WorldWideScience

Sample records for cosmic web analyzing

  1. Geometry and Morphology of the Cosmic Web : Analyzing Spatial Patterns in the Universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Platen, Erwin; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; Anton, F

    2009-01-01

    We review the analysis of the Cosmic Web by means of an extensive toolset based on the use of Delaunay and Voronoi tessellations. The Cosmic Web is the salient and pervasive foamlike pattern in which matter has organized itself on scales of a few up to more than a hundred Megaparsec. The weblike spa

  2. Geometry and Morphology of the Cosmic Web: Analyzing Spatial Patterns in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J T; Platen, Erwin

    2009-01-01

    We review the analysis of the Cosmic Web by means of an extensive toolset based on the use of Delaunay and Voronoi tessellations. The Cosmic Web is the salient and pervasive foamlike pattern in which matter has organized itself on scales of a few up to more than a hundred Megaparsec. First, we describe the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE). The DTFE formalism is shown to recover the hierarchical nature and the anisotropic morphology of the cosmic matter distribution. The Multiscale Morphology Filter (MMF) uses the DTFE density field to extract the diverse morphological elements - filaments, sheets and clusters - on the basis of a ScaleSpace analysis which searches for these morphologies over a range of scales. Subsequently, we discuss the Watershed Voidfinder (WVF), which invokes the discrete watershed transform to identify voids in the cosmic matter distribution. The WVF is able to determine the location, size and shape of the voids. The watershed transform is also a key element in the SpineWeb an...

  3. Understanding the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; Jones, Bernard J T; Frenk, Carlos S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the characteristics and the time evolution of the cosmic web from redshift, z=2, to present time, within the framework of the NEXUS+ algorithm. This necessitates the introduction of new analysis tools optimally suited to describe the very intricate and hierarchical pattern that is the cosmic web. In particular, we characterize filaments (walls) in terms of their linear (surface) mass density. This is very good in capturing the evolution of these structures. At early times the cosmos is dominated by tenuous filaments and sheets, which, during subsequent evolution, merge together, such that the present day web is dominated by fewer, but much more massive, structures. We also show that voids are more naturally described in terms of their boundaries and not their centres. We illustrate this for void density profiles, which, when expressed as a function of the distance from void boundary, show a universal profile in good qualitative agreement with the theoretical shell-crossing framework of expandin...

  4. Comparing cosmic web classifiers using information theory

    CERN Document Server

    Leclercq, Florent; Jasche, Jens; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a decision scheme for optimally choosing a classifier, which segments the cosmic web into different structure types (voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters). Our framework, based on information theory, accounts for the design aims of different classes of possible applications: (i) parameter inference, (ii) model selection, and (iii) prediction of new observations. As an illustration, we use cosmographic maps of web-types in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to assess the relative performance of the classifiers T-web, DIVA and ORIGAMI for: (i) analyzing the morphology of the cosmic web, (ii) discriminating dark energy models, and (iii) predicting galaxy colors. Our study substantiates a data-supported connection between cosmic web analysis and information theory, and paves the path towards principled design of analysis procedures for the next generation of galaxy surveys. We have made the cosmic web maps, galaxy catalog, and analysis scripts used in this work publicly available.

  5. Comparing cosmic web classifiers using information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Florent; Lavaux, Guilhem; Jasche, Jens; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a decision scheme for optimally choosing a classifier, which segments the cosmic web into different structure types (voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters). Our framework, based on information theory, accounts for the design aims of different classes of possible applications: (i) parameter inference, (ii) model selection, and (iii) prediction of new observations. As an illustration, we use cosmographic maps of web-types in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to assess the relative performance of the classifiers T-WEB, DIVA and ORIGAMI for: (i) analyzing the morphology of the cosmic web, (ii) discriminating dark energy models, and (iii) predicting galaxy colors. Our study substantiates a data-supported connection between cosmic web analysis and information theory, and paves the path towards principled design of analysis procedures for the next generation of galaxy surveys. We have made the cosmic web maps, galaxy catalog, and analysis scripts used in this work publicly available.

  6. Cosmic web imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shahinur; Martin, Chris; McLean, Ryan; Matuszewski, Matt; Chang, Daphne

    2006-06-01

    We are developing the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI) to detect and map emission from the intergalactic medium (IGM). CWI will observe the strong, redshift UV resonance lines of Lyα 1216, CIV 1550, and OVI 1033 over 3600-9000 Å to trace IGM at 1 view of 60 × 40 arcsec2 for observing extended emission over a large region. The spectrograph using Volume-Phase Holographic gratings have high peak diffraction efficiency and are tunable for covering a large bandpass with a single grating. A low read noise CCD combined with source/background shiftand-nod allowing control of systematics and Poisson-imited sky subtraction to observe the low surface brightness universe. With a resolution of R=10,000 CWI is sensitive to limiting surface brightness ranging from 25 - 27.5 mag/arcsec2 (10 min - 8 hours integration). Recent high resolution simulations predict Lyα Fluorescence from IGM at 100 - 1000 LU1. CWI with sensitivity of ~200 LU improves the current observational effort by an order of magnitude and enables us to explore wide range of overdensity (δ ~ 30 - 104) testing the standard model of structure formation in the universe. CWI also serves as the counter part to the balloon borne integral-field spectrograph Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL) currently being built and planned to be launched in Summer 2007. FIREBALL will observe Lyα Fluorescence from IGM at z = 0.7. CWI combined with FIREBALL will enable us to observe the evolution of IGM and the low surface brightness universe.

  7. Clusters and the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Van de Weygaert, R

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the intimate relationship between the filamentary features and the rare dense compact cluster nodes in this network, via the large scale tidal field going along with them, following the cosmic web theory developed Bond et al. The Megaparsec scale tidal shear pattern is responsible for the contraction of matter into filaments, and its link with the cluster locations can be understood through the implied quadrupolar mass distribution in which the clusters are to be found at the sites of the overdense patches. We present a new technique for tracing the cosmic web, identifying planar walls, elongated filaments and cluster nodes in the galaxy distribution. This will allow the practical exploitation of the concept of the cosmic web towards identifying and tracing the locations of the gaseous WHIM. These methods, the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE) and the Morphology Multiscale Filter (MMF) find their basis in computational geometry and visualization.

  8. Evolution of the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cautun, Marius; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2014-01-01

    The cosmic web is the largest scale manifestation of the anisotropic gravitational collapse of matter. It represents the transitional stage between linear and non-linear structures and contains easily accessible information about the early phases of structure formation processes. Here we investigate

  9. Evolution of the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; Jones, Bernard J T; Frenk, Carlos S

    2014-01-01

    The cosmic web is the largest scale manifestation of the anisotropic gravitational collapse of matter. It represents the transitional stage between linear and non-linear structures and contains easily accessible information about the early phases of structure formation processes. Here we investigate the characteristics and the time evolution of morphological components since. Our analysis involves the application of the NEXUS Multiscale Morphology Filter (MMF) technique, predominantly its NEXUS+ version, to high resolution and large volume cosmological simulations. We quantify the cosmic web components in terms of their mass and volume content, their density distribution and halo populations. We employ new analysis techniques to determine the spatial extent of filaments and sheets, like their total length and local width. This analysis identifies cluster and filaments as the most prominent components of the web. In contrast, while voids and sheets take most of the volume, they correspond to underdense environ...

  10. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; van de Weijgaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments, and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between th

  11. Radio Emission in the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Melo, Pablo A; Brueggen, Marcus; Hoeft, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    We explore the possibility of detecting radio emission in the \\emph{cosmic web} by analyzing shock waves in the MareNostrum cosmological simulation. This requires a careful calibration of shock finding algorithms in Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics simulations, which we present here. Moreover, we identify the elements of the cosmic web, namely voids, walls, filaments and clusters with the use of the SpineWeb technique, a procedure that classifies the structure in terms of its topology. Thus, we are able to study the Mach number distribution as a function of its environment. We find that the median Mach number, for clusters is $\\mathcal{M}_{\\mathrm{clusters}}\\approx1.8$, for filaments is $\\mathcal{M}_{\\mathrm{filaments}}\\approx 6.2$, for walls is $\\mathcal{M}_{\\mathrm{walls}}\\approx 7.5$, and for voids is $\\mathcal{M}_{\\mathrm{voids}}\\approx 18$. We then estimate the radio emission in the cosmic web using the formalism derived in Hoeft & Br\\"{u}ggen (2007). We also find that in order to match our simulation...

  12. Nexus of the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; Jones, Bernard J T; Frenk, Carlos S; Hellwing, Wojcieh A

    2012-01-01

    One of the important unknowns of current cosmology concerns the effects of the large scale distribution of matter on the formation and evolution of dark matter haloes and galaxies. One main difficulty in answering this question lies in the absence of a robust and natural way of identifying the large scale environments and their characteristics. This work summarizes the NEXUS+ formalism which extends and improves our multiscale scale-space MMF method. The new algorithm is very successful in tracing the Cosmic Web components, mainly due to its novel filtering of the density in logarithmic space. The method, due to its multiscale and hierarchical character, has the advantage of detecting all the cosmic structures, either prominent or tenuous, without preference for a certain size or shape. The resulting filamentary and wall networks can easily be characterized by their direction, thickness, mass density and density profile. These additional environmental properties allows to us to investigate not only the effect...

  13. Analyzing Web Service Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cambronero, M.-Emilia; Okika, Joseph C.; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2007-01-01

    Web services should be dependable, because businesses rely on them. For that purpose the Service Oriented Architecture has standardized specifications at a syntactical level. In this paper, we demonstrate how such specifications are used to derive semantic models in the form of (timed) automata...

  14. Multiscale Phenomenology of the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Jones, Bernard J T

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the structure and connectivity of the distinct morphologies that define the Cosmic Web. With the help of our Multiscale Morphology Filter (MMF), we dissect the matter distribution of a cosmological $\\Lambda$CDM N-body computer simulation into cluster, filaments and walls. The MMF is ideally suited to adress both the anisotropic morphological character of filaments and sheets, as well as the multiscale nature of the hierarchically evolved cosmic matter distribution. The results of our study may be summarized as follows: i).- While all morphologies occupy a roughly well defined range in density, this alone is not sufficient to differentiate between them given their overlap. Environment defined only in terms of density fails to incorporate the intrinsic dynamics of each morphology. This plays an important role in both linear and non linear interactions between haloes. ii).- Most of the mass in the Universe is concentrated in filaments, narrowly followed by clusters. In terms of volume, clusters only r...

  15. Smooth halos in the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Gaite, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Dark matter halos can be defined as smooth distributions of dark matter placed in a non-smooth cosmic web structure. This definition of halos demands a precise definition of smoothness and a characterization of the manner in which the transition from smooth halos to the cosmic web takes place. We introduce entropic measures of smoothness, related to measures of equality previously used in economy and with the advantage of being connected with standard methods of multifractal analysis already used for characterizing the cosmic web structure in $N$-body simulations. These entropic measures provide us with a quantitative description of the transition from the small scales portrayed as a distribution of halos to the larger scales portrayed as a cosmic web and, therefore, allow us to assign definite sizes to halos. However, these "smoothness sizes" have no direct relation to the virial radii.

  16. Yakov Zeldovich and the Cosmic Web Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Einasto, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    I discuss the formation of the modern cosmological paradigm. In more detail I describe the early study of dark matter and cosmic web and the role of Yakov Zeldovich in the formation of the present concepts on these subjects.

  17. Yakov Zeldovich and the Cosmic Web Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einasto, Jaan

    2016-10-01

    I discuss the formation of the modern cosmological paradigm. In more detail I describe the early study of dark matter and cosmic web and the role of Yakov Zeldovich in the formation of the present concepts on these subjects.

  18. NEXUS: tracing the cosmic web connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cautun, Marius; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the NEXUS algorithm for the identification of cosmic web environments: clusters, filaments, walls and voids. This is a multiscale and automatic morphological analysis tool that identifies all the cosmic structures in a scale free way, without preference for a certain size or shape. We d

  19. Bayesian Cosmic Web Reconstruction: BARCODE for Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, E G Patrick; Kitaura, Francisco; Cautun, Marius

    2016-01-01

    We describe the Bayesian BARCODE formalism that has been designed towards the reconstruction of the Cosmic Web in a given volume on the basis of the sampled galaxy cluster distribution. Based on the realization that the massive compact clusters are responsible for the major share of the large scale tidal force field shaping the anisotropic and in particular filamentary features in the Cosmic Web. Given the nonlinearity of the constraints imposed by the cluster configurations, we resort to a state-of-the-art constrained reconstruction technique to find a proper statistically sampled realization of the original initial density and velocity field in the same cosmic region. Ultimately, the subsequent gravitational evolution of these initial conditions towards the implied Cosmic Web configuration can be followed on the basis of a proper analytical model or an N-body computer simulation. The BARCODE formalism includes an implicit treatment for redshift space distortions. This enables a direct reconstruction on the ...

  20. How Cosmic Web Detachment Drives Galaxy Quenching

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We present the Cosmic Web Detachment (CWD) model, a conceptual framework to interpret galaxy evolution in a cosmological context, providing a direct link between the star formation history of galaxies and the cosmic web. The CWD model unifies several mechanism known to disrupt or stop star formation into one single physical process and provides a natural explanation for a wide range of galaxy properties. Galaxies begin accreting star-forming gas at early times via a network of primordial highly coherent filaments. The efficient star formation phase ends when non-linear interactions with other galaxies or elements of the cosmic web detach the galaxy from its network of primordial filaments, thus ending the efficient accretion of cold gas. The stripping of the filamentary web around galaxies is the physical process responsible of star formation quenching in gas stripping, harassment, strangulation and starvation. Being a purely gravitational/mechanical process CWD acts at a more fundamental level than internal ...

  1. Lagrangian Methods Of Cosmic Web Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, J D; Johnson, M S T

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic web defines the large scale distribution of matter we see in the Universe today. Classifying the cosmic web into voids, sheets, filaments and nodes allows one to explore structure formation and the role environmental factors have on halo and galaxy properties. While existing studies of cosmic web classification concentrate on grid based methods, this work explores a Lagrangian approach where the V-web algorithm proposed by Hoffman et al. (2012) is implemented with techniques borrowed from smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The Lagrangian approach allows one to classify individual objects (e.g. particles or halos) based on properties of their nearest neighbours in an adaptive manner. It can be applied directly to a halo sample which dramatically reduces computational cost and potentially allows an application of this classification scheme to observed galaxy samples. Finally, the Lagrangian nature admits a straight forward inclusion of the Hubble flow negating the necessity of a visually defined thresh...

  2. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depression & spatial complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weygaert, Rien; Shandarin, S.; Saar, E.; Einasto, J.

    2016-01-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do theyrepresent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probesand measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive tothe natu

  3. Bayesian Cosmic Web Reconstruction: BARCODE for Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, E. G. Patrick; van de Weygaert, Rien; Kitaura, Francisco; Cautun, Marius

    2016-10-01

    We describe the Bayesian \\barcode\\ formalism that has been designed towards the reconstruction of the Cosmic Web in a given volume on the basis of the sampled galaxy cluster distribution. Based on the realization that the massive compact clusters are responsible for the major share of the large scale tidal force field shaping the anisotropic and in particular filamentary features in the Cosmic Web. Given the nonlinearity of the constraints imposed by the cluster configurations, we resort to a state-of-the-art constrained reconstruction technique to find a proper statistically sampled realization of the original initial density and velocity field in the same cosmic region. Ultimately, the subsequent gravitational evolution of these initial conditions towards the implied Cosmic Web configuration can be followed on the basis of a proper analytical model or an N-body computer simulation. The BARCODE formalism includes an implicit treatment for redshift space distortions. This enables a direct reconstruction on the basis of observational data, without the need for a correction of redshift space artifacts. In this contribution we provide a general overview of the the Cosmic Web connection with clusters and a description of the Bayesian BARCODE formalism. We conclude with a presentation of its successful workings with respect to test runs based on a simulated large scale matter distribution, in physical space as well as in redshift space.

  4. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depressions & spatial complexity

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-01-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do they represent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probes and measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive to the nature of dark energy, while their substructure and galaxy population provides a direct key to the nature of dark matter. Also, the pristine environment of void interiors is an important testing ground for our understanding of environmental influences on galaxy formation and evolution. In this paper, we review the key aspects of the structure and dynamics of voids, with a particular focus on the hierarchical evolution of the void population. We demonstrate how the rich structural pattern of the Cosmic Web is related to the complex evolution and buildup of voids.

  5. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depression & spatial complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do theyrepresent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probesand measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive tothe nature of dark energy, while their substructure and galaxy population provides a direct key to thenature of dark matter. Also, the pristine environment of void interiors is an important testing groundfor our understanding of environmental influences on galaxy formation and evolution. In this paper, we reviewthe key aspects of the structure and dynamics ofvoids, with a particular focus on the hierarchical evolution of the void population. We demonstratehow the rich structural pattern of the Cosmic Web is related to the complex evolution and buildupof voids.

  6. Detecting the cosmic web with radio surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Vazza, F; Gheller, C; Ferrari, C; Bonafede, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the challenges to detect the cosmic web at radio wavelengths with state-of-the-art cosmological simulations of extragalactic magnetic fields. The incoming generation of radio surveys operating at low frequency, like LOFAR, SKA-LOW and MWA will have the best chance to detect the large-scale, low surface brightness emission from the shocked cosmic web. The detected radio emission will enable to constrain the average magnetisation level of the gas in filaments and the acceleration efficiency of electrons by strong shocks. In case of detections, through statistical modelling (e.g. correlation functions) it will be possible to discriminate among competing scenarios for the magnetisation of large-scale structures (i.e. astrophysical versus primordial scenarios), making radio surveys an important probe of cosmic magnetogenesis.

  7. Alpha Shape Topology of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weygaert, Rien van de; Platen, Erwin; Vegter, Gert; Eldering, Bob; Kruithof, Nico

    2010-01-01

    We study the topology of the Megaparsec Cosmic Web on the basis of the Alpha Shapes of the galaxy distribution. The simplicial complexes of the alpha shapes are used to determine the set of Betti numbers (βk, k = 1, . . . , D), which represent a complete characterization of the topology of a manifol

  8. The Sticky Geometry of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, Johan; Weygaert, Rien van de; Vegter, Gert; Jones, Bernard J.T.; Teillaud, Monique

    2012-01-01

    In this video we highlight the application of Computational Geometry to our understanding of the formation and dynamics of the Cosmic Web. The emergence of this intricate and pervasive weblike structure of the Universe on Megaparsec scales can be approximated by a well-known equation from fluid mech

  9. Multiscale phenomenology of the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the structure and connectivity of the distinct morphologies that define the cosmic web. With the help of our multiscale morphology filter (MMF), we dissect the matter distribution of a cosmological Lambda cold dark matter N-body computer simulation into cluster, filaments and walls. The M

  10. Multiscale phenomenology of the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the structure and connectivity of the distinct morphologies that define the cosmic web. With the help of our multiscale morphology filter (MMF), we dissect the matter distribution of a cosmological Lambda cold dark matter N-body computer simulation into cluster, filaments and walls. The

  11. Lagrangian methods of cosmic web classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J. D.; Faltenbacher, A.; Johnson, M. S. T.

    2016-05-01

    The cosmic web defines the large-scale distribution of matter we see in the Universe today. Classifying the cosmic web into voids, sheets, filaments and nodes allows one to explore structure formation and the role environmental factors have on halo and galaxy properties. While existing studies of cosmic web classification concentrate on grid-based methods, this work explores a Lagrangian approach where the V-web algorithm proposed by Hoffman et al. is implemented with techniques borrowed from smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The Lagrangian approach allows one to classify individual objects (e.g. particles or haloes) based on properties of their nearest neighbours in an adaptive manner. It can be applied directly to a halo sample which dramatically reduces computational cost and potentially allows an application of this classification scheme to observed galaxy samples. Finally, the Lagrangian nature admits a straightforward inclusion of the Hubble flow negating the necessity of a visually defined threshold value which is commonly employed by grid-based classification methods.

  12. THE LOCAL GROUP IN THE COSMIC WEB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forero-Romero, J. E. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, Cra. 1 No. 18A-10, Edificio Ip, Bogotá (Colombia); González, R., E-mail: je.forero@uniandes.edu.co, E-mail: regonzar@astro.puc.cl [Instituto de Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-01-20

    We explore the characteristics of the cosmic web around Local-Group (LG)-like pairs using a cosmological simulation in the ΛCDM cosmology. We use the Hessian of the gravitational potential to classify regions on scales of ∼2 Mpc as a peak, sheet, filament, or void. The sample of LG counterparts is represented by two samples of halo pairs. The first is a general sample composed of pairs with similar masses and isolation criteria as observed for the LG. The second is a subset with additional observed kinematic constraints such as relative pair velocity and separation. We find that the pairs in the LG sample with all constraints are: (1) preferentially located in filaments and sheets, (2) located in a narrow range of local overdensity 0 < δ < 2, web ellipticity 0.1 < e < 1.0, and prolateness –0.4 < p < 0.4, (3) strongly aligned with the cosmic web. The alignments are such that the pair orbital angular momentum tends to be perpendicular to the smallest tidal eigenvector, e-hat {sub 3}, which lies along the filament direction or the sheet plane. A stronger alignment is present for the vector linking the two halos with the vector e-hat {sub 3}. Additionally, we fail to find a strong correlation between the spin of each halo in the pair with the cosmic web. All of these trends are expected to a great extent from the selection of LG total mass in the general sample. Applied to the observed LG, there is a potential conflict between the alignments of the different satellite planes and the numerical evidence for satellite accretion along filaments; the direction defined by e-hat {sub 3}. This highlights the relevance of achieving a precise characterization for the location of the LG in the cosmic web in the cosmological context provided by ΛCDM.

  13. The Sticky Geometry of the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Hidding, Johan; Vegter, Gert; Jones, Bernard J T; Teillaud, Monique

    2012-01-01

    In this video we highlight the application of Computational Geometry to our understanding of the formation and dynamics of the Cosmic Web. The emergence of this intricate and pervasive weblike structure of the Universe on Megaparsec scales can be approximated by a well-known equation from fluid mechanics, the Burgers' equation. The solution to this equation can be obtained from a geometrical formalism. We have extended and improved this method by invoking weighted Delaunay and Voronoi tessellations. The duality between these tessellations finds a remarkable and profound reflection in the description of physical systems in Eulerian and Lagrangian terms. The resulting Adhesion formalism provides deep insight into the dynamics and topology of the Cosmic Web. It uncovers a direct connection between the conditions in the very early Universe and the complex spatial patterns that emerged out of these under the influence of gravity.

  14. The Network Behind the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Coutinho, B C; Albrecht, Kim; Dey, Arjun; Barabási, Albert-László; Torrey, Paul; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hernquist, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the cosmic web, viewing the Universe as a set of discrete galaxies held together by gravity, is deeply engrained in cosmology. Yet, little is known about the most effective construction and the characteristics of the underlying network. Here we explore seven network construction algorithms that use various galaxy properties, from their location, to their size and relative velocity, to assign a network to galaxy distributions provided by both simulations and observations. We find that a model relying only on spatial proximity offers the best correlations between the physical characteristics of the connected galaxies. We show that the properties of the networks generated from simulations and observations are identical, unveiling a deep universality of the cosmic web.

  15. An Origami Approximation to the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Neyrinck, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    The powerful Lagrangian view of structure formation was essentially introduced to cosmology by Zel'dovich. In the current cosmological paradigm, a dark-matter-sheet 3D manifold, inhabiting 6D position-velocity phase space, was flat (with vanishing velocity) at the big bang. Afterward, gravity stretched and bunched the sheet together in different places, forming a cosmic web when projected to the position coordinates. Here, I explain some properties of an origami approximation, in which the sheet does not stretch or contract (an assumption that is false in general), but is allowed to fold. Even without stretching, the sheet can form an idealized cosmic web, with convex polyhedral voids separated by straight walls and filaments, joined by convex polyhedral nodes. The nodes form in 'polygonal' or 'polyhedral' collapse, somewhat like spherical/ellipsoidal collapse, except incorporating simultaneous filament and wall formation. The origami approximation allows phase-space geometries of nodes, filaments, and walls ...

  16. A kinematic classification of the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, Yehuda; Yepes, Gustavo; Gottlöber, Stefan; Forero-Romero, Jaime E; Libeskind, Noam I; Knebe, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A new approach for the classification of the cosmic web is presented. In extension of the previous work of Hahn et al. (2007) and Forero-Romero et al. (2009) the new algorithm is based on the analysis of the velocity shear tensor rather than the gravitational tidal tensor. The procedure consists of the construction of the the shear tensor at each (grid) point in space and the evaluation of its three eigenvectors. A given point is classified to be either a void, sheet, filament or a knot according to the number of eigenvalues above a certain threshold, 0, 1, 2, or 3 respectively. The threshold is treated as a free parameter that defines the web. The algorithm has been applied to a dark matter only, high resolution simulation of a box of side-length 64$h^{-1}$Mpc and N = $1024^3$ particles with the framework of the WMAP5/LCDM model. The resulting velocity based cosmic web resolves structures down to <0.1$h^{-1}$Mpc scales, as opposed to the ~1$h^{-1}$Mpc scale of the tidal based web. The under-dense regions ...

  17. Turning Around along the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghun; Yepes, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    A bound violation designates a case in which the turnaround radius of a bound object exceeds the upper limit imposed by the spherical collapse model based on the standard ΛCDM paradigm. Given that the turnaround radius of a bound object is a stochastic quantity and that the spherical model overly simplifies the true gravitational collapse, which actually proceeds anisotropically along the cosmic web, the rarity of the occurrence of a bound violation may depend on the web environment. Assuming a Planck cosmology, we numerically construct the bound-zone peculiar velocity profiles along the cosmic web (filaments and sheets) around the isolated groups with virial mass {M}{{v}}≥slant 3× {10}13 {h}-1 {M}⊙ identified in the Small MultiDark Planck simulations and determine the radial distances at which their peculiar velocities equal the Hubble expansion speed as the turnaround radii of the groups. It is found that although the average turnaround radii of the isolated groups are well below the spherical bound limit on all mass scales, the bound violations are not forbidden for individual groups, and the cosmic web has an effect of reducing the rarity of the occurrence of a bound violation. Explaining that the spherical bound limit on the turnaround radius in fact represents the threshold distance up to which the intervention of the external gravitational field in the bound-zone peculiar velocity profiles around the nonisolated groups stays negligible, we discuss the possibility of using the threshold distance scale to constrain locally the equation of state of dark energy.

  18. Turning Around along the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jounghun

    2016-01-01

    A bound-violation designates a case that the turn-around radius of a bound object exceeds the upper limit put by the spherical collapse model based on the standard $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm. Given that the turn-around radius of a bound object is a stochastic quantity and that the spherical model overly simplifies the true gravitational collapse which actually proceeds anisotropically along the cosmic web, the rarity of the occurrence of a bound violation may depend on the web environment. Assuming a Planck cosmology, we numerically construct the bound-zone peculiar velocity profiles along the cosmic web (filaments and sheets) around the isolated groups with virial mass $M_{\\rm v}\\ge 3\\times 10^{13}\\,h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$ identified in the Small MultiDark Planck simulations and determine the radial distances at which their peculiar velocities equal the Hubble expansion speed as the turn-around radii of the groups. We find that although the average turn-around radii of the isolated groups are well below the spherical bo...

