WorldWideScience

Sample records for cosmology survey ii

  1. Spectral Confusion for Cosmological Surveys of Redshifted C II Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencilbeam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150-1300 µm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 C II] line and other lines. Although the [C II] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C II] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20? and 10', sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  2. SPECTRAL CONFUSION FOR COSMOLOGICAL SURVEYS OF REDSHIFTED C II EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H., E-mail: Alan.J.Kogut@nasa.gov [Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-06-20

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencil-beam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150–1300 μm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 μm [C ii] line and other lines. Although the [C ii] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C ii] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20″ and 10′, sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  3. Spectral Confusion for Cosmological Surveys of Redshifted C II Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, A.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Far-infrared cooling lines are ubiquitous features in the spectra of star-forming galaxies. Surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines provide a promising new tool to study structure formation and galactic evolution at redshifts including the epoch of reionization as well as the peak of star formation. Unlike neutral hydrogen surveys, where the 21 cm line is the only bright line, surveys of redshifted fine-structure lines suffer from confusion generated by line broadening, spectral overlap of different lines, and the crowding of sources with redshift. We use simulations to investigate the resulting spectral confusion and derive observing parameters to minimize these effects in pencilbeam surveys of redshifted far-IR line emission. We generate simulated spectra of the 17 brightest far-IR lines in galaxies, covering the 150-1300 µm wavelength region corresponding to redshifts 0 < z < 7, and develop a simple iterative algorithm that successfully identifies the 158 µm [C II] line and other lines. Although the [C II] line is a principal coolant for the interstellar medium, the assumption that the brightest observed lines in a given line of sight are always [C II] lines is a poor approximation to the simulated spectra once other lines are included. Blind line identification requires detection of fainter companion lines from the same host galaxies, driving survey sensitivity requirements. The observations require moderate spectral resolution 700 < R < 4000 with angular resolution between 20? and 10', sufficiently narrow to minimize confusion yet sufficiently large to include a statistically meaningful number of sources.

  4. Cosmology with Photometrically-Classified Type Ia Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Heather; Nichol, Robert C; Sako, Masao; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Olmstead, Matthew D; Bassett, Bruce; Biswas, Rahul; Brown, Peter; Cinabro, David; Dawson, Kyle S; Dilday, Ben; Foley, Ryan J; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kunz, Martin; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Richmond, Michael; Riess, Adam; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Taylor, Matt; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2012-01-01

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically-classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN typing technique of Sako et al. (2011), aided by host galaxy redshifts (0.05cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat LambdaCDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives omega_m=0.24+0.07-0.05 (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint stati...

  5. COSMOLOGY WITH PHOTOMETRICALLY CLASSIFIED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Heather; D' Andrea, Chris B; Nichol, Robert C.; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter; Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bassett, Bruce [Mathematics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, Cape Town (South Africa); Biswas, Rahul; Kuhlmann, Steve [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48126 (United States); Dilday, Ben [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Frieman, Joshua A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hlozek, Renee [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kunz, Martin, E-mail: Heather.Campbell@port.ac.uk [African Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Muizenberg, 7945, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2013-02-15

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN classification technique of Sako et al., aided by host-galaxy redshifts (0.05 < z < 0.55). SuperNova ANAlysis simulations of our methodology estimate that we have an SN Ia classification efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives {Omega} {sub m} = 0.24{sup +0.07} {sub -0.05} (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint statistical constraints on {Omega} {sub m} and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}}, comparable to those derived from the spectroscopically confirmed Three-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Using only our data, the statistics-only result favors an accelerating universe at 99.96% confidence. Assuming a constant wCDM cosmological model, and combining with H {sub 0}, cosmic microwave background, and luminous red galaxy data, we obtain w = -0.96{sup +0.10} {sub -0.10}, {Omega} {sub m} = 0.29{sup +0.02} {sub -0.02}, and {Omega} {sub k} = 0.00{sup +0.03} {sub -0.02} (statistical errors only), which is competitive with similar spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia analyses. Overall this comparison is reassuring, considering the lower redshift leverage of the SDSS-II SN sample (z < 0.55) and the lack of spectroscopic confirmation used herein. These results demonstrate the potential of photometrically classified SN Ia samples in improving

  6. First-year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Results: Hubble Diagram and Cosmological Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Richard; Cinabro, David; Vanderplas, Jake; Frieman, Joshua A; Marriner, John; Davis, Tamara M; Dilday, Benjamin; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Lampeitl, Hubert; Sako, Masao; Smith, Mathew; Zheng, Chen; Nichol, Robert C; Bassett, Bruce; Bender, Ralf; Depoy, Darren L; Doi, Mamoru; Elson, Ed; Filippenko, Alex V; Foley, Ryan J; Garnavich, Peter M; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Ketzeback, William; Kollatschny, W; Konishi, Kohki; Marshall, Jennifer L; McMillan, Russet J; Miknaitis, Gajus; Morokuma, Tomoki; M"ortsell, Edvard; Pan, Kaike; Prieto, Jose Luis; Richmond, Michael W; Riess, Adam G; Romani, Roger; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Takanashi, Naohiro; Tokita, Kouichi; van der Heyden, Kurt; Wheeler, J C; Yasuda, Naoki; York, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We present measurements of the Hubble diagram for 103 Type Ia supernovae (SNe) with redshifts 0.04 < z < 0.42, discovered during the first season (Fall 2005) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. These data fill in the redshift "desert" between low- and high-redshift SN Ia surveys. We combine the SDSS-II measurements with new distance estimates for published SN data from the ESSENCE survey, the Supernova Legacy Survey, the Hubble Space Telescope, and a compilation of nearby SN Ia measurements. Combining the SN Hubble diagram with measurements of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the SDSS Luminous Red Galaxy sample and with CMB temperature anisotropy measurements from WMAP, we estimate the cosmological parameters w and Omega_M, assuming a spatially flat cosmological model (FwCDM) with constant dark energy equation of state parameter, w. For the FwCDM model and the combined sample of 288 SNe Ia, we find w = -0.76 +- 0.07(stat) +- 0.11(syst), Omega_M = 0.306 +- 0.019(stat) +- 0.023...

  7. Cosmic Shear Results from the Deep Lens Survey. II. Full Cosmological Parameter Constraints from Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, M. James; Tyson, J. Anthony; Hilbert, Stefan; Schneider, Michael D.; Schmidt, Samuel; Wittman, David

    2016-06-01

    We present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude {r}{lim}˜ 27 (5σ ), is designed as a precursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing \\gt 10 deg2 cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9 yr results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives {{{Ω }}}m={0.293}-0.014+0.012, {σ }8={0.833}-0.018+0.011, {H}0={68.6}-1.2+1.4 {\\text{km s}}-1 {{{Mpc}}}-1, and {{{Ω }}}b=0.0475+/- 0.0012 for ΛCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ˜50%. When we do not assume flatness for ΛCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint {{{Ω }}}k=-{0.010}-0.015+0.013 from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which, however, is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation-of-state parameter w is tightly constrained when baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding w=-{1.02}-0.09+0.10 with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to w=-1.03+/- 0.03. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also with the predictions of a ΛCDM universe.

  8. First-Year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Results: Constraints on Non-Standard Cosmological Models

    CERN Document Server

    Sollerman, J; Davis, T M; Blomqvis, M; Bassett, B; Becker, A C; Cinabro, D; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frieman, J; Garnavich, P; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Miquel, R; Nichol, R C; Richmond, M W; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Vanderplas, J T; Wheeler, J C

    2009-01-01

    We use the new SNe Ia discovered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey together with additional supernova datasets as well as observations of the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations to constrain cosmological models. This complements the analysis presented by Kessler et al. in that we discuss and rank a number of the most popular non-standard cosmology scenarios. When this combined data-set is analyzed using the MLCS2k2 light-curve fitter, we find that more exotic models for cosmic acceleration provide a better fit to the data than the Lambda-CDM model. For example, the flat DGP model is ranked higher by our information criteria tests than the standard model. When the dataset is instead analyzed using the SALT-II light-curve fitter, the standard cosmological constant model fares best. Our investigation also includes inhomogeneous Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. While our LTB models can be made to fit the supernova data as well as any other model, the extra parameters they require are not...

  9. Southern Cosmology Survey II: Massive Optically-Selected Clusters from 70 square degrees of the SZE Common Survey Area

    CERN Document Server

    Menanteau, Felipe; Barrientos, L Felipe; Deshpande, Amruta J; Hilton, Matt; Infante, Leopoldo; Jimenez, Raul; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Spergel, David; Verde, Licia

    2010-01-01

    We present a catalog of 105 rich and massive ($M>3\\times10^{14}M_{\\sun}$) optically-selected clusters of galaxies extracted from 70 square-degrees of public archival griz imaging from the Blanco 4-m telescope acquired over 45 nights between 2005 and 2007. We use the clusters' optically-derived properties to estimate photometric redshifts, optical luminosities, richness, and masses. We complement the optical measurements with archival XMM-Newton and ROSAT X-ray data which provide additional luminosity and mass constraints on a modest fraction of the cluster sample. Two of our clusters show clear evidence for central lensing arcs; one of these has a spectacular large-diameter, nearly-complete Einstein Ring surrounding the brightest cluster galaxy. A strong motivation for this study is to identify the massive clusters that are expected to display prominent signals from the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect (SZE) and therefore be detected in the wide-area mm-band surveys being conducted by both the Atacama Cosmology Teles...

  10. Cosmology with photometric redshift surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, C; Blake, Chris; Bridle, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    We explore the utility of future photometric redshift imaging surveys for delineating the large-scale structure of the Universe, and assess the resulting constraints on the cosmological model. We perform two complementary types of analysis: (1) We quantify the statistical confidence and accuracy with which such surveys will be able to detect and measure characteristic features in the clustering power spectrum such as the acoustic oscillations and the turnover, in a model-independent fashion. For example, we show that a 10000 sq deg imaging survey with depth r = 22.5 and photometric redshift accuracy dz/(1+z) = 0.03 will detect the acoustic oscillations with 99.9% confidence, measuring the associated cosmological scale with 2% precision. Such a survey will also detect the turnover with 95% confidence, determining the corresponding scale with 20% accuracy. (2) By assuming a Lambda-CDM cosmology we calculate the confidence with which a non-zero baryon fraction can be deduced from such future surveys. After margi...

  11. Cosmology with cluster surveys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhabrata Majumdar

    2004-10-01

    Surveys of clusters of galaxies provide us with a powerful probe of the density and nature of the dark energy. The red-shift distribution of detected clusters is highly sensitive to the dark energy equation of state parameter . Upcoming Sunyaev–Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys would provide us large yields of clusters to very high red-shifts. Self-calibration of cluster scaling relations, possible for such a huge sample, would be able to constrain systematic biases on mass estimators. Combining cluster red-shift abundance with limited mass follow-up and cluster mass power spectrum can then give constraints on , as well as on 8 and to a few per cents.

  12. Exploring Bouncing Cosmologies with Cosmological Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Yi-Fu

    2014-01-01

    In light of the recent observational data coming from the sky we have two significant directions in the field of theoretical cosmology recently. First, we are now able to make use of present observations, such as the Planck and BICEP2 data, to examine theoretical predictions from the standard inflationary $\\Lambda$CDM which were made decades of years ago. Second, we can search for new cosmological signatures as a way to explore physics beyond the standard cosmic paradigm. In particular, a subset of early universe models admit a nonsingular bouncing solution that attempts to address the issue of the big bang singularity. These models have achieved a series of considerable developments in recent years, in particular in their perturbative frameworks, which made brand-new predictions of cosmological signatures that could be visible in current and forthcoming observations. In this article we present two representative paradigms of very early universe physics. The first is the so-called new matter (or matter-ekpyro...

  13. The cosmological analysis of X-ray surveys: II- Application of the CR-HR method to the XMM archive

    CERN Document Server

    Clerc, Nicolas; Pierre, Marguerite; Pacaud, Florian; Fèvre, Jean-Paul Le; Adami, Christophe; Altieri, Bruno; Valtchanov, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We have processed 2774 high-galactic observations from the XMM archive (as of May 2010) and extracted a serendipitous catalogue of some 850 clusters of galaxies based on purely X-ray criteria, following the methodology developed for the XMM-LSS survey. Restricting the sample to the highest signal-to-noise objects (347 clusters), we perform a cosmological analysis using the X-ray information only. The analysis consists in the modelling of the observed colour-magnitude (CR-HR) diagram constructed from cluster instrumental count-rates measured in the [0.5-2], [1-2] and [0.5-1] keV bands. A MCMC procedure simultaneously fits the cosmological parameters, the evolution of the cluster scaling laws and the selection effects. Our results are consistent with the \\sigma_8 and \\Omega_m values obtained by WMAP-5 and point toward a negative evolution of the cluster scaling relations with respect to the self-similar expectation. We are further able to constrain the cluster fractional radius xc= r_c/R500c, to xc = 0.24 +/- 0...

  14. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II) VI. Effect of massive neutrinos on the cosmological constraints from clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Boehringer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are important probes for the large-scale structure that allow us to test cosmological models. With the REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey we previously derived tight constraints on the cosmological parameters for the matter density, Omega_m, and the amplitude parameter of the matter density fluctuations, sigma_8. Whereas in these previous studies no effect of massive neutrinos was taken into account, we explore these effects in the present publication. We derive cosmological constraints for the sum of the neutrino masses of the conventional three neutrino families in the range 0 to 0.6 eV. The influence on the constraints of Omega_m and sigma_8 for the expected mass range is weak. Interesting constraints on the neutrino properties can be derived by comparing the cluster data with those from the Planck cosmic microwave background observations. The current tension between the Planck results and clusters can formally be resolved with neutrino masses of about M_nu = 0.45 (+- 0.28, 1-sigma) eV. W...

  15. Cosmological surveys with multi-object spectrographs

    CERN Document Server

    Colless, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Multi-object spectroscopy has been a key technique contributing to the current era of 'precision cosmology'. From the first exploratory surveys of the large-scale structure and evolution of the universe to the current generation of superbly detailed maps spanning a wide range of redshifts, multi-object spectroscopy has been a fundamentally important tool for mapping the rich structure of the cosmic web and extracting cosmological information of increasing variety and precision. This will continue to be true for the foreseeable future, as we seek to map the evolving geometry and structure of the universe over the full extent of cosmic history in order to obtain the most precise and comprehensive measurements of cosmological parameters. Here I briefly summarize the contributions that multi-object spectroscopy has made to cosmology so far, then review the major surveys and instruments currently in play and their prospects for pushing back the cosmological frontier. Finally, I examine some of the next generation ...

  16. Photometric Supernova Cosmology with BEAMS and SDSS-II

    CERN Document Server

    Hlozek, Renée; Bassett, Bruce; Smith, Mat; Newling, James; Varughese, Melvin; Kessler, Rick; Bernstein, Joe; Campbell, Heather; Dilday, Ben; Falck, Bridget; Frieman, Joshua; Kulhmann, Steve; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P

    2011-01-01

    Supernova cosmology without spectroscopic confirmation is an exciting new frontier which we address here with the Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS) algorithm and the full three years of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN). BEAMS is a Bayesian framework for using data from multiple species in statistical inference when one has the probability that each data point belongs to a given species, corresponding in this context to different types of supernovae with their probabilities derived from their multi-band lightcurves. We run the BEAMS algorithm on both Gaussian and more realistic SNANA simulations with of order 10^4 supernovae, testing the algorithm against various pitfalls one might expect in the new and somewhat uncharted territory of photometric supernova cosmology. We compare the performance of BEAMS to that of both mock spectroscopic surveys and photometric samples which have been cut using typical selection criteria. The latter typically are eith...

  17. Cosmological measurements with forthcoming radio continuum surveys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Raccanelli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available –819 (2012) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.20634.x Cosmological measurements with forthcoming radio continuum surveys Alvise Raccanelli,1� Gong-Bo Zhao,1 David J. Bacon,1 Matt J. Jarvis,2,3 Will J. Percival,1 Ray P. Norris,4 Huub Ro¨ttgering,5 Filipe B. Abdalla... of Universe – radio continuum: galaxies. 1 IN T RO D U C T I O N Radio surveys for cosmology are entering a new phase with the construction of the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) for radio �E-mail: alvise.raccanelli@port.ac.uk astronomy (Ro¨ttgering 2003...

  18. Cosmology with SKA Radio Continuum Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, Matt J; Blake, Chris; Brown, Michael L; Lindsay, Sam N; Raccanelli, Alvise; Santos, Mario; Schwarz, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Radio continuum surveys have, in the past, been of restricted use in cosmology. Most studies have concentrated on cross-correlations with the cosmic microwave background to detect the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, due to the large sky areas that can be surveyed. As we move into the SKA era, radio continuum surveys will have sufficient source density and sky area to play a major role in cosmology on the largest scales. In this chapter we summarise the experiments that can be carried out with the SKA as it is built up through the coming decade. We show that the SKA can play a unique role in constraining the non-Gaussianity parameter to \\sigma(f_NL) ~ 1, and provide a unique handle on the systematics that inhibit weak lensing surveys. The SKA will also provide the necessary data to test the isotropy of the Universe at redshifts of order unity and thus evaluate the robustness of the cosmological principle.Thus, SKA continuum surveys will turn radio observations into a central probe of cosmological research in th...

  19. Particle physics constraints from future cosmological surveys

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of cosmological surveys (of large scale structures, CMB polarisation, 21cm line), approved (Euclid, SKA, ...) or submitted (COrE+, LiteBird), have the potential to return a lot of relevant information for particle physics. I will present and comment some of the most recent sensitivity forecasts related to neutrino physics, light relics and Dark Matter properties.

  20. Cosmology with the WFIRST High Latitude Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Olivier

    Cosmic acceleration is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades. Testing and distinguishing among possible explanations requires cosmological measurements of extremely high precision that probe the full history of cosmic expansion and structure growth. The WFIRST-AFTA mission, as described in the Science Definition Team (SDT) reports (Spergel 2013, 2015), has the ability to improve these measurements by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to the current state of the art, while simultaneously extending their redshift grasp, greatly improving control of systematic effects, and taking a unified approach to multiple probes that provide complementary physical information and cross-checks of cosmological results. We have assembled a team with the expertise and commitment needed to address the stringent challenges of the WFIRST dark energy program through the Project's formulation phase. After careful consideration, we have elected to address investigations A (Galaxy Redshift Survey) and C (Weak Lensing and Cluster Growth) of the WFIRST SIT NRA with a unified team, because the two investigations are tightly linked at both the technical level and the theoretical modeling level. The imaging and spectroscopic elements of the High Latitude Survey (HLS) will be realized as an integrated observing program, and they jointly impose requirements on instrument and telescope performance, operations, and data transfer. The methods for simulating and interpreting weak lensing and galaxy clustering observations largely overlap, and many members of our team have expertise in both areas. The team PI, Olivier Dore, is a cosmologist with a broad expertise in cosmic microwave background and large scale structures. Yun Wang and Chris Hirata will serve as Lead Co-Investigators for topics A and C, respectively. Many members of our team have been involved with the design and requirements of a dark energy space mission for a decade or more, including the Co-Chair and three

  1. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II) IV. X-ray Luminosity Function and First Constraints on Cosmological Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Böhringer, H; Collins, C A

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray luminosity function is an important statistic of the census of galaxy clusters and an important means to probe the cosmological model of our Universe. Based on our recently completed REFLEX II cluster sample we construct the X-ray luminosity function of galaxy clusters for several redshift slices from $z = 0$ to $z = 0.4$ and discuss its implications. We find no significant signature of redshift evolution of the luminosity function in the redshift interval. We provide the results of fits of a parameterized Schechter function and extensions of it which provide a reasonable characterization of the data. Using a model for structure formation and galaxy cluster evolution we compare the observed X-ray luminosity function with predictions for different cosmological models. For the most interesting constraints for the cosmological parameters $\\Omega_m$ and $\\sigma_8$ we obatain $\\Omega_m \\sim 0.27 \\pm 0.03$ and $\\sigma_8 \\sim 0.80 \\pm 0.03$ based on the statistical uncertainty alone. Marginalizing over the...

  2. Parametrizing modified gravity for cosmological surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleyzes, Jérôme

    2017-09-01

    One of the challenges in testing gravity with cosmology is the vast freedom opened when extending General Relativity. For linear perturbations, one solution consists in using the effective field theory of dark energy. Even then, the theory space is described in terms of a handful of free functions of time. This needs to be reduced to a finite number of parameters to be practical for cosmological surveys. We explore in this article how well simple parametrizations, with a small number of parameters, can fit observables computed from complex theories. Imposing the stability of linear perturbations appreciably reduces the theory space we explore. We find that observables are not extremely sensitive to short time-scale variations and that simple, smooth parametrizations are usually sufficient to describe this theory space. Using the Bayesian information criterion, we find that using two parameters for each function (an amplitude and a power-law index) is preferred over complex models for 86% of our theory space.

  3. Type II Supernovae as Probes of Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Blondin, Stephane; Bloom, Joshua S; D'Andrea, Christopher B; Della Valle, Massimo; Dessart, Luc; Ellis, Richard S; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Goobar, Ariel; Hamuy, Mario; Hicken, Malcolm; Kasen, Daniel N; Krisciunas, Kevin L; Leonard, Douglas C; Li, Weidong; Livio, Mario; Marion, Howie; Matheson, Thomas; Neill, James D; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Nugent, Peter E; Quimby, Robert; Sako, Masao; Sullivan, Mark; Thomas, Rollin C; Turatto, Massimo; Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Wood-Vasey, W Michael

    2009-01-01

    - Constraining the cosmological parameters and understanding Dark Energy have tremendous implications for the nature of the Universe and its physical laws. - The pervasive limit of systematic uncertainties reached by cosmography based on Cepheids and Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) warrants a search for complementary approaches. - Type II SNe have been shown to offer such a path. Their distances can be well constrained by luminosity-based or geometric methods. Competing, complementary, and concerted efforts are underway, to explore and exploit those objects that are extremely well matched to next generation facilities. Spectroscopic follow-up will be enabled by space- based and 20-40 meter class telescopes. - Some systematic uncertainties of Type II SNe, such as reddening by dust and metallicity effects, are bound to be different from those of SNe Ia. Their stellar progenitors are known, promising better leverage on cosmic evolution. In addition, their rate - which closely tracks the ongoing star formation rate -...

  4. Cosmology with all-sky surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Bilicki, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Various aspects of cosmology require comprehensive all-sky mapping of the cosmic web to considerable depths. In order to probe the whole extragalactic sky beyond 100 Mpc, one must draw on multiwavelength datasets and state-of-the-art photometric redshift techniques. Here I summarize our dedicated program that employs the largest photometric all-sky surveys -- 2MASS, WISE and SuperCOSMOS -- to obtain accurate redshift estimates of millions of galaxies. The first outcome of these efforts -- the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ) -- was publicly released in 2013 and includes almost 1 million galaxies with a median redshift of z~0.1. I discuss how this catalog was constructed and how it is being used for various cosmological tests. I also present how combining the WISE mid-infrared survey with SuperCOSMOS optical data allowed us to push to depths over 1 Gpc on unprecedented angular scales. These photometric redshift samples, with about 20 million sources in total, provide access to volumes large enough to ...

  5. Cosmology with all-sky surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilicki, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Various aspects of cosmology require comprehensive all-sky mapping of the cosmic web to considerable depths. In order to probe the whole extragalactic sky beyond 100 Mpc, one must draw on multiwavelength datasets and state-of-the-art photometric redshift techniques. Here I summarize our dedicated program that employs the largest photometric all-sky surveys - 2MASS, WISE and SuperCOSMOS - to obtain accurate redshift estimates of millions of galaxies. The first outcome of these efforts - the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ) - was publicly released in 2013 and includes almost 1 million galaxies with a median redshift of z˜0.1. I discuss how this catalog was constructed and how it is being used for various cosmological tests. I also present how combining the WISE mid-infrared survey with SuperCOSMOS optical data allowed us to push to depths over 1 Gpc on unprecedented angular scales. These photometric redshift samples, with about 20 million sources in total, provide access to volumes large enough to study observationally the Copernican Principle of universal homogeneity and isotropy, as well as to probe various aspects of dark energy and dark matter through cross-correlations with other data such as the cosmic microwave or gamma-ray backgrounds. Last but not least, they constitute a test-bed for forthcoming wide-angle multi-million galaxy samples expected from such instruments as the SKA, Euclid, or LSST.

  6. Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-PSupernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Ellis, Richard; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leonard, Douglas C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Astier, Pierre; Carlberg, RaymondG.; Conley, Alex; Fabbro, Sebastien; Fouchez, Dominique; Neill, James D.; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J; Regnault, Nicolas

    2006-03-20

    We present the first high-redshift Hubble diagram for Type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P) based upon five events at redshift upto z {approx}0.3. This diagram was constructed using photometry from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and absorption line spectroscopy from the Keck observatory. The method used to measure distances to these supernovae is based on recent work by Hamuy&Pinto (2002) and exploits a correlation between the absolute brightness of SNeII-P and the expansion velocities derived from the minimum of the Fe II 516.9 nm P-Cygni feature observed during the plateau phases. We present three refinements to this method which significantly improve the practicality of measuring the distances of SNe II-P at cosmologically interesting redshifts. These are an extinction correction measurement based on the V-I colors at day 50, across-correlation measurement for the expansion velocity and the ability to extrapolate such velocities accurately over almost the entire plateau phase. We apply this revised method to our dataset of high-redshift SNe II-P and find that the resulting Hubble diagram has a scatter of only 0.26 magnitudes, thus demonstrating the feasibility of measuring the expansion history, with present facilities, using a method independent of that based upon supernovae of Type Ia.

  7. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters - II. Cosmological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, A. B.; Allen, S. W.; Morris, R. G.; Rapetti, D. A.; Applegate, D. E.; Kelly, P. L.; von der Linden, A.; Schmidt, R. W.

    2014-05-01

    This is the second in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. The data set employed here consists of Chandra observations of 40 such clusters, identified in a comprehensive search of the Chandra archive for hot (kT ≳ 5 keV), massive, morphologically relaxed systems, as well as high-quality weak gravitational lensing data for a subset of these clusters. Here we present cosmological constraints from measurements of the gas mass fraction, fgas, for this cluster sample. By incorporating a robust gravitational lensing calibration of the X-ray mass estimates, and restricting our measurements to the most self-similar and accurately measured regions of clusters, we significantly reduce systematic uncertainties compared to previous work. Our data for the first time constrain the intrinsic scatter in fgas, 7.4 ± 2.3 per cent in a spherical shell at radii 0.8-1.2 r2500 (˜1/4 of the virial radius), consistent with the expected level of variation in gas depletion and non-thermal pressure for relaxed clusters. From the lowest redshift data in our sample, five clusters at z 1, we obtain consistent results for Ωm and interesting constraints on dark energy: Ω _{{Λ }}=0.65^{+0.17}_{-0.22}> for non-flat ΛCDM (cosmological constant) models, and w = -0.98 ± 0.26 for flat models with a constant dark energy equation of state. Our results are both competitive and consistent with those from recent cosmic microwave background, Type Ia supernova and baryon acoustic oscillation data. We present constraints on more complex models of evolving dark energy from the combination of fgas data with these external data sets, and comment on the possibilities for improved fgas constraints using current and next-generation X-ray observatories and lensing data.

  8. Strictly isospectral Bianchi type II cosmological models

    CERN Document Server

    Rosu, H C; Obregón, O

    1996-01-01

    We show that, in the Q=0 factor ordering, the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the Bianchi type ll model with the Ansatz \\rm \\Psi=A\\, e^{\\pm \\Phi(q^{\\mu})}, due to its one-dimensional character, may be approached by the strictly isospectral Darboux-Witten technique in standard supersymmetric quantum mechanics. One-parameter families of cosmological potentials and normalizable `wavefunctions of the universe' are exhibited. The isospectral method can be used to introduce normalizable wavefunctions in quantum cosmology.

  9. Modern Cosmology: Interactive Computer Simulations that use Recent Observational Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Moldenhauer, Jacob; Stone, Keenan; Shuler, Ezekiel

    2013-01-01

    We present a collection of new, open-source computational tools for numerically modeling recent large-scale observational data sets using modern cosmology theory. Specifically, these tools will allow both students and researchers to constrain the parameter values in competitive cosmological models, thereby discovering both the accelerated expansion of the universe and its composition (e.g., dark matter and dark energy). These programs have several features to help the non-cosmologist build an understanding of cosmological models and their relation to observational data: a built-in collection of several real observational data sets; sliders to vary the values of the parameters that define different cosmological models; real-time plotting of simulated data; and $\\chi^2$ calculations of the goodness of fit for each choice of parameters (theory) and observational data (experiment). The current list of built-in observations includes several recent supernovae Type Ia surveys, baryon acoustic oscillations, the cosmi...

  10. A Study of General Education Astronomy Students' Understandings of Cosmology. Part I. Development and Validation of Four Conceptual Cosmology Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Duncan, Douglas K.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first in a series of five articles describing a national study of general education astronomy students' conceptual and reasoning difficulties with cosmology. In this paper, we describe the process by which we designed four new surveys to assess general education astronomy students' conceptual cosmology knowledge. These surveys focused…

  11. cosmolike - cosmological likelihood analyses for photometric galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Elisabeth; Eifler, Tim

    2017-09-01

    We explore strategies to extract cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy lensing, galaxy clustering, cluster number counts and cluster weak lensing. We utilize the cosmolike software to simulate results from a Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) like data set, specifically, we (1) compare individual and joint analyses of the different probes, (2) vary the selection criteria for lens and source galaxies, (3) investigate the impact of blending, (4) investigate the impact of the assumed cosmological model in multiprobe covariances, (6) quantify information content as a function of scales and (7) explore the impact of intrinsic galaxy alignment in a multiprobe context. Our analyses account for all cross-correlations within and across probes and include the higher-order (non-Gaussian) terms in the multiprobe covariance matrix. We simultaneously model cosmological parameters and a variety of systematics, e.g. uncertainties arising from shear and photo-z calibration, cluster mass-observable relation, galaxy intrinsic alignment and galaxy bias (up to 54 parameters altogether). We highlight two results: first, increasing the number density of source galaxies by ∼30 per cent, which corresponds to solving blending for LSST, only gains little information. Secondly, including small scales in clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing, by utilizing halo occupation distribution models, can substantially boost cosmological constraining power.

  12. Eyes Wide Open - Optimising Cosmological Surveys in a Crowded Market

    CERN Document Server

    Bassett, B A

    2004-01-01

    Optimising the major next-generation cosmological surveys (such as SNAP, KAOS etc...) is a key problem given our ignorance of the physics underlying cosmic acceleration and the plethora of surveys planned. We propose a Bayesian design framework which (1) maximises the discrimination power of a survey without assuming any underlying dark energy model, (2) finds the best niche survey geometry given current data and future competing experiments, (3) maximises the cross-section for serendipitous discoveries and (4) can be adapted to answer specific questions (such as `is dark energy dynamical?'). Integrated Parameter Space Optimisation (IPSO) is a design framework that integrates projected parameter errors over an entire dark energy parameter space and then extremises a figure of merit (such as Shannon entropy gain wich we show is stable to off-diagonal covariance matrix perturbations) as a function of survey parameters using analytical, grid or MCMC techniques. IPSO is thus a flexible, model-independent and scal...

  13. Testing foundations of modern cosmology with SKA all-sky surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Dominik J.; Bacon, David; Chen, Song; Clarkson, Chris; Huterer, Dragan; Kunz, Martin; Maartens, Roy; Raccanelli, Alvise; Rubart, Matthias; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational test...

  14. Testing foundations of modern cosmology with SKA all-sky surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Dominik J; Chen, Song; Clarkson, Chris; Huterer, Dragan; Kunz, Martin; Maartens, Roy; Raccanelli, Alvise; Rubart, Matthias; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational tests of cosmology to be carried out by means of SKA all-sky surveys.

  15. Cosmological Constraints from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gladders, M D; Hall, P B; Hoekstra, H; Infante, L; Majumdar, S; Yee, H K C; Gladders, Michael D.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hoekstra, Henk; Infante, Leopoldo; Majumdar, Subhabrata

    2006-01-01

    [abridged] We present a first cosmological analysis of a refined cluster catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS). The input cluster sample is derived from 72.07 square degrees of imaging data [...] The catalog contains 956 clusters over 0.35survey images has been extensively cross-checked against publicly available Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging [...] We analyze the cluster sample via a general self-calibration technique including scatter in the mass-richness relation [...]. We fit simultaneously for Omega_M and sigma_8, and four parameters describing the calibration of cluster richness to mass, its evolution with redshift, and scatter in the richness-mass relation. The principal goal of this general analysis is to establish the consistency (or lack thereof) between the fitted parameters (both cosmological and cluster mass observables) and available results on both from independent measures. From an unconstraine...

  16. Recent Developments in Astrophysical and Cosmological Exploitation of Microwave Surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burigana, Carlo; Davies, Rodney D.; De Bernardis, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the astrophysical results and the related cosmological implications derived from recent microwave surveys, with emphasis to those coming from the Planck mission. We critically discuss the impact of systematic effects and the role of methods to separate the cosmic...... microwave background (CMB) signal from the astrophysical emissions and each different astrophysical component from the others. We then review the state-of-the-art diffuse emissions, extragalactic sources, cosmic infrared background and galaxy clusters, addressing the information they provide to our global...

  17. Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Rubakov, V A

    2014-01-01

    In these lectures we first concentrate on the cosmological problems which, hopefully, have to do with the new physics to be probed at the LHC: the nature and origin of dark matter and generation of matter-antimatter asymmetry. We give several examples showing the LHC cosmological potential. These are WIMPs as cold dark matter, gravitinos as warm dark matter, and electroweak baryogenesis as a mechanism for generating matter-antimatter asymmetry. In the remaining part of the lectures we discuss the cosmological perturbations as a tool for studying the epoch preceeding the conventional hot stage of the cosmological evolution.

  18. Cosmology with gamma-ray bursts. II. Cosmography challenges and cosmological scenarios for the accelerated Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demianski, Marek; Piedipalumbo, Ester; Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2017-02-01

    Context. Explaining the accelerated expansion of the Universe is one of the fundamental challenges in physics today. Cosmography provides information about the evolution of the universe derived from measured distances, assuming only that the space time geometry is described by the Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric, and adopting an approach that effectively uses only Taylor expansions of basic observables. Aims: We perform a high-redshift analysis to constrain the cosmographic expansion up to the fifth order. It is based on the Union2 type Ia supernovae data set, the gamma-ray burst Hubble diagram, a data set of 28 independent measurements of the Hubble parameter, baryon acoustic oscillations measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), and some Gaussian priors on h and ΩM. Methods: We performed a statistical analysis and explored the probability distributions of the cosmographic parameters. By building up their regions of confidence, we maximized our likelihood function using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Results: Our high-redshift analysis confirms that the expansion of the Universe currently accelerates; the estimation of the jerk parameter indicates a possible deviation from the standard ΛCDM cosmological model. Moreover, we investigate implications of our results for the reconstruction of the dark energy equation of state (EOS) by comparing the standard technique of cosmography with an alternative approach based on generalized Padé approximations of the same observables. Because these expansions converge better, is possible to improve the constraints on the cosmographic parameters and also on the dark matter EOS. Conclusions: The estimation of the jerk and the DE parameters indicates at 1σ a possible deviation from the ΛCDM cosmological model.

  19. Survey strategy optimization for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bernardis, F.; Stevens, J. R.; Hasselfield, M.; Alonso, D.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Crowley, K. T.; Devlin, M.; Dunkley, J.; Gallardo, P. A.; Henderson, S. W.; Hilton, M.; Hlozek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Huffenberger, K.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A.; Louis, T.; Madhavacheril, M. S.; McMahon, J.; Næss, S.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Page, L. A.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; van Engelen, A.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-07-01

    In recent years there have been significant improvements in the sensitivity and the angular resolution of the instruments dedicated to the observation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). ACTPol is the first polarization receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and is observing the CMB sky with arcmin resolution over 2000 sq. deg. Its upgrade, Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT), will observe the CMB in five frequency bands and over a larger area of the sky. We describe the optimization and implementation of the ACTPol and AdvACT surveys. The selection of the observed fields is driven mainly by the science goals, that is, small angular scale CMB measurements, B-mode measurements and cross-correlation studies. For the ACTPol survey we have observed patches of the southern galactic sky with low galactic foreground emissions which were also chosen to maximize the overlap with several galaxy surveys to allow unique cross-correlation studies. A wider field in the northern galactic cap ensured significant additional overlap with the BOSS spectroscopic survey. The exact shapes and footprints of the fields were optimized to achieve uniform coverage and to obtain cross-linked maps by observing the fields with different scan directions. We have maximized the efficiency of the survey by implementing a close to 24 hour observing strategy, switching between daytime and nighttime observing plans and minimizing the telescope idle time. We describe the challenges represented by the survey optimization for the significantly wider area observed by AdvACT, which will observe roughly half of the low-foreground sky. The survey strategies described here may prove useful for planning future ground-based CMB surveys, such as the Simons Observatory and CMB Stage IV surveys.

  20. Cosmological tests of general relativity with future tomographic surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Pogosian, Levon; Silvestri, Alessandra; Zylberberg, Joel

    2009-12-11

    Future weak lensing surveys will map the evolution of matter perturbations and gravitational potentials, yielding a new test of general relativity on cosmic scales. They will probe the relations between matter overdensities, local curvature, and the Newtonian potential. These relations can be modified in alternative gravity theories or by the effects of massive neutrinos or exotic dark energy fluids. We introduce two functions of time and scale which account for any such modifications in the linear regime. We use a principal component analysis to find the eigenmodes of these functions that cosmological data will constrain. The number of constrained modes gives a model-independent forecast of how many parameters describing deviations from general relativity could be constrained, along with w(z). The modes' scale and time dependence tell us which theoretical models will be better tested.

  1. Survey strategy optimization for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    De Bernardis, F; Hasselfield, M; Alonso, D; Bond, J R; Calabrese, E; Choi, S K; Crowley, K T; Devlin, M; Dunkley, J; Gallardo, P A; Henderson, S W; Hilton, M; Hlozek, R; Ho, S P; Huffenberger, K; Koopman, B J; Kosowsky, A; Louis, T; Madhavacheril, M S; McMahon, J; Naess, S; Nati, F; Newburgh, L; Niemack, M D; Page, L A; Salatino, M; Schillaci, A; Schmitt, B L; Sehgal, N; Sievers, J L; Simon, S M; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; van Engelen, A; Vavagiakis, E M; Wollack, E J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there have been significant improvements in the sensitivity and the angular resolution of the instruments dedicated to the observation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). ACTPol is the first polarization receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and is observing the CMB sky with arcmin resolution over about 2000 sq. deg. Its upgrade, Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT), will observe the CMB in five frequency bands and over a larger area of the sky. We describe the optimization and implementation of the ACTPol and AdvACT surveys. The selection of the observed fields is driven mainly by the science goals, that is, small angular scale CMB measurements, B-mode measurements and cross-correlation studies. For the ACTPol survey we have observed patches of the southern galactic sky with low galactic foreground emissions which were also chosen to maximize the overlap with several galaxy surveys to allow unique cross-correlation studies. A wider field in the northern galactic cap ensured significant...

  2. Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Vittorio, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Modern cosmology has changed significantly over the years, from the discovery to the precision measurement era. The data now available provide a wealth of information, mostly consistent with a model where dark matter and dark energy are in a rough proportion of 3:7. The time is right for a fresh new textbook which captures the state-of-the art in cosmology. Written by one of the world's leading cosmologists, this brand new, thoroughly class-tested textbook provides graduate and undergraduate students with coverage of the very latest developments and experimental results in the field. Prof. Nicola Vittorio shows what is meant by precision cosmology, from both theoretical and observational perspectives.

  3. Gravitational Waves in Locally Rotationally Symmetric (LRS Class II Cosmologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bradley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we consider perturbations of homogeneous and hypersurface orthogonal cosmological backgrounds with local rotational symmetry (LRS, using a method based on the 1 + 1 + 2 covariant split of spacetime. The backgrounds, of LRS class II, are characterised by that the vorticity, the twist of the 2-sheets, and the magnetic part of the Weyl tensor all vanish. They include the flat Friedmann universe as a special case. The matter contents of the perturbed spacetimes are given by vorticity-free perfect fluids, but otherwise the perturbations are arbitrary and describe gravitational, shear, and density waves. All the perturbation variables can be given in terms of the time evolution of a set of six harmonic coefficients. This set decouples into one set of four coefficients with the density perturbations acting as source terms, and another set of two coefficients describing damped source-free gravitational waves with odd parity. We also consider the flat Friedmann universe, which has been considered by several others using the 1 + 3 covariant split, as a check of the isotropic limit. In agreement with earlier results we find a second-order wavelike equation for the magnetic part of the Weyl tensor which decouples from the density gradient for the flat Friedmann universes. Assuming vanishing vector perturbations, including the density gradient, we find a similar equation for the electric part of the Weyl tensor, which was previously unnoticed.

  4. Precision cosmology with a combination of wide and deep Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Khedekar, Satej; Das, Sudeep

    2010-01-01

    We show the advantages of a wedding cake design for Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cluster surveys. We show that by dividing up a cluster survey into a wide and a deep survey, one can essentially recover the cosmological information that would be diluted in a single survey of the same duration due to the uncertainties in our understanding of cluster physics. The parameter degeneracy directions of the deep and wide surveys are slightly different, and combining them breaks these degeneracies effectively. A variable depth survey with a few thousand clusters is as effective at constraining cosmological parameters as a single depth survey with a much larger cluster sample.

  5. Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-P Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Nugent, P; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Ellis, R; Fabbro, S; Fouchez, D; Gal-Yam, A; Howell, D A; Leonard, D C; Neill, J D; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Sullivan, M; Astier, Pierre; Carlberg, Raymond G.; Conley, Alex; Ellis, Richard; Fabbro, Sebastien; Fouchez, Dominique; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leonard, Douglas C.; Neill, James D.; Nugent, Peter; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J.; Regnault, Nicolas; Sullivan, Mark

    2006-01-01

    We present the first high-redshift Hubble diagram for Type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P) based upon five events at redshift up to z~0.3. This diagram was constructed using photometry from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and absorption line spectroscopy from the Keck observatory. The method used to measure distances to these supernovae is based on recent work by Hamuy & Pinto (2002) and exploits a correlation between the absolute brightness of SNe II-P and the expansion velocities derived from the minimum of the Fe II 516.9 nm P-Cygni feature observed during the plateau phases. We present three refinements to this method which significantly improve the practicality of measuring the distances of SNe II-P at cosmologically interesting redshifts. These are an extinction correction measurement based on the V-I colors at day 50, a cross-correlation measurement for the expansion velocity and the ability to extrapolate such velocities accurately over almost the entire plateau phase. We app...

  6. Fourier analysis of multi-tracer cosmological surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Abramo, L Raul; Loureiro, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    We present optimal quadratic estimators for the Fourier analysis of cosmological surveys that detect several different types of tracers of large-scale structure. Our estimators can be used to simultaneously fit the matter power spectrum and the biases of the tracers - as well as redshift-space distortions (RSDs), non-Gaussianities (NGs), or any other effects that are manifested through differences between the clusterings of distinct species of tracers. Our estimators reduce to the one by Feldman, Kaiser & Peacock (ApJ 1994, FKP) in the case of a survey consisting of a single species of tracer. We show that the multi-tracer estimators are unbiased, and that their covariance is given by the inverse of the multi-tracer Fisher matrix (Abramo, MNRAS 2013; Abramo & Leonard, MNRAS 2013). When the biases, RSDs and NGs are fixed to their fiducial values, and one is only interested in measuring the underlying power spectrum, our estimators are projected into the estimator found by Percival, Verde & Peacock ...

  7. Tracing the Cosmological Evolution of Stars and Cold Gas with CMB Spectral Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Eric R.

    2017-04-01

    A full account of galaxy evolution in the context of ΛCDM cosmology requires measurements of the average star-formation rate (SFR) and cold gas abundance across cosmic time. Emission from the CO ladder traces cold gas, and [C ii] fine structure emission at 158 μ {{m}} traces the SFR. Intensity mapping surveys the cumulative surface brightness of emitting lines as a function of redshift, rather than individual galaxies. CMB spectral distortion instruments are sensitive to both the mean and anisotropy of the intensity of redshifted CO and [C ii] emission. Large-scale anisotropy is proportional to the product of the mean surface brightness and the line luminosity-weighted bias. The bias provides a connection between galaxy evolution and its cosmological context, and is a unique asset of intensity mapping. Cross-correlation with galaxy redshift surveys allows unambiguous measurements of redshifted line brightness despite residual continuum contamination and interlopers. Measurement of line brightness through cross-correlation also evades cosmic variance and suggests new observation strategies. Galactic foreground emission is ≈ {10}3 times larger than the expected signals, and this places stringent requirements on instrument calibration and stability. Under a range of assumptions, a linear combination of bands cleans continuum contamination sufficiently that residuals produce a modest penalty over the instrumental noise. For PIXIE, the 2σ sensitivity to CO and [C ii] emission scales from ≈ 5× {10}-2 {kJy} {{sr}}-1 at low redshift to ≈ 2 {kJy} {{sr}}-1 by reionization.

  8. Cosmology with a SKA HI intensity mapping survey

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Mario G; Alonso, David; Camera, Stefano; Ferreira, Pedro G; Bernardi, Gianni; Maartens, Roy; Viel, Matteo; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Abdalla, Filipe B; Jarvis, Matt; Metcalf, R Benton; Pourtsidou, A; Wolz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    HI intensity mapping (IM) is a novel technique capable of mapping the large-scale structure of the Universe in three dimensions and delivering exquisite constraints on cosmology, by using HI as a biased tracer of the dark matter density field. This is achieved by measuring the intensity of the redshifted 21cm line over the sky in a range of redshifts without the requirement to resolve individual galaxies. In this chapter, we investigate the potential of SKA1 to deliver HI intensity maps over a broad range of frequencies and a substantial fraction of the sky. By pinning down the baryon acoustic oscillation and redshift space distortion features in the matter power spectrum -- thus determining the expansion and growth history of the Universe -- these surveys can provide powerful tests of dark energy models and modifications to General Relativity. They can also be used to probe physics on extremely large scales, where precise measurements of spatial curvature and primordial non-Gaussianity can be used to test in...

  9. Southern Cosmology Survey I: Optical Cluster Detections and Predictions for the Southern Common-Area Millimeter-Wave Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Menanteau, Felipe; Jimenez, Raul; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Verde, Licia; Kosowsky, Arthur; Moodley, Kavilan; Roche, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    We present first results from the Southern Cosmology Survey, a new multiwavelength survey of the southern sky coordinated with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), a recently commissioned ground-based mm-band Cosmic Microwave Background experiment. This article presents a full analysis of archival optical multi-band imaging data covering an 8 square degree region near right ascension 23 hours and declination -55 degrees, obtained by the Blanco 4-m telescope and Mosaic-II camera in late 2005. We describe the pipeline we have developed to process this large data volume, obtain accurate photometric redshifts, and detect optical clusters. Our cluster finding process uses the combination of a matched spatial filter, photometric redshift probability distributions and richness estimation. We present photometric redshifts, richness estimates, luminosities, and masses for 8 new optically-selected clusters with mass greater than $3\\times10^{14}M_{\\sun}$ at redshifts out to 0.7. We also present estimates for the expec...

  10. Using Maple + GRTensorII in teaching basics of General Relativity and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Sporea, Ciprian A

    2014-01-01

    In this article we propose some Maple procedures, for teaching purposes, to study the basics of General Relativity (GR) and Cosmology. After presenting some features of GRTensorII, a package specially built to deal with GR, we give two examples of how one can use these procedures. In the first example we build the Schwarzschild solution of Einstein equations, while in the second one we study some simple cosmological models.

  11. Improved cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of the SDSS-II and SNLS supernova samples

    CERN Document Server

    Betoule, M; Guy, J; Mosher, J; Hardin, D; Biswas, R; Astier, P; El-Hage, P; Konig, M; Kuhlmann, S; Marriner, J; Pain, R; Regnault, N; Balland, C; Bassett, B A; Brown, P J; Campbell, H; Carlberg, R G; Cellier-Holzem, F; Cinabro, D; Conley, A; D'Andrea, C B; DePoy, D L; Doi, M; Ellis, R S; Fabbro, S; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frieman, J A; Fouchez, D; Galbany, L; Goobar, A; Gupta, R R; Hill, G J; Hlozek, R; Hogan, C J; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Jha, S W; Guillou, L Le; Leloudas, G; Lidman, C; Marshall, J L; Möller, A; Mourão, A M; Neveu, J; Nichol, R; Olmstead, M D; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perlmutter, S; Prieto, J L; Pritchet, C J; Richmond, M; Riess, A G; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Sako, M; Schahmaneche, K; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Sollerman, J; Sullivan, M; Walton, N A; Wheeler, C J

    2014-01-01

    We present cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations obtained by the SDSS-II and SNLS collaborations. The data set includes several low-redshift samples (z<0.1), all 3 seasons from the SDSS-II (0.05 < z < 0.4), and 3 years from SNLS (0.2

  12. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J. [Pennsylvania U.; Guy, J. [LBL, Berkeley; Kessler, R. [Chicago U., KICP; Astier, P. [Paris U., VI-VII; Marriner, J. [Fermilab; Betoule, M. [Paris U., VI-VII; Sako, M. [Pennsylvania U.; El-Hage, P. [Paris U., VI-VII; Biswas, R. [Argonne; Pain, R. [Paris U., VI-VII; Kuhlmann, S. [Argonne; Regnault, N. [Paris U., VI-VII; Frieman, J. A. [Fermilab; Schneider, D. P. [Penn State U.

    2014-08-29

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ~120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ~255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ~290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w (input) – w (recovered)) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty, the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  13. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N. [LPNHE, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universié Denis Diderot Paris 7, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Kessler, R.; Frieman, J. A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marriner, J. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Schneider, D. P., E-mail: kessler@kicp.chicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ∼120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ∼255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ∼290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w {sub input} – w {sub recovered}) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  14. Cosmological constraints from 21cm surveys after reionization

    OpenAIRE

    Visbal, Eli; Loeb, Abraham; Wyithe, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    21cm emission from residual neutral hydrogen after the epoch of reionization can be used to trace the cosmological power spectrum of density fluctuations. Using a Fisher matrix formulation, we provide a detailed forecast of the constraints on cosmological parameters that are achievable with this probe. We consider two designs: a scaled-up version of the MWA observatory as well as a Fast Fourier Transform Telescope. We find that 21cm observations dedicated to post-reionization redshifts may yi...

  15. Type IA supernova spectroscopy analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chen

    2009-06-01

    Supernovae (SNe) have played an important role in the recent dramatic development of observational cosmology. They possess homogeneous observable properties, and thus approximate "standard candles", allowing them to be precise, luminosity distance indicators. Over the last decade, the observed sample of supernovae (SNe) has increased by more than an order of magnitude. Further advances will no longer be limited by statistical errors, but rather by the control of systematic uncertainties, associated with source diversity and evolution. Over 500 SNe Ia have been discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) -- II SN Survey during the three fall seasons from 2005 to 2007. We combine spectroscopic and photometric data to explore reducing these systematic errors. One challenge is to remove accurately the host galaxy light from the observed spectra. We have developed an effective host-subtraction tool using a composite color-constrained PCA+template-fitting program. We have applied this technique to more than 700 spectra from SNe with redshifts up to 0.4 obtained from the SDSS-II SN Survey and more than 200 spectra from low-z SNe at redshifts less than 0.01 obtained from the Center for Astrophysics (CfA) SN archive. We have also developed an automatic method to quantify spectral features of SNe Ia and applied it to the CfA and SDSS-II samples. By comparing the time series of the spectral features between these two samples, we have found no sign of cosmological evolution. We have, however, found evidence for luminosity-dependent differences in the Mg II 4300, Si II 4000, Si II 5800, and Si II 6150 lines. This should be useful for cosmological studies.

  16. HICOSMO: cosmology with a complete sample of galaxy clusters - II. Cosmological results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, G.; Reiprich, T. H.

    2017-10-01

    The X-ray bright, hot gas in the potential well of a galaxy cluster enables systematic X-ray studies of samples of galaxy clusters to constrain cosmological parameters. HIFLUGCS consists of the 64 X-ray brightest galaxy clusters in the Universe, building up a local sample. Here, we utilize this sample to determine, for the first time, individual hydrostatic mass estimates for all the clusters of the sample and, by making use of the completeness of the sample, we quantify constraints on the two interesting cosmological parameters, Ωm and σ8. We apply our total hydrostatic and gas mass estimates from the X-ray analysis to a Bayesian cosmological likelihood analysis and leave several parameters free to be constrained. We find Ωm = 0.30 ± 0.01 and σ8 = 0.79 ± 0.03 (statistical uncertainties, 68 per cent credibility level) using our default analysis strategy combining both a mass function analysis and the gas mass fraction results. The main sources of biases that we correct here are (1) the influence of galaxy groups (incompleteness in parent samples and differing behaviour of the Lx-M relation), (2) the hydrostatic mass bias, (3) the extrapolation of the total mass (comparing various methods), (4) the theoretical halo mass function and (5) other physical effects (non-negligible neutrino mass). We find that galaxy groups introduce a strong bias, since their number density seems to be over predicted by the halo mass function. On the other hand, incorporating baryonic effects does not result in a significant change in the constraints. The total (uncorrected) systematic uncertainties (∼20 per cent) clearly dominate the statistical uncertainties on cosmological parameters for our sample.

  17. Scale invariant cosmology II: model equations and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Maeder, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We want to establish the basic properties of a scale invariant cosmology, that also accounts for the hypothesis of scale invariance of the empty space at large scales. We write the basic analytical properties of the scale invariant cosmological models. The hypothesis of scale invariance of the empty space at large scale brings interesting simplifications in the scale invariant equations for cosmology. There is one new term, depending on the scale factor of the scale invariant cosmology, that opposes to gravity and favours an accelerated expansion. We first consider a zero-density model and find an accelerated expansion, going like t square. In models with matter present, the displacements due to the new term make a significant contribution Omega_l to the energy-density of the Universe, satisfying an equation of the form Omega_m + Omega_k + Omega_l = 1. Unlike the Friedman's models, there is a whole family of flat models (k=0) with different density parameters Omega_m smaller than 1. We examine the basic relat...

  18. The Coyote Universe II: Cosmological Models and Precision Emulation of the Nonlinear Matter Power Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitmann, Katrin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Habib, Salman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Higdon, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Brian J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; White, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The power spectrum of density fluctuations is a foundational source of cosmological information. Precision cosmological probes targeted primarily at investigations of dark energy require accurate theoretical determinations of the power spectrum in the nonlinear regime. To exploit the observational power of future cosmological surveys, accuracy demands on the theory are at the one percent level or better. Numerical simulations are currently the only way to produce sufficiently error-controlled predictions for the power spectrum. The very high computational cost of (precision) N-body simulations is a major obstacle to obtaining predictions in the nonlinear regime, while scanning over cosmological parameters. Near-future observations, however, are likely to provide a meaningful constraint only on constant dark energy equation of state 'wCDM' cosmologies. In this paper we demonstrate that a limited set of only 37 cosmological models -- the 'Coyote Universe' suite -- can be used to predict the nonlinear matter power spectrum at the required accuracy over a prior parameter range set by cosmic microwave background observations. This paper is the second in a series of three, with the final aim to provide a high-accuracy prediction scheme for the nonlinear matter power spectrum for wCDM cosmologies.

  19. Information Gain in Cosmology: From the Discovery of Expansion to Future Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Raveri, Marco; Zhao, Gongbo; Wang, Yuting

    2016-01-01

    Facing the advent of the next generation cosmological surveys we present a method to forecast knowledge gain on cosmological models. We propose this as a well defined and general tool to quantify the performance of different experiments in relation to different theoretical models. In particular, the assessment of experimental performance will benefit enormously from the fact that this method is invariant under re-parametrization of the model. We apply this to future surveys and compare expected knowledge advancements to the most relevant experiments performed over the history of modern cosmology. When considering the standard cosmological model, we show that it will rapidly reach knowledge saturation in the near future and forthcoming improvements will not match the past ones. On the contrary, we find that new observations have the potential for unprecedented knowledge jumps when extensions of the standard scenario are considered.

  20. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Clustering and Weak Lensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, T.M.C.; et al.

    2017-08-04

    We present cosmological results from a combined analysis of galaxy clustering and weak gravitational lensing, using 1321 deg$^2$ of $griz$ imaging data from the first year of the Dark Energy Survey (DES Y1). We combine three two-point functions: (i) the cosmic shear correlation function of 26 million source galaxies in four redshift bins, (ii) the galaxy angular autocorrelation function of 650,000 luminous red galaxies in five redshift bins, and (iii) the galaxy-shear cross-correlation of luminous red galaxy positions and source galaxy shears. To demonstrate the robustness of these results, we use independent pairs of galaxy shape, photometric redshift estimation and validation, and likelihood analysis pipelines. To prevent confirmation bias, the bulk of the analysis was carried out while blind to the true results; we describe an extensive suite of systematics checks performed and passed during this blinded phase. The data are modeled in flat $\\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM cosmologies, marginalizing over 20 nuisance parameters, varying 6 (for $\\Lambda$CDM) or 7 (for $w$CDM) cosmological parameters including the neutrino mass density and including the 457 $\\times$ 457 element analytic covariance matrix. We find consistent cosmological results from these three two-point functions, and from their combination obtain $S_8 \\equiv \\sigma_8 (\\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.783^{+0.021}_{-0.025}$ and $\\Omega_m = 0.264^{+0.032}_{-0.019}$ for $\\Lambda$CDM for $w$CDM, we find $S_8 = 0.794^{+0.029}_{-0.027}$, $\\Omega_m = 0.279^{+0.043}_{-0.022}$, and $w=-0.80^{+0.20}_{-0.22}$ at 68% CL. The precision of these DES Y1 results rivals that from the Planck cosmic microwave background measurements, allowing a comparison of structure in the very early and late Universe on equal terms. Although the DES Y1 best-fit values for $S_8$ and $\\Omega_m$ are lower than the central values from Planck ...