  19. The Local Group in the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Forero-Romero, Jaime E

    2014-01-01

    We explore the characteristics of the cosmic web around Local Group (LG) like pairs using a cosmological simulation in the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology. We use the Hessian of the gravitational potential to classify regions on scales of $\\sim 2$ Mpc as a peak, sheet, filament or void. The sample of LG counterparts is represented by two samples of halo pairs. The first is a general sample composed by pairs with similar masses and isolation criteria as observed for the LG. The second is a subset with additional observed kinematic constraints such as relative pair velocity and separation. We find that the pairs in the LG sample with all constraints are: (i) Preferentially located in filaments and sheets, (ii) Located in in a narrow range of local overdensity $0<\\delta<2$, web ellipticity $0.1cosmic web, in particular for pairs in filaments/sheets the pair orbital angular momentum tends to be perpendicular to the filament direction o...

  20. Disentangling the Cosmic Web with Lagrangian Submanifold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandarin, Sergei F.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2016-10-01

    The Cosmic Web is a complicated highly-entangled geometrical object. Remarkably it has formed from practically Gaussian initial conditions, which may be regarded as the simplest departure from exactly uniform universe in purely deterministic mapping. The full complexity of the web is revealed neither in configuration no velocity spaces considered separately. It can be fully appreciated only in six-dimensional (6D) phase space. However, studies of the phase space is complicated by the fact that every projection of it on a three-dimensional (3D) space is multivalued and contained caustics. In addition phase space is not a metric space that complicates studies of geometry. We suggest to use Lagrangian submanifold i.e., x = x(q), where both x and q are 3D vectors instead of the phase space for studies the complexity of cosmic web in cosmological N-body dark matter simulations. Being fully equivalent in dynamical sense to the phase space it has an advantage of being a single valued and also metric space.

  1. Big Data of the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu

    2016-10-01

    One of the main goals in cosmology is to understand how the Universe evolves, how it forms structures, why it expands, and what is the nature of dark matter and dark energy. Next decade large and expensive observational projects will bring information on the structure and the distribution of many millions of galaxies at different redshifts enabling us to make great progress in answering these questions. However, these data require a very special and complex set of analysis tools to extract the maximum valuable information. Statistical inference techniques are being developed, bridging the gaps between theory, simulations, and observations. In particular, we discuss the efforts to address the question: What is the underlying nonlinear matter distribution and dynamics at any cosmic time corresponding to a set of observed galaxies in redshift space? An accurate reconstruction of the initial conditions encodes the full phase-space information at any later cosmic time (given a particular structure formation model and a set of cosmological parameters). We present advances to solve this problem in a self-consistent way with Big Data techniques of the Cosmic Web.

  2. The Vainshtein mechanism in the cosmic web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falck, Bridget; Koyama, Kazuya [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Zhao, Gong-bo [National Astronomy Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, 100012 (China); Li, Baojiu, E-mail: bridget.falck@port.ac.uk, E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk, E-mail: gong-bo.zhao@port.ac.uk, E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Physics Department, University of Durham, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dependence of the Vainshtein screening mechanism on the cosmic web morphology of both dark matter particles and halos as determined by ORIGAMI. Unlike chameleon and symmetron screening, which come into effect in regions of high density, Vainshtein screening instead depends on the dimensionality of the system, and screened bodies can still feel external fields. ORIGAMI is well-suited to this problem because it defines morphologies according to the dimensionality of the collapsing structure and does not depend on a smoothing scale or density threshold parameter. We find that halo particles are screened while filament, wall, and void particles are unscreened, and this is independent of the particle density. However, after separating halos according to their large scale cosmic web environment, we find no difference in the screening properties of halos in filaments versus halos in clusters. We find that the fifth force enhancement of dark matter particles in halos is greatest well outside the virial radius. We confirm the theoretical expectation that even if the internal field is suppressed by the Vainshtein mechanism, the object still feels the fifth force generated by the external fields, by measuring peculiar velocities and velocity dispersions of halos. Finally, we investigate the morphology and gravity model dependence of halo spins, concentrations, and shapes.

  3. Dark matter and cosmic web story

    CERN Document Server

    Einasto, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    The concepts of dark matter and the cosmic web are some of the most significant developments in cosmology in the past century. They have decisively changed the classical cosmological paradigm, which was first elaborated upon during the first half of the 20th century but ran into serious problems in the second half. Today, they are integral parts of modern cosmology, which explains everything from the Big Bang to inflation to the large scale structure of the Universe. Dark Matter and Cosmic Web Story describes the contributions that led to a paradigm shift from the Eastern point of view. It describes the problems with the classical view, the attempts to solve them, the difficulties encountered by those solutions, and the conferences where the merits of the new concepts were debated. Amidst the science, the story of scientific work in a small country occupied by the Soviet Union and the tumultuous events that led to its breakup are detailed as well. This book is accompanied by a website which contains addit...

  4. The intergalactic medium in the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) accounts for >~ 90% of baryons at all epochs and yet its three dimensional distribution in the cosmic web remains mostly unknown. This is so because the only feasible way to observe the bulk of the IGM is through intervening absorption line systems in the spectra of bright background sources, which limits its characterization to being one-dimensional. Still, an averaged three dimensional picture can be obtained by combining and cross-matching multiple one-dimensional IGM information with three-dimensional galaxy surveys. Here, we present our recent and current efforts to map and characterize the IGM in the cosmic web using galaxies as tracers of the underlying mass distribution. In particular, we summarize our results on: (i) IGM around star-forming and non-star-forming galaxies; (ii) IGM within and around galaxy voids; and (iii) IGM in intercluster filaments. With these datasets, we can directly test the modern paradigm of structure formation and evolution of baryonic matter in the Universe.

  5. Featured Image: The Cosmic Velocity Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    You may have heard of the cosmic web, a network of filaments, clusters and voids that describes the three-dimensional distribution of matter in our universe. But have you ever considered the idea of a cosmic velocity web? In a new study led by Daniel Pomarde (IRFU CEA-Saclay, France), a team of scientists has built a detailed 3D view of the flows in our universe, showing in particular motions along filaments and in collapsing knots. In the image above (click for the full view), surfaces of knots (red) are embedded within surfaces of filaments (grey). The rainbow lines show the flow motion, revealing acceleration (redder tones) toward knots and retardation (bluer tones) beyond them. You can learn more about Pomarde and collaborators work and see their unusual and intriguing visualizationsin the video they produced, below. Check out the original paper for more information.CitationDaniel Pomarde et al 2017 ApJ 845 55. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa7f78

  6. An Origami Approximation to the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyrinck, Mark C.

    2016-10-01

    The powerful Lagrangian view of structure formation was essentially introduced to cosmology by Zel'dovich. In the current cosmological paradigm, a dark-matter-sheet 3D manifold, inhabiting 6D position-velocity phase space, was flat (with vanishing velocity) at the big bang. Afterward, gravity stretched and bunched the sheet together in different places, forming a cosmic web when projected to the position coordinates. Here, I explain some properties of an origami approximation, in which the sheet does not stretch or contract (an assumption that is false in general), but is allowed to fold. Even without stretching, the sheet can form an idealized cosmic web, with convex polyhedral voids separated by straight walls and filaments, joined by convex polyhedral nodes. The nodes form in `polygonal' or `polyhedral' collapse, somewhat like spherical/ellipsoidal collapse, except incorporating simultaneous filament and wall formation. The origami approximation allows phase-space geometries of nodes, filaments, and walls to be more easily understood, and may aid in understanding spin correlations between nearby galaxies. This contribution explores kinematic origami-approximation models giving velocity fields for the first time.

  7. A Dynamical Classification of the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Forero-Romero, J E; Gottlöber, S; Klypin, A; Yepes, G

    2008-01-01

    A dynamical classification of the cosmic web is proposed. The large scale environment is classified into four web types: voids, sheets, filaments and knots. The classification is based on the evaluation of the deformation tensor, i.e. the Hessian of the gravitational potential, on a grid. The classification is based on counting the number of eigenvalues above a certain threshold, lambda_th at each grid point, where the case of zero, one, two or three such eigenvalues corresponds to void, sheet, filament or a knot grid point. The collection of neighboring grid points, friends-of-friends, of the same web attribute constitutes voids, sheets, filaments and knots as web objects. A simple dynamical consideration suggests that lambda_th should be approximately unity, upon an appropriate scaling of the deformation tensor. The algorithm has been applied and tested against a suite of (dark matter only) cosmological N-body simulations. In particular, the dependence of the volume and mass filling fractions on lambda_th a...

  8. Adhesion and the Geometry of the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Hidding, Johan; Vegter, Gert; Jones, Bernard J T

    2012-01-01

    We present a new way to formulate the geometry of the Cosmic Web in terms of Lagrangian space. The Adhesion model has an ingenious geometric interpretation out of which the spine of the Cosmic Web emerges naturally. Within this context we demonstrate a deep connection of the relation between Eulerian and Lagrangian space with that between Voronoi and Delaunay tessellations.

  9. Cosmic Web Type Dependence of Halo Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, J D

    2016-01-01

    We use the Millennium simulation to show that halo clustering varies significantly with cosmic web type. Halos are classified as node, filament, sheet and void halos based on the eigenvalue decomposition of the velocity shear tensor. This classification allows us to examine the clustering of halos as a function of web type in different mass ranges. We find that node halos show positive bias for all mass ranges probed, even for 10^11 and 10^12 Msun/h mass bins where the clustering of the entire halo sample is anti-biased. In all mass bins filament halos show negligible bias, whereas void and sheet halos are anti-biased. The zero-crossing of the void and sheet correlation functions occur at much smaller scales Mpc/h when compared to 5the same correlation functions for the entire halo sample. Our results suggest that the mass dependence of halo clustering is rooted in the composition of web types in the mass bin. The substantial fraction of node type halos for halo masses 2 x 10^13 Msun/h leads to positive bias....

  10. The Vainshtein Mechanism in the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Falck, Bridget; Zhao, Gong-bo; Li, Baojiu

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the Vainshtein screening mechanism on the cosmic web morphology of both dark matter particles and halos as determined by ORIGAMI. Unlike chameleon and symmetron screening, which come into effect in regions of high density, Vainshtein screening instead depends on the dimensionality of the system, and screened bodies can still feel external fields. ORIGAMI is well-suited to this problem because it defines morphologies according to the dimensionality of the collapsing structure and does not depend on a smoothing scale or density threshold parameter. We find that halo particles are screened while filament, wall, and void particles are unscreened, and this is independent of the particle density. However, after separating halos according to their large scale morphological environment, we find no difference in the screening properties of halos in filaments versus halos in clusters. We find that the fifth force enhancement of dark matter particles in halos is greatest well outside the...

  11. The place of the Local Group in the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Forero-Romero, Jaime E

    2014-01-01

    We use the Bolshoi Simulation to find the most probable location of the Local Group (LG) in the cosmic web. Our LG simulacra are pairs of halos with isolation and kinematic properties consistent with observations. The cosmic web is defined using a tidal tensor approach. We find that the LG's preferred location is regions with a dark matter overdensity close to the cosmic average. This makes filaments and sheets the preferred environment. We also find a strong alignment between the LG and the cosmic web. The orbital angular momentum is preferentially perpendicular to the smallest tidal eigenvector, while the vector connecting the two halos is strongly aligned along the smallest tidal eigenvector and perpendicular to the largest tidal eigenvector; the pair lies and moves along filaments and sheets. We do not find any evidence for an alignment between the spin of each halo in the pair and the cosmic web.

  12. The place of the Local Group in the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; González, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    We use the Bolshoi Simulation to find the most probable location of the Local Group (LG) in the cosmic web. Our LG simulacra are pairs of halos with isolation and kinematic properties consistent with observations. The cosmic web is defined using a tidal tensor approach. We find that the LG's preferred location is regions with a dark matter overdensity close to the cosmic average. This makes filaments and sheets the preferred environment. We also find a strong alignment between the LG and the cosmic web. The orbital angular momentum is preferentially perpendicular to the smallest tidal eigenvector, while the vector connecting the two halos is strongly aligned along the the smallest tidal eigenvector and perpendicular to the largest tidal eigenvector; the pair lies and moves along filaments and sheets. We do not find any evidence for an alignment between the spin of each halo in the pair and the cosmic web.

  13. Forming Stars From the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    Scientists have recently identified a connection between metal-poor regions in a set of dwarf galaxies and bursts of star-formation activity within them. These observations provide long-awaited evidence supporting predictions of how stars formed in the early universe and in dwarf galaxies today. Metal-Poor Clues: The primary driver of star formation over cosmic history is thought to be the accretion onto galaxies of cold gas streaming from the cosmic web. The best way to confirm this model would be to observe a cloud of cosmic gas flowing into an otherwise-quiescent galaxy and launching a wave of star formation. But because cold gas doesnt emit much radiation, its difficult to detect directly.Now, a team of scientists have found a clever way around this problem: they searched galaxies for a correlation between areas of active star formation and metal-poor regions. Why? Because metal-poor regions could be a smoking gun indicating a recently accreted cloud of cold gas from the cosmic web. Impacting Clouds: Distribution of metallicity along the major axis of one of the target galaxies. The red bar in the top image shows the position of the spectrograph slit along the galaxy, with the arrow showing the direction of growing distance in the plot below. The plot shows the metallicity variation (red symbols) and star-formation rate (blue line) along the galaxys major axis. The metallicity drop coincides with the brightest knot of the galaxy. [Snchez Almeida et al. 2015]The authors of this study, led by Jorge Snchez Almeida (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias and University of La Laguna, Spain), used the Great Canary Telescope to obtain high-quality spectra of ten dwarf galaxies with especially low average metallicities. They aligned the spectrograph slit along the major axes of the galaxies in order to measure abundances as a function of position within each galaxy.The team found that, in nine out of the ten cases, the galaxies displayed sharp drops (by factors of 310

  14. The cosmic web for density perturbations of various scales

    CERN Document Server

    Suhhonenko, I; Liivamägi, L J; Saar, E; Einasto, M; Hütsi, G; Müller, V; Starobinsky, A A; Tago, E; Tempel, E

    2011-01-01

    We follow the evolution of galaxy systems in numerical simulation. Our goal is to understand the role of density perturbations of various scales in the formation and evolution of the cosmic web. We perform numerical simulations with the full power spectrum of perturbations, and with spectrum cut at long wavelengths. Additionally, we have one model, where we cut the intermediate waves. We analyze the density field and study the void sizes and density field clusters in different models. Our analysis shows that the fine structure (groups and clusters of galaxies) is created by small-scale density perturbations of scale $\\leq 8$ \\Mpc. Filaments of galaxies and clusters are created by perturbations of intermediate scale from $\\sim 8$ to $\\sim 32$ \\Mpc, superclusters of galaxies by larger perturbations. We conclude that the scale of the pattern of the cosmic web is determined by density perturbations of scale up to $\\sim 100$ \\Mpc. Larger perturbations do not change the pattern of the web, but modulate the richness...

  15. Cosmic Web and Environmental Dependence of Screening: Vainshtein vs. Chameleon

    CERN Document Server

    Falck, Bridget; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2015-01-01

    Theories which modify general relativity to explain the accelerated expansion of the Universe often use screening mechanisms to satisfy constraints on Solar System scales. We investigate the effects of the cosmic web and the local environmental density of dark matter halos on the screening properties of the Vainshtein and chameleon screening mechanisms. We compare the cosmic web morphology of dark matter particles, mass functions of dark matter halos, mass and radial dependence of screening, velocity dispersions and peculiar velocities, and environmental dependence of screening mechanisms in $f(R)$ and nDGP models. Using the ORIGAMI cosmic web identification routine we find that the Vainshtein mechanism depends on the cosmic web morphology of dark matter particles, since these are defined according to the dimensionality of their collapse, while the chameleon mechanism shows no morphology dependence. The chameleon screening of halos and their velocity dispersions depend on halo mass, and small halos and subhal...

  16. The baryon content of the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Big-Bang nucleosynthesis indicates that baryons account for 5% of the Universe’s total energy content[1]. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two[2,3]. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not yet condensed into virialised halos, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web: a low-density plasma at temperature 105–107 K known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM)[3,4,5,6]. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars[7,8,9,10] and hot gas between interacting clusters[11,12,13,14]. These observations were however unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of ten-million-degree gas associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster[15] were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we reveal hot gas structures that are coherent over 8 Mpc scales. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10% of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. PMID:26632589

  17. Cosmic Web Reconstruction through Density Ridges: Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Brinkmann, Jon; Freeman, Peter E; Genovese, Christopher R; Schneider, Donald P; Wasserman, Larry

    2015-01-01

    We construct a catalogue for filaments using a novel approach called SCMS (subspace constrained mean shift; Ozertem & Erdogmus 2011; Chen et al. 2015). SCMS is a gradient-based method that detects filaments through density ridges (smooth curves tracing high-density regions). A great advantage of SCMS is its uncertainty measure, which allows an evaluation of the errors for the detected filaments. To detect filaments, we use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which consist of three galaxy samples: the NYU main galaxy sample (MGS), the LOWZ sample and the CMASS sample. Each of the three dataset covers different redshift regions so that the combined sample allows detection of filaments up to z = 0.7. Our filament catalogue consists of a sequence of two-dimensional filament maps at different redshifts that provide several useful statistics on the evolution cosmic web. To construct the maps, we select spectroscopically confirmed galaxies within 0.050 < z < 0.700 and partition them into 130 bins. For ...

  18. Cosmic web reconstruction through density ridges: catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ho, Shirley; Brinkmann, Jon; Freeman, Peter E.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wasserman, Larry

    2016-10-01

    We construct a catalogue for filaments using a novel approach called SCMS (subspace constrained mean shift). SCMS is a gradient-based method that detects filaments through density ridges (smooth curves tracing high-density regions). A great advantage of SCMS is its uncertainty measure, which allows an evaluation of the errors for the detected filaments. To detect filaments, we use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which consist of three galaxy samples: the NYU main galaxy sample (MGS), the LOWZ sample and the CMASS sample. Each of the three data set covers different redshift regions so that the combined sample allows detection of filaments up to z = 0.7. Our filament catalogue consists of a sequence of two-dimensional filament maps at different redshifts that provide several useful statistics on the evolution cosmic web. To construct the maps, we select spectroscopically confirmed galaxies within 0.050 < z < 0.700 and partition them into 130 bins. For each bin, we ignore the redshift, treating the galaxy observations as a 2-D data and detect filaments using SCMS. The filament catalogue consists of 130 individual 2-D filament maps, and each map comprises points on the detected filaments that describe the filamentary structures at a particular redshift. We also apply our filament catalogue to investigate galaxy luminosity and its relation with distance to filament. Using a volume-limited sample, we find strong evidence (6.1σ-12.3σ) that galaxies close to filaments are generally brighter than those at significant distance from filaments.

  19. Identifying and Analyzing Web Server Attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, Christian; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara E.; Frincke, Deborah A.; Komisarczuk, Peter; Muschevici, Radu; Welch, Ian D.

    2008-08-29

    Abstract: Client honeypots can be used to identify malicious web servers that attack web browsers and push malware to client machines. Merely recording network traffic is insufficient to perform comprehensive forensic analyses of such attacks. Custom tools are required to access and analyze network protocol data. Moreover, specialized methods are required to perform a behavioral analysis of an attack, which helps determine exactly what transpired on the attacked system. This paper proposes a record/replay mechanism that enables forensic investigators to extract application data from recorded network streams and allows applications to interact with this data in order to conduct behavioral analyses. Implementations for the HTTP and DNS protocols are presented and their utility in network forensic investigations is demonstrated.

  20. Dynamics of pairwise motions in the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Hellwing, Wojciech A

    2014-01-01

    We present results of analysis of the dark matter (DM) pairwise velocity statistics in different Cosmic Web environments. We use the DM velocity and density field from the Millennium 2 simulation together with the NEXUS+ algorithm to segment the simulation volume into voxels uniquely identifying one of the four possible environments: nodes, filaments, walls or cosmic voids. We show that the PDFs of the mean infall velocities $v_{12}$ as well as its spatial dependence together with the perpendicular and parallel velocity dispersions bear a significant signal of the large-scale structure environment in which DM particle pairs are embedded. The pairwise flows are notably colder and have smaller mean magnitude in wall and voids, when compared to much denser environments of filaments and nodes. We discuss on our results, indicating that they are consistent with a simple theoretical predictions for pairwise motions as induced by gravitational instability mechanism. Our results indicate that the Cosmic Web elements ...

  1. The cosmic web in CosmoGrid void regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieder, Steven; van de Weygaert, Rien; Cautun, Marius; Beygu, Burcu; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We study the formation and evolution of the cosmic web, using the high-resolution CosmoGrid ΛCDM simulation. In particular, we investigate the evolution of the large-scale structure around void halo groups, and compare this to observations of the VGS-31 galaxy group, which consists of three interact

  2. Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer Web Service System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Zhai, C.; Tang, B.; Jiang, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a cloud-enabled web-service system that empowers physics-based, multi-variable model performance evaluations and diagnoses through the comprehensive and synergistic use of multiple observational data, reanalysis data, and model outputs. We have developed a methodology to transform an existing science application code into a web service using a Python wrapper interface and Python web service frameworks. The web-service system, called Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA), currently supports (1) all the observational datasets from Obs4MIPs and a few ocean datasets from NOAA and Argo, which can serve as observation-based reference data for model evaluation, (2) many of CMIP5 model outputs covering a broad range of atmosphere, ocean, and land variables from the CMIP5 specific historical runs and AMIP runs, and (3) ECMWF reanalysis outputs for several environmental variables in order to supplement observational datasets. Analysis capabilities currently supported by CMDA are (1) the calculation of annual and seasonal means of physical variables, (2) the calculation of time evolution of the means in any specified geographical region, (3) the calculation of correlation between two variables, (4) the calculation of difference between two variables, and (5) the conditional sampling of one physical variable with respect to another variable. A web user interface is chosen for CMDA because it not only lowers the learning curve and removes the adoption barrier of the tool but also enables instantaneous use, avoiding the hassle of local software installation and environment incompatibility. CMDA will be used as an educational tool for the summer school organized by JPL's Center for Climate Science in 2014. In order to support 30+ simultaneous users during the school, we have deployed CMDA to the Amazon cloud environment. The cloud-enabled CMDA will provide each student with a virtual machine while the user interaction with the system will remain the same

  3. Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer Web Service System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Zhai, C.; Tang, B.; Jiang, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report stressed the need for the comprehensive and innovative evaluation of climate models with newly available global observations. The traditional approach to climate model evaluation, which compares a single parameter at a time, identifies symptomatic model biases and errors but fails to diagnose the model problems. The model diagnosis process requires physics-based multi-variable comparisons that typically involve large-volume and heterogeneous datasets, making them both computationally- and data-intensive. To address these challenges, we are developing a parallel, distributed web-service system that enables the physics-based multi-variable model performance evaluations and diagnoses through the comprehensive and synergistic use of multiple observational data, reanalysis data, and model outputs. We have developed a methodology to transform an existing science application code into a web service using a Python wrapper interface and Python web service frameworks (i.e., Flask, Gunicorn, and Tornado). The web-service system, called Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA), currently supports (1) all the datasets from Obs4MIPs and a few ocean datasets from NOAA and Argo, which can serve as observation-based reference data for model evaluation and (2) many of CMIP5 model outputs covering a broad range of atmosphere, ocean, and land variables from the CMIP5 specific historical runs and AMIP runs. Analysis capabilities currently supported by CMDA are (1) the calculation of annual and seasonal means of physical variables, (2) the calculation of time evolution of the means in any specified geographical region, (3) the calculation of correlation between two variables, and (4) the calculation of difference between two variables. A web user interface is chosen for CMDA because it not only lowers the learning curve and removes the adoption barrier of the tool but also enables instantaneous use

  4. Dynamics of pairwise motions in the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwing, Wojciech A.

    2016-10-01

    We present results of analysis of the dark matter (DM) pairwise velocity statistics in different Cosmic Web environments. We use the DM velocity and density field from the Millennium 2 simulation together with the NEXUS+ algorithm to segment the simulation volume into voxels uniquely identifying one of the four possible environments: nodes, filaments, walls or cosmic voids. We show that the PDFs of the mean infall velocities v 12 as well as its spatial dependence together with the perpendicular and parallel velocity dispersions bear a significant signal of the large-scale structure environment in which DM particle pairs are embedded. The pairwise flows are notably colder and have smaller mean magnitude in wall and voids, when compared to much denser environments of filaments and nodes. We discuss on our results, indicating that they are consistent with a simple theoretical predictions for pairwise motions as induced by gravitational instability mechanism. Our results indicate that the Cosmic Web elements are coherent dynamical entities rather than just temporal geometrical associations. In addition it should be possible to observationally test various Cosmic Web finding algorithms by segmenting available peculiar velocity data and studying resulting pairwise velocity statistics.

  5. Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer Web Service System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Pan, L.; Zhai, C.; Tang, B.; Kubar, T. L.; Li, J.; Zhang, J.; Wang, W.

    2015-12-01

    Both the National Research Council Decadal Survey and the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report stressed the need for the comprehensive and innovative evaluation of climate models with the synergistic use of global satellite observations in order to improve our weather and climate simulation and prediction capabilities. The abundance of satellite observations for fundamental climate parameters and the availability of coordinated model outputs from CMIP5 for the same parameters offer a great opportunity to understand and diagnose model biases in climate models. In addition, the Obs4MIPs efforts have created several key global observational datasets that are readily usable for model evaluations. However, a model diagnostic evaluation process requires physics-based multi-variable comparisons that typically involve large-volume and heterogeneous datasets, making them both computationally- and data-intensive. In response, we have developed a novel methodology to diagnose model biases in contemporary climate models and implementing the methodology as a web-service based, cloud-enabled, provenance-supported climate-model evaluation system. The evaluation system is named Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA), which is the product of the research and technology development investments of several current and past NASA ROSES programs. The current technologies and infrastructure of CMDA are designed and selected to address several technical challenges that the Earth science modeling and model analysis community faces in evaluating and diagnosing climate models. In particular, we have three key technology components: (1) diagnostic analysis methodology; (2) web-service based, cloud-enabled technology; (3) provenance-supported technology. The diagnostic analysis methodology includes random forest feature importance ranking, conditional probability distribution function, conditional sampling, and time-lagged correlation map. We have implemented the

  6. Cosmic Web of Galaxies in the COMOS Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, Behnam; Martin, Christopher D.; Mobasher, Bahram; Scoville, Nicholas; Sobral, David; COSMOS science Team

    2017-01-01

    We use a mass complete sample of galaxies with accurate photometric redshifts in the COSMOS field to estimate the density field and to extract the components of the cosmic web. The comic web extraction algorithm relies on the signs and the ratio of eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix and is enable to integrate the density field into clusters, filaments and the field. We show that at z 0.8, the trend flattens out. For star-forming galaxies only, the median star-formation rate declines by ~ 0.3-0.4 dex from the field to clusters for both satellites and centrals, only at z < 0.5. We argue that for satellite galaxies, the main role of the cosmic web environment is to control their star-forming/quiescent fraction, whereas for centrals, it is mainly to control their overall star-formation rate. Given these, we suggest that most satellite galaxies experience a rapid quenching mechanism as they fall from the field into clusters through the channel of filaments, whereas for central galaxies, it is mostly due to a slow quenching process. Our preliminary results highlight the importance of the large-scale cosmic web on the evolution of galaxies.

  7. Collisionless Dynamics and the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    I review the nature of three-dimensional collapse in the Zeldovich approximation, how it relates to the underlying nature of the three-dimensional Lagrangian manifold and naturally gives rise to a hierarchical structure formation scenario that progresses through collapse from voids to pancakes, filaments and then halos. I then discuss how variations of the Zeldovich approximation (based on the gravitational or the velocity potential) have been used to define classifications of the cosmic large-scale structure into dynamically distinct parts. Finally, I turn to recent efforts to devise new approaches relying on tessellations of the Lagrangian manifold to follow the fine-grained dynamics of the dark matter fluid into the highly non-linear regime and both extract the maximum amount of information from existing simulations as well as devise new simulation techniques for cold collisionless dynamics.

  8. Collisionless Dynamics and the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    I review the nature of three-dimensional collapse in the Zeldovich approximation, how it relates to the underlying nature of the three-dimensional Lagrangian manifold and naturally gives rise to a hierarchical structure formation scenario that progresses through collapse from voids to pancakes, filaments and then halos. I then discuss how variations of the Zeldovich approximation (based on the gravitational or the velocity potential) have been used to define classifications of the cosmic large-scale structure into dynamically distinct parts. Finally, I turn to recent efforts to devise new approaches relying on tessellations of the Lagrangian manifold to follow the fine-grained dynamics of the dark matter fluid into the highly non-linear regime and both extract the maximum amount of information from existing simulations as well as devise new simulation techniques for cold collisionless dynamics.

  9. On the Nonlinear Evolution of Cosmic Web: Lagrangian Dynamics Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the nonlinear evolution of cosmic morphologies of the large-scale structure by examining the Lagrangian dynamics of various tensors of a cosmic fluid element, including the velocity gradient tensor, the Hessian matrix of the gravitational potential as well as the deformation tensor. Instead of the eigenvalue representation, the first two tensors, which associate with the "kinematic" and "dynamical" cosmic web classification algorithm respectively, are studied in a more convenient parameter space. These parameters are defined as the rotational invariant coefficients of the characteristic equation of the tensor. In the nonlinear local model (NLM) where the magnetic part of Weyl tensor vanishes, these invariants are fully capable of characterizing the dynamics. Unlike the Zeldovich approximation (ZA), where various morphologies do not change before approaching a one-dimensional singularity, the sheets in NLM are unstable for both overdense and underdense perturbations. While it has long been known...

  10. The Zel'dovich approximation: key to understanding cosmic web complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, Johan; Shandarin, Sergei F.; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2013-01-01

    We describe how the dynamics of cosmic structure formation defines the intricate geometric structure of the spine of the cosmic web. The Zel'dovich approximation is used to model the backbone of the cosmic web in terms of its singularity structure. The description by Arnold et al. in terms of catast

  11. The Zel'dovich approximation: key to understanding cosmic web complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidding, Johan; Shandarin, Sergei F.; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2014-01-01

    We describe how the dynamics of cosmic structure formation defines the intricate geometric structure of the spine of the cosmic web. The Zel'dovich approximation is used to model the backbone of the cosmic web in terms of its singularity structure. The description by Arnold et al. in terms of catast

  12. Submegaparsec individual photometric redshift estimation from cosmic web constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; Weygaert, Rien van de; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Mobasher, Bahram

    2015-11-01

    We present a method, PhotoWeb, for estimating photometric redshifts of individual galaxies, and their equivalent distance, with megaparsec and even submegaparsec accuracy using the cosmic web as a constraint over photo-z estimates. PhotoWeb redshift errors of individual galaxies are of the order of Δz ≃ 0.0007, compared to errors of Δz ≃ 0.02 for current photo-z techniques. The mean redshift error is of the order of Δz ≃ 5 × 10-5-5 × 10-4 compared to mean errors in the range Δz ≃ 0.001-0.01 for the best available photo-z estimates in the literature. Current photo-z techniques produce redshift estimates with large errors due to the poor constraining power the galaxy's spectral energy distribution and projected clustering can provide. The cosmic web, on the other hand, provides the strongest constraints on the position of galaxies. The network of walls, filaments and voids occupy ˜ 10 per centof the volume of the Universe, yet they contain ˜ 95 per centof galaxies. The cosmic web, being a cellular system with well-defined boundaries, defines a restricted set of intermittent positions a galaxy can occupy along a given line of sight. Using the information in the density field computed from spectroscopic redshifts, we can narrow the possible locations of a given galaxy along the line of sight from a single broad probability distribution (from photo-z) to one or a few narrow peaks. Our first results improve previous photo-z errors by more than one order of magnitude allowing submegaparsec errors in some cases. Such accurate estimates for tens of millions of galaxies will allow unprecedented galaxy-Large Scale Structure (LSS) studies. In this work, we apply our technique to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photo-z galaxy sample and discuss its performance and future improvements.

  13. Bayesian large-scale structure inference and cosmic web analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Leclercq, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Surveys of the cosmic large-scale structure carry opportunities for building and testing cosmological theories about the origin and evolution of the Universe. This endeavor requires appropriate data assimilation tools, for establishing the contact between survey catalogs and models of structure formation. In this thesis, we present an innovative statistical approach for the ab initio simultaneous analysis of the formation history and morphology of the cosmic web: the BORG algorithm infers the primordial density fluctuations and produces physical reconstructions of the dark matter distribution that underlies observed galaxies, by assimilating the survey data into a cosmological structure formation model. The method, based on Bayesian probability theory, provides accurate means of uncertainty quantification. We demonstrate the application of BORG to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data and describe the primordial and late-time large-scale structure in the observed volume. We show how the approach has led to the fi...

  14. The Grand Cosmic Web of the First Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Visbal, Eli; Fialkov, Anastasia; Tseliakhovich, Dmitriy; Hirata, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the formation and evolution of the very first stars and galaxies represents one of the most exciting and challenging questions facing the scientific community today. Since the universe was filled with neutral hydrogen at early times, the most promising method for observing the epoch of the first stars is using the prominent 21-cm spectral line of the hydrogen atom (Hogan & Rees 1979, Madau et al. 1997). Current observational efforts (Furlanetto et al. 2006) are focused on the reionization era (cosmic age around 500 million years), with earlier times considered much more challenging. Here we discuss the formation of the first stars in light of a recently noticed effect of relative velocity between the dark matter and gas (Tseliakhovich & Hirata 2010). We produce simulated maps of the first stars and show that the relative velocity effect significantly enhances large-scale clustering and produces a prominent cosmic web on 100 comoving Mpc scales in the 21-cm intensity distribution. This st...

  15. The Lyα forest and the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiksin, Avery

    2016-10-01

    The accurate description of the properties of the Lyman-α forest is a spectacular success of the Cold Dark Matter theory of cosmological structure formation. After a brief review of early models, it is shown how numerical simulations have demonstrated the Lyman-α forest emerges from the cosmic web in the quasi-linear regime of overdensity. The quasi-linear nature of the structures allows accurate modeling, providing constraints on cosmological models over a unique range of scales and enabling the Lyman-α forest to serve as a bridge to the more complex problem of galaxy formation.

  16. Analyzing the Change-Proneness of APIs and web APIs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, D.

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing the Change-Proneness of APIs and web APIs APIs and web APIs are used to expose existing business logic and, hence, to ease the reuse of functionalities across multiple software systems. Software systems can use the business logic of legacy systems by binding their APIs and web APIs. With t

  17. Gas accretion from the cosmic web in the local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Elmegreen, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    Numerical simulations predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web drives star formation in disks galaxies. The process is important in low mass haloes (One of the most compelling cases for gas accretion at work in the local universe comes from the extremely metal poor (XMP) galaxies. They show metallicity inhomogeneities associated with star-forming regions, so that large starbursts have lower metallicity than the underlying galaxy. Here we put forward the case for gas accretion from the web posed by XMP galaxies. Two other observational results are discussed too, namely, the fact that the gas consumption time-scale is shorter than most stellar ages, and the systematic morphological distortions of the HI around galaxies.

  18. Cosmic web-type classification using decision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Leclercq, Florent; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a decision criterion for segmenting the cosmic web into different structure types (voids, sheets, filaments and clusters) on the basis of their respective probabilities and the strength of data constraints. Our approach is inspired by an analysis of games of chance where the gambler only plays if a positive expected net gain can be achieved based on some degree of privileged information. The result is a general solution for classification problems in the face of uncertainty, including the option of not committing to a class for a candidate object. As an illustration, we produce high-resolution maps of web-type constituents in the nearby Universe as probed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey main galaxy sample. Other possible applications include the selection and labeling of objects in catalogs derived from astronomical survey data.

  19. The Local Dimension: a method to quantify the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Prakash

    2008-01-01

    It is now well accepted that the galaxies are distributed in filaments, sheets and clusters all of which form an interconnected network known as the Cosmic Web. It is a big challenge to quantify the shapes of the interconnected structural elements that form this network. Tools like the Minkowski functionals which use global properties, though well suited for an isolated object like a single sheet or filament, are not suited for an interconnected network of such objects. We consider the Local Dimension $D$, defined through $N(R)=A R^D$, where $N(R)$ is the galaxy number count within a sphere of comoving radius $R$ centered on a particular galaxy, as a tool to locally quantify the shape in the neigbourhood of different galaxies along the Cosmic Web. We expect $D \\sim 1,2$ and 3 for a galaxy located in a filament, sheet and cluster respectively. Using LCDM N-body simulations we find that it is possible to determine $D$ through a power law fit to $N(R)$ across the length-scales 2 to $10 {\\rm Mpc}$ for $\\sim 33 %$...

  20. Clusters, voids and reconstructions of the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, E. G. Patrick

    2016-12-01

    The Universe is filled for 95% with dark matter and energy that we cannot see. Of the remaining 5% normal matter we can only see a small part. However, if we want to study the Universe as a whole, we will have to get to know it for 100%. We have to uncover indirectly where dark matter is hiding and what is the nature of dark energy. In this thesis we explore two such methods. The first part describes how we can use the large empty regions between galaxies, "voids", to learn more about dark energy. We converted our theoretical simulations to a model of real observations of galaxies. In this model, we perform the same measurements as we would in real observations. This way, we show that it is indeed possible to unravel the nature of dark energy. The second part is based on our computer code: BARCODE. It unites two models: a physical model of the formation of the Cosmic Web, and a description of the observational effects of (clusters of) galaxies, in particular the effect of redshift on distance measurements. It allows us to back-trace our observations to the primordial conditions. These enable us to trace all (dark) matter, also that which we did not directly observe. The result is a reconstruction of the complete Cosmic Web. In these, we studied "filaments". These objects have not yet been extensively studied. BARCODE will enable further study, e.g. by using it to find observable filaments.

  1. HI Imaging the Low Red-shift Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, R

    2004-01-01

    Only in recent years has the realization emerged that galaxies do not dominate the universal baryon budget but are merely the brightest pearls of an underlying Cosmic Web. Although the gas in these inter-galactic filaments is moderately to highly ionized, QSO absorption lines have shown that the surface area increases dramatically in going down to lower HI column densities. The first image of the Cosmic Web in HI emission has just been made of the Local Group filament connecting M31 and M33. The corresponding HI distribution function is in very good agreement with that of the QSO absorption lines, confirming the 30-fold increase in surface area expected between 10^19 cm^-2 and 10^17 cm^-2. The critical observational challenge is crossing the "HI desert", the range of log(N_HI) from about 19.5 down to 18, over which photo-ionization by the intergalactic radiation field produces an exponential decline in the neutral fraction from essentially unity down to a few percent. Nature is kinder again to the HI observer...

  2. The cosmic web mysterious architecture of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Gott, J Richard

    2016-01-01

    J. Richard Gott was among the first cosmologists to propose that the structure of our universe is like a sponge made up of clusters of galaxies intricately connected by filaments of galaxies—a magnificent structure now called the "cosmic web" and mapped extensively by teams of astronomers. Here is his gripping insider’s account of how a generation of undaunted theorists and observers solved the mystery of the architecture of our cosmos. The Cosmic Web begins with modern pioneers of extragalactic astronomy, such as Edwin Hubble and Fritz Zwicky. It goes on to describe how, during the Cold War, the American school of cosmology favored a model of the universe where galaxies resided in isolated clusters, whereas the Soviet school favored a honeycomb pattern of galaxies punctuated by giant, isolated voids. Gott tells the stories of how his own path to a solution began with a high-school science project when he was eighteen, and how he and astronomer Mario Jurič measured the Sloan Great Wall of Galaxies, a fi...

  3. Low-frequency radio constraints on the synchrotron cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernstrom, T.; Gaensler, B. M.; Brown, S.; Lenc, E.; Norris, R. P.

    2017-06-01

    We present a search for the synchrotron emission from the synchrotron cosmic web by cross-correlating 180-MHz radio images from the Murchison Widefield Array with tracers of large-scale structure (LSS). We use two versions of the radio image covering 21.76° × 21.76° with point sources brighter than 0.05 Jy subtracted, with and without filtering of Galactic emission. As tracers of the LSS, we use the Two Micron All-Sky Survey and the Wide-field InfraRed Explorer redshift catalogues to produce galaxy number density maps. The cross-correlation functions all show peak amplitudes at 0°, decreasing with varying slopes towards zero correlation over a range of 1°. The cross-correlation signals include components from point source, Galactic, and extragalactic diffuse emission. We use models of the diffuse emission from smoothing the density maps with Gaussians of sizes 1-4 Mpc to find limits on the cosmic web components. From these models, we find surface brightness 99.7 per cent upper limits in the range of 0.09-2.20 mJy beam-1 (average beam size of 2.6 arcmin), corresponding to 0.01-0.30 mJy arcmin-2. Assuming equipartition between energy densities of cosmic rays and the magnetic field, the flux density limits translate to magnetic field strength limits of 0.03-1.98 μG, depending heavily on the spectral index. We conclude that for a 3σ detection of 0.1 μG magnetic field strengths via cross-correlations, image depths of sub-mJy to sub-μJy are necessary. We include discussion on the treatment and effect of extragalactic point sources and Galactic emission, and next steps for building on this work.

  4. APPROACHES TO ANALYZE THE QUALITY OF ROMANIAN TOURISM WEB SITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacurezeanu Ramona

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of our work is to analyze travel web-sites, more exactly, whether the criteria used to analyze virtual stores are also adequate for the Romanian tourism product. Following the study, we concluded that the Romanian online tourism web-sites for the Romanian market have the features that we found listed on similar web-sites of France, England, Germany, etc. In conclusion, online Romanian tourism can be considered one of the factors of economic growth.

  5. The cosmic web and the orientation of angular momenta

    CERN Document Server

    Libeskind, Noam I; Knebe, Alexander; Steinmetz, Matthias; Gottlöber, Stefan; Metuki, Ofer; Yepes, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    We use a 64$h^{-1}$Mpc dark matter (DM) only cosmological simulation to examine the large scale orientation of haloes and substructures with respect the cosmic web. A web classification scheme based on the velocity shear tensor is used to assign to each halo in the simulation a web type: knot, filament, sheet or void. Using $\\sim10^6$ haloes that span ~3 orders of magnitude in mass the orientation of the halo's spin and the orbital angular momentum of subhaloes with respect to the eigenvectors of the shear tensor is examined. We find that the orbital angular momentum of subhaloes tends to align with the intermediate eigenvector of the velocity shear tensor for all haloes in knots, filaments and sheets. This result indicates that the kinematics of substructures located deep within the virialized regions of a halo is determined by its infall which in turn is determined by the large scale velocity shear, a surprising result given the virilaized nature of haloes. The non-random nature of subhalo accretion is thus...

  6. Multi-stream portrait of the Cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Nesar; Shandarin, Sergei

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of the first study of the multi-stream environment of dark matter haloes in cosmological N-body simulations in the ΛCDM cosmology. The full dynamical state of dark matter can be described as a three-dimensional sub-manifold in six-dimensional phase space - the dark matter sheet. In our study we use a Lagrangian sub-manifold x = x (q , t) (where x and q are co-moving Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates respectively), which is dynamically equivalent to the dark matter sheet but is more convenient for numerical analysis. Our major results can be summarized as follows. At the resolution of the simulation, the cosmic web represents a hierarchical structure: each halo is embedded in the filamentary framework of the web predominantly at the filament crossings, and each filament is embedded in the wall like fabric of the web at the wall crossings. Locally, each halo or sub-halo is a peak in the number of streams field. The number of streams in the neighbouring filaments is higher than in the neighbouring walls. The walls are regions where number of streams is equal to three or a few. Voids are uniquely defined by the local condition requiring to be a single-stream flow region.

  7. The Peak/Dip Picture of the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Graziano

    2016-10-01

    The initial shear field plays a central role in the formation of large-scale structures, and in shaping the geometry, morphology, and topology of the cosmic web. We discuss a recent theoretical framework for the shear tensor, termed the `peak/dip picture', which accounts for the fact that halos/voids may form from local extrema of the density field - rather than from random spatial positions; the standard Doroshkevich's formalism is generalized, to include correlations between the density Hessian and shear field at special points in space around which halos/voids may form. We then present the `peak/dip excursion-set-based' algorithm, along with its most recent applications - merging peaks theory with the standard excursion set approach.

  8. Tracing the Cosmic Web substructure with Lagrangian submanifold

    CERN Document Server

    Shandarin, Sergei F

    2014-01-01

    A new computational paradigm for the analysis of substructure of the Cosmic Web in cosmological cold dark matter simulations is proposed. We introduce a new data-field --- the flip-flop field ---which carries wealth of information about the history and dynamics of the structure formation in the universe. The flip-flop field is an ordered data set in Lagrangian space representing the number of turns inside out sign reversals of an elementary volume of each collisionless fluid element represented by a computational particle in a N-body simulation. This field is computed using the Lagrangian submanifold, i.e. the three-dimensional dark matter sheet in the six-dimensional space formed by three Lagrangian and three Eulerian coordinates of the simulation particles. It is demonstrated that the very rich substructure of dark matter haloes and the void regions can be reliably and unambiguously recovered from the flip-flop field.

  9. The cosmic web in CosmoGrid void regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Steven; van de Weygaert, Rien; Cautun, Marius; Beygu, Burcu; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2016-10-01

    We study the formation and evolution of the cosmic web, using the high-resolution CosmoGrid ΛCDM simulation. In particular, we investigate the evolution of the large-scale structure around void halo groups, and compare this to observations of the VGS-31 galaxy group, which consists of three interacting galaxies inside a large void. The structure around such haloes shows a great deal of tenuous structure, with most of such systems being embedded in intra-void filaments and walls. We use the Nexus+} algorithm to detect walls and filaments in CosmoGrid, and find them to be present and detectable at every scale. The void regions embed tenuous walls, which in turn embed tenuous filaments. We hypothesize that the void galaxy group of VGS-31 formed in such an environment.

  10. Cosmic Web Reconstruction through Density Ridges: Method and Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Freeman, Peter E; Genovese, Christopher R; Wasserman, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The detection and characterization of filamentary structures in the cosmic web allows cosmologists to constrain parameters that dictates the evolution of the Universe. While many filament estimators have been proposed, they generally lack estimates of uncertainty, reducing their inferential power. In this paper, we demonstrate how one may apply the Subspace Constrained Mean Shift (SCMS) algorithm (Ozertem and Erdogmus (2011); Genovese et al. (2012)) to uncover filamentary structure in galaxy data. The SCMS algorithm is a gradient ascent method that models filaments as density ridges, one-dimensional smooth curves that trace high-density regions within the point cloud. We also demonstrate how augmenting the SCMS algorithm with bootstrap-based methods of uncertainty estimation allows one to place uncertainty bands around putative filaments. We apply the SCMS method to datasets sampled from the P3M N-body simulation, with galaxy number densities consistent with SDSS and WFIRST-AFTA and to LOWZ and CMASS data fro...

  11. User Behavior Analysis from Web Log using Log Analyzer Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Bakariya

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Now a day, internet plays a role of huge database in which many websites, information and search engines are available. But due to unstructured and semi-structured data in webpage, it has become a challenging task to extract relevant information. Its main reason is that traditional knowledge based technique are not correct to efficiently utilization the knowledge, because it consist of many discover pattern, contains a lots of noise and uncertainty. In this paper, analyzing of web usage mining has been made with the help if web log data for which web log analyzer tool, “Deep Log Analyzer” to find out abstract information from particular server and also tried to find out the user behavior and also developed an ontology which consist the relation among efficient web apart of web usage mining.

  12. A giant protogalactic disk linked to the cosmic web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D Christopher; Matuszewski, Mateusz; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D; Moore, Anna; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J Xavier; Chang, Daphne

    2015-08-13

    The specifics of how galaxies form from, and are fuelled by, gas from the intergalactic medium remain uncertain. Hydrodynamic simulations suggest that 'cold accretion flows'--relatively cool (temperatures of the order of 10(4) kelvin), unshocked gas streaming along filaments of the cosmic web into dark-matter halos--are important. These flows are thought to deposit gas and angular momentum into the circumgalactic medium, creating disk- or ring-like structures that eventually coalesce into galaxies that form at filamentary intersections. Recently, a large and luminous filament, consistent with such a cold accretion flow, was discovered near the quasi-stellar object QSO UM287 at redshift 2.279 using narrow-band imaging. Unfortunately, imaging is not sufficient to constrain the physical characteristics of the filament, to determine its kinematics, to explain how it is linked to nearby sources, or to account for its unusual brightness, more than a factor of ten above what is expected for a filament. Here we report a two-dimensional spectroscopic investigation of the emitting structure. We find that the brightest emission region is an extended rotating hydrogen disk with a velocity profile that is characteristic of gas in a dark-matter halo with a mass of 10(13) solar masses. This giant protogalactic disk appears to be connected to a quiescent filament that may extend beyond the virial radius of the halo. The geometry is strongly suggestive of a cold accretion flow.

  13. Imaging the Low Red-shift Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, R; Braun, Robert; Thilker, David

    2005-01-01

    The first image of a Cosmic Web, Lyman Limit System has just been made in HI emission within the Local Group filament connecting M31 and M33. The corresponding HI distribution function is in very good agreement with that of the QSO absorption lines, confirming the 30-fold increase in surface area expected between 10^19 cm^-2 and 10^17 cm^-2. The critical observational challenge is crossing the ``HI desert'', the range of log(N_HI) from about 19.5 down to 18, over which photo-ionization by the intergalactic radiation field produces an exponential decline in the neutral fraction from essentially unity down to a few percent. Nature is kinder again to the HI observer below log(N_HI) = 18, where the neutral fraction decreases only very slowly with log(N_HI). Average spectra of the M31/M33 filament suggest a kinetic temperature of 2x10^5 K for the parent ion population, consistent with significant shock-heating. The brightest knot within the filament, with only a 2x10^4 K apparent temperature, is suggestive of loca...

  14. Halo mass distribution reconstruction across the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Cheng; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Yepes, Gustavo; Tao, Charling

    2015-01-01

    We study the relation between halo mass and its environment from a probabilistic perspective. We find that halo mass depends not only on local dark matter density, but also on non-local quantities such as the cosmic web environment and the halo-exclusion effect. Given these accurate relations, we have developed the HADRON-code (Halo mAss Distribution ReconstructiON), a technique which permits us to assign halo masses to a distribution of haloes in three-dimensional space. This can be applied to the fast production of mock galaxy catalogues, by assigning halo masses, and reproducing accurately the bias for different mass cuts. The resulting clustering of the halo populations agree well with that drawn from the BigMultiDark $N$-body simulation: the power spectra are within 1-$\\sigma$ up to scales of $k=0.2\\,h\\,{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, when using augmented Lagrangian perturbation theory based mock catalogues. Only the most massive haloes show a larger deviation. For these, we find evidence of the halo-exclusion effect. ...

  15. Filaments of the radio cosmic web: opportunities and challenges for SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Vazza, Franco; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brüggen, Marcus; Gheller, Claudio; Braun, Robert; Brown, Shea

    2015-01-01

    The detection of the diffuse gas component of the cosmic web remains a formidable challenge. In this work we study synchrotron emission from the cosmic web with simulated SKA1 observations, which can represent an fundamental probe of the warm-hot intergalactic medium. We investigate radio emission originated by relativistic electrons accelerated by shocks surrounding cosmic filaments, assuming diffusive shock acceleration and as a function of the (unknown) large-scale magnetic fields. The detection of the brightest parts of large ($>10 \\rm Mpc$) filaments of the cosmic web should be within reach of the SKA1-LOW, if the magnetic field is at the level of a $\\sim 10$ percent equipartition with the thermal gas, corresponding to $\\sim 0.1 \\mu G$ for the most massive filaments in simulations. In the course of a 2-years survey with SKA1-LOW, this will enable a first detection of the "tip of the iceberg" of the radio cosmic web, and allow for the use of the SKA as a powerful tool to study the origin of cosmic magneti...

  16. Spider casts its web on the cosmic microwave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2015-02-01

    An experiment successfully touched down in Antarctica last month after gathering data on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) that could reveal the faint remnants of gravitational waves created during that rapid expansion of the very early universe known as inflation.

  17. User Behavior Analysis from Web Log using Log Analyzer Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Brijesh Bakariya; Ghanshyam Singh Thakur

    2013-01-01

    Now a day, internet plays a role of huge database in which many websites, information and search engines are available. But due to unstructured and semi-structured data in webpage, it has become a challenging task to extract relevant information. Its main reason is that traditional knowledge based technique are not correct to efficiently utilization the knowledge, because it consist of many discover pattern, contains a lots of noise and uncertainty. In this paper, analyzing of web usage minin...

  18. The topology of the cosmic web in terms of persistent Betti numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranav, Pratyush; Edelsbrunner, Herbert; van de Weygaert, Rien; Vegter, Gert; Kerber, Michael; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Wintraecken, Mathijs

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a multiscale topological description of the Megaparsec web-like cosmic matter distribution. Betti numbers and topological persistence offer a powerful means of describing the rich connectivity structure of the cosmic web and of its multiscale arrangement of matter and galaxies. Emanating from algebraic topology and Morse theory, Betti numbers and persistence diagrams represent an extension and deepening of the cosmologically familiar topological genus measure and the related geometric Minkowski functionals. In addition to a description of the mathematical background, this study presents the computational procedure for computing Betti numbers and persistence diagrams for density field filtrations. The field may be computed starting from a discrete spatial distribution of galaxies or simulation particles. The main emphasis of this study concerns an extensive and systematic exploration of the imprint of different web-like morphologies and different levels of multiscale clustering in the corresponding computed Betti numbers and persistence diagrams. To this end, we use Voronoi clustering models as templates for a rich variety of web-like configurations and the fractal-like Soneira-Peebles models exemplify a range of multiscale configurations. We have identified the clear imprint of cluster nodes, filaments, walls, and voids in persistence diagrams, along with that of the nested hierarchy of structures in multiscale point distributions. We conclude by outlining the potential of persistent topology for understanding the connectivity structure of the cosmic web, in large simulations of cosmic structure formation and in the challenging context of the observed galaxy distribution in large galaxy surveys.

  19. Modeling and Analyze the Deep Web: Surfacing Hidden Value

    OpenAIRE

    Suneet Kumar; Anuj Kumar Yadav; Rakesh Bharati; Rani Choudhary

    2011-01-01

    Focused web crawlers have recently emerged as an alternative to the well-established web search engines. While the well-known focused crawlers retrieve relevant web-pages, there are various applications which target whole websites instead of single web-pages. For example, companies are represented by websites, not by individual web-pages. To answer queries targeted at Websites, web directories are an established solution. In this paper, we introduce a novel focused website crawler to employ t...

  20. A Two-Tiered Model for Analyzing Library Web Site Usage Statistics, Part 1: Web Server Logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Laura B.