  1. The power spectrum and bispectrum of SDSS DR11 BOSS galaxies II: cosmological interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Noreña, Jorge; Cuesta, Antonio J; Samushia, Lado; Percival, Will J; Wagner, Christian; Manera, Marc; Schneider, Donald P

    2014-01-01

    We examine the cosmological implications of the measurements of the linear growth rate of cosmological structure obtained in a companion paper from the power spectrum and bispectrum monopoles of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data, Release 11, CMASS galaxies. This measurement was of $f^{0.43}\\sigma_8$, where $\\sigma_8$ is the amplitude of dark matter density fluctuations, and $f$ is the linear growth rate, at the effective redshift of the survey, $z_{\\rm eff}=0.57$. In conjunction with Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data, interesting constraints can be placed on models with non-standard neutrino properties and models where gravity deviates from general relativity on cosmological scales. In particular, the sum of the masses of the three species of the neutrinos is constrained to $m_\

  2. Cosmological Constraints From Weak Lensing Peak Statistics With CFHT Stripe-82 Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiangkun; Li, Ran; Shan, Huanyuan; Wang, Qiao; Fu, Liping; Fan, Zuhui; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Leauthaud, Alexie; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Makler, Martin; Moraes, Bruno; Erben, Thomas; Charbonnier, Aldée

    2014-01-01

    We derived constraints on cosmological parameters using weak lensing peak statistics measured on the $\\sim130~\\rm{deg}^2$ of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe82 Survey (CS82). This analysis, based on a fast GPU code, demonstrates the feasibility of using peak statistics in cosmological studies. For our measurements, we considered peaks with signal-to-noise ratio in the range of $\

  3. Cosmology In Terms Of The Deceleration Parameter. Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Bolotin, Yu L; Lemets, O A; Yerokhin, D A; Zazunov, L G

    2015-01-01

    In the early seventies, Alan Sandage defined cosmology as the search for two numbers: Hubble parameter ${{H}_{0}}$ and deceleration parameter ${{q}_{0}}$. The first of the two basic cosmological parameters (the Hubble parameter) describes the linear part of the time dependence of the scale factor. Treating the Universe as a dynamical system it is natural to assume that it is non-linear: indeed, linearity is nothing more than approximation, while non-linearity represents the generic case. It is evident that future models of the Universe must take into account different aspects of its evolution. As soon as the scale factor is the only dynamical variable, the quantities which determine its time dependence must be essentially present in all aspects of the Universe' evolution. Basic characteristics of the cosmological evolution, both static and dynamical, can be expressed in terms of the parameters ${{H}_{0}}$ and ${{q}_{0}}$. The very parameters (and higher time derivatives of the scale factor) enable us to const...

  4. Peculiar Velocities into the Next Generation: Cosmological Parameters From Large Surveys without Bias from Nonlinear Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Abate, Alexandra; Teodoro, Luis F A; Warren, Michael S; Hendry, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We investigate methods to best estimate the normalisation of the mass density fluctuation power spectrum (sigma_8) using peculiar velocity data from a survey like the Six degree Field Galaxy Velocity Survey (6dFGSv). We focus on two potential problems (i) biases from nonlinear growth of structure and (ii) the large number of velocities in the survey. Simulations of LambdaCDM-like models are used to test the methods. We calculate the likelihood from a full covariance matrix of velocities averaged in grid cells. This simultaneously reduces the number of data points and smooths out nonlinearities which tend to dominate on small scales. We show how the averaging can be taken into account in the predictions in a practical way, and show the effect of the choice of cell size. We find that a cell size can be chosen that significantly reduces the nonlinearities without significantly increasing the error bars on cosmological parameters. We compare our results with those from a principal components analysis following Wa...

  5. Kähler forms and cosmological solutions in type II supergravities

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Alberca, N

    2000-01-01

    We consider cosmological solutions to type II supergravity theories where thespacetime is split into a FRW universe and a K\\"ahler space, which may be takento be Calabi-Yau. The various 2-forms present in the theories are taken to beproportional to the K\\"ahler form associated to the K\\"ahler space.

  6. CosmoLike - Cosmological Likelihood Analyses for Photometric Galaxy Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    We explore strategies to extract cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy lensing, galaxy clustering, cluster number counts and cluster weak lensing. We utilize the CosmoLike software to simulate results from an LSST like data set, specifically, we 1) compare individual and joint analyses of the different probes, 2) vary the selection criteria for lens and source galaxies, 3) investigate the impact of blending, 4) investigate the impact of the assumed cosmological model in multi-probe covariances, 6) quantify information content as a function of scales, and 7) explore the impact of intrinsic galaxy alignment in a multi-probe context. Our analyses account for all cross correlations within and across probes and include the higher-order (non-Gaussian) terms in the multi-probe covariance matrix. We simultaneously model cosmological parameters and a variety of systematics, e.g. uncertainties arising from shear and photo-z calibration, cluster mass-observable relation, galaxy in...

  7. Consequences of CCD imperfections for cosmology determined by weak lensing surveys: From laboratory measurements to cosmological parameter bias

    CERN Document Server

    Okura, Yuki; May, Morgan; Plazas, Andrés A; Tamagawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing causes subtle changes in the apparent shapes of galaxies due to the bending of light by the gravity of foreground masses. By measuring the shapes of large numbers of galaxies (millions in recent surveys, up to tens of billions in future surveys) we can infer the parameters that determine cosmology. Imperfections in the detectors used to record images of the sky can introduce changes in the apparent shape of galaxies, which in turn can bias the inferred cosmological parameters. In this paper we consider the effect of two widely discussed sensor imperfections: tree-rings, due to impurity gradients which cause transverse electric fields in the Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD), and pixel-size variation, due to periodic CCD fabrication errors. These imperfections can be observed when the detectors are subject to uniform illumination (flat field images). We develop methods to determine the spurious shear and convergence (due to the imperfections) from the flat-field images. We calculate how t...

  8. Generalized Swiss-Cheese Cosmologies II: Spherical Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Grenon, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    The generalized Swiss - cheese model, consisting of a Lema\\^itre - Tolman (inhomogeneous dust) region matched, by way of a comoving boundary surface, onto a Robertson-Walker background of homogeneous dust, has become a standard construction in modern cosmology. Here we ask if this construction can be made more realistic by introducing some evolution of the boundary surface. The answer we find is no. To maintain a boundary surface using the Darmois - Israel junction conditions, as opposed to the introduction of a surface layer, the boundary must remain exactly comoving. The options are to drop the assumption of dust or allow the development of surface layers. Either option fundamentally changes the original construction.

  9. Generalized Swiss-cheese cosmologies. II. Spherical dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenon, Cédric; Lake, Kayll

    2011-10-01

    The generalized Swiss-cheese model, consisting of a Lemaître-Tolman (inhomogeneous dust) region matched, by way of a comoving boundary surface, onto a Robertson-Walker background of homogeneous dust, has become a standard construction in modern cosmology. Here, we ask if this construction can be made more realistic by introducing some evolution of the boundary surface. The answer we find is no. To maintain a boundary surface using the Darmois-Israel junction conditions, as opposed to the introduction of a surface layer, the boundary must remain exactly comoving. The options are to drop the assumption of dust or allow the development of surface layers. Either option fundamentally changes the original construction.

  10. The Effects of Relativistic Corrections on Cosmological Parameter Estimations from SZE Cluster Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Z H

    2003-01-01

    Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) cluster surveys are anticipated to yield tight constraints on cosmological parameters such as the equation of state of dark energy. In this paper, we study the impact of relativistic corrections of the thermal SZE on the cluster number counts expected from a cosmological model and thus, assuming that other cosmological parameters are known to high accuracies, on the determination of the $w$ parameter and $\\sigma_8$ from a SZE cluster survey, where $w=p/\\rho$ with $p$ the pressure and $\\rho$ the density of dark energy, and $\\sigma_8$ is the rms of the extrapolated linear density fluctuation smoothed over $8\\hbox{Mpc}h^{-1}$. For the purpose of illustrating the effects of relativistic corrections, our analyses mainly focus on $\

  11. A survey of dark matter and related topics in cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bing-Lin

    2017-04-01

    This article presents an extensive review of the status of the search of the dark matter. The first eight sections are devoted to topics in dark matter and its experimental searches, and the rest to selected topics in astrophysics and cosmology, which are intended to supply some of the needed background for students in particle physics. Sections 9 and 13 are introductory cosmology. The three astrophysical topics, Big Bang nucleosynthesis Section 10, Boltzmann transport equation and freeze out of massive particles Section 11, and CMB anisotropy Section 12 can all be studied in analytical approaches when reasonable approximations are made. Their original analytically forms, to which this article follows very closely, were given by particle physicists. Dark matter is an evolving subject requiring timely update to stay current. Hence a review of such a subject matter would undoubtedly have something wanting when it appears in print. It is hoped that this review can form a humble basis for those graduate students who would like to pursue the subject of dark matter. The reader can use the extensive table of contents to see in some details the materials covered in the article.

  12. Cosmological Avatars of the Landscape II: CMB and LSS Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, R; Takahashi, T; Mersini-Houghton, Laura; Takahashi, Tomo

    2006-01-01

    This is the second paper in the series that confronts predictions of a model of the landscape with cosmological observations. We show here how the modifications of the Friedmann equation due to the decohering effects of long wavelength modes on the wavefunction of the Universe defined on the landscape leave unique signatures on the CMB spectra and large scale structure (LSS). We show that the effect of the string corrections is to suppress $\\sigma_8$ and the CMB $TT$ spectrum at large angles, thereby bringing WMAP and SDSS data for $\\sigma_8$ into agreement. We find interesting features imprinted on the matter power spectrum $P(k)$: power is suppressed at large scales indicating the possibility of primordial voids competing with the ISW effect. Furthermore, power is enhanced at structure and substructure scales, $k\\simeq 10^{-2-0} h~{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$. Our smoking gun for discriminating this proposal from others with similar CMB and LSS predictions come from correlations between cosmic shear and temperature anis...

  13. Cosmology with AGN dust time lags-simulating the new VEILS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönig, S. F.; Watson, D.; Kishimoto, M.; Gandhi, P.; Goad, M.; Horne, K.; Shankar, F.; Banerji, M.; Boulderstone, B.; Jarvis, M.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2017-01-01

    The time lag between optical and near-infrared continuum emission in active galactic nuclei (AGN) shows a tight correlation with luminosity and has been proposed as a standardizable candle for cosmology. In this paper, we explore the use of these AGN hot-dust time lags for cosmological model fitting under the constraints of the new VISTA Extragalactic Infrared Legacy Survey (VEILS). This new survey will target a 9 deg2 field observed in J and Ks band with a 14-d cadence and will run for 3 yr. The same area will be covered simultaneously in the optical griz bands by the Dark Energy Survey, providing complementary time-domain optical data. We perform realistic simulations of the survey setup, showing that we expect to recover dust time lags for about 450 objects out of a total of 1350 optical type 1 AGN, spanning a redshift range of 0.1 4.

  14. Cosmology with AGN dust time lags -- Simulating the new VEILS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hönig, S F; Kishimoto, M; Gandhi, P; Goad, M; Horne, K; Shankar, F; Banerji, M; Boulderstone, B; Jarvis, M; Smith, M; Sullivan, M

    2016-01-01

    The time lag between optical and near-infrared continuum emission in active galactic nuclei (AGN) shows a tight correlation with luminosity and has been proposed as a standardisable candle for cosmology. In this paper, we explore the use of these AGN hot-dust time lags for cosmological model fitting under the constraints of the new VISTA Extragalactic Infrared Legacy Survey VEILS. This new survey will target a 9 deg^2 field observed in J- and Ks-band with a 14-day cadence and will run for three years. The same area will be covered simultaneously in the optical griz bands by the Dark Energy Survey, providing complementary time-domain optical data. We perform realistic simulations of the survey setup, showing that we expect to recover dust time lags for about 450 objects out of a total of 1350 optical type 1 AGN, spanning a redshift range of 0.1 4.

  15. Spectroscopic failures in photometric redshift calibration: cosmological biases and survey requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Carlos E. [KIPAC, Menlo Park; Huterer, Dragan [Michigan U.; Lin, Huan [Fermilab; Busha, Michael T. [Zurich U.; Wechsler, Risa H. [SLAC

    2014-10-11

    We use N-body-spectro-photometric simulations to investigate the impact of incompleteness and incorrect redshifts in spectroscopic surveys to photometric redshift training and calibration and the resulting effects on cosmological parameter estimation from weak lensing shear-shear correlations. The photometry of the simulations is modeled after the upcoming Dark Energy Survey and the spectroscopy is based on a low/intermediate resolution spectrograph with wavelength coverage of 5500{\\AA} < {\\lambda} < 9500{\\AA}. The principal systematic errors that such a spectroscopic follow-up encounters are incompleteness (inability to obtain spectroscopic redshifts for certain galaxies) and wrong redshifts. Encouragingly, we find that a neural network-based approach can effectively describe the spectroscopic incompleteness in terms of the galaxies' colors, so that the spectroscopic selection can be applied to the photometric sample. Hence, we find that spectroscopic incompleteness yields no appreciable biases to cosmology, although the statistical constraints degrade somewhat because the photometric survey has to be culled to match the spectroscopic selection. Unfortunately, wrong redshifts have a more severe impact: the cosmological biases are intolerable if more than a percent of the spectroscopic redshifts are incorrect. Moreover, we find that incorrect redshifts can also substantially degrade the accuracy of training set based photo-z estimators. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining redshifts, either spectroscopically or photometrically, for objects at z > 1.3. We discuss several approaches for reducing the cosmological biases, in particular finding that photo-z error estimators can reduce biases appreciably.

  16. The Southern H ii Region Discovery Survey (SHRDS): Pilot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C.; Jordan, C.; Dickey, John M.; Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Balser, Dana S.; Bania, T. M.; Dawson, J. R.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Wenger, Trey V.

    2017-07-01

    The Southern H ii Region Discovery Survey is a survey of the third and fourth quadrants of the Galactic plane that will detect radio recombination line (RRL) and continuum emission at cm-wavelengths from several hundred H ii region candidates using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The targets for this survey come from the WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions and were identified based on mid-infrared and radio continuum emission. In this pilot project, two different configurations of the Compact Array Broad Band receiver and spectrometer system were used for short test observations. The pilot surveys detected RRL emission from 36 of 53 H ii region candidates, as well as seven known H ii regions that were included for calibration. These 36 recombination line detections confirm that the candidates are true H ii regions and allow us to estimate their distances.

  17. The cosmological analysis of X-ray cluster surveys; III. Bypassing cluster mass measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pierre, M; Faccioli, L; Clerc, N; Gastaud, R; Koulouridis, E; Pacaud, F

    2016-01-01

    Despite strong theoretical arguments, the use of clusters as cosmological probes is, in practice, frequently questioned because of the many uncertainties impinging on cluster mass estimates. Our aim is to develop a fully self-consistent cosmological approach of X-ray cluster surveys, exclusively based on observable quantities, rather than masses. This procedure is justified given the possibility to directly derive the cluster properties via ab initio modelling, either analytically or by using hydrodynamical simulations. In this third paper, we evaluate the method on cluster toy-catalogues. We model the population of detected clusters in the count-rate -- hardness-ratio -- angular size -- redshift space and compare the corresponding 4-dimensional diagram with theoretical predictions. The best cosmology+physics parameter configuration is determined using a simple minimisation procedure; errors on the parameters are derived by scanning the likelihood hyper-surfaces with a wide range of starting values. The metho...

  18. Cosmology with gamma-ray bursts: II Cosmography challenges and cosmological scenarios for the accelerated Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Demianski, Marek; Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Context. Explaining the accelerated expansion of the Universe is one of the fundamental challenges in physics today. Cosmography provides information about the evolution of the universe derived from measured distances, assuming only that the space time ge- ometry is described by the Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric, and adopting an approach that effectively uses only Taylor expansions of basic observables. Aims. We perform a high-redshift analysis to constrain the cosmographic expansion up to the fifth order. It is based on the Union2 type Ia supernovae data set, the gamma-ray burst Hubble diagram, a data set of 28 independent measurements of the Hubble param- eter, baryon acoustic oscillations measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-{\\alpha} forest in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), and some Gaussian priors on h and {\\Omega}M . Methods. We performed a statistical analysis and explored the probability distributions of the cosmographic parameters. By building up ...

  19. Self-tuning Solution of Cosmological Constant in RS-II Model and Goldstone Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J E

    2001-01-01

    I give a review on the self-tuning solution of the cosmological constant in a 5D RS-II model using a three index antisymmetric tensor field $A_{MNP}$. The three index antisymmetric tensor field can be the fundamental one appearing in 11D supergravity. Also, the dual of its field strength $H_{MNPQ}$, being a massless scalar, may be interpreted as a Goldstone boson of some spontaneously broken global symmetry.

  20. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: Final data release and cosmological results

    CERN Document Server

    Parkinson, David; Blake, Chris; Poole, Gregory B; Davis, Tamara M; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Contreras, Carlos; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Croton, Darren; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, I-hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, D Christopher; Pimbblet, Kevin; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted K; Yee, H K C

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents cosmological results from the final data release of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We perform full analyses of different cosmological models using the WiggleZ power spectra measured at z=0.22, 0.41, 0.60, and 0.78, combined with other cosmological datasets. The limiting factor in this analysis is the theoretical modelling of the galaxy power spectrum, including non-linearities, galaxy bias, and redshift-space distortions. In this paper we assess several different methods for modelling the theoretical power spectrum, testing them against the Gigaparsec WiggleZ simulations (GiggleZ). We fit for a base set of 6 cosmological parameters, {Omega_b h^2, Omega_CDM h^2, H_0, tau, A_s, n_s}, and 5 supplementary parameters {n_run, r, w, Omega_k, sum m_nu}. In combination with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), our results are consistent with the LambdaCDM concordance cosmology, with a measurement of the matter density of Omega_m =0.29 +/- 0.016 and amplitude of fluctuations sigma_8 = 0.825 +/- 0...

  1. Gravitational lensing statistics with extragalactic surveys - II. Analysis of the Jodrell Bank-VLA Astrometric Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbig, P; Marlow, D; Quast, R; Wilkinson, PN; Browne, IWA; Koopmans, LVE

    We present constraints on the cosmological constant lambda(0) from gravitational lensing statistics of the Jodrell Bank-VLA Astrometric Survey (JVAS). Although this is the largest gravitational lens survey which has been analysed, cosmological constraints are only comparable to those from optical

  2. Fundamental Cosmology from Precision Spectroscopy: II. Synergies with supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Leite, A C O

    2015-01-01

    In previous work [Amendola {\\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. D86 (2012) 063515], Principal Component Analysis based methods to constrain the dark energy equation of state using Type Ia supernovae and other low redshift probes were extended to spectroscopic tests of the stability fundamental couplings, which can probe higher redshifts. Here we use them to quantify the gains in sensitivity obtained by combining spectroscopic measurements expected from ESPRESSO at the VLT and the high-resolution ultra-stable spectrograph for the E-ELT (known as ELT-HIRES) with future supernova surveys. In addition to simulated low and intermediate redshift supernova surveys, we assess the dark energy impact of high-redshift supernovas detected by JWST and characterized by the E-ELT or TMT. Our results show that a detailed characterization of the dark energy properties beyond the acceleration phase (i.e., deep in the matter era) is viable, and may reach as deep as redshift 4.

  3. Estimating cosmological parameters from future gravitational lens surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Dobke, Benjamin M; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Auger, Matthew W

    2009-01-01

    Upcoming ground and space based observatories such as the DES, the LSST, the JDEM concepts and the SKA, promise to dramatically increase the size of strong gravitational lens samples. A significant fraction of the systems are expected to be time delay lenses. Many of the existing lensing degeneracies become less of an issue with large samples since the distributions of a number of parameters are predictable, and can be incorporated into an analysis, thus helping to lessen the degeneracy. Assuming a mean galaxy density profile that does not evolve with redshift, a Lambda-CDM cosmology, and Gaussian distributions for bulk parameters describing the lens and source populations, we generate synthetic lens catalogues and examine the relationship between constraints on the Omega_m - Omega_Lambda plane and H_0 with increasing lens sample size. We find that, with sample sizes of ~400 time delay lenses, useful constraints can be obtained for Omega_m and Omega_Lambda with approximately similar levels of precision as fro...

  4. Probing cosmology with weak lensing selected clusters II: Dark energy and f(R) gravity models

    CERN Document Server

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing and future wide-field galaxy surveys can be used to locate a number of clusters of galaxies with cosmic shear measurement alone. We study constraints on cosmological models using statistics of weak lensing selected galaxy clusters. We extend our previous theoretical framework to model the statistical properties of clusters in variants of cosmological models as well as in the standard LCDM model. Weak lensing selection of clusters does not rely on the conventional assumption such as the relation between luminosity and mass and/or hydrostatic equilibrium, but a number of observational effects compromise robust identification. We use a large set of realistic mock weak-lensing catalogs as well as analytic models to perform a Fisher analysis and make forecast for constraining two competing cosmological models, wCDM model and f(R) model proposed by Hu & Sawicki, with our lensing statistics. We show that weak lensing selected clusters are excellent probe of cosmology when combined with cosmic shear power...

  5. Cosmology with AGN dust time lags - Simulating the new VEILS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönig, S. F.; Watson, D.; Kishimoto, M.; Gandhi, P.; Goad, M.; Horne, K.; Shankar, F.; Banerji, M.; Boulderstone, B.; Jarvis, M.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2016-10-01

    The time lag between optical and near-infrared continuum emission in active galactic nuclei (AGN) shows a tight correlation with luminosity and has been proposed as a standardisable candle for cosmology. In this paper, we explore the use of these AGN hot-dust time lags for cosmological model fitting under the constraints of the new VISTA Extragalactic Infrared Legacy Survey VEILS. This new survey will target a 9 deg2 field observed in J- and Ks-band with a 14-day cadence and will run for three years. The same area will be covered simultaneously in the optical griz bands by the Dark Energy Survey, providing complementary time-domain optical data. We perform realistic simulations of the survey setup, showing that we expect to recover dust time lags for about 450 objects out of a total of 1350 optical type 1 AGN, spanning a redshift range of 0.1 AGN as well as in the normalisation of the lag-luminosity relation, we are able to constrain Ω _Λ in ΛCDM with similar accuracy as current supernova samples. We discuss the benefits of combining AGN and supernovae for cosmology and connect the present work to future attempts to reach out to redshifts of z > 4.

  6. Cosmological Forecasts for Combined and Next Generation Peculiar Velocity Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Howlett, Cullan; Blake, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Peculiar velocity surveys present a very promising route to measuring the growth rate of large-scale structure and its scale dependence. However, individual peculiar velocity surveys suffer from large statistical errors due to the intrinsic scatter in the relations used to infer a galaxy's true distance. In this context we use a Fisher Matrix formalism to investigate the statistical benefits of combining multiple peculiar velocity surveys. We find that for all cases we consider there is a marked improvement on constraints on the linear growth rate $f\\sigma_{8}$. For example, the constraining power of only a few peculiar velocity measurements is such that the addition of the 2MASS Tully-Fisher survey (containing only $\\sim2,000$ galaxies) to the full redshift and peculiar velocity samples of the 6-degree Field Galaxy Survey (containing $\\sim 110,000$ redshifts and $\\sim 9,000$ velocities) can improve growth rate constraints by $\\sim20\\%$. Furthermore, the combination of the future TAIPAN and WALLABY+WNSHS surv...

  7. SPOKES: an End-to-End Simulation Facility for Spectroscopic Cosmological Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Nord, B; Refregier, A; Gamper, La; Gamper, Lu; Hambrecht, B; Chang, C; Forero-Romero, J E; Serrano, S; Cunha, C; Coles, O; Nicola, A; Busha, M; Bauer, A; Saunders, W; Jouvel, S; Kirk, D; Wechsler, R

    2016-01-01

    The nature of dark matter, dark energy and large-scale gravity pose some of the most pressing questions in cosmology today. These fundamental questions require highly precise measurements, and a number of wide-field spectroscopic survey instruments are being designed to meet this requirement. A key component in these experiments is the development of a simulation tool to forecast science performance, define requirement flow-downs, optimize implementation, demonstrate feasibility, and prepare for exploitation. We present SPOKES (SPectrOscopic KEn Simulation), an end-to-end simulation facility for spectroscopic cosmological surveys designed to address this challenge. SPOKES is based on an integrated infrastructure, modular function organization, coherent data handling and fast data access. These key features allow reproducibility of pipeline runs, enable ease of use and provide flexibility to update functions within the pipeline. The cyclic nature of the pipeline offers the possibility to make the science outpu...

  8. Recent results and perspectives on cosmology and fundamental physics from microwave surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burigana, Carlo; Battistelli, Elia Stefano; Benetti, Micol

    2016-01-01

    surveys, and their cross-correlations are presented. Looking at fine signatures in the CMB, such as the lack of power at low multipoles, the primordial power spectrum (PPS) and the bounds on non-Gaussianities, complemented by galaxy surveys, we discuss inflationary physics and the generation of primordial......Recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) data in temperature and polarization have reached high precision in estimating all the parameters that describe the current so-called standard cosmological model. Recent results about the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect from CMB anisotropies, galaxy...... perturbations in the early universe. Three important topics in particle physics, the bounds on neutrinos masses and parameters, on thermal axion mass and on the neutron lifetime derived from cosmological data are reviewed, with attention to the comparison with laboratory experiment results. Recent results from...

  9. Recent results and perspectives on cosmology and fundamental physics from microwave surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Burigana, Carlo; Benetti, Micol; Cabass, Giovanni; De Bernardis, Paolo; Alighieri, Sperello Di Serego; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Gerbino, Martina; Giusarma, Elena; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Liguori, Michele; Masi, Silvia; Norgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Rosati, Piero; Salvati, Laura; Trombetti, Tiziana; Vielva, Patricio

    2016-01-01

    Recent cosmic microwave background data in temperature and polarization have reached high precision in estimating all the parameters that describe the current so-called standard cosmological model. Recent results about the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect from cosmic microwave background anisotropies, galaxy surveys, and their cross-correlations are presented. Looking at fine signatures in the cosmic microwave background, such as the lack of power at low multipoles, the primordial power spectrum and the bounds on non-Gaussianities, complemented by galaxy surveys, we discuss inflationary physics and the generation of primordial perturbations in the early Universe. Three important topics in particle physics, the bounds on neutrinos masses and parameters, on thermal axion mass and on the neutron lifetime derived from cosmological data are reviewed, with attention to the comparison with laboratory experiment results. Recent results from cosmic polarization rotation analyses aimed at testing the Einstein equivalence ...

  10. Dwarf Cosmology with the Stromlo Missing Satellites Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Jerjen

    2010-01-01

    Sky Survey. The primary objective of the program is to characterise the baryonic and dark matter components of a complete sample of MW satellites in the Southern hemisphere to provide stringent observational constraints for improving our understanding of how the Milky Way formed and what physical processes governed galaxy formation and evolution in general.

  11. Cosmological constraints from multiple tracers in spectroscopic surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Alarcon, Alex; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We use the Fisher matrix formalism to study the expansion and growth history of the Universe using galaxy clustering with 2D angular cross-correlation tomography in spectroscopic or high resolution photometric redshift surveys. The radial information is contained in the cross correlations between narrow redshift bins. We show how multiple tracers with redshift space distortions cancel sample variance and arbitrarily improve the constraints on the dark energy equation of state $\\omega(z)$ and the growth parameter $\\gamma$ in the noiseless limit. The improvement for multiple tracers quickly increases with the bias difference between the tracers, up to a factor $\\sim4$ in $\\text{FoM}_{\\gamma\\omega}$. We model a magnitude limited survey with realistic density and bias using a conditional luminosity function, finding a factor 1.3-9.0 improvement in $\\text{FoM}_{\\gamma\\omega}$ -- depending on global density -- with a split in a halo mass proxy. Partly overlapping redshift bins improve the constraints in multiple tr...

  12. The sloan digital sky survey-II supernova survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5° wide...... spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during...

  13. HI and cosmological constraints from intensity mapping, optical, and CMB surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Crittenden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We forecast constraints on neutral hydrogen (HI) and cosmological parameters using near-term intensity mapping surveys with instruments such as BINGO, MeerKAT, and the SKA, and Stage III and IV optical galaxy surveys. If foregrounds and systematic effects can be controlled - a problem which becomes much easier in cross-correlation - these surveys will provide exquisite measurements of the HI density and bias, as well as measurements of the growth of structure, the angular diameter distance, and the Hubble rate, over a wide range of redshift. We also investigate the possibility of detecting the late time ISW effect using the Planck satellite and forthcoming intensity mapping surveys, finding that a large sky survey with Phase 1 of the SKA can achieve a near optimal detection.

  14. Recent results and perspectives on cosmology and fundamental physics from microwave surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burigana, Carlo; Battistelli, Elia Stefano; Benetti, Micol

    2016-01-01

    surveys, and their cross-correlations are presented. Looking at fine signatures in the CMB, such as the lack of power at low multipoles, the primordial power spectrum (PPS) and the bounds on non-Gaussianities, complemented by galaxy surveys, we discuss inflationary physics and the generation of primordial...... perturbations in the early universe. Three important topics in particle physics, the bounds on neutrinos masses and parameters, on thermal axion mass and on the neutron lifetime derived from cosmological data are reviewed, with attention to the comparison with laboratory experiment results. Recent results from...

  15. Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity inspired Bianchi-II cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Giani, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    We study different aspects of the Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz inspired Bianchi-II cosmology. First, we present exact solutions for a toy model, where only the cubic in spatial curvature terms are present in the action; then we briefly discuss some exotic singularities, which can appear in this toy model, finally, we analyse qualitatively the equations of motion for a more complicated model, where different powers of the spatial curvature terms are present. Generally, our analysis gives some arguments in favour of existence of an oscillatory approach to the singularity in the universe governed by the Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz type gravity.

  16. LRS Bianchi Type II Massive String Cosmological Models with Magnetic Field in Lyra's Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bianchi type II massive string cosmological models with magnetic field and time dependent gauge function ( in the frame work of Lyra's geometry are investigated. The magnetic field is in -plane. To get the deterministic solution, we have assumed that the shear ( is proportional to the expansion (. This leads to , where and are metric potentials and is a constant. We find that the models start with a big bang at initial singularity and expansion decreases due to lapse of time. The anisotropy is maintained throughout but the model isotropizes when . The physical and geometrical aspects of the model in the presence and absence of magnetic field are also discussed.

  17. Correcting cosmological parameter biases for all redshift surveys induced by estimating and reweighting redshift distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Markus Michael; Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Seitz, Stella

    2017-04-01

    Photometric redshift uncertainties are a major source of systematic error for ongoing and future photometric surveys. We study different sources of redshift error caused by choosing a suboptimal redshift histogram bin width and propose methods to resolve them. The selection of a too large bin width is shown to oversmooth small-scale structure of the radial distribution of galaxies. This systematic error can significantly shift cosmological parameter constraints by up to 6σ for the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w. Careful selection of bin width can reduce this systematic by a factor of up to 6 as compared with commonly used current binning approaches. We further discuss a generalized resampling method that can correct systematic and statistical errors in cosmological parameter constraints caused by uncertainties in the redshift distribution. This can be achieved without any prior assumptions about the shape of the distribution or the form of the redshift error. Our methodology allows photometric surveys to obtain unbiased cosmological parameter constraints using a minimum number of spectroscopic calibration data. For a DES-like galaxy clustering forecast, we obtain unbiased results with respect to errors caused by suboptimal histogram bin width selection, using only 5k representative spectroscopic calibration objects per tomographic redshift bin.

  18. Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Clusters in the 2500 square-degree SPT-SZ Survey

    CERN Document Server

    de Haan, T; Bleem, L E; Allen, S W; Applegate, D E; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M; Bayliss, M; Bocquet, S; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Chiu, I; Cho, H-M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Dobbs, M A; Doucouliagos, A N; Foley, R J; Forman, W R; Garmire, G P; George, E M; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Gupta, N; Halverson, N W; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Hoekstra, H; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hou, Z; Hrubes, J D; Huang, N; Jones, C; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; von der Linden, A; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McDonald, M; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Mocanu, L M; Mohr, J J; Murray, S S; Padin, S; Pryke, C; Rapetti, D; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Schrabback, T; Shirokoff, E; Song, J; Spieler, H G; Stalder, B; Stanford, S A; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K T; Stubbs, C W; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vikhlinin, A; Williamson, R; Zenteno, A

    2016-01-01

    (abridged) We present cosmological constraints obtained from galaxy clusters identified by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signature in the 2500 square degree South Pole Telescope Sunyaev Zel'dovich survey. We consider the 377 cluster candidates identified at z>0.25 with a detection significance greater than five, corresponding to the 95% purity threshold for the survey. We compute constraints on cosmological models using the measured cluster abundance as a function of mass and redshift. We include additional constraints from multi-wavelength observations, including Chandra X-ray data for 82 clusters and a weak lensing-based prior on the normalization of the mass-observable scaling relations. Assuming a LCDM cosmology, where the species-summed neutrino mass has the minimum allowed value (mnu = 0.06 eV) from neutrino oscillation experiments, we combine the cluster data with a prior on H0 and find sigma_8 = 0.797+-0.031 and Omega_m = 0.289+-0.042, with the parameter combination sigma_8(Omega_m/0.27)^0.3 = 0.784...

  19. Cosmology constraints from shear peak statistics in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    CERN Document Server

    Kacprzak, T; Friedrich, O; Amara, A; Refregier, A; Marian, L; Dietrich, J P; Suchyta, E; Aleksić, J; Bacon, D; Becker, M R; Bonnett, C; Bridle, S L; Chang, C; Eifler, T F; Hartley, W; Huff, E M; Krause, E; MacCrann, N; Melchior, P; Nicola, A; Samuroff, S; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M A; Weller, J; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Armstrong, R; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, R A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Lima, M; March, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E S; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Vikram, V; Walker, A R; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Shear peak statistics has gained a lot of attention recently as a practical alternative to the two point statistics for constraining cosmological parameters. We perform a shear peak statistics analysis of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data, using weak gravitational lensing measurements from a 139 deg$^2$ field. We measure the abundance of peaks identified in aperture mass maps, as a function of their signal-to-noise ratio, in the signal-to-noise range $04$ would require significant corrections, which is why we do not include them in our analysis. We compare our results to the cosmological constraints from the two point analysis on the SV field and find them to be in good agreement in both the central value and its uncertainty. We discuss prospects for future peak statistics analysis with upcoming DES data.

  20. Correcting cosmological parameter biases for all redshift surveys induced by estimating and reweighting redshift distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, Markus Michael; Paech, Kerstin; Seitz, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Photometric redshift uncertainties are a major source of systematic error for ongoing and future photometric surveys. We study different sources of redshift error caused by common suboptimal binning techniques and propose methods to resolve them. The selection of a too large bin width is shown to oversmooth small scale structure of the radial distribution of galaxies. This systematic error can significantly shift cosmological parameter constraints by up to $6 \\, \\sigma$ for the dark energy equation of state parameter $w$. Careful selection of bin width can reduce this systematic by a factor of up to 6 as compared with commonly used current binning approaches. We further discuss a generalised resampling method that can correct systematic and statistical errors in cosmological parameter constraints caused by uncertainties in the redshift distribution. This can be achieved without any prior assumptions about the shape of the distribution or the form of the redshift error. Our methodology allows photometric surve...

  1. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; et al.

    2014-01-14

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS Stripe 82, a 300 deg2 area along the celestial equator. This data release is comprised of all transient sources brighter than r~22.5 mag with no history of variability prior to 2004. Dedicated spectroscopic observations were performed on a subset of 889 transients, as well as spectra for thousands of transient host galaxies using the SDSS-III BOSS spectrographs. Photometric classifications are provided for the candidates with good multi-color light curves that were not observed spectroscopically. From these observations, 4607 transients are either spectroscopically confirmed, or likely to be, supernovae, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2 distance moduli for a total of 1443 SN Ia with spectroscopic redshifts as well as photometric redshifts for a further 677 purely-photometric SN Ia candidates. Using the spectroscopically confirmed subset of the three-year SDSS-II SN Ia sample and assuming a flat Lambda-CDM cosmology, we determine Omega_M = 0.315 +/- 0.093 (statistical error only) and detect a non-zero cosmological constant at 5.7 sigmas.

  2. II José Plínio Baptista School of Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Piattella, Oliver; Rodrigues, Davi; Velten, Hermano; Zimdahl, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    The series of texts composing this book is based on the lectures presented during the II José Plínio Baptista School of Cosmology, held in Pedra Azul (Espírito Santo, Brazil) between 9 and 14 March 2014. This II JBPCosmo has been entirely devoted to the problem of understanding theoretical and observational aspects of Cosmic Background Radiation (CMB). The CMB is one of the most important phenomena in Physics and a fundamental probe of our Universe when it was only 400,000 years old. It is an extraordinary laboratory where we can learn from particle physics to cosmology; its discovery in 1965 has been a landmark event in the history of physics. The observations of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation through the satellites COBE, WMAP and Planck provided a huge amount of data which are being analyzed in order to discover important information regarding the composition of our universe and the process of structure formation.

  3. An Empirical Approach to Cosmological Galaxy Survey Simulation: Application to SPHEREx Low-Resolution Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stickley, Nathaniel R; Masters, Daniel; de Putter, Roland; Doré, Olivier; Bock, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Highly accurate models of the galaxy population over cosmological volumes are necessary in order to predict the performance of upcoming cosmological missions. We present a data-driven model of the galaxy population constrained by deep 0.1-8 $\\rm \\mu m$ imaging and spectroscopic data in the COSMOS survey, with the immediate goal of simulating the spectroscopic redshift performance of the proposed SPHEREx mission. SPHEREx will obtain over the full-sky $R\\sim41$ spectrophotometry at moderate spatial resolution ($\\sim6"$) over the wavelength range 0.75-4.18 $\\rm \\mu m$ and $R\\sim135$ over the wavelength range 4.18-5 $\\rm \\mu m$. We show that our simulation accurately reproduces a range of known galaxy properties, encapsulating the full complexity of the galaxy population and enables realistic, full end-to-end simulations to predict mission performance. Finally, we discuss potential applications of the simulation framework to future cosmology missions and give a description of released data products.

  4. Cosmology from cosmic shear with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, M. R. [et al.

    2016-07-06

    We present the first constraints on cosmology from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), using weak lensing measurements from the preliminary Science Verification (SV) data. We use 139 square degrees of SV data, which is less than 3% of the full DES survey area. Using cosmic shear 2-point measurements over three redshift bins we find σ8(m=0.3)0.5 = 0:81 ± 0:06 (68% confidence), after marginalising over 7 systematics parameters and 3 other cosmological parameters. Furthermore, we examine the robustness of our results to the choice of data vector and systematics assumed, and find them to be stable. About 20% of our error bar comes from marginalising over shear and photometric redshift calibration uncertainties. The current state-of-the-art cosmic shear measurements from CFHTLenS are mildly discrepant with the cosmological constraints from Planck CMB data. Our results are consistent with both datasets. Our uncertainties are ~30% larger than those from CFHTLenS when we carry out a comparable analysis of the two datasets, which we attribute largely to the lower number density of our shear catalogue. We investigate constraints on dark energy and find that, with this small fraction of the full survey, the DES SV constraints make negligible impact on the Planck constraints. The moderate disagreement between the CFHTLenS and Planck values of σ8m=0.3)0.5 is present regardless of the value of w.

  5. Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Clusters in the 2500 square-degree SPT-SZ Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Haan, T.; et al.

    2016-03-21

    (abridged) We present cosmological constraints obtained from galaxy clusters identified by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signature in the 2500 square degree South Pole Telescope Sunyaev Zel'dovich survey. We consider the 377 cluster candidates identified at z>0.25 with a detection significance greater than five, corresponding to the 95% purity threshold for the survey. We compute constraints on cosmological models using the measured cluster abundance as a function of mass and redshift. We include additional constraints from multi-wavelength observations, including Chandra X-ray data for 82 clusters and a weak lensing-based prior on the normalization of the mass-observable scaling relations. Assuming a LCDM cosmology, where the species-summed neutrino mass has the minimum allowed value (mnu = 0.06 eV) from neutrino oscillation experiments, we combine the cluster data with a prior on H0 and find sigma_8 = 0.797+-0.031 and Omega_m = 0.289+-0.042, with the parameter combination sigma_8(Omega_m/0.27)^0.3 = 0.784+-0.039. These results are in good agreement with constraints from the CMB from SPT, WMAP, and Planck, as well as with constraints from other cluster datasets. Adding mnu as a free parameter, we find mnu = 0.14+-0.08 eV when combining the SPT cluster data with Planck CMB data and BAO data, consistent with the minimum allowed value. Finally, we consider a cosmology where mnu and N_eff are fixed to the LCDM values, but the dark energy equation of state parameter w is free. Using the SPT cluster data in combination with an H0 prior, we measure w = -1.28+-0.31, a constraint consistent with the LCDM cosmological model and derived from the combination of growth of structure and geometry. When combined with primarily geometrical constraints from Planck CMB, H0, BAO and SNe, adding the SPT cluster data improves the w constraint from the geometrical data alone by 14%, to w = -1.023+-0.042.

  6. Mapping the Galaxy Color-Redshift Relation: Optimal Photometric Redshift Calibration Strategies for Cosmology Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Daniel; Stern, Daniel; Ilbert, Olivier; Salvato, Mara; Schmidt, Samuel; Longo, Giuseppe; Rhodes, Jason; Paltani, Stephane; Mobasher, Bahram; Hoekstra, Henk; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Coupon, Jean; Steinhardt, Charles; Speagle, Josh; Faisst, Andreas; Kalinich, Adam; Brodwin, Mark; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of >10^9 galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where - in galaxy color space - redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and whe...

  7. The sloan digital sky survey-II supernova survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5° wide...... centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for the discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between September 1 and November 30 of 2005-7. During...... the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327...

  8. Precision Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2017-04-01

    Preface; Notation and conventions; Part I. 100 Years of Cosmology: 1. Emerging cosmology; 2. The cosmic expansion; 3. The cosmic microwave background; 4. Recent cosmology; Part II. Newtonian Cosmology: 5. Newtonian cosmology; 6. Dark energy cosmological models; 7. The early universe; 8. The inhomogeneous universe; 9. The inflationary universe; Part III. Relativistic Cosmology: 10. Minkowski space; 11. The energy momentum tensor; 12. General relativity; 13. Space-time geometry and calculus; 14. The Einstein field equations; 15. Solutions of the Einstein equations; 16. The Robertson–Walker solution; 17. Congruences, curvature and Raychaudhuri; 18. Observing and measuring the universe; Part IV. The Physics of Matter and Radiation: 19. Physics of the CMB radiation; 20. Recombination of the primeval plasma; 21. CMB polarisation; 22. CMB anisotropy; Part V. Precision Tools for Precision Cosmology: 23. Likelihood; 24. Frequentist hypothesis testing; 25. Statistical inference: Bayesian; 26. CMB data processing; 27. Parametrising the universe; 28. Precision cosmology; 29. Epilogue; Appendix A. SI, CGS and Planck units; Appendix B. Magnitudes and distances; Appendix C. Representing vectors and tensors; Appendix D. The electromagnetic field; Appendix E. Statistical distributions; Appendix F. Functions on a sphere; Appendix G. Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  9. Fisher matrix forecast on cosmological parameters from the dark energy survey 2-point angular correlation function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobreira, F.; Rosenfeld, R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (IFT/UNESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. Fisica Teorica; Simoni, F. de; Costa, L.A.N. da; Gaia, M.A.G.; Ramos, B.; Ogando, R.; Makler, M. [Laboratorio Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia (LIneA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: We study the cosmological constraints expected for the upcoming project Dark Energy Survey (DES) with the full functional form of the 2-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation function model applied in this work includes the effects of linear redshift-space distortion, photometric redshift errors (assumed to be Gaussian) and non-linearities prevenient from gravitational infall. The Fisher information matrix is constructed with the full covariance matrix, which takes the correlation between nearby redshift shells in a proper manner. The survey was sliced into 20 redshift shells in the range 0:4 {<=} z {<=} 1:40 with a variable angular scale in order to search only the scale around the signal from the baryon acoustic oscillation, therefore well within the validity of the non-linear model employed. We found that under those assumptions and with a flat {Lambda}CDM WMAP7 fiducial model, the DES will be able to constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter w with a precision of {approx} 20% and the cold dark matter with {approx} 11% when marginalizing over the other 25 parameters (bias is treated as a free parameter for each shell). When applying WMAP7 priors on {Omega}{sub baryon}, {Omega} c{sub dm}, n{sub s}, and HST priors on the Hubble parameter, w is constrained with {approx} 9% precision. This shows that the full shape of the angular correlation function with DES data will be a powerful probe to constrain cosmological parameters. (author)

  10. Recent results and perspectives on cosmology and fundamental physics from microwave surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burigana, Carlo; Battistelli, Elia Stefano; Benetti, Micol; Cabass, Giovanni; de Bernardis, Paolo; di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; di Valentino, Eleonora; Gerbino, Martina; Giusarma, Elena; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Liguori, Michele; Masi, Silvia; Norgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Rosati, Piero; Salvati, Laura; Trombetti, Tiziana; Vielva, Patricio

    2016-04-01

    Recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) data in temperature and polarization have reached high precision in estimating all the parameters that describe the current so-called standard cosmological model. Recent results about the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect from CMB anisotropies, galaxy surveys, and their cross-correlations are presented. Looking at fine signatures in the CMB, such as the lack of power at low multipoles, the primordial power spectrum (PPS) and the bounds on non-Gaussianities, complemented by galaxy surveys, we discuss inflationary physics and the generation of primordial perturbations in the early universe. Three important topics in particle physics, the bounds on neutrinos masses and parameters, on thermal axion mass and on the neutron lifetime derived from cosmological data are reviewed, with attention to the comparison with laboratory experiment results. Recent results from cosmic polarization rotation (CPR) analyses aimed at testing the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP) are presented. Finally, we discuss the perspectives of next radio facilities for the improvement of the analysis of future CMB spectral distortion experiments.

  11. MAPPING THE GALAXY COLOR–REDSHIFT RELATION: OPTIMAL PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CALIBRATION STRATEGIES FOR COSMOLOGY SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masters, Daniel; Steinhardt, Charles; Faisst, Andreas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Capak, Peter [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Rhodes, Jason [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ilbert, Olivier [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire dAstrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Salvato, Mara [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schmidt, Samuel [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Longo, Giuseppe [Department of Physics, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Paltani, Stephane; Coupon, Jean [Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva ch. dcogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem H’´ugel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Speagle, Josh [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, MS 46, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kalinich, Adam [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano [Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte—INAF, via Moiariello 16, I-80131, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳10{sup 9} galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color–redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  12. LRS Bianchi type-II string cosmological models in a modified theory of gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakavalli, T.; Ananda Rao, G.; Reddy, D. R. K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of spatially homogeneous anisotropic LRS Bianchi type-II cosmological models with string source in a modified theory of gravitation formulated by Harko et al. (Phys. Rev. D 84:024020, 2011) which is universally known as f( R, T) gravity. Here R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the energy momentum tensor. By solving the field equation we have presented massive string and Takabyasi or p-string models in this theory. However it is interesting to note that geometric string in this space-time does not exist in this theory. Physical and geometrical properties of the strings obtained are also discussed.

  13. Asymptotics with a positive cosmological constant: II. Linear fields on de Sitter space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Kesavan, Aruna

    2015-01-01

    Linearized gravitational waves in de Sitter space-time are analyzed in detail to obtain guidance for constructing the theory of gravitational radiation in presence of a positive cosmological constant in full, nonlinear general relativity. Specifically: i) In the exact theory, the intrinsic geometry of $\\scri$ is often assumed to be conformally flat in order to reduce the asymptotic symmetry group from $\\Diff$ to the de Sitter group. Our {results show explicitly} that this condition is physically unreasonable; ii) We obtain expressions of energy-momentum and angular momentum fluxes carried by gravitational waves in terms of fields defined at $\\scrip$; iii) We argue that, although energy of linearized gravitational waves can be arbitrarily negative in general, gravitational waves emitted by physically reasonable sources carry positive energy; and, finally iv) We demonstrate that the flux formulas reduce to the familiar ones in Minkowski space-time in spite of the fact that the limit $\\Lambda \\to 0$ is discontin...

  14. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II)\\\\ II. Construction and Properties of the Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Böhringer, Hans; Collins, Chris A; Guzzo, Luigi; Nowak, Nina; Bobrovskyi, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy clusters provide unique laboratories to study astrophysical processes on large scales and are important probes for cosmology. X-ray observations are currently the best means of detecting and characterizing galaxy clusters. In this paper we describe the construction of the REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey based on the southern part of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. REFLEX II extends the REFLEX I survey by a factor of about two down to a flux limit of $1.8 \\times 10^{-12}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ (0.1 - 2.4 keV). We describe the determination of the X-ray parameters, the process of X-ray source identification, and the construction of the survey selection function. The REFLEX II cluster sample comprises currently 915 objects. A standard selection function is derived for a lower source count limit of 20 photons in addition to the flux limit. The median redshift of the sample is $z = 0.102$. Internal consistency checks and the comparison to several other galaxy cluster surveys imply that REFLEX II is better than 9...

  15. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    CERN Document Server

    Mosher, J; Kessler, R; Astier, P; Marriner, J; Betoule, M; Sako, M; El-Hage, P; Biswas, R; Pain, R; Kuhlmann, S; Regnault, N; Frieman, J A; Schneider, D P

    2014-01-01

    We use simulated SN Ia samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and the bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: 120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, 255 SDSS SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and 290 SNLS SNe Ia (z <= 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (winput - wrecovered) ranging from -0.005 +/- 0.012 to -0.024 +/- 0.010. These biases a...

  16. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: 850um maps, catalogues and number counts

    CERN Document Server

    Geach, J E; Halpern, M; Smail, Ian; van der Werf, P; Alexander, D M; Almaini, O; Aretxaga, I; Arumugam, V; Asboth, V; Banerji, M; Beanlands, J; Best, P N; Blain, A W; Birkinshaw, M; Chapin, E L; Chapman, S C; Chen, C-C; Chrysostomou, A; Clarke, C; Clements, D L; Conselice, C; Coppin, K E K; Cowley, W I; Danielson, A L R; Eales, S; Edge, A C; Farrah, D; Gibb, A; Harrison, C M; Hine, N K; Hughes, D; Ivison, R J; Jarvis, M; Jenness, T; Jones, S F; Karim, A; Koprowski, M; Knudsen, K K; Lacey, C G; Mackenzie, T; Marsden, G; McAlpine, K; McMahon, R; Meijerink, R; Michalowski, M J; Oliver, S J; Page, M J; Peacock, J A; Rigopoulou, D; Robson, E I; Roseboom, I; Rotermund, K; Scott, Douglas; Serjeant, S; Simpson, C; Simpson, J M; Smith, D J B; Spaans, M; Stanley, F; Stevens, J A; Swinbank, A M; Targett, T; Thomson, A P; Valiante, E; Webb, T M A; Willott, C; Zavala, J A; Zemcov, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalogue of nearly 3,000 submillimetre sources detected at 850um over ~5 square degrees surveyed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). This is the largest survey of its kind at 850um, probing a meaningful cosmic volume at the peak of star formation activity and increasing the sample size of submillimetre galaxies selected at 850um by an order of magnitude. We describe the wide 850um survey component of S2CLS, which covers the key extragalactic survey fields: UKIDSS-UDS, COSMOS, Akari-NEP, Extended Groth Strip, Lockman Hole North, SSA22 and GOODS-North. The average 1-sigma depth of S2CLS is 1.2 mJy/beam, approaching the SCUBA-2 850um confusion limit, which we determine to be ~0.8 mJy/beam. We measure the single dish 850um number counts to unprecedented accuracy, reducing the Poisson errors on the differential counts to approximately 4% at S_850~3mJy. With several independent fields, we investigate field-to-field variance, finding that the num...

  17. Cosmology constraints from shear peak statistics in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacprzak, T.; et al.

    2016-03-16

    Shear peak statistics has gained a lot of attention recently as a practical alternative to the two point statistics for constraining cosmological parameters. We perform a shear peak statistics analysis of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data, using weak gravitational lensing measurements from a 139 deg$^2$ field. We measure the abundance of peaks identified in aperture mass maps, as a function of their signal-to-noise ratio, in the signal-to-noise range $0<\\mathcal S / \\mathcal N<4$. To predict the peak counts as a function of cosmological parameters we use a suite of $N$-body simulations spanning 158 models with varying $\\Omega_{\\rm m}$ and $\\sigma_8$, fixing $w = -1$, $\\Omega_{\\rm b} = 0.04$, $h = 0.7$ and $n_s=1$, to which we have applied the DES SV mask and redshift distribution. In our fiducial analysis we measure $\\sigma_{8}(\\Omega_{\\rm m}/0.3)^{0.6}=0.77 \\pm 0.07$, after marginalising over the shear multiplicative bias and the error on the mean redshift of the galaxy sample. We introduce models of intrinsic alignments, blending, and source contamination by cluster members. These models indicate that peaks with $\\mathcal S / \\mathcal N>4$ would require significant corrections, which is why we do not include them in our analysis. We compare our results to the cosmological constraints from the two point analysis on the SV field and find them to be in good agreement in both the central value and its uncertainty. We discuss prospects for future peak statistics analysis with upcoming DES data.

  18. Peculiar velocities into the next generation: cosmological parameters from large surveys without bias from non-linear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Alexandra; Bridle, Sarah; Teodoro, Luis F. A.; Warren, Michael S.; Hendry, Martin

    2008-10-01

    We investigate methods to best estimate the normalization of the mass density fluctuation power spectrum (σ8) using peculiar velocity data from a survey like the six-degree Field Galaxy Velocity Survey (6dFGSv). We focus on two potential problems: (i) biases from non-linear growth of structure and (ii) the large number of velocities in the survey. Simulations of ΛCDM-like models are used to test the methods. We calculate the likelihood from a full covariance matrix of velocities averaged in grid cells. This simultaneously reduces the number of data points and smoothes out non-linearities which tend to dominate on small scales. We show how the averaging can be taken into account in the predictions in a practical way, and show the effect of the choice of cell size. We find that a cell size can be chosen that significantly reduces the non-linearities without significantly increasing the error bars on cosmological parameters. We compare our results with those from a principal components analysis following Watkins et al. and Feldman et al. to select a set of optimal moments constructed from linear combinations of the peculiar velocities that are least sensitive to the non-linear scales. We conclude that averaging in grid cells performs equally well. We find that for a survey such as 6dFGSv we can estimate σ8 with less than 3 per cent bias from non-linearities. The expected error on σ8 after marginalizing over Ωm is approximately 16 per cent.

  19. Cosmology constraints from shear peak statistics in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacprzak, T.; Kirk, D.; Friedrich, O.; Amara, A.; Refregier, A.; Marian, L.; Dietrich, J. P.; Suchyta, E.; Aleksić, J.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S. L.; Chang, C.; Eifler, T. F.; Hartley, W. G.; Huff, E. M.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Nicola, A.; Samuroff, S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Weller, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    Shear peak statistics has gained a lot of attention recently as a practical alternative to the two-point statistics for constraining cosmological parameters. We perform a shear peak statistics analysis of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data, using weak gravitational lensing measurements from a 139 deg2 field. We measure the abundance of peaks identified in aperture mass maps, as a function of their signal-to-noise ratio, in the signal-to-noise range 0analysis we measure σ8(Ωm/0.3)0.6 = 0.77 ± 0.07, after marginalizing over the shear multiplicative bias and the error on the mean redshift of the galaxy sample. We introduce models of intrinsic alignments, blending and source contamination by cluster members. These models indicate that peaks with S/N>4 would require significant corrections, which is why we do not include them in our analysis. We compare our results to the cosmological constraints from the two-point analysis on the SV field and find them to be in good agreement in both the central value and its uncertainty. We discuss prospects for future peak statistics analysis with upcoming DES data.