    2003-01-01

    Proposes a two-tiered model for analyzing web site usage statistics for academic libraries: one tier for library administrators that analyzes measures indicating library use, and a second tier for web site managers that analyzes measures aiding in server maintenance and site design. Discusses the technology of web site usage statistics, and…

  1. Structural analysis of the SDSS Cosmic Web - I. Non-linear density field reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Vegter, Gert; Calvo, Miguel A. Aragón

    2011-01-01

    This study is the first in a series in which we analyse the structure and topology of the Cosmic Web as traced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The main issue addressed in the present study is the translation of the irregularly distributed discrete spatial data in the galaxy redshift survey i

  2. Structural analysis of the SDSS Cosmic Web : I. Non-linear density field reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platen, Erwin; Weygaert, Rien van de; Jones, Bernard J.T.; Vegter, Gert; Aragón Calvo, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    This study is the first in a series in which we analyse the structure and topology of the Cosmic Web as traced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The main issue addressed in the present study is the translation of the irregularly distributed discrete spatial data in the galaxy redshift survey i

  3. X-ray spectroscopy of clusters of galaxies and of the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, N.

    2008-01-01

    I present the results on the study of the chemical evolution of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and on the evolution of clusters of galaxies in the context of the cosmic web. Clusters of galaxies are excellent laboratories to study the chemical enrichment history of the Universe. This thesis presents

  4. The cosmic web of the Local Universe: cosmic variance, matter content and its relation to galaxy morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuza, Sebastián E.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Heß, Steffen; Libeskind, Noam I.; Müller, Volker

    2014-11-01

    We present, for the first time, a Local Universe (LU) characterization using high-precision constrained N-body simulations based on self-consistent phase-space reconstructions of the large-scale structure in the Two-Micron All-Sky Galaxy Redshift Survey. We analyse whether we live in a special cosmic web environment by estimating cosmic variance from a set of unconstrained ΛCDM simulations as a function of distance to random observers. By computing volume and mass filling fractions for voids, sheets, filaments and knots, we find that the LU displays a typical scatter of about 1σ at scales r ≳ 15 h-1 Mpc, in agreement with ΛCDM, converging to a fair unbiased sample when considering spheres of about 60 h-1 Mpc radius. Additionally, we compute the matter density profile of the LU and we have found a reasonable agreement with the estimates of Karachentsev only when considering the contribution of dark haloes. This indicates that observational estimates might be biased towards low-density values. As a first application of our reconstruction, we investigate the likelihood that different galaxy morphological types inhabit certain cosmic web environments. In particular, we find that, irrespective of the method used to define the web, either based on the density or the peculiar velocity field, elliptical galaxies show a clear tendency to preferentially reside in clusters as opposed to voids (up to levels of 5.3σ and 9.8σ, respectively) and conversely for spiral galaxies (up to levels of 5.6σ and 5.4σ, respectively). These findings are compatible with previous works, albeit at higher confidence levels.

  5. Breaking the Cosmic Degeneracy between Modified Gravity and Massive Neutrinos with the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Shim, Junsup; Baldi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In a recent work, Baldi et al. highlighted the issue of cosmic degeneracies, consisting in the fact that the standard statistics of the large-scale structure might not be sufficient to conclusively test cosmological models beyond $\\Lambda $CDM when multiple extensions of the standard scenario coexist in nature. In particular, it was shown that the characteristic features of an $f(R)$ Modified Gravity theory and of massive neutrinos with an appreciable total mass $\\Sigma _{i}m_{\

  6. KOMPONEN WEB DATA ANALYZER PADA IE STUDI KASUS: AKSES WEB TERFAVORIT LABORATORIUM IBS TEKNIK INFORMATIKA - ITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlis Heru Murti

    2005-07-01

    Explorer. Untuk itu di dalam pelaksanaan penelitian ini, akan dilakukan perancangan dan pembuatan sebuah perangkat lunak komponen Web Data Analyzer yang melekat pada browser Internet Explorer untuk pencarian akses web terfavorit pengguna. Uji coba dan evaluasi pada penelitian ini dilakukan dengan melakukan instalasi komponen Web Data Analyzer pada sejumlah workstation di Laboratorium IBS Teknik Informatika ITS. Hasil uji coba menunjukkan bahwa komponen Web Data Analyzer mampu memonitor dan menganalisa data aktivitas browsing pengguna serta melakukan otomatisasi terhadap fitur Favorites Internet Explorer dari data aktivitas browsing pengguna yang berhasil tersimpan ke database server. Kata kunci: band object, explorer bar, browser helper object (bho, http analyzer.

  7. HMR Log Analyzer: Analyze Web Application Logs Over Hadoop MapReduce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayalee Narkhede

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In today’s Internet world, log file analysis is becoming a necessary task for analyzing the customer’sbehavior in order to improve advertising and sales as well as for datasets like environment, medical,banking system it is important to analyze the log data to get required knowledge from it. Web mining is theprocess of discovering the knowledge from the web data. Log files are getting generated very fast at therate of 1-10 Mb/s per machine, a single data center can generate tens of terabytes of log data in a day.These datasets are huge. In order to analyze such large datasets we need parallel processing system andreliable data storage mechanism. Virtual database system is an effective solution for integrating the databut it becomes inefficient for large datasets. The Hadoop framework provides reliable data storage byHadoop Distributed File System and MapReduce programming model which is a parallel processingsystem for large datasets. Hadoop distributed file system breaks up input data and sends fractions of theoriginal data to several machines in hadoop cluster to hold blocks of data. This mechanism helps toprocess log data in parallel using all the machines in the hadoop cluster and computes result efficiently.The dominant approach provided by hadoop to “Store first query later”, loads the data to the HadoopDistributed File System and then executes queries written in Pig Latin. This approach reduces the responsetime as well as the load on to the end system. This paper proposes a log analysis system using HadoopMapReduce which will provide accurate results in minimum response time.

  8. Bayesian analysis of the dynamic cosmic web in the SDSS galaxy survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Florent; Jasche, Jens; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    Recent application of the Bayesian algorithm \\textsc{borg} to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) main sample galaxies resulted in the physical inference of the formation history of the observed large-scale structure from its origin to the present epoch. In this work, we use these inferences as inputs for a detailed probabilistic cosmic web-type analysis. To do so, we generate a large set of data-constrained realizations of the large-scale structure using a fast, fully non-linear gravitational model. We then perform a dynamic classification of the cosmic web into four distinct components (voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters) on the basis of the tidal field. Our inference framework automatically and self-consistently propagates typical observational uncertainties to web-type classification. As a result, this study produces accurate cosmographic classification of large-scale structure elements in the SDSS volume. By also providing the history of these structure maps, the approach allows an analysis of the origin and growth of the early traces of the cosmic web present in the initial density field and of the evolution of global quantities such as the volume and mass filling fractions of different structures. For the problem of web-type classification, the results described in this work constitute the first connection between theory and observations at non-linear scales including a physical model of structure formation and the demonstrated capability of uncertainty quantification. A connection between cosmology and information theory using real data also naturally emerges from our probabilistic approach. Our results constitute quantitative chrono-cosmography of the complex web-like patterns underlying the observed galaxy distribution.

  9. Dependence of GAMA galaxy halo masses on the cosmic web environment from 100 deg2 of KiDS weak lensing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Margot M.; Cacciato, Marcello; Dvornik, Andrej; Eardley, Lizzie; Heymans, Catherine; Hoekstra, Henk; Kuijken, Konrad; McNaught-Roberts, Tamsyn; Sifón, Cristóbal; Viola, Massimo; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Bilicki, Maciej; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P.; Erben, Thomas; Grado, Aniello; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; de Jong, Jelte T. A.; Liske, Jochen; McFarland, John; Nakajima, Reiko; Napolitano, Nicola R.; Norberg, Peder; Peacock, John A.; Radovich, Mario; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Schneider, Peter; Sikkema, Gert; van Uitert, Edo; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Valentijn, Edwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies and their dark matter haloes are part of a complex network of mass structures, collectively called the cosmic web. Using the tidal tensor prescription these structures can be classified into four cosmic environments: voids, sheets, filaments and knots. As the cosmic web may influence the fo

  10. Clusters of galaxies and the cosmic web with SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Ruta; Lal, Dharam Vir; Bagchi, Joydeep; Paul, Surajit; Malu, Siddharth; Datta, Abhirup; Parekh, Viral; Sharma, Prateek; Pandey-Pommier, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    The intra-cluster and inter-galactic media (ICM, IGM) that pervade the large scale structure of the Universe are known to be magnetised at sub-micro Gauss to micro Gauss levels and to contain cosmic rays (CRs). The acceleration of CRs and their evolution along with that of magnetic fields in these media is still not well understood. Diffuse radio sources of synchrotron origin associated with the ICM such as radio halos, relics and mini-halos are direct probes of the underlying mechanisms of CR acceleration. Observations with radiotelescopes such as the GMRT, the VLA and the WSRT (0.15 - 2 GHz) have revealed scaling relations between the thermal and non-thermal properties of clusters and favour the role of shocks in the formation of radio relics and of turbulent re-acceleration in the formation of radio halos and mini-halos. Due to the limitations of current radio telescopes, wide-band studies and exploration of low mass and supercluster-scale systems is difficult. The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) is a next ge...

  11. The Emergence of the Modern Universe Tracing the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Shull, J M; Morse, J A; Neff, S G; Clarke, J T; Heckman, T; Kinney, A L; Jenkins, E B; Dupree, A K; Baum, S A; Hasan, H

    1999-01-01

    This is the report of the Ultraviolet-Optical Working Group (UVOWG) commissioned by NASA to study the scientific rationale for new missions in ultraviolet/optical space astronomy approximately ten years from now, when the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is de-orbited. The UVOWG focused on a scientific theme, The Emergence of the Modern Universe, the period from redshifts z = 3 to 0, occupying over 80% of cosmic time and beginning after the first galaxies, quasars, and stars emerged into their present form. We considered high-throughput UV spectroscopy (10-50x throughput of HST/COS) and wide-field optical imaging (at least 10 arcmin square). The exciting science to be addressed in the post-HST era includes studies of dark matter and baryons, the origin and evolution of the elements, and the major construction phase of galaxies and quasars. Key unanswered questions include: Where is the rest of the unseen universe? What is the interplay of the dark and luminous universe? How did the IGM collapse to form the galaxi...

  12. Analyzing Web pages visual scanpaths: between and within tasks variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drusch, Gautier; Bastien, J M Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for comparing scanpaths in a bottom-up approach, and a test of the scanpath theory. To do so, we conducted a laboratory experiment in which 113 participants were invited to accomplish a set of tasks on two different websites. For each site, they had to perform two tasks that had to be repeated ounce. The data were analyzed using a procedure similar to the one used by Duchowski et al. [8]. The first step was to automatically identify, then label, AOIs with the mean-shift clustering procedure [19]. Then, scanpaths were compared two by two with a modified version of the string-edit method, which take into account the order of AOIs visualizations [2]. Our results show that scanpaths variability between tasks but within participants seems to be lower than the variability within task for a given participant. In other words participants seem to be more coherent when they perform different tasks, than when they repeat the same tasks. In addition, participants view more of the same AOI when they perform a different task on the same Web page than when they repeated the same task. These results are quite different from what predicts the scanpath theory.

  13. The Fabric of the Universe: Exploring the Cosmic Web in 3D Prints and Woven Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Benedikt; Facio, Isaac

    2017-05-01

    We introduce The Fabric of the Universe, an art and science collaboration focused on exploring the cosmic web of dark matter with unconventional techniques and materials. We discuss two of our projects in detail. First, we describe a pipeline for translating three-dimensional (3D) density structures from N-body simulations into solid surfaces suitable for 3D printing, and present prints of a cosmological volume and of the infall region around a massive cluster halo. In these models, we discover wall-like features that are invisible in two-dimensional projections. Going beyond the sheer visualization of simulation data, we undertake an exploration of the cosmic web as a three-dimensional woven textile. To this end, we develop experimental 3D weaving techniques to create sphere-like and filamentary shapes and radically simplify a region of the cosmic web into a set of filaments and halos. We translate the resulting tree structure into a series of commands that can be executed by a digital weaving machine, and present a large-scale textile installation.

  14. The cosmic web of the Local Universe: cosmic variance, matter content and its relation to galaxy morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Nuza, Sebastian E; Hess, Steffen; Libeskind, Noam I; Mueller, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We present, for the first time, a characterization of the Local Universe (LU) using high precision constrained $N$-body simulations based on self-consistent phase-space reconstructions of the large-scale structure. Our study relies on the Two-Micron All-Sky Galaxy Redshift Survey. The first question we want to address is whether we live in a special cosmic web environment. We assess this problem by estimating cosmic variance from a set of unconstrained $\\Lambda$CDM simulations as a function of distance to random observers. By computing volume and mass filling fractions for voids, sheets, filaments and knots, we find that the LU displays a typical scatter of about $1\\sigma$ at scales $r\\gtrsim15\\,h^{-1}\\,$Mpc, in agreement with $\\Lambda$CDM, converging to a fair unbiased sample when considering spheres of about $60\\,h^{-1}\\,$Mpc radius. Additionally, we compute the matter density profile of the LU and found a reasonable agreement with the estimates of Karachentsev (2012) only when considering the contribution ...

  15. Sub-Megaparsec Individual Photometric Redshift Estimation from Cosmic Web Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; Jones, Bernard J T; Mobasher, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    We present a method, PhotoWeb, for estimating photometric redshifts of individual galaxies, and their equivalent distance, with megaparsec and even sub-megaparsec accuracy using the Cosmic Web as a constraint over photo-z estimates. PhotoWeb redshift errors for individual galaxies are of the order of delta_z = 0.0007, compared to errors of delta_z = 0.02 for current photo-z techniques. The mean redshift error is of the order of 0.00005-0.0004 compared to mean errors in the range delta_z =z 0.001-0.01 for the best available photo-z estimates in the literature. Current photo-z techniques based on the spectral energy distribution of galaxies and projected clustering produce redshift estimates with large errors due to the poor constraining power the galaxy's spectral energy distribution and projected clustering can provide. The Cosmic Web, on the other hand, provides the strongest constraints on the position of galaxies. The network of walls, filaments and voids occupy ~%10 of the volume of the Universe, yet they...

  16. Alpha, Betti and the Megaparsec Universe: on the Topology of the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien; Edelsbrunner, Herbert; Jones, Bernard J T; Pranav, Pratyush; Park, Changbom; Hellwing, Wojciech A; Eldering, Bob; Kruithof, Nico; P., E G; Bos,; Hidding, Johan; Feldbrugge, Job; Have, Eline ten; van Engelen, Matti; Caroli, Manuel; Teillaud, Monique

    2013-01-01

    We study the topology of the Megaparsec Cosmic Web in terms of the scale-dependent Betti numbers, which formalize the topological information content of the cosmic mass distribution. While the Betti numbers do not fully quantify topology, they extend the information beyond conventional cosmological studies of topology in terms of genus and Euler characteristic. The richer information content of Betti numbers goes along the availability of fast algorithms to compute them. For continuous density fields, we determine the scale-dependence of Betti numbers by invoking the cosmologically familiar filtration of sublevel or superlevel sets defined by density thresholds. For the discrete galaxy distribution, however, the analysis is based on the alpha shapes of the particles. These simplicial complexes constitute an ordered sequence of nested subsets of the Delaunay tessellation, a filtration defined by the scale parameter, $\\alpha$. As they are homotopy equivalent to the sublevel sets of the distance field, they are ...

  17. The Topology of the Cosmic Web in Terms of Persistent Betti Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Pranav, Pratyush; van de Weygaert, Rien; Vegter, Gert; Kerber, Michael; Wintraecken, Mathijs

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a multiscale topological description of the Megaparsec weblike cosmic matter distribution. Betti numbers and topological persistence offer a powerful means of describing the rich connectivity structure of the cosmic web and of its multiscale arrangement of matter and galaxies. Emanating from algebraic topology and Morse theory, Betti numbers and persistence diagrams represent an extension and deepening of the cosmologically familiar topological genus measure, and the related geometric Minkowski functionals. In addition to a description of the mathematical background, this study presents the computational procedure for computing Betti numbers and persistence diagrams for density field filtrations. The field may be computed starting from a discrete spatial distribution of galaxies or simulation particles. The main emphasis of this study concerns an extensive and systematic exploration of the imprint of different weblike morphologies and different levels of multiscale clustering in the corresponding...

  18. Bayesian analysis of the dynamic cosmic web in the SDSS galaxy survey

    CERN Document Server

    Leclercq, Florent; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Recent application of the Bayesian algorithm BORG to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) main sample galaxies resulted in the physical inference of the formation history of the observed large-scale structure from its origin to the present epoch. In this work, we use these inferences as inputs for a detailed probabilistic cosmic web-type analysis. To do so, we generate a large set of data-constrained realizations of the large-scale structure using a fast, fully non-linear gravitational model. We then perform a dynamic classification of the cosmic web into four distinct components (voids, sheets, filaments and clusters) on the basis of the tidal field. Our inference framework automatically and self-consistently propagates typical observational uncertainties to web-type classification. As a result, this study produces highly detailed and accurate cosmographic classification of large-scale structure elements in the SDSS volume. By also providing the history of these structure maps, the approach allows an analysis...

  19. Quantifying the Cosmic Web in the New Era of Redshift Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Lahav, O

    2004-01-01

    Two main strategies have been implemented in mapping the local universe: whole-sky 'shallow' surveys and 'deep' surveys over limited parts of the sky. The two approaches complement each other in studying cosmography and statistical properties of the Universe. We summarise some results on the power spectrum of fluctuations and Wiener reconstruction of the density field from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) of 230,000 redshifts. We then discuss future challenges in quantifying the web of cosmic structure in the on-going redshift surveys.

  20. The cosmic web and microwave background fossilize the first turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris

    2016-10-01

    Collisional fluid mechanics theory predicts a turbulent hot big bang at Planck conditions from large, negative, turbulence stresses below the Fortov-Kerr limit (Big bang turbulence fossilized when quarks formed, extracting the mass energy of the universe by extreme negative viscous stresses of inflation, expanding to length scales larger than the horizon scale ct. Viscous-gravitational structure formation by fragmentation was triggered at big bang fossil vorticity turbulence vortex lines during the plasma epoch, as observed by the Planck space telescope. A cosmic web of protogalaxies, protogalaxyclusters, and protogalaxysuperclusters that formed in turbulent boundary layers of the spinning voids are hereby identified as expanding turbulence fossils that falsify CDMHC cosmology.

  1. The effect of cosmic web filaments on the properties of groups and their central galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, A.; Heinämäki, P.; Tempel, E.; Einasto, M.; Lietzen, H.; Nurmi, P.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The nature versus nurture scenario in galaxy and group evolution is a long-standing problem not yet fully understood on cosmological scales. Aims: We study the properties of groups and their central galaxies in different large-scale environments defined by the luminosity density field and the cosmic web filaments. Methods: We use the luminosity density field constructed using 8 h-1 Mpc smoothing to characterize the large-scale environments. We use the Bisous model to extract the filamentary structures in different large-scale environments. We study the properties of galaxy groups as a function of their dynamical mass in different large-scale environments. Results: We find differences in the properties of central galaxies and their groups in and outside of filaments at fixed halo and large-scale environments. In high-density environments, the group mass function has higher number densities in filaments compared to that outside of filaments towards the massive end. The relation is the opposite in low-density environments. At fixed group mass and large-scale luminosity density, mass-to-light ratios show that groups in filaments are slightly more luminous than those outside of filaments. At fixed group mass and large-scale luminosity density, central galaxies in filaments have redder colors, higher stellar masses, and lower specific star formation rates than those outside of filaments. However, the differences in central galaxy and group properties in and outside of filaments are not clear in some group mass bins. We show that the differences in central galaxy properties are due to the higher abundances of elliptical galaxies in filaments. Conclusions: Filamentary structures in the cosmic web are not simply visual associations of galaxies, but rather play an important role in shaping the properties of groups and their central galaxies. The differences in central galaxy and group properties in and outside of cosmic web filaments are not simple effects related

  2. Revealing the z ~ 2.5 Cosmic Web with 3D Lyα Forest Tomography: a Deformation Tensor Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; White, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Studies of cosmological objects should take into account their positions within the cosmic web of large-scale structure. Unfortunately, the cosmic web has only been extensively mapped at low redshifts (z\\lt 1), using galaxy redshifts as tracers of the underlying density field. At z\\gt 1, the required galaxy densities are inaccessible for the foreseeable future, but 3D reconstructions of Lyα forest absorption in closely separated background QSOs and star-forming galaxies already offer a detailed window into z˜ 2-3 large-scale structure. We quantify the utility of such maps for studying the cosmic web by using realistic z = 2.5 Lyα forest simulations matched to observational properties of upcoming surveys. A deformation tensor-based analysis is used to classify voids, sheets, filaments, and nodes in the flux, which are compared to those determined from the underlying dark matter (DM) field. We find an extremely good correspondence, with 70% of the volume in the flux maps correctly classified relative to the DM web, and 99% classified to within one eigenvalue. This compares favorably to the performance of galaxy-based classifiers with even the highest galaxy densities from low-redshift surveys. We find that narrow survey geometries can degrade the recovery of the cosmic web unless the survey is ≳ 60 {h}-1 {Mpc} or ≳ 1 deg on the sky. We also examine halo abundances as a function of the cosmic web, and find a clear dependence as a function of flux overdensity, but little explicit dependence on the cosmic web. These methods will provide a new window on cosmological environments of galaxies at this very special time in galaxy formation, “high noon,” and on overall properties of cosmological structures at this epoch.

  3. Cosmic Web Research with KAT-7, MeerKAT and FAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, C.

    2016-02-01

    The seven-dish KAT-7 array was built as an engineering test-bed for the 64-dish Karoo Array Telescope, known as MeerKAT, which is the South African precursor of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). KAT-7 and MeerKAT are located close to the South African SKA core site in the Northern Cape's Karoo desert region. Construction of the KAT-7 array was completed in December 2010. The short baselines (26 to 185 m) and low system temperature (Tsys ˜ 26 K) of the telescope make it very sensitive to large-scale, low-surface-brightness emission, which is one of the HI science drivers for MeerKAT and one of the future strengths of FAST. While the main purpose of KAT-7 was to test technical solutions for MeerKAT and the SKA, scientific targets were also observed during commissioning to test the HI line mode and the first results obtained are presented. A description of MeerKAT and an update on its construction is also given. Early science should start in mid-2016 with a partial array and the full array should be completed at the end of 2017. For cosmic-web research (detection of low column density HI), a future combination of data from FAST and MeerKAT should allow to explore the unknown territory of < 1018 cm-2 surface densities and the possible connection between spiral galaxies and the surrounding cosmic web.

  4. Relation between halo spin and cosmic-web filaments at z ≃ 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Roberto E.; Prieto, Joaquin; Padilla, Nelson; Jimenez, Raul

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the spin evolution of dark matter haloes and their dependence on the number of connected filaments from the cosmic web at high redshift (spin-filament relation hereafter). To this purpose, we have simulated 5000 haloes in the mass range 5 × 109 h-1 M⊙ to 5 × 1011 h-1 M⊙ at z = 3 in cosmological N-body simulations. We confirm the relation found by Prieto et al. (2015) where haloes with fewer filaments have larger spin. We also found that this relation is more significant for higher halo masses, and for haloes with a passive (no major mergers) assembly history. Another finding is that haloes with larger spin or with fewer filaments have their filaments more perpendicularly aligned with the spin vector. Our results point to a picture in which the initial spin of haloes is well described by tidal torque theory and then gets subsequently modified in a predictable way because of the topology of the cosmic web, which in turn is given by the currently favoured Lambda cold dark matter (LCDM) model. Our spin-filament relation is a prediction from LCDM that could be tested with observations.

  5. A Newly Forming Cold Flow Protogalactic Disk, a Signature of Cold Accretion from the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Matuszewski, Mateusz; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D.; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Trainor, Ryan

    2016-06-01

    How galaxies form from, and are fueled by, gas from the intergalactic medium (IGM) remains one of the major unsolved problems in galaxy formation. While the classical Cold Dark Matter paradigm posits galaxies forming from cooling virialized gas, recent theory and numerical simulations have highlighted the importance of cold accretion flows—relatively cool (T ˜ few × 104 K) unshocked gas streaming along filaments into dark matter halos, including hot, massive, high-redshift halos. These flows are thought to deposit gas and angular momentum into the circumgalactic medium resulting in disk- or ring-like structures, eventually coalescing into galaxies forming at filamentary intersections. We earlier reported a bright, Lyα emitting filament near the QSO HS1549+19 at redshift z = 2.843 discovered with the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager. We now report that the bright part of this filament is an enormous (R > 100 kpc) rotating structure of hydrogen gas with a disk-like velocity profile consistent with a 4 × 1012 M ⊙ halo. The orbital time of the outer part of the what we term a “protodisk” is comparable to the virialization time and the age of the universe at this redshift. We propose that this protodisk can only have recently formed from cold gas flowing directly from the cosmic web.

  6. Relation between halo spin and cosmic web filaments at z~3

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Roberto E; Padilla, Nelson; Jimenez, Raul

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the spin evolution of dark matter haloes and their dependence on the number of connected filaments from the cosmic web at high redshift (spin-filament relation hereafter). To this purpose, we have simulated $5000$ haloes in the mass range $5\\times10^{9}h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$ to $5\\times10^{11}h^{-1}M_{\\odot}$ at $z=3$ in cosmological N-body simulations. We confirm the relation found by Prieto et al. 2015 where haloes with fewer filaments have larger spin. We also found that this relation is more significant for higher halo masses, and for haloes with a passive (no major mergers) assembly history. Another finding is that haloes with larger spin or with fewer filaments have their filaments more perpendicularly aligned with the spin vector. Our results point to a picture in which the initial spin of haloes is well described by tidal torque theory and then gets subsequently modified in a predictable way because of the topology of the cosmic web, which in turn is given by the currently favoured LCDM model...

  7. Cosmic Web of Galaxies in the COSMOS Field: Public Catalog and Different Quenching for Centrals and Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Darvish, Behnam; Martin, D Christopher; Sobral, David; Scoville, Nick Z; Stroe, Andra; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2016-01-01

    We use a mass complete (log($M/M_{\\odot}$) $\\geqslant$ 9.6) sample of galaxies with accurate photometric redshifts in the COSMOS field to construct the density field and the cosmic web to $z$=1.2. The comic web extraction relies on the density field Hessian matrix and breaks the density field into clusters, filaments and the field. We provide the density field and cosmic web measures to the community. We show that at $z$ $\\lesssim$ 0.8, the median star-formation rate (SFR) in the cosmic web gradually declines from the field to clusters and this decline is especially sharp for satellites ($\\sim$ 1 dex vs. $\\sim$ 0.5 dex for centrals). However, at $z$ $\\gtrsim$ 0.8, the trend flattens out for the overall galaxy population and satellites. For star-forming galaxies only, the median SFR is constant at $z$ $\\gtrsim$ 0.5 but declines by $\\sim$ 0.3-0.4 dex from the field to clusters for satellites and centrals at $z$ $\\lesssim$ 0.5. We argue that for satellites, the main role of the cosmic web environment is to contr...

  8. Collab-Analyzer: An Environment for Conducting Web-Based Collaborative Learning Activities and Analyzing Students' Information-Searching Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Hsiang; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Kuo, Fan-Ray

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have found that students might get lost or feel frustrated while searching for information on the Internet to deal with complex problems without real-time guidance or supports. To address this issue, a web-based collaborative learning system, Collab-Analyzer, is proposed in this paper. It is not only equipped with a collaborative…

  9. An Application of Session Based Clustering to Analyze Web Pages of User Interest from Web Log Files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    c. P. Sumathi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: With the continued growth and proliferation of e-commerce, Web services and Web-based information systems, the volumes of click-stream and user data collected by Web-based organizations in their daily operations have reached astronomical proportions. Analyzing such data can help these organizations optimize the functionality of web-based applications and provide more personalized content to visitors. This type of analysis involved the automatic discovery of usage interest on the web pages which are often stored in web and applications server access logs. Approach: The usage interest on the web pages in various sessions was partitioned into clusters such that sessions with “similar” interest were placed in the same cluster using expectation maximization clustering technique as discussed in this study. Results: The approach results in the generation of usage profiles and automatic identification of user interest in each profile. Conclusion: The significance of the results will be helpful for organizations for web site improvement based on their navigational interest and provide recommendations for page(s not yet visited by the user.

  10. Cosmic Web of Galaxies in the COSMOS Field: Public Catalog and Different Quenching for Centrals and Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, Behnam; Mobasher, Bahram; Martin, D. Christopher; Sobral, David; Scoville, Nick; Stroe, Andra; Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2017-03-01

    We use a mass complete (log(M/{M}ȯ ) ≥slant 9.6) sample of galaxies with accurate photometric redshifts in the COSMOS field to construct the density field and the cosmic web to z = 1.2. The comic web extraction relies on the density field Hessian matrix and breaks the density field into clusters, filaments, and the field. We provide the density field and cosmic web measures to the community. We show that at z ≲ 0.8, the median star formation rate (SFR) in the cosmic web gradually declines from the field to clusters and this decline is especially sharp for satellites (∼1 dex versus ∼0.5 dex for centrals). However, at z ≳ 0.8, the trend flattens out for the overall galaxy population and satellites. For star-forming (SF) galaxies only, the median SFR is constant at z ≳ 0.5 but declines by ∼0.3–0.4 dex from the field to clusters for satellites and centrals at z ≲ 0.5. We argue that for satellites, the main role of the cosmic web environment is to control their SF fraction, whereas for centrals, it is mainly to control their overall SFR at z ≲ 0.5 and to set their fraction at z ≳ 0.5. We suggest that most satellites experience a rapid quenching mechanism as they fall from the field into clusters through filaments, whereas centrals mostly undergo a slow environmental quenching at z ≲ 0.5 and a fast mechanism at higher redshifts. Our preliminary results highlight the importance of the large-scale cosmic web on galaxy evolution.

  11. Blue camera of the Keck cosmic web imager, fabrication and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockosi, Constance; Cowley, David; Cabak, Jerry; Hilyard, David; Pfister, Terry

    2016-08-01

    The Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI) is a new facility instrument being developed for the W. M. Keck Observatory and funded for construction by the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP) of the National Science Foundation (NSF). KCWI is a bench-mounted spectrograph for the Keck II right Nasmyth focal station, providing integral field spectroscopy over a seeing-limited field up to 20" x 33" in extent. Selectable Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings provide high efficiency and spectral resolution in the range of 1000 to 20000. The dual-beam design of KCWI passed a Preliminary Design Review in summer 2011. The detailed design of the KCWI blue channel (350 to 700 nm) is now nearly complete, with the red channel (530 to 1050 nm) planned for a phased implementation contingent upon additional funding. KCWI builds on the experience of the Caltech team in implementing the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI), in operation since 2009 at Palomar Observatory. KCWI adds considerable flexibility to the CWI design, and will take full advantage of the excellent seeing and dark sky above Mauna Kea with a selectable nod-and-shuffle observing mode. In this paper, models of the expected KCWI sensitivity and background subtraction capability are presented, along with a detailed description of the instrument design. The KCWI team is lead by Caltech (project management, design and implementation) in partnership with the University of California at Santa Cruz (camera optical and mechanical design) and the W. M. Keck Observatory (program oversight and observatory interfaces). The optical design of the blue camera for the Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI) by Harland Epps of the University of California, Santa Cruz is a lens assembly consisting of eight spherical optical elements. Half the elements are calcium fluoride and all elements are air spaced. The design of the camera barrel is unique in that all the optics are secured in their respective cells with an RTV annulus without additional hardware

  12. Measuring alignments between galaxies and the cosmic web at $z \\sim 2-3$ using IGM tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Krolewski, Alex; Lukic, Zarija; White, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many galaxy formation models predict alignments between galaxy spin and the cosmic web (i.e. the directions of filaments and sheets), leading to intrinsic alignment between galaxies that creates a systematic error in weak lensing measurements. These effects are often predicted to be stronger at high-redshifts ($z\\gtrsim1$) that are inaccessible to massive galaxy surveys on foreseeable instrumentation, but IGM tomography of the Ly$\\alpha$ forest from closely-spaced quasars and galaxies is starting to measure the $z\\sim2-3$ cosmic web with the requisite fidelity. Using mock surveys from hydrodynamical simulations, we examine the utility of this technique, in conjunction with coeval galaxy samples, to measure alignment between galaxies and the cosmic web at $z\\sim2.5$. We show that IGM tomography surveys with $\\lesssim5$ $h^{-1}$ Mpc sightline spacing can accurately recover the eigenvectors of the tidal tensor, which we use to define the directions of the cosmic web. For galaxy spins and shapes, we use a model p...

  13. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): The galaxy luminosity function within the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Eardley, E; McNaught-Roberts, T; Heymans, C; Norberg, P; Alpaslan, M; Baldry, I; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Cluver, M E; Driver, S P; Farrow, D J; Liske, J; Loveday, J; Robotham, A S G

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the galaxy luminosity function on geometric environment within the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The tidal tensor prescription, based on the Hessian of the pseudo-gravitational potential, is used to classify the cosmic web and define the geometric environments: for a given smoothing scale, we classify every position of the surveyed region, $0.04<{z}<0.26$, as either a void, a sheet, a filament or a knot. We consider how to choose appropriate thresholds in the eigenvalues of the Hessian in order to partition the galaxies approximately evenly between environments. We find a significant variation in the luminosity function of galaxies between different geometric environments; the normalisation, characterised by $\\phi^{*}$ in a Schechter function fit, increases by an order of magnitude from voids to knots. The turnover magnitude, characterised by $M^*$, brightens by approximately $0.5$ mag from voids to knots. However, we show that the observed modulation can be en...

  14. Probing the cosmic web: inter-cluster filament detection using gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Mead, James M G; McCarthy, Ian G

    2009-01-01

    The problem of detecting dark matter filaments in the cosmic web is considered. Weak lensing is an ideal probe of dark matter, and therefore forms the basis of particularly promising detection methods. We consider and develop a number of weak lensing techniques that could be used to detect filaments in individual or stacked cluster fields, and apply them to synthetic lensing data sets in the fields of clusters from the Millennium Simulation. These techniques are multipole moments of the shear and convergence, mass reconstruction, and parameterized fits to filament mass profiles using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach. In particular, two new filament detection techniques are explored (multipole shear filters and Markov Chain Monte Carlo mass profile fits), and we outline the quality of data required to be able to identify and quantify filament profiles. We also consider the effects of large scale structure on filament detection. We conclude that using these techniques, there will be realistic prospects of de...

  15. The persistent cosmic web and its filamentary structure I: Theory and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Sousbie, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    We present DisPerSE, a novel approach to the coherent multi-scale identification of all types of astrophysical structures, and in particular the filaments, in the large scale distribution of matter in the Universe. This method and corresponding piece of software allows a genuinely scale free and parameter free identification of the voids, walls, filaments, clusters and their configuration within the cosmic web, directly from the discrete distribution of particles in N-body simulations or galaxies in sparse observational catalogues. To achieve that goal, the method works directly over the Delaunay tessellation of the discrete sample and uses the DTFE density computed at each tracer particle; no further sampling, smoothing or processing of the density field is required. The idea is based on recent advances in distinct sub-domains of computational topology, which allows a rigorous application of topological principles to astrophysical data sets, taking into account uncertainties and Poisson noise. Practically, t...

  16. The same with less: The cosmic web of warm versus cold dark matter dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Darren S; Smith, Robert E; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Moore, Ben

    2014-01-01

    We explore fundamental properties of the distribution of low mass dark matter halos within the cosmic web using warm dark matter (WDM) and cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological simulations. Using self abundance-matched mock galaxy catalogs, we show that the distribution of dwarf galaxies in a WDM universe, wherein low mass halo formation is heavily suppressed, is nearly indistinguishable to that of a CDM universe whose low mass halos are not seen because galaxy formation is suppressed below some threshold halo mass. However, if the scatter between dwarf galaxy luminosity and halo properties is large enough, low mass CDM halos would sometimes host relatively bright galaxies thereby populating CDM voids with the occasional isolated galaxy and reducing the numbers of completely empty voids. Otherwise, without high mass to light scatter, all mock galaxy clustering statistics that we consider--the auto-correlation function, the numbers and radial profiles of satellites, the numbers of isolated galaxies, and the PDF ...

  17. Spin alignments within the cosmic web: a theory of constrained tidal torques near filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Codis, Sandrine; Pogosyan, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The geometry of the cosmic web drives in part the spin acquisition of galaxies. This can be explained in a Lagrangian framework, by identifying the specific long-wavelength correlations within the primordial Gaussian random field which are relevant to spin acquisition. Tidal Torque Theory is revisited in the context of such anisotropic environments, biased by the presence of a filament within a wall. The point process of filament-type saddles represents it most efficiently. The constrained misalignment between the tidal and the inertia tensors in the vicinity of filament-type saddles simply explains the distribution of spin directions. This misalignment implies in particular an azimuthal orientation for the spins of more massive galaxies and a spin alignment with the filament for less massive galaxies. This prediction is found to be in qualitative agreement with measurements in Gaussian random fields and N-body simulations. It relates the transition mass to the geometry of the saddle, and accordingly predicts...

  18. Why do galactic spins flip in the cosmic web? A Theory of Tidal Torques near saddles

    CERN Document Server

    Pichon, Christophe; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Dubois, Yohan; Desjacques, Vincent; Devriendt, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Filaments of the cosmic web drive spin acquisition of disc galaxies. The point process of filament-type saddle represent best this environment and can be used to revisit the Tidal Torque Theory in the context of an anisotropic peak (saddle) background split. The constrained misalignment between the tidal tensor and the Hessian of the density field generated in the vicinity of filament saddle points simply explains the corresponding transverse and longitudinal point-reflection symmetric geometry of spin distribution. It predicts in particular an azimuthal orientation of the spins of more massive galaxies and spin alignment with the filament for less massive galaxies. Its scale dependence also allows us to relate the transition mass corresponding to the alignment of dark matter halos spin relative to the direction of their neighboring filament to this geometry, and to predict accordingly it s scaling with the mass of non linearity, as was measured in simulations.

  19. The magnetic field and turbulence of the cosmic web measured using a brilliant fast radio burst

    CERN Document Server

    Ravi, V; Bailes, M; Bannister, K; Bhandari, S; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keane, E F; Kerr, M; Tiburzi, C; Tuntsov, A V; Vedantham, H K

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration events thought to originate beyond the Milky Way galaxy. Uncertainty surrounding the burst sources, and their propagation through intervening plasma, has limited their use as cosmological probes. We report on a mildly dispersed (dispersion measure 266.5+-0.1 pc cm^-3), exceptionally intense (120+-30 Jy), linearly polarized, scintillating burst (FRB 150807) that we directly localize to 9 arcmin^2. Based on a low Faraday rotation (12.0+-0.7 rad m^-2), we infer negligible magnetization in the circum-burst plasma and constrain the net magnetization of the cosmic web along this sightline to <21 nG, parallel to the line-of-sight. The burst scintillation suggests weak turbulence in the ionized intergalactic medium.

  20. Why do galactic spins flip in the cosmic web? A Theory of Tidal Torques near saddles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Christophe; Codis, Sandrine; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Dubois, Yohan; Desjacques, Vincent; Devriendt, Julien

    2016-10-01

    Filaments of the cosmic web drive spin acquisition of disc galaxies. The point process of filament-type saddle represent best this environment and can be used to revisit the Tidal Torque Theory in the context of an anisotropic peak (saddle) background split. The constrained misalignment between the tidal tensor and the Hessian of the density field generated in the vicinity of filament saddle points simply explains the corresponding transverse and longitudinal point-reflection symmetric geometry of spin distribution. It predicts in particular an azimuthal orientation of the spins of more massive galaxies and spin alignment with the filament for less massive galaxies. Its scale dependence also allows us to relate the transition mass corresponding to the alignment of dark matter halos' spin relative to the direction of their neighboring filament to this geometry, and to predict accordingly it's scaling with the mass of non linearity, as was measured in simulations.

  1. Mapping the Cosmic Web with the largest all-sky surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilicki, Maciej; Peacock, John A.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Steward, Louise

    2016-10-01

    Our view of the low-redshift Cosmic Web has been revolutionized by galaxy redshift surveys such as 6dFGS, SDSS and 2MRS. However, the trade-off between depth and angular coverage limits a systematic three-dimensional account of the entire sky beyond the Local Volume (z sphere, one must draw on multiwavelength datasets and state-of-the-art photometric redshift techniques. We have undertaken a dedicated program of cross-matching the largest photometric all-sky surveys - 2MASS, WISE and SuperCOSMOS - to obtain accurate redshift estimates of millions of galaxies. The first outcome of these efforts - the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ, Bilicki et al. 2014a) - has been publicly released and includes almost 1 million galaxies with a mean redshift of z=0.08. Here we summarize how this catalog was constructed and how using the WISE mid-infrared sample together with SuperCOSMOS optical data allows us to push to redshift shells of z~ 0.2 -0.3 on unprecedented angular scales. Our catalogs, with ~ 20 million sources in total, provide access to cosmological volumes crucial for studies of local galaxy flows (clustering dipole, bulk flow) and cross-correlations with the cosmic microwave background such as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect or lensing studies.

  2. A new probe of the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2015-08-01

    Establishing the properties of magnetic fields on scales larger than galaxy clusters is critical for resolving the unknown origin and evolution of galactic and cluster magnetism. More generally, observations of magnetic fields on cosmic scales are needed for assessing the impacts of magnetism on cosmology, particle physics, and structure formation over the full history of the Universe. However, firm observational evidence for magnetic fields in large scale structure remains elusive. In an effort to address this problem, we have developed a novel statistical method to infer the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments using observation of the two-point correlation of Faraday rotation measures from a dense grid of extragalactic radio sources. Here we describe our approach, which embeds and extends the pioneering work of Kolatt (1998) within the context of Information Field Theory (a statistical theory for Bayesian inference on spatially distributed signals; Enfllin et al., 2009). We describe prospects for observation, for example with forthcoming data from the ultra-deep JVLA CHILES Con Pol survey and future surveys with the SKA.

  3. Void asymmetries in the cosmic web: a mechanism for bulk flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2014-01-01

    Bulk flows of galaxies moving with respect to the cosmic microwave background are well established observationally and seen in the most recent LCDM simulations. With the aid of an idealised Gadget-2 simulation, we show that void asymmetries in the cosmic web can exacerbate local bulk flows of galaxies. The Cosmicflows-2 survey, which has mapped in detail the 3D structure of the Local Universe, reveals that the Local Group resides in a "local sheet" of galaxies that borders a "local void" with a diameter of about 40 Mpc. The void is emptying out at a rate of 16 km/s/Mpc. In a co-moving frame, the Local Sheet is found to be moving away from the Local Void at ~ 260 km/s. Our model shows how asymmetric collapse due to unbalanced voids on either side of a developing sheet or wall can lead to a systematic movement of the sheet. We conjectured that asymmetries could lead to a large-scale separation of dark matter and baryons, thereby driving a dependence of galaxy properties with environment, but we do not find any ...

  4. Void asymmetries in the cosmic web: a mechanism for bulk flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Sharma, S.

    2016-10-01

    Bulk flows of galaxies moving with respect to the cosmic microwave background are well established observationally and seen in the most recent ΛCDM simulations. With the aid of an idealised Gadget-2 simulation, we show that void asymmetries in the cosmic web can exacerbate local bulk flows of galaxies. The {\\it Cosmicflows-2} survey, which has mapped in detail the 3D structure of the Local Universe, reveals that the Local Group resides in a ``local sheet'' of galaxies that borders a ``local void'' with a diameter of about 40 Mpc. The void is emptying out at a rate of 16 km s-1 Mpc-1. In a co-moving frame, the Local Sheet is found to be moving away from the Local Void at ~ 260 km s-1. Our model shows how asymmetric collapse due to unbalanced voids on either side of a developing sheet or wall can lead to a systematic movement of the sheet. We conjectured that asymmetries could lead to a large-scale separation of dark matter and baryons, thereby driving a dependence of galaxy properties with environment, but we do {\\it not} find any evidence for this effect.

  5. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Eckert, Dominique; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Celine

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5% of the Universe's total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons might not have condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of $10^5-10^7$ kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at $10^7$ kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous obs...

  6. Evolution of Mass and Velocity Field in the Cosmic Web: Comparison between Baryonic and Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weishan; Feng, Long-Long

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the evolution of the cosmic web since z = 5 in grid-based cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, focusing on the mass and velocity fields of both baryonic and cold dark matter. The tidal tensor of density is used as the main method for web identification, with λ th = 0.2–1.2. The evolution trends in baryonic and dark matter are similar, although moderate differences are observed. Sheets appear early, and their large-scale pattern may have been set up by z = 3. In terms of mass, filaments supersede sheets as the primary collapsing structures from z ∼ 2–3. Tenuous filaments assembled with each other to form prominent ones at z < 2. In accordance with the construction of the frame of the sheets, the cosmic divergence velocity, v div, was already well-developed above 2–3 Mpc by z = 3. Afterwards, the curl velocity, v curl, grew dramatically along with the rising of filaments, becoming comparable to v div, for <2–3 Mpc at z = 0. The scaling of v curl can be described by the hierarchical turbulence model. The alignment between the vorticity and the eigenvectors of the shear tensor in the baryonic matter field resembles that in the dark matter field, and is even moderately stronger between {\\boldsymbol{ω }} and {{\\boldsymbol{e}}}1, and ω and {{\\boldsymbol{e}}}3. Compared with dark matter, there is slightly less baryonic matter found residing in filaments and clusters, and its vorticity developed more significantly below 2–3 Mpc. These differences may be underestimated because of the limited resolution and lack of star formation in our simulation. The impact of the change of dominant structures in overdense regions at z ∼ 2–3 on galaxy formation and evolution is shortly discussed.

  7. Measuring Alignments between Galaxies and the Cosmic Web at z ˜ 2-3 Using IGM Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolewski, Alex; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lukić, Zarija; White, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Many galaxy formation models predict alignments between galaxy spin and the cosmic web (i.e., directions of filaments and sheets), leading to an intrinsic alignment between galaxies that creates a systematic error in weak-lensing measurements. These effects are often predicted to be stronger at high redshifts (z ≳ 1) that are inaccessible to massive galaxy surveys on foreseeable instrumentation, but IGM tomography of the Lyα forest from closely spaced quasars and galaxies is starting to measure the z ˜ 2-3 cosmic web with requisite fidelity. Using mock surveys from hydrodynamical simulations, we examine the utility of this technique, in conjunction with coeval galaxy samples, to measure alignment between galaxies and the cosmic web at z ˜ 2.5. We show that IGM tomography surveys with ≲5 h -1 Mpc sightline spacing can accurately recover the eigenvectors of the tidal tensor, which we use to define the directions of the cosmic web. For galaxy spins and shapes, we use a model parameterized by the alignment strength, {{Δ }} , with respect to the tidal tensor eigenvectors from the underlying density field, and also consider observational effects such as errors in the galaxy position angle, inclination, and redshift. Measurements using the upcoming ˜1 deg2 CLAMATO tomographic survey and 600 coeval zCOSMOS-Deep galaxies should place 3σ limits on extreme alignment models with {{Δ }} ˜ 0.1, but much larger surveys encompassing >10,000 galaxies, such as Subaru PFS, will be required to constrain models with {{Δ }} ˜ 0.03. These measurements will constrain models of galaxy-cosmic web alignment and test tidal torque theory at z ˜ 2, improving our understanding of the physics of intrinsic alignments.

  8. Hydrodynamical simulations of coupled and uncoupled quintessence models I: Halo properties and the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Lewis, Geraint F; Wales, Scott; Yepes, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a series of adiabatic hydrodynamical simulations of several quintessence models (both with a free and an interacting scalar field) in comparison to a standard \\LCDM\\ cosmology. For each we use $2\\times1024^3$ particles in a $250$\\hMpc\\ periodic box assuming WMAP7 cosmology. In this work we focus on the properties of haloes in the cosmic web at $z=0$. The web is classified into \\emph{voids}, \\emph{sheets}, \\emph{filaments} and \\emph{knots} depending on the eigenvalues of the velocity shear tensor, which are an excellent proxy for the underlying overdensity distribution. We find that the properties of objects classified according to their surrounding environment shows a substantial dependence on the underlying cosmology; for example, while $V_{\\rm max}$ shows average deviations of $\\approx5$ per cent across the different models when considering the full halo sample, comparing objects classified according to their environment, the size of the deviation can be as large as $20$ per cent. ...

  9. Revealing the z~2.5 Cosmic Web With 3D Lyman-Alpha Forest Tomography: A Deformation Tensor Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Khee-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Studies of cosmological objects should take into account their positions within the cosmic web of large-scale structure. Unfortunately, the cosmic web has only been extensively mapped at low-redshifts ($z1$, the required galaxy densities are inaccessible for the foreseeable future, but 3D reconstructions of Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest absorption in closely-separated background QSOs and star-forming galaxies already offer a detailed window into $z\\sim2-3$ large-scale structure. We quantify the utility of such maps for studying the cosmic web by using realistic $z=2.5$ Ly$\\alpha$ forest simulations matched to observational properties of upcoming surveys. A deformation tensor-based analysis is used to classify voids, sheets, filaments and nodes in the flux, which is compared to those determined from the underlying dark matter field. We find an extremely good correspondence, with $70\\%$ of the volume in the flux maps correctly classified relative to the dark matter web, and $99\\%$ classified to within 1 eigenvalue. Thi...

  10. Probabilistic Inference of Dark Matter Properties in Galaxy Clusters and the Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yin-Yee

    isotropic DM web. At this scale, it is possible to compare the spatial distribution of DM to simulations to give competitive constraints on cosmological parameters. Using weak lensing signals for estimating cosmological parameters is also known as cosmic shear inference. While I used a parametric technique to estimate the mass of El Gordo in chapter 2, my work in chapter 4 introduces a new non-parametric model using a Gaussian Process. As I have built the lensing physics into the very core of the covariance kernel matrix, we can also simultaneously infer the several important lensing observables, such as shear and convergence, given some lensed galaxy shapes. More importantly, this technique relies on fewer assumptions about the photometric redshift than traditional cosmic shear analysis technique. This may reduce the bias towards a ducial cosmology and lead to interesting discoveries. I conclude my work in Chapter 5 and discuss the implications of my work. This includes some future directions for analyzing DM by using simulations with different underlying DM models and real data. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  11. Implementing a Cost Effectiveness Analyzer for Web-Supported Academic Instruction: A Campus Wide Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Anat; Nachmias, Rafi

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a quantitative cost effectiveness analyzer for Web-supported academic instruction that was developed in Tel Aviv University during a long term study. The paper presents the cost effectiveness analysis of Tel Aviv University campus. Cost and benefit of 3,453 courses were analyzed, exemplifying campus-wide…

  12. Structural analysis of the SDSS Cosmic Web - I. Non-linear density field reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Vegter, Gert; Calvo, Miguel A. Aragón

    2011-10-01

    This study is the first in a series in which we analyse the structure and topology of the Cosmic Web as traced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The main issue addressed in the present study is the translation of the irregularly distributed discrete spatial data in the galaxy redshift survey into a representative density field. The density field will form the basis for a statistical, topological and cosmographic study of the cosmic density field in our Local Universe. We investigate the ability of three reconstruction techniques to analyse and investigate web-like features and geometries in a discrete distribution of objects. The three methods are the linear Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE), its higher order equivalent Natural Neighbour Field Estimator (NNFE) and a version of the Kriging interpolation adapted to the specific circumstances encountered in galaxy redshift surveys, the Natural Lognormal Kriging technique. DTFE and NNFE are based on the local geometry defined by the Voronoi and Delaunay tessellations of the galaxy distribution. The three reconstruction methods are analysed and compared using mock magnitude- and volume-limited SDSS redshift surveys, obtained on the basis of the Millennium simulation. We investigate error trends, biases and the topological structure of the resulting fields, concentrating on the void population identified by the Watershed Void Finder. Environmental effects are addressed by evaluating the density fields on a range of Gaussian filter scales. Comparison with the void population in the original simulation yields the fraction of false void mergers and false void splits. In most tests DTFE, NNFE and Kriging have largely similar density and topology error behaviour. Cosmetically, higher order NNFE and Kriging methods produce more visually appealing reconstructions. Quantitatively, however, DTFE performs better, even while being computationally far less demanding. A successful recovery of the void population on

  13. Cosmological Origami: Properties of Cosmic-Web Components When a Non-Stretchy Dark-Matter Sheet Folds

    CERN Document Server

    Neyrinck, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    In the current cosmological paradigm, an initially flat three-dimensional manifold that pervades space (the `dark-matter sheet') folds up to build concentrations of mass (galaxies), and a cosmic web between them. Galaxies are nodes, connected by a network of filaments and walls. The folding is in six-dimensional (3D position, plus 3D velocity) phase space. The positions of creases, or caustics, mark the edges of structures. Here, I introduce an origami approximation to cosmological structure formation, in which the dark-matter sheet is not allowed to stretch. But it still produces an idealized cosmic web, with nodes, filaments, walls and voids. In 2D, nodes form in `polygonal collapse' (a twist-fold in origami), necessarily generating filaments simultaneously. In 3D, nodes form in `polyhedral collapse,' simultaneously generating filaments and walls. The masses, spatial arrangement, and angular momenta of nodes and filaments are related in the model. I describe some `tetrahedral collapse', or tetrahedral twist...

  14. Developing a Webcam-Based Data Logger to Analyze Cosmic Rays in a Cloud Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealon, Kelly; Bellis, Matt

    2015-04-01

    Muons from secondary cosmic rays provide students with an opportunity to interact with a natural phenomenon that relies both on special relativity and fairly sophisticated particle physics knowledge. In many physics departments, undergraduate students set up a pair of scintillators in coincidence to measure the rate of these muons and in some cases, measure their angular dependence, but this requires specialized and potentially expensive equipment. We have spent the past year formalizing a design of a cloud chamber that relies not on dry ice, but Peltier thermoelectric coolers, that can be built for about one hundred dollars worth of equipment. With this design we can see the tracks left by cosmic rays, however to turn it into a useful undergraduate physics lab requires some sort of data logger. This poster details our efforts to use an off-the-shelf webcam to trigger on the change in image when a cosmic ray track appears in the chamber. We use this to estimate the rate and angular dependence and compare our results to other measurements. The successes and limitations of this approach will be discussed.