  20. CLUSTERING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY III PHOTOMETRIC LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE MEASUREMENT, SYSTEMATICS, AND COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Shirley; White, Martin; Schlegel, David J.; Seljak, Uros; Reid, Beth [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 50R-5045, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cuesta, Antonio; Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); De Putter, Roland [ICC, University of Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Saito, Shun [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, CA (United States); Schlafly, Eddie [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden St. MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos [Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon (CEFCA), Plaza de San Juan 1, planta 2, E-44001 Teruel (Spain); Sanchez, Ariel G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Blanton, Michael [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Skibba, Ramin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Schneider, Don [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mena, Olga [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC (Spain); Viel, Matteo, E-mail: cwho@lbl.gov [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2012-12-10

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveyed 14,555 deg{sup 2}, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present a study of galaxy clustering using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts, spanning between z = 0.45 and z = 0.65, constructed from the SDSS using methods described in Ross et al. This data set spans 11,000 deg{sup 2} and probes a volume of 3 h {sup -3} Gpc{sup 3}, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We describe in detail the construction of the survey window function and various systematics affecting our measurement. With such a large volume, high-precision cosmological constraints can be obtained given careful control and understanding of the observational systematics. We present a novel treatment of the observational systematics and its applications to the clustering signals from the data set. In this paper, we measure the angular clustering using an optimal quadratic estimator at four redshift slices with an accuracy of {approx}15%, with a bin size of {delta}{sub l} = 10 on scales of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs; at l {approx} 40-400). We also apply corrections to the power spectra due to systematics and derive cosmological constraints using the full shape of the power spectra. For a flat {Lambda}CDM model, when combined with cosmic microwave background Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7 (WMAP7) and H{sub 0} constraints from using 600 Cepheids observed by Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3; HST), we find {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.73 {+-} 0.019 and H{sub 0} to be 70.5 {+-} 1.6 s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1} km. For an open {Lambda}CDM model, when combined with WMAP7 + HST, we find {Omega}{sub K} = 0.0035 {+-} 0.0054, improved over WMAP7+HST alone by 40%. For a wCDM model, when combined with WMAP7+HST+SN, we find w = -1.071 {+-} 0.078, and H{sub 0} to be 71.3 {+-} 1.7 s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1} km, which is competitive with the latest large-scale structure constraints from large spectroscopic

  1. A thousand shadows of Andromeda: rotating planes of satellites in the Millennium-II cosmological simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ibata, Rodrigo A; Lewis, Geraint F; Martin, Nicolas F; Conn, Anthony; Elahi, Pascal; Arias, Veronica; Fernando, Nuwanthika

    2014-01-01

    In a recent contribution, Bahl \\& Baumgardt investigated the incidence of planar alignments of satellite galaxies in the Millennium-II simulation, and concluded that vast thin planes of dwarf galaxies, similar to that observed in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), occur frequently by chance in $\\Lambda$-Cold Dark Matter cosmology. However, their analysis did not capture the essential fact that the observed alignment is simultaneously radially extended, yet thin, and kinematically unusual. With the caveat that the Millennium-II simulation may not have sufficient mass resolution to identify confidently simulacra of low-luminosity dwarf galaxies, we re-examine that simulation for planar structures, using the same method as employed by Ibata et al. (2013) on the real M31 satellites. We find that 0.04\\% of host galaxies display satellite alignments that are at least as extreme as the observations, when we consider their extent, thickness and number of members rotating in the same sense. We further investigate the ang...

  2. Type II-P Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey and the Standardized Candle Method

    CERN Document Server

    D'Andrea, Chris B; Dilday, Benjamin; Frieman, Joshua A; Holtzman, Jon; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J C; Yasuda, Naoki; Cinabro, David; Jha, Saurabh; Nichol, Robert C; Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Atlee, David W; Basset, Bruce; Castander, Francisco J; Goobar, Ariel; Miquel, Ramon; Nordin, Jakob; Östman, Linda; Prieto, Jose Luis; Quimby, Robert; Riess, Adam G; Stritzinger, Maximilian

    2009-01-01

    We apply the Standardized Candle Method (SCM) for Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), which relates the velocity of the ejecta of a SN to its luminosity during the plateau, to 15 SNe II-P discovered over the three season run of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II Supernova Survey. The redshifts of these SNe - 0.027 0.01) as all of the current literature on the SCM combined. We find that the SDSS SNe have a very small intrinsic I-band dispersion (0.22 mag), which can be attributed to selection effects. When the SCM is applied to the combined SDSS-plus-literature set of SNe II-P, the dispersion increases to 0.29 mag, larger than the scatter for either set of SNe separately. We show that the standardization cannot be further improved by eliminating SNe with positive plateau decline rates, as proposed in Poznanski et al. (2009). We thoroughly examine all potential systematic effects and conclude that for the SCM to be useful for cosmology, the methods currently used to determine the Fe II velocity at day 50 mus...

  3. See Change: the Supernova Sample from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Brian; Perlmutter, Saul; Boone, Kyle; Nordin, Jakob; Rubin, David; Lidman, Chris; Deustua, Susana E.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Aldering, Greg Scott; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jee, James; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Santos, Joana; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Fassbender, Rene; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Wechsler, Risa H.; Muzzin, Adam; Willis, Jon; Boehringer, Hans; Gladders, Michael; Goobar, Ariel; Amanullah, Rahman; Hook, Isobel; Huterer, Dragan; Huang, Xiaosheng; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric; Pain, Reynald; Saunders, Clare; Suzuki, Nao; Barbary, Kyle H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Meyers, Joshua; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Sofiatti, Caroline; Wilson, Gillian; Rozo, Eduardo; Hilton, Matt; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Luther, Kyle; Yen, Mike; Fagrelius, Parker; Dixon, Samantha; Williams, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The Supernova Cosmology Project has finished executing a large (174 orbits, cycles 22-23) Hubble Space Telescope program, which has measured ~30 type Ia Supernovae above z~1 in the highest-redshift, most massive galaxy clusters known to date. Our SN Ia sample closely matches our pre-survey predictions; this sample will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z~1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, See Change will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With the primary observing campaign completed, we present the preliminary supernova sample and our path forward to the supernova cosmology results. We also compare the number of SNe Ia discovered in each cluster with our pre-survey expectations based on cluster mass and SFR estimates. Our extensive HST and ground-based campaign has already produced unique results; we have confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members known to date, confirmed the redshift of one of the most massive galaxy clusters at z~1.2 expected across the entire sky, and characterized one of the most extreme starburst environments yet known in a z~1.7 cluster. We have also discovered a lensed SN Ia at z=2.22 magnified by a factor of ~2.7, which is the highest spectroscopic redshift SN Ia currently known.

  4. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: the clustering of submillimetre galaxies in the UKIDSS UDS field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Aaron; Almaini, Omar; Chen, Chian-Chou; Smail, Ian; Arumugam, Vinodiran; Blain, Andrew; Chapin, Edward L.; Chapman, Scott C.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Cowley, William I.; Dunlop, James S.; Farrah, Duncan; Geach, James; Hartley, William G.; Ivison, Rob J.; Maltby, David T.; Michałowski, Michał J.; Mortlock, Alice; Scott, Douglas; Simpson, Chris; Simpson, James M.; van der Werf, Paul; Wild, Vivienne

    2017-01-01

    Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) are among the most luminous dusty galaxies in the Universe, but their true nature remains unclear; are SMGs the progenitors of the massive elliptical galaxies we see in the local Universe, or are they just a short-lived phase among more typical star-forming galaxies? To explore this problem further, we investigate the clustering of SMGs identified in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We use a catalogue of submillimetre (850 μm) source identifications derived using a combination of radio counterparts and colour/infrared selection to analyse a sample of 610 SMG counterparts in the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Survey (UKIDSS) Ultra Deep Survey (UDS), making this the largest high-redshift sample of these galaxies to date. Using angular cross-correlation techniques, we estimate the halo masses for this large sample of SMGs and compare them with passive and star-forming galaxies selected in the same field. We find that SMGs, on average, occupy high-mass dark matter haloes (Mhalo > 1013 M⊙) at redshifts z > 2.5, consistent with being the progenitors of massive quiescent galaxies in present-day galaxy clusters. We also find evidence of downsizing, in which SMG activity shifts to lower mass haloes at lower redshifts. In terms of their clustering and halo masses, SMGs appear to be consistent with other star-forming galaxies at a given redshift.

  5. Cosmology with photometric weak lensing surveys: Constraints with redshift tomography of convergence peaks and moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Andrea; May, Morgan; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is becoming a mature technique for constraining cosmological parameters, and future surveys will be able to constrain the dark energy equation of state w . When analyzing galaxy surveys, redshift information has proven to be a valuable addition to angular shear correlations. We forecast parameter constraints on the triplet (Ωm,w ,σ8) for a LSST-like photometric galaxy survey, using tomography of the shear-shear power spectrum, convergence peak counts and higher convergence moments. We find that redshift tomography with the power spectrum reduces the area of the 1 σ confidence interval in (Ωm,w ) space by a factor of 8 with respect to the case of the single highest redshift bin. We also find that adding non-Gaussian information from the peak counts and higher-order moments of the convergence field and its spatial derivatives further reduces the constrained area in (Ωm,w ) by factors of 3 and 4, respectively. When we add cosmic microwave background parameter priors from Planck to our analysis, tomography improves power spectrum constraints by a factor of 3. Adding moments yields an improvement by an additional factor of 2, and adding both moments and peaks improves by almost a factor of 3 over power spectrum tomography alone. We evaluate the effect of uncorrected systematic photometric redshift errors on the parameter constraints. We find that different statistics lead to different bias directions in parameter space, suggesting the possibility of eliminating this bias via self-calibration.

  6. Simulations of the WFIRST Supernova Survey and Forecasts of Cosmological Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hounsell, R. [Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept.; Scolnic, D. [Chicago U., KICP; Foley, R. J. [UC, Santa Cruz; Kessler, R. [Chicago U., KICP; Miranda, V. [Pennsylvania U.; Avelino, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Bohlin, R. C. [Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Filippenko, A. V. [UC, Berkeley; Frieman, J. [Fermilab; Jha, S. W. [Rutgers U., Piscataway; Kelly, P. L. [UC, Berkeley; Kirshner, R. P. [Xerox, Palo Alto; Mandel, K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Rest, A. [Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Riess, A. G. [Johns Hopkins U.; Rodney, S. A. [South Carolina U.; Strolger, L. [Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.

    2017-02-06

    The Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) was the highest rankedlarge space-based mission of the 2010 New Worlds, New Horizons decadal survey.It is now a NASA mission in formulation with a planned launch in themid-2020's. A primary mission objective is to precisely constrain the nature ofdark energy through multiple probes, including Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia).Here, we present the first realistic simulations of the WFIRST SN survey basedon current hardware specifications and using open-source tools. We simulate SNlight curves and spectra as viewed by the WFIRST wide-field channel (WFC)imager and integral field channel (IFC) spectrometer, respectively. We examine11 survey strategies with different time allocations between the WFC and IFC,two of which are based upon the strategy described by the WFIRST ScienceDefinition Team, which measures SN distances exclusively from IFC data. Wepropagate statistical and, crucially, systematic uncertainties to predict thedark energy task force figure of merit (DETF FoM) for each strategy. Theincrease in FoM values with SN search area is limited by the overhead times foreach exposure. For IFC-focused strategies the largest individual systematicuncertainty is the wavelength-dependent calibration uncertainty, whereas forWFC-focused strategies, it is the intrinsic scatter uncertainty. We find thatthe best IFC-focused and WFC-exclusive strategies have comparable FoM values.Even without improvements to other cosmological probes, the WFIRST SN surveyhas the potential to increase the FoM by more than an order of magnitude fromthe current values. Although the survey strategies presented here have not beenfully optimized, these initial investigations are an important step in thedevelopment of the final hardware design and implementation of the WFIRSTmission.

  7. Cosmological evolution of the Fanaroff-Riley type II source population

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y

    2008-01-01

    By combining a model for the evolution of the radio luminosity of an individual source with the radio luminosity function, we perform a multi-dimensional Monte-Carlo simulation to investigate the cosmological evolution of the Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio galaxy population by generating large artificial samples. The properties of FRII sources are required to evolve with redshift in the artificial samples to fit the observations. Either the maximum jet age or the maximum density of the jet environment or both evolve with redshift. We also study the distribution of FRII source properties as a function of redshift. From currently available data we can not constrain the shape of the distribution of environment density or age, but jet power is found to follow a power-law distribution with an exponent of approximately -2. This power-law slope does not change with redshift out to z=0.6. We also find the distribution of the pressure in the lobes of FRII sources to evolve with redshift up to $z\\sim1.2$.

  8. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: 850 μm maps, catalogues and number counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, J. E.; Dunlop, J. S.; Halpern, M.; Smail, Ian; van der Werf, P.; Alexander, D. M.; Almaini, O.; Aretxaga, I.; Arumugam, V.; Asboth, V.; Banerji, M.; Beanlands, J.; Best, P. N.; Blain, A. W.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chapin, E. L.; Chapman, S. C.; Chen, C.-C.; Chrysostomou, A.; Clarke, C.; Clements, D. L.; Conselice, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Cowley, W. I.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Eales, S.; Edge, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Gibb, A.; Harrison, C. M.; Hine, N. K.; Hughes, D.; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, M.; Jenness, T.; Jones, S. F.; Karim, A.; Koprowski, M.; Knudsen, K. K.; Lacey, C. G.; Mackenzie, T.; Marsden, G.; McAlpine, K.; McMahon, R.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Peacock, J. A.; Rigopoulou, D.; Robson, E. I.; Roseboom, I.; Rotermund, K.; Scott, Douglas; Serjeant, S.; Simpson, C.; Simpson, J. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Spaans, M.; Stanley, F.; Stevens, J. A.; Swinbank, A. M.; Targett, T.; Thomson, A. P.; Valiante, E.; Wake, D. A.; Webb, T. M. A.; Willott, C.; Zavala, J. A.; Zemcov, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present a catalogue of ˜3000 submillimetre sources detected (≥3.5σ) at 850 μm over ˜5 deg2 surveyed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). This is the largest survey of its kind at 850 μm, increasing the sample size of 850 μm selected submillimetre galaxies by an order of magnitude. The wide 850 μm survey component of S2CLS covers the extragalactic fields: UKIDSS-UDS, COSMOS, Akari-NEP, Extended Groth Strip, Lockman Hole North, SSA22 and GOODS-North. The average 1σ depth of S2CLS is 1.2 mJy beam-1, approaching the SCUBA-2 850 μm confusion limit, which we determine to be σc ≈ 0.8 mJy beam-1. We measure the 850 μm number counts, reducing the Poisson errors on the differential counts to approximately 4 per cent at S850 ≈ 3 mJy. With several independent fields, we investigate field-to-field variance, finding that the number counts on 0.5°-1° scales are generally within 50 per cent of the S2CLS mean for S850 > 3 mJy, with scatter consistent with the Poisson and estimated cosmic variance uncertainties, although there is a marginal (2σ) density enhancement in GOODS-North. The observed counts are in reasonable agreement with recent phenomenological and semi-analytic models, although determining the shape of the faint-end slope (S850 10 mJy there are approximately 10 sources per square degree, and we detect the distinctive up-turn in the number counts indicative of the detection of local sources of 850 μm emission, and strongly lensed high-redshift galaxies. All calibrated maps and the catalogue are made publicly available.

  9. Clustering of Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Photometric Luminous Galaxies: The Measurement, Systematics and Cosmological Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Shirley; Seo, Hee-Jong; de Putter, Roland; Ross, Ashley J; White, Martin; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Saito, Shun; Schlegel, David J; Schlafly, Eddie; Seljak, Uros; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Sanchez, Ariel G; Percival, Will J; Blanton, Michael; Skibba, Ramin; Schneider, Don; Reid, Beth; Mena, Olga; Viel, Matteo; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Prada, Francisco; Weaver, Benjamin; Bahcall, Neta; Bizyaev, Dimitry; Brewinton, Howard; Brinkman, Jon; da Costa, Luiz Nicolaci; Gott, John R; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Nichol, Bob; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Ross, Nicholas P; Simmons, Audrey; de Simoni, Fernando; Snedden, Stephanie; Yeche, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveyed 14,555 square degrees, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present a study of galaxy clustering using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts, spanning between $z=0.45$ and $z=0.65$, constructed from the SDSS using methods described in Ross et al. (2011). This data-set spans 11,000 square degrees and probes a volume of $3h^{-3} \\rm{Gpc}^3$, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We present a novel treatment of the observational systematics and its applications to the clustering signals from the data set. In this paper, we measure the angular clustering using an optimal quadratic estimator at 4 redshift slices with an accuracy of ~15% with bin size of delta_l = 10 on scales of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) (at l~40-400). We derive cosmological constraints using the full-shape of the power-spectra. For a flat Lambda CDM model, when combined with Cosmic Microwave Background Wilkinson Microw...

  10. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: The clustering of submillimetre galaxies in the UKIDSS UDS field

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, Aaron; Chen, Chian-Chou; Smail, Ian; Arumugam, Vinodiran; Blain, Andrew; Chapin, Edward L; Chapman, Scott C; Conselice, Christopher J; Cowley, William I; Dunlop, James S; Farrah, Duncan; Geach, James; Hartley, William G; Ivison, Rob J; Maltby, David T; Michałowski, Michał J; Mortlock, Alice; Scott, Douglas; Simpson, Chris; Simpson, James M; van der Werf, Paul; Wild, Vivienne

    2016-01-01

    Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) are among the most luminous dusty galaxies in the Universe, but their true nature remains unclear; are SMGs the progenitors of the massive elliptical galaxies we see in the local Universe, or are they just a short-lived phase among more typical star-forming galaxies? To explore this problem further, we investigate the clustering of SMGs identified in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We use a catalogue of submillimetre ($850\\mu$m) source identifications derived using a combination of radio counterparts and colour/IR selection to analyse a sample of 914 SMGs in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS), making this the largest high redshift sample of these galaxies to date. Using angular cross-correlation techniques, we estimate the halo masses for this large sample of SMGs and compare them with passive and star-forming galaxies selected in the same field. We find that SMGs, on average, occupy high-mass dark matter halos (M$_{\\text{halo}} >10^{13}$M$_{\\odot}$) at redshifts $z > 2.5$, ...

  11. Cosmological Constraints from a Combination of Galaxy Clustering & Lensing -- II. Fisher Matrix Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    More, Surhud; Cacciato, Marcello; More, Anupreeta; Mo, Houjun; Yang, Xiaohu

    2012-01-01

    We quantify the accuracy with which the cosmological parameters characterizing the energy density of matter (\\Omega_m), the amplitude of the power spectrum of matter fluctuations (\\sigma_8), the energy density of neutrinos (\\Omega_{\

  12. Lagrangian theory of structure formation in relativistic cosmology II: average properties of a generic evolution model

    CERN Document Server

    Buchert, Thomas; Wiegand, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Kinematical and dynamical properties of a generic inhomogeneous cosmological model, spatially averaged with respect to free-falling (generalized fundamental) observers, are investigated for the matter model `irrotational dust'. Paraphrasing a previous Newtonian investigation, we present a relativistic generalization of a backreaction model based on volume-averaging the `Relativistic Zel'dovich Approximation'. In this model we investigate the effect of `kinematical backreaction' on the evolution of cosmological parameters as they are defined in an averaged inhomogenous cosmology, and we show that the backreaction model interpolates between orthogonal symmetry properties by covering subcases of the plane-symmetric solution, the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi solution and the Szekeres solution. We so obtain a powerful model that lays the foundations for quantitatively addressing curvature inhomogeneities as they would be interpreted as `Dark Energy' or `Dark Matter' in a quasi-Newtonian cosmology. The present model, havi...

  13. Ca II Absorbers in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Sardane, Gendith M; Rao, Sandhya M

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a survey for CaII 3934,3969 absorption-line systems culled from ~ 95,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 and Data Release 9 quasar spectra. With 435 doublets identified in the catalog, this list is the largest CaII catalog compiled to date, spanning redshifts z = 0.3 A, is n_0=0.017 +/- 0.001. In comparison to MgII surveys, we found that only 3% of MgII systems in the SDSS have CaII, confirming that it is rare to identify CaII in quasar absorption-line surveys. We also report on some preliminary investigations of the nature of the two populations of CaII absorbers, and show that they can likely be distinguished using their MgII properties.

  14. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: The LABOCA/ACT Survey of Clusters at All Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, Robert R; Baker, Andrew J; Bond, J Richard; Crichton, Devin; Devlin, Mark J; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Huffenberger, Kevin M; Hughes, John P; Infante, Leopoldo; Lima, Marcos; Marriage, Tobias A; Menanteau, Felipe; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Schmitt, Benjamin L; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, J L; Sifón, Cristóbal; Staggs, Suzanne T; Swetz, Daniel; Weiß, Axel; Wollack, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of eleven Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect (SZE)-selected galaxy clusters (ten with new data) from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) southern survey. We have obtained new imaging from the Large APEX Bolometer Camera (345GHz; LABOCA) on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope, the Australia Telescope Compact Array (2.1GHz; ATCA), and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (250, 350, and $500\\,\\rm\\mu m$; SPIRE) on the Herschel Space Observatory. Spatially-resolved 345GHz SZE increments with integrated S/N > 5 are found in six clusters. We compute 2.1GHz number counts as a function of cluster-centric radius and find significant enhancements in the counts of bright sources at projected radii $\\theta < \\theta_{2500}$. By extrapolating in frequency, we predict that the combined signals from 2.1GHz-selected radio sources and 345GHz-selected SMGs contaminate the 148GHz SZE decrement signal by ~5% and the 345GHz SZE increment by ~18%. After removing radio source...

  15. The Sedentary Multi-Frequency Survey; 1, Statistical Identification and Cosmological Properties of HBL BL Lacs

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, P; Padovani, P

    1999-01-01

    We have assembled a multi-frequency database by cross-correlating the NVSS catalog of radio sources with the RASSBSC list of soft X-ray sources, obtaining optical magnitude estimates from the Palomar and UK Schmidt surveys as provided by the APM and COSMOS on-line services. By exploiting the nearly unique broad-band properties of High-Energy Peaked (HBL) BL Lacs we have statistically identified a sample of 218 objects that is expected to include about 85% of BL Lacs and that is therefore several times larger than all other published samples of HBLs. Using a subset (155 objects) that is radio flux limited and statistically well-defined we have derived the \\vovm distribution and the LogN-LogS of extreme HBLs (fx/fr >= 3E-10 erg/cm2/s/Jansky) down to 3.5 mJy. We find that the LogN-LogS flattens around 20 mJy and that = 0.42 +/- 0.02. This extends to the radio band earlier results, based on much smaller X-ray selected samples, about the anomalous cosmological observational properties of HBL BL Lacs. A comparison...

  16. SED-dependent Galactic Extinction Prescription for Euclid and Future Cosmological Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Galametz, Audrey; Paltani, Stephane; Apostolakos, Nikolaos; Dubath, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of upcoming cosmological surveys will depend on the accurate estimates of photometric redshifts. In the framework of the implementation of the photo-z algorithm for Euclid, we are exploring new avenues to improve template-fitting methods. The paper focusses on the prescription of the extinction of source light by dust in the Milky Way. Since Galactic extinction strongly correlates with wavelength and photometry is commonly obtained in broad-band filters, the amount of absorption depends on the source SED, a point often neglected as the SED is not known a-priori. A consequence of this is that the observed E(B-V) (=A_B-A_V) will be different from the E(B-V) used to normalise the absorption law k_lambda (=A_lambda/E(B-V)). Band-pass corrections are required to renormalise the law for a given SED. We assess the band-pass corrections of a range of SEDs and find they vary by up to 20%. We investigate how dust-to-reddening scaling factors depend of the sources used for their calibration. We derive scalin...

  17. Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Extragalactic Sources at 148 GHz in the 2008 Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Marriage, T A; Lin, Y -T; Marsden, D; Nolta, M R; Partridge, B; Ade, P A R; Aguirre, P; Amiri, M; Appel, J W; Barrientos, L F; Battistelli, E S; Bond, J R; Brown, B; Burger, B; Chervenak, J; Das, S; Devlin, M J; Dicker, S R; Doriese, W B; Dunkley, J; Dunner, R; Essinger-Hileman, T; Fisher, R P; Fowler, J W; Hajian, A; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Hilton, G C; Hilton, M; Hincks, A D; Hlozek, R; Huffenberger, K M; Hughes, D H; Hughes, J P; Infante, L; Irwin, K D; Kaul, M; Klein, J; Kosowsky, A; Lau, J M; Limon, M; Lupton, R H; Martocci, K; Mauskopf, P; Menanteau, F; Moodley, K; Moseley, H; Netterfield, C B; Niemack, M D; Page, L A; Parker, L; Quintana, H; Reid, B; Sehgal, N; Sherwin, B D; Sievers, J; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Swetz, D S; Switzer, E R; Thornton, R; Trac, H; Tucker, C; Warne, R; Wilson, G; Wollack, E; Zhao, Y

    2010-01-01

    We report on extragalactic sources detected in a 455 square-degree map of the southern sky made with data at a frequency of 148 GHz from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope 2008 observing season. We provide a catalog of 157 sources with flux densities spanning two orders of magnitude: from 15 to 1500 mJy. Comparison to other catalogs shows that 98% of the ACT detections correspond to sources detected at lower radio frequencies. Three of the sources appear to be associated with the brightest cluster galaxies of low redshift X-ray selected galaxy clusters. Estimates of the radio to mm-wave spectral indices and differential counts of the sources further bolster the hypothesis that they are nearly all radio sources, and that their emission is not dominated by re-emission from warm dust. In a bright (>50 mJy) 148 GHz-selected sample with complete cross-identifications from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey, we observe an average steepening of the spectra between 5, 20, and 148 GHz with median spectral indices of $...

  18. The Supernova Legacy Survey 3-year sample: Type Ia Supernovae photometric distances and cosmological constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Guy, J; Conley, A; Regnault, N; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Fouchez, D; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perrett, K M; Pritchet, C J; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Balam, D; Baumont, S; Ellis, R S; Fabbro, S; Fakhouri, H K; Fourmanoit, N; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Graham, M L; Hsiao, E; Kronborg, T; Lidman, C; Mourao, A M; Perlmutter, S; Ripoche, P; Suzuki, N; Walker, E S

    2010-01-01

    We present photometric properties and distance measurements of 252 high redshift Type Ia supernovae (0.15 < z < 1.1) discovered during the first three years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). These events were detected and their multi-colour light curves measured using the MegaPrime/MegaCam instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), by repeatedly imaging four one-square degree fields in four bands. Follow-up spectroscopy was performed at the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes to confirm the nature of the supernovae and to measure their redshifts. Systematic uncertainties arising from light curve modeling are studied, making use of two techniques to derive the peak magnitude, shape and colour of the supernovae, and taking advantage of a precise calibration of the SNLS fields. A flat LambdaCDM cosmological fit to 231 SNLS high redshift Type Ia supernovae alone gives Omega_M = 0.211 +/- 0.034(stat) +/- 0.069(sys). The dominant systematic uncertainty comes from uncertainties in the photometri...

  19. Negative Energy Cosmology and the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Prokopec, Tomislav

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that string theories naturally compactify on anti-de Sitter spaces, and yet cosmological observations show no evidence of a negative cosmological constant in the early Universe's evolution. In this letter we present two simple nonlocal modifications of the standard Friedmann cosmology that can lead to observationally viable cosmologies with an initial (negative) cosmological constant. The nonlocal operators we include are toy models for the quantum cosmological backreaction. In Model I an initial quasiperiodic oscillatory epoch is followed by inflation and a late time matter era, representing a dark matter candidate. The backreaction in Model II quickly compensates the negative cosmological term such that the Ricci curvature scalar rapidly approaches zero, and the Universe ends up in a late time radiation era.

  20. Cosmology from Large Scale Galaxy Clustering and Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, J.; et al.

    2016-04-26

    We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as $\\Omega_m = 0.31 \\pm 0.09$ and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as $\\sigma_8 = 0.74 +\\pm 0.13$ after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into $S_8$ = $\\sigma_8(\\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.16} = 0.74 \\pm 0.12$ for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 < z < 0.5, while $S_8 = 0.78 \\pm 0.09$ using two bins over the range 0.2 < z < 0.5. We study the robustness of the results under changes in the data vectors, modelling and systematics treatment, including photometric redshift and shear calibration uncertainties, and find consistency in the derived cosmological parameters. We show that our results are consistent with previous cosmological analyses from DES and other data sets and conclude with a joint analysis of DES angular clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Planck CMB data, Baryon Accoustic Oscillations and Supernova type Ia measurements.

  1. Cosmology from large-scale galaxy clustering and galaxy–galaxy lensing with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, J.; Sánchez, C.; Clampitt, J.; Blazek, J.; Crocce, M.; Jain, B.; Zuntz, J.; Amara, A.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; DeRose, J.; Dodelson, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gaztanaga, E.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W. G.; Kacprzak, T.; Kirk, D.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; Park, Y.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Wechsler, R. H.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D' Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-10-05

    We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as $\\Omega_m = 0.31 \\pm 0.09$ and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as $\\sigma_8 = 0.74 +\\pm 0.13$ after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into $S_8$ = $\\sigma_8(\\Omega_m/0.3)^{0.16} = 0.74 \\pm 0.12$ for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 < z < 0.5, while $S_8 = 0.78 \\pm 0.09$ using two bins over the range 0.2 < z < 0.5. We study the robustness of the results under changes in the data vectors, modelling and systematics treatment, including photometric redshift and shear calibration uncertainties, and find consistency in the derived cosmological parameters. We show that our results are consistent with previous cosmological analyses from DES and other data sets and conclude with a joint analysis of DES angular clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Planck CMB data, Baryon Accoustic Oscillations and Supernova type Ia measurements.

  2. Cosmology from large-scale galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, J.; Sánchez, C.; Clampitt, J.; Blazek, J.; Crocce, M.; Jain, B.; Zuntz, J.; Amara, A.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; DeRose, J.; Dodelson, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gaztanaga, E.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W. G.; Kacprzak, T.; Kirk, D.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; Park, Y.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Wechsler, R. H.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 deg2 contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large-scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Ωm = 0.31 ± 0.09 and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as σ8 = 0.74 ± 0.13 after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into S8 ≡ σ8(Ωm/0.3)0.16 = 0.74 ± 0.12 for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 < z < 0.5, while S8 = 0.78 ± 0.09 using two bins over the range 0.2 < z < 0.5. We study the robustness of the results under changes in the data vectors, modelling and systematics treatment, including photometric redshift and shear calibration uncertainties, and find consistency in the derived cosmological parameters. We show that our results are consistent with previous cosmological analyses from DES and other data sets and conclude with a joint analysis of DES angular clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Planck Cosmic Microwave Background data, baryon accoustic oscillations and Supernova Type Ia measurements.

  3. SED-dependent galactic extinction prescription for Euclid and future cosmological surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galametz, Audrey; Saglia, Roberto; Paltani, Stéphane; Apostolakos, Nikolaos; Dubath, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The outcome of upcoming cosmological surveys will depend on the accurate estimates of photometric redshifts. In the framework of the implementation of the photometric redshift algorithm for the ESA Euclid mission, we are exploring new avenues to improve current template-fitting methods. This paper focusses in particular on the prescription of the extinction of a source light by dust in the Milky Way. Since Galactic extinction strongly correlates with wavelength and photometry is commonly obtained through broad-band filters, the amount of absorption depends on the source intrinsic spectral energy distribution (SED), a point however neglected as the source SED is not known a-priori. A consequence of this dependence is that the observed EB-V (=AB-AV) will in general be different from the EB-V used to normalise the Galactic absorption law kλ (=Aλ/EB-V). Band-pass corrections are thus required to adequately renormalise the law for a given SED. In this work, we assess the band-pass corrections of a range of SEDs and find they vary by up to 20%. We have investigated how neglecting these corrections biases the calibration of dust into reddening map and how the scaling of the map depends of the sources used for its calibration. We derive dust-to-reddening scaling factors from the colour excesses of z 0.1, 8% of the Euclid Wide survey), the variations in corrections can be up to 0.1 mag in the "bluer" optical filters (ugr) and up to 0.04 mag in the near-infrared filters. We find that an inaccurate correction of Galactic extinction critically affects photometric redshift estimates. In particular, for high extinction lines of sights and z consideration the dependence of extinction with SED.

  4. A Type II Supernova Hubble Diagram from the CSP-I, SDSS-II, and SNLS Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Hamuy, M.; Galbany, L.; Anderson, J. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Carlberg, R. G.; Sullivan, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. Andrew; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Folatelli, G.; Pritchet, C.; Basa, S.

    2017-02-01

    The coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will restrict spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence new methods based solely on photometric data must be developed. Here, we construct a complete Hubble diagram of Type II supernovae (SNe II) combining data from three different samples: the Carnegie Supernova Project-I, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II SN, and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Applying the Photometric Color Method (PCM) to 73 SNe II with a redshift range of 0.01–0.5 and with no spectral information, we derive an intrinsic dispersion of 0.35 mag. A comparison with the Standard Candle Method (SCM) using 61 SNe II is also performed and an intrinsic dispersion in the Hubble diagram of 0.27 mag, i.e., 13% in distance uncertainties, is derived. Due to the lack of good statistics at higher redshifts for both methods, only weak constraints on the cosmological parameters are obtained. However, assuming a flat universe and using the PCM, we derive the universe’s matter density: {{{Ω }}}m={0.32}-0.21+0.30 providing a new independent evidence for dark energy at the level of two sigma. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes, with the du Pont and Swope telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program N-2005A-Q-11, GN-2005B-Q-7, GN-2006A-Q-7, GS-2005A-Q-11, GS-2005B-Q-6, and GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programmes 076.A-0156,078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  5. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: Cosmological neutrino mass constraint from blue high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Riemer--Sørensen, Signe; Parkinson, David; Davis, Tamara M; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Contreras, Carlos; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Croton, Darren; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, I-hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, D Christopher; Pimbblet, Kevin; Poole, Gregory B; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted K; Yee, H K C

    2011-01-01

    The absolute neutrino mass scale is currently unknown, but can be constrained from cosmology. The WiggleZ high redshift star-forming blue galaxy sample is less sensitive to systematics from non-linear structure formation, redshift-space distortions and galaxy bias than previous surveys. We obtain a upper limit on the sum of neutrino masses of 0.60eV (95% confidence) for WiggleZ+Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. Combining with priors on the Hubble Parameter and the baryon acoustic oscillation scale gives an upper limit of 0.29eV, which is the strongest neutrino mass constraint derived from spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys.

  6. Peaks in the cosmological density field: parameter constraints from 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey data

    CERN Document Server

    De, S

    2009-01-01

    We use the number density of peaks in the smoothed cosmological density field taken from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey to constrain parameters related to the power spectrum of mass fluctuations, n (the spectral index), dn/d(lnk) (rolling in the spectral index), and the neutrino mass, m_nu. In a companion paper we use N-body simulations to study how the peak density responds to changes in the power spectrum, the presence of redshift distortions and the relationship between galaxies and dark matter halos. In the present paper we make measurements of the peak density from 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey data, for a range of smoothing filter scales from 4-33 h^-1 Mpc. We use these measurements to constrain the cosmological parameters, finding n=1.36 (+0.75)(-0.64), m_nu < 1.76 eV, dn/d(lnk)=-0.012 (+0.192)(-0.208), at the 68 % confidence level, where m_nu is the total mass of three massive neutrinos. At 95% confidence we find m_nu< 2.48 eV. These measurements represent an alternative way to constrain cosmologic...

  7. Cosmology from large scale galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, J.; Sánchez, C.; Clampitt, J.; Blazek, J.; Crocce, M.; Jain, B.; Zuntz, J.; Amara, A.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; DeRose, J.; Dodelson, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gaztanaga, E.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Hartley, W. G.; Kacprzak, T.; Kirk, D.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; Park, Y.; Ross, A. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Wechsler, R. H.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-10-01

    We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Ωm = 0.31 ± 0.09 and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as σ8 = 0.74 ± 0.13 after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into S8 ≡ σ8(Ωm/0.3)0.16 = 0.74 ± 0.12 for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 CMB data, Baryon Accoustic Oscillations and Supernova type Ia measurements.

  8. Multi-frequency survey of background radiations of the Universe. The "Cosmological Gene" project. First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parijskij, Yu. N.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Nizhel'Skii, N. A.; Bursov, N. N.; Berlin, A. B.; Grechkin, A. A.; Zharov, V. I.; Zhekanis, G. V.; Majorova, E. K.; Semenova, T. A.; Stolyarov, V. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Kratov, D. V.; Udovitskii, R. Yu.; Khaikin, V. B.

    2011-10-01

    The results of the first stage of the "Cosmological Gene" project of the Russian Academy of Sciences are reported. These results consist in the accumulation of multi-frequency data in 31 frequency channels in the wavelength interval 1-55 cm with maximum achievable statistical sensitivity limited by the noise of background radio sources at all wavelengths exceeding 1.38 cm. The survey region is determined by constraints 00 h microwave background are reported as well as the contribution of these noise components in millimeter-wave experiments to be performed in the nearest years. The role of dipole radio emission of fullerene-type dust nanostructures is shown to be small. The most precise estimates of the role of background radio sources with inverted spectra are given and these sources are shown to create no serious interference in experiments. The average spectral indices of the weakest sources of the NVSS and FIRST catalogs are estimated. The "saturation" data for all wavelengths allowed a constraint to be imposed on the Sunyaev-Zeldovich noise (the SZ noise) at all wavelengths, and made it possible to obtain independent estimates of the average sky temperature from sources, substantially weaker than those listed in the NVSS catalog. These estimates are inconsistent with the existence of powerful extragalactic synchrotron background associated with radio sources. Appreciable "quadrupole" anisotropy in is detected in the distribution of the spectral index of the synchrotron radiation of the Galaxy, and this anisotropy should be taken into account when estimating the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on small l. All the results are compared to the results obtained by foreign researchers in recent years.

  9. The Effect of Peculiar Velocities on Supernova Cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Tamara Maree; Hui, Lam; Frieman, Joshua A.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the effect that peculiar velocities have on the cosmological inferences we make using luminosity distance indicators, such as Type Ia supernovae. In particular we study the corrections required to account for (1) our own motion, (2) correlations in galaxy motions, and (3) a possible...... local under- or overdensity. For all of these effects we present a case study showing the impact on the cosmology derived by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN Survey). Correcting supernova (SN) redshifts for the cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole slightly overcorrects...

  10. String cosmology in LRS Bianchi type-II dusty Universe with time-decaying vacuum energy density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hassan Amirhashchi; Hosein Mohamadian

    2012-04-01

    A model of a cloud formed by massive strings is used as a source of LRS Bianchi type-II with time-decaying vacuum energy density . To construct string cosmological models, we have used the energy–momentum tensor for such strings as formulated by Letelier (1983). The high nonlinear field equations have been solved for two types of strings: (i) massive string and (ii) Nambu string. The expansion in the model is assumed to be proportional to the shear . This condition leads to $A = B^m$, where and are the metric coefficients, is a constant and is an integrating constant. Our models are in accelerating phase which is consistent with the recent observations of supernovae type-Ia. The physical and geometrical behaviour of these models are also discussed.

  11. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: The Impact of Galaxy Neighbours on Weak Lensing Cosmology with im3shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuroff, S.; et al.

    2017-08-04

    We use a suite of simulated images based on Year 1 of the Dark Energy Survey to explore the impact of galaxy neighbours on shape measurement and shear cosmology. The hoopoe image simulations include realistic blending, galaxy positions, and spatial variations in depth and PSF properties. Using the im3shape maximum-likelihood shape measurement code, we identify four mechanisms by which neighbours can have a non-negligible influence on shear estimation. These effects, if ignored, would contribute a net multiplicative bias of $m \\sim 0.03 - 0.09$ in the DES Y1 im3shape catalogue, though the precise impact will be dependent on both the measurement code and the selection cuts applied. This can be reduced to percentage level or less by removing objects with close neighbours, at a cost to the effective number density of galaxies $n_\\mathrm{eff}$ of 30%. We use the cosmological inference pipeline of DES Y1 to explore the cosmological implications of neighbour bias and show that omitting blending from the calibration simulation for DES Y1 would bias the inferred clustering amplitude $S_8\\equiv \\sigma_8 (\\Omega _\\mathrm{m} /0.3)^{0.5}$ by $2 \\sigma$ towards low values. Finally, we use the hoopoe simulations to test the effect of neighbour-induced spatial correlations in the multiplicative bias. We find the impact on the recovered $S_8$ of ignoring such correlations to be subdominant to statistical error at the current level of precision.

  12. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: Cosmological neutrino mass constraint from blue high-redshift galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Riemer-Sørensen, Signe; Blake, Chris; Parkinson, David; Davis, Tamara M.; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Contreras, Carlos; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Croton, Darren; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl

    2011-01-01

    The absolute neutrino mass scale is currently unknown, but can be constrained from cosmology. The WiggleZ high redshift star-forming blue galaxy sample is less sensitive to systematics from non-linear structure formation, redshift-space distortions and galaxy bias than previous surveys. We obtain a upper limit on the sum of neutrino masses of 0.60eV (95% confidence) for WiggleZ+Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. Combining with priors on the Hubble Parameter and the baryon acoustic oscillat...

  13. Dynamics and chaos in the unified scalar field cosmology II - in a box

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the global dynamics of unified dark matter cosmological models and analyze it in a new dynamical system setting. In particular, by defining a suitable set of variables we obtain a bounded variable space, a feature that allows a better control of the critical elements of the system. First, we give a comprehensive cosmological interpretation of the critical points. Then, we turn our focus on particular representative trajectories with physically motivated initial conditions studied in the first paper of the series, and we discuss how the scale factor relates to the equation of state parameter. We review and complement these results in the light of the new variable approach by discussing the issue whether the system is chaotic or not.

  14. Status of the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Matthew; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Alcock, Charles; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Castro, Joel; Chen, Wen Ping; Chu, You-Hua; Cook, Kem H.; Geary, John C.; Huang, Chung-Kai; Kim, Dae-Won; Norton, Timothy; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Yen, WeiLing; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Figueroa, Liliana

    2016-10-01

    The Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II) will aim to detect occultations of stars by small (~1 km diameter) objects in the Kuiper Belt and beyond. Such events are very rare ($Construction of the site began in the fall of 2013, and the survey will begin in the summer of 2017. This poster will provide an update on the status of the survey development and the schedule leading to the beginning of survey operations.

  15. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; C. Becker, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS S...

  16. The Philosophy of Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamcham, Khalil; Silk, Joseph; Barrow, John D.; Saunders, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Part I. Issues in the Philosophy of Cosmology: 1. Cosmology, cosmologia and the testing of cosmological theories George F. R. Ellis; 2. Black holes, cosmology and the passage of time: three problems at the limits of science Bernard Carr; 3. Moving boundaries? – comments on the relationship between philosophy and cosmology Claus Beisbart; 4. On the question why there exists something rather than nothing Roderich Tumulka; Part II. Structures in the Universe and the Structure of Modern Cosmology: 5. Some generalities about generality John D. Barrow; 6. Emergent structures of effective field theories Jean-Philippe Uzan; 7. Cosmological structure formation Joel R. Primack; 8. Formation of galaxies Joseph Silk; Part III. Foundations of Cosmology: Gravity and the Quantum: 9. The observer strikes back James Hartle and Thomas Hertog; 10. Testing inflation Chris Smeenk; 11. Why Boltzmann brains do not fluctuate into existence from the de Sitter vacuum Kimberly K. Boddy, Sean M. Carroll and Jason Pollack; 12. Holographic inflation revised Tom Banks; 13. Progress and gravity: overcoming divisions between general relativity and particle physics and between physics and HPS J. Brian Pitts; Part IV. Quantum Foundations and Quantum Gravity: 14. Is time's arrow perspectival? Carlo Rovelli; 15. Relational quantum cosmology Francesca Vidotto; 16. Cosmological ontology and epistemology Don N. Page; 17. Quantum origin of cosmological structure and dynamical reduction theories Daniel Sudarsky; 18. Towards a novel approach to semi-classical gravity Ward Struyve; Part V. Methodological and Philosophical Issues: 19. Limits of time in cosmology Svend E. Rugh and Henrik Zinkernagel; 20. Self-locating priors and cosmological measures Cian Dorr and Frank Arntzenius; 21. On probability and cosmology: inference beyond data? Martin Sahlén; 22. Testing the multiverse: Bayes, fine-tuning and typicality Luke A. Barnes; 23. A new perspective on Einstein's philosophy of cosmology Cormac O

  17. Bianchi Type-II String Cosmological Models in Normal Gauge for Lyra's Manifold with Constant Deceleration Parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Shilpi; Pradhan, Anirudh

    2010-01-01

    The present study deals with a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi-II cosmological models representing massive strings in normal gauge for Lyra's manifold by applying the variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter that yields a constant value of deceleration parameter. The variation law for Hubble's parameter generates two types of solutions for the average scale factor, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential form. Using these two forms, Einstein's modified field equations are solved separately that correspond to expanding singular and non-singular models of the universe respectively. The energy-momentum tensor for such string as formulated by Letelier (1983) is used to construct massive string cosmological models for which we assume that the expansion ($\\theta$) in the model is proportional to the component $\\sigma^{1}_{~1}$ of the shear tensor $\\sigma^{j}_{i}$. This condition leads to $A = (BC)^{m}$, where A, B and C are the metric coefficients and m is proportionality cons...

  18. Multiwavelength Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plionis, M.

    2004-07-01

    The recent scientific efforts in Astrophysics & Cosmology have brought a revolution to our understanding of the Cosmos. Amazing results is the outcome of amazing experiments! The huge scientific, technological & financial effort that has gone into building the 10-m class telescopes as well as many space and balloon observatories, essential to observe the multitude of cosmic phenomena in their manifestations at different wavelengths, from gamma-rays to the millimetre and the radio, has given and is still giving its fruits of knowledge. These recent scientific achievements in Observational and Theoretical Cosmology were presented in the "Multiwavelength Cosmology" conference that took place on beautiful Mykonos island in the Aegean between 17 and 20 June 2003. More than 180 Cosmologists from all over the world gathered for a four-day intense meeting in which recent results from large ground based surveys (AAT/2-df, SLOAN) and space missions (WMAP, Chandra, XMM, ISO, HST) were presented and debated, providing a huge impetus to our knowledge of the Cosmos. The future of the subject (experiments, and directions of research) was also discussed. The conference was devoted mostly on the constraints on Cosmological models and galaxy formation theories that arise from the study of the high redshift Universe, from clusters of galaxies, and their evolution, from the cosmic microwave background, the large-scale structure and star-formation history. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-1971-8

  19. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    CERN Document Server

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Percival, Will J; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2016-01-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new FFT-based estimators, we measure the power spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles l > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular diameter distance, the Hubble parameter, and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full shape clustering measurements in combination with CMB and SN Ia data. Assuming a {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, we constra...

  20. First Results of The Konkoly Blazhko Survey II

    CERN Document Server

    Sódor, Á; Molnár, L; Szeidl, B; Hurta, Zs; Bakos, G Á; Hartman, J; Béky, B; Noyes, R W; Sasselov, D; Mazeh, T; Bartus, J; Belucz, B; Hajdu, G; Kővári, Zs; Kun, E; Nagy, I; Posztobányi, K; Smitola, P; Vida, K

    2012-01-01

    The two parts of the Konkoly Blazhko Survey (KBS I and II) are introduced. The most important preliminary findings of the second part are presented in comparison to the results of the first part. Two interesting cases of very strong modulation from the KBS II are also shown.

  1. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Chen; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter M; Hogan, Craig J; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marshall, Jennifer L; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C; Prieto, Jose Luis; Riess, Adam G; Richmond, Michael W; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Takanashi, Naohiro; Tokita, Kouichi; van der Heyden, Kurt; Yasuda, Naoki; Assef, Roberto J; Barentine, John; Bender, Ralf; Blandford, Roger D; Bremer, Malcolm; Brewington, Howard; Collins, Chris A; Crotts, Arlin; Dembicky, Jack; Eastman, Jason; Edge, Alastair; Elson, Ed; Eyler, Michael E; Filippenko, Alexei V; Foley, Ryan J; Frank, Stephan; Goobar, Ariel; Harvanek, Michael; Hopp, Ulrich; Ihara, Yutaka; Kahn, Steven; Ketzeback, William; Kleinman, Scott J; Kollatschny, Wolfram; Krzesiński, Jurek; Leloudas, Giorgos; Long, Daniel C; Lucey, John; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMillan, Russet J; Morgan, Christopher W; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nitta, Atsuko; Ostman, Linda; Pan, Kaike; Romer, A Kathy; Saurage, Gabrelle; Schlesinger, Katie; Snedden, Stephanie A; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Watson, Linda C; Watters, Shannon; Wheeler, J Craig; York, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05 - 0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existi...

  2. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert

    2008-03-25

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

  3. PKDGRAV3: Beyond Trillion Particle Cosmological Simulations for the Next Era of Galaxy Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Potter, Douglas; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-01-01

    We report on the successful completion of a 2 trillion particle cosmological simulation to z=0 run on the Piz Daint supercomputer (CSCS, Switzerland), using 4000+ GPU nodes for a little less than 80h of wall-clock time or 350,000 node hours. Using multiple benchmarks and performance measurements on the US Oak Ridge National Laboratory Titan supercomputer, we demonstrate that our code PKDGRAV3, delivers, to our knowledge, the fastest time-to-solution for large-scale cosmological N-body simulations. This was made possible by using the Fast Multipole Method in conjunction with individual and adaptive particle time steps, both deployed efficiently (and for the first time) on supercomputers with GPU-accelerated nodes. The very low memory footprint of PKDGRAV3 allowed us to run the first ever benchmark with 8 trillion particles on Titan, and to achieve perfect scaling up to 18000 nodes and a peak performance of 10 Pflops.

  4. Beyond Einstein Gravity A Survey of Gravitational Theories for Cosmology and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Beyond Einstein’s Gravity is a graduate level introduction to extended theories of gravity and cosmology, including variational principles, the weak-field limit, gravitational waves, mathematical tools, exact solutions, as well as cosmological and astrophysical applications. The book provides a critical overview of the research in this area and unifies the existing literature using a consistent notation. Although the results apply in principle to all alternative gravities, a special emphasis is on scalar-tensor and f(R) theories. They were studied by theoretical physicists from early on, and in the 1980s they appeared in attempts to renormalize General Relativity and in models of the early universe. Recently, these theories have seen a new lease of life, in both their metric and metric-affine versions, as models of the present acceleration of the universe without introducing the mysterious and exotic dark energy. The dark matter problem can also be addressed in extended gravity. These applications are contr...

  5. The Supernova Legacy Survey 3-year sample: Type Ia supernovae photometric distances and cosmological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, J.; Sullivan, M.; Conley, A.; Regnault, N.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Fouchez, D.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K. M.; Pritchet, C. J.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Balam, D.; Baumont, S.; Ellis, R. S.; Fabbro, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fourmanoit, N.; González-Gaitán, S.; Graham, M. L.; Hsiao, E.; Kronborg, T.; Lidman, C.; Mourao, A. M.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Suzuki, N.; Walker, E. S.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: We present photometric properties and distance measurements of 252 high redshift Type Ia supernovae (0.15 instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), by repeatedly imaging four one-square degree fields in four bands. Follow-up spectroscopy was performed at the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes to confirm the nature of the supernovae and to measure their redshifts. Methods: Systematic uncertainties arising from light curve modeling are studied, making use of two techniques to derive the peak magnitude, shape and colour of the supernovae, and taking advantage of a precise calibration of the SNLS fields. Results: A flat ΛCDM cosmological fit to 231 SNLS high redshift type Ia supernovae alone gives Ω_M = 0.211 ± 0.034(stat) ± 0.069(sys). The dominant systematic uncertainty comes from uncertainties in the photometric calibration. Systematic uncertainties from light curve fitters come next with a total contribution of ±0.026 on Ω_M. No clear evidence is found for a possible evolution of the slope (β) of the colour-luminosity relation with redshift. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory using the Very Large Telescope on the Cerro Paranal (ESO Large Programme 171.A-0486 & 176.A-0589). Based on observations (programs GS-2003B-Q-8, GN-2003B-Q-9, GS-2004A-Q-11, GN-2004A-Q-19, GS-2004B-Q-31, GN-2004B-Q-16, GS-2005A-Q-11, GN-2005A-Q-11, GS-2005B-Q-6, GN-2005B-Q-7, GN-2006A-Q-7, GN-2006B

  6. The cosmological significance of Low Surface Brightness galaxies found in a deep blind neutral-hydrogen survey

    CERN Document Server

    Minchin, R F; Parker, Q A; Boyce, P J; De Blok, W J G; Banks, G D; Ekers, R D; Freeman, K C; García, D A; Gibson, B K; Grossi, M; Haynes, R F; Knezek, P M; Lang, R H; Malin, D F; Price, R M; Putman, M E; Stewart, I M; Wright, A E

    2004-01-01

    We have placed limits on the cosmological significance of gas-rich low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies as a proportion of the total population of gas-rich galaxies by carrying out a very deep survey (HIDEEP) for neutral hydrogen (HI) with the Parkes multibeam system. Such a survey avoids the surface-brightness selection effects that limit the usefulness of optical surveys for finding LSB galaxies. To complement the HIDEEP survey we have digitally stacked eight 1-hour R-band Tech Pan films from the UK Schmidt Telescope covering 36 square degrees of the survey area to reach a very deep isophotal limit of 26.5 R mag/sq. arcsec. At this level, we find that all of the 129 HI sources within this area have optical counterparts and that 107 of them can be identified with individual galaxies. We have used the properties of the galaxies identified as the optical counterparts of the HI sources to estimate the significance of LSB galaxies (defined to be those at least 1.5 magnitudes dimmer in effective surface-brightne...

  7. The CLASS blazar survey - II. Optical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caccianiga, A; Marcha, MJ; Anton, S; Mack, KH; Neeser, MJ

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the optical properties of the objects selected in the CLASS blazar survey. Because an optical spectrum is now available for 70 per cent of the 325 sources present in the sample, a spectral classification, based on the appearance of the emission/absorption lines, is possible. A wi

  8. The CLASS blazar survey - II. Optical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caccianiga, A; Marcha, MJ; Anton, S; Mack, KH; Neeser, MJ

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the optical properties of the objects selected in the CLASS blazar survey. Because an optical spectrum is now available for 70 per cent of the 325 sources present in the sample, a spectral classification, based on the appearance of the emission/absorption lines, is possible. A

  9. Complete Hamiltonian analysis of cosmological perturbations at all orders II: non-canonical scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Debottam; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we present a consistent Hamiltonian analysis of cosmological perturbations for generalized non-canonical scalar fields. In order to do so, we introduce a new phase-space variable that is uniquely defined for different non-canonical scalar fields. We also show that this is the simplest and efficient way of expressing the Hamiltonian. We extend the Hamiltonian approach of [1] to non-canonical scalar field and obtain an unique expression of speed of sound in terms of phase-space variable. In order to invert generalized phase-space Hamilton's equations to Euler-Lagrange equations of motion, we prescribe a general inversion formulae and show that our approach for non-canonical scalar field is consistent. We also obtain the third and fourth order interaction Hamiltonian for generalized non-canonical scalar fields and briefly discuss the extension of our method to generalized Galilean scalar fields.

  10. Complete Hamiltonian analysis of cosmological perturbations at all orders II: Non-canonical scalar field

    CERN Document Server

    Nandi, Debottam

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a consistent Hamiltonian analysis of cosmological perturbations for generalized non-canonical scalar fields. In order to do so, we introduce a new phase-space variable that is uniquely defined for different non-canonical scalar fields. We also show that this is the simplest and efficient way of expressing the Hamiltonian. We extend the Hamiltonian approach of [arXiv:1512.02539] to non-canonical scalar field and obtain a new definition of speed of sound in phase-space. In order to invert generalized phase-space Hamilton's equations to Euler-Lagrange equations of motion, we prescribe a general inversion formulae and show that our approach for non-canonical scalar field is consistent. We also obtain the third and fourth order interaction Hamiltonian for generalized non-canonical scalar fields and briefly discuss the extension of our method to generalized Galilean scalar fields.

  11. Cosmology from large scale galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    CERN Document Server

    Kwan, Juliana; Clampitt, Joseph; Blazek, Jonathan; Crocce, Martin; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Zuntz, Joe; Amara, Adam; Becker, Matthew; Bernstein, Gary; Bonnett, Christopher; DeRose, Joseph; Dodelson, Scott; Eifler, Tim; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Gruen, Daniel; Hartley, Will; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Kirk, Donnacha; Krause, Elisabeth; MacCrann, Niall; Miquel, Ramon; Park, Youngsoo; Ross, Ashley; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli; Sheldon, Erin; Troxel, Michael A; Wechsler, Risa; Abbott, Tim; Abdalla, Filipe; Allam, Sahar; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Brooks, David; Burke, David; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Cunha, Carlos; D'Andrea, Chris; da Costa, Luiz; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, H Thomas; Dietrich, Jörg; Doel, Peter; Evrard, August; Fernandez, Enrique; Finley, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Frieman, Josh; Gerdes, David; Gruendl, Robert; Gutierrez, Gaston; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David; Jarvis, Mike; Kuehn, Kyler; Lahav, Ofer; Lima, Marcos; Maia, Marcio; Marshall, Jennifer; Martini, Paul; Melchior, Peter; Mohr, Joe; Nichol, Robert; Nord, Brian; Plazas, Andres; Reil, Kevin; Romer, Kathy; Roodman, Aaron; Sanchez, Eusebio; Scarpine, Vic; Sevilla, Ignacio; Smith, R Chris; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly; Tarle, Gregory; Thomas, Daniel; Vikram, Vinu; Walker, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Omega_m = 0.31 +/- 0.09 and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as sigma_8 = 0.74 +/- 0.13 after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into S_8 = sigma_8(Omega_m/0.3)^{0.16} = 0.74 +/- 0.12 for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35

  12. Neutrino masses and cosmological parameters from a Euclid-like survey: Markov Chain Monte Carlo forecasts including theoretical errors

    CERN Document Server

    Audren, Benjamin; Bird, Simeon; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Viel, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    We present forecasts for the accuracy of determining the parameters of a minimal cosmological model and the total neutrino mass based on combined mock data for a future Euclid-like galaxy survey and Planck. We consider two different galaxy surveys: a spectroscopic redshift survey and a cosmic shear survey. We make use of the Monte Carlo Markov Chains (MCMC) technique and assume two sets of theoretical errors. The first error is meant to account for uncertainties in the modelling of the effect of neutrinos on the non-linear galaxy power spectrum and we assume this error to be fully correlated in Fourier space. The second error is meant to parametrize the overall residual uncertainties in modelling the non-linear galaxy power spectrum at small scales, and is conservatively assumed to be uncorrelated and to increase with the ratio of a given scale to the scale of non-linearity. It hence increases with wavenumber and decreases with redshift. With these two assumptions for the errors and assuming further conservat...

  13. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: the submillimetre properties of Lyman break galaxies at z=3-5

    CERN Document Server

    Coppin, K E K; Almaini, O; Arumugam, V; Dunlop, J S; Hartley, W G; Ivison, R J; Simpson, C J; Smith, D J B; Swinbank, A M; Blain, A W; Bourne, N; Bremer, M; Conselice, C; Harrison, C M; Mortlock, A; Chapman, S C; Davies, L J M; Farrah, D; Gibb, A; Jenness, T; Karim, A; Knudsen, K K; Ibar, E; Michałowski, M J; Peacock, J A; Rigopoulou, D; Robson, E I; Scott, D; Stevens, J; van der Werf, P P

    2014-01-01

    We present statistically significant detections at 850um of the Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) population at z=3, 4, and 5 using data from the Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS) in the United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey Ultra Deep Survey (UKIDSS-UDS) field. We employ a stacking technique to probe beneath the survey limit to measure the average 850um flux density of LBGs at z=3, 4, and 5 with typical ultraviolet luminosities of L(1700A)~10^29 erg/s/Hz. We measure 850um flux densities of (0.25 +/- 0.03, (0.41 +/- 0.06), and (0.88 +/- 0.23) mJy respectively, and find that they contribute at most 20 per cent to the cosmic far-infrared background at 850um. Fitting an appropriate range of spectral energy distributions to the z=3, 4, and 5 LBG stacked 24-850um fluxes, we derive infrared (IR) luminosities of L(8-1000um)~3.2, 5.5, and 11.0x10^11 Lsun (corresponding to star formation rates of ~50-200 Msun/yr) respectively. We find that the evolution in the IR luminosity...

  14. Cosmological constraints with weak lensing peak counts and second-order statistics in a large-field survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Austin; Lin, Chieh-An; Lanusse, Francois; Leonard, Adrienne; Starck, Jean-Luc; Kilbinger, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Peak statistics in weak lensing maps access the non-Gaussian information contained in the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are therefore a promising complementary probe to two-point and higher-order statistics to constrain our cosmological models. To prepare for the high precision afforded by next-generation weak lensing surveys, we assess the constraining power of peak counts in a simulated Euclid-like survey on the cosmological parameters Ωm, σ8, and w0de. In particular, we study how CAMELUS---a fast stochastic model for predicting peaks---can be applied to such large surveys. The algorithm avoids the need for time-costly N-body simulations, and its stochastic approach provides full PDF information of observables. We measure the abundance histogram of peaks in a mock shear catalogue of approximately 5,000 deg2 using a multiscale mass map filtering technique, and we then constrain the parameters of the mock survey using CAMELUS combined with approximate Bayesian computation, a robust likelihood-free inference algorithm. We find that peak statistics yield a tight but significantly biased constraint in the σ8-Ωm plane, indicating the need to better understand and control the model's systematics before applying it to a real survey of this size or larger. We perform a calibration of the model to remove the bias and compare results to those from the two-point correlation functions (2PCF) measured on the same field. In this case, we find the derived parameter Σ8 = σ8(Ωm/0.27)α = 0.76 (-0.03 +0.02) with α = 0.65 for peaks, while for 2PCF the values are Σ8 = 0.76 (-0.01 +0.02) and α = 0.70. We conclude that the constraining power can therefore be comparable between the two weak lensing observables in large-field surveys. Furthermore, the tilt in the σ8-Ωm degeneracy direction for peaks with respect to that of 2PCF suggests that a combined analysis would yield tighter constraints than either measure alone. As expected, w0de cannot be

  15. Surveys in differential-algebraic equations II

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The present volume comprises survey articles on various fields of Differential-Algebraic Equations (DAEs), which have widespread applications in controlled dynamical systems, especially in mechanical and electrical engineering and a strong relation to (ordinary) differential equations. The individual chapters provide reviews, presentations of the current state of research and new concepts in - Observers for DAEs - DAEs in chemical processes - Optimal control of DAEs - DAEs from a functional-analytic viewpoint - Algebraic methods for DAEs The results are presented in an accessible style, making this book suitable not only for active researchers but also for graduate students (with a good knowledge of the basic principles of DAEs) for self-study.

  16. Pajarito Plateau archaeological surveys and excavations. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, C R

    1982-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory continues its archaeological program of data gathering and salvage excavations. Sites recently added to the archaeological survey are described, as well as the results of five excavations. Among the more interesting and important discoveries are (1) the apparently well-established local use of anhydrous lime, and (2) a late pre-Columbian use of earlier house sites and middens for garden plots. Evidence indicated that the local puebloan population was the result of an expansion of upper Rio Grande peoples, not an influx of migrants.

  17. Chaos and universality in the dynamics of inflationary cosmologies. II. The role of nonextensive statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, H. P.; Damião Soares, I.; Tonini, E. V.

    2003-03-01

    We discuss universal statistical patterns in the chaotic dynamics of closed inflationary cosmologies, associated with the presence of a saddle-center critical point in the phase space of the models. We extend and complete the analysis made in a previous paper [H. P. de Oliveira, S. L. Sautu, I. Damião Soares, and E. V. Tonini, Phys. Rev. D 60, 121301 (1999)], including also other inflationary models. The statistical distribution connected to orbits that visit a neighborhood of the saddle center is shown to be in the realm of Tsallis nonextensive statistics that generalizes the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics for systems in which long-range interactions are present. The value of the entropic index q of the distribution function determines the dimension of the fractal basin boundaries in the ensemble of initial conditions, with respect to the code recollapse/escape into inflation. In a regime of high nonintegrability, this distribution is universal in the sense that it is scale invariant, independent of the parameters of the model and independent of the particular system where the saddle-center is present. Also it does not depend on the specific model where the saddle-center is present. The consequences for the physics of the early stages of inflation are discussed.

  18. Quantification of discreteness effects in cosmological N-body simulations: II. Evolution up to shell crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Joyce, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We apply a recently developed perturbative formalism which describes the evolution under their self-gravity of particles displaced from a perfect lattice to quantify precisely, up to shell crossing, the effects of discreteness in dissipationless cosmological N-body simulations. We give simple expressions, explicitly dependent on the particle density, for the evolution of power in each mode as a function of red-shift. For typical starting red-shifts the effect of finite particle number is to {\\it slow down} slightly the growth of power compared to that in the fluid limit (e.g. by about ten percent at half the Nyquist frequency), and to induce also dispersion in the growth as a function of direction at a comparable level. Further, above the Nyquist frequency, purely discrete power generated in the initial conditions is amplified. We note that, at fixed particle number, the effects of discreteness increase as the initial red-shift $z_{\\rm init}$ is increased, with divergence from the fluid limit as $z_{\\rm init}...

  19. On the dynamical state of galaxy clusters: insights from cosmological simulations II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weiguang; Power, Chris; Borgani, Stefano; Knebe, Alexander; Lewis, Geraint F.; Murante, Giuseppe; Poole, Gregory B.

    2016-10-01

    Using a suite of cosmology simulations of a sample of >120 galaxy clusters with log (MDM, vir) ≤ 14.5. We compare clusters that form in purely dark matter run and their counterparts in hydro runs and investigate 4 independent parameters, that are normally used to classify dynamical state. We find that the virial ratio η in hydro-dynamical runs is ˜10 per cent lower than in the DM run, and there is no clear separation between the relaxed and unrelaxed clusters for any parameter. Further, using the velocity dispersion deviation parameter ζ, which is defined as the ratio between cluster velocity dispersion σ and the theoretical prediction σ _t = √{G M_{total}/R}, we find that there is a linear correlation between the virial ratio η and this ζ parameter. We propose to use this ζ parameter, which can be easily derived from observed galaxy clusters, as a substitute of the η parameter to quantify the cluster dynamical state.

  20. Cosmological Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes. II. Evidence for Downsizing of Spin Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan-Rong; Ho, Luis C

    2012-01-01

    The spin is an important but poorly constrained parameter for describing supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Using the continuity equation of SMBH number density, we explicitly obtain the mass-dependent cosmological evolution of the radiative efficiency for accretion, which serves as a proxy for SMBH spin. Our calculations make use of the SMBH mass function of active and inactive galaxies (derived in the first paper of this series), the bolometric luminosity function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), corrected for the contribution from Compton-thick sources, and the observed Eddington ratio distribution. We find that the radiative efficiency generally increases with increasing black hole mass at high redshifts (z>~1), roughly as \\eta \\propto M_bh^0.5, while the trend reverses at lower redshifts, such that the highest efficiencies are attained by the lowest mass black holes. Black holes with M_bh>~10^8.5M_sun maintain radiative efficiencies as high as \\eta~0.3-0.4 at high redshifts, near the maximum for rapidly ...

  1. Galaxy Evolution in Cosmological Simulations with Outflows II: Metallicities and Gas Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Davé, Romeel; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D

    2011-01-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to investigate how inflows, star formation, and outflows govern the the gaseous and metal content of galaxies. In our simulations, galaxy metallicities are established by a balance between inflows and outflows as governed by the mass outflow rate, implying that the mass-metallicity relation reflects how the outflow rate varies with stellar mass. Gas content is set by a competition between inflow into and gas consumption within the ISM, the latter being governed by the star formation law, while the former is impacted by both wind recycling and preventive feedback. Stochasticity in the inflow rate moves galaxies off the equilibrium mass-metallicity and mass-gas fraction relations in a manner correlated with the SFR, and the scatter is set by the timescale to re-equilibrate. The evolution of both relations from z=3-0 is slow, as individual galaxies tend to evolve mostly along the relations. Gas fractions at a given stellar mass slowly decrease with time because the co...

  2. Self-similar cosmological solutions with dark energy II: black holes, naked singularities and wormholes

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, Hideki; Carr, B J

    2007-01-01

    We use a combination of numerical and analytical methods, exploiting the equations derived in an accompanying paper, to classify all spherically symmetric self-similar solutions which are asymptotically Friedmann at large distances and contain a perfect fluid with equation of state $p=(\\gamma -1)\\mu$ with $0<\\gamma<2/3$. The expansion of the Friedmann universe is accelerated in this case. We find a one-parameter family of self-similar solutions representing a black hole embedded in a Friedmann background. This suggests that, in contrast to the positive pressure case, black holes in a universe with dark energy can grow as fast as the Hubble horizon if they are not too large. There are also self-similar solutions which contain a central naked singularity with negative mass. We also find various kinds of self-similar wormhole solutions; these represent a Friedmann universe connected to either another Friedmann universe or some other cosmological model. These wormholes are generally traversable, where we de...

  3. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Power-spectrum analysis of the final dataset and cosmological implications

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, S; Peacock, J A; Norberg, P; Baugh, C M; Frenk, C S; Baldry, I K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bridges, T; Cannon, R; Colless, M; Collins, C; Couch, W; Cross, N J G; Dalton, G B; Eke, V R; De Propris, R; Driver, S P; Efstathiou, G P; Ellis, Richard S; Glazebrook, K; Jackson, C; Jenkins, A; Lahav, O; Lewis, I; Lumsden, S; Maddox, S; Madgwick, D; Peterson, B A; Sutherland, W; Taylor, K

    2005-01-01

    We present a power spectrum analysis of the final 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, employing a direct Fourier method. The sample used comprises 221,414 galaxies with measured redshifts. We investigate in detail the modelling of the sample selection. A new angular mask is derived, based on revisions to the photometric calibration. The redshift selection function is determined by dividing the survey according to rest-frame colour, and deducing a self-consistent treatment of k-corrections and evolution for each population. The covariance matrix for the power-spectrum estimates is determined using two different approaches to the construction of mock surveys which are used to demonstrate that the input cosmological model can be correctly recovered. We are confident that the 2dFGRS power spectrum can be used to infer the matter content of the universe. On large scales, our estimated power spectrum shows evidence for the `baryon oscillations' that are predicted in CDM models. Fitting to a CDM model, assuming a primordial...

  4. Cosmological Evolution of Supermassive Black Holes. II. Evidence for Downsizing of Spin Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Ho, Luis C.

    2012-04-01

    The spin is an important but poorly constrained parameter for describing supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Using the continuity equation of SMBH number density, we explicitly obtain the mass-dependent cosmological evolution of the radiative efficiency for accretion, which serves as a proxy for SMBH spin. Our calculations make use of the SMBH mass function of active and inactive galaxies (derived in the first paper of this series), the bolometric luminosity function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), corrected for the contribution from Compton-thick sources, and the observed Eddington ratio distribution. We find that the radiative efficiency generally increases with increasing black hole mass at high redshifts (z >~ 1), roughly as ηvpropM 0.5 •, while the trend reverses at lower redshifts, such that the highest efficiencies are attained by the lowest mass black holes. Black holes with M • >~ 108.5 M ⊙ maintain radiative efficiencies as high as η ≈ 0.3-0.4 at high redshifts, near the maximum for rapidly spinning systems, but their efficiencies drop dramatically (by an order of magnitude) by z ≈ 0. The pattern for lower mass holes is somewhat more complicated but qualitatively similar. Assuming that the standard accretion disk model applies, we suggest that the accretion history of SMBHs and their accompanying spins evolves in two distinct regimes: an early phase of prolonged accretion, plausibly driven by major mergers, during which the black hole spins up, then switching to a period of random, episodic accretion, governed by minor mergers and internal secular processes, during which the hole spins down. The transition epoch depends on mass, mirroring other evidence for "cosmic downsizing" in the AGN population; it occurs at z ≈ 2 for high-mass black holes and somewhat later, at z ≈ 1, for lower mass systems.

  5. Galaxy evolution in cosmological simulations with outflows - II. Metallicities and gas fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.

    2011-09-01

    We use cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to investigate how inflows, star formation and outflows govern the gaseous and metal content of galaxies within a hierarchical structure formation context. In our simulations, galaxy metallicities are established by a balance between inflows and outflows as governed by the mass outflow rate, implying that the mass-metallicity relation reflects how the outflow rate varies with stellar mass. Gas content, meanwhile, is set by a competition between inflow into and gas consumption within the interstellar medium, the latter being governed by the star formation law, while the former is impacted by both wind recycling and preventive feedback. Stochastic variations in the inflow rate move galaxies off the equilibrium mass-metallicity and mass-gas fraction relations in a manner correlated with the star formation rate, and the scatter is set by the time-scale to re-equilibrate. The evolution of both relations from z= 3 → 0 is slow, as individual galaxies tend to evolve mostly along the relations. Gas fractions at a given stellar mass slowly decrease with time because the cosmic inflow rate diminishes faster than the consumption rate, while metallicities slowly increase as infalling gas becomes more enriched. Observations from z˜ 3 → 0 are better matched by simulations employing momentum-driven wind scalings rather than constant wind speeds, but all models predict too low gas fractions at low masses and too high metallicities at high masses. All our models reproduce observed second-parameter trends of the mass-metallicity relation with the star formation rate and environment, indicating that these are a consequence of equilibrium and not feedback. Overall, the analytical framework of our equilibrium scenario broadly captures the relevant physics establishing the galaxy gas and metal content in simulations, which suggests that the cycle of baryonic inflows and outflows centrally governs the cosmic evolution of these properties

  6. European cardiac resynchronization therapy survey II: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, Kenneth; Normand, Camilla; Anker, Stefan D; Auricchio, Angelo; Blomström, Carina Lundqvist; Lundqvist, Carina Blomström; Bogale, Nigussie; Cleland, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Gasparini, Maurizio; Gitt, Anselm; Hindricks, Gerhard; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Ponikowski, Piotr; Stellbrink, Christoph; Ruschitzka, Frank; Linde, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) Survey II is a 6 months snapshot survey initiated by two ESC Associations, the European Heart Rhythm Association and the Heart Failure Association, which is designed to describe clinical practice regarding implantation of CRT devices in a broad sample of hospitals in 47 ESC member countries. The large volume of clinical and demographic data collected should reflect current patient selection, implantation, and follow-up practice and provide information relevant for assessing healthcare resource utilization in connection with CRT. The findings of this survey should permit representative benchmarking both nationally and internationally across Europe.

  7. Alcock-Paczynski cosmological test

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Corredoira, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In order to test the expansion of the Universe and its geometry, we carry out an Alcock & Paczynski cosmological test, that is, an evaluation of the ratio of observed angular size to radial/redshift size. The main advantage of this test is that it does not depend on the evolution of the galaxies, but only on the geometry of the Universe. However, the redshift distortions produced by the peculiar velocities of the gravitational infall do also have an influence, which should be separated from the cosmological effect. We derive the anisotropic correlation function of sources in three surveys within Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS): galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS-DR10, and QSOs from SDSS-II and SDSS-III/BOSS-DR10. From these, we are able to disentangle the dynamic and geometric distortions and, thus deriving the ratio of observed angular size to radial/redshift size at different redshifts. We also add some other values available in the literature. Then, we use the data to evaluate which cosmological model fits th...

  8. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project. II. Samples and X-Ray Data Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Burenin, R. A.; Ebeling, H.;

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the measurements of the galaxy cluster mass functions at z ≈ 0.05 and z ≈ 0.5 using high-quality Chandra observations of samples derived from the ROSAT PSPC All-Sky and 400 deg2 surveys. We provide a full reference for the data analysis procedures, present updated calibration of relati...

  9. SKA Weak Lensing II: Simulated Performance and Survey Design Considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Bonaldi, Anna; Camera, Stefano; Brown, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    We construct a pipeline for simulating weak lensing cosmology surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), taking as inputs telescope sensitivity curves; correlated source flux, size and redshift distributions; a simple ionospheric model; source redshift and ellipticity measurement errors. We then use this simulation pipeline to optimise a 2-year weak lensing survey performed with the first deployment of the SKA (SKA1). Our assessments are based on the total signal-to-noise of the recovered shear power spectra, a metric that we find to correlate very well with a standard dark energy figure of merit. We first consider the choice of frequency band, trading off increases in number counts at lower frequencies against poorer resolution; our analysis strongly prefers the higher frequency Band 2 (950-1760 MHz) channel of the SKA-MID telescope to the lower frequency Band 1 (350-1050 MHz). Best results would be obtained by allowing the centre of Band 2 to shift towards lower frequency, around 1.1 GHz. We then move o...

  10. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the Southern Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, Danica; Marriage, Tobias A; Switzer, Eric R; Partridge, Bruce; Massardi, Marcella; Morales, Gustavo; Addison, Graeme; Bond, J Richard; Crichton, Devin; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark; Dunner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam; Hughes, John P; Irwin, Kent; Kosowsky, Arthur; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael; Page, Lyman; Reese, Erik D; Schmitt, Benjamin; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Jonathan; Staggs, Suzanne; Swetz, Daniel; Thornton, Robert; Wollack, Edward

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of 191 extragalactic sources detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 GHz and/or 218 GHz in the 2008 Southern survey. Flux densities span 14-1700 mJy, and we use source spectral indices derived using ACT-only data to divide our sources into two sub-populations: 167 radio galaxies powered by central active galactic nuclei (AGN), and 24 dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We cross-identify 97% of our sources (166 of the AGN and 19 of the DSFGs) with those in currently available catalogs. When combined with flux densities from the Australian Telescope 20 GHz survey and follow-up observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the synchrotron-dominated population is seen to exhibit a steepening of the slope of the spectral energy distribution from 20 to 148 GHz, with the trend continuing to 218 GHz. The ACT dust-dominated source population has a median spectral index of 3.7+0.62-0.86, and includes both local galaxies and sources with redshifts as great as 5.6. Dusty ...

  11. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the Southern Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Danica; Gralla, Megan; Marriage, Tobias A.; Switzer, Eric R.; Partridge, Bruce; Massardi, Marcella; Morales, Gustavo; Addison, Graeme; Bond, J. Richard; Crichton, Devin; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalogue of 191 extragalactic sources detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 and/or 218 GHz in the 2008 Southern survey. Flux densities span 14 - 1700 mJy, and we use source spectral indices derived using ACT-only data to divide our sources into two subpopulations: 167 radio galaxies powered by central active galactic nuclei (AGN) and 24 dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We cross-identify 97 per cent of our sources (166 of the AGN and 19 of the DSFGs) with those in currently available catalogues. When combined with flux densities from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey and follow-up observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the synchrotron-dominated population is seen to exhibit a steepening of the slope of the spectral energy distribution from 20 to 148 GHz, with the trend continuing to 218 GHz. The ACT dust-dominated source population has a median spectral index, alpha(sub 148-218), of 3.7 +0.62/-0.86), and includes both local galaxies and sources with redshift around 6. Dusty sources with no counterpart in existing catalogues likely belong to a recently discovered subpopulation of DSFGs lensed by foreground galaxies or galaxy groups.

  12. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the Southern Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Danica; Gralla, Megan; Marriage, Tobias A.; Switzer, Eric R.; Partridge, Bruce; Massardi, Marcella; Morales, Gustavo; Addison, Graeme; Bond, J. Richard; Crighton, Devin; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark; Dunner, Rolando; Hajian, Amir; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent; Kosowsky, Arthur; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael; Page, Lyman; Reese, Erik D.; Schmitt, Benjamin; Sehgal, Neelima; Sievers, Johnathan; Staggs, Suzanne; Swetz, Daniel; Thornton, Robert; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalogue of 191 extragalactic sources detected by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 and/or 218 GHz in the 2008 Southern survey. Flux densities span 14 -1700 mJy, and we use source spectral indices derived using ACT-only data to divide our sources into two subpopulations: 167 radio galaxies powered by central active galactic nuclei (AGN) and 24 dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We cross-identify 97 per cent of our sources (166 of the AGN and 19 of the DSFGs) with those in currently available catalogues. When combined with flux densities from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey and follow-up observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the synchrotron-dominated population is seen to exhibit a steepening of the slope of the spectral energy distribution from 20 to 148 GHz, with the trend continuing to 218 GHz. The ACT dust-dominated source population has a median spectral index, A(sub 148-218), of 3.7 (+0.62 or -0.86), and includes both local galaxies and sources with redshift around 6. Dusty sources with no counterpart in existing catalogues likely belong to a recently discovered subpopulation of DSFGs lensed by foreground galaxies or galaxy groups.

  13. Cosmological forecasts for combined and next-generation peculiar velocity surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Cullan; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Blake, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Peculiar velocity surveys present a very promising route to measuring the growth rate of large-scale structure and its scale dependence. However, individual peculiar velocity surveys suffer from large statistical errors due to the intrinsic scatter in the relations used to infer a galaxy's true distance. In this context, we use a Fisher matrix formalism to investigate the statistical benefits of combining multiple peculiar velocity surveys. We find that for all cases we consider that there is a marked improvement on constraints on the linear growth rate fσ8. For example, the constraining power of only a few peculiar velocity measurements is such that the addition of the 2MASS Tully-Fisher survey (containing only ˜2000 galaxies) to the full redshift and peculiar velocity samples of the 6-degree Field Galaxy Survey (containing ˜110 000 redshifts and ˜9000 velocities) can improve growth rate constraints by ˜20 per cent. Furthermore, the combination of the future TAIPAN and WALLABY+WNSHS surveys has the potential to reach a ˜3 per cent error on fσ8, which will place tight limits on possible extensions to General Relativity. We then turn to look at potential systematics in growth rate measurements that can arise due to incorrect calibration of the peculiar velocity zero-point and from scale-dependent spatial and velocity bias. For next-generation surveys, we find that neglecting velocity bias in particular has the potential to bias constraints on the growth rate by over 5σ, but that an offset in the zero-point has negligible impact on the velocity power spectrum.

  14. Cosmological constraints with weak-lensing peak counts and second-order statistics in a large-field survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Austin; Lin, Chieh-An; Lanusse, François; Leonard, Adrienne; Starck, Jean-Luc; Kilbinger, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Peak statistics in weak-lensing maps access the non-Gaussian information contained in the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are therefore a promising complementary probe to two-point and higher-order statistics to constrain our cosmological models. Next-generation galaxy surveys, with their advanced optics and large areas, will measure the cosmic weak-lensing signal with unprecedented precision. To prepare for these anticipated data sets, we assess the constraining power of peak counts in a simulated Euclid-like survey on the cosmological parameters Ωm, σ8, and w0de. In particular, we study how Camelus, a fast stochastic model for predicting peaks, can be applied to such large surveys. The algorithm avoids the need for time-costly N-body simulations, and its stochastic approach provides full PDF information of observables. Considering peaks with a signal-to-noise ratio ≥ 1, we measure the abundance histogram in a mock shear catalogue of approximately 5000 deg2 using a multiscale mass-map filtering technique. We constrain the parameters of the mock survey using Camelus combined with approximate Bayesian computation, a robust likelihood-free inference algorithm. Peak statistics yield a tight but significantly biased constraint in the σ8-Ωm plane, as measured by the width ΔΣ8 of the 1σ contour. We find Σ8 = σ8(Ωm/ 0.27)α = 0.77-0.05+0.06 with α = 0.75 for a flat ΛCDM model. The strong bias indicates the need to better understand and control the model systematics before applying it to a real survey of this size or larger. We perform a calibration of the model and compare results to those from the two-point correlation functions ξ± measured on the same field. We calibrate the ξ± result as well, since its contours are also biased, although not as severely as for peaks. In this case, we find for peaks Σ8 = 0.76-0.03+0.02 with α = 0.65, while for the combined ξ+ and ξ- statistics the values are Σ8 = 0.76-0.01+0.02 and α = 0

  15. Search and Analysis of Galaxy-Scale Strong Gravitational Lenses in Cosmological Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, F.

    2013-11-01

    This article focuses on the development of a novel detector of strong galaxy-galaxy lenses based on the massive modelling of candidates in wide-field ground-based imaging data. Indeed, not only are these events rare in the Universe, but they are at the same time very valuable to understand galaxy formation and evolution in a cosmological context. We use parametric models, which are optimized by MCMC in a bayesian framework, so that we know the distribution of errors. We first generate several training samples : a hundred lenses simulated in HST and CFHT conditions, along with 325 observed lens candidates resulting from a series of preselections on the CFHTLS-Wide galaxies, and that we classify according to their credibility. The whole challenge in designing this detector lies in a subtle balance between the quality of models and the execution time. We massively run the modelling on our samples, beginning with ideal application conditions that we make more complex by stages so as to get closer to the observation conditions and save time. We show that a 7-parameter model assuming a spherical source can recover the Einstein radius from the CFHT simulations with a precision of 7%. We apply a mask to the input data that noticeably enhances the robustness of the models facing environment problems, with a median convergence time of 4 minutes that could be easily reduced by a factor of 10 with more direct optimization techniques. From our results, we define selection contours in the parameter space, resulting in a completeness of 38% and a purity of 55% for the sample of 51 candidates accepted by our robot among the 325 preselected systems.

  16. Observational Constraints on the Nature of the Dark Energy: First Cosmological Results From the ESSENCE Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Vasey, W.Michael; Miknaitis, G.; Stubbs, C.W.; Jha, S.; Riess, A.G.; Garnavich, P.M.; Kirshner, R.P.; Aguilera, C.; Becker, A.C.; Blackman, J.W.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Conley, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Foley, R.J.; Garg, A.; Hicken, M.; Krisciunas, K.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-01-05

    We present constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, w = P/({rho}c{sup 2}), using 60 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the ESSENCE supernova survey. We derive a set of constraints on the nature of the dark energy assuming a flat Universe. By including constraints on ({Omega}{sub M}, w) from baryon acoustic oscillations, we obtain a value for a static equation-of-state parameter w = -1.05{sub -0.12}{sup +0.13} (stat 1{sigma}) {+-} 0.13 (sys) and {Omega}{sub M} = 0.274{sub -0.020}{sup +0.033} (stat 1{sigma}) with a best-fit {chi}{sup 2}/DoF of 0.96. These results are consistent with those reported by the Super-Nova Legacy Survey in a similar program measuring supernova distances and redshifts. We evaluate sources of systematic error that afflict supernova observations and present Monte Carlo simulations that explore these effects. Currently, the largest systematic currently with the potential to affect our measurements is the treatment of extinction due to dust in the supernova host galaxies. Combining our set of ESSENCE SNe Ia with the SuperNova Legacy Survey SNe Ia, we obtain a joint constraint of w = -1.07{sub -0.09}{sup +0.09} (stat 1{sigma}) {+-} 0.13 (sys), {Omega}{sub M} = 0.267{sub -0.018}{sup +0.028} (stat 1{sigma}) with a best-fit {chi}{sup 2}/DoF of 0.91. The current SNe Ia data are fully consistent with a cosmological constant.

  17. Neutrino masses and cosmological parameters from a Euclid-like survey: Markov Chain Monte Carlo forecasts including theoretical errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audren, Benjamin; Lesgourgues, Julien [Institut de Théorie des Phénomènes Physiques, École PolytechniqueFédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bird, Simeon [Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ, 08540 (United States); Haehnelt, Martin G. [Kavli Institute for Cosmology and Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Viel, Matteo, E-mail: benjamin.audren@epfl.ch, E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch, E-mail: spb@ias.edu, E-mail: haehnelt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via Tiepolo 11, 34143, Trieste (Italy)

    2013-01-01

    We present forecasts for the accuracy of determining the parameters of a minimal cosmological model and the total neutrino mass based on combined mock data for a future Euclid-like galaxy survey and Planck. We consider two different galaxy surveys: a spectroscopic redshift survey and a cosmic shear survey. We make use of the Monte Carlo Markov Chains (MCMC) technique and assume two sets of theoretical errors. The first error is meant to account for uncertainties in the modelling of the effect of neutrinos on the non-linear galaxy power spectrum and we assume this error to be fully correlated in Fourier space. The second error is meant to parametrize the overall residual uncertainties in modelling the non-linear galaxy power spectrum at small scales, and is conservatively assumed to be uncorrelated and to increase with the ratio of a given scale to the scale of non-linearity. It hence increases with wavenumber and decreases with redshift. With these two assumptions for the errors and assuming further conservatively that the uncorrelated error rises above 2% at k = 0.4 h/Mpc and z = 0.5, we find that a future Euclid-like cosmic shear/galaxy survey achieves a 1-σ error on M{sub ν} close to 32 meV/25 meV, sufficient for detecting the total neutrino mass with good significance. If the residual uncorrelated errors indeed rises rapidly towards smaller scales in the non-linear regime as we have assumed here then the data on non-linear scales does not increase the sensitivity to the total neutrino mass. Assuming instead a ten times smaller theoretical error with the same scale dependence, the error on the total neutrino mass decreases moderately from σ(M{sub ν}) = 18 meV to 14 meV when mildly non-linear scales with 0.1 h/Mpc < k < 0.6 h/Mpc are included in the analysis of the galaxy survey data.

  18. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: ALMA resolves the bright-end of the sub-millimeter number counts

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, James; Swinbank, Mark; Chapman, Scott; Geach, James; Ivison, Rob; Thomson, Alasdair; Aretxaga, Itziar; Blain, Andrew; Cowley, Will; Chen, Chian-Chou; Coppin, Kristen; Dunlop, Jim; Edge, Alastair; Farrah, Duncan; Ibar, Edo; Karim, Alex; Knudsen, Kirsten; Meijerink, Rowin; Michalowski, Michal; Scott, Douglas; Spanns, Marco; van der Werf, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We present high-resolution 870-um ALMA continuum maps of 30 bright sub-millimeter sources in the UKIDSS UDS field. These sources are selected from deep, 1-square degrees 850-um maps from the SCUBA--2 Cosmology Legacy Survey, and are representative of the brightest sources in the field (median SCUBA2 flux S_850=8.7+/-0.4 mJy). We detect 52 sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) at >4-sigma significance in our 30 ALMA maps. In 61+/-17% of the ALMA maps the single-dish source comprises a blend of >=2 SMGs, where the secondary SMGs are Ultra--Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) with L_IR>10^12 Lo. The brightest SMG contributes on average 80+/-4% of the single-dish flux density, and in the ALMA maps containing >=2 SMGs the secondary SMG contributes 25+/-3% of the integrated ALMA flux. We construct source counts and show that multiplicity boosts the apparent single-dish cumulative counts by 20% at S_870>7.5mJy, and by 60% at S_870>12mJy. We combine our sample with previous ALMA studies of fainter SMGs and show that the cou...

  19. HERSCHEL GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY OF [N ii] FINE STRUCTURE EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L., E-mail: Paul.F.Goldsmith@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10{sup −8}–10{sup −7} Wm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} level over the range –60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10–50 cm{sup −3} with an average value of 29 cm{sup −3} and N{sup +} column densities 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  20. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: angular clustering tomography and its cosmological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Crocce, Martin; Scoccimarro, Roman; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Samushia, Lado; Tinker, Jeremy; Thomas, Daniel; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the cosmological implications of studying galaxy clustering using a tomographic approach applied to the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) DR12 galaxy sample, including both auto- and cross-correlation functions between redshift shells. We model the signal of the full shape of the angular correlation function, ω(θ), in redshift bins using state-of-the-art modelling of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions. We present results on the redshift evolution of the linear bias of BOSS galaxies, which cannot be obtained with traditional methods for galaxy-clustering analysis. We also obtain constraints on cosmological parameters, combining this tomographic analysis with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Type Ia supernova (SNIa). We explore a number of cosmological models, including the standard Λ cold dark matter model and its most interesting extensions, such as deviations from wDE = -1, non-minimal neutrino masses, spatial curvature and deviations from general relativity (GR) using the growth-index γ parametrization. These results are, in general, comparable to the most precise present-day constraints on cosmological parameters, and show very good agreement with the standard model. In particular, combining CMB, ω(θ) and SNIa, we find a value of wDE consistent with -1 to a precision better than 5 per cent when it is assumed to be constant in time, and better than 6 per cent when we also allow for a spatially curved Universe.

  1. Status of the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio

    2014-11-01

    TAOS II is a next generation occultation survey with the goal of measuring the size distribution of the small objects (diameters between 0.5 and 30 km) in the Kuiper Belt. The project is a collaboration between the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, The survey will operate three 1.3 m telescopes at San Pedro Martir Observatory in Baja California, Mexico. Each telescope will be equipped with a custom camera comprising a focal plane array of CMOS imagers. Each camera will be capable of reading out image data from 10,000 stars at a cadence of 20 Hz. All telescopes will monitor the same set of stars simultaneously to search for coincident occultation events while minimizing the false positive rate. This poster describes the project and reports on the progress of the development of the survey infrastructure.

  2. The Green Bank Telescope Galactic H II Region Discovery Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bania, T M; Balser, Dana S; Rood, R T

    2010-01-01

    We discovered a large population of previously unknown Galactic H II regions by using the Green Bank Telescope to detect their hydrogen radio recombination line emission. Since recombination lines are optically thin at 3 cm wavelength, we can detect H II regions across the entire Galactic disk. Our targets were selected based on spatially coincident 24 micron and 21 cm continuum emission. For the Galactic zone -16 deg < L_gal < 67 deg and abs(B_gal) < 1 deg, we detected 602 discrete recombination line components from 448 lines of sight, 95% of the sample targets, which more than doubles the number of known H II regions in this part of the Milky Way. We found 25 new first quadrant nebulae with negative LSR velocities, placing them beyond the Solar orbit. Because we can detect all nebulae inside the Solar orbit that are ionized by O-stars, the Discovery Survey targets, when combined with existing H II region catalogs, give a more accurate census of Galactic H II regions and their properties. The distri...

  3. The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS): a cosmological forecast

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Ross, Ashley J; Shandera, Sarah; Percival, Will J; Dawson, Kyle S; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Myers, Adam D; Brownstein, Joel R; Comparat, Johan; Delubac, Timothée; Gao, Pengyuan; Hojjati, Alireza; Koyama, Kazuya; McBride, Cameron K; Meza, Andrés; Newman, Jeffrey A; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pogosian, Levon; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tao, Charling; Wang, Dandan; Yèche, Christophe; Zhang, Hanyu; Zhang, Yuecheng; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Fangzhou; Zou, Hu

    2015-01-01

    We present a science forecast for the eBOSS survey, part of the SDSS-IV project, which is a spectroscopic survey using multiple tracers of large-scale structure, including luminous red galaxies (LRGs), emission line galaxies (ELGs) and quasars (both as a direct probe of structure and through the Ly-$\\alpha$ forest). Focusing on discrete tracers, we forecast the expected accuracy of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO), the redshift-space distortion (RSD) measurements, the $f_{\\rm NL}$ parameter quantifying the primordial non-Gaussianity, the dark energy and modified gravity parameters. We also use the line-of-sight clustering in the Ly-$\\alpha$ forest to constrain the total neutrino mass. We find that eBOSS LRGs ($0.60.6$), ELGs ($0.6

  4. Type Ia Supernovae Selection and Forecast of Cosmology Constraints for the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gjergo, Eda; Cunningham, John D; Kuhlmann, Steve; Biswas, Rahul; Kovacs, Eve; Bernstein, Joseph P; Spinka, Harold

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a study of selection criteria to identify Type Ia supernovae photometrically in a simulated mixed sample of Type Ia supernovae and core collapse supernovae. The simulated sample is a mockup of the expected results of the Dark Energy Survey. Fits to the MLCS2k2 and SALT2 Type Ia supernova models are compared and used to help separate the Type Ia supernovae from the core collapse sample. The Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit (modified to include core collapse supernovae systematics) is used to discriminate among the various selection criteria. This study of varying selection cuts for Type Ia supernova candidates is the first to evaluate core collapse contamination using the Figure of Merit. Different factors that contribute to the Figure of Merit are detailed. With our analysis methods, both SALT2 and MLCS2k2 Figures of Merit improve with tighter selection cuts and higher purities, peaking at 98% purity.

  5. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-05-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power-spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new fast-Fourier-transform-based estimators, we measure the power-spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles ℓ > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular-diameter distance, the Hubble parameter and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full-shape clustering measurements in combination with cosmic microwave background and Type Ia supernova data. Assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology, we constrain the matter density to Ω M= 0.311_{-0.010}^{+0.009} and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6_{-0.6}^{+0.7} km s^{-1 Mpc^{-1}}, at a confidence level of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the ΛCDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019_{-0.039}^{+0.048}. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy-clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  6. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-01-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new FFT-based estimators, we measure the power spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles ℓ > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular diameter distance, the Hubble parameter, and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full shape clustering measurements in combination with CMB and SN Ia data. Assuming a ΛCDM cosmology, we constrain the matter density to Ω M= 0.311_{-0.010}^{+0.009} and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6_{-0.6}^{+0.7} km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}, at a confidence level (CL) of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the ΛCDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019_{-0.039}^{+0.048}. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. (2016) to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  7. Photometric H alpha and [O II] Luminosity Function of SDF and SXDF Galaxies: Implications for Future Baryon Oscillation Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Sumiyoshi, Masanao; Oshige, Shunsuke; Glazebrook, Karl; Akiyama, Masayuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Masao; Yoshida, Makiko; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kodama, Tadayuki

    2009-01-01

    Efficient selection of emission line galaxies at z > 1 by photometric information in wide field surveys is one of the keys for future spectroscopic surveys to constrain dark energy using the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signature. Here we estimate the H alpha and [O II] line luminosity functions of galaxies at z = 0.5-1.7 using a novel approach where multi-wavelength imaging data is used to jointly estimate both photometric redshifts and star-formation rates. These photometric estimates of line luminosities at high-redshift use the large data sets of the Subaru Deep Field and Subaru XMM-Newton Deep Field (covering \\sim 1 deg^2) and are calibrated with the spectroscopic data of the local Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. The derived luminosity functions (especially H alpha) are in reasonable agreement with the past estimates based on spectroscopic or narrow-band-filter surveys. This dataset is useful for examining the photometric selection of target galaxies for BAO surveys because of the large cosmologi...

  8. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: power-spectrum analysis of the final data set and cosmological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Shaun; Percival, Will J.; Peacock, John A.; Norberg, Peder; Baugh, Carlton M.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Cross, Nicholas J. G.; Dalton, Gavin; Eke, Vincent R.; De Propris, Roberto; Driver, Simon P.; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jackson, Carole; Jenkins, Adrian; Lahav, Ofer; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Maddox, Steve; Madgwick, Darren; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    2005-09-01

    We present a power-spectrum analysis of the final 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), employing a direct Fourier method. The sample used comprises 221414 galaxies with measured redshifts. We investigate in detail the modelling of the sample selection, improving on previous treatments in a number of respects. A new angular mask is derived, based on revisions to the photometric calibration. The redshift selection function is determined by dividing the survey according to rest-frame colour, and deducing a self-consistent treatment of k-corrections and evolution for each population. The covariance matrix for the power-spectrum estimates is determined using two different approaches to the construction of mock surveys, which are used to demonstrate that the input cosmological model can be correctly recovered. We discuss in detail the possible differences between the galaxy and mass power spectra, and treat these using simulations, analytic models and a hybrid empirical approach. Based on these investigations, we are confident that the 2dFGRS power spectrum can be used to infer the matter content of the universe. On large scales, our estimated power spectrum shows evidence for the `baryon oscillations' that are predicted in cold dark matter (CDM) models. Fitting to a CDM model, assuming a primordial ns= 1 spectrum, h= 0.72 and negligible neutrino mass, the preferred parameters are Ωmh= 0.168 +/- 0.016 and a baryon fraction Ωb/Ωm= 0.185 +/- 0.046 (1σ errors). The value of Ωmh is 1σ lower than the 0.20 +/- 0.03 in our 2001 analysis of the partially complete 2dFGRS. This shift is largely due to the signal from the newly sampled regions of space, rather than the refinements in the treatment of observational selection. This analysis therefore implies a density significantly below the standard Ωm= 0.3: in combination with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), we infer Ωm= 0.231 +/- 0.021.

  9. Science with the space-based interferometer eLISA. II. Gravitational waves from cosmological phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprini, Chiara [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). IPht; CNRS, Gif-sur Yvette (France); Hindmarsh, Mark [Sussex Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics and Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Huber, Stephan [Sussex Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; and others

    2016-04-15

    We investigate the potential for the eLISA space-based interferometer to detect the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by strong first-order cosmological phase transitions. We discuss the resulting contributions from bubble collisions, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and sound waves to the stochastic background, and estimate the total corresponding signal predicted in gravitational waves. The projected sensitivity of eLISA to cosmological phase transitions is computed in a model-independent way for various detector designs and configurations. By applying these results to several specific models, we demonstrate that eLISA is able to probe many well-motivated scenarios beyond the Standard Model of particle physics predicting strong first-order cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe.

  10. Science with the space-based interferometer eLISA. II: Gravitational waves from cosmological phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Caprini, Chiara; Huber, Stephan; Konstandin, Thomas; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Nardini, Germano; No, Jose Miguel; Petiteau, Antoine; Schwaller, Pedro; Servant, Geraldine; Weir, David J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the potential for the eLISA space-based interferometer to detect the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by strong first-order cosmological phase transitions. We discuss the resulting contributions from bubble collisions, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, and sound waves to the stochastic background, and estimate the total corresponding signal predicted in gravitational waves. The projected sensitivity of eLISA to cosmological phase transitions is computed in a model-independent way for various detector designs and configurations. By applying these results to several specific models, we demonstrate that eLISA is able to probe many well-motivated scenarios beyond the Standard Model of particle physics predicting strong first-order cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe.

  11. Cosmological Parameters from the Comparison of the 2MASS Gravity Field with Peculiar Velocity Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Pike, R W; Hudson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    We compare the peculiar velocity field within 65 $h^{-1}$ Mpc predicted from 2MASS photometry and public redshift data to three independent peculiar velocity surveys based on type Ia supernovae, surface brightness fluctuations in ellipticals, and Tully-Fisher distances to spirals. The three peculiar velocity samples are each in good agreement with the predicted velocities and produce consistent results for $\\beta_{K}=\\Omega\\sbr{m}^{0.6}/b_{K}$. Taken together the best fit $\\beta_{K} = 0.49 \\pm 0.04$. We explore the effects of morphology on the determination of $\\beta$ by splitting the 2MASS sample into E+S0 and S+Irr density fields and find both samples are equally good tracers of the underlying dark matter distribution, but that early-types are more clustered by a relative factor $b\\sbr{E}/b\\sbr{S} \\sim 1.6$. The density fluctuations of 2MASS galaxies in $8 h^{-1}$ Mpc spheres in the local volume is found to be $\\sigma\\sbr{8,K} = 0.9$. From this result and our value of $\\beta_{K}$, we find $\\sigma_8 (\\Omega\\...

  12. NEW MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS IN DEEP SPITZER/IRAC SURVEY DATA AND THEIR COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashlinsky, A. [SSAI, Lanham MD 20706 (United States); Arendt, R. G.; Mather, J.; Moseley, S. H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G., E-mail: alexander.kashlinsky@nasa.gov [Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We extend previous measurements of cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign using new data from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Two fields with depths of {approx_equal} 12 hr pixel{sup -1} over three epochs are analyzed at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. Maps of the fields were assembled using a self-calibration method uniquely suitable for probing faint diffuse backgrounds. Resolved sources were removed from the maps to a magnitude limit of mag{sub AB} {approx_equal} 25, as indicated by the level of the remaining shot noise. The maps were then Fourier transformed and their power spectra were evaluated. Instrumental noise was estimated from the time-differenced data, and subtracting this isolates the spatial fluctuations of the actual sky. The power spectra of the source-subtracted fields remain identical (within the observational uncertainties) for the three epochs indicating that zodiacal light contributes negligibly to the fluctuations. Comparing to 8 {mu}m power spectra shows that Galactic cirrus cannot account for the fluctuations. The signal appears isotropically distributed on the sky as required for an extragalactic origin. The CIB fluctuations continue to diverge to >10 times those of known galaxy populations on angular scales out to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign . The low shot-noise levels remaining in the diffuse maps indicate that the large-scale fluctuations arise from the spatial clustering of faint sources well below the confusion noise. The spatial spectrum of these fluctuations is in reasonable agreement with an origin in populations clustered according to the standard cosmological model ({Lambda}CDM) at epochs coinciding with the first stars era.

  13. Spectroscopy of supernova host galaxies from the SDSS-II SN survey with the SDSS and BOSS spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Matthew Dwaune

    Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) have been used as standard candles to measure cosmological distances. The initial discovery of the accelerated expansion of the universe was performed using ~50 SNe Ia. Large SNe surveys have increased the number of spectroscopically-confirmed SNe Ia to over a thousand with redshift coverage beyond z = 1. We are now in the age of abundant photometry without the ability for full follow-up spectroscopy of all SN candidates. SN cosmology using these large samples will increasingly rely on robust photometric classification of SN candidates. Photometric classification will increase the sample by including faint SNe as these are preferentially not observed with follow-up spectroscopy. The primary concern with using photometrically classified SNe Ia in cosmology is when a core-collapse SNe is incorrectly classified as an SN Ia. This can be mitigated by obtaining the host galaxy redshift of each SN candidate and using this information as a prior in the photometric classification, removing one degree of freedom. To test the impact of redshift on photometric classification, I have performed an assessment on photometric classification of candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) SN Survey. I have tested the classification with and without redshift priors by looking at the change of photometric classification, the effect of data quality on photometric classification, and the effect of SN light curve properties on photometric classification. Following our suggested classification scheme, there are a total of 1038 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1002 SNe~Ia with the spectroscopic redshift. For 912 (91.0%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Finally, I investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. When using the SALT2

  14. NEWLY IDENTIFIED EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs) FROM THE SPITZER GLIMPSE II SURVEY. II. MOLECULAR CLOUD ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xi; Gan Conggui; Shen Zhiqiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); He Jinhua, E-mail: chenxi@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Yunnan Astronomical Observatory/National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011, Yunnan Province (China)

    2013-06-01

    We have undertaken a survey of molecular lines in the 3 mm band toward 57 young stellar objects using the Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra 22 m radio telescope. The target sources were young stellar objects with active outflows (extended green objects (EGOs)) newly identified from the GLIMPSE II survey. We observe a high detection rate (50%) of broad line wing emission in the HNC and CS thermal lines, which combined with the high detection rate of class I methanol masers toward these sources (reported in Paper I) further demonstrates that the GLIMPSE II EGOs are associated with outflows. The physical and kinematic characteristics derived from the 3 mm molecular lines for these newly identified EGOs are consistent with these sources being massive young stellar objects with ongoing outflow activity and rapid accretion. These findings support our previous investigations of the mid-infrared properties of these sources and their association with other star formation tracers (e.g., infrared dark clouds, methanol masers and millimeter dust sources) presented in Paper I. The high detection rate (64%) of the hot core tracer CH{sub 3}CN reveals that the majority of these new EGOs have evolved to the hot molecular core stage. Comparison of the observed molecular column densities with predictions from hot core chemistry models reveals that the newly identified EGOs from the GLIMPSE II survey are members of the youngest hot core population, with an evolutionary time scale of the order of 10{sup 3} yr.

  15. Non-singular spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant: II. static solutions of the einstein-maxwell equations

    CERN Document Server

    Chrusciel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We construct infinite-dimensional families of non-singular static space times, solutions of the vacuum Einstein-Maxwell equations with a negative cosmological constant. The families include an infinite-dimensional family of solutions with the usual AdS conformal structure at conformal infinity.

  16. Non-singular space-times with a negative cosmological constant: II. Static solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściel, Piotr T.; Delay, Erwann

    2017-08-01

    We construct infinite-dimensional families of non-singular static space-times, solutions of the vacuum Einstein-Maxwell equations with a negative cosmological constant. The families include an infinite-dimensional family of solutions with the usual AdS conformal structure at conformal infinity.

  17. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  18. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    CERN Document Server

    Frieman, Joshua A; Becker, A; Choi, C; Cinabro, D; De Jongh, F; Depoy, D L; Dilday, B; Doi, M; Garnavich, P M; Hogan, C J; Holtzman, J; Im, M; Jha, S; Kessler, R; Konishi, K; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J; Marshall, J L; McGinnis, D; Miknaitis, G; Nichol, R C; Prieto, J L; Riess, A G; Richmond, M W; Romani, R; Sako, M; Schneider, D P; Smith, M; Takanashi, N; Tokita, K; van der Heyden, K; Yasuda, N; Zheng, C; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Annis, J; Assef, R J; Barentine, J; Bender, R; Blandford, R D; Boroski, W N; Bremer, M; Brewington, H; Collins, C A; Crotts, A; Dembicky, J; Eastman, J; Edge, A; Edmondson, E; Elson, E; Eyler, M E; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Frank, S; Goobar, A; Gueth, T; Gunn, J E; Harvanek, M; Hopp, U; Ihara, Y; Ivezić, Ž; Kahn, S; Kaplan, J; Kent, S; Ketzeback, W; Kleinman, S J; Kollatschny, W; Kron, R G; Krzesiński, J; Lamenti, D; Leloudas, G; Lin, H; Long, D C; Lucey, J; Lupton, R H; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; McMillan, R J; Méndez, J; Morgan, C W; Morokuma, T; Nitta, A; Ostman, L; Pan, K; Rockosi, C M; Romer, A K; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Saurage, G; Schlesinger, K; Snedden, S A; Sollerman, J; Stoughton, C; Stritzinger, M; Subba-Rao, M; Tucker, D; Väisänen, P; Watson, L C; Watters, S; Wheeler, J C; Yanny, B; York, D

    2007-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large ...

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  20. On the Cluster Physics of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and X-ray Surveys III: Measurement Biases and Cosmological Evolution of Gas and Stellar Mass Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, N; Pfrommer, C; Sievers, J L

    2012-01-01

    Gas masses tightly correlate with the virial masses of galaxy clusters, allowing for a precise determination of cosmological parameters by means of large-scale X-ray surveys. However, according to recent Suzaku X-ray measurements, gas mass fractions, f_gas, appear to be considerably larger than the cosmic mean at the virial radius, R_200, questioning the accuracy of the cosmological parameter estimations. Here, we use a large suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study measurement biases of f_gas. We employ different variants of simulated physics, including radiative gas physics, star formation, and thermal feedback by active galactic nuclei. Computing the mass profiles in 48 angular cones, whose footprints partition the sphere, we find anisotropic gas and total mass distributions that imply an angular variance of f_gas at the level of 30%. This anisotropic distribution originates from the recent formation epoch of clusters and from the strong internal baryon-to-dark-matter density bias. In the ...

  1. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological implications of the configuration-space clustering wedges

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Ariel G; Crocce, Martin; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; DallaVecchia, Claudio; Lippich, Martha; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We explore the cosmological implications of anisotropic clustering measurements in configuration space of the final galaxy samples from Data Release 12 of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We implement a new detailed modelling of the effects of non-linearities, galaxy bias and redshift-space distortions that can be used to extract unbiased cosmological information from our measurements for scales $s \\gtrsim 20\\,h^{-1}{\\rm Mpc}$. We combined the galaxy clustering information from BOSS with the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and Type Ia supernovae samples and found no significant evidence for a deviation from the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. In particular, these data sets can constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter to $w_{\\rm DE}=-0.996\\pm0.042$ when assumed time-independent, the curvature of the Universe to $\\Omega_{k}=-0.0007\\pm 0.0030$ and the sum of the neutrino masses to $\\sum m_{\

  2. Survey of biomass gasification. Volume II. Principles of gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, T.B. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    Biomass can be converted by gasification into a clean-burning gaseous fuel that can be used to retrofit existing gas/oil boilers, to power engines, to generate electricity, and as a base for synthesis of methanol, gasoline, ammonia, or methane. This survey describes biomass gasification, associated technologies, and issues in three volumes. Volume I contains the synopsis and executive summary, giving highlights of the findings of the other volumes. In Volume II the technical background necessary for understanding the science, engineering, and commercialization of biomass is presented. In Volume III the present status of gasification processes is described in detail, followed by chapters on economics, gas conditioning, fuel synthesis, the institutional role to be played by the federal government, and recommendations for future research and development.

  3. Observational cosmology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, RH; Papantonopoulos, E

    2005-01-01

    I discuss the classical cosmological tests, i.e., angular size-redshift, flux-redshift, and galaxy number counts, in the light of the cosmology prescribed by the interpretation of the CMB anisotropies. The discussion is somewhat of a primer for physicists, with emphasis upon the possible systematic

  4. The sloan digital sky Survey-II supernova survey: search algorithm and follow-up observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bassett, Bruce [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Becker, Andrew; Hogan, Craig J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cinabro, David [Department of Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); DeJongh, Fritz; Frieman, Joshua A.; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Depoy, D. L.; Prieto, Jose Luis [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Dilday, Ben; Kessler, Richard [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Doi, Mamoru [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Garnavich, Peter M. [University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, MSC 4500, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Jha, Saurabh [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, P.O. Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States); Konishi, Kohki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8582 (Japan); Lampeitl, Hubert [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Mercantile House, Hampshire Terrace, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2EG (United Kingdom); and others

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg{sup 2} region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the type Ia SNe, the main driver for the survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  5. Imaginative Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenberger, R H; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Magueijo, Joao

    1999-01-01

    We review a few off-the-beaten-track ideas in cosmology. They solve a variety of fundamental problems; also they are fun. We start with a description of non-singular dilaton cosmology. In these scenarios gravity is modified so that the Universe does not have a singular birth. We then present a variety of ideas mixing string theory and cosmology. These solve the cosmological problems usually solved by inflation, and furthermore shed light upon the issue of the number of dimensions of our Universe. We finally review several aspects of the varying speed of light theory. We show how the horizon, flatness, and cosmological constant problems may be solved in this scenario. We finally present a possible experimental test for a realization of this theory: a test in which the Supernovae results are to be combined with recent evidence for redshift dependence in the fine structure constant.

  6. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the configuration-space clustering wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Lippich, Martha; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-01-01

    We explore the cosmological implications of anisotropic clustering measurements in configuration space of the final galaxy samples from Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We implement a new detailed modelling of the effects of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions that can be used to extract unbiased cosmological information from our measurements for scales s ≳ 20 h-1 Mpc. We combined the information from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) with the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and Type Ia supernovae samples and found no significant evidence for a deviation from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological model. In particular, these data sets can constrain the dark energy equation-of-state parameter to wDE = -0.996 ± 0.042 when to be assumed time independent, the curvature of the Universe to Ωk = -0.0007 ± 0.0030 and the sum of the neutrino masses to ∑mν < 0.25 eV at 95 per cent confidence levels. We explore the constraints on the growth rate of cosmic structures assuming f(z) = Ωm(z)γ and obtain γ = 0.609 ± 0.079, in good agreement with the predictions of general relativity of γ = 0.55. We compress the information of our clustering measurements into constraints on the parameter combinations DV(z)/rd, FAP(z) and fσ8(z) at zeff = 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61 with their respective covariance matrices and find good agreement with the predictions for these parameters obtained from the best-fitting ΛCDM model to the CMB data from the Planck satellite. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others by Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  7. 94 studies on dog population in makurdi, nigeria (ii): a survey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STUDIES ON DOG POPULATION IN MAKURDI, NIGERIA (II): A SURVEY OF ... several studies on the ectoparasites of dogs have shown that ..... Epidemiological survey of. JOURNAL OF ... endoparasites of dogs and cats with selamectin.

  8. Effects of the Size of Cosmological N-body Simulations on Physical Quantities – II: Halo Formation and Destruction Rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayanti Prasad

    2007-06-01

    In this study we show how errors due to finite box size affect formation and the destruction rate for haloes in cosmological N-body simulations. In an earlier study we gave an analytic prescription of finding the corrections in the mass function. Following the same approach, in this paper we give analytical expressions for corrections in the formation rate, destruction rate and the rate of change in comoving number density, and compute their expected values for the power law ( = -2) and LCDM models.

  9. Hamiltonian cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M.

    1972-01-01

    The study of cosmological models by means of equations of motion in Hamiltonian form is considered. Hamiltonian methods applied to gravity seem to go back to Rosenfeld (1930), who constructed a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian for linearized general relativity theory. The first to notice that cosmologies provided a simple model in which to demonstrate features of Hamiltonian formulation was DeWitt (1967). Applications of the ADM formalism to homogeneous cosmologies are discussed together with applications of the Hamiltonian formulation, giving attention also to Bianchi-type universes. Problems involving the concept of superspace and techniques of quantization are investigated.