  15. A cosmic web filament revealed in Lyman-α emission around a luminous high-redshift quasar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio; Prochaska, J Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F; Madau, Piero

    2014-02-06

    Simulations of structure formation in the Universe predict that galaxies are embedded in a 'cosmic web', where most baryons reside as rarefied and highly ionized gas. This material has been studied for decades in absorption against background sources, but the sparseness of these inherently one-dimensional probes preclude direct constraints on the three-dimensional morphology of the underlying web. Here we report observations of a cosmic web filament in Lyman-α emission, discovered during a survey for cosmic gas fluorescently illuminated by bright quasars at redshift z ≈ 2.3. With a linear projected size of approximately 460 physical kiloparsecs, the Lyman-α emission surrounding the radio-quiet quasar UM 287 extends well beyond the virial radius of any plausible associated dark-matter halo and therefore traces intergalactic gas. The estimated cold gas mass of the filament from the observed emission-about 10(12.0 ± 0.5)/C(1/2) solar masses, where C is the gas clumping factor-is more than ten times larger than what is typically found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that a population of intergalactic gas clumps with subkiloparsec sizes may be missing in current numerical models.

  16. A cosmic web filament revealed in Lyman-alpha emission around a luminous high-redshift quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F; Madau, Piero

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of structure formation in the Universe predict that galaxies are embedded in a "cosmic web", where the majority of baryons reside as rarefied and highly ionized gas. This material has been studied for decades in absorption against background sources, but the sparseness of these inherently one-dimensional probes preclude direct constraints on the three-dimensional morphology of the underlying web. Here we report observations of a cosmic web filament in Lyman-alpha emission, discovered during a survey for cosmic gas fluorescently "illuminated" by bright quasars at z=2.3. With a projected size of approximately 460 physical kpc, the Lyman-alpha emission surrounding the radio-quiet quasar UM287 extends well beyond the virial radius of any plausible associated dark matter halo. The estimated cold gas mass of the nebula from the observed emission is at least ten times larger than what is typically found by cosmological simulations, suggesting that a population of intergalactic gas clumps with sub-kpc siz...

  17. Cosmic Web and Star Formation Activity in Galaxies at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Darvish, Behnam; Mobasher, Bahram; Scoville, Nicholas; Best, Philip; Sales, Laura; Smail, Ian

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of the delineated cosmic web/filaments on the star formation activity by exploring a sample of 425 narrow-band selected H{\\alpha} emitters, as well as 2846 color-color selected underlying star-forming galaxies for a large scale structure (LSS) at z=0.84 in the COSMOS field from the HiZELS survey. Using the scale-independent Multi-scale Morphology Filter (MMF) algorithm, we are able to quantitatively describe the density field and disentangle it into its major components: fields, filaments and clusters. We show that the observed median star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, specific star formation rate (sSFR), the mean SFR-Mass relation and its scatter for both H{\\alpha} emitters and underlying star-forming galaxies do not strongly depend on different classes of environment, in agreement with previous studies. However, the fraction of H{\\alpha} emitters varies with environment and is enhanced in filamentary structures at z~1. We propose mild galaxy-galaxy interactions as the possible ...

  18. Mapping the Cosmic Web with the largest all-sky surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Bilicki, Maciej; Jarrett, Thomas H; Cluver, Michelle E; Steward, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Our view of the low-redshift Cosmic Web has been revolutionized by galaxy redshift surveys such as 6dFGS, SDSS and 2MRS. However, the trade-off between depth and angular coverage limits a systematic three-dimensional account of the entire sky beyond the Local Volume (z<0.05). In order to reliably map the Universe to cosmologically significant depths over the full celestial sphere, one must draw on multiwavelength datasets and state-of-the-art photometric redshift techniques. We have undertaken a dedicated program of cross-matching the largest photometric all-sky surveys -- 2MASS, WISE and SuperCOSMOS -- to obtain accurate redshift estimates of millions of galaxies. The first outcome of these efforts -- the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ, Bilicki et al. 2014a) -- has been publicly released and includes almost 1 million galaxies with a mean redshift of z=0.08. Here we summarize how this catalog was constructed and how using the WISE mid-infrared sample together with SuperCOSMOS optical data allows ...

  19. The effect of cosmic web filaments on the properties of groups and their central galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Poudel, Anup; Tempel, Elmo; Einasto, Maret; Lietzen, Heidi; Nurmi, Pasi

    2016-01-01

    The nature versus nurture scenario in galaxy and group evolution is a long-standing problem not yet fully understood on cosmological scales. We study the properties of groups and their central galaxies in different large-scale environments defined by the luminosity density field and the cosmic web filaments. We use the luminosity density field constructed using 8 Mpc/h smoothing to characterize the large-scale environments and the Bisous model to extract the filamentary structures in different large-scale environments. We find differences in the properties of central galaxies and their groups in and outside of filaments at fixed halo and large-scale environments. In high-density environments, the group mass function has higher number densities in filaments compared to that outside of filaments towards the massive end. The relation is opposite in low-density environments. At fixed group mass and large-scale luminosity density, groups in filaments are slightly more luminous and their central galaxies have redde...

  20. Vortical Motions of Baryonic Gas in the Cosmic Web: Growth History and Scaling Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Weishan

    2015-01-01

    The vortical motions of the baryonic gas residing in large scale structures are investigated by cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. Proceeding in the formation of the cosmic web, the vortical motions of baryonic matter are pumped up by baroclinity in two stages, i.e., the formation of sheets, and filaments. The mean curl velocity are about $< 1$, 1-10, 10-150, 5-50 km/s in voids, sheets, filaments and knots at $z=0$, respectively. The scaling of the vortical velocity of gas can be well described by the She-Leveque hierarchical turbulence model in the range of $l<0.65(1.50) h^{-1}$ Mpc in simulation of box size 25(100) $h^{-1}$ Mpc. The fractal Hausdorff dimension of vortical motions, $d$, revealed by velocity structure functions, is $\\sim 2.1-2.3$($\\sim 1.8-2.1$). It is slightly larger than the fractal dimension of mass distribution in filaments, $\\textit{D}^f \\sim 1.9-2.2$, and smaller than the fractal dimension of sheets, $\\textit{D}^s \\sim 2.4-2.7$. The vortical kinetic energy of baryonic gas is m...

  1. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Stellar mass growth of spiral galaxies in the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Marcum, Pamela M; Popescu, Cristina; Tuffs, Richard; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J I; Davies, Luke J M; Driver, Simon P; Holwerda, Benne W; Kelvin, Lee S; Lara-López, Maritza A; López-Sánchez, Ángel R; Loveday, Jon; Moffett, Amanda; Taylor, Edward N; Owers, Matt; Robotham, Aaron S G

    2016-01-01

    We look for correlated changes in stellar mass and star formation rate along filaments in the cosmic web by examining the stellar masses and UV-derived star formation rates (SFR) of 1,799 ungrouped and unpaired spiral galaxies that reside in filaments. We devise multiple distance metrics to characterise the complex geometry of filaments, and find that galaxies closer to the cylindrical centre of a filament have higher stellar masses than their counterparts near the periphery of filaments, on the edges of voids. In addition, these peripheral spiral galaxies have higher specific star formation rates (SSFR) at a given mass. Complementing our sample of filament spiral galaxies with spiral galaxies in tendrils and voids, we find that the average SFR of these objects in different large scale environments are similar to each other with the primary discriminant in SFR being stellar mass, in line with previous works. However, the distributions of SFRs are found to vary with large-scale environment. Our results thus su...

  2. Absorption in the Cosmic Web: Characterizing the Intergalactic Medium in Cosmological Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    We propose to observe and characterize the IGM associated with cosmological filaments in a statistical manner up to redshift ~0.4. For this purpose, we have used a published cluster catalog (Hao et al. 2010) to identify massive nodes in the cosmic web. We used cluster-pairs separated by 10 to ensure a full characterization of HI and OVI lines at column densities N~10^13 cm^-2. This setup will allow us to detect broad and shallow HI and OVI lines (if any) at the redshifts of these filaments, believed to trace portions of the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). Combining these new observations with those from our pilot study carried out in cycle 20 (ID 12958, PI Tejos), we aim to provide a firm detection of the WHIM in cosmological filaments, at the 95% confidence level. Our findings will test our understanding of galaxy formation and the role of AGN/supernova feedback by comparing them with state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations. We will also test the the hypothesis which states that the majority of OVI absorbers at low-z are confined within Prochaska et al. 2011; Tumlinson et al. 2011).

  3. The f(Script R) halo mass function in the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Braun-Bates, F.; Winther, H. A.; Alonso, D.; Devriendt, J.

    2017-03-01

    An important indicator of modified gravity is the effect of the local environment on halo properties. This paper examines the influence of the local tidal structure on the halo mass function, the halo orientation, spin and the concentration-mass relation. We use the excursion set formalism to produce a halo mass function conditional on large-scale structure. Our simple model agrees well with simulations on large scales at which the density field is linear or weakly non-linear. Beyond this, our principal result is that f(Script R) does affect halo abundances, the halo spin parameter and the concentration-mass relationship in an environment-independent way, whereas we find no appreciable deviation from \\text{ΛCDM} for the mass function with fixed environment density, nor the alignment of the orientation and spin vectors of the halo to the eigenvectors of the local cosmic web. There is a general trend for greater deviation from \\text{ΛCDM} in underdense environments and for high-mass haloes, as expected from chameleon screening.

  4. The importance of the cosmic web and halo substructure for power spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, Francesco; Bacon, David J; Crittenden, Robert; Percival, Will J

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study the relevance of the cosmic web and substructures on the matter and lensing power spectra measured from halo mock catalogues extracted from the N-body simulations. Since N-body simulations are computationally expensive, it is common to use faster methods that approximate the dark matter field as a set of halos. In this approximation, we replace mass concentrations in N-body simulations by a spherically symmetric Navarro-Frenk-White halo density profile. We also consider the full mass field as the sum of two distinct fields: dark matter halos ($M>9\\times 10^{12}~M_{\\odot}$/h) and particles not included into halos. Mock halos reproduce well the matter power spectrum, but underestimate the lensing power spectrum on large and small scales. For sources at $z_{\\rm s}=1$ the lensing power spectrum is underestimated by up to 40% at $\\ell\\approx 10^4$ with respect to the simulated halos. The large scale effect can be alleviated by combining the mock catalogue with the dark matter distribution out...

  5. A WebGIS-based system for analyzing and visualizing air quality data for Shanghai Municipality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Manyi; Liu, Chaoshun; Gao, Wei

    2014-10-01

    An online visual analytical system based on Java Web and WebGIS for air quality data for Shanghai Municipality was designed and implemented to quantitatively analyze and qualitatively visualize air quality data. By analyzing the architecture of WebGIS and Java Web, we firstly designed the overall scheme for system architecture, then put forward the software and hardware environment and also determined the main function modules for the system. The visual system was ultimately established with the DIV + CSS layout method combined with JSP, JavaScript, and some other computer programming languages based on the Java programming environment. Moreover, Struts, Spring, and Hibernate frameworks (SSH) were integrated in the system for the purpose of easy maintenance and expansion. To provide mapping service and spatial analysis functions, we selected ArcGIS for Server as the GIS server. We also used Oracle database and ESRI file geodatabase to store spatial data and non-spatial data in order to ensure the data security. In addition, the response data from the Web server are resampled to implement rapid visualization through the browser. The experimental successes indicate that this system can quickly respond to user's requests, and efficiently return the accurate processing results.

  6. Dependence of GAMA galaxy halo masses on the cosmic web environment from 100 deg2 of KiDS weak lensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Margot M.; Cacciato, Marcello; Dvornik, Andrej; Eardley, Lizzie; Heymans, Catherine; Hoekstra, Henk; Kuijken, Konrad; McNaught-Roberts, Tamsyn; Sifón, Cristóbal; Viola, Massimo; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Bilicki, Maciej; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P.; Erben, Thomas; Grado, Aniello; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Holwerda, Benne W.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; de Jong, Jelte T. A.; Liske, Jochen; McFarland, John; Nakajima, Reiko; Napolitano, Nicola R.; Norberg, Peder; Peacock, John A.; Radovich, Mario; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Schneider, Peter; Sikkema, Gert; van Uitert, Edo; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Valentijn, Edwin A.

    2016-11-01

    Galaxies and their dark matter haloes are part of a complex network of mass structures, collectively called the cosmic web. Using the tidal tensor prescription these structures can be classified into four cosmic environments: voids, sheets, filaments and knots. As the cosmic web may influence the formation and evolution of dark matter haloes and the galaxies they host, we aim to study the effect of these cosmic environments on the average mass of galactic haloes. To this end we measure the galaxy-galaxy lensing profile of 91 195 galaxies, within 0.039 < z < 0.263, from the spectroscopic Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey, using {˜ }100 ° ^2 of overlapping data from the Kilo-Degree Survey. In each of the four cosmic environments we model the contributions from group centrals, satellites and neighbouring groups to the stacked galaxy-galaxy lensing profiles. After correcting the lens samples for differences in the stellar mass distribution, we find no dependence of the average halo mass of central galaxies on their cosmic environment. We do find a significant increase in the average contribution of neighbouring groups to the lensing profile in increasingly dense cosmic environments. We show, however, that the observed effect can be entirely attributed to the galaxy density at much smaller scales (within 4 h-1 Mpc), which is correlated with the density of the cosmic environments. Within our current uncertainties we find no direct dependence of galaxy halo mass on their cosmic environment.

  7. Analyzing weak lensing of the cosmic microwave background using the likelihood function

    CERN Document Server

    Hirata, C M; Hirata, Christopher M.; Seljak, Uros

    2003-01-01

    Future experiments will produce high-resolution temperature maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and are expected to reveal the signature of gravitational lensing by intervening large-scale structures. We construct all-sky maximum-likelihood estimators that use the lensing effect to estimate the projected density (convergence) of these structures, its power spectrum, and cross-correlation with other observables. This contrasts with earlier quadratic-estimator approaches that Taylor-expanded the observed CMB temperature to linear order in the lensing deflection angle; these approaches gave estimators for the temperature-convergence correlation in terms of the CMB three-point correlation function and for the convergence power spectrum in terms of the CMB four-point correlation function, which can be biased and non-optimal due to terms beyond the linear order. We show that for sufficiently weak lensing, the maximum-likelihood estimator reduces to the computationally less demanding quadratic estimator. T...

  8. ZOMG - I. How the cosmic web inhibits halo growth and generates assembly bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzyszkowski, Mikolaj; Porciani, Cristiano; Romano-Díaz, Emilio; Garaldi, Enrico

    2017-07-01

    The clustering of dark matter haloes with fixed mass depends on their formation history, an effect known as assembly bias. We use zoom N-body simulations to investigate the origin of this phenomenon. For each halo at redshift z = 0, we determine the time in which the physical volume containing its final mass becomes stable. We consider five examples for which this happens at z ˜ 1.5 and two that do not stabilize by z = 0. The zoom simulations show that early-collapsing haloes do not grow in mass at z = 0 while late-forming ones show a net inflow. The reason is that 'accreting' haloes are located at the nodes of a network of thin filaments feeding them. Conversely, each 'stalled' halo lies within a prominent filament that is thicker than the halo size. Infalling material from the surroundings becomes part of the filament while matter within it recedes from the halo. We conclude that assembly bias originates from quenching halo growth due to tidal forces following the formation of non-linear structures in the cosmic web, as previously conjectured in the literature. Also the internal dynamics of the haloes change: the velocity anisotropy profile is biased towards radial (tangential) orbits in accreting (stalled) haloes. Our findings reveal the cause of the yet unexplained dependence of halo clustering on the anisotropy. Finally, we extend the excursion-set theory to account for these effects. A simple criterion based on the ellipticity of the linear tidal field combined with the spherical-collapse model provides excellent predictions for both classes of haloes.

  9. Counter Data of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer aboard the Cassini spacecraft and possible "dust clouds" at Saturn

    OpenAIRE

    Khalisi, Emil; Srama, Ralf; Grün, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    We present the impact rates of dust particles recorded by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) aboard the Cassini spacecraft. The "dust counters" evaluate the quality of an impact and give rise to the apparent density of dust particles in space. The raw data is pre-selected and refined to a new structure that serves to a better investigation of densities, flows, and properties of interplanetary dust grains. Our data is corrected for the dead time of the instrument and corresponds to an assumed Kepl...

  10. The Clustering of Galaxies in the Completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmic Flows and Cosmic Web from Luminous Red Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernández; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12) CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given ΛCDM cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift dependent nonlinear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalised perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the ARGO code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions (RSD). Our tests relying on accurate N-body based mock galaxy catalogues, show unbiased real space power spectra of the nonlinear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the nonlinear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual lightcone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10% of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, e.g. BAO reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ), integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) measurements, or environmental studies.

  11. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmic flows and cosmic web from luminous red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Hernández Monteagudo, Carlos; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-06-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given Λ cold dark matter cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift-dependent non-linear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalized perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the argo code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions. Our tests relying on accurate N-body-based mock galaxy catalogues show unbiased real space power spectra of the non-linear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the non-linear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual light-cone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10 per cent of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, for example, baryon acoustic oscillation reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich, integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurements or environmental studies.

  12. w4CSeq: software and web application to analyze 4C-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mingyang; Gao, Fan; Lu, Wange; Wang, Kai

    2016-11-01

    Circularized Chromosome Conformation Capture followed by deep sequencing (4C-Seq) is a powerful technique to identify genome-wide partners interacting with a pre-specified genomic locus. Here, we present a computational and statistical approach to analyze 4C-Seq data generated from both enzyme digestion and sonication fragmentation-based methods. We implemented a command line software tool and a web interface called w4CSeq, which takes in the raw 4C sequencing data (FASTQ files) as input, performs automated statistical analysis and presents results in a user-friendly manner. Besides providing users with the list of candidate interacting sites/regions, w4CSeq generates figures showing genome-wide distribution of interacting regions, and sketches the enrichment of key features such as TSSs, TTSs, CpG sites and DNA replication timing around 4C sites. Users can establish their own web server by downloading source codes at https://github.com/WGLab/w4CSeq Additionally, a demo web server is available at http://w4cseq.wglab.org CONTACT: kaiwang@usc.edu or wangelu@usc.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A Web-based System for Observing and Analyzing Computer Mediated Communications

    CERN Document Server

    May, Madeth; Prévôt, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Tracking data of user's activities resulting from Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) tools (forum, chat, etc.) is often carried out in an ad-hoc manner, which either confines the reusability of data in different purposes or makes data exploitation difficult. Our research works are biased toward methodological challenges involved in designing and developing a generic system for tracking user's activities while interacting with asynchronous communication tools like discussion forums. We present in this paper, an approach for building a Web-based system for observing and analyzing user activity on any type of discussion forums.

  14. Synchrotron Emission on the Largest Scales: Radio Detection of the Cosmic-Web

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shea D. Brown

    2011-12-01

    Shocks and turbulence generated during large-scale structure formation are predicted to produce large-scale, low surface-brightness synchrotron emission. On the largest scales, this emission is globally correlated with the thermal baryon distribution, and constitutes the `synchrotron cosmic-web’. I present the observational prospects and challenges for detecting this faint emission with upcoming SKA pathfinders.

  15. Clusters of Galaxies and the Cosmic Web with Square Kilometre Array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruta Kale; K. S. Dwarakanath; Dharam Vir Lal; Joydeep Bagchi; Surajit Paul; Siddharth Malu; Abhirup Datta; Viral Parekh; Prateek Sharma; Mamta Pandey-Pommier

    2016-12-01

    The intra-cluster and inter-galactic media that pervade the large scale structure of the Universe are known to be magnetized at sub-micro Gauss to micro Gauss levels and to contain cosmic rays. The acceleration of cosmic rays and their evolution along with that of magnetic fields in these media is still not well understood. Diffuse radio sources of synchrotron origin associated with the Intra-Cluster Medium (ICM) such as radio halos, relics and mini-halos are direct probes of the underlying mechanisms of cosmic ray acceleration. Observations with radio telescopes such as the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, the Very Large Array and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope have led to the discoveries of about 80 such sources and allowed detailed studies in the frequency range 0.15–1.4 GHz of a few. These studies have revealed scaling relations between the thermal and non-thermal properties of clusters and favour the role of shocks in the formation of radio relics and of turbulent re-acceleration in the formation of radio halos and mini-halos. The radio halos are known to occur in merging clusters and mini-halos are detected in about half of the cool-core clusters. Due to the limitations of current radio telescopes, low mass galaxy clusters and galaxy groups remain unexplored as they are expected to contain much weaker radio sources. Distinguishing between the primary and the secondary models of cosmic ray acceleration mechanisms requires spectral measurements over a wide range of radio frequencies and with high sensitivity. Simulations have also predicted weak diffuse radio sources associated with filaments connecting galaxy clusters. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a next generation radio telescope that will operate in the frequency range of 0.05–20 GHz with unprecedented sensitivities and resolutions. The expected detection limits of SKA will reveal a few hundred to thousand new radio halos, relics and mini-halos providing the first large and comprehensive

  16. Persistence of information on the web: Analyzing citations contained in research articles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrance, S.; Coetzee, F.; Flake, G.

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the persistence of information on the web, looking at the percentage of invalid URLs contained in academic articles within the CiteSeer (ResearchIndex) database. The number of URLs contained in the papers has increased from an average of 0.06 in 1993 to 1.6 in 1999. We found...... that a significant percentage of URLs are now invalid, ranging from 23% for 1999 articles, to 53% for 1994. We also found that for almost all of the invalid URLs, it was possible to locate the information (or highly related information) in an alternate location, primarily with the use of search engines. However......, the ability to relocate missing information varied according to search experience and effort expended. Citation practices suggest that more information may be lost in the future unless these practices are improved. We discuss persistent URL standards and their usage, and give recommendations for citing URLs...

  17. SambVca 2. A Web Tool for Analyzing Catalytic Pockets with Topographic Steric Maps

    KAUST Repository

    Falivene, Laura

    2016-06-27

    Developing more efficient catalysts remains one of the primary targets of organometallic chemists. To accelerate reaching this goal, effective molecular descriptors and visualization tools can represent a remarkable aid. Here, we present a Web application for analyzing the catalytic pocket of metal complexes using topographic steric maps as a general and unbiased descriptor that is suitable for every class of catalysts. To show the broad applicability of our approach, we first compared the steric map of a series of transition metal complexes presenting popular mono-, di-, and tetracoordinated ligands and three classic zirconocenes. This comparative analysis highlighted similarities and differences between totally unrelated ligands. Then, we focused on a recently developed Fe(II) catalyst that is active in the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones and imines. Finally, we expand the scope of these tools to rationalize the inversion of enantioselectivity in enzymatic catalysis, achieved by point mutation of three amino acids of mononuclear p-hydroxymandelate synthase.

  18. Collab-Analyzer: An Environment for Conducting Web-Based Collaborative Learning Activities and Analyzing Students' Information-Searching Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Hsiang; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Kuo, Fan-Ray

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have found that students might get lost or feel frustrated while searching for information on the Internet to deal with complex problems without real-time guidance or supports. To address this issue, a web-based collaborative learning system, Collab-Analyzer, is proposed in this paper. It is not only equipped with a collaborative…

  19. Analyzing the Evolution of Web Services using Fine-Grained Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, D.; Pinzger, M.

    2012-01-01

    Preprint of paper published in: ICWS 2012 - IEEE 19th International Conference on Web Services, 24-29 June 2012; doi:10.1109/ICWS.2012.29 In the service-oriented paradigm web service interfaces are considered contracts between web service subscribers and providers. However, these interfaces are co

  20. Analyzing the cosmic variance limit of remote dipole measurements of the cosmic microwave background using the large-scale kinetic Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Terrana, Alexandra; Johnson, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Due to cosmic variance we cannot learn any more about large-scale inhomogeneities from the primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) alone. More information on large scales is essential for resolving large angular scale anomalies in the CMB. Here we consider cross correlating the large-scale kinetic Sunyaev Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect and probes of large-scale structure, a technique known as kSZ tomography. The statistically anisotropic component of the cross correlation encodes the CMB dipole as seen by free electrons throughout the observable Universe, providing information about long wavelength inhomogeneities. We compute the large angular scale power asymmetry, constructing the appropriate transfer functions, and estimate the cosmic variance limited signal to noise for a variety of redshift bin configurations. The signal to noise is significant over a large range of power multipoles and numbers of bins. We present a simple mode counting argument indicating that kSZ tomography can be used to estimate more mode...

  1. Dependence of GAMA galaxy halo masses on the cosmic web environment from 100 square degrees of KiDS weak lensing data

    CERN Document Server

    Brouwer, Margot M; Dvornik, Andrej; Eardley, Lizzie; Heymans, Catherine; Hoekstra, Henk; Kuijken, Konrad; McNaught-Roberts, Tamsyn; Sifón, Cristóbal; Viola, Massimo; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Bilicki, Maciej; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P; Erben, Thomas; Grado, Aniello; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Holwerda, Benne W; Hopkins, Andrew M; de Jong, Jelte T A; Liske, Jochen; McFarland, John; Nakajima, Reiko; Napolitano, Nicola R; Norberg, Peder; Peacock, John A; Radovich, Mario; Robotham, Aaron S G; Schneider, Peter; Sikkema, Gert; van Uitert, Edo; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies and their dark matter haloes are part of a complex network of mass structures, collectively called the cosmic web. Using the tidal tensor prescription these structures can be classified into four cosmic environments: voids, sheets, filaments and knots. As the cosmic web may influence the formation and evolution of dark matter haloes and the galaxies they host, we aim to study the effect of these cosmic environments on the average mass of galactic haloes. To this end we measure the galaxy-galaxy lensing profile of 91,195 galaxies, within 0.039 < z < 0.263, from the spectroscopic Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, using ~100 square degrees of overlapping data from the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS). In each of the four cosmic environments we model the contributions from group centrals, satellites and neighbouring groups to the stacked galaxy-galaxy lensing profiles. After correcting the lens samples for differences in the stellar mass distribution, we find no dependence of the average halo mass o...

  2. Forward, back and home again : analyzing user behavior on the web

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    In a period of less than two decades, the World Wide Web has evolved into one of the most important sources of information and services. Due to the infancy of the Web and its rapid growth, our knowledge on how users interact with the Web is limited - knowledge which is likely to provide pointers for improvements in the design of Web sites and Web browsers. In this thesis, we aim to provide an integrative overview of theoretical insights and empirical findings, and to extend this body of knowl...

  3. The rarity of Dark Matter Halos in medium-sized walls of the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Tze; Primack, Joel R.; Lee, Christoph; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; Behroozi, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In 2014, Marshall McCall mapped out our Local Sheet, the cosmic wall containing the Milk Way and Andromeda galaxies. We use the large new Bolshoi-Planck cosmological simulation to investigate how rare our type of Local Sheet is, with 2 nearby halos like those of Milky Way and Andromeda. The conclusion of our investigation is that the occurrence of a pair of galaxies the size of Milky Way and Andromeda near the center of a wall 8 mpc in diameter, with the pair of galaxies within 0.7 mpc/h of each other, is very rare : it makes up only 0.05% of all walls in the simulation.

  4. Analyzing Web 2.0 Integration with Next Generation Networks for Services Rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtaria, Kamaljit I

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Networks (NGN) aims to integrate for IP-based telecom infrastructures and provide most advance & high speed emerging value added services. NGN capable to provide higher innovative services, these services will able to integrate communication and Web service into a single platform. IP Multimedia Subsystem, a NGN leading technology, enables a variety of NGN-compliant communications services to interoperate while being accessed through different kinds of access networks, preferably broadband. IMS–NGN services essential by both consumer and corporate users are by now used to access services, even communications services through the web and web-based communities and social networks, It is key for success of IMS-based services to be provided with efficient web access, so users can benefit from those new services by using web-based applications and user interfaces, not only NGN-IMS User Equipments and SIP protocol. Many Service are under planning which provided only under convergence of ...