  10. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, Masao; Becker, Andrew C; Brown, Peter J; Campbell, Heather; Cane, Rachel; Cinabro, David; D'Andrea, Chris B; Dawson, Kyle S; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Filippenko, Alexei V; Fischer, John A; Foley, Ryan J; Frieman, Joshua A; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M; Goobar, Ariel; Gupta, Ravi R; Hill, Gary J; Hayden, Brian T; Hlozek, Renee; Holtzman, Jon A; Hopp, Ulrich; Jha, Saurabh W; Kessler, Richard; Kollatschny, Wolfram; Leloudas, Giorgos; Marriner, John; Marshall, Jennifer L; Miquel, Ramon; Morokuma, Tomoki; Mosher, Jennifer; Nichol, Robert C; Nordin, Jakob; Olmstead, Matthew D; Ostman, Linda; Prieto, Jose L; Richmond, Michael; Romani, Roger W; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Max; Schneider, Donald P; Smith, Mathew; Wheeler, J Craig; Yasuda, Naoki; Zheng, Chen

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS Stripe 82, a 300 deg2 area along the celestial equator. This data release is comprised of all transient sources brighter than r~22.5 mag with no history of variability prior to 2004. Dedicated spectroscopic observations were performed on a subset of 889 transients, as well as spectra for thousands of transient host galaxies using the SDSS-III BOSS spectrographs. Photometric classifications are provided for the candidates with good multi-color light curves that were not observed spectroscopically. From these observations, 4607 transients are either spectroscopically confirmed, or likely to be, supernovae, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy ide...

  11. Cosmology and Quantum Field Theory II: Study of an extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with a Dynamical Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    G., Leonardo Quintanar

    2015-01-01

    We study the cosmological implications of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL model) when the coupling constant is field dependent. The NJL model has a four-fermion interaction describing two different phases due to quantum interaction effects and determined by the strength of the coupling constant g. It describes massless fermions for weak coupling and a massive fermions and strong coupling, where a fermion condensate is formed. In the original NJL model the coupling constant g is indeed constant, and in this work we consider a modified version of the NJL model by introducing a dynamical field dependent coupling motivated by string theory. The effective potential as a function of the varying coupling (aimed to implement a natural phase transition) is seen to develop a negative divergence, i.e. becomes a "bottomless well" in certain limit region. Although we explain how an lower unbounded potential is not necessarily unacceptable in a cosmological context, the divergence can be removed if we consider a mass term for ...

  12. Cosmological singularity

    CERN Document Server

    Belinski, V

    2009-01-01

    The talk at international conference in honor of Ya. B. Zeldovich 95th Anniversary, Minsk, Belarus, April 2009. The talk represents a review of the old results and contemporary development on the problem of cosmological singularity.

  13. Neutrino cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Miele, Gennaro; Pastor, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The role that neutrinos have played in the evolution of the Universe is the focus of one of the most fascinating research areas that has stemmed from the interplay between cosmology, astrophysics and particle physics. In this self-contained book, the authors bring together all aspects of the role of neutrinos in cosmology, spanning from leptogenesis to primordial nucleosynthesis, their role in CMB and structure formation, to the problem of their direct detection. The book starts by guiding the reader through aspects of fundamental neutrino physics, such as the standard cosmological model and the statistical mechanics in the expanding Universe, before discussing the history of neutrinos in chronological order from the very early stages until today. This timely book will interest graduate students and researchers in astrophysics, cosmology and particle physics, who work with either a theoretical or experimental focus.

  14. Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Equatorial Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster Sample with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, N; Miyatake, H; Hasselfield, M; Gralla, M B; Allison, R; Bond, J R; Calabrese, E; Crichton, D; Devlin, M J; Dunkley, J; Dünner, R; Erben, T; Ferrara, S; Halpern, M; Hilton, M; Hill, J C; Hincks, A D; Hložek, R; Huffenberger, K M; Hughes, J P; Kneib, J P; Kosowsky, A; Makler, M; Marriage, T A; Menanteau, F; Miller, L; Moodley, K; Moraes, B; Niemack, M D; Page, L; Shan, H; Sehgal, N; Sherwin, B D; Sievers, J L; Sifón, C; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Taylor, J; Thornton, R; van Waerbeke, L; Wollack, E J

    2015-01-01

    Mass calibration uncertainty is the largest systematic effect for using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological parameters. We present weak lensing mass measurements from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey for galaxy clusters selected through their high signal-to-noise thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) signal measured with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The average weak lensing mass is $\\left(4.8\\pm0.8\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$, consistent with the tSZ mass estimate of $\\left(4.70\\pm1.0\\right)\\,\\times10^{14}\\,\\mathrm{M}_\\odot$ which assumes a universal pressure profile for the cluster gas. Our results are consistent with previous weak-lensing measurements of tSZ-detected clusters from the Planck satellite. When comparing our results, we estimate the Eddington bias correction for the sample intersection of Planck and weak-lensing clusters which was previously neglected.

  15. Weak-lensing mass calibration of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope equatorial Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster sample with the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope stripe 82 survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, N.; Leauthaud, A.; Miyatake, H.; Hasselfield, M.; Gralla, M. B.; Allison, R.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Crichton, D.; Devlin, M. J.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; Erben, T.; Ferrara, S.; Halpern, M.; Hilton, M.; Hill, J. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hložek, R.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hughes, J. P.; Kneib, J. P.; Kosowsky, A.; Makler, M.; Marriage, T. A.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, L.; Moodley, K.; Moraes, B.; Niemack, M. D.; Page, L.; Shan, H.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Sifón, C.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Taylor, J. E.; Thornton, R.; van Waerbeke, L.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Mass calibration uncertainty is the largest systematic effect for using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological parameters. We present weak lensing mass measurements from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey for galaxy clusters selected through their high signal-to-noise thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) signal measured with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). For a sample of 9 ACT clusters with a tSZ signal-to-noise greater than five the average weak lensing mass is (4.8±0.8) ×1014 Msolar, consistent with the tSZ mass estimate of (4.70±1.0) ×1014 Msolar which assumes a universal pressure profile for the cluster gas. Our results are consistent with previous weak-lensing measurements of tSZ-detected clusters from the Planck satellite. When comparing our results, we estimate the Eddington bias correction for the sample intersection of Planck and weak-lensing clusters which was previously excluded.

  16. FAST-PT II: an algorithm to calculate convolution integrals of general tensor quantities in cosmological perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiao; Blazek, Jonathan A.; McEwen, Joseph E.; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2017-02-01

    Cosmological perturbation theory is a powerful tool to predict the statistics of large-scale structure in the weakly non-linear regime, but even at 1-loop order it results in computationally expensive mode-coupling integrals. Here we present a fast algorithm for computing 1-loop power spectra of quantities that depend on the observer's orientation, thereby generalizing the FAST-PT framework (McEwen et al., 2016) that was originally developed for scalars such as the matter density. This algorithm works for an arbitrary input power spectrum and substantially reduces the time required for numerical evaluation. We apply the algorithm to four examples: intrinsic alignments of galaxies in the tidal torque model; the Ostriker-Vishniac effect; the secondary CMB polarization due to baryon flows; and the 1-loop matter power spectrum in redshift space. Code implementing this algorithm and these applications is publicly available at https://github.com/JoeMcEwen/FAST-PT.

  17. FAST-PT II: an algorithm to calculate convolution integrals of general tensor quantities in cosmological perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Xiao; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological perturbation theory is a powerful tool to predict the statistics of large-scale structure in the weakly non-linear regime, but even at 1-loop order it results in computationally expensive mode-coupling integrals. Here we present a fast algorithm for computing 1-loop power spectra of quantities that depend on the observer's orientation, thereby generalizing the FAST-PT framework (McEwen et al., 2016) that was originally developed for scalars such as the matter density. This algorithm works for an arbitrary input power spectrum and substantially reduces the time required for numerical evaluation. We apply the algorithm to four examples: intrinsic alignments of galaxies in the tidal torque model; the Ostriker-Vishniac effect; the secondary CMB polarization due to baryon flows; and the 1-loop matter power spectrum in redshift space. Code implementing this algorithm and these applications is publicly available at https://github.com/JoeMcEwen/FAST-PT.

  18. iCosmo: an interactive cosmology package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refregier, A.; Amara, A.; Kitching, T. D.; Rassat, A.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: The interactive software package iCosmo, designed to perform cosmological calculations is described. Methods: iCosmo is a software package to perfom interactive cosmological calculations for the low-redshift universe. Computing distance measures, the matter power spectrum, and the growth factor is supported for any values of the cosmological parameters. It also computes derived observed quantities for several cosmological probes such as cosmic shear, baryon acoustic oscillations, and type Ia supernovae. The associated errors for these observable quantities can be derived for customised surveys, or for pre-set values corresponding to current or planned instruments. The code also allows for calculation of cosmological forecasts with Fisher matrices, which can be manipulated to combine different surveys and cosmological probes. The code is written in the IDL language and thus benefits from the convenient interactive features and scientific libraries available in this language. iCosmo can also be used as an engine to perform cosmological calculations in batch mode, and forms a convenient adaptive platform for the development of further cosmological modules. With its extensive documentation, it may also serve as a useful resource for teaching and for newcomers to the field of cosmology. Results: The iCosmo package is described with a number of examples and command sequences. The code is freely available with documentation at http://www.icosmo.org, along with an interactive web interface and is part of the Initiative for Cosmology, a common archive for cosmological resources.

  19. Cosmology from start to finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L

    2006-04-27

    Cosmology is undergoing a revolution. With recent precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation, large galaxy redshift surveys, better measurements of the expansion rate of the Universe and a host of other astrophysical observations, there is now a standard, highly constrained cosmological model. It is not a cosmology that was predicted. Unidentified dark particles dominate the matter content of our Universe, and mysteries surround the processes responsible for the accelerated expansion at its earliest moments (inflation?) and for its recent acceleration (dark energy?). New measurements must address the fundamental questions: what happened at the birth of the Universe, and what is its ultimate fate?

  20. Cosmological principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesson, P.S.

    1979-10-01

    The Cosmological Principle states: the universe looks the same to all observers regardless of where they are located. To most astronomers today the Cosmological Principle means the universe looks the same to all observers because density of the galaxies is the same in all places. A new Cosmological Principle is proposed. It is called the Dimensional Cosmological Principle. It uses the properties of matter in the universe: density (rho), pressure (p), and mass (m) within some region of space of length (l). The laws of physics require incorporation of constants for gravity (G) and the speed of light (C). After combining the six parameters into dimensionless numbers, the best choices are: 8..pi..Gl/sup 2/ rho/c/sup 2/, 8..pi..Gl/sup 2/ rho/c/sup 4/, and 2 Gm/c/sup 2/l (the Schwarzchild factor). The Dimensional Cosmological Principal came about because old ideas conflicted with the rapidly-growing body of observational evidence indicating that galaxies in the universe have a clumpy rather than uniform distribution. (SC)

  1. Deconstructing cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    The advent of sensitive high-resolution observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation and their successful interpretation in terms of the standard cosmological model has led to great confidence in this model's reality. The prevailing attitude is that we now understand the Universe and need only work out the details. In this book, Sanders traces the development and successes of Lambda-CDM, and argues that this triumphalism may be premature. The model's two major components, dark energy and dark matter, have the character of the pre-twentieth-century luminiferous aether. While there is astronomical evidence for these hypothetical fluids, their enigmatic properties call into question our assumptions of the universality of locally determined physical law. Sanders explains how modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) is a significant challenge for cold dark matter. Overall, the message is hopeful: the field of cosmology has not become frozen, and there is much fundamental work ahead for tomorrow's cosmologis...

  2. Dimensionless cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Narimani, Ali; Scott, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Although it is possible that some fundamental physical constants could vary in time, it is important to only consider dimensionless combinations, such as the fine structure constant or the equivalent coupling constant for gravity. Once all such dimensionless numbers have been given, then we can be sure that our cosmological picture is governed by the same physical laws as that of another civilization with an entirely different set of units. An additional feature of the standard model of cosmology raises an extra complication, namely that the epoch at which we live is a crucial part of the model. This can be defined by giving the value of any one of the evolving cosmological parameters. It takes some care to avoid inconsistent results for constraints on variable constants, which could be caused by effectively fixing more than one parameter today. We show examples of this effect by considering in some detail the physics of Big Bang nucleosynthesis, recombination and microwave background anisotropies, being care...

  3. Cosmological bootstrap

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, V V

    2012-01-01

    A huge value of cosmological constant characteristic for the particle physics and the inflation of early Universe are inherently related to each other: one can construct a fine-tuned superpotential, which produces a flat potential of inflaton with a constant density of energy V=\\Lambda^4 after taking into account for leading effects due to the supergravity, so that an introduction of small quantum loop-corrections to parameters of this superpotential naturally results in the dynamical instability relaxing the primary cosmological constant by means of inflationary regime. The model phenomenologically agrees with observational data on the large scale structure of Universe at \\Lambda~10^{16} GeV.

  4. Characterising large-scale structure with the REFLEX II cluster survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Gayoung

    2016-10-01

    We study the large-scale structure with superclusters from the REFLEX X-ray cluster survey together with cosmological N-body simulations. It is important to construct superclusters with criteria such that they are homogeneous in their properties. We lay out our theoretical concept considering future evolution of superclusters in their definition, and show that the X-ray luminosity and halo mass functions of clusters in superclusters are found to be top-heavy, different from those of clusters in the field. We also show a promising aspect of using superclusters to study the local cluster bias and mass scaling relation with simulations.

  5. Characterising large-scale structure with the REFLEX II cluster survey

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Gayoung

    2015-01-01

    We study the large-scale structure with superclusters from the REFLEX X-ray cluster survey together with cosmological N-body simulations. It is important to construct superclusters with criteria such that they are homogeneous in their properties. We lay out our theoretical concept considering future evolution of superclusters in their definition, and show that the X-ray luminosity and halo mass functions of clusters in superclusters are found to be top-heavy, different from those of clusters in the field. We also show a promising aspect of using superclusters to study the local cluster bias and mass scaling relation with simulations.

  6. Integrable Scalar Cosmologies II. Can they fit into Gauged Extended Supergavity or be encoded in N=1 superpotentials?

    CERN Document Server

    Fre, P; Trigiante, M

    2013-01-01

    The question whether the integrable one-field cosmologies classified in a previous paper by Fre, Sagnotti and Sorin can be embedded as consistent one-field truncations into Extended Gauged Supergravity or in N=1 supergravity gauged by a superpotential without the use of D-terms is addressed in this paper. The answer is that such an embedding is very difficult and rare but not impossible. Indeed we were able to find two examples of integrable models embedded in Supergravity in this way. Both examples are fitted into N=1 Supergravity by means of a very specific and interesting choice of the superpotential W(z). The question whether there are examples of such an embedding in extended Gauged Supergravity remains open. In the present paper, relying on the embedding tensor formalism we classified all gaugings of the N=2 STU model, confirming, in the absence on hypermultiplets, the uniqueness of the stable de Sitter vacuum found several years ago by Fre, Trigiante and Van Proeyen and excluding the embedding of any i...

  7. iCosmo: an Interactive Cosmology Package

    CERN Document Server

    Refregier, Alexandre; Kitching, Thomas; Rassat, Anais

    2008-01-01

    iCosmo is a software package to perform interactive cosmological calculations for the low redshift universe. The computation of distance measures, the matter power spectrum, and the growth factor is supported for any values of the cosmological parameters. It also performs the computation of observables for several cosmological probes such as weak gravitational lensing, baryon acoustic oscillations and supernovae. The associated errors for these observables can be derived for customised surveys, or for pre-set values corresponding to current or planned instruments. The code also allows for the calculation of cosmological forecasts with Fisher matrices which can be manipulated to combine different surveys and cosmological probes. The code is written in the IDL language and thus benefits from the convenient interactive features and scientific library available in this language. iCosmo can also be used as an engine to perform cosmological calculations in batch mode, and forms a convenient evolutive platform for t...

  8. Axion Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, David J E

    2015-01-01

    Axions comprise a broad class of particles that can play a major role in explaining the unknown aspects of cosmology. They are also extraordinarily well-motivated within high energy physics, and so axion cosmology offers us a unique view onto these theories. I present a comprehensive and pedagogical view on the cosmology and astrophysics of axion-like particles, starting from inflation and progressing via the CMB and structure formation up to the present-day Universe. I briefly review the motivation and models for axions in particle physics and string theory. The primary focus is on the population of ultralight axions created via vacuum realignment, and its role as a dark matter (DM) candidate with distinctive phenomenology. Cosmological observations place robust constraints on the axion mass and relic density in this scenario, and I review where such constraints come from. I next cover aspects of galaxy formation with axion DM, and ways this can be used to further search for evidence of axions. An absolute l...

  9. Be Stars as Seen Through Telescopes in Survey Mode (II)

    CERN Document Server

    Rivinius, Th; Baade, D

    2016-01-01

    The first half of the review dedicated to survey works on Be stars (Baade, Martayan, and Rivinius, this vol.) put emphasis on what we can learn from surveys about Be stars as a part of an environment, such as Be stars in binaries, Be stars in different metalicities, or Be stars as part of a star forming and then co-evolving group. This second half will rather concentrate on the information that more focused surveys can give on a Be star, understood as an individual object, and in this way attempts to bridge the gap between highly detailed single star studies, and necessarily broad survey and catalog work.

  10. Burrell-Optical-Kepler Survey (BOKS) II: Early Variability Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Feldmeier, J.; von Braun, K.; Everett, M.; Mihos, C.; Harding, P.; Knox, C.; Sherry, W.; Lee, T.; Ciardi, D.; Rudick, C.; Proctor, M.; van Belle, G.

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results for the photometric time-series data obtained with the BOKS survey (see BOKS I poster Feldmeier et al.). The BOKS survey covers about 1 square degree in the constellation of Cygnus. We obtained nearly 2000 SDSS r-band images spanning a total time period of 39 days. Each point source in our BOKS survey is also present in the single epoch, 7-color photometric survey catalogue being produced by the NASA Discovery program Kepler mission. Light curves of approximately 60,000 point sources, spanning r=14 to 20, are examined and discussed. We will present variability demographics for the BOKS survey including characterization of the light curves into variable classes based on type, color, amplitude, and any extra-solar planet transit candidates.

  11. Seeing in the dark -- II. Cosmic shear in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Huff, Eric M; Hirata, Christopher M; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Schlegel, David; Seljak, Uros

    2011-01-01

    Statistical weak lensing by large-scale structure -- cosmic shear -- is a promising cosmological tool, which has motivated the design of several large upcoming surveys. Here, we present a measurement of cosmic shear using coadded Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging in 168 square degrees of the equatorial region, with r<23.5 and i<22.5, a source number density of 2.2 galaxies per square arcminute and median redshift of 0.52. These coadds were generated using a new method described in the companion Paper I that was intended to minimise systematic errors in the lensing measurement due to coherent PSF anisotropies that are otherwise prevalent in the SDSS imaging data. We present measurements of cosmic shear out to angular separations of 2 degrees, along with systematics tests that (combined with those from Paper I on the catalogue generation) demonstrate that our results are dominated by statistical rather than systematic errors. Assuming a cosmological model corresponding to WMAP7 and allowing only the...

  12. Cosmological ``Truths''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothun, Greg

    2011-10-01

    Ever since Aristotle placed us, with certainty, in the Center of the Cosmos, Cosmological models have more or less operated from a position of known truths for some time. As early as 1963, for instance, it was ``known'' that the Universe had to be 15-17 billion years old due to the suspected ages of globular clusters. For many years, attempts to determine the expansion age of the Universe (the inverse of the Hubble constant) were done against this preconceived and biased notion. Not surprisingly when more precise observations indicated a Hubble expansion age of 11-13 billion years, stellar models suddenly changed to produce a new age for globular cluster stars, consistent with 11-13 billion years. Then in 1980, to solve a variety of standard big bang problems, inflation was introduced in a fairly ad hoc manner. Inflation makes the simple prediction that the net curvature of spacetime is zero (i.e. spacetime is flat). The consequence of introducing inflation is now the necessary existence of a dark matter dominated Universe since the known baryonic material could comprise no more than 1% of the necessary energy density to make spacetime flat. As a result of this new cosmological ``truth'' a significant world wide effort was launched to detect the dark matter (which obviously also has particle physics implications). To date, no such cosmological component has been detected. Moreover, all available dynamical inferences of the mass density of the Universe showed in to be about 20% of that required for closure. This again was inconsistent with the truth that the real density of the Universe was the closure density (e.g. Omega = 1), that the observations were biased, and that 99% of the mass density had to be in the form of dark matter. That is, we know the universe is two component -- baryons and dark matter. Another prevailing cosmological truth during this time was that all the baryonic matter was known to be in galaxies that populated our galaxy catalogs. Subsequent

  13. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, Shadab; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blazek, Jonathan A; Bolton, Adam S; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J; Dawson, Kyle S; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Reid, Beth A; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Satpathy, Siddharth; Scóccola, Claudia G; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simmons, Audrey; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A; Swanson, Molly E C; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A; Wang, Yuting; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhai, Zhongxu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg^2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc^3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51, and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DM*H from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by f{\\sigma}8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one m...

  14. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Sunyaev Zel'dovich Selected Galaxy Clusters at 148 GHz in the 2008 Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Marriage, T A; Ade, P A R; Aguirre, P; Amiri, M; Appel, J W; Barrientos, L F; Battistelli, E S; Bond, J R; Brown, B; Burger, B; Chervenak, J; Das, S; Devlin, M J; Dicker, S R; Doriese, W B; Dunkley, J; Dunner, R; Essinger-Hileman, T; Fisher, R P; Fowler, J W; Hajian, A; Halpern, M; Hasselfield, M; Hern'andez-Monteagudo, C; Hilton, G C; Hilton, M; Hincks, A D; Hlozek, R; Huffenberger, K M; Hughes, D H; Hughes, J P; Infante, L; Irwin, K D; Juin, J B; Kaul, M; Klein, J; Kosowsky, A; Lau, J M; Limon, M; Lin, Y -T; Lupton, R H; Marsden, D; Martocci, K; Mauskopf, P; Menanteau, F; Moodley, K; Moseley, H; Netterfield, C B; Niemack, M D; Nolta, M R; Page, L A; Parker, L; Partridge, B; Quintana, H; Reese, E D; Reid, B; Sehgal, N; Sherwin, B D; Sievers, J; Spergel, D N; Staggs, S T; Swetz, D S; Switzer, E R; Thornton, R; Trac, H; Tucker, C; Warne, R; Wilson, G; Wollack, E; Zhao, Y

    2010-01-01

    We report on twenty-three clusters detected blindly as Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) decrements in a 148 GHz, 455 square-degree map of the southern sky made with data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope 2008 observing season. All SZ detections have confirmed optical counterparts. Ten of the clusters are new discoveries. One newly discovered cluster, ACT-CL J0102-4915, with a redshift of 0.75 (photometric), has an SZ decrement comparable to the most massive systems at lower redshifts. Simulations of the cluster recovery method reproduce the sample purity measured by optical follow-up. In particular, for clusters detected with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than six, simulations are consistent with optical follow-up that demonstrated this subsample is 100% pure. The simulations further imply that the total sample is 80% complete for clusters with mass in excess of 6x10^14 solar masses referenced to the cluster volume characterized by five hundred times the critical density. The Compton y -- X-ray luminosity mass co...

  15. Axion cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, David J. E.

    2016-07-01

    Axions comprise a broad class of particles that can play a major role in explaining the unknown aspects of cosmology. They are also well-motivated within high energy physics, appearing in theories related to CP-violation in the standard model, supersymmetric theories, and theories with extra-dimensions, including string theory, and so axion cosmology offers us a unique view onto these theories. I review the motivation and models for axions in particle physics and string theory. I then present a comprehensive and pedagogical view on the cosmology and astrophysics of axion-like particles, starting from inflation and progressing via BBN, the CMB, reionization and structure formation, up to the present-day Universe. Topics covered include: axion dark matter (DM); direct and indirect detection of axions, reviewing existing and future experiments; axions as dark radiation; axions and the cosmological constant problem; decays of heavy axions; axions and stellar astrophysics; black hole superradiance; axions and astrophysical magnetic fields; axion inflation, and axion DM as an indirect probe of inflation. A major focus is on the population of ultralight axions created via vacuum realignment, and its role as a DM candidate with distinctive phenomenology. Cosmological observations place robust constraints on the axion mass and relic density in this scenario, and I review where such constraints come from. I next cover aspects of galaxy formation with axion DM, and ways this can be used to further search for evidence of axions. An absolute lower bound on DM particle mass is established. It is ma > 10-24eV from linear observables, extending to ma ≳ 10-22eV from non-linear observables, and has the potential to reach ma ≳ 10-18eV in the future. These bounds are weaker if the axion is not all of the DM, giving rise to limits on the relic density at low mass. This leads to the exciting possibility that the effects of axion DM on structure formation could one day be detected

  16. Optimal Moments for the Analysis of Peculiar Velocity Surveys II: Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, H A; Melott, A L; Chambers, S W; Feldman, Hume A.; Watkins, Richard; Melott, Adrian L.; Chambers, Scott W.

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of peculiar velocity surveys face several challenges, including low signal--to--noise in individual velocity measurements and the presence of small--scale, nonlinear flows. This is the second in a series of papers in which we describe a new method of overcoming these problems by using data compression as a filter with which to separate large--scale, linear flows from small--scale noise that can bias results. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method using realistic catalogs of galaxy velocities drawn from N--body simulations. Our tests show that a likelihood analysis of simulated catalogs that uses all of the information contained in the peculiar velocities results in a bias in the estimation of the power spectrum shape parameter $\\Gamma$ and amplitude $\\beta$, and that our method of analysis effectively removes this bias. We expect that this new method will cause peculiar velocity surveys to re--emerge as a useful tool to determine cosmological parameters.

  17. National Youth Survey US: Wave II (NYS-1977)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Youth data for the second wave of the National Youth Survey are contained in this data collection. The first wave was conducted in 1976. Youths were interviewed in...

  18. A Survey of Fertilizer Dealers: II. Sources of Agronomic Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a survey of fertilizer dealers that was conducted to assess how the dealers were obtaining their agronomic information, aside from formal training sessions, and determine if these sources of information were satisfactory in fulfilling the dealers' needs. (TW)

  19. Dionysian cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Neves, J C S

    2015-01-01

    In the Nietzschean philosophy, the concept of force from physics is important to build one of its main concepts: the will to power. The concept of force, which Nietzsche found out in the Classical Mechanics, almost disappears in the physics of the XX century with the Quantum Field Theory and General Relativity. Is the Nietzschean world as contending forces, a Dionysian cosmology, possible in the current science?

  20. Superstring cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Enrique

    1985-01-01

    Some cosmological consequences of the assumption that superstrings are more fundamental objects than ordinary local quantum fields are examined. We study, in particular, the dependence of both the string tension and the temperature of the primordial string soup on cosmic time. A particular scenario is proposed in which the universe undergoes a contracting ``string phase'' before the ordinary ``big bang,'' which according to this picture is nothing but the outcome of the transition from nonlocal to local fundamental physics.

  1. Medieval Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    During the early Middle Ages (ca 500 to ca 1130) scholars with an interest in cosmology had little useful and dependable literature. They relied heavily on a partial Latin translation of PLATO's Timaeus by Chalcidius (4th century AD), and on a series of encyclopedic treatises associated with the names of Pliny the Elder (ca AD 23-79), Seneca (4 BC-AD 65), Macrobius (fl 5th century AD), Martianus ...

  2. Goldstone Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We investigate scalar-tensor theories where matter couples to the scalar field via a kinetically dependent conformal coupling. These models can be seen as the low-energy description of invariant field theories under a global Abelian symmetry. The scalar field is then identified with the Goldstone mode of the broken symmetry. It turns out that the properties of these models are very similar to the ones of ultralocal theories where the scalar-field value is directly determined by the local matter density. This leads to a complete screening of the fifth force in the Solar System and between compact objects, through the ultralocal screening mechanism. On the other hand, the fifth force can have large effects in extended structures with large-scale density gradients, such as galactic halos. Interestingly, it can either amplify or damp Newtonian gravity, depending on the model parameters. We also study the background cosmology and the linear cosmological perturbations. The background cosmology is hardly different f...

  3. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Ata, Metin; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Reid, Beth A.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simmons, Audrey; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A.; Wang, Yuting; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhai, Zhongxu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-09-01

    We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method, in combination with a cosmic microwave background prior on the sound horizon scale, after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DMH from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by fσ8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine individual measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one method; in particular, the AP measurement from sub-BAO scales sharpens constraints from post-reconstruction BAOs by breaking degeneracy between DM and H. Combined with Planck 2016 cosmic microwave background measurements, our distance scale measurements simultaneously imply curvature ΩK = 0.0003 ± 0.0026 and a dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -1.01 ± 0.06, in strong affirmation of the spatially flat cold dark matter (CDM) model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM). Our RSD measurements of fσ8, at 6 per cent precision, are similarly consistent with this model. When combined with supernova Ia data, we find H0 = 67.3 ± 1.0 km s-1 Mpc-1 even for our most general dark energy model, in tension with some direct measurements. Adding extra relativistic species as a degree of freedom loosens the constraint only slightly, to H0 = 67.8 ± 1.2 km s-1 Mpc-1. Assuming flat

  4. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array by SKA-Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kohri, Kazunori; Namikawa, Toshiya; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takahashi, Tomo; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Yoshikawa, Kohji

    2016-12-01

    In the past several decades, the standard cosmological model has been established and its parameters have been measured to a high precision, while there are still many fundamental questions in cosmology; such as the physics in the very early universe, the origin of the cosmic acceleration, and the nature of dark matter. The forthcoming radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the world's largest, will be able to open a new frontier in cosmology and will be one of the most powerful tools for cosmology in the coming decade. The cosmological surveys conducted by the SKA would have the potential not only to answer these fundamental questions but also deliver precision cosmology. In this article we briefly review the role of the SKA from the viewpoint of modern cosmology. The cosmological science led by the SKA-Japan Consortium (SKA-JP) Cosmology Science Working Group is also discussed.

  5. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array by SKA-Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kohri, Kazunori; Namikawa, Toshiya; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takahashi, Tomo; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Yoshikawa, Kohji

    2016-10-01

    In the past several decades, the standard cosmological model has been established and its parameters have been measured to a high precision, while there are still many fundamental questions in cosmology; such as the physics in the very early universe, the origin of the cosmic acceleration, and the nature of dark matter. The forthcoming radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the world's largest, will be able to open a new frontier in cosmology and will be one of the most powerful tools for cosmology in the coming decade. The cosmological surveys conducted by the SKA would have the potential not only to answer these fundamental questions but also deliver precision cosmology. In this article we briefly review the role of the SKA from the viewpoint of modern cosmology. The cosmological science led by the SKA-Japan Consortium (SKA-JP) Cosmology Science Working Group is also discussed.

  6. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array by SKA-Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Kohri, Kazunori; Namikawa, Toshiya; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takahashi, Tomo; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Yoshikawa, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    In the past several decades, the standard cosmological model has been established and its parameters have been measured to a high precision, while there are still many of the fundamental questions in cosmology; such as the physics in the very early Universe, the origin of the cosmic acceleration and the nature of the dark matter. The future world's largest radio telescope, Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to open the new frontier of cosmology and will be one of the most powerful tools for cosmology in the next decade. The cosmological surveys conducted by the SKA would have the potential not only to answer these fundamental questions but also deliver the precision cosmology. In this article we briefly review the role of the SKA from the view point of the modern cosmology. The cosmology science led by the SKA-Japan Consortium (SKA-JP) Cosmology Science Working Group is also discussed.

  7. Quantum Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin

    The universe, ultimately, is to be described by quantum theory. Quantum aspects of all there is, including space and time, may not be significant for many purposes, but are crucial for some. And so a quantum description of cosmology is required for a complete and consistent worldview. At any rate, even if we were not directly interested in regimes where quantum cosmology plays a role, a complete physical description could not stop at a stage before the whole universe is reached. Quantum theory is essential in the microphysics of particles, atoms, molecules, solids, white dwarfs and neutron stars. Why should one expect this ladder of scales to end at a certain size? If regimes are sufficiently violent and energetic, quantum effects are non-negligible even on scales of the whole cosmos; this is realized at least once in the history of the universe: at the big bang where the classical theory of general relativity would make energy densities diverge. 1.Lachieze-Rey, M., Luminet, J.P.: Phys. Rept. 254,135 (1995), gr-qc/9605010 2.BSDeWitt1967Phys. Rev.160511131967PhRv..160.1113D0158.4650410.1103/PhysRev.160.1113DeWitt, B.S.: Phys. Rev. 160(5), 1113 (1967) 3.Wiltshire, D.L.: In: Robson B., Visvanathan N., Woolcock W.S. (eds.) Cosmology: The Physics of the Universe, pp. 473-531. World Scientific, Singapore (1996). gr-qc/0101003 4.Isham C.J.: In: DeWitt, B.S., Stora, R. (eds.) Relativity, Groups and Topology II. Lectures Given at the 1983 Les Houches Summer School on Relativity, Groups and Topology, Elsevier Science Publishing Company (1986) 5.Klauder, J.: Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 12, 1769 (2003), gr-qc/0305067 6.Klauder, J.: Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 3, 81 (2006), gr-qc/0507113 7.DGiulini1995Phys. Rev. D5110563013381161995PhRvD..51.5630G10.1103/PhysRevD.51.5630Giulini, D.: Phys. Rev. D 51(10), 5630 (1995) 8.Kiefer, C., Zeh, H.D.: Phys. Rev. D 51, 4145 (1995), gr-qc/9402036 9.WFBlythCJIsham1975Phys. Rev. D117684086991975PhRvD..11..768B10.1103/PhysRevD.11.768Blyth, W

  8. Parameterized post-Newtonian cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghai, Viraj A. A.; Clifton, Timothy

    2017-03-01

    Einstein’s theory of gravity has been extensively tested on solar system scales, and for isolated astrophysical systems, using the perturbative framework known as the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. This framework is designed for use in the weak-field and slow-motion limit of gravity, and can be used to constrain a large class of metric theories of gravity with data collected from the aforementioned systems. Given the potential of future surveys to probe cosmological scales to high precision, it is a topic of much contemporary interest to construct a similar framework to link Einstein’s theory of gravity and its alternatives to observations on cosmological scales. Our approach to this problem is to adapt and extend the existing PPN formalism for use in cosmology. We derive a set of equations that use the same parameters to consistently model both weak fields and cosmology. This allows us to parameterize a large class of modified theories of gravity and dark energy models on cosmological scales, using just four functions of time. These four functions can be directly linked to the background expansion of the universe, first-order cosmological perturbations, and the weak-field limit of the theory. They also reduce to the standard PPN parameters on solar system scales. We illustrate how dark energy models and scalar-tensor and vector-tensor theories of gravity fit into this framework, which we refer to as ‘parameterized post-Newtonian cosmology’ (PPNC).

  9. Cosmological Constraints from Measurements of Type Ia Supernovae discovered during the first 1.5 years of the Pan-STARRS1 Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Rest, A; Foley, R J; Huber, M E; Chornock, R; Narayan, G; Tonry, J L; Berger, E; Soderberg, A M; Stubbs, C W; Riess, A; Kirshner, R P; Smartt, S J; Schlafly, E; Rodney, S; Botticella, M T; Brout, D; Challis, P; Czekala, I; Drout, M; Hudson, M J; Kotak, R; Leibler, C; Lunnan, R; Marion, G H; McCrum, M; Milisavljevic, D; Pastorello, A; Sanders, N E; Smith, K; Stafford, E; Thilker, D; Valenti, S; Wood-Vasey, W M; Zheng, Z; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Denneau, L; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Hodapp, K W; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Wainscoat, R; Waters, C

    2013-01-01

    We present griz light curves of 146 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia Supernovae (0.03Survey. The Pan-STARRS1 natural photometric system is determined by a combination of on-site measurements of the instrument response function and observations of spectrophotometric standard stars. We have investigated spatial and time variations in the photometry, and we find that the systematic uncertainties in the photometric system are currently 1.2% without accounting for the uncertainty in the HST Calspec definition of the AB system. We discuss our efforts to minimize the systematic uncertainties in the photometry. A Hubble diagram is constructed with a subset of 112 SNe Ia (out of the 146) that pass our light curve quality cuts. The cosmological fit to 313 SNe Ia (112 PS1 SNe Ia + 201 low-z SNe Ia), using only SNe and assuming a constant dark energy equation of state and flatness, yields w = -1.015^{+0.319}_{-0.201}(Stat)+{0.164}_{-0....

  10. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: blank-field number counts of 450um-selected galaxies and their contribution to the cosmic infrared background

    CERN Document Server

    Geach, J E; Coppin, K E K; Dunlop, J S; Halpern, M; Smail, Ian; van der Werf, P; Serjeant, S; Farrah, D; Roseboom, I; Targett, T; Arumugam, V; Asboth, V; Blain, A; Chrysostomou, A; Clarke, C; Ivison, R J; Jones, S L; Karim, A; Mackenzie, T; Meijerink, R; Michalowski, M J; Scott, D; Simpson, J; Swinbank, A M; Alexander, D; Almaini, O; Aretxaga, I; Best, P; Chapman, S; Clements, D L; Conselice, C; Danielson, A L R; Eales, S; Edge, A C; Gibb, A; Hughes, D; Jenness, T; Knudsen, K K; Lacey, C; Marsden, G; McMahon, R; Oliver, S; Page, M J; Peacock, J A; Rigopoulou, D; Robson, E I; Spaans, M; Stevens, J; Webb, T M A; Willott, C; Wilson, C D; Zemcov, M

    2012-01-01

    The first deep blank-field 450um map (1-sigma~1.3mJy) from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS), conducted with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) is presented. Our map covers 140 arcmin^2 of the COSMOS field, in the footprint of the HST CANDELS area. Using 60 submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) detected at >3.75-sigma, we evaluate the number counts of 450um-selected galaxies with flux densities S_450>5mJy. The 8-arcsec JCMT beam and high sensitivity of SCUBA-2 now make it possible to directly resolve a larger fraction of the cosmic infrared background (CIB, peaking at ~200um) into the individual galaxies responsible for its emission than has previously been possible at this wavelength. At S_450>5mJy we resolve (7.4[+/-]0.7)x10^-2 MJy/sr of the CIB at 450um (equivalent to 16[+/-]7% of the absolute brightness measured by COBE at this wavelength) into point sources. A further ~40% of the CIB can be recovered through a statistical stack of 24um emitters in this field, indicating that the majority (~60%) o...

  11. Cold Dust Emission from X-ray AGN in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: Dependence on Luminosity, Obscuration & AGN Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Banerji, Manda; Willott, C J; Geach, J E; Harrison, C M; Alaghband-Zadeh, S; Alexander, D M; Bourne, N; Coppin, K E K; Dunlop, J S; Farrah, D; Jarvis, M; Michalowski, M J; Page, M; Smith, D J B; Swinbank, A M; Symeonidis, M; Van der Werf, P P

    2015-01-01

    We study the 850um emission in X-ray selected AGN in the 2 sq-deg COSMOS field using new data from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We find 19 850um bright X-ray AGN in a high-sensitivity region covering 0.89 sq-deg with flux densities of S850=4-10 mJy. The 19 AGN span the full range in redshift and hard X-ray luminosity covered by the sample - 0.71 X-ray AGN - S850=0.71+/-0.08mJy. We explore trends in the stacked 850um flux densities with redshift, finding no evolution in the average cold dust emission over the redshift range probed. For Type 1 AGN, there is no significant correlation between the stacked 850um flux and hard X-ray luminosity. However, in Type 2 AGN the stacked submm flux is a factor of 2 higher at high luminosities. When averaging over all X-ray luminosities, no significant differences are found in the stacked submm fluxes of Type 1 and Type 2 AGN as well as AGN separated on the basis of X-ray hardness ratios and optical-to-infrared colours. However, at log10(LX) >44.4, dependences in ave...

  12. Religion, theology and cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Fitzgerald

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cosmology is one of the predominant research areas of the contemporary world. Advances in modern cosmology have prompted renewed interest in the intersections between religion, theology and cosmology. This article, which is intended as a brief introduction to the series of studies on theological cosmology in this journal, identifies three general areas of theological interest stemming from the modern scientific study of cosmology: contemporary theology and ethics; cosmology and world religions; and ancient cosmologies. These intersections raise important questions about the relationship of religion and cosmology, which has recently been addressed by William Scott Green and is the focus of the final portion of the article.

  13. Chemical cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Boeyens, Jan CA

    2010-01-01

    The composition of the most remote objects brought into view by the Hubble telescope can no longer be reconciled with the nucleogenesis of standard cosmology and the alternative explanation, in terms of the LAMBDA-Cold-Dark-Matter model, has no recognizable chemical basis. A more rational scheme, based on the chemistry and periodicity of atomic matter, opens up an exciting new interpretation of the cosmos in terms of projective geometry and general relativity. The response of atomic structure to environmental pressure predicts non-Doppler cosmical redshifts and equilibrium nucleogenesis by alp

  14. Quantum Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Bojowald, Martin

    1999-01-01

    A complete model of the universe needs at least three parts: (1) a complete set of physical variables and dynamical laws for them, (2) the correct solution of the dynamical laws, and (3) the connection with conscious experience. In quantum cosmology, item (2) is the quantum state of the cosmos. Hartle and Hawking have made the `no-boundary' proposal, that the wavefunction of the universe is given by a path integral over all compact Euclidean 4-dimensional geometries and matter fields that hav...

  15. Rastall cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Fabris, J C; Rodrigues, D C; Batista, C E M; Daouda, M H

    2012-01-01

    We review the difficulties of the generalized Chaplygin gas model to fit observational data, due to the tension between background and perturbative tests. We argue that such issues may be circumvented by means of a self-interacting scalar field representation of the model. However, this proposal seems to be successful only if the self-interacting scalar field has a non-canonical form. The latter can be implemented in Rastall's theory of gravity, which is based on a modification of the usual matter conservation law. We show that, besides its application to the generalized Chaplygin gas model, other cosmological models based on Rastall's theory have many interesting and unexpected new features.

  16. Cosmological constraints from measurements of type Ia supernovae discovered during the first 1.5 yr of the Pan-STARRS1 survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Scolnic, D.; Riess, A.; Rodney, S.; Brout, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stubbs, C. W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Challis, P.; Czekala, I.; Drout, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Huber, M. E.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Narayan, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smartt, S. J. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT71NN (United Kingdom); Schlafly, E. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Botticella, M. T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-11-01

    We present griz {sub P1} light curves of 146 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia; 0.03 < z < 0.65) discovered during the first 1.5 yr of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey. The Pan-STARRS1 natural photometric system is determined by a combination of on-site measurements of the instrument response function and observations of spectrophotometric standard stars. We find that the systematic uncertainties in the photometric system are currently 1.2% without accounting for the uncertainty in the Hubble Space Telescope Calspec definition of the AB system. A Hubble diagram is constructed with a subset of 113 out of 146 SNe Ia that pass our light curve quality cuts. The cosmological fit to 310 SNe Ia (113 PS1 SNe Ia + 222 light curves from 197 low-z SNe Ia), using only supernovae (SNe) and assuming a constant dark energy equation of state and flatness, yields w=−1.120{sub −0.206}{sup +0.360}(Stat){sub −0.291}{sup +0.269}(Sys). When combined with BAO+CMB(Planck)+H {sub 0}, the analysis yields Ω{sub M}=0.280{sub −0.012}{sup +0.013} and w=−1.166{sub −0.069}{sup +0.072} including all identified systematics. The value of w is inconsistent with the cosmological constant value of –1 at the 2.3σ level. Tension endures after removing either the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) or the H {sub 0} constraint, though it is strongest when including the H {sub 0} constraint. If we include WMAP9 cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraints instead of those from Planck, we find w=−1.124{sub −0.065}{sup +0.083}, which diminishes the discord to <2σ. We cannot conclude whether the tension with flat ΛCDM is a feature of dark energy, new physics, or a combination of chance and systematic errors. The full Pan-STARRS1 SN sample with ∼three times as many SNe should provide more conclusive results.

  17. Coasting cosmologies with time dependent cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Pimentel, L O; Pimentel, Luis O.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of a time dependent cosmological constant is considered in a family of scalar tensor theories. Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models for vacumm and perfect fluid matter are found. They have a linear expansion factor, the so called coasting cosmology, the gravitational "constant" decreace inversely with time; this model satisfy the Dirac hipotesis. The cosmological "constant" decreace inversely with the square of time, therefore we can have a very small value for it at present time.

  18. Cosmology with Superluminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Scovacricchi, Dario; Bacon, David; Sullivan, Mark; Prajs, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) as standardisable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z~3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the "Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae" (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardisation values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalise over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ~100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Omega_m by at least 20% (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia a...

  19. Clustering, cosmology and a new era of black hole demographics- II. The conditional luminosity functions of Type 2 and Type 1 active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    The orientation-based unification model of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) posits that the principle difference between obscured (Type 2) and unobscured (Type 1) AGNs is the line of sight into the central engine. If this model is correct then there should be no difference in many of the properties of AGN host galaxies (e.g. the mass of the surrounding dark matter haloes). However, recent clustering analyses of Type 1 and Type 2 AGNs have provided some evidence for a difference in the halo mass, in conflict with the orientation-based unified model. In this work, a method to compute the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs is presented. The CLF allows many fundamental halo properties to be computed as a function of AGN luminosity, which we apply to the question of the host halo masses of Type 1 and 2 AGNs. By making use of the total AGN CLF, the Type 1 X-ray luminosity function, and the luminosity-dependent Type 2 AGN fraction, the CLFs of Type 1 and 2 AGNs are calculated at z ≈ 0 and 0.9. At both z, there is no statistically significant difference in the mean halo mass of Type 2 and 1 AGNs at any luminosity. There is marginal evidence that Type 1 AGNs may have larger halo masses than Type 2s, which would be consistent with an evolutionary picture where quasars are initially obscured and then subsequently reveal themselves as Type 1s. As the Type 1 lifetime is longer, the host halo will increase somewhat in mass during the Type 1 phase. The CLF technique will be a powerful way to study the properties of many AGNs subsets (e.g. radio-loud, Compton-thick) as future wide-area X-ray and optical surveys substantially increase our ability to place AGNs in their cosmological context.

  20. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics - II. The Conditional Luminosity Functions of Type 2 and Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    The orientation-based unification model of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) posits that the principle difference between obscured (Type 2) and unobscured (Type 1) AGNs is the line-of-sight into the central engine. If this model is correct than there should be no difference in many of the properties of AGN host galaxies (e.g., the mass of the surrounding dark matter haloes). However, recent clustering analyses of Type 1 and Type 2 AGNs have provided some evidence for a difference in the halo mass, in conflict with the orientation-based unified model. In this work, a method to compute the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs is presented. The CLF allows many fundamental halo properties to be computed as a function of AGN luminosity, which we apply to the question of the host halo masses of Type 1 and 2 AGNs. By making use of the total AGN CLF, the Type 1 X-ray luminosity function, and the luminosity-dependent Type 2 AGN fraction, the CLFs of Type 1 and 2 AGNs are calculated at z ≈ 0 and 0.9. At both z, there is no statistically significant difference in the mean halo mass of Type 2 and 1 AGNs at any luminosity. There is marginal evidence that Type 1 AGNs may have larger halo masses than Type 2s, which would be consistent with an evolutionary picture where quasars are initially obscured and then subsequently reveal themselves as Type 1s. As the Type 1 lifetime is longer, the host halo will increase somewhat in mass during the Type 1 phase. The CLF technique will be a powerful way to study the properties of many AGNs subsets (e.g., radio-loud, Compton-thick) as future wide-area X-ray and optical surveys substantially increase our ability to place AGNs in their cosmological context.

  1. Symmetron Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterbichler, Kurt; Levy, Aaron; Matas, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The symmetron is a scalar field associated with the dark sector whose coupling to matter depends on the ambient matter density. The symmetron is decoupled and screened in regions of high density, thereby satisfying local constraints from tests of gravity, but couples with gravitational strength in regions of low density, such as the cosmos. In this paper we derive the cosmological expansion history in the presence of a symmetron field, tracking the evolution through the inflationary, radiation- and matter-dominated epochs, using a combination of analytical approximations and numerical integration. For a broad range of initial conditions at the onset of inflation, the scalar field reaches its symmetry-breaking vacuum by the present epoch, as assumed in the local analysis of spherically-symmetric solutions and tests of gravity. For the simplest form of the potential, the energy scale is too small for the symmetron to act as dark energy, hence we must add a cosmological constant to drive late-time cosmic acceler...

  2. Cascading Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Nishant; Khoury, Justin; Trodden, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We develop a fully covariant, well-posed 5D effective action for the 6D cascading gravity brane-world model, and use this to study cosmological solutions. We obtain this effective action through the 6D decoupling limit, in which an additional scalar degree mode, \\pi, called the brane-bending mode, determines the bulk-brane gravitational interaction. The 5D action obtained this way inherits from the sixth dimension an extra \\pi self-interaction kinetic term. We compute appropriate boundary terms, to supplement the 5D action, and hence derive fully covariant junction conditions and the 5D Einstein field equations. Using these, we derive the cosmological evolution induced on a 3-brane moving in a static bulk. We study the strong- and weak-coupling regimes analytically in this static ansatz, and perform a complete numerical analysis of our solution. Although the cascading model can generate an accelerating solution in which the \\pi field comes to dominate at late times, the presence of a critical singularity prev...

  3. Fermionic cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimento, L P; Forte, M [Physics Department, UBA, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Devecchi, F P; Kremer, G M; Ribas, M O; Samojeden, L L, E-mail: kremer@fisica.ufpr.br, E-mail: devecchi@fisica.ufpr.br, E-mail: chimento@df.uba.ar [Physics Department, UFPR, 81531-990 Curitiba (Brazil)

    2011-07-08

    In this work we review if fermionic sources could be responsible for accelerated periods during the evolution of a FRW universe. In a first attempt, besides the fermionic source, a matter constituent would answer for the decelerated periods. The coupled differential equations that emerge from the field equations are integrated numerically. The self-interaction potential of the fermionic field is considered as a function of the scalar and pseudo-scalar invariants. It is shown that the fermionic field could behave like an inflaton field in the early universe, giving place to a transition to a matter dominated (decelerated) period. In a second formulation we turn our attention to analytical results, specifically using the idea of form-invariance transformations. These transformations can be used for obtaining accelerated cosmologies starting with conventional cosmological models. Here we reconsider the scalar field case and extend the discussion to fermionic fields. Finally we investigate the role of a Dirac field in a Brans-Dicke (BD) context. The results show that this source, in combination with the BD scalar, promote a final eternal accelerated era, after a matter dominated period.

  4. Newtonian cosmology - Problems of cosmological didactics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarzynski, E.

    1983-03-01

    The article presents different methods of model construction in Newtonian cosmology. Newtonian cosmology is very convenient for discussion of local problems, so the problems presented are of great didactic importance. The constant k receives a new interpretation in relativistic cosmology as the curvature of the space in consequence of the greater informational capacity of Riemann space in comparison to Euclidean space. 11 references.

  5. PHAT Stellar Cluster Survey. II. Andromeda Project Cluster Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, L Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Wallace, Matthew L; Simpson, Robert J; Lintott, Chris J; Kapadia, Amit; Skillman, Evan D; Caldwell, Nelson; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R; Williams, Benjamin F; Beerman, Lori C; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A; Sarajedini, Ata

    2015-01-01

    We construct a stellar cluster catalog for the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey using image classifications collected from the Andromeda Project citizen science website. We identify 2,753 clusters and 2,270 background galaxies within ~0.5 deg$^2$ of PHAT imaging searched, or ~400 kpc$^2$ in deprojected area at the distance of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). These identifications result from 1.82 million classifications of ~20,000 individual images (totaling ~7 gigapixels) by tens of thousands of volunteers. We show that our crowd-sourced approach, which collects >80 classifications per image, provides a robust, repeatable method of cluster identification. The high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope images resolve individual stars in each cluster and are instrumental in the factor of ~6 increase in the number of clusters known within the survey footprint. We measure integrated photometry in six filter passbands, ranging from the near-UV to the near-IR. PHAT clusters span a range of ~8 ma...

  6. A tutorial survey of topics in wireless networking: Part II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anurag Kumar; D Manjunath

    2007-12-01

    This is the second part of the survey of recent and emerging topics in wireless networking. We provide an overview of the area of wireless networking as that of dealing with problems of resource allocation so that the various connections that utilise the network achieve their desired performance objectives. In Part I we provided a taxonomy of wireless networks as they have been deployed. We then provided a quick survey of the main issues in the wireless 'physical' layer. We then discussed some resource allocation formulations in CDMA (code division multiple access) cellular networks and OFDMA (orthogonal frequency division multiple access) networks. In this part we begin with a discussion of random access wireless networks. We first provide an overview of the evolution of random access networks from Aloha to the currently popular 802·11 (Wi-Fi) networks. We then analyse the performance of the 802·11 random access protocol. We briefly discuss the problem of optimal association of nodes to Wi-Fi access points. Next, we consider topics in ad hoc multihop wireless networks. We first discuss topology and cross layer control. For the latter, we describe the important maximum weight link scheduling algorithm. The connectivity and capacity of randomly deployed networks are then analysed. Finally, we provide an overview of the technical issues in the emerging area of wireless sensor networks.

  7. The WSRT Virgo Hi filament survey II; Cross Correlation Data

    CERN Document Server

    Popping, Attila

    2011-01-01

    The extended environment of galaxies contains a wealth of information about the formation and life cycle of galaxies which are regulated by accretion and feedback processes. Observations of neutral hydrogen are routinely used to image the high brightness disks of galaxies and to study their kinematics. Deeper observations will give more insight into the distribution of diffuse gas in the extended halo of the galaxies and the IGM, where numerical simulations predict a cosmic web of extended structures and gaseous filaments. To observe the extended environment of galaxies, column density sensitivities have to be achieved that probe the regime of Lyman limit systems. HI observations are typically limited to a brightness sensitivity of NHI~10^19 cm-2, but this must be improved upon by ~2 orders of magnitude. In this paper we present the interferometric data of the Westerbork Virgo HI Filament Survey (WVFS) - the total power product of this survey has been published in an earlier paper. By observing at extreme hou...

  8. The Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey VI : The Virgo Cluster (II)

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, R; Auld, R; Minchin, R F; Smith, R

    2012-01-01

    We present 21 cm observations of a 5 x degree region in the Virgo cluster, obtained as part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey. 13 cluster members are detected, together with 36 objects in the background. We compare and contrast the results from this area with a larger 10 x degree region. We combine the two data sets to produce an HI mass function, which shows a higher detection rate at low masses (but finds fewer massive galaxies) than less sensitive wider-area surveys, such as ALFALFA. We find that the HI-detected galaxies are distributed differently to the non-detections, both spatially and in velocity, providing further evidence that the cluster is still assembling. We use the Tully-Fisher relation to examine the possibility of morphological evolution. We find that highly deficient galaxies, as well as some early-type galaxies, have much lower velocity widths than the Tully-Fisher relation predicts, indicating gas loss via ram pressure stripping. We also find that HI detections without optical count...

  9. The Core Collapse Supernova Rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-08-26

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10(–)(4)((h/0.7)(3)/(yr Mpc(3))) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  10. Bright but slow - Type II supernovae from OGLE-IV - Implications for magnitude limited surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Poznanski, Dovi; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Zuzanna; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Blagorodnova, Nadejda

    2015-01-01

    We study a sample of 11 Type II supernovae (SNe) discovered by the OGLE-IV survey. All objects have well sampled I-band light curves, and at least one spectrum. We find that 2 or 3 of the 11 SNe have a declining light curve, and spectra consistent with other SNe II-L, while the rest have plateaus that can be as short as 70d, unlike the 100d typically found in nearby galaxies. The OGLE SNe are also brighter, and show that magnitude limited surveys find SNe that are different than usually found...

  11. The core collapse supernova rate from the SDSS-II supernova survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Dilday, Ben [Spokane, WA 99203 (United States); Galbany, Lluis [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Gupta, Ravi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kessler, R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marriner, John [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2FX (United Kingdom); Richmond, Michael [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Sollerman, Jesper, E-mail: cinabro@physics.wayne.edu [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-09-10

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10{sup –4}((h/0.7){sup 3}/(yr Mpc{sup 3})) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  12. The Higgs Portal and Cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assamagan, Ketevi [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chen, Chien-Yi [Perimeter Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Univ. of Victoria, BC (Canada); Chou, John Paul [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Curtin, David [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Fedderke, Michael A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Gershtein, Yuri [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); He, Xiao-Gang [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China); Klute, Markus [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kozaczuk, Jonathon [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kotwal, Ashutosh [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Lowette, Steven [Vrije Univ., Brussels (Belgium); No, Jose Miguel [Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom); Plehn, Tilman [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany); Qian, Jianming [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ramsey-Musolf, Michael [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Safonov, Alexei [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shelton, Jessie [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Spannowsky, Michael [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Su, Shufang [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Walker, Devin G. E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Willocq, Stephane [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Winslow, Peter [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Higgs portal interactions provide a simple mechanism for addressing two open problems in cosmology: dark matter and the baryon asymmetry. In the latter instance, Higgs portal interactions may contain the ingredients for a strong first-order electroweak phase transition as well as new CP-violating interactions as needed for electroweak baryogenesis. These interactions may also allow for a viable dark matter candidate. We survey the opportunities for probing the Higgs portal as it relates to these questions in cosmology at the LHC and possible future colliders.

  13. The Higgs Portal and Cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assamagan, Ketevi [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chen, Chien-Yi [Perimeter Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Univ. of Victoria, BC (Canada); Chou, John Paul [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Curtin, David [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Fedderke, Michael A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Gershtein, Yuri [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); He, Xiao-Gang [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China); Klute, Markus [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kozaczuk, Jonathon [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kotwal, Ashutosh [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Lowette, Steven [Vrije Univ., Brussels (Belgium); No, Jose Miguel [Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom); Plehn, Tilman [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany); Qian, Jianming [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ramsey-Musolf, Michael [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Safonov, Alexei [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shelton, Jessie [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Spannowsky, Michael [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Su, Shufang [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Walker, Devin G. E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Willocq, Stephane [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Winslow, Peter [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Higgs portal interactions provide a simple mechanism for addressing two open problems in cosmology: dark matter and the baryon asymmetry. In the latter instance, Higgs portal interactions may contain the ingredients for a strong first order electroweak phase transition as well as new CP-violating interactions as needed for electroweak baryogenesis. These interactions may also allow for a viable dark matter candidate. We survey the opportunities for probing the Higgs portal as it relates to these questions in cosmology at the LHC and possible future colliders.

  14. The Higgs Portal and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Assamagan, Ketevi; Chou, John Paul; Curtin, David; Fedderke, Michael A; Gershtein, Yuri; He, Xiao-Gang; Klute, Markus; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Lowette, Steven; No, Jose Miguel; Plehn, Tilman; Qian, Jianming; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael; Safonov, Alexei; Shelton, Jessie; Spannowsky, Michael; Su, Shufang; Walker, Devin G E; Willocq, Stephane; Winslow, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Higgs portal interactions provide a simple mechanism for addressing two open problems in cosmology: dark matter and the baryon asymmetry. In the latter instance, Higgs portal interactions may contain the ingredients for a strong first order electroweak phase transition as well as new CP-violating interactions as needed for electroweak baryogenesis. These interactions may also allow for a viable dark matter candidate. We survey the opportunities for probing the Higgs portal as it relates to these questions in cosmology at the LHC and possible future colliders.

  15. Cosmology With Extra Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Martín, J

    2005-01-01

    We review several properties of models that include extra dimensions, focusing on aspects related to cosmology and particle physics phenomenology. The properties of effective four dimensional inflationary geometry are studied in two distinct frameworks: (i) in Kaluza- Klein (KK) compactifications and (ii) in braneworld scenarios. From numerical simulations we find that inflationary braneworlds are unstable if the scale of inflation is too large in comparison with the stabilization scale of the interbrane distance. The analysis of perturbations confirms the existence of a tachyon associated with the volume modulus of the extra dimensions both in braneworlds and KK compactifications. With the numerical program BRANECODE non- perturbative properties of braneworlds are studied. We fully understand the non-perturbative consequences of this instability. Generic attractors are (i) an increase of the interbrane distance and the formation of a naked singularity, (ii) the brane colli...

  16. An introduction to cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Narlikar, Jayant Vishnu

    2002-01-01

    The third edition of this successful textbook is fully updated and includes important recent developments in cosmology. It begins with an introduction to cosmology and general relativity, and goes on to cover the mathematical models of standard cosmology. The physical aspects of cosmology, including primordial nucleosynthesis, the astroparticle physics of inflation, and the current ideas on structure formation are discussed. Alternative models of cosmology are reviewed, including the model of Quasi-Steady State Cosmology, which has recently been proposed as an alternative to Big Bang Cosmology.

  17. Cosmological networks

    CERN Document Server

    Boguna, Marian; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    Networks often represent systems that do not have a long history of studies in traditional fields of physics, albeit there are some notable exceptions such as energy landscapes and quantum gravity. Here we consider networks that naturally arise in cosmology. Nodes in these networks are stationary observers uniformly distributed in an expanding open FLRW universe with any scale factor, and two observers are connected if one can causally influence the other. We show that these networks are growing Lorentz-invariant graphs with power-law distributions of node degrees. New links in these networks not only connect new nodes to existing ones, but also appear at a certain rate between existing nodes, as they do in many complex networks.

  18. Seroepidemiologic studies in Oaxaca, Mexico. II. Survey for arbovirus antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, R S; Zarate, M L; Cedeño-Ferreira, J; Antonio Paz, E

    1979-01-01

    A serologic survey was conducted in south-western Mexico to obtain information on human experience with arbovirus infections. Sera were collected from two semitropical areas along the Pacific coast of Oaxaca State, two mountain areas above 1,700 meters and the interior valley at 1,500 meters. Of the 610 sera tested for group A antibody, 4.9 per cent were positive in the hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) test to Venezuelan (VE), 11 per cent to Eastern, and none to Western encephalitis viruses. In neutralization tests the antibody was shown to be probably due to VE virus infections. When sera were screened for group B antibodies in the HI test, 32 per cent were positive with St. Louis encephalitis (SLE), 19 per cent with Ilhéus, and 4 per cent with yellow fever viruses. The pattern of reactions suggested that SLE or an antigenically related virus was responsible for the antibody detected. An unusually high rate was found in a mountain area at 2,000 meters: 41 per cent of 113 persons tested were seropositive to SLE. Of 493 sera screened by complement-fixation test, 6 per cent were positive to Nepuyo, 4 per cent to Patois, and 3 per cent to Tlacotalpan viruses.

  19. THE CARNEGIE-IRVINE GALAXY SURVEY. II. ISOPHOTAL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhaoyu [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Peng, Chien Y. [NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    The Carnegie-Irvine Galaxy Survey (CGS) is a comprehensive investigation of the physical properties of a complete, representative sample of 605 bright (B{sub T} {<=} 12.9 mag) galaxies in the southern hemisphere. This contribution describes the isophotal analysis of the broadband (BVRI) optical imaging component of the project. We pay close attention to sky subtraction, which is particularly challenging for some of the large galaxies in our sample. Extensive crosschecks with internal and external data confirm that our calibration and sky subtraction techniques are robust with respect to the quoted measurement uncertainties. We present a uniform catalog of one-dimensional radial profiles of surface brightness and geometric parameters, as well as integrated colors and color gradients. Composite profiles highlight the tremendous diversity of brightness distributions found in disk galaxies and their dependence on Hubble type. A significant fraction of S0 and spiral galaxies exhibit non-exponential profiles in their outer regions. We perform Fourier decomposition of the isophotes to quantify non-axisymmetric deviations in the light distribution. We use the geometric parameters, in conjunction with the amplitude and phase of the m = 2 Fourier mode, to identify bars and quantify their size and strength. Spiral arm strengths are characterized using the m = 2 Fourier profiles and structure maps. Finally, we utilize the information encoded in the m = 1 Fourier profiles to measure disk lopsidedness. The databases assembled here and in Paper I lay the foundation for forthcoming scientific applications of CGS.

  20. Cosmological tests of modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard Λ CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  1. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  2. The Pittsburgh Sloan Digital Sky Survey MgII Quasar Absorption-Line Survey Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Quider, Anna M; Turnshek, David A; Rao, Sandhya M; Monier, Eric M; Weyant, Anja N; Busche, Joseph R

    2011-01-01

    We present a catalog of intervening MgII quasar absorption-line systems in the redshift interval 0.36 17,000 measured MgII doublets. We also present data on the ~44,600 quasar spectra which were searched to construct the catalog, including redshift and magnitude information, continuum-normalized spectra, and corresponding arrays of redshift-dependent minimum rest equivalent widths detectable at our confidence threshold. The catalog is available on the web. A careful second search of 500 random spectra indicated that, for every 100 spectra searched, approximately one significant MgII system was accidentally rejected. Current plans to expand the catalog beyond DR4 quasars are discussed. Many MgII absorbers are known to be associated with galaxies. Therefore, the combination of large size and well understood statistics makes this catalog ideal for precision studies of the low-ionization and neutral gas regions associated with galaxies at low to moderate redshift. An analysis of the statistics of MgII absorbers ...

  3. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: Multi-wavelength Properties of ALMA-identified Submillimeter Galaxies in UKIDSS-UDS

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, J M; Swinbank, A M; Ivison, R J; Dunlop, J S; Geach, J E; Almaini, O; Arumugam, V; Bremer, M N; Chen, Chian-Chou; Conselice, C; Coppin, K E K; Farrah, D; Ibar, E; Hartley, W G; Ma, C J; Michalowski, M J; Spaans, M; Thomson, A P; van der Werf, P P

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 52 sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs), identified using ALMA 870$\\mu$m continuum imaging in a pilot program to precisely locate bright SCUBA2-selected sub-mm sources in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field. Using the available deep (especially near-infrared), panoramic imaging of the UDS field at optical-to-radio wavelengths we characterize key properties of the SMG population. The median photometric redshift of the bright ALMA/SCUBA-2 UDS (AS2UDS) SMGs that are detected in a sufficient number of wavebands to derive a robust photometric redshift is $z$=2.65$\\pm$0.13. However, similar to previous studies, 27% of the SMGs are too faint at optical-to-near-infrared wavelengths to derive a reliable photometric redshift. Assuming that these SMGs lie at z$\\gtrsim$3 raises the median redshift of the full sample to $z$=2.9$\\pm$0.2. A subset of 23, unlensed, bright AS2UDS SMGs have sizes measured from resolved imaging of their rest-frame far-infrared emission. We show that the ...

  4. Cosmic flow from 2MASS redshift survey: The origin of CMB dipole and implications for LCDM cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Lavaux, G; Mohayaee, R; Colombi, S

    2008-01-01

    We generate the peculiar velocity field for the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) catalog using an orbit-reconstruction algorithm. The reconstructed velocities of individual objects in 2MRS are well-correlated with the peculiar velocities obtained from high-precision observed distances within 3,000 km/s. We estimate the mean matter density to be 0.31 +/- 0.05 by comparing observed to reconstructed velocities in this volume. The reconstructed motion of the Local Group in the rest frame established by distances within 3,000 km/s agrees with the observed motion and is generated by fluctuations within this volume, in agreement with observations. Then, we reconstruct the velocity field of 2MRS in successively larger radii, to study the problem of convergence towards the CMB dipole. We find that less than half of the amplitude of the CMB dipole is generated within a volume enclosing the Hydra-Centaurus-Norma supercluster at around 40 Mpc/h. Although most of the amplitude of the CMB dipole seems to be recovered by 120 Mp...

  5. Interacting galaxies and cosmological parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Reboul, H

    2006-01-01

    We propose a (physical)-geometrical method to measure the present rates of the density cosmological parameters for a Friedmann-Lemaitre universe. The distribution of linear separations between two interacting galaxies,when both of them undergo a first massive starburst, is used as a standard of length. Statistical properties of the linear separations of such pairs of ``interactivated'' galaxies are estimated from the data in the Two Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey. Synthetic samples of interactivated pairs are generated with random orientations and a likely distribution of redshifts. The resolution of the inverse problem provides the probability densities of the retrieved cosmological parameters. The accuracies that can be achieved by that method on matter and cosmological constant densities parameters are computed depending on the size of ongoing real samples. Observational prospects are investigated as the foreseeable surface densities on the sky and magnitudes of those objects.

  6. Cosmological Calculations on the GPU

    CERN Document Server

    Bard, Deborah; Allen, Mark T; Yepremyan, Hasmik; Kratochvil, Jan M

    2012-01-01

    Cosmological measurements require the calculation of nontrivial quantities over large datasets. The next generation of survey telescopes (such as DES, PanSTARRS, and LSST) will yield measurements of billions of galaxies. The scale of these datasets, and the nature of the calculations involved, make cosmological calculations ideal models for implementation on graphics processing units (GPUs). We consider two cosmological calculations, the two-point angular correlation function and the aperture mass statistic, and aim to improve the calculation time by constructing code for calculating them on the GPU. Using CUDA, we implement the two algorithms on the GPU and compare the calculation speeds to comparable code run on the CPU. We obtain a code speed-up of between 10 - 180x faster, compared to performing the same calculation on the CPU. The code has been made publicly available.

  7. The effect of peculiar velocities on supernova cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Tamara M; Frieman, Joshua A; Haugbølle, Troels; Kessler, Richard; Sinclair, Benjamin; Sollerman, Jesper; Bassett, Bruce; Marriner, John; Mörtsell, Edvard; Nichol, Robert C; Richmond, Michael W; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of peculiar velocities and their effect on supernova cosmology. In particular, we study (a) the corrections due to our own motion, (b) the effects of correlations in peculiar velocities induced by large-scale structure, and (c) uncertainties arising from a possible local under- or over-density. For all of these effects we present a case study of their impact on the cosmology derived by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN Survey). Correcting supernova redshifts for the CMB dipole slightly over-corrects nearby supernovae that share some of our local motion. We show that while neglecting the CMB dipole would cause a shift in the derived equation of state of Delta w ~ 0.04 (at fixed matter density) the additional local-motion correction is currently negligible (Delta w<0.01). We use a covariance-matrix approach to statistically account for correlated peculiar velocities. This down-weights nearby supernovae and effectively acts as a graduated version of the usual ...

  8. On an Alternative Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Vankov, A

    1998-01-01

    The suggested alternative cosmology is based on the idea of barion symmetric universe, in which our home universe is a representative of multitude of typical matter and antimatter universes. This alternative concept gives a physically reasonable explanation of all major problems of the Standard Cosmological Model. Classification Code MSC: Cosmology 524.8 Key words: standard cosmological model, alternative cosmology, barionic symmetry, typical universe, quasars, cosmic rays.

  9. Evidence for the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and velocity reconstruction from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaan, Emmanuel; Ferraro, Simone; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Smith, Kendrick M.; Ho, Shirley; Aiola, Simone; Battaglia, Nicholas; Bond, J. Richard; De Bernardis, Francesco; Calabrese, Erminia; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn; Hill, J. Colin; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Hubmayr, Johannes; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent D.; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Li, Dale; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Maurin, Loïc; McMahon, Jeffrey John; Moodley, Kavilan; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Pappas, Christine G.; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sherwin, Blake D.; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; van Engelen, Alexander; Wollack, Edward J.; ACTPol Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We use microwave temperature maps from two seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at 146 GHz, together with the "Constant Mass" CMASS galaxy sample from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey to measure the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect over the redshift range z =0.4 - 0.7 . We use galaxy positions and the continuity equation to obtain a reconstruction of the line-of-sight velocity field. We stack the microwave temperature at the location of each halo, weighted by the corresponding reconstructed velocity. We vary the size of the aperture photometry filter used, thus probing the free electron profile of these halos from within the virial radius out to three virial radii, on the scales relevant for investigating the missing baryons problem. The resulting best fit kSZ model is preferred over the no-kSZ hypothesis at 3.3 and 2.9 σ for two independent velocity reconstruction methods, using 25,537 galaxies over 660 square degrees. The data suggest that the baryon profile is shallower than the dark matter in the inner regions of the halos probed here, potentially due to energy injection from active galactic nucleus or supernovae. Thus, by constraining the gas profile on a wide range of scales, this technique will be useful for understanding the role of feedback in galaxy groups and clusters. The effect of foregrounds that are uncorrelated with the galaxy velocities is expected to be well below our signal, and residual thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich contamination is controlled by masking the most massive clusters. Finally, we discuss the systematics involved in converting our measurement of the kSZ amplitude into the mean free electron fraction of the halos in our sample.

  10. Parameterized Post-Newtonian Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Sanghai, Viraj A A

    2016-01-01

    Einstein's theory of gravity has been extensively tested on solar system scales, and for isolated astrophysical systems, using the perturbative framework known as the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. This framework is designed for use in the weak-field and slow-motion limit of gravity, and can be used to constrain a large class of metric theories of gravity with data collected from the aforementioned systems. Given the potential of future surveys to probe cosmological scales to high precision, it is a topic of much contemporary interest to construct a similar framework to link Einstein's theory of gravity and its alternatives to observations on cosmological scales. Our approach to this problem is to adapt and extend the existing PPN formalism for use in cosmology. We derive a set of equations that use the same parameters to consistently model both weak fields and cosmology. This allows us to parameterize a large class of modified theories of gravity and dark energy models on cosmological scales, ...

  11. Cosmic infrared background fluctuations of the COSMOS field in the SPLASH survey: new measurements and the cosmological explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    The cosmic infrared background (CIB) is the integrated emission of all sources through cosmic time and carries an abundance of information about the star formation and galaxy growth in the Universe. Due to significant and complex foregrounds from our Galaxy, the optimal way to study the unresolved background is to actually study its fluctuations, especially at large angular scales where they reflect the clustering of unresolved galaxies. Our new measurements of the CIB fluctuations reach the largest angular scale to date for such a study, thanks to new observations of the COSMOS field from the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH). We analyzed Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 um data of the whole field, with an average depth of 1.33 hour/pixel over 4 epochs spanning 2 years. We found that the auto-power spectra are consistent among various epochs and are correlated at the two channels. We confirmed the previously detected excess flux at large scales of the power spectra.The cross-correlation of the CIB fluctuations with backgrounds at other wavelengths is an extremely useful technique to understand the excess flux. The previously seen CIB and X-ray background (CXB) cross-correlation suggests significant contribution to the CIB fluctuations from accreting black holes that is much higher than among any known populations, and such a cross-correlation is also used as an evidence for the existence of direct collapse black holes in the early Universe.In this talk, we will present the first CIB fluctuation measurements of the COSMOS field using the new SPLASH data and we will also revisit the CIB and CXB cross-correlation in this field, which is about 20 times larger than the previous study and therefore with much improved significance levels. Measuring CIB fluctuations is a powerful tool to study the large-scale structure of the Universe. The CIB and CXB cross-correlation can not only provide observational constrains on the theoretical modeling of the CIB

  12. Supernova constraints on decaying vacuum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, S; Borges, H A; Alcaniz, J S

    2006-01-01

    There is mounting observational evidence that the expansion of our Universe is undergoing a late-time acceleration. Among many proposals to describe this phenomenon, the cosmological constant seems to be the simplest and the most natural explanation. However, despite its observational successes, such a possibility exacerbates the well known cosmological constant problem, requiring a natural explanation for its small, but nonzero, value. In this paper we consider a cosmological scenario driven by a varying cosmological term, in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter. We show that this model is indistinguishable from the standard one in that the early radiation phase is followed by a long dust-dominated era, and only recently the varying cosmological term becomes dominant, accelerating the cosmic expansion. In order to test the viability of this scenario we have used the most recent type Ia supernova data, i.e., the High-Z SN Search (HZS) Team and the Supernova Legacy Survey (...

  13. Bright but slow - Type II supernovae from OGLE-IV & magnitude limited surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Blagorodnova, Nadejda

    2015-01-01

    We study a sample of 11 Type II supernovae (SNe) discovered by the OGLE-IV survey. All objects have well sampled I-band light curves, and at least one spectrum. We find that 3 or 4 of the 11 SNe have a declining light curve, making them SNe II-L, while the rest have plateaus that can be as short as 70d, unlike the 100d typically found in nearby galaxies. These SNe are also brighter than found in the local Universe, and show that magnitude limited surveys find SNe that are different than found in nearby galaxies. We discuss this sample in the context of understanding Type II SNe as a class and their suggested use as standard candles.

  14. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  15. A Class I and Class II Methanol Maser Survey of Extended Green Objects (EGOs) from the GLIMPSE Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Cyganowski, C J; Hunter, T R; Churchwell, E

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a high angular resolution Very Large Array (VLA) Class I 44 GHz and Class II 6.7 GHz methanol maser survey of a sample of ~20 massive young stellar object (MYSO) outflow candidates selected on the basis of extended 4.5 micron emission in Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) images. These 4.5 micron-selected candidates are referred to as extended green objects (EGOs), for the common coding of this band as green in three-color IRAC images. The detection rate of 6.7 GHz Class II methanol masers, which are associated exclusively with massive YSOs, towards EGOs is greater than ~64%--nearly double the detection rate of surveys using other MYSO selection criteria. The detection rate of Class I 44 GHz methanol masers, which trace molecular outflows, is ~89% towards EGOs associated with 6.7 GHz methanol masers. The two types of methanol masers exhibit different spatial distributions: 6.7 GHz masers are centrally concentrated and usually coincide with 24 m...

  16. Cosmological Parameters from Redshift-Space Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Matsubara, T; Matsubara, Takahiko; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2002-01-01

    We estimate how clustering in large-scale redshift surveys can constrain various cosmological parameters. Depth and sky coverage of modern redshift surveys are greater than ever, opening new possibilities for statistical analysis. We have constructed a novel maximum likelihood technique applicable to deep redshift surveys of wide sky coverage by taking into account the effects of both curvature and linear velocity distortions. The Fisher information matrix is evaluated numerically to show the bounds derived from a given redshift sample. We find that intermediate-redshift galaxies, such as the Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, can constrain cosmological parameters, including the cosmological constant, unexpectedly well. The importance of the dense as well as deep sampling in designing redshift surveys is emphasized.

  17. Quantized Cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, M

    2003-11-19

    This paper discusses the problem of inflation in the context of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Cosmology. We show how, after a simple change of variables, one can quantize the problem in a way which parallels the classical discussion. The result is that two of the Einstein equations arise as exact equations of motion; one of the usual Einstein equations (suitably quantized) survives as a constraint equation to be imposed on the space of physical states. However, the Friedmann equation, which is also a constraint equation and which is the basis of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, acquires a welcome quantum correction that becomes significant for small scale factors. We then discuss the extension of this result to a full quantum mechanical derivation of the anisotropy ({delta}{rho}/{rho}) in the cosmic microwave background radiation and the possibility that the extra term in the Friedmann equation could have observable consequences. Finally, we suggest interesting ways in which these techniques can be generalized to cast light on the question of chaotic or eternal inflation. In particular, we suggest that one can put an experimental bound on how far away a universe with a scale factor very different from our own must be, by looking at its effects on our CMB radiation.

  18. Cosmological daemon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref'eva, I. Ya.; Volovich, I. V.

    2011-08-01

    Classical versions of the Big Bang cosmological models of the universe contain a singularity at the start of time, hence the time variable in the field equations should run over a half-line. Nonlocal string field theory equations with infinite number of derivatives are considered and an important difference between nonlocal operators on the whole real line and on a half-line is pointed out. We use the heat equation method and show that on the half-line in addition to the usual initial data a new arbitrary function (external source) occurs that we call the daemon function. The daemon function governs the evolution of the universe similar to Maxwell's demon in thermodynamics. The universe and multiverse are open systems interacting with the daemon environment. In the simplest case the nonlocal scalar field reduces to the usual local scalar field coupled with an external source which is discussed in the stochastic approach to inflation. The daemon source can help to get the chaotic inflation scenario with a small scalar field.

  19. The ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II) I. Newly identified X-ray luminous clusters at z>=0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Gayoung

    2011-01-01

    We report 19 intermediate redshift clusters newly detected in the ROSAT All-Sky survey that are spectroscopically confirmed. They form a part of 911 objects in the REFLEX II cluster catalogue with a limiting flux of 1.8\\times10^12 erg/s/cm2 in the 0.1-2.4 keV ROSAT band at redshift z >= 0.2. In addition we report three clusters from the REFLEX III supplementary catalogue, which contains objects below the REFLEX II flux limit but satisfies the redshift constraint above. These clusters are spectroscopically followed-up by our ESO NTT-EFOSC2 campaigns for the redshift measurement. We describe our observing and data reduction methods. We show how X-ray properties such as spectral hardness ratio and source extent can be used as important diagnostics in selecting galaxy cluster candidates. Physical properties of the clusters are subsequently calculated from the X-ray observations. This sample contains the high mass and intermediate-redshift galaxy clusters for astrophysical and cosmological applications.

  20. Newtonian cosmology revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    1996-09-01

    I show that if Newtonian gravity is formulated in geometrical language, then Newtonian cosmology is as rigorous as relativistic cosmology. In homogeneous and isotropic universes, the geodesic deviation equation in Newtonian cosmology is proven to be exactly the same as the geodesic deviation equation in relativistic Friedmann cosmologies. This equation can be integrated to yield a constraint equation formally identical to the Friedmann equation. However, Newtonian cosmology is more general than Friedmann cosmology: by generalizing the flat-space Newtonian gravity force law to Riemannian metrics, I show that ever-expanding and recollapsing universes are allowed in any homogeneous and isotropic spatial geometry.

  1. The extended ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-ray Galaxy Cluster Survey (REFLEX II) V. Exploring a local underdensity in the Southern Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Boehringer, Hans; Bristow, Martyn; Collins, Chris A

    2014-01-01

    Several claims have been made that we are located in a locally underdense region of the Universe based on observations of supernovae and galaxy density distributions. Two recent studies of K-band galaxy surveys have provided new support for a local underdensity in the galaxy distribution out to distances of 200 - 300 Mpc. If confirmed, such large local underdensities would have important implications on the interpretation of local measurements of cosmological parameters. Galaxy clusters have been shown to be ideal probes to trace the large-scale structure of the Universe. In this paper we study the local density distribution in the southern sky with the X-ray detected galaxy clusters from the REFLEX II cluster survey. From the normalized comoving number density of clusters we find an average underdensity of ~30 - 40% in the redshift range out to z ~0.04 (~170 Mpc) in the southern extragalactic sky with a significance larger than 3.4sigma. On larger scales from 300 Mpc to over 1 Gpc the density distribution ap...

  2. The HIFI spectral survey of AFGL 2591 (CHESS). II. Summary of the survey

    CERN Document Server

    Kazmierczak-Barthel, M; Helmich, F P; Chavarria, L; Wang, K -S; Ceccarelli, C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the richness of submillimeter spectral features in the high-mass star forming region AFGL 2591. As part of the CHESS (Chemical Herschel Survey of Star Forming Regions) Key Programme, AFGL 2591 was observed by the Herschel/HIFI instrument. The spectral survey covered a frequency range from 480 up to 1240 GHz as well as single lines from 1267 to 1901 GHz (i.e. CO, HCl, NH3, OH and [CII]). Rotational and population diagram methods were used to calculate column densities, excitation temperatures and the emission extents of the observed molecules associated with AFGL 2591. The analysis was supplemented with several lines from ground-based JCMT spectra. From the HIFI spectral survey analysis a total of 32 species were identified (including isotopologues). In spite of the fact that lines are mostly quite week, 268 emission and 16 absorption lines were found (excluding blends). Molecular column densities range from 6e11 to 1e19 cm-2 and excitation temperatures range from 19 to 175 K. One can disti...

  3. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Angular clustering tomography and its cosmological implications

    CERN Document Server

    Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Crocce, Martin; Scoccimarro, Roman; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Samushia, Lado; Tinker, Jeremy; Thomas, Daniel; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological implications of studying galaxy clustering using a tomographic approach applied to the final BOSS DR12 galaxy sample, including both auto- and cross-correlation functions between redshift shells. We model the signal of the full shape of the angular correlation function, $\\omega(\\theta)$, in redshift bins using state-of-the-art modelling of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions. We present results on the redshift evolution of the linear bias of BOSS galaxies, which cannot be obtained with traditional methods for galaxy-clustering analysis. We also obtain constraints on cosmological parameters, combining this tomographic analysis with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and type Ia supernova (SNIa). We explore a number of cosmological models, including the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model and its most interesting extensions, such as deviations from $w_\\rm{DE} = -1$, non-minimal neutrino masses, spatial curvature and deviations from general relativity u...

  4. Physical and Morphological Properties of [O II] Emitting Galaxies in the HETDEX Pilot Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bridge, Joanna S; Ciardullo, Robin; Hagen, Alex; Zeimann, Greg; Malz, A I; Acquaviva, Viviana; Schneider, Donald P; Drory, Niv; Gebhardt, Karl; Jogee, Shardha

    2014-01-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Dark Energy Experiment pilot survey identified 284 [O II] 3727 emitting galaxies in a 169 square-arcminute field of sky in the redshift range 0 < z < 0.57. This line flux limited sample provides a bridge between studies in the local universe and higher-redshift [O II] surveys. We present an analysis of the star formation rates (SFRs) of these galaxies as a function of stellar mass as determined via spectral energy distribution fitting. The [O II] emitters fall on the "main sequence" of star-forming galaxies with SFR decreasing at lower masses and redshifts. However, the slope of our relation is flatter than that found for most other samples, a result of the metallicity dependence of the [O II] star formation rate indicator. The mass specific SFR is higher for lower mass objects, supporting the idea that massive galaxies formed more quickly and efficiently than their lower mass counterparts. This is confirmed by the fact that the equivalent widths of the [O II] emission lines trend small...

  5. How SN Ia host-galaxy properties affect cosmological parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, H; Gilmore, G

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the relationship between Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) properties, and the characteristics of their host galaxies, using a sample of 581 SNe Ia from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) SN Survey. We also investigate the effects of this on the cosmological constraints derived from SNe~Ia. Compared to previous studies, our sample is larger by a factor of $>4$, and covers a substantially larger redshift range (up to z~0.5), which is directly applicable to the volume of cosmological interest. We measure a significant correlation (>5\\sigma) between the host-galaxy stellar-mass and the SN~Ia Hubble Residuals (HR). We find a weak correlation (1.4\\sigma) between the host-galaxy metallicity as measured from emission lines in the spectra, and the SN~Ia HR. We also find evidence that the slope of the correlation between host-galaxy mass and HR is -0.11 $\\mathrm{mag}/\\mathrm{log}(\\mathrm{M}_{\\mathrm{host}}/\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot})$ steeper in lower metallicity galaxies. We test the effe...

  6. Changes of Multiple Metal Accumulation (MMA in New Orleans Soil: Preliminary Evaluation of Differences between Survey I (1992 and Survey II (2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W. Mielke

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil metal surveys were conducted in Baltimore, MD (1976-1979, Minnesota (1981-1988 and most recently, New Orleans, LA (1989-present. The unique characteristic of New Orleans is that it has two surveys; Survey I was completed in 1992 and Survey II was completed in 2000. This paper seeks to determine if there is a perceptible change in the amount of metals during less than a decade that separated these surveys. The Survey I collection was 4,026 samples stratified by 283 census tracts. All samples were collected in residential neighborhoods at least one block from a busy street. The Survey II collection was 5,467 samples stratified by 286 census tracts (plus City Park. The Survey II collection included busy streets as a category of samples. For comparison, the busy street category of 1,078 samples was excluded from Survey II for a total of 4,388 samples. The extraction methods of the two surveys used the same protocol for strength of acid (1 M HNO3, shaker-time (2 hours, and room temperature (~22ºC. However, Survey II differed in amount of sample used in extraction. For Surveys I and II, 4.0g and 0.4g were used respectively. The same ICP-AES was used to measure 8 metals in both surveys. To evaluate the analytical results of the two methods, reference soil samples (n=36 from the Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories, International Soil-analytical Exchange (WEPAL; ISE were used. The relationship between the 4.0 and 0.4 g results were linear and the Survey I results were adjusted for sample:acid ratio. Further evaluation was done by creating interpolated Multiple Metal Accumulation (MMA maps based on the median MMA for each census tract. A new map was created by dividing Survey II MMA by Survey I MMA. The ratio indicates increases of soil metals in the inner city and decreases of soil metals in the outlying areas of Metropolitan New Orleans. Comparing fresh parent alluvium from the Mississippi River with urban soil metal

  7. Cosmology for physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Lyth, David

    2016-01-01

    Written by an award-winning cosmologist, this brand new textbook provides advanced undergraduate and graduate students with coverage of the very latest developments in the observational science of cosmology. The book is separated into three parts; part I covers particle physics and general relativity, part II explores an account of the known history of the universe, and part III studies inflation. Full treatment of the origin of structure, scalar fields, the cosmic microwave background and the early universe are provided. Problems are included in the book with solutions provided in a separate solutions manual. More advanced extension material is offered in the Appendix, ensuring the book is fully accessible to students with a wide variety of background experience.

  8. Unimodular-Mimetic Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Nojiri, S; Oikonomou, V K

    2016-01-01

    We combine the unimodular gravity and mimetic gravity theories into a unified theoretical framework, which is proposed to solve the cosmological constant problem and the dark matter issue. After providing the formulation of the unimodular mimetic gravity and investigating all the new features that the vacuum unimodular gravity implies, by using the underlying reconstruction method, we realize some well known cosmological evolutions, with some of these being exotic for the ordinary Einstein-Hilbert gravity. Specifically we provide the vacuum unimodular mimetic gravity description of the de Sitter cosmology, of the perfect fluid with constant equation of state cosmology, of the Type IV singular cosmology and of the $R^2$ inflation cosmology. Moreover, we investigate how cosmologically viable cosmologies, which are compatible with the recent observational data, can be realized by the vacuum unimodular mimetic gravity. Since in some cases, the graceful exit from inflation problem might exist, we provide a qualita...

  9. An introduction to cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, Kerstin E

    2016-01-01

    Cosmology is becoming an important tool to test particle physics models. We provide an overview of the standard model of cosmology with an emphasis on the observations relevant for testing fundamental physics.

  10. Introduction to cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Roos, Matts

    2015-01-01

    The Fourth Edition of Introduction to Cosmology provides a concise, authoritative study of cosmology at an introductory level. Starting from elementary principles and the early history of cosmology, the text carefully guides the student on to curved spacetimes, special and general relativity, gravitational lensing, the thermal history of the Universe, and cosmological models, including extended gravity models, black holes and Hawking's recent conjectures on the not-so-black holes.

  11. Elements of String Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Maurizio

    2011-03-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Notation, units and conventions; 1. A short review of standard and inflationary cosmology; 2. The basic string cosmology equations; 3. Conformal invariance and string effective action; 4. Duality symmetries and cosmological solutions; 5. Inflationary kinematics; 6. The string phase; 7. The cosmic background of relic gravitational waves; 8. Scalar perturbations and the anisotropy of the CMB radiation; 9. Dilaton phenomenology; 10. Elements of brane cosmology; Index.

  12. Dark D-brane cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivisto, Tomi [Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wills, Danielle [Centre for Particle Theory, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Zavala, Ivonne, E-mail: t.s.koivisto@astro.uio.no, E-mail: d.e.wills@durham.ac.uk, E-mail: e.i.zavala@rug.nl [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Disformally coupled cosmologies arise from Dirac-Born-Infeld actions in Type II string theories, when matter resides on a moving hidden sector D-brane. Since such matter interacts only very weakly with the standard model particles, this scenario can provide a natural origin for the dark sector of the universe with a clear geometrical interpretation: dark energy is identified with the scalar field associated to the D-brane's position as it moves in the internal space, acting as quintessence, while dark matter is identified with the matter living on the D-brane, which can be modelled by a perfect fluid. The coupling functions are determined by the (warped) extra-dimensional geometry, and are thus constrained by the theory. The resulting cosmologies are studied using both dynamical system analysis and numerics. From the dynamical system point of view, one free parameter controls the cosmological dynamics, given by the ratio of the warp factor and the potential energy scales. The disformal coupling allows for new scaling solutions that can describe accelerating cosmologies alleviating the coincidence problem of dark energy. In addition, this scenario may ameliorate the fine-tuning problem of dark energy, whose small value may be attained dynamically, without requiring the mass of the dark energy field to be unnaturally low.

  13. Summary of cosmology workshop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarun Sandeep

    2004-10-01

    Cosmology is passing through a golden phase of rapid advance. The cosmology workshop at ICGC-2004 attracted a large number of research contributions to diverse topics of cosmology. I attempt to classify and summarize the research work and results of the oral and poster presentations made at the meeting.

  14. The Case Against Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Disney, M J

    2000-01-01

    It is argued that some of the recent claims for cosmology are grossly overblown. Cosmology rests on a very small database: it suffers from many fundamental difficulties as a science (if it is a science at all) whilst observations of distant phenomena are difficult to make and harder to interpret. It is suggested that cosmological inferences should be tentatively made and sceptically received.

  15. Foregrounds for observations of the cosmological 21 cm line: II. Westerbork observations of the fields around 3C196 and the North Celestial Pole

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardi, G; Brentjens, M A; Ciardi, B; Jelić, V; Koopmans, L V E; Labropoulos, P; Offringa, A; Pandey, V N; Schaye, J; Thomas, R M; Yatawatta, S; Zaroubi, S

    2010-01-01

    In the coming years a new insight into galaxy formation and the thermal history of the Universe is expected to come from the detection of the highly redshifted cosmological 21 cm line. The cosmological 21 cm line signal is buried under Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds which are likely to be a few orders of magnitude brighter. Strategies and techniques for effective subtraction of these foreground sources require a detailed knowledge of their structure in both intensity and polarization on the relevant angular scales of 1-30 arcmin. We present results from observations conducted with the Westerbork telescope in the 140-160 MHz range with 2 arcmin resolution in two fields located at intermediate Galactic latitude, centred around the bright quasar 3C196 and the North Celestial Pole. They were observed with the purpose of characterizing the foreground properties in sky areas where actual observations of the cosmological 21 cm line could be carried out. The polarization data were analysed through the rotatio...

  16. Testing Nonstandard Cosmological Models with SNLS3 Supernova Data and Other Cosmological Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengxiang; Wu, Puxun; Yu, Hongwei

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the implications for some nonstandard cosmological models using data from the first three years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3), assuming a spatially flat universe. A comparison between the constraints from the SNLS3 and those from other SN Ia samples, such as the ESSENCE, Union2, SDSS-II, and Constitution samples, is given and the effects of different light-curve fitters are considered. We find that analyzing SNe Ia with SALT2 or SALT or SiFTO can give consistent results and the tensions between different data sets and different light-curve fitters are obvious for fewer-free-parameters models. At the same time, we also study the constraints from SNLS3 along with data from the cosmic microwave background and the baryonic acoustic oscillations (CMB/BAO), and the latest Hubble parameter versus redshift (H(z)). Using model selection criteria such as χ2/dof, goodness of fit, Akaike information criterion, and Bayesian information criterion, we find that, among all the cosmological models considered here (ΛCDM, constant w, varying w, Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP), modified polytropic Cardassian, and the generalized Chaplygin gas), the flat DGP is favored by SNLS3 alone. However, when additional CMB/BAO or H(z) constraints are included, this is no longer the case, and the flat ΛCDM becomes preferred.

  17. TESTING NONSTANDARD COSMOLOGICAL MODELS WITH SNLS3 SUPERNOVA DATA AND OTHER COSMOLOGICAL PROBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhengxiang; Yu Hongwei [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of the Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Wu Puxun, E-mail: hwyu@hunnu.edu.cn [Center of Nonlinear Science and Department of Physics, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China)

    2012-01-10

    We investigate the implications for some nonstandard cosmological models using data from the first three years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3), assuming a spatially flat universe. A comparison between the constraints from the SNLS3 and those from other SN Ia samples, such as the ESSENCE, Union2, SDSS-II, and Constitution samples, is given and the effects of different light-curve fitters are considered. We find that analyzing SNe Ia with SALT2 or SALT or SiFTO can give consistent results and the tensions between different data sets and different light-curve fitters are obvious for fewer-free-parameters models. At the same time, we also study the constraints from SNLS3 along with data from the cosmic microwave background and the baryonic acoustic oscillations (CMB/BAO), and the latest Hubble parameter versus redshift (H(z)). Using model selection criteria such as {chi}{sup 2}/dof, goodness of fit, Akaike information criterion, and Bayesian information criterion, we find that, among all the cosmological models considered here ({Lambda}CDM, constant w, varying w, Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP), modified polytropic Cardassian, and the generalized Chaplygin gas), the flat DGP is favored by SNLS3 alone. However, when additional CMB/BAO or H(z) constraints are included, this is no longer the case, and the flat {Lambda}CDM becomes preferred.

  18. A Monte Carlo Simulation Framework for Testing Cosmological Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heymann Y.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We tested alternative cosmologies using Monte Carlo simulations based on the sam- pling method of the zCosmos galactic survey. The survey encompasses a collection of observable galaxies with respective redshifts that have been obtained for a given spec- troscopic area of the sky. Using a cosmological model, we can convert the redshifts into light-travel times and, by slicing the survey into small redshift buckets, compute a curve of galactic density over time. Because foreground galaxies obstruct the images of more distant galaxies, we simulated the theoretical galactic density curve using an average galactic radius. By comparing the galactic density curves of the simulations with that of the survey, we could assess the cosmologies. We applied the test to the expanding-universe cosmology of de Sitter and to a dichotomous cosmology.

  19. Comparing acquired angioedema with hereditary angioedema (types I/II): findings from the Icatibant Outcome Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, H J; Zanichelli, A; Caballero, T; Bouillet, L; Aberer, W; Maurer, M; Fain, O; Fabien, V; Andresen, I

    2017-04-01

    Icatibant is used to treat acute hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency types I/II (C1-INH-HAE types I/II) and has shown promise in angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE). Data from the Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) were analysed to evaluate the effectiveness of icatibant in the treatment of patients with C1-INH-AAE and compare disease characteristics with those with C1-INH-HAE types I/II. Key medical history (including prior occurrence of attacks) was recorded upon IOS enrolment. Thereafter, data were recorded retrospectively at approximately 6-month intervals during patient follow-up visits. In the icatibant-treated population, 16 patients with C1-INH-AAE had 287 attacks and 415 patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II had 2245 attacks. Patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II were more often male (69 versus 42%; P = 0·035) and had a significantly later mean (95% confidence interval) age of symptom onset [57·9 (51·33-64·53) versus 14·0 (12·70-15·26) years]. Time from symptom onset to diagnosis was significantly shorter in patients with C1-INH-AAE versus C1-INH-HAE types I/II (mean 12·3 months versus 118·1 months; P = 0·006). Patients with C1-INH-AAE showed a trend for higher occurrence of attacks involving the face (35 versus 21% of attacks; P = 0·064). Overall, angioedema attacks were more severe in patients with C1-INH-HAE types I/II versus C1-INH-AAE (61 versus 40% of attacks were classified as severe to very severe; P types I/II, respectively. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  20. NEWLY IDENTIFIED EXTENDED GREEN OBJECTS (EGOs) FROM THE SPITZER GLIMPSE II SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Gan, Cong-Gui; Shen, Zhi-Qiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ellingsen, Simon P.; Titmarsh, Anita [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia); He, Jin-Hua, E-mail: chenxi@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Yunnan Astronomical Observatory/National Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming, 650011 Yunnan Province (China)

    2013-05-01

    We have produced a catalog containing 98 newly identified massive young stellar object (MYSO) candidates associated with ongoing outflows (known as extended green objects, or EGOs). These have been identified from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) II data set and our new identifications increase the number of known EGOs to {approx}400 in our Galaxy, adding to the {approx}300 previously identified EGOs reported by Cyganowski et al. from the GLIMPSE I survey. The high detection rate ({approx}70%) of 95 GHz class I methanol masers achieved in a survey toward 57 of these new EGOs with the Mopra 22 m radio telescope demonstrates that the new EGOs are associated with outflows. Investigations of the mid-infrared properties and physical associations with other star formation tracers (e.g., infrared dark clouds, class I and II methanol masers, and millimeter Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey sources) reveal that the newly identified EGOs are very similar in nature to those in the sample of Cyganowski et al. All of the observational evidence supports the hypothesis that EGOs correspond to MYSOs at the earliest evolutionary stage, with ongoing outflow activity, and active rapid accretion.

  1. THE SWIFT AGN AND CLUSTER SURVEY. II. CLUSTER CONFIRMATION WITH SDSS DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: Rhiannon.D.Griffin-1@ou.edu, E-mail: xdai@ou.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ∼85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections.

  2. Elements of String Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Tseytlin, Arkady A

    1992-01-01

    Aspects of string cosmology for critical and non-critical strings are discussed emphasizing the necessity to account for the dilaton dynamics for a proper incorporation of ``large - small" duality. This drastically modifies the intuition one has with Einstein's gravity. For example winding modes, even though contribute to energy density, oppose expansion and if not annihilated will stop the expansion. Moreover we find that the radiation dominated era of the standard cosmology emerges quite naturally in string cosmology. Our analysis of non-critical string cosmology provides a reinterpretation of the (universal cover of the) recently studied two dimensional black hole solution as a conformal realization of cosmological solutions found previously by Mueller.

  3. Agnostic cosmology in the CAMEL framework

    CERN Document Server

    Henrot-Versillé, S; Plaszczynski, S; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Spinelli, M; Tristram, M

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological parameter estimation is traditionally performed in the Bayesian context. By adopting an "agnostic" statistical point of view, we show the interest of confronting the Bayesian results to a frequentist approach based on profile-likelihoods. To this purpose, we have developed the Cosmological Analysis with a Minuit Exploration of the Likelihood ("CAMEL") software. Written from scratch in pure C++, emphasis was put in building a clean and carefully-designed project where new data and/or cosmological computations can be easily included. CAMEL incorporates the latest cosmological likelihoods and gives access from the very same input file to several estimation methods: (i) A high quality Maximum Likelihood Estimate (a.k.a "best fit") using MINUIT ; (ii) profile likelihoods, (iii) a new implementation of an Adaptive Metropolis MCMC algorithm that relieves the burden of reconstructing the proposal distribution. We present here those various statistical techniques and roll out a full use-case that can then...

  4. Rigorous Newtonian cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    1996-10-01

    It is generally believed that it is not possible to rigorously analyze a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model in Newtonian mechanics. I show on the contrary that if Newtonian gravity theory is rewritten in geometrical language in the manner outlined in 1923-1924 by Élie Cartan [Ann. Ecole Norm. Sup. 40, 325-412 (1923); 41, 1-25 (1924)], then Newtonian cosmology is as rigorous as Friedmann cosmology. In particular, I show that the equation of geodesic deviation in Newtonian cosmology is exactly the same as equation of geodesic deviation in the Friedmann universe, and that this equation can be integrated to yield a constraint equation formally identical to the Friedmann equation. However, Newtonian cosmology is more general than Friedmann cosmology: Ever-expanding and recollapsing universes are allowed in any noncompact homogeneous and isotropic spatial topology. I shall give a brief history of attempts to do cosmology in the framework of Newtonian mechanics.

  5. Constraints on cosmological parameters in power-law cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Rani, Sarita; Shahalam, M; Singh, J K; Myrzakulov, R

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we examine observational constraints on the power law cosmology; essentially dependent on two parameters $H_0$ (hubble constant) and $q$ (deceleration parameter). We investigate the constraints on these parameters using the latest 28 points of H(z) data and 580 points of Union2.1 compilation data performing a joint test with H(z) and Union2.1 compilation data. We also forecast constraints using a simulated data set for the future JDEM, supernovae survey. Our studies show that power-law cosmology tunes well with the H(z) and Union2.1 compilation data; the estimates obtained with $1\\sigma$ are in close agreement with the recent probes described in the literature. However, the constraints obtained on $$ and $$ i.e. $H_0$ average and $q$ average using the simulated data set for the future JDEM, supernovae survey are found to be inconsistent with the values obtained from the H(z) and Union2.1 SNe Ia data. We also perform the statefinder analysis and find that the power-law cosmological models approa...

  6. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Power Spectrum at 148 and 218 GHz from the 2008 Southern Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Sudeep; Ade, Peter A R; Aguirre, Paula; Amir, Mandana; Appel, John W; Barrientos, L Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S; Bond, J Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon R; Doriese, W Bertrand; Dunkley, Joanna; Dünner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P; Fowler, Joseph W; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hilton, Gene C; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renée; Huffenberger, Kevin M; Hughes, David H; Hughes, John P; Infante, Leopoldo; Irwin, Kent D; Juin, Jean Baptiste; Kaul, Madhuri; Klein, Jeff; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lau, Judy M; Limon, Michele; Lin, Yen-Ting; Lupton, Robert H; Marsden, Danica; Martocci, Krista; Mauskopf, Phil; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Moseley, Harvey; Netterfield, Calvin B; Niemack, Michael D; Nolta, Michael R; Page, Lyman A; Parker, Lucas; Partridge, Bruce; Reid, Beth; Sehgal, Neelima; Sherwin, Blake D; Sievers, Jon; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; Swetz, Daniel S; Switzer, Eric R; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Tucker, Carole; Warne, Ryan; Wollack, Ed; Zhao, Yue

    2010-01-01

    We present measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum made by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope at 148 GHz and 218 GHz, as well as the cross-frequency spectrum between the two channels. Our results clearly show the second through the seventh acoustic peaks in the CMB power spectrum. The measurements of these higher-order peaks provide an additional test of the {\\Lambda}CDM cosmological model. At l > 3000, we detect power in excess of the primary anisotropy spectrum of the CMB. At lower multipoles 500 < l < 3000, we find evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB in the power spectrum at the 2.8{\\sigma} level. We also detect a low level of Galactic dust in our maps, which demonstrates that we can recover known faint, diffuse signals.

  7. Cosmological Measurements with General Relativistic Galaxy Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Bertacca, Daniele; Doré, Olivier; Durrer, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological dependence and the constraining power of large-scale galaxy correlations, including all redshift-distortions, wide-angle, lensing and gravitational potential effects on linear scales. We analyze the cosmological information present in the lensing convergence and in the gravitational potential terms describing the so-called "relativistic effects," and we find that, while smaller than the information contained in intrinsic galaxy clustering, it is not negligible. We investigate how neglecting them does bias cosmological measurements performed by future spectroscopic and photometric large-scale surveys such as SKA and Euclid. We perform a Fisher analysis using the CLASS code, modified to include scale-dependent galaxy bias and redshift-dependent magnification and evolution bias. Our results show that neglecting relativistic terms introduces an error in the forecasted precision in measuring cosmological parameters of the order of a few tens of percent, in particular when measuring ...

  8. A Cosmological Framework for the Co-Evolution of Quasars, Supermassive Black Holes, and Elliptical Galaxies: II. Formation of Red Ellipticals

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Cox, Thomas J.; Keres, Dusan; Hernquist, Lars

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged) We develop and test a model for the cosmological role of mergers in the formation and quenching of red, early-type galaxies. Making the ansatz that star formation is quenched after a gas-rich, spheroid-forming major merger, we demonstrate that this naturally predicts the turnover in the efficiency of star formation at ~L_star, as well as the observed mass functions/density of red galaxies as a function of redshift, the formation times of spheroids as a function of mass, and the fra...

  9. A survey of weak MgII absorbers at redshift =1.78

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, R S; Kim, T S; Lynch, Ryan S.; Charlton, Jane C.; Kim, Tae-Sun

    2006-01-01

    The exact nature of weak MgII absorbers (those with W_r(2796) < 0.3 A) is a matter of debate, but most are likely related to areas of local star formation or supernovae activity outside of giant galaxies. Using 18 QSO spectra obtained with the Ultra-Violet Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we have conducted a survey for weak MgII absorbers at 1.4 < z < 2.4. We searched a redshift path length of 8.51, eliminating regions badly contaminated by atmospheric absorption so that the survey is close to 100% complete to W_r(2796) = 0.02 A. We found a total of 9 weak absorbers, yielding a number density of absorbers of dN/dz = 1.06 +/- 0.12 for 0.02 <= W_r(2796) < 0.3 A. Narayanan et al. (2005) found dN/dz = 1.00 +/- 0.20 at 0 < z < 0.3 and Churchill et al. (1999) found dN/dz = 1.74 +/- 0.10 at 0.4 < z < 1.4. Therefore, the population of weak MgII absorbers appears to peak at z~1. We explore the expected evolution of the absorber population subject to a changing e...

  10. The XXL Survey. II. The bright cluster sample: catalogue and luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, F.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P. A.; Adami, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Pierre, M.; Maughan, B. J.; Lieu, M.; Le Fèvre, J. P.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Ardila, F.; Baldry, I.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Chiappetti, L.; Démoclès, J.; Eckert, D.; Evrard, A. E.; Faccioli, L.; Gastaldello, F.; Guennou, L.; Horellou, C.; Iovino, A.; Koulouridis, E.; Le Brun, V.; Lidman, C.; Liske, J.; Maurogordato, S.; Menanteau, F.; Owers, M.; Poggianti, B.; Pomarède, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Rapetti, D.; Reiprich, T. H.; Smith, G. P.; Tuffs, R.; Valageas, P.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The XXL Survey is the largest survey carried out by the XMM-Newton satellite and covers a total area of 50 square degrees distributed over two fields. It primarily aims at investigating the large-scale structures of the Universe using the distribution of galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei as tracers of the matter distribution. The survey will ultimately uncover several hundreds of galaxy clusters out to a redshift of ~2 at a sensitivity of ~10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band. Aims: This article presents the XXL bright cluster sample, a subsample of 100 galaxy clusters selected from the full XXL catalogue by setting a lower limit of 3 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2 on the source flux within a 1' aperture. Methods: The selection function was estimated using a mixture of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical recipes that closely reproduce the source selection process. An extensive spectroscopic follow-up provided redshifts for 97 of the 100 clusters. We derived accurate X-ray parameters for all the sources. Scaling relations were self-consistently derived from the same sample in other publications of the series. On this basis, we study the number density, luminosity function, and spatial distribution of the sample. Results: The bright cluster sample consists of systems with masses between M500 = 7 × 1013 and 3 × 1014 M⊙, mostly located between z = 0.1 and 0.5. The observed sky density of clusters is slightly below the predictions from the WMAP9 model, and significantly below the prediction from the Planck 2015 cosmology. In general, within the current uncertainties of the cluster mass calibration, models with higher values of σ8 and/or ΩM appear more difficult to accommodate. We provide tight constraints on the cluster differential luminosity function and find no hint of evolution out to z ~ 1. We also find strong evidence for the presence of large-scale structures in the XXL bright cluster sample and identify five new superclusters. Based on

  11. Craig and Kalam Cosmological Argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhosein Tavacoly

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available   Among different arguments for the existence of God the Kalam cosmological argument is a very famous one which is elaborated by Professor William lane Craig. Craig claims that the universe began to exist , then he continues to say: everything that begins to exist has a cause and therefore the universe has a cause. But how do we know that the universe began to exist? This premise forms the most important part of Craig’s contention, and he bolsters it by four arguments, the first two are driven from philosophy and the other two, which he prefers to name them “confirmations from sciences” are driven from sciences the first one evokes to big bang theory and the seconds to the second principle of thermodynamic which are respectively adopted from cosmology and physics.   In this essay we are going to survey Craig’s arguments and estimate their value and weight.

  12. Craig and Kalam Cosmological Argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavacoli, Gh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Among different arguments for the existence of God the Kalam cosmological argument is a very famous one which is elaborated by Professor William lane Craig. Craig claims that the universe began to exist, then he continues to say: everything that begins to exist has a cause and therefore the universe has a cause. But how do we know that the universe began to exist? This premise forms the most important part of Craig’s contention, and he bolsters it by four arguments, the first two are driven from philosophy and the other two, which he prefers to name them “confirmations from sciences” are driven from sciences; the first one evokes to big bang theory and the seconds to the second principle of thermodynamic which are respectively adopted from cosmology and physics.In this essay we are going to survey Craig’s arguments and estimate their value and weight.

  13. Craig and Kalam Cosmological Argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhosein Tavacoly

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Among different arguments for the existence of God the Kalam cosmological argument is a very famous one which is elaborated by Professor William lane Craig. Craig claims that the universe began to exist , then he continues to say: everything that begins to exist has a cause and therefore the universe has a cause. But how do we know that the universe began to exist? This premise forms the most important part of Craig’s contention, and he bolsters it by four arguments, the first two are driven from philosophy and the other two, which he prefers to name them “confirmations from sciences” are driven from sciences the first one evokes to big bang theory and the seconds to the second principle of thermodynamic which are respectively adopted from cosmology and physics.   In this essay we are going to survey Craig’s arguments and estimate their value and weight.

  14. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY. IV. HELIUM AND CARBON RECOMBINATION LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenger, Trey V.; Bania, T. M. [Astronomy Department, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Balser, Dana S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA, 22903-2475 (United States); Anderson, L. D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    The Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS) found hundreds of previously unknown Galactic regions of massive star formation by detecting hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) emission from candidate H II region targets. Since the HRDS nebulae lie at large distances from the Sun, they are located in previously unprobed zones of the Galactic disk. Here, we derive the properties of helium and carbon RRL emission from HRDS nebulae. Our target sample is the subset of the HRDS that has visible helium or carbon RRLs. This criterion gives a total of 84 velocity components (14% of the HRDS) with helium emission and 52 (9%) with carbon emission. For our highest quality sources, the average {sup 4}He{sup +}/H{sup +} abundance ratio by number, (y {sup +}), is 0.068 {+-} 0.023(1{sigma}). This is the same ratio as that measured for the sample of previously known Galactic H II regions. Nebulae without detected helium emission give robust y {sup +} upper limits. There are 5 RRL emission components with y {sup +} less than 0.04 and another 12 with upper limits below this value. These H II regions must have either a very low {sup 4}He abundance or contain a significant amount of neutral helium. The HRDS has 20 nebulae with carbon RRL emission but no helium emission at its sensitivity level. There is no correlation between the carbon RRL parameters and the 8 {mu}m mid-infrared morphology of these nebulae.

  15. Probing The New Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Zentner, A R

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in observational techniques have transformed cosmology into a field inundated with ever-expanding, high-quality data sets and driven cosmology toward a standard model where the classic cosmological parameters are accurately measured. I briefly discuss some of the methods used to determine cosmological parameters, particularly primordial nucleosynthesis, the magnitude- redshift relation of supernovae, and cosmic microwave background anisotropy. I demonstrate how cosmological data can be used to complement particle physics and constrain extensions to the Standard Model. Specifically, I present bounds on light particle species and the properties of unstable, weakly-interacting, massive particles. Despite the myriad successes of the emerging standard cosmological model, unanswered questions linger. Numerical simulations of structure formation predict galactic central densities that are considerably higher than observed. They also reveal hundreds of satellites orbiting Milky Way-like galaxies while th...

  16. Cosmology and time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balbi Amedeo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Time has always played a crucial role in cosmology. I review some of the aspects of the present cosmological model which are more directly related to time, such as: the definition of a cosmic time; the existence of typical timescales and epochs in an expanding universe; the problem of the initial singularity and the origin of time; the cosmological arrow of time.