  5. Quantifying the Cosmic Web in the New Era of Redshift Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Lahav, Ofer

    2004-01-01

    Two main strategies have been implemented in mapping the local universe: whole-sky 'shallow' surveys and 'deep' surveys over limited parts of the sky. The two approaches complement each other in studying cosmography and statistical properties of the Universe. We summarise some results on the power spectrum of fluctuations and Wiener reconstruction of the density field from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS) of 230,000 redshifts. We then discuss future challenges in quantifying the web of...

  6. Dancing in the dark: galactic properties trace spin swings along the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Dubois, Yohan; Welker, Charlotte; Borgne, Damien Le; Devriendt, Julien; Laigle, Clotilde; Codis, Sandrine; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Arnouts, Stéphane; Benabed, Karim; Bertin, Emmanuel; Blaizot, Jeremy; Bouchet, François; Cardoso, Jean-François; Colombi, Stéphane; de Lapparent, Valérie; Desjacques, Vincent; Gavazzi, Raphaël; Kassin, Susan; Kimm, Taysun; McCracken, Henry; Milliard, Bruno; Peirani, Sébastien; Prunet, Simon; Rouberol, Stéphane; Silk, Joseph; Slyz, Adrianne; Sousbie, Thierry; Teyssier, Romain; Tresse, Laurence; Treyer, Marie; Vibert, Didier; Volonteri, Marta

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, Horizon-AGN, is used to investigate the alignment between the spin of galaxies and the large-scale cosmic filaments above redshift one. The analysis of more than 150 000 galaxies with morphological diversity in a 100 Mpc/h comoving box size shows that the spin of low-mass, rotation-dominated, blue, star-forming galaxies is preferentially aligned with their neighbouring filaments. High-mass, dispersion-dominated, red, quiescent galaxies tend to have a spin perpendicular to nearby filaments. The reorientation of the spin of massive galaxies is provided by galaxy mergers which are significant in the mass build up of high-mass galaxies. We find that the stellar mass transition from alignment to misalignment happens around 3.10^10 M_sun. This is consistent with earlier findings of a dark matter mass transition for the orientation of the spin of halos (5.10^11 M_sun at the same redshift from Codis et al., 2012). With these numerical evidence, we advocate a scena...

  7. Intrinsic alignment of simulated galaxies in the cosmic web: implications for weak lensing surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Codis, Sandrine; Dubois, Yohan; Pichon, Christophe; Benabed, Karim; Desjacques, Vincent; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic alignment of galaxy shapes and their cross-correlation with the surrounding dark matter tidal field are investigated using the 160 000, z=1.2 synthetic galaxies extracted from the high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Horizon-AGN. One- and two-point statistics of the spin of the stellar component are measured as a function of mass and colour. For the low-mass galaxies, this spin is locally aligned with the tidal field `filamentary' direction while, for the high-mass galaxies, it is perpendicular to both filaments and walls. The bluest galaxies of our synthetic catalog are more strongly correlated with the surrounding tidal field than the reddest galaxies, and this correlation extends up to 10 Mpc/h comoving distance. We also report a correlation of the projected ellipticities of blue, intermediate mass galaxies on a similar scale at a level of 10^(-4) which could be a concern for cosmic shear measurements. We do not report any measurable intrinsic alignments of the reddest galax...

  8. An observational signal of the void shape correlation and its link to the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jounghun

    2014-01-01

    The shapes of cosmic voids are prone to distortions by the external tidal forces since their low-densities imply a lower internal resistance. This susceptibility of the void shapes to the tidal distortions makes them useful as an indicator of the large-scale tidal and density fields, despite the practical difficulty in defining them. Using the void catalog constructed by Pan et al. (2012) from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR7), we detect a clear 4 sigma signal of spatial correlations of the void shapes on the scale of 20 Mpc/h and show that the signal is robust against the projection of the void shapes onto the plane of sky. By constructing a simple analytic model for the void shape correlation, within the framework of tidal torque theory, we demonstrate that the void shape correlation function scales linearly with the two-point correlation function of the linear density field. We also find a direct observational evidence for the cross-correlation of the void shapes with the ...

  9. A geospatial web portal for sharing and analyzing greenhouse gas data derived from satellite remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hao; Yu, Bailang; Chen, Zuoqi; Hu, Yingjie; Huang, Yan; Wu, Jianping; Wu, Bin; Ge, Rong

    2013-09-01

    Greenhouse gas data collected by different institutions throughout the world have significant scientific values for global climate change studies. Due to the diversity of data formats and different specifications of data access interfaces, most of those data should be first downloaded onto a local machine before they can be used. To overcome this limitation, we present a geospatial web portal for sharing and analyzing greenhouse gas data derived from remote sensing images. As a proof-of-concept, a prototype has also been designed and implemented. The workflow of the web portal contains four processes: data access, data analysis, results visualization, and results output. A large volume of greenhouse gas data have been collected, described, and indexed in the portal, and a variety of data analysis services, such as calculating the temporal variation of regionally averaged column CO2 values and analyzing the latitudinal variations of globally averaged column CO2 values, are integrated into this portal. With the integrated geospatial data and services, researchers can collect and analyze greenhouse gas data online, and can preview and download the analysis results directly from the web portal. The geospatial web portal has been implemented as a web application, and we also used a study case to illustrate this framework.

  10. xGASS: gas-rich central galaxies in small groups and their connections to cosmic web gas feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowiecki, Steven; Catinella, Barbara; Cortese, Luca; Saintonge, Amélie; Brown, Toby; Wang, Jing

    2017-04-01

    We use deep H i observations obtained as part of the extended GALEX Arecibo SDSS survey (xGASS) to study the cold gas properties of central galaxies across environments. We find that below stellar masses of 1010.2 M⊙, central galaxies in groups have an average atomic hydrogen gas fraction ˜0.3 dex higher than those in isolation at the same stellar mass. At these stellar masses, group central galaxies are usually found in small groups of N = 2 members. The higher H i content in these low-mass group central galaxies is mirrored by their higher average star formation activity and molecular hydrogen content. At larger stellar masses, this difference disappears and central galaxies in groups have similar (or even smaller) gas reservoirs and star formation activity compared to those in isolation. We discuss possible scenarios able to explain our findings and suggest that the higher gas content in low-mass group central galaxies is likely due to the contributions from the cosmic web or H i-rich minor mergers, which also fuel their enhanced star formation activity.

  11. GALAXIES IN FILAMENTS HAVE MORE SATELLITES: THE INFLUENCE OF THE COSMIC WEB ON THE SATELLITE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION IN THE SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Quan; Libeskind, N. I. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Tempel, E., E-mail: qguo@aip.de [Tartu Observatory, Observatooriumi 1, 61602 Tõravere (Estonia)

    2015-02-20

    We investigate whether the satellite luminosity function (LF) of primary galaxies identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) depends on whether the host galaxy is in a filament or not. Isolated primary galaxies are identified in the SDSS spectroscopic sample, and potential satellites (that are up to four magnitudes fainter than their hosts) are searched for in the much deeper photometric sample. Filaments are constructed from the galaxy distribution by the Bisous process. Isolated primary galaxies are divided into two subsamples: those in filaments and those not in filaments. We examine the stacked mean satellite LF of both the filament and nonfilament samples and find that, on average, the satellite LF of galaxies in filaments is significantly higher than those of galaxies not in filaments. The filamentary environment can increase the abundance of the brightest satellites (M {sub sat.} < M {sub prim.} + 2.0) by a factor of ∼2 compared with nonfilament isolated galaxies. This result is independent of the primary galaxy magnitude, although the satellite LF of galaxies in the faintest magnitude bin is too noisy to determine if such a dependence exists. Because our filaments are extracted from a spectroscopic flux-limited sample, we consider the possibility that the difference in satellite LF is due to a redshift, color, or environmental bias, finding these to be insufficient to explain our result. The dependence of the satellite LF on the cosmic web suggests that the filamentary environment may have a strong effect on the efficiency of galaxy formation.

  12. xGASS: Gas-rich central galaxies in small groups and their connections to cosmic web gas feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowiecki, Steven; Catinella, Barbara; Cortese, Luca; Saintonge, Amélie; Brown, Toby; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    We use deep HI observations obtained as part of the extended GALEX Arecibo SDSS survey (xGASS) to study the cold gas properties of central galaxies across environments. We find that, below stellar masses of 1010.2 M⊙, central galaxies in groups have an average atomic hydrogen gas fraction ˜0.3dex higher than those in isolation at the same stellar mass. At these stellar masses, group central galaxies are usually found in small groups of N=2 members. The higher HI content in these low mass group central galaxies is mirrored by their higher average star formation activity and molecular hydrogen content. At larger stellar masses, this difference disappears and central galaxies in groups have similar (or even smaller) gas reservoirs and star formation activity compared to those in isolation. We discuss possible scenarios able to explain our findings and suggest that the higher gas content in low mass group central galaxies is likely due to contributions from the cosmic web or HI-rich minor mergers, which also fuel their enhanced star formation activity.

  13. Towards the statistical detection of the warm-hot intergalactic medium in inter-cluster filaments of the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Tejos, Nicolas; Crighton, Neil H M; Morris, Simon L; Werk, Jessica K; Theuns, Tom; Padilla, Nelson; Bielby, Rich M; Finn, Charles W

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] Modern analyses of structure formation predict a universe tangled in a cosmic web of dark matter and diffuse baryons. These theories further predict that by the present day, a significant fraction of the baryons will be shock-heated to $T \\sim 10^{5}-10^{7}$K yielding a warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), but whose actual existence has eluded a firm observational confirmation. We have designed a novel experiment to search for signatures of the WHIM, by targeting the putative filaments connecting galaxy clusters. Here, we detail the experimental design and report on our first study of a remarkable QSO sightline, that passes within $\\Delta d 50$ km/s) and OVI absorption lines within $\\Delta v < 1000$ km/s from the cluster-pairs redshifts, corresponding to $\\sim 2$, $\\sim 2$, $\\sim 6$ and $\\sim 4$ times their field expectations, respectively. We also report on covering fractions, $f_c$, of gas close to cluster-pairs, and find that the $f_c$ of BLAs are $\\sim 4-7$ times higher than the random expe...

  14. Galaxies in Filaments have More Satellites: The Influence of the Cosmic Web on the Satellite Luminosity Function in the SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Quan; Tempel, E.; Libeskind, N. I.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate whether the satellite luminosity function (LF) of primary galaxies identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) depends on whether the host galaxy is in a filament or not. Isolated primary galaxies are identified in the SDSS spectroscopic sample, and potential satellites (that are up to four magnitudes fainter than their hosts) are searched for in the much deeper photometric sample. Filaments are constructed from the galaxy distribution by the Bisous process. Isolated primary galaxies are divided into two subsamples: those in filaments and those not in filaments. We examine the stacked mean satellite LF of both the filament and nonfilament samples and find that, on average, the satellite LF of galaxies in filaments is significantly higher than those of galaxies not in filaments. The filamentary environment can increase the abundance of the brightest satellites (M sat. 2.0) by a factor of ~2 compared with nonfilament isolated galaxies. This result is independent of the primary galaxy magnitude, although the satellite LF of galaxies in the faintest magnitude bin is too noisy to determine if such a dependence exists. Because our filaments are extracted from a spectroscopic flux-limited sample, we consider the possibility that the difference in satellite LF is due to a redshift, color, or environmental bias, finding these to be insufficient to explain our result. The dependence of the satellite LF on the cosmic web suggests that the filamentary environment may have a strong effect on the efficiency of galaxy formation.

  15. MATISSE a web-based tool to access, visualize and analyze high resolution minor bodies observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzi, Angelo; Capria, Maria Teresa; Palomba, Ernesto; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Giommi, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    In the recent years planetary exploration missions acquired data from minor bodies (i.e., dwarf planets, asteroid and comets) at a detail level never reached before. Since these objects often present very irregular shapes (as in the case of the comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko target of the ESA Rosetta mission) "classical" bidimensional projections of observations are difficult to understand. With the aim of providing the scientific community a tool to access, visualize and analyze data in a new way, ASI Science Data Center started to develop MATISSE (Multi-purposed Advanced Tool for the Instruments for the Solar System Exploration - http://tools.asdc.asi.it/matisse.jsp) in late 2012. This tool allows 3D web-based visualization of data acquired by planetary exploration missions: the output could either be the straightforward projection of the selected observation over the shape model of the target body or the visualization of a high-order product (average/mosaic, difference, ratio, RGB) computed directly online with MATISSE. Standard outputs of the tool also comprise downloadable files to be used with GIS software (GeoTIFF and ENVI format) and 3D very high-resolution files to be viewed by means of the free software Paraview. During this period the first and most frequent exploitation of the tool has been related to visualization of data acquired by VIRTIS-M instruments onboard Rosetta observing the comet 67P. The success of this task, well represented by the good number of published works that used images made with MATISSE confirmed the need of a different approach to correctly visualize data coming from irregular shaped bodies. In the next future the datasets available to MATISSE are planned to be extended, starting from the addition of VIR-Dawn observations of both Vesta and Ceres and also using standard protocols to access data stored in external repositories, such as NASA ODE and Planetary VO.

  16. Analyzing Web 2.0 Integration with Next Generation Networks for Services Rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaljit I. Lakhtaria

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Next Generation Networks (NGN aims to integrate for IP-based telecominfrastructures and provide most advance & high speed emerging value added services.NGN capable to provide higher innovative services, these services will able to integratecommunication and Web service into a single platform. IP Multimedia Subsystem, aNGN leading technology, enables a variety of NGN-compliant communications servicesto interoperate while being accessed through different kinds of access networks,preferably broadband. IMS–NGN services essential by both consumer and corporateusers are by now used to access services, even communications services through the weband web-based communities and social networks, It is key for success of IMS-basedservices to be provided with efficient web access, so users can benefit from those newservices by using web-based applications and user interfaces, not only NGN-IMS UserEquipments and SIP protocol. Many Service are under planning which provided onlyunder convergence of IMS & Web 2.0. Convergence between Web 2.0 and NGN-IMScreates and serves new invented innovative, entertainment and information appealing aswell as user centric services and applications. These services merge features from WWWand Communication worlds. On the one hand, interactivity, ubiquity, social orientation,user participation and content generation, etc. are relevant characteristics coming fromWeb 2.0 services. Parallel IMS enables services including multimedia telephony, mediasharing (video-audio, instant messaging with presence and context, online directory,etc. all of them applicable to mobile, fixed or convergent telecom networks. With thispaper, this paper brings out the benefits of adopting web 2.0 technologies for telecomservices. As the services are today mainly driven by the user's needs, and proposed theconcept of unique customizable service interface.

  17. The Implementation of a Cost Effectiveness Analyzer for Web-Supported Academic Instruction: An Example from Life Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Anat; Nachmias, Rafi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes implementation of a quantitative cost effectiveness analyzer for Web-supported academic instruction that was developed in our University. The paper presents the cost effectiveness analysis of one academic exemplary course in Life Science department and its introducing to the course lecturer for evaluation. The benefits and…

  18. The features of the Cosmic Web unveiled by the flip-flop field

    CERN Document Server

    Shandarin, Sergei F

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of the observed structure in the universe can be reached only in the theoretical framework of dark matter. N-body simulations are indispensable for the analysis of the formation and evolution of the dark matter web. Two primary fields - density and velocity fields - are used in most of studies. However dark matter provides two additional fields which are unique for collisionless media only. These are the multi- stream field in Eulerian space and flip-flop field in Lagrangian space. The flip-flop field represents the number of sign reversals of an elementary volume of each collisionless fluid element. This field can be estimated by counting the sign reversals of the Jacobian at each particle at every time step of the simulation. The Jacobian is evaluated by numerical differentiation of the Lagrangian submanifold, i.e., the three-dimensional dark matter sheet in the six-dimensional space formed by three Lagrangian and three Eulerian coordinates. We present the results of the statistical study of t...

  19. Web-Based Interactive System for Analyzing Achievement Gaps in Public Schools System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Mulvenon, Sean W.; Stegman, Charles; Xia, Yanling

    2010-01-01

    The National Office for Research on Measurement and Evaluation Systems (NORMES) at the University of Arkansas developed a web-based interactive system to provide information on state, district, and school level achievement gaps between white students and black students, socioeconomically disadvantaged students and non-disadvantaged students, male…

  20. SynergyFinder: a web application for analyzing drug combination dose-response matrix data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianevski, Aleksandr; He, Liye; Aittokallio, Tero; Tang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Rational design of drug combinations has become a promising strategy to tackle the drug sensitivity and resistance problem in cancer treatment. To systematically evaluate the pre-clinical significance of pairwise drug combinations, functional screening assays that probe combination effects in a dose-response matrix assay are commonly used. To facilitate the analysis of such drug combination experiments, we implemented a web application that uses key functions of R-package SynergyFinder, and provides not only the flexibility of using multiple synergy scoring models, but also a user-friendly interface for visualizing the drug combination landscapes in an interactive manner. The SynergyFinder web application is freely accessible at https://synergyfinder.fimm.fi ; The R-package and its source-code are freely available at http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/synergyfinder.html . jing.tang@helsinki.fi.

  1. A web application for recording and analyzing the clinical experiences of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Linda; Sedlmeyer, Robert; Carlson, Cathy; Modlin, Susan

    2003-01-01

    A primary focus in nursing education is to provide students with a diverse range of clinical experiences. Historically, the collection and assessment of data from students' clinical experiences have been paper-and-pencil tasks that are arduous for both students and nursing faculty. The volume of collected information also has made it difficult to produce ad hoc statistical reports without additional intensive manual labor. To facilitate recording and analysis of these data, the Nursing and Computer Science Departments at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne have collaborated to create a Web application: Essential Clinical Behaviors. The use of the Web-accessible database represents a major change in nursing education by alteration of format used by students to record their clinical experiences in nursing courses. The application was designed to enhance nursing students' learning and to assist faculty in making student assignments, evaluating student progress, and supporting curriculum decisions. This report discusses the rationale for the development of the Web application, a description of its data entry and reporting mechanisms, an overview of the system architecture, its use in the nursing curriculum, and planned enhancements.

  2. Structural Analysis of the SDSS Cosmic Web I.Nonlinear Density Field Reconstructions

    CERN Document Server

    Platen, Erwin; Jones, Bernard J T; Vegter, Gert; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the ability of three reconstruction techniques to analyze and investigate weblike features and geometries in a discrete distribution of objects. The three methods are the linear Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE), its higher order equivalent Natural Neighbour Field Estimator (NNFE) and a version of Kriging interpolation adapted to the specific circumstances encountered in galaxy redshift surveys, the Natural Lognormal Kriging technique. DTFE and NNFE are based on the local geometry defined by the Voronoi and Delaunay tessellations of the galaxy distribution. The three reconstruction methods are analysed and compared using mock magnitude-limited and volume-limited SDSS redshift surveys, obtained on the basis of the Millennium simulation. We investigate error trends, biases and the topological structure of the resulting fields, concentrating on the void population identified by the Watershed Void Finder. Environmental effects are addressed by evaluating the density fields on a range of ...

  3. shinyGEO: a web-based application for analyzing gene expression omnibus datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Jasmine; Gargano, Michael A; Dancik, Garrett M

    2016-12-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) is a public repository of gene expression data. Although GEO has its own tool, GEO2R, for data analysis, evaluation of single genes is not straightforward and survival analysis in specific GEO datasets is not possible without bioinformatics expertise. We describe a web application, shinyGEO, that allows a user to download gene expression data sets directly from GEO in order to perform differential expression and survival analysis for a gene of interest. In addition, shinyGEO supports customized graphics, sample selection, data export and R code generation so that all analyses are reproducible. The availability of shinyGEO makes GEO datasets more accessible to non-bioinformaticians, promising to lead to better understanding of biological processes and genetic diseases such as cancer. Web application and source code are available from http://gdancik.github.io/shinyGEO/ CONTACT: dancikg@easternct.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. GoPubMed与Web of Knowledge分析工具Analyze Results的比较研究%Comparison of GoPubMed and Analyze Results, an analysis tool of Web of Knowledge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玢; 许培扬; 王敏; 马明; 栗文靖

    2009-01-01

    GoPubMed是基于本体论的生物医学文献分析工具,它可以对检索到的PubMed文献进行全方位的统计分析,Web of Knowlegde平台的Analyze Results分析功能也可对检索结果进行统计分析.对这2种文献分析工具特点进行对比分析.

  5. A Novel Web Application to Analyze and Visualize Extreme Heat Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Jones, H.; Trtanj, J.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths in the United States annually and is expected to increase with our warming climate. However, most of these deaths are preventable with proper tools and services to inform the public about heat waves. In this project, we have investigated the key indicators of a heat wave, the vulnerable populations, and the data visualization strategies of how those populations most effectively absorb heat wave data. A map-based web app has been created that allows users to search and visualize historical heat waves in the United States incorporating these strategies. This app utilizes daily maximum temperature data from NOAA Global Historical Climatology Network which contains about 2.7 million data points from over 7,000 stations per year. The point data are spatially aggregated into county-level data using county geometry from US Census Bureau and stored in Postgres database with PostGIS spatial capability. GeoServer, a powerful map server, is used to serve the image and data layers (WMS and WFS). The JavaScript-based web-mapping platform Leaflet is used to display the temperature layers. A number of functions have been implemented for the search and display. Users can search for extreme heat events by county or by date. The "by date" option allows a user to select a date and a Tmax threshold which then highlights all of the areas on the map that meet those date and temperature parameters. The "by county" option allows the user to select a county on the map which then retrieves a list of heat wave dates and daily Tmax measurements. This visualization is clean, user-friendly, and novel because while this sort of time, space, and temperature measurements can be found by querying meteorological datasets, there does not exist a tool that neatly packages this information together in an easily accessible and non-technical manner, especially in a time where climate change urges a better understanding of heat waves.

  6. ATGC transcriptomics: a web-based application to integrate, explore and analyze de novo transcriptomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Clavijo, Bernardo; Rivarola, Máximo; Moreno, Patricio; Fernandez, Paula; Dopazo, Joaquín; Paniego, Norma

    2017-02-22

    In the last years, applications based on massively parallelized RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) have become valuable approaches for studying non-model species, e.g., without a fully sequenced genome. RNA-seq is a useful tool for detecting novel transcripts and genetic variations and for evaluating differential gene expression by digital measurements. The large and complex datasets resulting from functional genomic experiments represent a challenge in data processing, management, and analysis. This problem is especially significant for small research groups working with non-model species. We developed a web-based application, called ATGC transcriptomics, with a flexible and adaptable interface that allows users to work with new generation sequencing (NGS) transcriptomic analysis results using an ontology-driven database. This new application simplifies data exploration, visualization, and integration for a better comprehension of the results. ATGC transcriptomics provides access to non-expert computer users and small research groups to a scalable storage option and simple data integration, including database administration and management. The software is freely available under the terms of GNU public license at http://atgcinta.sourceforge.net .

  7. A user-friendly web portal for analyzing conformational changes in structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sameer; Thangam, Manonanthini; Vasudevan, Praveen; Kumar, G Ramesh; Unni, Rahul; Devi, P K Gayathri; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Initiation of the Tuberculosis Structural Consortium has resulted in the expansion of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) protein structural database. Currently, 969 experimentally solved structures are available for 354 MTB proteins. This includes multiple crystal structures for a given protein under different functional conditions, such as the presence of different ligands or mutations. In depth analysis of the multiple structures reveal that subtle differences exist in conformations of a given protein under varied conditions. Therefore, it is immensely important to understand the conformational differences between the multiple structures of a given protein in order to select the most suitable structure for molecular docking and structure-based drug designing. Here, we introduce a web portal ( http://bmi.icmr.org.in/mtbsd/torsion.php ) that we developed to provide comparative data on the ensemble of available structures of MTB proteins, such as Cα root means square deviation (RMSD), sequence identity, presence of mutations and torsion angles. Additionally, torsion angles were used to perform principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the conformational differences between the structures. Additionally, we present a few case studies to demonstrate this database. Graphical Abstract Conformational changes seen in the structures of the enoyl-ACP reductase protein encoded by the Mycobacterial gene inhA.

  8. 基于Web Service企业级应用分析与构建%Analyzing and Building Enterprise Application Based on Web Service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭清菊

    2009-01-01

    Web Service是创建可操作的分布式应用程序的新平台,该文分析了Web Service核心技术标准和Web Service的企业应用,并以网络会议管理系统为例介绍了以Web Service为核心的企业级应用案例.

  9. The Clustering of Galaxies in the Completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmic Flows and Cosmic Web from Luminous Red Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ata, Metin; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E; Ferraro, Simone; McDonald, Patrick; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernández; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perciva, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G; Schlege, David; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We present a Bayesian phase space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12) CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 $h^{-1}$ Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift dependent nonlinear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalised perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the \\textsc{argo} code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions (RSD). Our tests relying on accurate $N$-body based mock galaxy catalogues, show unbiased real space power spectra of the nonlinear density field up to $k\\sim0.2\\, h$ Mpc$^{-1}$, and vanishing quadrupoles down to $\\sim20\\,h^{-1}$ Mpc. We also demonstrate tha...

  10. Utilizing mixed methods research in analyzing Iranian researchers’ informarion search behaviour in the Web and presenting current pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Asadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using mixed methods research design, the current study has analyzed Iranian researchers’ information searching behaviour on the Web.Then based on extracted concepts, the model of their information searching behavior was revealed. . Forty-four participants, including academic staff from universities and research centers were recruited for this study selected by purposive sampling. Data were gathered from questionnairs including ten questions and semi-structured interview. Each participant’s memos were analyzed using grounded theory methods adapted from Strauss & Corbin (1998. Results showed that the main objectives of subjects were doing a research, writing a paper, studying, doing assignments, downloading files and acquiring public information in using Web. The most important of learning about how to search and retrieve information were trial and error and get help from friends among the subjects. Information resources are identified by searching in information resources (e.g. search engines, references in papers, and search in Online database… communications facilities & tools (e.g. contact with colleagues, seminars & workshops, social networking..., and information services (e.g. RSS, Alerting, and SDI. Also, Findings indicated that searching by search engines, reviewing references, searching in online databases, and contact with colleagues and studying last issue of the electronic journals were the most important for searching. The most important strategies were using search engines and scientific tools such as Google Scholar. In addition, utilizing from simple (Quick search method was the most common among subjects. Using of topic, keywords, title of paper were most important of elements for retrieval information. Analysis of interview showed that there were nine stages in researchers’ information searching behaviour: topic selection, initiating search, formulating search query, information retrieval, access to information

  11. Development of a Web GIS Application for Visualizing and Analyzing Community Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Hugh; Qin, Han; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-01-01

    Improving survival rates at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as a priority for reducing overall rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the United States. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is important for public health officials and residents to be able to quickly locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and to target these areas for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes an OHCA web mapping application that was developed to provide users with interactive maps and data for them to quickly visualize and analyze the geographic pattern of cardiac arrest rates, bystander CPR rates, and survival rates at the neighborhood level in different U.S. cities. The data comes from the CARES Registry and is provided over a period spanning several years so users can visualize trends in neighborhood out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patterns. Users can also visualize areas that are statistical hot and cold spots for cardiac arrest and compare OHCA and bystander CPR rates in the hot and cold spots. Although not designed as a public participation GIS (PPGIS), this application seeks to provide a forum around which data and maps about local patterns of OHCA can be shared, analyzed and discussed with a view of empowering local communities to take action to address the high rates of OHCA in their vicinity. PMID:23923097

  12. Development of a Web GIS Application for Visualizing and Analyzing Community Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Hugh; Qin, Han; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-01-01

    Improving survival rates at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as a priority for reducing overall rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the United States. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is important for public health officials and residents to be able to quickly locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and to target these areas for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes an OHCA web mapping application that was developed to provide users with interactive maps and data for them to quickly visualize and analyze the geographic pattern of cardiac arrest rates, bystander CPR rates, and survival rates at the neighborhood level in different U.S. cities. The data comes from the CARES Registry and is provided over a period spanning several years so users can visualize trends in neighborhood out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patterns. Users can also visualize areas that are statistical hot and cold spots for cardiac arrest and compare OHCA and bystander CPR rates in the hot and cold spots. Although not designed as a public participation GIS (PPGIS), this application seeks to provide a forum around which data and maps about local patterns of OHCA can be shared, analyzed and discussed with a view of empowering local communities to take action to address the high rates of OHCA in their vicinity.