  17. Current Issues in Cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbour, J B [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester (United States)

    2007-02-07

    to a far better review article or book on modern cosmology. The doubters' case is threadbare at best, as Alain Blanchard put it rather more politely in his panel contribution. The Burbidges and Halton Arp reiterate the difficulties that these eminent scientists have long had in reconciling certain observations with the standard model. Most workers in the field are aware of their views and find they lack substance, especially Arp's worries about some close coincidences between the observed positions of low-redshift galaxies and high-redshift quasars. Virtually everyone believes that they have no statistical significance. Arp's belief that some quasars have non-cosmological redshifts and are being spewed out of nearby exploding galactic centres raises eyebrows. For me the most worthwhile of the 'rebel' papers is Narlikar's. Its first half is a thought-provoking survey of the many modifications through which the big-bang model has passed. He calls them additions of epicycles and in some cases I think he has a point. But his rival theory seems very far fetched and makes my point about Hamlet's ghost. The steady-state theory just will not die: in 1994, Hoyle, G. Burbidge, and Narlikar published the quasi-steady-state theory (The Astrophysical Journal 410 437) in which the universe expands, not perfectly steadily but 'in mini-creation events at regular intervals and in response the universe oscillates on a short-term period of about 50 Gyr while it also has a steady (exponential) long-term expansion at a characteristic time scale of about 1000 Gyr.' I won't go into details, but this looks like a whopping epicycle on the steady-state model{exclamation_point} Wickramasinghe's paper is on iron whiskers, which have now taken over from standard dust as the agents that must transform starlight into the microwave background. In my view the two best papers in the volume are those of the panellists Alain Blanchard (in favour of

  18. Sociology of Modern Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Corredoira, M.

    2009-08-01

    Certain results of observational cosmology cast critical doubt on the foundations of standard cosmology but leave most cosmologists untroubled. Alternative cosmological models that differ from the Big Bang have been published and defended by heterodox scientists; however, most cosmologists do not heed these. This may be because standard theory is correct and all other ideas and criticisms are incorrect, but it is also to a great extent due to sociological phenomena such as the ``snowball effect'' or ``groupthink''. We might wonder whether cosmology, the study of the Universe as a whole, is a science like other branches of physics or just a dominant ideology.

  19. Inhomogeneous Big Bang Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wagh, S M

    2002-01-01

    In this letter, we outline an inhomogeneous model of the Big Bang cosmology. For the inhomogeneous spacetime used here, the universe originates in the infinite past as the one dominated by vacuum energy and ends in the infinite future as the one consisting of "hot and relativistic" matter. The spatial distribution of matter in the considered inhomogeneous spacetime is {\\em arbitrary}. Hence, observed structures can arise in this cosmology from suitable "initial" density contrast. Different problems of the standard model of Big Bang cosmology are also resolved in the present inhomogeneous model. This inhomogeneous model of the Big Bang Cosmology predicts "hot death" for the universe.

  20. The supernova cosmology cookbook: Bayesian numerical recipes

    CERN Document Server

    Karpenka, N V

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and observational cosmology have enjoyed a number of significant successes over the last two decades. Cosmic microwave background measurements from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck, together with large-scale structure and supernova (SN) searches, have put very tight constraints on cosmological parameters. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) played a central role in the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2011. The last decade has seen an enormous increase in the amount of high quality SN observations, with SN catalogues now containing hundreds of objects. This number is expected to increase to thousands in the next few years, as data from next-generation missions, such as the Dark Energy Survey and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope become available. In order to exploit the vast amount of forthcoming high quality data, it is extremely important to develop robust and efficient statistical analysis methods to answer cosmological q...

  1. Alchemical poetry in medieval and early modern Europe: a preliminary survey and synthesis. Part II - Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Didier

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a preliminary description of medieval and early modern alchemical poetry composed in Latin and in the principal vernacular languages of western Europe. It aims to distinguish the various genres in which this poetry flourished, and to identify the most representative aspects of each cultural epoch by considering the medieval and early modern periods in turn. Such a distinction (always somewhat artificial) between two broad historical periods may be justified by the appearance of new cultural phenomena that profoundly modified the character of early modern alchemical poetry: the ever-increasing importance of the prisca theologia, the alchemical interpretation of ancient mythology, and the rise of neo-Latin humanist poetry. Although early modern alchemy was marked by the appearance of new doctrines (notably the alchemical spiritus mundi and Paracelsianism), alchemical poetry was only superficially modified by criteria of a scientific nature, which therefore appear to be of lesser importance. This study falls into two parts. Part I provides a descriptive survey of extant poetry, and in Part II the results of the survey are analysed in order to highlight such distinctive features as the function of alchemical poetry, the influence of the book market on its evolution, its doctrinal content, and the question of whether any theory of alchemical poetry ever emerged. Part II is accompanied by an index of the authors and works cited in both parts.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Second epoch VLBA Calibrator Survey (VCS-II) (Gordon+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, D.; Jacobs, C.; Beasley, A.; Peck, A.; Gaume, R.; Charlot, P.; Fey, A.; Ma, C.; Titov, O.; Boboltz, D.

    2016-07-01

    Six Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) calibrator survey campaigns were run between 1994 and 2007 (VCS1, Beasley et al. 2002, cat. J/ApJS/141/13; VCS2, Fomalont et al. 2003, cat. J/AJ/126/2562; VCS3, Petrov et al. 2005, cat. J/AJ/129/1163; VCS4, Petrov et al. 2006, cat. J/AJ/131/1872; VCS5, Kovalev et al. 2007, cat. J/AJ/133/1236; VCS6, Petrov et al. 2008, cat. J/AJ/136/580) We report on the results of a second epoch VLBA Calibrator Survey campaign (VCS-II) in which 2400 VCS sources were re-observed in the X and S bands. The VLBA S/X (S band~2.3GHz and X band~8.6GHz) dual frequency system was used. We used the VLBA RDBE/Mark5C system, which has 16 32MHz channels and records 2 Gbits/s using 2 bit sampling. Due to S-band filters below 2200MHz and above 2400MHz at most of the VLBA antennas, and a broad area of RFI from SiriusXM satellites (2320-2345MHz), only four channels could be deployed in the S band (2220.0, 2252.0, 2284.0, and 2348.0MHz). The other 12 channels were deployed in the X band (8460.0, 8492.0, 8524.0, 8556.0, 8620.0, 8652.0, 8716.0, 8748.0, 8812.0, 8844.0, 8876.0, and 8908.0MHz). We set a target of 300 sources per session, or 2400 total sources for the 8 VLBA sessions. We selected all sources from the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) S/X astrometric/geodetic catalog (available at http://gemini.gsfc.nasa.gov/solutions/ or by following the links at http://lupus.gsfc.nasa.gov/) between -50° and +90° decl. that had been observed in only 1 or 2 sessions as of mid 2013. This amounted to ~2060 sources. To fill out the list, we added ~340 additional sources that had been observed but not detected in the original VCS1-6 analysis. The eight schedules were run between 2014 January and 2015 March (VCS-II-A/BG219A on 2014 01/04 10:04-01/05 10:02; VCS-II-B/BG219B1 on 2014 05/31 17:12-06/01 17:05; VCS-II-D/BG219D on 2014 06/09 09:13-06/10 09:10; VCS-II-C/BG219C on 2014 08/05 13:03-08/06 13:00; VCS-II-E/BG219E on 2014 08/09 00:00-08/09 23:55; VCS-II-F/BG219F on 2014

  3. Cosmology with superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scovacricchi, D.; Nichol, R. C.; Bacon, D.; Sullivan, M.; Prajs, S.

    2016-02-01

    We predict cosmological constraints for forthcoming surveys using superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) as standardizable candles. Due to their high peak luminosity, these events can be observed to high redshift (z ˜ 3), opening up new possibilities to probe the Universe in the deceleration epoch. We describe our methodology for creating mock Hubble diagrams for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), the `Search Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae' (SUDSS) and a sample of SLSNe possible from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), exploring a range of standardization values for SLSNe. We include uncertainties due to gravitational lensing and marginalize over possible uncertainties in the magnitude scale of the observations (e.g. uncertain absolute peak magnitude, calibration errors). We find that the addition of only ≃100 SLSNe from SUDSS to 3800 Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from DES can improve the constraints on w and Ωm by at least 20 per cent (assuming a flat wCDM universe). Moreover, the combination of DES SNe Ia and 10 000 LSST-like SLSNe can measure Ωm and w to 2 and 4 per cent, respectively. The real power of SLSNe becomes evident when we consider possible temporal variations in w(a), giving possible uncertainties of only 2, 5 and 14 per cent on Ωm, w0 and wa, respectively, from the combination of DES SNe Ia, LSST-like SLSNe and Planck. These errors are competitive with predicted Euclid constraints, indicating a future role for SLSNe for probing the high-redshift Universe.

  4. The Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey: IV. Helium and Carbon Recombination Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Wenger, Trey V; Balser, Dana S; Anderson, L D

    2012-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS) found hundreds of previously unknown Galactic regions of massive star formation by detecting hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) emission from candidate H II region targets. Since the HRDS nebulae lie at large distances from the Sun, they are located in previously unprobed zones of the Galactic disk. Here we derive the properties of helium and carbon RRL emission from HRDS nebulae. Our target sample is the subset of the HRDS that has visible helium or carbon RRLs. This criterion gives a total of 84 velocity components (14% of the HRDS) with helium emission and 52 (9%) with carbon emission. For our highest quality sources, the average ionic He-4+/H+ abundance ratio by number, , is 0.068 +/- 0.023 (1-sigma). This is the same ratio as that measured for the sample of previously known Galactic H II regions. Nebulae without detected helium emission give robust y+ upper limits. There are 5 RRL emission components with y+ less than 0.04 and another ...

  5. Scrutinizing Exotic Cosmological Models Using ESSENCE Supernova Data Combined With Other Cosmological Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Tamara M.; Mortsell, E.; Sollerman, J.; Becker, A.C.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Filippenko, A.V.; Foley, R.J.; Garnavich, P.M.; Jha, S.; Krisciunas, K.; Kirshner, R.P.; Leibundgut, B.; Li, W.; Matheson, T.; Miknaitis, G.; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Riess, A.G.; Schmidt, B.P.; /Bohr Inst. /Stockholm U. /Washington U.,

    2007-01-25

    The first cosmological results from the ESSENCE supernova survey (Wood-Vasey et al. 2007) are extended to a wider range of cosmological models including dynamical dark energy and non-standard cosmological models. We fold in a greater number of external data sets such as the recent Higher-z release of high-redshift supernovae (Riess et al. 2007) as well as several complementary cosmological probes. Model comparison statistics such as the Bayesian and Akaike information criteria are applied to gauge the worth of models. These statistics favor models that give a good fit with fewer parameters. Based on this analysis, the preferred cosmological model is the flat cosmological constant model, where the expansion history of the universe can be adequately described with only one free parameter describing the energy content of the universe. Amongst the more exotic models that provide good fits to the data, we note a preference for models whose best-fit parameters reduce them to the cosmological constant model.

  6. Observational constraints on late-time \\Lambda(t) cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, S; Pigozzo, C; Alcaniz, J S

    2007-01-01

    The cosmological constant, i.e., the energy density stored in the true vacuum state of all existing fields in the Universe, is the simplest and the most natural possibility to describe the current cosmic acceleration. However, despite its observational successes, such a possibility exacerbates the well known cosmological constant problem, requiring a natural explanation for its small, but nonzero, value. In this paper we study cosmological consequences of a scenario driven by a varying cosmological term, in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter. We test the viability of this scenario and study a possible way to distinguish it from the current standard cosmological model by using recent observations of type Ia supernova (Supernova Legacy Survey Collaboration), measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the position of the first peak of the cosmic microwave background angular spectrum from the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotr...

  7. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Christopher; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda Labor and Munoz).

  8. The VMC Survey. XIII. Type II Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Ripepi, V; Marconi, M; Clementini, G; Cioni, M-R L; de Grijs, R; Emerson, J P; Groenewegen, M A T; Ivanov, V D; Muraveva, T; Piatti, A E; Subramanian, S

    2014-01-01

    The VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds System (VMC) is collecting deep $K_\\mathrm{s}$--band time--series photometry of the pulsating variable stars hosted in the system formed by the two Magellanic Clouds and the Bridge connecting them. In this paper we have analysed a sample of 130 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Type II Cepheids (T2CEPs) found in tiles with complete or near complete VMC observations for which identification and optical magnitudes were obtained from the OGLE III survey. We present $J$ and $K_\\mathrm{s}$ light curves for all 130 pulsators, including 41 BL Her, 62 W Vir (12 pW Vir) and 27 RV Tau variables. We complement our near-infrared photometry with the $V$ magnitudes from the OGLE III survey, allowing us to build a variety of Period-Luminosity ($PL$), Period-Luminosity-Colour ($PLC$) and Period-Wesenheit ($PW$) relationships, including any combination of the $V, J, K_\\mathrm{s}$ filters and valid for BL Her and W Vir classes. These relationships were calibrated in terms of the LMC distanc...

  9. MASH-II: More Planetary Nebulae from the AAO/UKST H\\alpha Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Miszalski, B; Acker, A; Birkby, J L; Frew, D J; Kovacevic, A

    2007-01-01

    We present a supplement to the Macquarie/AAO/Strasbourg H$\\alpha$ planetary nebulae (PNe) catalogue (MASH), which we denote MASH-II. The supplement consists of over 300 true, likely and possible new Galactic PNe found after re-examination of the entire AAO/UKST H$\\alpha$ survey of the southern Galactic Plane in digital form. We have spectroscopically confirmed over 240 of these new candidates as bona-fide PNe and we include other high quality candidates awaiting spectroscopic confirmation as possible PNe. These latest discoveries largely comprise two distinct groups: small, star-like or moderately resolved PNe at one end and mostly large, extremely low surface brightness PNe at the other. Neither group were easy to discover from simple visual scrutiny of the original survey exposures as for MASH but were relatively straightforward to uncover from the digital images via application of semi-automated discovery techniques. We suspect the few PNe still hidden in the H$\\alpha$ survey will lie outside our search cr...

  10. Phantom cosmologies and fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Chimento, Luis P; Forte, Monica; Kremer, Gilberto M

    2007-01-01

    Form invariance transformations can be used for constructing phantom cosmologies starting with conventional cosmological models. In this work we reconsider the scalar field case and extend the discussion to fermionic fields, where the "phantomization" process exhibits a new class of possible accelerated regimes.

  11. Perspectives in cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilenkin, Alexander, E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.ed [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The 'new standard cosmology', based on the theory of inflation, has very impressive observational support. I review some outstanding problems of the new cosmology and the global view of the universe - the multiverse - that it suggests. I focus in particular on prospects for further observational tests of inflation and of the multiverse.

  12. String Cosmology: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAllister, Liam P.; Silverstein, Eva

    2007-10-22

    We give an overview of the status of string cosmology. We explain the motivation for the subject, outline the main problems, and assess some of the proposed solutions. Our focus is on those aspects of cosmology that benefit from the structure of an ultraviolet-complete theory.

  13. Cosmological implications of Geometrothermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Luongo, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    We use the formalism of Geometrothermodynamics to derive a series of fundamental equations for thermodynamic systems. It is shown that all these fundamental equations can be used in the context of relativistic cosmology to derive diverse scenarios which include the standard cosmological model, a unified model for dark energy and dark matter, and an effective inflationary model.

  14. Cosmological Implications of Geometrothermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, O.; Quevedo, H.

    2015-01-01

    We use the formalism of Geometrothermodynamics to derive a series of fundamental equations for thermodynamic systems. It is shown that all these fundamental equations can be used in the context of relativistic cosmology to derive diverse scenarios which include the standard cosmological model, a unified model for dark energy and dark matter, and an effective inflationary model.

  15. Neutrino properties from cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannestad, S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years precision cosmology has become an increasingly powerful probe of particle physics. Perhaps the prime example of this is the very stringent cosmological upper bound on the neutrino mass. However, other aspects of neutrino physics, such as their decoupling history and possible non-s...

  16. Dwarf-Galaxy Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina; Brinks, Elias; Kravtsov, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies provide opportunities for drawing inferences about the processes in the early universe by observing our "cosmological backyard"-the Local Group and its vicinity. This special issue of the open-access journal Advances in Astronomy is a snapshot of the current state of the art of dwarf-galaxy cosmology.

  17. Three-form cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivisto, Tomi S., E-mail: T.Koivisto@ThPhys.Uni-Heidelberg.d [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, 69120 (Germany); Nunes, Nelson J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, 69120 (Germany)

    2010-03-01

    Cosmology of self-interacting three-forms is investigated. The minimally coupled canonical theory can naturally generate a variety of isotropic background dynamics, including scaling, possibly transient acceleration and phantom crossing. An intuitive picture of the cosmological dynamics is presented employing an effective potential. Numerical solutions and analytical approximations are provided for scenarios which are potentially important for inflation or dark energy.

  18. BMS in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Kehagias, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Symmetries play an interesting role in cosmology. They are useful in characterizing the cosmological perturbations generated during inflation and lead to consistency relations involving the soft limit of the statistical correlators of large-scale structure dark matter and galaxies overdensities. On the other hand, in observational cosmology the carriers of the information about these large-scale statistical distributions are light rays traveling on null geodesics. Motivated by this simple consideration, we study the structure of null infinity and the associated BMS symmetry in a cosmological setting. For decelerating Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds, for which future null infinity exists, we find that the BMS transformations which leaves the asymptotic metric invariant to leading order. Contrary to the asymptotic flat case, the BMS transformations in cosmology generate Goldstone modes corresponding to both scalar and tensor degrees of freedom which may exist at null infinity and perturb the asymptotic d...

  19. Classical and quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This comprehensive textbook is devoted to classical and quantum cosmology, with particular emphasis on modern approaches to quantum gravity and string theory and on their observational imprint. It covers major challenges in theoretical physics such as the big bang and the cosmological constant problem. An extensive review of standard cosmology, the cosmic microwave background, inflation and dark energy sets the scene for the phenomenological application of all the main quantum-gravity and string-theory models of cosmology. Born of the author's teaching experience and commitment to bridging the gap between cosmologists and theoreticians working beyond the established laws of particle physics and general relativity, this is a unique text where quantum-gravity approaches and string theory are treated on an equal footing. As well as introducing cosmology to undergraduate and graduate students with its pedagogical presentation and the help of 45 solved exercises, this book, which includes an ambitious bibliography...

  20. Cosmology and particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    The interplay between cosmology and elementary particle physics is discussed. The standard cosmology is reviewed, concentrating on primordial nucleosynthesis and discussing how the standard cosmology has been used to place constraints on the properties of various particles. Baryogenesis is discussed, showing how a scenario in which the B-, C-, and CP-violating interactions in GUTs provide a dynamical explanation for the predominance of matter over antimatter and for the present baryon-to-photon ratio. It is shown how the very early dynamical evolution of a very weakly coupled scalar field which is initially displaced from the minimum of its potential may explain a handful of very fundamental cosmological facts which are not explained by the standard cosmology.

  1. Testing loop quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2017-03-01

    Loop quantum cosmology predicts that quantum gravity effects resolve the big-bang singularity and replace it by a cosmic bounce. Furthermore, loop quantum cosmology can also modify the form of primordial cosmological perturbations, for example by reducing power at large scales in inflationary models or by suppressing the tensor-to-scalar ratio in the matter bounce scenario; these two effects are potential observational tests for loop quantum cosmology. In this article, I review these predictions and others, and also briefly discuss three open problems in loop quantum cosmology: its relation to loop quantum gravity, the trans-Planckian problem, and a possible transition from a Lorentzian to a Euclidean space-time around the bounce point.

  2. Introduction to cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Ryden, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Introduction to Cosmology provides a rare combination of a solid foundation of the core physical concepts of cosmology and the most recent astronomical observations. The book is designed for advanced undergraduates or beginning graduate students and assumes no prior knowledge of general relativity. An emphasis is placed on developing the readers' physical insight rather than losing them with complex math. An approachable writing style and wealth of fresh and imaginative analogies from "everyday" physics are used to make the concepts of cosmology more accessible. The book is unique in that it not only includes recent major developments in cosmology, like the cosmological constant and accelerating universe, but also anticipates key developments expected in the next few years, such as detailed results on the cosmic microwave background.

  3. Preferred axis in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The foundation of modern cosmology relies on the so-called cosmological principle which states an homogeneous and isotropic distribution of matter in the universe on large scales. However, recent observations, such as the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, the motion of galaxies in the universe, the polarization of quasars and the acceleration of the cosmic expansion, indicate preferred directions in the sky. If these directions have a cosmological origin, the cosmological principle would be violated, and modern cosmology should be reconsidered. In this paper, by considering the preferred axis in the CMB parity violation, we find that it coincides with the preferred axes in CMB quadrupole and CMB octopole, and they all align with the direction of the CMB kinematic dipole. In addition, the preferred directions in the velocity flows, quasar alignment, anisotropy of the cosmic acceleration, the handedness of spiral galaxies, and the angular distribution of the fine-structu...

  4. A Taste of Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Verde, L

    2013-01-01

    This is the summary of two lectures that aim to give an overview of cosmology. I will not try to be too rigorous in derivations, nor to give a full historical overview. The idea is to provide a "taste" of cosmology and some of the interesting topics it covers. The standard cosmological model is presented and I highlight the successes of cosmology over the past decade or so. Keys to the development of the standard cosmological model are observations of the cosmic microwave background and of large-scale structure, which are introduced. Inflation and dark energy and the outlook for the future are also discussed. Slides from the lectures are available from the school website: physicschool.web.cern.ch/PhysicSchool/CLASHEP/CLASHEP2011/.

  5. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, E.C. Stoner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Cotton, W. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Chandler, C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Churchwell, E. B. [The University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dougherty, S. M. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada); Fender, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gledhill, T. M. [Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Hindson, L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jackson, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Kurtz, S. E. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, C.P. 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Marti, J., E-mail: C.R.Purcell@leeds.ac.uk [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, Edif. A3, E-23071 Jaen (Spain); and others

    2013-03-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  6. A Cosmological Framework for the Co-Evolution of Quasars, Supermassive Black Holes, and Elliptical Galaxies: II. Formation of Red Ellipticals

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Keres, Dusan; Hernquist, Lars

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged) We develop and test a model for the cosmological role of mergers in the formation and quenching of red, early-type galaxies. Making the ansatz that star formation is quenched after a gas-rich, spheroid-forming major merger, we demonstrate that this naturally predicts the turnover in the efficiency of star formation at ~L_star, as well as the observed mass functions/density of red galaxies as a function of redshift, the formation times of spheroids as a function of mass, and the fraction of quenched galaxies as a function of galaxy and halo mass, environment, and redshift. Comparing to a variety of semi-analytic models in which quenching is primarily driven by halo mass considerations or secular/disk instabilities, we demonstrate that our model and different broad classes of models make unique and robust qualitative predictions for a number of observables, including the red fraction as a function of galaxy and halo mass, the density of passive galaxies and evolution of the color-morphology-density r...

  7. The cosmological principle is not in the sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Hyun, Hwasu; Noh, Hyerim; Hwang, Jai-chan

    2017-08-01

    The homogeneity of matter distribution at large scales, known as the cosmological principle, is a central assumption in the standard cosmological model. The case is testable though, thus no longer needs to be a principle. Here we perform a test for spatial homogeneity using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) sample by counting galaxies within a specified volume with the radius scale varying up to 300 h-1 Mpc. We directly confront the large-scale structure data with the definition of spatial homogeneity by comparing the averages and dispersions of galaxy number counts with allowed ranges of the random distribution with homogeneity. The LRG sample shows significantly larger dispersions of number counts than the random catalogues up to 300 h-1 Mpc scale, and even the average is located far outside the range allowed in the random distribution; the deviations are statistically impossible to be realized in the random distribution. This implies that the cosmological principle does not hold even at such large scales. The same analysis of mock galaxies derived from the N-body simulation, however, suggests that the LRG sample is consistent with the current paradigm of cosmology, thus the simulation is also not homogeneous in that scale. We conclude that the cosmological principle is neither in the observed sky nor demanded to be there by the standard cosmological world model. This reveals the nature of the cosmological principle adopted in the modern cosmology paradigm, and opens a new field of research in theoretical cosmology.

  8. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Sehgal, Neelima; Trac, Hy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters based on a sample of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-selected galaxy clusters detected in a millimeter-wave survey by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The cluster sample used in this analysis consists of 9 optically-confirmed high-mass clusters comprising the high-significance end of the total cluster sample identified in 455 square degrees of sky surveyed during 2008 at 148 GHz. We focus on the most massive systems to reduce the degeneracy between unknown...

  9. Complementary cosmological tests of RSII brane models

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Dahia, F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore observational bounds on flat and non-flat cosmological models in Type II Randall-Sundrum (RSII) branes. In a first analysis, we consider current measurements of the expansion rate H(z) (with two priors on the local Hubble parameter) and 288 Type Ia supernovae from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (within the framework of the mlcs2k2 light-curve fitting method). We find that the joint analysis involving these data is an interesting tool to impose limits on the brane tension density parameter (Omega_{lambda}) and that the spatial curvature has a negligible influence on Omega_{lambda} estimates. In order to obtain stronger bounds for the contribution of the $\\Omega_{\\lambda}$ we also add in our analysis the baryon oscillation peak (BAO) and cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) observations by using the so-called CMB/BAO ratio. From this analysis we find that the Omega_{lambda} contribution is less than 4.10^{-5} (1sigma).

  10. Cosmology and the neutrino mass ordering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannestad, Steen; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple method to quantify a possible exclusion of the inverted neutrino mass ordering from cosmological bounds on the sum of the neutrino masses. The method is based on Bayesian inference and allows for a calculation of the posterior odds of normal versus inverted ordering. We apply...... the method for a specific set of current data from Planck CMB data and large-scale structure surveys, providing an upper bound on the sum of neutrino masses of 0.14 eV at 95% CL. With this analysis we obtain posterior odds for normal versus inverted ordering of about 2:1. If cosmological data is combined...

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SN Ia host-galaxy/cosmological parameters (Campbell+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, H.; Fraser, M.; Gilmore, G.

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated correlations between SNe Ia light curves and their host galaxies and look at the effect on the cosmological constraints. For this we have used the sample of 581 photometrically classified SNe Ia from Campbell et al. (2013, Cat. J/ApJ/763/88). This sample was assembled from three years of photometry from the SDSS-II SN Survey, together with BOSS spectroscopy of the host galaxies of transients. We use the stellar population parameters derived from the BOSS DR10 results (Ahn et al., 2012ApJS..203...21A, Cat V/139) (1 data file).

  12. Environmental monitoring survey of oil and gas fields in Region II in 2009. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    The oil companies Statoil ASA, ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS, Total E&P Norge AS, Talisman Energy Norge AS and Marathon Petroleum Norge AS commissioned Section of Applied Environmental Research at UNI RESEARCH AS to undertake the monitoring survey of Region II in 2009. Similar monitoring surveys in Region II have been carried out in 1996, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The survey in 2009 included in total 18 fields: Rev, Varg, Sigyn, Sleipner Vest, Sleipner OEst, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Vale, Skirne, Byggve, Heimdal, Volve, Vilje og Alvheim. Sampling was conducted from the vessel MV Libas between May 18 and May 27. Samples were collected from in totally 137 sampling sites, of which 15 were regional sampling sites. Samples for chemical analysis were collected at all sites, whereas samples for benthos analysis were collected at 12 fields. As in previous surveys, Region II is divided into natural sub-regions. One sub-region is shallow (77-96 m) sub-region, a central sub-region (107-130 m) and a northern subregion (115-119 m). The sediments of the shallow sub-region had relatively lower content of TOM and pelite and higher content of fine sand than the central and northern sub-regions. Calculated areas of contamination are shown for the sub-regions in Table 1.1. The fields Sigyn, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Skirne, Byggve, Vilje og Alvheim showed no contamination of THC. At the other fields there were minor changes from 2006. The concentrations of barium increased in the central sub-region from 2006 to 2009, also at fields where no drilling had been undertaken during the last years. The same laboratory and methods are used during the three last regional investigations. The changes in barium concentrations may be due to high variability of barium concentrations in the sediments. This is supported by relatively large variations in average barium concentrations at the regional sampling sites in

  13. BMS in cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehagias, A. [Physics Division, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zografou Campus, Athens (Greece); Riotto, A. [Department of Theoretical Physics,24 quai E. Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Center for Astroparticle Physics (CAP),24 quai E. Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2016-05-25

    Symmetries play an interesting role in cosmology. They are useful in characterizing the cosmological perturbations generated during inflation and lead to consistency relations involving the soft limit of the statistical correlators of large-scale structure dark matter and galaxies overdensities. On the other hand, in observational cosmology the carriers of the information about these large-scale statistical distributions are light rays traveling on null geodesics. Motivated by this simple consideration, we study the structure of null infinity and the associated BMS symmetry in a cosmological setting. For decelerating Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds, for which future null infinity exists, we find that the BMS transformations which leaves the asymptotic metric invariant to leading order. Contrary to the asymptotic flat case, the BMS transformations in cosmology generate Goldstone modes corresponding to scalar, vector and tensor degrees of freedom which may exist at null infinity and perturb the asymptotic data. Therefore, BMS transformations generate physically inequivalent vacua as they populate the universe at null infinity with these physical degrees of freedom. We also discuss the gravitational memory effect when cosmological expansion is taken into account. In this case, there are extra contribution to the gravitational memory due to the tail of the retarded Green functions which are supported not only on the light-cone, but also in its interior. The gravitational memory effect can be understood also from an asymptotic point of view as a transition among cosmological BMS-related vacua.

  14. Unimodular-mimetic cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, S.; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-06-01

    We combine the unimodular gravity and mimetic gravity theories into a unified theoretical framework, which is proposed to provide a suggestive proposal for a framework that may assist in the discussion and search for a solution to the cosmological constant problem and the dark matter issue. After providing the formulation of the unimodular mimetic gravity and investigating all the new features that the vacuum unimodular gravity implies, by using the underlying reconstruction method, we realize some well known cosmological evolutions, with some of these being exotic for the ordinary Einstein-Hilbert gravity. Specifically we provide the vacuum unimodular mimetic gravity description of the de Sitter cosmology and of the perfect fluid with constant equation of state cosmology. As we demonstrate, these cosmologies can be realized by vacuum mimetic unimodular gravity, without the existence of any matter fluid source. Moreover, we investigate how cosmologically viable cosmologies, which are compatible with the recent observational data, can be realized by the vacuum unimodular mimetic gravity. Since in some cases, a graceful exit from inflation problem might exist, we provide a qualitative description of the mechanism that can potentially generate the graceful exit from inflation in these theories, by searching for the unstable de Sitter solutions in the context of unimodular mimetic theories of gravity.

  15. BMS in cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehagias, A.; Riotto, A.

    2016-05-01

    Symmetries play an interesting role in cosmology. They are useful in characterizing the cosmological perturbations generated during inflation and lead to consistency relations involving the soft limit of the statistical correlators of large-scale structure dark matter and galaxies overdensities. On the other hand, in observational cosmology the carriers of the information about these large-scale statistical distributions are light rays traveling on null geodesics. Motivated by this simple consideration, we study the structure of null infinity and the associated BMS symmetry in a cosmological setting. For decelerating Friedmann-Robertson-Walker backgrounds, for which future null infinity exists, we find that the BMS transformations which leaves the asymptotic metric invariant to leading order. Contrary to the asymptotic flat case, the BMS transformations in cosmology generate Goldstone modes corresponding to scalar, vector and tensor degrees of freedom which may exist at null infinity and perturb the asymptotic data. Therefore, BMS transformations generate physically inequivalent vacua as they populate the universe at null infinity with these physical degrees of freedom. We also discuss the gravitational memory effect when cosmological expansion is taken into account. In this case, there are extra contribution to the gravitational memory due to the tail of the retarded Green functions which are supported not only on the light-cone, but also in its interior. The gravitational memory effect can be understood also from an asymptotic point of view as a transition among cosmological BMS-related vacua.

  16. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Christopher

    2002-07-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda sigma confidence level, which is in mild conflict with the results of the Type la supernova surveys. We continue to find that neither spiral galaxies nor groups and clusters contribute significantly to the production of gravitational lenses. The lack of group and cluster lenses is strong evidence for the role of baryonic cooling in increasing the efficiency of galaxies as lenses compared to groups and clusters of higher mass but lower central density. Unfortunately for the ultimate objective of the proposal, improved constraints on the cosmological constant, the next large survey

  17. SNe Ia host galaxy properties from Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Jonas; Pforr, Janine; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Beifiori, Alessandra; Gupta, Ravi R; Schneider, Donald P

    2012-01-01

    We study the stellar populations of SNe Ia host galaxies using SDSS-II spectroscopy. We focus on the relationships of SNe Ia properties with stellar velocity dispersion and the stellar population parameters age, metallicity and element abundance ratios derived by fitting absorption line indices to stellar population models. We concentrate on a sub-sample of 84 SNe Ia from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. In agreement with previous findings, we find that SALT2 stretch factor values show the strongest dependence on stellar population age. Hence, SNe Ia peak-luminosity is closely related to the age of the stellar progenitor systems, where more luminous SNe Ia appear in younger stellar populations. We find no statistically significant trends in the Hubble residual with any of the stellar population parameters studied, including age and metallicity contrary to the literature, as well as with stellar velocity dispersion. Moreover, we find that the method of stellar mass derivation is affecting the Hubble residual-mass...

  18. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Neelima; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A R; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W; Barrientos, L Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S; Bond, J Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon R; Doriese, W Bertrand; Dunkley, Joanna; Dünner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P; Fowler, Joseph W; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Hilton, Gene C; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renée; Holtz, David; Huffenberger, Kevin M; Hughes, David H; Hughes, John P; Infante, Leopoldo; Irwin, Kent D; Jones, Andrew; Juin, Jean Baptiste; Klein, Jeff; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lau, Judy M; Limon, Michele; Lin, Yen-Ting; Lupton, Robert H; Marriage, Tobias A; Marsden, Danica; Martocci, Krista; Mauskopf, Phil; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Moseley, Harvey; Netterfield, Calvin B; Niemack, Michael D; Nolta, Michael R; Page, Lyman A; Parker, Lucas; Partridge, Bruce; Reid, Beth; Sherwin, Blake D; Sievers, Jon; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; Swetz, Daniel S; Switzer, Eric R; Thornton, Robert; Tucker, Carole; Warne, Ryan; Wollack, Ed; Zhao, Yue

    2010-01-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters based on a sample of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-selected galaxy clusters detected in a millimeter-wave survey by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The cluster sample used in this analysis consists of 9 optically-confirmed high-mass clusters comprising the high-significance end of the total cluster sample identified in 455 square degrees of sky surveyed during 2008 at 148 GHz. We focus on the most massive systems to reduce the degeneracy between unknown cluster astrophysics and cosmology derived from SZ surveys. We describe the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal with a 4-parameter fit. Marginalizing over the values of the parameters in this fit with conservative priors gives sigma_8 = 0.851 +/- 0.115 and w = -1.14 +/- 0.35 for a spatially-flat wCDM cosmological model with WMAP 7-year priors on cosmological parameters. This gives a modest improvement in statistical uncertainty over WMAP 7-year constraints alone. Fixing the scaling relation between cluste...

  19. Cosmology with peculiar velocities: observational effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, P.; Davis, T. M.; Howlett, C.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we investigate how observational effects could possibly bias cosmological inferences from peculiar velocity measurements. Specifically, we look at how bulk flow measurements are compared with theoretical predictions. Usually bulk flow calculations try to approximate the flow that would occur in a sphere around the observer. Using the Horizon Run 2 simulation we show that the traditional methods for bulk flow estimation can overestimate the magnitude of the bulk flow for two reasons: when the survey geometry is not spherical (the data do not cover the whole sky), and when the observations undersample the velocity distributions. Our results may explain why several bulk flow measurements found bulk flow velocities that seem larger than those expected in standard Λ cold dark matter cosmologies. We recommend a different approach when comparing bulk flows to cosmological models, in which the theoretical prediction for each bulk flow measurement is calculated specifically for the geometry and sampling rate of that survey. This means that bulk flow values will not be comparable between surveys, but instead they are comparable with cosmological models, which is the more important measure.

  20. Optimising Spectroscopic and Photometric Galaxy Surveys: Same-sky Benefits for Dark Energy and Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, Donnacha; Bridle, Sarah; Jouvel, Stephanie; Abdalla, Filipe B; Frieman, Joshua A

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiple cosmological probes can produce measurements of cosmological parameters much more stringent than those possible with any individual probe. We examine the combination of two highly correlated probes of late-time structure growth: (i) weak gravitational lensing from a survey with photometric redshifts and (ii) galaxy clustering and redshift space distortions from a survey with spectroscopic redshifts. We choose generic survey designs so that our results are applicable to a range of current and future photometric redshift (e.g. KiDS, DES, HSC, Euclid) and spectroscopic redshift (e.g. DESI, 4MOST, Sumire) surveys. Combining the surveys greatly improves their power to measure both dark energy and modified gravity. An independent, non-overlapping combination sees a dark energy figure of merit more than 4 times larger than that produced by either survey alone. The powerful synergies between the surveys are strongest for modified gravity, where their constraints are orthogonal, producing a...

  1. Magnetogenesis in bouncing cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Peng; Easson, Damien A; Guo, Zong-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    We consider the process of magnetogenesis in the context of nonsingular bounce cosmology. We show that large primordial magnetic fields can be generated during contraction without encountering strong coupling and backreaction issues. The fields may seed large-scale magnetic fields with observationally interesting strengths. This result leads to a theoretical constraint on the relation of the energy scale of the bounce cosmology to the number of effective e-folding of the contracting phase in the case of scale invariance for the power spectrum of primordial magnetic fields. We show that this constraint can be satisfied in a sizable region of the parameter space for the nonsingular bounce cosmology.

  2. Cosmology Theory and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, A D

    1998-01-01

    The comparison of the Standard Cosmological Model (SCM) with astronomical observations, i.e. theory versus experiment, and with the Minimal Standard Model (MSM) in particle physics, i.e. theory versus theory, is discussed. The main issue of this talk is whether cosmology indicates new physics beyond the standard $SU(3)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)$ model with minimal particle content. The answer to this question is strongly and definitely "YES". New, yet unknown, physics exists and cosmology presents very weighty arguments in its favor.

  3. Magnetogenesis in bouncing cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Peng; Cai, Yi-Fu; Easson, Damien A.; Guo, Zong-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    We consider the process of magnetogenesis in the context of nonsingular bounce cosmology. We show that large primordial magnetic fields can be generated during contraction without encountering strong coupling and backreaction issues. The fields may seed large-scale magnetic fields with observationally interesting strengths. This result leads to a theoretical constraint on the relation of the energy scale of the bounce cosmology to the number of effective e -foldings of the contracting phase in the case of scale invariance for the power spectrum of primordial magnetic fields. We show that this constraint can be satisfied in a sizable region of the parameter space for the nonsingular bounce cosmology.

  4. Cosmology, Epistemology and Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Wasaburo

    1992-03-01

    We may consider the following three fundamental epistemological questions concerning cosmology. Can cosmology at last understand the origin of the universe? Can computers at last create? Can life be formed at last synthetically? These questions are in some sense related to the liar paradox containing the self-reference and, therefore, may not be answered by recursive processes in finite time. There are, however, various implications such that the chaos may break the trap of the self- reference paradox. In other words, Goedel's incompleteness theorem would not apply to chaos, even if the chaos can be generated by recursive processes. Internal relations among cosmology, epistemology and chaos must be investigated in greater detail

  5. The International Deep Planet Survey II: The frequency of directly imaged giant exoplanets with stellar mass

    CERN Document Server

    Galicher, Raphael; Macintosh, Bruce; Zuckerman, Ben; Barman, Travis; Konopacky, Quinn; Song, Inseok; Patience, Jenny; Lafreniere, David; Doyon, Rene; Nielsen, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Radial velocity and transit methods are effective for the study of short orbital period exoplanets but they hardly probe objects at large separations for which direct imaging can be used. We carried out the international deep planet survey of 292 young nearby stars to search for giant exoplanets and determine their frequency. We developed a pipeline for a uniform processing of all the data that we have recorded with NIRC2/Keck II, NIRI/Gemini North, NICI/Gemini South, and NACO/VLT for 14 years. The pipeline first applies cosmetic corrections and then reduces the speckle intensity to enhance the contrast in the images. The main result of the international deep planet survey is the discovery of the HR 8799 exoplanets. We also detected 59 visual multiple systems including 16 new binary stars and 2 new triple stellar systems, as well as 2,279 point-like sources. We used Monte Carlo simulations and the Bayesian theorem to determine that 1.05[+2.80-0.70]% of stars harbor at least one giant planet between 0.5 and 14...

  6. Preliminary Evaluation of a New Cosmology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, Kimberly A.; Martin, Dominique; Hayes, Patrycia; Targett, Tom; Bailey, Janelle M.; Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2015-01-01

    Informed by our research on student understanding of cosmology, The Big Ideas in Cosmology is an immersive set of web-based learning modules that integrates text, figures, and visualizations with short and long interactive tasks and real cosmological data. This enables the transformation of general education astronomy and cosmology classes from primarily lecture and book-based courses to a more engaging format that builds important STEM skills.During the spring 2014 semester, we field-tested a subset of chapters with the general education astronomy and cosmology classes at Sonoma State University in a flipped-classroom format. We administered pre and post content and attitude assessments in the two flipped classes as well as two lecture classes. The majority of cosmology students had taken astronomy before whereas the astronomy students had not.When switching to an active mode of learning (e.g., flipped classroom instead of lecture), many instructors report pushback from students. We saw this effect from students in course evaluations, who reported dissatisfaction with "having to do more work." However, the students in the flipped section in astronomy made greater gains on the multiple choice content assessment than the students in either of the two lecture sections. On the attitude assessment (the CLASS), the cosmology students made a small shift toward more expert-like opinions. Preliminary results from open-ended content surveys indicate that, prior to instruction, students had difficulty answering 'why' or 'how do we know' questions; that post-instruction, students are less likely to respond "I don't know" or to leave an answer blank; and that students using the modules made gains in their content knowledge.Module development was supported by NASA ROSES E/PO Grant #NNXl0AC89G, the Illinois Space Grant Consortium, the Fermi E/PO program, Sonoma State University's Space Science Education and Public Outreach Group, and Great River Technology

  7. Constraining cosmology with pairwise velocity estimator

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Yin-Zhe; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a full statistical method for the pairwise velocity estimator previously proposed, and apply Cosmicflows-2 catalogue to this method to constrain cosmology. We first calculate the covariance matrix for line-of-sight velocities for a given catalogue, and then simulate the mock full-sky surveys from it, and then calculate the variance for the pairwise velocity field. By applying the $8315$ independent galaxy samples and compressed $5224$ group samples from Cosmicflows-2 catalogue to this statistical method, we find that the joint constraint on $\\Omega^{0.6}_{\\rm m}h$ and $\\sigma_{8}$ is completely consistent with the WMAP 9-year and Planck 2015 best-fitting cosmology. Currently, there is no evidence for the modified gravity models or any dynamic dark energy models from this practice, and the error-bars need to be reduced in order to provide any concrete evidence against/to support $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology.

  8. Cosmology with Peculiar Velocities: Observational Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Per; Howlett, Cullan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how observational effects could possibly bias cosmological inferences from peculiar velocity measurements. Specifically, we look at how bulk flow measurements are compared with theoretical predictions. Usually bulk flow calculations try to approximate the flow that would occur in a sphere around the observer. Using the Horizon Run 2 simulation we show that the traditional methods for bulk flow estimation can overestimate the magnitude of the bulk flow for two reasons: when the survey geometry is not spherical (the data do not cover the whole sky), and when the observations undersample the velocity distributions. Our results may explain why several bulk flow measurements found bulk flow velocities that seem larger than those expected in standard {\\Lambda}CDM cosmologies. We recommend a different approach when comparing bulk flows to cosmological models, in which the theoretical prediction for each bulk flow measurement is calculated specifically for the geometry and sampling rate o...

  9. A Herschel [C ii] Galactic plane survey. I. The global distribution of ISM gas components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, J. L.; Langer, W. D.; Velusamy, T.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The [C ii] 158 μm line is an important tool for understanding the life cycle of interstellar matter. Ionized carbon is present in a variety of phases of the interstellar medium (ISM), including the diffuse ionized medium, warm and cold atomic clouds, clouds in transition from atomic to molecular, and dense and warm photon dominated regions. Aims: Velocity-resolved observations of [C ii] are the most powerful technique available to disentangle the emission produced by these components. These observations can also be used to trace CO-dark H2 gas and determine the total mass of the ISM. Methods: The Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+ (GOT C+) project surveys the [C ii] 158 μm line over the entire Galactic disk with velocity-resolved observations using the Herschel/HIFI instrument. We present the first longitude-velocity maps of the [C ii] emission for Galactic latitudes b = 0°, ±0.5°, and ±1.0°. We combine these maps with those of H i, 12CO, and 13CO to separate the different phases of the ISM and study their properties and distribution in the Galactic plane. Results: [C ii] emission is mostly associated with spiral arms, mainly emerging from Galactocentric distances between 4 and 10 kpc. It traces the envelopes of evolved clouds as well as clouds that are in the transition between atomic and molecular. We estimate that most of the observed [C ii] emission is produced by dense photon dominated regions (~47%), with smaller contributions from CO-dark H2 gas (~28%), cold atomic gas (~21%), and ionized gas (~4%). Atomic gas inside the Solar radius is mostly in the form of cold neutral medium (CNM), while the warm neutral medium gas dominates the outer galaxy. The average fraction of CNM relative to total atomic gas is ~43%. We find that the warm and diffuse CO-dark H2 is distributed over a larger range of Galactocentric distances (4-11 kpc) than the cold and dense H2 gas traced by 12CO and 13CO (4-8 kpc). The fraction of CO-dark H2 to total H2 increases

  10. Building Cosmological Frozen Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kastor, David

    2016-01-01

    Janis-Newman-Winicour (JNW) spacetimes generalize the Schwarzschild solution to include a massless scalar field. Although suffering from naked singularities, they share the `frozen star' features of Schwarzschild black holes. Cosmological versions of the JNW spacetimes were discovered some time ago by Husain, Martinez and Nunez and by Fonarev. Unlike Schwarzschild-deSitter black holes, these solutions are dynamical, and the scarcity of exact solutions for dynamical black holes in cosmological backgrounds motivates their further study. Here we show how the cosmological JNW spacetimes can be built, starting from simpler, static, higher dimensional, vacuum `JNW brane' solutions via two different generalized dimensional reduction schemes that together cover the full range of JNW parameter space. Cosmological versions of a BPS limit of charged dilaton black holes are also known. JNW spacetimes represent a different limiting case of the charged, dilaton black hole family. We expect that understanding this second da...

  11. Cosmology Beyond Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Solomon, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe poses a major challenge to our understanding of fundamental physics. One promising avenue is to modify general relativity and obtain a new description of the gravitational force. Because gravitation dominates the other forces mostly on large scales, cosmological probes provide an ideal testing ground for theories of gravity. In this thesis, we describe two complementary approaches to the problem of testing gravity using cosmology. In the first part, we discuss the cosmological solutions of massive gravity and its generalisation to a bimetric theory. These theories describe a graviton with a small mass, and can potentially explain the late-time acceleration in a technically-natural way. We describe these self-accelerating solutions and investigate the cosmological perturbations in depth, beginning with an investigation of their linear stability, followed by the construction of a method for solving these perturbations in the quasistatic limit. This allows the predictio...

  12. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  13. Cosmological Ontology and Epistemology

    CERN Document Server

    Page, Don N

    2014-01-01

    In cosmology, we would like to explain our observations and predict future observations from theories of the entire universe. Such cosmological theories make ontological assumptions of what entities exist and what their properties and relationships are. One must also make epistemological assumptions or metatheories of how one can test cosmological theories. Here I shall propose a Bayesian analysis in which the likelihood of a complete theory is given by the normalized measure it assigns to the observation used to test the theory. In this context, a discussion is given of the trade-off between prior probabilities and likelihoods, of the measure problem of cosmology, of the death of Born's rule, of the Boltzmann brain problem, of whether there is a better principle for prior probabilities than mathematical simplicity, and of an Optimal Argument for the Existence of God.

  14. Cosmology: macro and micro

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A new approach to cosmology and space-time is developed, which emphasizes the description of the matter degrees of freedom of Einstein's theory of gravity by a family of K\\"ahler-Einstein Fano manifolds.

  15. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Khlopov, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs) are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY) models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  16. Tensors, relativity, and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dalarsson, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Tensors, Relativity, and Cosmology, Second Edition, combines relativity, astrophysics, and cosmology in a single volume, providing a simplified introduction to each subject that is followed by detailed mathematical derivations. The book includes a section on general relativity that gives the case for a curved space-time, presents the mathematical background (tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry), discusses the Einstein equation and its solutions (including black holes and Penrose processes), and considers the energy-momentum tensor for various solutions. In addition, a section on relativistic astrophysics discusses stellar contraction and collapse, neutron stars and their equations of state, black holes, and accretion onto collapsed objects, with a final section on cosmology discussing cosmological models, observational tests, and scenarios for the early universe. This fully revised and updated second edition includes new material on relativistic effects, such as the behavior of clocks and measuring rods in m...

  17. Quantum Cosmology: Effective Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Quantum cosmology has traditionally been studied at the level of symmetry-reduced minisuperspace models, analyzing the behavior of wave functions. However, in the absence of a complete full setting of quantum gravity and detailed knowledge of specific properties of quantum states, it remained difficult to make testable predictions. For quantum cosmology to be part of empirical science, it must allow for a systematic framework in which corrections to well-tested classical equations can be derived, with any ambiguities and ignorance sufficiently parameterized. As in particle and condensed-matter physics, a successful viewpoint is one of effective theories, adapted to specific issues one encounters in quantum cosmology. This review presents such an effective framework of quantum cosmology, taking into account, among other things, space-time structures, covariance, the problem of time and the anomaly issue.

  18. Testing Fractional Action Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Shchigolev, V K

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests that gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  19. Testing fractional action cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  20. Cosmological diagrammatic rules

    CERN Document Server

    Giddings, Steven B

    2010-01-01

    A simple set of diagrammatic rules is formulated for perturbative evaluation of ``in-in" correlators, as is needed in cosmology and other nonequilibrium problems. These rules are both intuitive, and efficient for calculational purposes.

  1. Cosmological diagrammatic rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giddings, Steven B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Sloth, Martin S., E-mail: giddings@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: sloth@cern.ch [CERN, Physics Department, Theory Unit, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    A simple set of diagrammatic rules is formulated for perturbative evaluation of ''in-in'' correlators, as is needed in cosmology and other nonequilibrium problems. These rules are both intuitive, and efficient for calculational purposes.

  2. Discrete Newtonian Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Gibbons, Gary W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we lay down the foundations for a purely Newtonian theory of cosmology, valid at scales small compared with the Hubble radius, using only Newtonian point particles acted on by gravity and a possible cosmological term. We describe the cosmological background which is given by an exact solution of the equations of motion in which the particles expand homothetically with their comoving positions constituting a central configuration. We point out, using previous work, that an important class of central configurations are homogeneous and isotropic, thus justifying the usual assumptions of elementary treatments. The scale factor is shown to satisfy the standard Raychaudhuri and Friedmann equations without making any fluid dynamic or continuum approximations. Since we make no commitment as to the identity of the point particles, our results are valid for cold dark matter, galaxies, or clusters of galaxies. In future publications we plan to discuss perturbations of our cosmological background from the p...

  3. Introduction to cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Ryden, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This second edition of Introduction to Cosmology is an exciting update of an award-winning textbook. It is aimed primarily at advanced undergraduate students in physics and astronomy, but is also useful as a supplementary text at higher levels. It explains modern cosmological concepts, such as dark energy, in the context of the Big Bang theory. Its clear, lucid writing style, with a wealth of useful everyday analogies, makes it exceptionally engaging. Emphasis is placed on the links between theoretical concepts of cosmology and the observable properties of the universe, building deeper physical insights in the reader. The second edition includes recent observational results, fuller descriptions of special and general relativity, expanded discussions of dark energy, and a new chapter on baryonic matter that makes up stars and galaxies. It is an ideal textbook for the era of precision cosmology in the accelerating universe.

  4. Cosmology as geodesic motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Paul K [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Wohlfarth, Mattias N R [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-07

    For gravity coupled to N scalar fields, with arbitrary potential V, it is shown that all flat (homogeneous and isotropic) cosmologies correspond to geodesics in an (N + 1)-dimensional 'augmented' target space of Lorentzian signature (1, N), timelike if V > 0, null if V = 0 and spacelike if V < 0. Accelerating cosmologies correspond to timelike geodesics that lie within an 'acceleration subcone' of the 'lightcone'. Non-flat (k = {+-}1) cosmologies are shown to evolve as projections of geodesic motion in a space of dimension N + 2, of signature (1, N + 1) for k = -1 and signature (2, N) for k = +1. This formalism is illustrated by cosmological solutions of models with an exponential potential, which are comprehensively analysed; the late-time behaviour for other potentials of current interest is deduced by comparison.

  5. Orbits of massive satellite galaxies - II. Bayesian estimates of the Milky Way and Andromeda masses using high-precision astrometry and cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ekta; Besla, Gurtina; Mandel, Kaisey

    2017-07-01

    In the era of high-precision astrometry, space observatories like the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Gaia are providing unprecedented 6D phase-space information of satellite galaxies. Such measurements can shed light on the structure and assembly history of the Local Group, but improved statistical methods are needed to use them efficiently. Here we illustrate such a method using analogues of the Local Group's two most massive satellite galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Triangulum (M33), from the Illustris dark-matter-only cosmological simulation. We use a Bayesian inference scheme combining measurements of positions, velocities and specific orbital angular momenta (j) of the LMC/M33 with importance sampling of their simulated analogues to compute posterior estimates of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda's (M31) halo masses. We conclude that the resulting host halo mass is more susceptible to bias when using measurements of the current position and velocity of satellites, especially when satellites are at short-lived phases of their orbits (i.e. at pericentre). Instead, the j value of a satellite is well conserved over time and provides a more reliable constraint on host mass. The inferred virial mass of the MW (M31) using j of the LMC (M33) is {{M}}_{vir, MW} = 1.02^{+0.77}_{-0.55} × 10^{12} M⊙ ({{M}}_{vir, M31} = 1.37^{+1.39}_{-0.75} × 10^{12} M⊙). Choosing simulated analogues whose j values are consistent with the conventional picture of a previous (<3 Gyr ago), close encounter (<100 kpc) of M33 about M31 results in a very low virial mass for M31 (˜1012 M⊙). This supports the new scenario put forth in Patel, Besla & Sohn, wherein M33 is on its first passage about M31 or on a long-period orbit. We conclude that this Bayesian inference scheme, utilizing satellite j, is a promising method to reduce the current factor of 2 spread in the mass range of the MW and M31. This method is easily adaptable to include additional satellites as new 6D

  6. Classification of cosmological milestones

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Jambrina, L

    2006-01-01

    In this paper causal geodesic completeness of FLRW cosmological models is analysed in terms of generalised power expansions of the scale factor in coordinate time. The strength of the found singularities is discussed following the usual definitions due to Tipler and Krolak. It is shown that while classical cosmological models are both timelike and lightlike geodesically incomplete, certain observationally alllowed models which have been proposed recently are lightlike geodesically complete.

  7. A Planck Vacuum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daywitt W. C.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Both the big-bang and the quasi-steady-state cosmologies originate in some type of Planck state. This paper presents a new cosmological theory based on the Planck- vacuum negative-energy state, a state consisting of a degenerate collection of negative- energy Planck particles. A heuristic look at the Einstein field equation provides a con- vincing argument that such a vacuum state could provide a theoretical explanation for the visible universe.

  8. Accelerating Cosmologies from Compactification

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, P K; Townsend, Paul K.; Wohlfarth, Mattias N.R.

    2003-01-01

    A solution of the (4+n)-dimensional vacuum Einstein equations is found for which spacetime is compactified on a compact hyperbolic manifold of time-varying volume to a flat four-dimensional FLRW cosmology undergoing accelerated expansion in Einstein conformal frame. This shows that the `no-go' theorem forbidding acceleration in `standard' (time-independent) compactifications of string/M-theory does not apply to `cosmological' (time-dependent) hyperbolic compactifications.

  9. Relativistic cosmological hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, J

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the relativistic cosmological hydrodynamic perturbations. We present the general large scale solutions of the perturbation variables valid for the general sign of three space curvature, the cosmological constant, and generally evolving background equation of state. The large scale evolution is characterized by a conserved gauge invariant quantity which is the same as a perturbed potential (or three-space curvature) in the comoving gauge.

  10. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Rawlings, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We review how the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will address fundamental questions in cosmology, focussing on its use for neutral Hydrogen (HI) surveys. A key enabler of its unique capabilities will be large (but smart) receptors in the form of aperture arrays. We outline the likely contributions of Phase-1 of the SKA (SKA1), Phase-2 SKA (SKA2) and pathfinding activities (SKA0). We emphasise the important role of cross-correlation between SKA HI results and those at other wavebands such as: surveys for objects in the EoR with VISTA and the SKA itself; and huge optical and near-infrared redshift surveys, such as those with HETDEX and Euclid. We note that the SKA will contribute in other ways to cosmology, e.g. through gravitational lensing and $H_{0}$ studies.

  11. Building cosmological frozen stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastor, David; Traschen, Jennie

    2017-02-01

    Janis–Newman–Winicour (JNW) solutions generalize Schwarzschild to include a massless scalar field. While they share the familiar infinite redshift feature of Schwarzschild, they suffer from the presence of naked singularities. Cosmological versions of JNW spacetimes were discovered some years ago, in the most general case, by Fonarev. Fonarev solutions are also plagued by naked singularities, but have the virtue, unlike e.g. Schwarzschild–deSitter, of being dynamical. Given that exact dynamical cosmological black hole solutions are scarce, Fonarev solutions merit further study. We show how Fonarev solutions can be obtained via generalized dimensional reduction from simpler static vacuum solutions. These results may lead towards constructions of actual dynamical cosmological black holes. In particular, we note that cosmological versions of extremal charged dilaton black holes are known. JNW spacetimes represent a different limiting case of the family of charged dilaton black holes, which have been important in the context of string theory, and better understanding their cosmological versions of JNW spacetimes thus provides a second data point towards finding cosmological versions of the entire family.

  12. Emergent cosmology revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Satadru; Sahni, Varun [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune 411007 (India); Shtanov, Yuri [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine); Unnikrishnan, Sanil, E-mail: satadru@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: shtanov@bitp.kiev.ua, E-mail: sanil@lnmiit.ac.in [Department of Physics, The LNM Institute of Information Technology, Jaipur 302031 (India)

    2014-07-01

    We explore the possibility of emergent cosmology using the effective potential formalism. We discover new models of emergent cosmology which satisfy the constraints posed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We demonstrate that, within the framework of modified gravity, the emergent scenario can arise in a universe which is spatially open/closed. By contrast, in general relativity (GR) emergent cosmology arises from a spatially closed past-eternal Einstein Static Universe (ESU). In GR the ESU is unstable, which creates fine tuning problems for emergent cosmology. However, modified gravity models including Braneworld models, Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) and Asymptotically Free Gravity result in a stable ESU. Consequently, in these models emergent cosmology arises from a larger class of initial conditions including those in which the universe eternally oscillates about the ESU fixed point. We demonstrate that such an oscillating universe is necessarily accompanied by graviton production. For a large region in parameter space graviton production is enhanced through a parametric resonance, casting serious doubts as to whether this emergent scenario can be past-eternal.

  13. The International Deep Planet Survey. II. The frequency of directly imaged giant exoplanets with stellar mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicher, R.; Marois, C.; Macintosh, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Barman, T.; Konopacky, Q.; Song, I.; Patience, J.; Lafrenière, D.; Doyon, R.; Nielsen, E. L.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Radial velocity and transit methods are effective for the study of short orbital period exoplanets but they hardly probe objects at large separations for which direct imaging can be used. Aims: We carried out the international deep planet survey of 292 young nearby stars to search for giant exoplanets and determine their frequency. Methods: We developed a pipeline for a uniform processing of all the data that we have recorded with NIRC2/Keck II, NIRI/Gemini North, NICI/Gemini South, and NACO/VLT for 14 yr. The pipeline first applies cosmetic corrections and then reduces the speckle intensity to enhance the contrast in the images. Results: The main result of the international deep planet survey is the discovery of the HR 8799 exoplanets. We also detected 59 visual multiple systems including 16 new binary stars and 2 new triple stellar systems, as well as 2279 point-like sources. We used Monte Carlo simulations and the Bayesian theorem to determine that 1.05+2.80-0.70% of stars harbor at least one giant planet between 0.5 and 14 MJ and between 20 and 300 AU. This result is obtained assuming uniform distributions of planet masses and semi-major axes. If we consider power law distributions as measured for close-in planets instead, the derived frequency is 2.30+5.95-1.55%, recalling the strong impact of assumptions on Monte Carlo output distributions. We also find no evidence that the derived frequency depends on the mass of the hosting star, whereas it does for close-in planets. Conclusions: The international deep planet survey provides a database of confirmed background sources that may be useful for other exoplanet direct imaging surveys. It also puts new constraints on the number of stars with at least one giant planet reducing by a factor of two the frequencies derived by almost all previous works. Tables 11-15 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  14. Hydra II: A Faint and Compact Milky Way Dwarf Galaxy Found in the Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Nidever, David L.; Besla, Gurtina; Olsen, Knut; Walker, Alistair R.; Vivas, A. Katherina; Gruendl, Robert A.; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Blum, Robert D.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C.; Bell, Eric F.; Chu, You-Hua; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; de Boer, Thomas J. L.; Gallart, Carme; Jin, Shoko; Kunder, Andrea; Majewski, Steven R.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monachesi, Antonela; Monelli, Matteo; Monteagudo, Lara; Noël, Noelia E. D.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4 m Telescope. The new satellite is compact ({{r}h}=68 ± 11 pc) and faint ({{M}V}=-4.8 ± 0.3),

  15. SN 2006oz: rise of a super-luminous supernova observed by the SDSS-II SN Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leloudas, Georgios; Chatzopoulos, E.; Dilday, B.;

    2012-01-01

    to contribute to a better understanding of these objects by studying SN 2006oz, a newly-recognized member of this class. Methods. We present multi-color light curves of SN 2006oz from the SDSS-II SN Survey that cover its rise time, as well as an optical spectrum that shows that the explosion occurred at z ~ 0...

  16. String cosmology versus standard and inflationary cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Gasperini, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the basic, model-independent differences between the pre-big bang scenario, arising naturally in a string cosmology context, and the standard inflationary scenario. We use an unconventional approach in which the introduction of technical details is avoided as much as possible, trying to focus the reader's attention on the main conceptual aspects of both scenarios. The aim of the paper is not to conclude in favour either of one or of the other scenario, but to raise questions that are left to the reader's meditation. Warnings: the paper does not contain equations, and is not intended as a complete review of all aspects of string cosmology.

  17. Cosmological perturbations in teleparallel Loop Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Haro, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Cosmological perturbations in Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) could be studied from two totally different ways. The first one, called holonomy corrected LQC, is performed in the Hamiltonian framework, where the Asthekar connection is replaced by a suitable sinus function (holonomy correction), in order to have a well-defined quantum analogue. The alternative approach is based in the fact that isotropic LQC could be also obtained as a particular case of teleparallel $F(T)$ gravity (teleparallel LQC). Then, working in the Lagrangian framework and using the well-know perturbation equations in $F(T)$ gravity, we have obtained, in teleparallel LQC, the equations for scalar and tensor perturbations, and the corresponding Mukhanov-Sasaki equations. For scalar perturbations, our equation only differs from the one obtained by holonomy corrections in the velocity of sound, leading both formulations, essentially to the same scale invariant power spectrum when a matter-dominated universe is considered. However for tensor pe...

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Observational Cosmology Observational Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Observational Cosmology by Stephen Serjeant fills a niche that was underserved in the textbook market: an up-to-date, thorough cosmology textbook focused on observations, aimed at advanced undergraduates. Not everything about the book is perfect - some subjects get short shrift, in some cases jargon dominates, and there are too few exercises. Still, on the whole, the book is a welcome addition. For decades, the classic textbooks of cosmology have focused on theory. But for every Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect there is a Butcher-Oemler effect; there are as many cosmological phenomena established by observations, and only explained later by theory, as there were predicted by theory and confirmed by observations. In fact, in the last decade, there has been an explosion of new cosmological findings driven by observations. Some are so new that you won't find them mentioned in books just a few years old. So it is not just refreshing to see a book that reflects the new realities of cosmology, it is vital, if students are to truly stay up on a field that has widened in scope considerably. Observational Cosmology is filled with full-color images, and graphs from the latest experiments. How exciting it is that we live in an era where satellites and large experiments have gathered so much data to reveal astounding details about the origin of the universe and its evolution. To have all the latest data gathered together and explained in one book will be a revelation to students. In fact, at times it was to me. I've picked up modern cosmological knowledge through a patchwork of reading papers, going to colloquia, and serving on grant and telescope allocation panels. To go back and see them explained from square one, and summarized succinctly, filled in quite a few gaps in my own knowledge and corrected a few misconceptions I'd acquired along the way. To make room for all these graphs and observational details, a few things had to be left out. For one, there are few derivations

  19. Sagittarius II, Draco II and Laevens 3: three new Milky Way satellites discovered in the Pan-STARRS 1 3pi Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Laevens, Benjamin P M; Bernard, Edouard J; Schlafly, Edward F; Sesar, Branimir; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F; Ferguson, Annette M N; Slater, Colin T; Sweeney, William E; Wyse, Rosemary F G; Huxor, Avon P; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth C; Draper, Peter W; Magnier, Eugene A; Metcalfe, Nigel; Tonry, John L; Wainscoat, Richard J; Waters, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of three new Milky Way satellites from our search for compact stellar overdensities in the photometric catalog of the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (Pan-STARRS 1, or PS1) 3pi survey. The first satellite, Laevens 3, is located at a heliocentric distance of d=67+/-3 kpc. With a total magnitude of Mv=-4.4+/-0.3 and a half-light radius rh=7+/-2 pc, its properties resemble those of outer halo globular clusters. The second system, Draco II/Laevens 4 (Dra II), is a closer and fainter satellite (d~20 kpc, Mv =-2.9+/-0.8), whose uncertain size (rh = 19 +8/-6 pc) renders its classification difficult without kinematic information; it could either be a faint and extended globular cluster or a faint and compact dwarf galaxy. The third satellite, Sagittarius II/Laevens 5 (Sgr II), has an ambiguous nature as it is either the most compact dwarf galaxy or the most extended globular cluster in its luminosity range (rh = 37 +9/-8 pc and Mv=-5.2+/-0.4). At a heliocentric distance...

  20. A Cosmological Framework for the Co-Evolution of Quasars, Supermassive Black Holes, and Elliptical Galaxies. II. Formation of Red Ellipticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Cox, Thomas J.; Kereš, Dušan; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-04-01

    We develop and test a model for the cosmological role of mergers in the formation and quenching of red, early-type galaxies. By combining theoretically well-constrained halo and subhalo mass functions as a function of redshift and environment with empirical halo occupation models, we predict the distribution of mergers as a function of redshift, environment, and physical galaxy properties. Making the simple Ansatz that star formation is quenched after a gas-rich, spheroid-forming major merger, we demonstrate that this naturally predicts the turnover in the efficiency of star formation and baryon fractions in galaxies at ~L* (without any parameters tuned to this value), as well as the observed mass functions and mass density of red galaxies as a function of redshift, the formation times of early-type galaxies as a function of mass, and the fraction of quenched galaxies as a function of galaxy and halo mass, environment, and redshift. Comparing our model to a variety of semianalytic models in which quenching is primarily driven by halo mass considerations or secular/disk instabilities, we demonstrate that our model makes unique and robust qualitative predictions for a number of observables, including the bivariate red fraction as a function of galaxy and halo mass, the density of passive galaxies at high redshifts, the emergence/evolution of the color-morphology-density relations at high redshift, and the fraction of disky/boxy (or cusp/core) spheroids as a function of mass. In each case, the observations favor a model in which some mechanism quenches future star formation after a major merger builds a massive spheroid. Models where quenching is dominated by a halo mass threshold fail to match the behavior of the bivariate red fractions, predict too low a density of passive galaxies at high redshift, and overpredict by an order of magnitude the mass of the transition from disky to boxy ellipticals. Models driven by secular disk instabilities also qualitatively

  1. WHEPP-X: Report of the working group on cosmology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Kaplinghat; L Sriramkumar; A Berera; P Chingangbam; R K Jain; M Joy; J Martin; S Mohanty; A Nautiyal; R Rangarajan; S Ray; V H S Kumar

    2009-01-01

    This is a summary of the activities of the working group on cosmology at WHEPP-X. The three main problems that were discussed at some length by the group during the course of the workshop were (i) canceling a `large' cosmological constant, (ii) non-Gaussianities in inflationary models and (iii) stability of interacting models of dark energy and dark matter. We have briefly outlined these problems and have indicated the progress made.

  2. Modern Cosmology: Assumptions and Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jai-Chan

    2012-06-01

    Physical cosmology tries to understand the Universe at large with its origin and evolution. Observational and experimental situations in cosmology do not allow us to proceed purely based on the empirical means. We examine in which sense our cosmological assumptions in fact have shaped our current cosmological worldview with consequent inevitable limits. Cosmology, as other branches of science and knowledge, is a construct of human imagination reflecting the popular belief system of the era. The question at issue deserves further philosophic discussions. In Whitehead's words, ``philosophy, in one of its functions, is the critic of cosmologies.'' (Whitehead 1925).

  3. Modern Cosmology: Assumptions and Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Jai-chan

    2012-01-01

    Physical cosmology tries to understand the Universe at large with its origin and evolution. Observational and experimental situations in cosmology do not allow us to proceed purely based on the empirical means. We examine in which sense our cosmological assumptions in fact have shaped our current cosmological worldview with consequent inevitable limits. Cosmology, as other branches of science and knowledge, is a construct of human imagination reflecting the popular belief system of the era. The question at issue deserves further philosophic discussions. In Whitehead's words, "philosophy, in one of its functions, is the critic of cosmologies". (Whitehead 1925)

  4. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Foley, Ryan J; Frieman, Joshua A; Garnavich, Peter M; Goobar, Ariel; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh W; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Nordin, Jakob; Östman, Linda; Riess, Adam G; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P; Sollerman, Jesper; Stritzinger, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We rediscover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy typeand the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3 sigma) that SNe Ia are ~0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R_V ~1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R_V ...

  5. Survey of non-linear hydrodynamic models of type-II Cepheids

    CERN Document Server

    Smolec, R

    2015-01-01

    We present a grid on non-linear convective type-II Cepheid models. The dense model grids are computed for 0.6M_Sun and a range of metallicities ([Fe/H]=-2.0,-1.5,-1.0), and for 0.8M_Sun ([Fe/H]=-1.5). Two sets of convective parameters are considered. The models cover the full temperature extent of the classical instability strip, but are limited in luminosity; for the most luminous models violent pulsation leads to the decoupling of the outermost model shell. Hence, our survey reaches only the shortest period RV Tau domain. In the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram we detect two domains in which period doubled pulsation is possible. The first extends through the BL Her domain and low luminosity W Vir domain (pulsation periods ~2-6.5 d). The second domain extends at higher luminosities (W Vir domain; periods >9.5d). Some models within these domains display period-4 pulsation. We also detect very narrow domains (~10 K wide) in which modulation of pulsation is possible. Another interesting phenomenon we detect is double...

  6. CALIFA, the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey: II. First public data release

    CERN Document Server

    Husemann, B; Sánchez, S F; Barrado-Navascues, D; Bekeraitė, S; Bomans, D J; Castillo-Morales, A; Catalán-Torrecilla, C; Fernandes, R Cid; Falcón-Barroso, J; García-Benito, R; Delgado, R M González; Iglesias-Páramo, J; Johnson, B D; Kupko, D; López-Fernandez, R; Lyubenova, M; Marino, R A; Mast, D; Miskolczi, A; Monreal-Ibero, A; de Paz, A Gil; Pérez, E; Pérez, I; Rosales-Ortega, F F; Ruiz-Lara, T; Schilling, U; van de Ven, G; Walcher, J; Alves, J; de Amorim, A L; Backsmann, N; Barrera-Ballesteros, J K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Dettmar, R -J; Demleitner, M; Díaz, A I; Enke, H; Florido, E; Flores, H; Galbany, L; Gallazzi, A; García-Lorenzo, B; Gomes, J M; Gruel, N; Haines, T; Holmes, L; Jungwiert, B; Kalinova, V; Kehrig, C; Kennicutt, R C; Klar, J; Lehnert, M D; Lóez-Sáchez, Á R; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A; Mármol-Queraltó, E; Márquez, I; Mendez-Abreu, J; Mollá, M; del Olmo, A; Meidt, S E; Papaderos, P; Puschnig, J; Quirrenbach, A; Roth, M M; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Spekkens, K; Singh, R; Stanishev, V; Trager, S C; Vilchez, J M; Wild, V; Wisotzki, L; Zibetti, S; Ziegler, B

    2012-01-01

    We present the first public data release of the CALIFA survey. It consists of science-grade optical datacubes for the first 100 of eventually 600 nearby (0.005ii) a medium-resolution V1200 setup covering the nominal wavelength range 3650-4840A with a spectral resolution of 2.3A (FWHM). We present the characteristics and data structure of the CALIFA datasets that should be taken into account for scientific exploita...

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    2008-11-01

    The field of cosmology has been transformed since the glorious decades of the 1920's and 1930's when theory and observation converged to develop the current model of the expanding universe. It was a triumph of the theory of general relativity and astronomy. The first revolution came when the nuclear physicists entered the fray. This marked the debut of the hot big bang, in which the light elements were synthesized in the first three minutes. It was soon realised that elements like carbon and iron were synthesized in exploding stars. However helium, as well as deuterium and lithium, remain as George Gamow envisaged, the detritus of the big bang. The climax arrived with one of the most remarkable discoveries of the twentieth century, the cosmic microwave background radiation, in 1964. The fossil glow turned out to have the spectrum of an ideal black body. One could not imagine a stronger confirmation of the hot and dense origin of the universe. This discovery set the scene for the next major advance. It was now the turn of the particle physicists, who realized that the energies attained near the beginning of the universe, and unachievable in any conceivable terrestrial accelerator, provided a unique testing ground for theories of grand unification of the fundamental forces. This led Alan Guth and Andrei Linde in 1980 to propose the theory of inflation, which solved outstanding puzzles of the big bang. One could now understand why the universe is so large and homogeneous, and the origin of the seed fluctuations that gave rise to large-scale structure. A key prediction was that the universe should have Euclidean geometry, now verified to a precision of a few percent. Modern cosmology is firmly embedded in particle physics. It merits a text written by a particle physicist who can however appreciate the contributions of astronomy that provide the foundation and infrastructure for the theory of the expanding universe. There are now several such texts available. The most

  8. Cosmological acceleration. Dark energy or modified gravity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bludman, S.

    2006-05-15

    We review the evidence for recently accelerating cosmological expansion or ''dark energy'', either a negative pressure constituent in General Relativity (Dark Energy) or modified gravity (Dark Gravity), without any constituent Dark Energy. If constituent Dark Energy does not exist, so that our universe is now dominated by pressure-free matter, Einstein gravity must be modified at low curvature. The vacuum symmetry of any Robertson-Walker universe then characterizes Dark Gravity as low- or high-curvature modifications of Einstein gravity. The dynamics of either kind of ''dark energy'' cannot be derived from the homogeneous expansion history alone, but requires also observing the growth of inhomogeneities. Present and projected observations are all consistent with a small fine tuned cosmological constant, but also allow nearly static Dark Energy or gravity modified at cosmological scales. The growth of cosmological fluctuations will potentially distinguish between static and ''dynamic'' ''dark energy''. But, cosmologically distinguishing the Concordance Model {lambda}CDM from modified gravity will require a weak lensing shear survey more ambitious than any now projected. Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati low-curvature modifications of Einstein gravity may also be detected in refined observations in the solar system (Lue and Starkman) or at the intermediate Vainstein scale (Iorio) in isolated galaxy clusters. Dark Energy's epicyclic character, failure to explain the original Cosmic Coincidence (''Why so small now?'') without fine tuning, inaccessibility to laboratory or solar system tests, along with braneworld theories, now motivate future precision solar system, Vainstein-scale and cosmological-scale studies of Dark Gravity. (Orig.)

  9. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleban, Matthew [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University,4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Stanford University,382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94306 (United States); Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University and SLAC,2575 Sand Hill Road, M/S 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2016-10-12

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with “flat” (including toroidal) and “open” (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are “flat” or “open”. Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with “flat” or “open” topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.

  10. Thermal Tachyacoustic Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Abhineet

    2014-01-01

    An intriguing possibility that can address pathologies in both early universe cosmology (i.e. the horizon problem) and quantum gravity (i.e. non-renormalizability), is that particles at very high energies and/or temperatures could propagate arbitrarily fast. A concrete realization of this possibility for the early universe is the Tachyacoustic (or Speedy Sound) cosmology, which could also produce a scale-invariant spectrum for scalar cosmological perturbations. Here, we study Thermal Tachyacoustic Cosmology (TTC), i.e. this scenario with thermal initial conditions. We find that a phase transition in the early universe, around the scale of Grand Unified Theories (GUT scale; $T\\sim 10^{15}$ GeV), during which the speed of sound drops by $25$ orders of magnitude within a Hubble time, can fit current CMB observations. We further discuss how production of primordial black holes constrains the cosmological acoustic history, while coupling TTC to Horava-Lifshitz gravity leads to a lower limit on the amplitude of ten...

  11. Thermal tachyacoustic cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Abhineet; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2014-08-01

    An intriguing possibility that can address pathologies in both early Universe cosmology (i.e. the horizon problem) and quantum gravity (i.e. nonrenormalizability), is that particles at very high energies and/or temperatures could propagate arbitrarily fast. A concrete realization of this possibility for the early Universe is the tachyacoustic (or speedy sound) cosmology, which could also produce a scale-invariant spectrum for scalar cosmological perturbations. Here, we study thermal tachyacoustic cosmology (TTC), i.e. this scenario with thermal initial conditions. We find that a phase transition in the early Universe, around the scale of the grand unified theory (GUT scale; T ˜1015 GeV), during which the speed of sound drops by 25 orders of magnitude within a Hubble time, can fit current CMB observations. We further discuss how production of primordial black holes constrains the cosmological acoustic history, while coupling TTC to Horava-Lifshitz gravity leads to a lower limit on the amplitude of tensor modes (r≳10-3), that are detectable by CMBpol (and might have already been seen by the BICEP-Keck Collaboration).

  12. Conceptual Problems in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, F J Amaral

    2011-01-01

    In this essay a critical review of present conceptual problems in current cosmology is provided from a more philosophical point of view. In essence, a digression on how could philosophy help cosmologists in what is strictly their fundamental endeavor is presented. We start by recalling some examples of enduring confrontations among philosophers and physicists on what could be contributed by the formers to the day-time striving of the second ones. Then, a short review of the standard model Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walter (FLRW) of cosmology is given. It seems apparent that cosmology is living a golden age with the advent of observations of high precision. Nonetheless, a critical revisiting of the direction in which it should go on appears also needed, for misconcepts like "quantum backgrounds for cosmological classical settings" and "quantum gravity unification" have not been properly constructed up-to-date. Thus, knowledge-building in cosmology, more than in any other field, should begin with visions of...

  13. Inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleban, Matthew; Senatore, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    In homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, the topology of the universe determines its ultimate fate. If the Weak Energy Condition is satisfied, open and flat universes must expand forever, while closed cosmologies can recollapse to a Big Crunch. A similar statement holds for homogeneous but anisotropic (Bianchi) universes. Here, we prove that arbitrarily inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies with ``flat'' (including toroidal) and ``open'' (including compact hyperbolic) spatial topology that are initially expanding must continue to expand forever at least in some region at a rate bounded from below by a positive number, despite the presence of arbitrarily large density fluctuations and/or the formation of black holes. Because the set of 3-manifold topologies is countable, a single integer determines the ultimate fate of the universe, and, in a specific sense, most 3-manifolds are ``flat'' or ``open''. Our result has important implications for inflation: if there is a positive cosmological constant (or suitable inflationary potential) and initial conditions for the inflaton, cosmologies with ``flat'' or ``open'' topology must expand forever in some region at least as fast as de Sitter space, and are therefore very likely to begin inflationary expansion eventually, regardless of the scale of the inflationary energy or the spectrum and amplitude of initial inhomogeneities and gravitational waves. Our result is also significant for numerical general relativity, which often makes use of periodic (toroidal) boundary conditions.

  14. Radio Relics in Cosmological Simulations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Hoeft; S. E. Nuza; S. Gottlöber; R. J. van Weeren; H. J. A. Röttgering; M. Brüggen

    2011-12-01

    Radio relics have been discovered in many galaxy clusters. They are believed to trace shock fronts induced by cluster mergers. Cosmological simulations allow us to study merger shocks in detail since the intra-cluster medium is heated by shock dissipation. Using high resolution cosmological simulations, identifying shock fronts and applying a parametric model for the radio emission allows us to simulate the formation of radio relics. We analyze a simulated shock front in detail. We find a rather broad Mach number distribution. The Mach number affects strongly the number density of relativistic electrons in the downstream area, hence, the radio luminosity varies significantly across the shock surface. The abundance of radio relics can be modeled with the help of the radio power probability distribution which aims at predicting radio relic number counts. Since the actual electron acceleration efficiency is not known, predictions for the number counts need to be normalized by the observed number of radio relics. For the characteristics of upcoming low frequency surveys we find that about thousand relics are awaiting discovery.

  15. Information Gains from Cosmological Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Grandis, S; Refregier, A; Amara, A; Nicola, A

    2015-01-01

    In light of the growing number of cosmological observations, it is important to develop versatile tools to quantify the constraining power and consistency of cosmological probes. Originally motivated from information theory, we use the relative entropy to compute the information gained by Bayesian updates in units of bits. This measure quantifies both the improvement in precision and the 'surprise', i.e. the tension arising from shifts in central values. Our starting point is a WMAP9 prior which we update with observations of the distance ladder, supernovae (SNe), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and weak lensing as well as the 2015 Planck release. We consider the parameters of the flat $\\Lambda$CDM concordance model and some of its extensions which include curvature and Dark Energy equation of state parameter $w$. We find that, relative to WMAP9 and within these model spaces, the probes that have provided the greatest gains are Planck (10 bits), followed by BAO surveys (5.1 bits) and SNe experiments (3.1 ...

  16. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: The EGS deep field I - Deep number counts and the redshift distribution of the recovered Cosmic Infrared Background at 450 and 850 um

    CERN Document Server

    Zavala, J A; Geach, J E; Hughes, D H; Birkinshaw, M; Chapin, E; Chapman, S; Chen, Chian-Chou; Clements, D L; Dunlop, J S; Farrah, D; Ivison, R J; Jenness, T; Michałowski, M J; Robson, E I; Scott, Douglas; Simpson, J; Spaans, M; van der Werf, P

    2016-01-01

    We present deep observations at 450 um and 850 um in the Extended Groth Strip field taken with the SCUBA-2 camera mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the deep SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS), achieving a central instrumental depth of $\\sigma_{450}=1.2$ mJy/beam and $\\sigma_{850}=0.2$ mJy/beam. We detect 57 sources at 450 um and 90 at 850 um with S/N > 3.5 over ~70 sq. arcmin. From these detections we derive the number counts at flux densities $S_{450}>4.0$ mJy and $S_{850}>0.9$ mJy, which represent the deepest number counts at these wavelengths derived using directly extracted sources from only blank-field observations with a single-dish telescope. Our measurements smoothly connect the gap between previous shallower blank-field single-dish observations and deep interferometric ALMA results. We estimate the contribution of our SCUBA-2 detected galaxies to the cosmic infrared background (CIB), as well as the contribution of 24 um-selected galaxies through a stacking technique, which ...

  17. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project III: Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Burenin, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    , and nearly a factor of 2 improvement in systematics compared with constraints that can be obtained without clusters. The joint analysis of these four data sets puts a conservative upper limit on the masses of light neutrinos ∑m ν ...Chandra observations of large samples of galaxy clusters detected in X-rays by ROSAT provide a new, robust determination of the cluster mass functions at low and high redshifts. Statistical and systematic errors are now sufficiently small, and the redshift leverage sufficiently large for the mass...... function evolution to be used as a useful growth of a structure-based dark energy probe. In this paper, we present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from Chandra observations of 37 clusters with langzrang = 0.55 derived from 400 deg2 ROSAT serendipitous survey and 49 brightest z ≈ 0.05 clusters...

  18. Axions : Theory and Cosmological Role

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    We review recent developments on axion cosmology. Topics include : axion cold dark matter, axions from topological defects, axion isocurvature perturbation and its non-Gaussianity and axino/saxion cosmology in supersymmetric axion model.

  19. Cosmological Constraints with Clustering-Based Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Kovetz, Ely D; Rahman, Mubdi

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that observations lacking reliable redshift information, such as photometric and radio continuum surveys, can produce robust measurements of cosmological parameters when empowered by clustering-based redshift estimation. This method infers the redshift distribution based on the spatial clustering of sources, using cross-correlation with a reference dataset with known redshifts. Applying this method to the existing SDSS photometric galaxies, and projecting to future radio continuum surveys, we show that sources can be efficiently divided into several redshift bins, increasing their ability to constrain cosmological parameters. We forecast constraints on the dark-energy equation-of-state and on local non-gaussianity parameters. We explore several pertinent issues, including the tradeoff between including more sources versus minimizing the overlap between bins, the shot-noise limitations on binning, and the predicted performance of the method at high redshifts. Remarkably, we find that, once this ...

  20. The Cosmological Evolution of BL Lacertae Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, P; Perri, M; Padovani, P

    2000-01-01

    We review the main results from several radio, X-ray and multi-frequency surveys on the topic of cosmological evolution of BL Lacertae objects. Updated findings on BL Lac evolution following the recent identification of many sources in the ``Sedentary Multi-Frequency survey'' are also discussed. By means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations we test some possible explanations for the peculiar cosmological evolution of BL Lacs. We find that a dependence of the relativistic Doppler factor on radio luminosity (as expected within the beaming scenario) may induce low values of V/V_max and that both edge effects at the low luminosity end of the BL Lacs radio luminosity function, and incompleteness at faint optical magnitudes may be the cause of the low V/V_max found for extreme HBL sources in X-ray selected samples.

  1. A new approach for obtaining cosmological constraints from Type Ia Supernovae using Approximate Bayesian Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Jennings, Elise; Sako, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological parameter estimation techniques that robustly account for systematic measurement uncertainties will be crucial for the next generation of cosmological surveys. We present a new analysis method, superABC, for obtaining cosmological constraints from Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves using Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) without any likelihood assumptions. The ABC method works by using a forward model simulation of the data where systematic uncertainties can be simulated and marginalized over. A key feature of the method presented here is the use of two distinct metrics, the `Tripp' and `Light Curve' metrics, which allow us to compare the simulated data to the observed data set. The Tripp metric takes as input the parameters of models fit to each light curve with the SALT-II method, whereas the Light Curve metric uses the measured fluxes directly without model fitting. We apply the superABC sampler to a simulated data set of $\\sim$1000 SNe corresponding to the first season of the Dark En...

  2. Strongly Coupled Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bonometto, S A; Musco, I; Mainini, R; Maccio', A V

    2014-01-01

    Models including an energy transfer from CDM to DE are widely considered in the literature, namely to allow DE a significant high-z density. Strongly Coupled cosmologies assume a much larger coupling between DE and CDM, together with the presence of an uncoupled warm DM component, as the role of CDM is mostly restricted to radiative eras. This allows us to preserve small scale fluctuations even if the warm particle, possibly a sterile neutrino, is quite light, O(100 eV). Linear theory and numerical simulations show that these cosmologies agree with LCDM on supergalactic scales; e.g., CMB spectra are substantially identical. Simultaneously, simulations show that they significantly ease problems related to the properties of MW satellites and cores in dwarfs. SC cosmologies also open new perspectives on early black hole formation, and possibly lead towards unificating DE and inflationary scalar fields.

  3. The philosophy of cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, Joseph; Barrow, John D; Saunders, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Following a long-term international collaboration between leaders in cosmology and the philosophy of science, this volume addresses foundational questions at the limit of science across these disciplines, questions raised by observational and theoretical progress in modern cosmology. Space missions have mapped the Universe up to its early instants, opening up questions on what came before the Big Bang, the nature of space and time, and the quantum origin of the Universe. As the foundational volume of an emerging academic discipline, experts from relevant fields lay out the fundamental problems of contemporary cosmology and explore the routes toward finding possible solutions. Written for graduates and researchers in physics and philosophy, particular efforts are made to inform academics from other fields, as well as the educated public, who wish to understand our modern vision of the Universe, related philosophical questions, and the significant impacts on scientific methodology.

  4. Evolving Horava Cosmological Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Fathi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Several sets of radially propagating null congruence generators are exploited in order to form 3-dimensional marginally trapped surfaces, referred to as black hole and cosmological apparent horizons in a Horava universe. Based on this method, we deal with the characteristics of the 2-dimensional space-like spheres of symmetry and the peculiarities of having trapping horizons. Moreover, we apply this method in standard expanding and contracting FLRW cosmological models of a Horava universe to investigate the conditions under which the extra parameters of the theory may lead to trapped/anti-trapped surfaces both in the future and in the past. We also include the cases of negative time, referred to as the finite past, and discuss the formation of anti-trapped surfaces inside the cosmological apparent horizons.

  5. Cosmological Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Stornaiolo, C

    2002-01-01

    In this letter we propose the existence of low density black holes and discuss its compatibility with the cosmological observations. The origin of these black holes can be traced back to the collapse of long wavelength cosmological perturbations during the matter dominated era, when the densities are low enough to neglect any internal and thermal pressure. By introducing a threshold density $\\hat{\\rho}$ above which pressure and non-gravitational interactions become effective, we find the highest wavelength for the perturbations that can reach an equilibrium state instead of collapsing to a black hole. The low density black holes introduced here, if they exist, can be observed through weak and strong gravitational lensing effects. Finally we observe that we obtained here a cosmological model which is capable to explain in a qualitative way the void formation together with the value $\\Omega=1$. But we remark that it needs to be improved by considering non spherical symmetric black holes.

  6. Cosmological Perturbations in Antigravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oltean, Marius

    2014-01-01

    We compute the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a recently proposed Weyl-symmetric theory of two scalar fields with oppositely-signed conformal couplings to Einstein gravity. It is motivated from the minimal conformal extension of the Standard Model, such that one of these scalar fields is the Higgs while the other is a new particle, the dilaton, introduced to make the Higgs mass conformally symmetric. At the background level, the theory admits novel geodesically-complete cyclic cosmological solutions characterized by a brief period of repulsive gravity, or "antigravity", during each successive transition from a Big Crunch to a Big Bang. We show that despite the necessarily wrong-signed kinetic term of the dilaton in the full action, its cosmological solutions are stable at the perturbative level.

  7. Time in quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A cosmological model with two global internal times shows that time reparameterization invariance, and therefore covariance, is not guaranteed by deparameterization. In particular, it is impossible to derive proper-time effective equations from a single deparameterized model if quantum corrections from fluctuations and higher moments are included. The framework of effective constraints shows how proper-time evolution can consistently be defined in quantum cosmological systems, such that it is time reparameterization invariant when compared with other choices of coordinate time. At the same time, it allows transformations of moment corrections in different deparameterizations of the same model, indicating partial time reparameterization of internal-time evolution. However, in addition to corrections from moments such as quantum fluctuations, also factor ordering corrections may appear. The latter generically break covariance in internal-time formulations. Fluctuation effects in quantum cosmology are therefore ...

  8. Cosmology as Geodesic Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, P K; Townsend, Paul K.; Wohlfarth, Mattias N.R.

    2004-01-01

    For gravity coupled to N scalar fields with arbitrary potential V, it is shown that all flat (homogeneous and isotropic) cosmologies correspond to geodesics in an (N+1)-dimensional `extended target space' of Lorentzian signature (1,N), timelike if V>0 and spacelike if V<0. Accelerating cosmologies correspond to timelike geodesics that lie within an `acceleration subcone' of the `lightcone'. Non-flat (k=-1,+1) cosmologies are shown to evolve as projections of geodesic motion in a space of dimension N+2, of signature (1,N+1) for k=-1 and signature (2,N) for k=+1. We illustrate these results for various potentials of current interest, including exponential and inverse power potentials.

  9. General relativity and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Bucher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This year marks the hundredth anniversary of Einstein's 1915 landmark paper "Die Feldgleichungen der Gravitation" in which the field equations of general relativity were correctly formulated for the first time, thus rendering general relativity a complete theory. Over the subsequent hundred years physicists and astronomers have struggled with uncovering the consequences and applications of these equations. This contribution, which was written as an introduction to six chapters dealing with the connection between general relativity and cosmology that will appear in the two-volume book "One Hundred Years of General Relativity: From Genesis and Empirical Foundations to Gravitational Waves, Cosmology and Quantum Gravity," endeavors to provide a historical overview of the connection between general relativity and cosmology, two areas whose development has been closely intertwined.

  10. The strained state cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Starting from some relevant facts concerning the behaviour of the universe over large scale and time span, the analogy between the geometric approach of General Relativ- ity and the classical description of an elastic strained material continuum is discussed. Extending the elastic deformation approach to four dimensions it is shown that the accelerated expansion of the universe is recovered. The strain field of space-time repro- duces properties similar to the ones ascribed to the dark energy currently called in to explain the accelerated expansion. The strain field in the primordial universe behaves as radiation, but asymptotically it reproduces the cosmological constant. Subjecting the theory to a number of cosmological tests confirms the soundness of the approach and gives an optimal value for the one parameter of the model, i.e. the bulk modulus of the space-time continuum. Finally various aspects of the Strained State Cosmology (SSC) are discussed and contrasted with some non-linear massive gravity theor...

  11. Cosmological Reflection of Particle Symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Maxim Khlopov

    2016-01-01

    The standard model involves particle symmetry and the mechanism of its breaking. Modern cosmology is based on inflationary models with baryosynthesis and dark matter/energy, which involves physics beyond the standard model. Studies of the physical basis of modern cosmology combine direct searches for new physics at accelerators with its indirect non-accelerator probes, in which cosmological consequences of particle models play an important role. The cosmological reflection of particle symmetr...

  12. Brane cosmology in teleparallel gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Atazadeh, K

    2014-01-01

    We consider cosmology of brane-world scenario in the frame work of teleparallel gravity in that way matter is localized on the brane. We show that the cosmology of such branes is different from the standard cosmology in teleparallelism. In particular, we obtain a class of new solutions with a constant five-dimensional radius and cosmologically evolving brane in the context of constant torsion $f(T)$ gravity.

  13. Loop quantum cosmology: Anisotropies and inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    In this dissertation we extend the improved dynamics of loop quantum cosmology from the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-times to cosmological models which allow anisotropies and inhomogeneities. Specifically, we consider the cases of the homogeneous but anisotropic Bianchi type I, II and IX models with a massless scalar field as well as the vacuum, inhomogeneous, linearly polarized Gowdy T3 model. For each case, we derive the Hamiltonian constraint operator and study its properties. In particular, we show how in all of these models the classical big bang and big crunch singularities are resolved due to quantum gravity effects. Since the Bianchi models play a key role in the Belinskii, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz conjecture regarding the nature of generic space-like singularities in general relativity, the quantum dynamics of the Bianchi cosmologies are likely to provide considerable intuition about the fate of such singularities in quantum gravity. In addition, the results obtained here provide an important step toward the full loop quantization of cosmological space-times that allow generic inhomogeneities; this would provide falsifiable predictions that could be compared to observations.

  14. Relativistic Cosmology Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crothers S. J.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In a previous paper the writer treated of particular classes of cosmological solutions for certain Einstein spaces and claimed that no such solutions exist in relation thereto. In that paper the assumption that the proper radius is zero when the line-element is singular was generally applied. This general assumption is unjustified and must be dropped. Consequently, solutions do exist in relation to the aforementioned types, and are explored herein. The concept of the Big Bang cosmology is found to be inconsistent with General Relativity

  15. Fluids in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L

    2014-01-01

    We review the role of fluids in cosmology by first introducing them in General Relativity and then applied to a FRW Universe's model. We describe how relativistic and non-relativistic components evolve in the background dynamics. We also introduce scalar fields to show that they are able to yield an inflationary dynamics at very early times (inflation) and late times (quintessence). Then, we proceed to study the thermodynamical properties of the fluids and, lastly, its perturbed kinematics. We make emphasis in the constrictions of parameters by recent cosmological probes.

  16. Horizons of cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Horizons of Cosmology: Exploring Worlds Seen and Unseen is the fourth title published in the Templeton Science and Religion Series, in which scientists from a wide range of fields distill their experience and knowledge into brief tours of their respective specialties. In this volume, highly esteemed astrophysicist Joseph Silk explores the vast mysteries and speculations of the field of cosmology in a way that balances an accessible style for the general reader and enough technical detail for advanced students and professionals. Indeed, while the p

  17. The Cosmological Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Monaco, P

    1997-01-01

    This thesis aims to review the cosmological mass function problem, both from the theoretical and the observational point of view, and to present a new mass function theory, based on realistic approximations for the dynamics of gravitational collapse. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction on gravitational dynamics in cosmological models. Chapter 2 gives a complete review of the mass function theory. Chapters 3 and 4 present the ``dynamical'' mass function theory, based on truncated Lagrangian dynamics and on the excursion set approach. Chapter 5 reviews the observational state-of-the-art and the main applications of the mass function theories described before. Finally, Chapter 6 gives conclusions and future prospects.

  18. Advances in modern cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The twentieth century elevated our understanding of the Universe from its early stages to what it is today and what is to become of it. Cosmology is the weapon that utilizes all the scientific tools that we have created to feel less lost in the immensity of our Universe. The standard model is the theory that explains the best what we observe. Even with all the successes that this theory had, two main questions are still to be answered: What is the nature of dark matter and dark energy? This book attempts to understand these questions while giving some of the most promising advances in modern cosmology.

  19. Adventures in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This volume tells of the quest for cosmology as seen by some of the finest cosmologists in the world. It starts with "Galaxy Formation from Start to Finish" and ends with "The First Supermassive Black Holes in the Universe," exploring in between the grand themes of galaxies, the early universe, expansion of the universe, dark matter and dark energy. This up-to-date collection of review articles offers a general introduction to cosmology and is intended for all probing into the profound questions on where we came from and where we are going.

  20. Galaxies and Cosmology with DENIS

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, G A; Bonin, W; Banchet, V

    1997-01-01

    The DENIS survey is currently imaging 21334 deg^2 of the mainly southern sky in the IJK and the observations are expected to go on until mid 2000. The expectations for extragalactic and cosmological research are outlined, including a quantitative assessment of the effects of recent star formation on the measured fluxes of galaxies. The galaxy extraction is much improved with the modeling of the PSF across the 12'x12' frames and the reliability of star/galaxy separation (currently based upon a combination of classical and neural-network based methods) is measured from visual inspection to be >90% at I = 16. The I band counts follow the high bright-end normalization and the J differential counts follow N(J) \\simeq 11 \\times dex [0.6 (J-14)] deg^{-2} mag^{-1} and are expected to be complete, reliable and photometrically accurate

  1. Survey of non-linear hydrodynamic models of type-II Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolec, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a grid of non-linear convective type-II Cepheid models. The dense model grids are computed for 0.6 M⊙ and a range of metallicities ([Fe/H] = -2.0, -1.5, -1.0), and for 0.8 M⊙ ([Fe/H] = -1.5). Two sets of convective parameters are considered. The models cover the full temperature extent of the classical instability strip, but are limited in luminosity; for the most luminous models, violent pulsation leads to the decoupling of the outermost model shell. Hence, our survey reaches only the shortest period RV Tau domain. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, we detect two domains in which period-doubled pulsation is possible. The first extends through the BL Her domain and low-luminosity W Vir domain (pulsation periods ˜2-6.5 d). The second domain extends at higher luminosities (W Vir domain; periods >9.5 d). Some models within these domains display period-4 pulsation. We also detect very narrow domains (˜10 K wide) in which modulation of pulsation is possible. Another interesting phenomenon we detect is double-mode pulsation in the fundamental mode and in the fourth radial overtone. Fourth overtone is a surface mode, trapped in the outer model layers. Single-mode pulsation in the fourth overtone is also possible on the hot side of the classical instability strip. The origin of the above phenomena is discussed. In particular, the role of resonances in driving different pulsation dynamics as well as in shaping the morphology of the radius variation curves is analysed.

  2. A Survey of MgII Absorption at 2 < z < 6 with Magellan / FIRE: I: Sample and Evolution of the MgII Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Matejek, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    We present initial results from the first systematic survey for MgII quasar absorption lines at z > 2.5. Using infrared spectra of 46 high-redshift quasars, we discovered 111 MgII systems over a path covering 1.9 5, with a maximum of z = 5.33 - the most distant MgII system now known. The comoving MgII line density for weaker systems (Wr < 1.0A) is statistically consistent with no evolution from z = 0.4 to z = 5.5, while that for stronger systems increases three-fold until z \\sim 3 before declining again towards higher redshifts. The equivalent width distribution, which fits an exponential, reflects this evolution by flattening as z approaches 3 before steepening again. The rise and fall of the strong absorbers suggests a connection to the star formation rate density, as though they trace galactic outflows or other byproducts of star formation. The weaker systems' lack of evolution does not fit within this interpretation, but may be reproduced by extrapolating low redshift scaling relations between host ga...

  3. A COMPLETE ATLAS OF H I ABSORPTION TOWARD H II REGIONS IN THE SOUTHERN GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY (SGPS I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.; Dickey, J. M.; Dawson, J. R. [School of Physical Sciences, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001 (Australia); McClure-Griffiths, N. M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    We present a complete catalog of H I emission and absorption spectrum pairs, toward H II regions, detectable within the boundaries of the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS I), a total of 252 regions. The catalog is presented in graphical, numerical, and summary formats. We demonstrate an application of this new data set through an investigation of the locus of the Near 3 kpc Arm.

  4. The VIPERS Multi-Lambda Survey - II: Diving with massive galaxies in 22 square degrees since z = 1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Moutard, T; Ilbert, O; Coupon, J; Davidzon, I; Guzzo, L; Hudelot, P; McCracken, H J; Van Waerbeke, L; Morrison, G E; Fèvre, O Le; Comte, V; Bolzonella, M; Fritz, A; Garilli, B; Scodeggio, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) and stellar mass density from redshift z=0.2 to z=1.5 of a $K_{AB}$22.5) samples, respectively. The SMF is measured with ~760,000 galaxies down to $K_s$=22 and over an effective area of ~22.4 deg$^2$, the latter of which drastically reduces the statistical uncertainties (i.e. Poissonian error & cosmic variance). We point out the importance of a careful control of the photometric calibration, whose impact becomes quickly dominant when statistical uncertainties are reduced, which will be a major issue for future generation of cosmological surveys with, e.g. EUCLID or LSST. By exploring the rest-frame (NUV-r) vs (r-$K_s$) color-color diagram separating star-forming and quiescent galaxies, (1) we find that the density of very massive log($M_*/ M_{\\odot}$) > 11.5 galaxies is largely dominated by quiescent galaxies and increases by a factor 2 from z~1 to z~0.2, which allows for additional mass assembly via dry mergers, (2) we confirm a scena...

  5. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    including horse, camel, mammoth, Ertm E-TR-48-III-II 20 musk ox, and certain species of bison, goat, and bear, which had previously inhabited the marsh and...34 - - -9,$.. 𔄃 Im I I I Si to * Location lype/Contents Affiliation 42B@644 rid e over cr ek - P/J depression, cleared areas, Fr elon (f4-5-18-92) ground

  6. Ekpyrotic and Cyclic Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Ekpyrotic and cyclic cosmologies provide theories of the very early and of the very late universe. In these models, the big bang is described as a collision of branes - and thus the big bang is not the beginning of time. Before the big bang, there is an ekpyrotic phase with equation of state w=P/rho >> 1 (where P is the average pressure and rho the average energy density) during which the universe slowly contracts. This phase resolves the standard cosmological puzzles and generates a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of cosmological perturbations containing a significant non-gaussian component. At the same time it produces small-amplitude gravitational waves with a blue spectrum. The dark energy dominating the present-day cosmological evolution is reinterpreted as a small attractive force between our brane and a parallel one. This force eventually induces a new ekpyrotic phase and a new brane collision, leading to the idea of a cyclic universe. This review discusses the detailed properties of these models, thei...

  7. Quantum cosmological metroland model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, E.; Franzen, A.T.

    2010-01-01

    Relational particle mechanics is useful for modelling whole-universe issues such as quantum cosmology or the problem of time in quantum gravity, including some aspects outside the reach of comparably complex mini-superspace models. In this paper, we consider the mechanics of pure shape and not scale

  8. Cosmological dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, Genly

    2014-01-01

    In this book are studied, from the perspective of the dynamical systems, several Universe models. In chapter 1 we give a bird's eye view on cosmology and cosmological problems. Chapter 2 is devoted to a brief review on some results and useful tools from the qualitative theory of dynamical systems. They provide the theoretical basis for the qualitative study of concrete cosmological models. Chapters 1 and 2 are a review of well-known results. Chapters 3, 4, 5 and 6 are devoted to our main results. In these chapters are extended and settled in a substantially different, more strict mathematical language, several results obtained by one of us in arXiv:0812.1013 [gr-qc]; arXiv:1009.0689 [gr-qc]; arXiv:0904.1577[gr-qc]; and arXiv:0909.3571 [hep-th]. In chapter 6, we provide a different approach to the subject discussed in astro-ph/0503478. Additionally, we perform a Poincar\\'e compactification process allowing to construct a global phase space containing all the cosmological information in both finite and infinite...

  9. Relativistic cosmology; Cosmologia Relativista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastero-Gil, M.

    2015-07-01

    Relativistic cosmology is nothing but the study of the evolution of our universe expanding from the General Theory of Relativity, which describes the gravitational interaction at any scale and given its character far-reaching is the force that dominate the evolution of the universe. (Author)

  10. Ekpyrotic and cyclic cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehners, Jean-Luc [Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: jlehners@princeton.edu

    2008-09-15

    Ekpyrotic and cyclic cosmologies provide theories of the very early and of the very late universe. In these models, the big bang is described as a collision of branes - and thus the big bang is not the beginning of time. Before the big bang, there is an ekpyrotic phase with equation of state w=P/({rho}) >>1 (where P is the average pressure and {rho} the average energy density) during which the universe slowly contracts. This phase resolves the standard cosmological puzzles and generates a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of cosmological perturbations containing a significant non-Gaussian component. At the same time it produces small-amplitude gravitational waves with a blue spectrum. The dark energy dominating the present-day cosmological evolution is reinterpreted as a small attractive force between our brane and a parallel one. This force eventually induces a new ekpyrotic phase and a new brane collision, leading to the idea of a cyclic universe. This review discusses the detailed properties of these models, their embedding in M-theory and their viability, with an emphasis on open issues and observational signatures.

  11. Cosmology and the Bispectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefusatti, Emiliano; /Fermilab /CCPP, New York; Crocce, Martin; Pueblas, Sebastian; Scoccimarro, Roman; /CCPP, New York

    2006-04-01

    The present spatial distribution of galaxies in the Universe is non-Gaussian, with 40% skewness in 50 h{sup -1} Mpc spheres, and remarkably little is known about the information encoded in it about cosmological parameters beyond the power spectrum. In this work they present an attempt to bridge this gap by studying the bispectrum, paying particular attention to a joint analysis with the power spectrum and their combination with CMB data. They address the covariance properties of the power spectrum and bispectrum including the effects of beat coupling that lead to interesting cross-correlations, and discuss how baryon acoustic oscillations break degeneracies. They show that the bispectrum has significant information on cosmological parameters well beyond its power in constraining galaxy bias, and when combined with the power spectrum is more complementary than combining power spectra of different samples of galaxies, since non-Gaussianity provides a somewhat different direction in parameter space. In the framework of flat cosmological models they show that most of the improvement of adding bispectrum information corresponds to parameters related to the amplitude and effective spectral index of perturbations, which can be improved by almost a factor of two. Moreover, they demonstrate that the expected statistical uncertainties in {sigma}s of a few percent are robust to relaxing the dark energy beyond a cosmological constant.

  12. Notes on Hadza cosmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaanes, Thea

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: This article concerns Hadza cosmology examined through objects, rituals and the Hadza concept of epeme. A brief background to the Hadza and the eldwork that informs this study is followed by a close analysis of three key objects that are central to the argument presented. The objects ar...

  13. Anisotropic Lyra cosmology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B B Bhowmik; A Rajput

    2004-06-01

    Anisotropic Bianchi Type-I cosmological models have been studied on the basis of Lyra's geometry. Two types of models, one with constant deceleration parameter and the other with variable deceleration parameter have been derived by considering a time-dependent displacement field.

  14. National databases and rheumatology research II: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Krishnan, Eswar

    2004-11-01

    Three National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were conducted in the United States between 1971 and 1994 to provide data on the nutritional and health status of the population and on specific target conditions. This article describes features of the surveys and provides examples of research on musculoskeletal disorders that used the survey data.

  15. Some epistemic questions of cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Grujic, Petar V

    2007-01-01

    We discuss a number of fundamental aspects of modern cosmological concepts, from the phenomenological, observational, theoretical and epistemic points of view. We argue that the modern cosmology, despite a great advent, in particular in the observational sector, is yet to solve important problems, posed already by the classical times. In particular the stress is put on discerning the scientific features of modern cosmological paradigms from the more speculative ones, with the latter immersed in some aspects deeply into mythological world picture. We finally discuss the principal paradigms, which are present in the modern cosmological studies and evaluate their epistemic merits. KEY WORDS: cosmology, epistemology, methodology, mythology, philosophy of science

  16. The Case for Deep, Wide-Field Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Scranton, Ryan; Caldwell, Robert; Cooray, Asantha; Dore, Olivier; Habib, Salman; Heavens, Alan; Heitmann, Katrin; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Knox, Lloyd; Newman, Jeffrey A; Serra, Paolo; Song, Yong-Seon; Strauss, Michael; Tyson, Tony; Verde, Licia; Zhan, Hu

    2009-01-01

    Much of the science case for the next generation of deep, wide-field optical/infrared surveys has been driven by the further study of dark energy. This is a laudable goal (and the subject of a companion white paper by Zhan et al.). However, one of the most important lessons of the current generation of surveys is that the interesting science questions at the end of the survey are quite different than they were when the surveys were being planned. The current surveys succeeded in this evolving terrain by being very general tools that could be applied to a number of very fundamental measurements. Likewise, the accessibility of the data enabled the broader cosmological and astronomical community to generate more science than the survey collaborations could alone. With that in mind, we should consider some of the basic physical and cosmological questions that surveys like LSST and JDEM-Wide will be able to address.

  17. Metric-Independent Volume-Forms in Gravity and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Guendelman, Eduardo; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Employing alternative spacetime volume-forms (generally-covariant integration measure densities) independent of the pertinent Riemannian spacetime metric have profound impact in general relativity. Although formally appearing as "pure-gauge" dynamical degrees of freedom they trigger a number of remarkable physically important phenomena such as: (i) new mechanism of dynamical generation of cosmological constant; (ii) new type of "quintessential inflation" scenario in cosmology; (iii) non-singular initial "emergent universe" phase of cosmological evolution preceding the inflationary phase; (iv) new mechanism of dynamical spontaneous breakdown of supersymmetry in supergravity; (v) gravitational electrovacuum "bags". We study in some detail the properties, together with their canonical Hamiltonian formulation, of a class of generalized gravity-matter models built with two independent non-Riemannian volume-forms and discuss their implications in cosmology.

  18. A Massive Galaxy Cluster At z=1.45 From The XMM Cluster Survey: Discovery, Confirmation And Implications For The L-T Relation And Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirli, Kivanc; Romer, A. K.; Davidson, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Viana, P. T.; Hilton, M.; Collins, C. A.; Kay, S. T.; Liddle, A. R.; Mann, R. G.; Miller, C. J.; Nichol, R. C.; West, M. J.; Conselice, C. J.; Spinrad, H.; Stern, D.; XCS Collaboration

    2006-06-01

    We report the discovery of the hottest cluster known at z > 1. It was identified as an extended X-ray source in the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS, Romer et al., 2001) and optical spectroscopy shows that 6 galaxies within a 60 arcsec diameter region lie at z = 1.45 ± 0.01. Hence its redshift is the highest currently known for a spectroscopically-confirmed cluster. Analysis of the X-ray spectra yields kT = 7.9+2.8-1.8 keV (90% confidence) and suggests that it is relatively massive for such a high redshift cluster.We acknowledge financial support from NASA grant NAG-11634 (AKR, RCN, KS, MD, PTPV), The Royal Astronomical Society's Hosie Request (MD, KS), PPARC (ARL, STK, RGM), the NASA XMM program (KS), the Institute of Astronomy at the University of Edinburgh (MD), Liverpool John Moores University (MH), Carnegie Mellon University (KS, AKR), and NSF grant AST-0205960 (MJW).

  19. Orthopedic manifestations in patients with muco­polysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome enrolled in the Hunter Outcome Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Link

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II or Hunter syndrome is a rare, inherited disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. As a result of this deficiency, glycosaminoglycans accumulate in lysosomes in many tissues, leading to progressive multisystemic disease. The cardiopulmonary and neurological problems associated with MPS II have received considerable attention. Orthopedic manifestations are common but not as well characterized. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and severity of orthopedic manifestations of MPS II and to determine the relationship of these signs and symptoms with cardiovascular, pulmonary and central nervous system involvement. Orthopedic manifestations of MPS II were studied using cross-sectional data from the Hunter Outcome Survey (HOS. The HOS is a global, physician-led, multicenter observational database that collects information on the natural history of MPS II and the long-term safety and effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy. As of January 2009, the HOS contained baseline data on joint range of motion in 124 males with MPS II. In total, 79% of patients had skeletal manifestations (median onset, 3.5 years and 25% had abnormal gait (median onset, 5.4 years. Joint range of motion was restricted for all joints assessed (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee and ankle. Extension was the most severely affected movement: the exception to this was the shoulder. Surgery for orthopedic problems was rare. The presence of orthopedic manifestations was associated with the presence of central nervous system and pulmonary involvement, but not so clearly with cardiovascular involvement. Orthopedic interventions should be considered on an individual-patient basis. Although some orthopedic manifestations associated with MPS II may be managed routinely, a good knowledge of other concurrent organ system involvement is essential. A multidisciplinary approach is required.

  20. The Galaxy Cosmological Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, Amanda R; Ribeiro, Marcelo B; Stoeger, William R

    2014-01-01

    We study the galaxy cosmological mass function (GCMF) in a semi-empirical relativistic approach using observational data provided by galaxy redshift surveys. Starting from the theory of Ribeiro & Stoeger (2003, arXiv:astro-ph/0304094) between the mass-to-light ratio, the selection function obtained from the luminosity function (LF) data and the luminosity density, the average luminosity $L$ and the average galactic mass $\\mathcal{M}_g$ are computed in terms of the redshift. $\\mathcal{M}_g$ is also alternatively estimated by a method that uses the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF). Comparison of these two forms of deriving the average galactic mass allows us to infer a possible bias introduced by the selection criteria of the survey. We used the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey sample of 5558 galaxies in the redshift range $0.5 < z < 5.0$ and its LF Schechter parameters in the B-band, as well as this sample's stellar mass-to-light ratio and its GSMF data. Assuming ${\\mathcal{M}_{g_0}} \\approx 10^{11} ...