  13. The PPI3D web server for searching, analyzing and modeling protein-protein interactions in the context of 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapkūnas, Justas; Timinskas, Albertas; Olechnovič, Kliment; Margelevičius, Mindaugas; Dičiūnas, Rytis; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-12-22

    The PPI3D web server is focused on searching and analyzing the structural data on protein-protein interactions. Reducing the data redundancy by clustering and analyzing the properties of interaction interfaces using Voronoi tessellation makes this software a highly effective tool for addressing different questions related to protein interactions.

  14. Unveiling hidden black holes in the cosmic web: Dark matter halos of WISE quasars from Planck CMB lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickox, Ryan

    The WISE and Planck surveys have now produced groundbreaking data sets which, in concert, can be exploited to obtain revolutionary constraints on the evolution of structure in the Universe. One particularly powerful application of WISE has been to uncover millions of the previously "hidden" obscured quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes that are shrouded in gas and dust and so are not detectable using traditional ground-based optical and near-IR techniques. Recently, Planck has produced the most precise all-sky map to date of dark matter structures via the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We propose to combine these data sets to obtain a uniquely powerful measurement of the link between rapidly growing black holes and their host dark matter structures, by cross-correlating the density field of WISE-selected quasars with the CMB lensing convergence maps obtained from Planck. This proposal will build on our current ADAP program (NNX12AE38G), which studies the host dark matter halos of WISE-selected quasars via spatial clustering. NNX12AE38G involves a detailed characterization of the redshifts, luminosities, and spectral energy distributions of WISE-selected quasars and uses new techniques to measure how quasars cluster around themselves. NNX12AE38G has contributed to more than 10 journal articles and 5 conference proceedings. Building on our current work, an even more complete understanding of the link between black holes and their host dark matter structures is possible if we employ an independent method for measuring the clustering bias (and thus characteristic halo mass) of the quasar population. This has recently become possible using CMB lensing maps. In the past two years, our team has conducted an initial analysis covering 2500 square degrees using WISE-selected quasars and lensing maps from the South Pole Telescope (Geach, Hickox, Myers et al., 2013), and have implemented this technique with Planck over part of the SDSS region

  15. Cosmic Rays - A Word-Wide Student Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The QuarkNet program has distributed hundreds of cosmic ray detectors for use in high schools and research facilities throughout the world over the last decade. Data collected by those students has been uploaded to a central server where web-based analysis tools enable users to characterize and to analyze everyone's cosmic ray data. Since muons rain down on everyone in the world, all students can participate in this free, high energy particle environment. Through self-directed inquiry students have designed their own experiments: exploring cosmic ray rates and air shower structure; and using muons to measure their speed, time dilation, lifetime, and affects on biological systems. We also plan to expand our annual International Muon Week project to create a large student-led collaboration where similar cosmic ray measurements are performed simultaneously throughout the world.

  16. Scholarship 2.0: analyzing scholars’ use of Web 2.0 tools in research and teaching activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licia Calvi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15 years the Web has transformed the ways in which we search for information and use it. In more recent years, we have seen the emergence of a new array of innovative tools that collectively go under the name of ‘Web 2.0’, in which the information user is also increasingly an information producer (i.e., prosumer, by sharing or creating content.The success of Web 2.0 tools for personal use is only partially replicated in the professional sphere and, particularly, in the academic environment in relation with research and teaching.To date, very few studies have explored the level of adoption of Web 2.0 among academic researchers in their research and teaching activity. It is not known in what way how and how much Web 2.0 is currently used within research communities, and we are not aware of the drivers and the drawbacks of the use of Web 2.0 tools in academia, where the majority of people is focused either on research or on teaching activities.To analyse these issues, i.e. the combined adoption of Web 2.0 tools in teaching and research, the authors carried out a survey among teaching and researching staff of the University of Breda in The Netherlands. This country was chosen mainly because it is on the cutting edge as far as innovation is concerned. An important driver in choosing the Breda University’s academic community was the fact that one of the two authors of this survey works as senior researcher at this university.The purpose of our survey was to explore the level of adoption of Web 2.0 tools among the academic communities. We were interested in investigating how they were using these tools in the creation of scientific knowledge both in their research and teaching activity. We were also interested in analysing differences in the level of adoption of Web 2.0 tools with regard to researchers’ position, age, gender, and research field.Finally, in our study we explored the issue of peer reviewing in the Web 2.0 setting

  17. Four phases of angular-momentum buildup in high-z galaxies:from cosmic-web streams to an extended tilted ring, disc and bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Danovich, Mark; Hahn, Oliver; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel

    2014-01-01

    We study the buildup of angular momentum (AM) in high-z galaxies using zoom-in hydro-cosmological simulations. The disc AM originates in a few co-planar streams of cold gas and merging galaxies tracing filaments of the cosmic web and undergo 4 phases of evolution. In phase I, outside the halo virial radius (Rv), the elongated streams gain AM by tidal torques with a specific AM (sAM) ~1.7 times that of the dark matter (DM) due to the gas' higher quadrupole moment. This AM is expressed as stream impact parameters, from ~0.3Rv to occasional counter rotation. In phase II, in the outer halo, while the incoming DM mixes with the existing halo of lower sAM to a spin $\\lambda_{\\rm dm}\\sim0.04$, the cold streams transport the AM to the inner halo such that their spin in the halo is $\\sim3\\lambda_{\\rm dm}$. In phase III, near pericenter, the streams dissipate and form a non-uniform, rotating ring extending to ~0.3Rv and tilted relative to the inner disc. Torques exerted partly by the disc make the gas ring lose AM, spi...

  18. Mining the Social Web Analyzing Data from Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Other Social Media Sites

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Want to tap the tremendous amount of valuable social data in Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+? This refreshed edition helps you discover who's making connections with social media, what they're talking about, and where they're located. You'll learn how to combine social web data, analysis techniques, and visualization to find what you've been looking for in the social haystack-as well as useful information you didn't know existed. Each standalone chapter introduces techniques for mining data in different areas of the social Web, including blogs and email. All you need to get started

  19. Open Source Web-Based Solutions for Disseminating and Analyzing Flood Hazard Information at the Community Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    -Santillan, M. M.-M.; Santillan, J. R.; Morales, E. M. O.

    2017-09-01

    We discuss in this paper the development, including the features and functionalities, of an open source web-based flood hazard information dissemination and analytical system called "Flood EViDEns". Flood EViDEns is short for "Flood Event Visualization and Damage Estimations", an application that was developed by the Caraga State University to address the needs of local disaster managers in the Caraga Region in Mindanao, Philippines in accessing timely and relevant flood hazard information before, during and after the occurrence of flood disasters at the community (i.e., barangay and household) level. The web application made use of various free/open source web mapping and visualization technologies (GeoServer, GeoDjango, OpenLayers, Bootstrap), various geospatial datasets including LiDAR-derived elevation and information products, hydro-meteorological data, and flood simulation models to visualize various scenarios of flooding and its associated damages to infrastructures. The Flood EViDEns application facilitates the release and utilization of this flood-related information through a user-friendly front end interface consisting of web map and tables. A public version of the application can be accessed at http://121.97.192.11:8082/"target="_blank">http://121.97.192.11:8082/. The application is currently expanded to cover additional sites in Mindanao, Philippines through the "Geo-informatics for the Systematic Assessment of Flood Effects and Risks for a Resilient Mindanao" or the "Geo-SAFER Mindanao" Program.

  20. Analyzing trophic transfer of heavy metals for food webs in the newly-formed wetlands of the Yellow River Delta, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Baoshan, E-mail: cuibs@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang Qijun [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang Kejiang [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Liu Xinhui; Zhang Honggang [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Nine heavy metals sampled from water, sediments, and aquatic organisms in the newly-formed wetlands of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) of China were analyzed to evaluate their concentrations and trophic transfer in food webs. The stable carbon ({delta}{sup 13}C) and nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) isotopes were used to investigate trophic interactions. Results show that most of heavy metals detected in water and sediments are lower than that in Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta. The longest food web is approximately 4 with the highest trophic level of birds. The difference of heavy metal concentrations between endangered Saunders's Gull and other three kinds of protected birds is not obvious. Cd, Zn, and Hg were identified to have an increase with the trophic level (TL), while As, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb show an opposite trend, however, the biomagnification of the selected nine heavy metals in the food webs is not significant. - Highlights: > Heavy metal content in newly-formed wetlands is lower than that in similar regions. > There is a trophic level-dependent accumulation of heavy metals in food webs. > The longest food web is approximately 4 with the highest trophic level of birds. > Cd, Zn, and Hg were identified to increase with the trophic level. > The difference of metal content between Saunders's Gull and other birds isn't obvious. - The newly-formed wetlands show slight heavy metal contamination and weak biomagnification through the food webs in the Yellow River Delta.

  1. Nexus of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cautun, Marius; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Hellwing, Wojciech A.

    2015-01-01

    One of the important unknowns of current cosmology concerns the effects of the large scale distribution of matter on the formation and evolution of dark matter haloes and galaxies. One main difficulty in answering this question lies in the absence of a robust and natural way of identifying the large

  2. MS Data Miner: a web-based software tool to analyze, compare, and share mass spectrometry protein identifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrlund, Thomas F; Poulsen, Ebbe T; Scavenius, Carsten; Sanggaard, Kristian W; Enghild, Jan J

    2012-09-01

    Data processing and analysis of proteomics data are challenging and time consuming. In this paper, we present MS Data Miner (MDM) (http://sourceforge.net/p/msdataminer), a freely available web-based software solution aimed at minimizing the time required for the analysis, validation, data comparison, and presentation of data files generated in MS software, including Mascot (Matrix Science), Mascot Distiller (Matrix Science), and ProteinPilot (AB Sciex). The program was developed to significantly decrease the time required to process large proteomic data sets for publication. This open sourced system includes a spectra validation system and an automatic screenshot generation tool for Mascot-assigned spectra. In addition, a Gene Ontology term analysis function and a tool for generating comparative Excel data reports are included. We illustrate the benefits of MDM during a proteomics study comprised of more than 200 LC-MS/MS analyses recorded on an AB Sciex TripleTOF 5600, identifying more than 3000 unique proteins and 3.5 million peptides. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Analyzing HT-SELEX data with the Galaxy Project tools--A web based bioinformatics platform for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, William H; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-03-15

    The development of DNA and RNA aptamers for research as well as diagnostic and therapeutic applications is a rapidly growing field. In the past decade, the process of identifying aptamers has been revolutionized with the advent of high-throughput sequencing (HTS). However, bioinformatics tools that enable the average molecular biologist to analyze these large datasets and expedite the identification of candidate aptamer sequences have been lagging behind the HTS revolution. The Galaxy Project was developed in order to efficiently analyze genome, exome, and transcriptome HTS data, and we have now applied these tools to aptamer HTS data. The Galaxy Project's public webserver is an open source collection of bioinformatics tools that are powerful, flexible, dynamic, and user friendly. The online nature of the Galaxy webserver and its graphical interface allow users to analyze HTS data without compiling code or installing multiple programs. Herein we describe how tools within the Galaxy webserver can be adapted to pre-process, compile, filter and analyze aptamer HTS data from multiple rounds of selection.

  4. Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Vachaspati, Tanmay; Steer, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    This article, written for Scolarpedia, provides a brief introduction into the subject of cosmic strings, together with a review of their main properties, cosmological evolution and observational signatures.

  5. Comparative Pathway Analyzer--a web server for comparative analysis, clustering and visualization of metabolic networks in multiple organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehm, Sebastian; Gilbert, David; Tauch, Andreas; Stoye, Jens; Goesmann, Alexander

    2008-07-01

    In order to understand the phenotype of any living system, it is essential to not only investigate its genes, but also the specific metabolic pathway variant of the organism of interest, ideally in comparison with other organisms. The Comparative Pathway Analyzer, CPA, calculates and displays the differences in metabolic reaction content between two sets of organisms. Because results are highly dependent on the distribution of organisms into these two sets and the appropriate definition of these sets often is not easy, we provide hierarchical clustering methods for the identification of significant groupings. CPA also visualizes the reaction content of several organisms simultaneously allowing easy comparison. Reaction annotation data and maps for visualizing the results are taken from the KEGG database. Additionally, users can upload their own annotation data. This website is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement. It is available at https://www.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de/groups/brf/software/cpa/index.html.

  6. Cosmic Magnification

    CERN Document Server

    Ménard, B

    2002-01-01

    I present the current status of the cosmic magnification produced by systematic amplification of background sources by large-scale structures. After introducing its principle, I focus on its interests for cosmology and underline its complementary aspect to cosmic shear and galaxy auto-correlations. I finally discuss recent investigations using higher-order statistics.

  7. Cosmic superstrings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2008-08-28

    Cosmic superstrings are expected to be formed at the end of brane inflation, within the context of brane-world cosmological models inspired from string theory. By studying the properties of cosmic superstring networks and comparing their phenomenological consequences against observational data, we aim to pin down the successful and natural inflationary model and get an insight into the stringy description of our Universe.

  8. Using the World Wide Web as a Teaching Tool: Analyzing Images of Aging and the Visual Needs of an Aging Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobi, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of Web site images of aging to identify positive and negative representations can help teach students about social perceptions of older adults. Another learning experience involves consideration of the needs of older adults in Web site design. (SK)

  9. Canny Algorithm, Cosmic Strings and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danos, Rebecca J.; Brandenberger, Robert H.

    We describe a new code to search for signatures of cosmic strings in cosmic microwave anisotropy maps. The code implements the Canny algorithm, an edge detection algorithm designed to search for the lines of large gradients in maps. Such a gradient signature which is coherent in position-space is produced by cosmic strings via the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We test the power of our new code to set limits on the tension of the cosmic strings by analyzing simulated data, with and without cosmic strings. We compare maps with a pure Gaussian scale-invariant power spectrum with maps which have a contribution of a distribution of cosmic strings obeying a scaling solution. The maps have angular scale and angular resolution comparable to what current and future ground-based small-scale cosmic microwave anisotropy experiments will achieve. We present tests of the codes, indicate the limits on the string tension which could be set with the current code, and describe various ways to refine the analysis. Our results indicate that when applied to the data of ongoing cosmic microwave experiments such as the South Pole Telescope project, the sensitivity of our method to the presence of cosmic strings will be more than an order of magnitude better than the limits from existing analyses.

  10. Simply Analyzing the Application of Web Technology in Distribution Network%浅析Web技术在配网GIS中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨勤勤

    2004-01-01

    针对传统配电管理系统中GIS的特点,提出原有的GIS系统已不能满足现在管理信息系统发展的要求,而Web GIS在这方面已获得了成功,能够很好的解决这一要求.比较Web GIS和传统GIS的不同,分析Web GIS的实现技术,并以实例分析了Web GIS在生产工作中的应用.

  11. Research of Web Pages Categorization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongda Lin; Kun Deng; Yanfen Hong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss several issues related to automated classification of web pages, especially text classification of web pages. We analyze features selection and categorization algorithms of web pages and give some suggestions for web pages categorization.

  12. Cosmic Forms

    CERN Document Server

    Kleman, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    The continuous 1D defects of an isotropic homogeneous material in an Euclidean 3D space are classified by a construction method, the Volterra process (VP). We employ the same method to classify the continuous 2D defects (which we call \\textit{cosmic forms}) of a vacuum in a 4D maximally symmetric spacetime. These defects fall into three different classes: i)- $m$-forms, akin to 3D space disclinations, related to ordinary rotations and analogous to Kibble's global cosmic strings (except that being continuous any deficit angle is allowed); ii)- $t$-forms, related to Lorentz boosts (hyperbolic rotations); iii)- $r$-forms, never been considered so far, related to null rotations. A detailed account of their metrics is presented. Their inner structure in many cases appears as a non-singular \\textit{core} separated from the outer part by a timelike hypersurface with distributional curvature and/or torsion, yielding new types of geometrical interactions with cosmic dislocations and other cosmic disclinations. Whereas...

  13. Cosmic confusion

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J

    1994-01-01

    We propose to minimise the cosmic confusion between Gaussian and non Gaussian theories by investigating the structure in the m's for each multipole of the cosmic radiation temperature anisotropies. We prove that Gaussian theories are (nearly) the only theories which treat all the m's equally. Hence we introduce a set of invariant measures of ``m-preference'' to be seen as non-Gaussianity indicators. We then derive the distribution function for the quadrupole ``m-preference'' measure in Gaussian theories. A class of physically motivated toy non Gaussian theories is introduced as an example. We show how the quadrupole m-structure is crucial in reducing the confusion between these theories and Gaussian theories.

  14. Cosmic Ether

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1998-01-01

    A prerelativistic approach to particle dynamics is explored in an expanding Robertson-Walker cosmology. The receding galactic background provides a distinguished frame of reference and a unique cosmic time. In this context the relativistic, purely geometric space-time concept is criticized. Physical space is regarded as a permeable medium, the cosmic ether, which effects the world-lines of particles and rays. We study in detail a Robertson-Walker universe with linear expansion factor and negatively curved, open three-space; we choose the permeability tensor of the ether in such a way that the semiclassical approximation is exact. Galactic red-shifts depend on the refractive index of the ether. In the local Minkowskian limit the ether causes a time variation of mass, which scales inversely proportional to cosmic time. In the globally geodesic rest frames of galactic observers the ether manifests itself in an unbounded speed of signal transfer, in bifurcations of world-lines, and in time inversion effects.

  15. Cosmic Flows and the Structure of the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    The Local Volume is the area of the cosmos we can analyze in most detail with respect to the properties of its galaxy population, their abundance, their inner structure, their distribution, and their formation. Indeed, many challenges of the cosmological concordance model such as the substructure crisis or the surprising occurrence of vast planes of satellite galaxies are intimately linked to observations of the local galaxy population. However, owing to the peculiar environment of our Milky Way system and its cosmic neighborhood, the Local Volume may also be severely biased. Cosmography, i.e. the reconstruction of the local cosmic web from cosmic flows, and constrained simulations of structure formation as a tool to produce simulated local group analogues provide a powerful method to analyze and quantify these biases. Possible applications include the analysis of the local distribution of dwarf galaxies around luminous galaxies and the characterization of the mass accretion history of these objects. Thanks to the extension of galaxy velocity data out to distances in excess of 200Mpc, we are now capable to reconstruct the 3D matter distribution out to these distances, thus constraining the formation history of object such as the Virgo Cluster.

  16. Cosmic radioactivities

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M; Arnould, Marcel; Prantzos, Nikos

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclides with half-lives ranging from some years to billions of years presumably synthesized outside of the solar system are now recorded in ``live'' or ``fossil'' form in various types of materials, like meteorites or the galactic cosmic rays. They bring specific astrophysical messages the deciphering of which is briefly reviewed here, with special emphasis on the contribution of Dave Schramm and his collaborators to this exciting field of research. Short-lived radionuclides are also present in the Universe today, as directly testified by the gamma-ray lines emitted by the de-excitation of their daughter products. A short review of recent developments in this field is also presented.

  17. Cosmic radioactivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Marcel; Prantzos, Nikos

    1999-07-01

    Radionuclides with half-lives ranging from some years to billions of years presumably synthesized outside of the solar system are now recorded in "live" or "fossil" form in various types of materials, like meteorites or the galactic cosmic rays. They bring specific astrophysical messages, the deciphering of which is briefly reviewed here, with special emphasis on the contribution of Dave Schramm and his collaborators to this exciting field of research. Short-lived radionuclides are also present in the Universe today, as directly testified by the γ-ray lines emitted by the de-excitation of their daughter products. A short review of recent developments in this field is also presented.

  18. TFmiR: a web server for constructing and analyzing disease-specific transcription factor and miRNA co-regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mohamed; Spaniol, Christian; Nazarieh, Maryam; Helms, Volkhard

    2015-07-01

    TFmiR is a freely available web server for deep and integrative analysis of combinatorial regulatory interactions between transcription factors, microRNAs and target genes that are involved in disease pathogenesis. Since the inner workings of cells rely on the correct functioning of an enormously complex system of activating and repressing interactions that can be perturbed in many ways, TFmiR helps to better elucidate cellular mechanisms at the molecular level from a network perspective. The provided topological and functional analyses promote TFmiR as a reliable systems biology tool for researchers across the life science communities. TFmiR web server is accessible through the following URL: http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/tfmir.

  19. LOCALIZED STARBURSTS IN DWARF GALAXIES PRODUCED BY THE IMPACT OF LOW-METALLICITY COSMIC GAS CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Filho, M. E. [Instituto Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Elmegreen, B. G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Granada (Spain); Amorín, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Ascasibar, Y. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Papaderos, P., E-mail: jos@iac.es [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2015-09-10

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter halos. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here, we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias optical spectra of 10 XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60% solar, on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6% solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possible if the metal-poor gas fell onto the disk recently. We analyze several possibilities for the origin of the metal-poor gas, favoring the metal-poor gas infall predicted by numerical models. If this interpretation is correct, XMPs trace the cosmic web gas in their surroundings, making them probes to examine its properties.

  20. ICO amplicon NGS data analysis: a Web tool for variant detection in common high-risk hereditary cancer genes analyzed by amplicon GS Junior next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Feliubadaló, Lídia; Menéndez, Mireia; Lopez-Doriga, Sergio; Morón-Duran, Francisco D; del Valle, Jesús; Tornero, Eva; Montes, Eva; Cuesta, Raquel; Campos, Olga; Gómez, Carolina; Pineda, Marta; González, Sara; Moreno, Victor; Capellá, Gabriel; Lázaro, Conxi

    2014-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized genomic research and is set to have a major impact on genetic diagnostics thanks to the advent of benchtop sequencers and flexible kits for targeted libraries. Among the main hurdles in NGS are the difficulty of performing bioinformatic analysis of the huge volume of data generated and the high number of false positive calls that could be obtained, depending on the NGS technology and the analysis pipeline. Here, we present the development of a free and user-friendly Web data analysis tool that detects and filters sequence variants, provides coverage information, and allows the user to customize some basic parameters. The tool has been developed to provide accurate genetic analysis of targeted sequencing of common high-risk hereditary cancer genes using amplicon libraries run in a GS Junior System. The Web resource is linked to our own mutation database, to assist in the clinical classification of identified variants. We believe that this tool will greatly facilitate the use of the NGS approach in routine laboratories.

  1. Cosmic Voids: structure, dynamics and galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2009-01-01

    In this review we discuss several aspects of Cosmic Voids. Voids are a major component of the large scale distribution of matter and galaxies in the Universe. They are of instrumental importance for understanding the emergence of the Cosmic Web. Their relatively simple shape and structure makes them into useful tools for extracting the value of a variety cosmic parameters, possibly including even that of the influence of dark energy. Perhaps most promising and challenging is the issue of the galaxies found within their realm. Not only does the pristine environment of voids provide a promising testing ground for assessing the role of environment on the formation and evolution of galaxies, the dearth of dwarf galaxies may even represent a serious challenge to the standard view of cosmic structure formation.

  2. Use of a Web-based physical activity record system to analyze behavior in a large population: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Hideyuki; Yamada, Yosuke; Ishida, Mika; Takase, Hideto; Kimura, Misaka

    2015-03-19

    The use of Web-based physical activity systems has been proposed as an easy method for collecting physical activity data. We have developed a system that has exhibited high accuracy as assessed by the doubly labeled water method. The purpose of this study was to collect behavioral data from a large population using our Web-based physical activity record system and assess the physical activity of the population based on these data. In this paper, we address the difference in physical activity for each urban scale. In total, 2046 participants (aged 30-59 years; 1105 men and 941 women) participated in the study. They were asked to complete data entry before bedtime using their personal computer on 1 weekday and 1 weekend day. Their residential information was categorized as urban, urban-rural, or rural. Participant responses expressed the intensity of each activity at 15-minute increments and were recorded on a Web server. Residential areas were compared and multiple regression analysis was performed. Most participants had a metabolic equivalent (MET) ranging from 1.4 to 1.8, and the mean MET was 1.60 (SD 0.28). The median value of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA, ≥3 MET) was 7.92 MET-hours/day. A 1-way ANCOVA showed that total physical activity differed depending on the type of residential area (F2,2027=5.19, P=.006). The urban areas (n=950) had the lowest MET-hours/day (mean 37.8, SD, 6.0), followed by urban-rural areas (n=432; mean 38.6, SD 6.5; P=.04), and rural areas (n=664; mean 38.8, SD 7.4; P=.002). Two-way ANCOVA showed a significant interaction between sex and area of residence on the urban scale (F2,2036=4.53, P=.01). Men in urban areas had the lowest MET-hours/day (MVPA, ≥3 MET) at mean 7.9 (SD 8.7); men in rural areas had a MET-hours/day (MVPA, ≥3 MET) of mean 10.8 (SD 12.1, P=.002). No significant difference was noted in women among the 3 residential areas. Multiple regression analysis showed that physical activity consisting of

  3. Wormhole cosmic censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Ureña-López, L. Arturo; Miranda, Galaxia

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the properties of a Kerr-like wormhole supported by phantom matter, which is an exact solution of the Einstein-phantom field equations. It is shown that the solution has a naked ring singularity which is unreachable to null geodesics falling freely from the outside. Similarly to Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship, that states that all naked singularities in the Universe must be protected by event horizons, here we conjecture from our results that a naked singularity can also be fully protected by the intrinsic properties of a wormhole's throat.

  4. On the Properties of Cosmic String Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Paul Henry

    1996-01-01

    When coupled with the prevailing ideas of cosmology, the standard model of particle physics implies that the early universe underwent a sequence of phase transitions. Such phase transitions can lead to topological defects such as magnetic monopoles, domain walls and cosmic strings. The formation and subsequent evolution of a network of cosmic strings may have played a key role in the development of the early universe. One of the most crucial elements in the evolution of the cosmic string network is the formation and decay of closed loops of cosmic string. After formation, the loops lose their energy by emitting gravitational radiation. This provides the primary energy loss mechanism for the cosmic string network. In addition, the cosmic string loops may display a number of observable features through which the cosmic string model may be constrained. In this dissertation a number of the key properties of cosmic string loops are investigated. A general method for determining the rates at which cosmic string loops radiate both energy and linear momentum is developed and implemented. Exact solutions for the radiation rates of a several new classes of loops are derived and used to test the validity of using the piecewise linear method on smooth loop trajectories. A large set of representative loop trajectories is produced using the method of loop fragmentation. These trajectories are analyzed to provide useful information on the properties of realistic cosmic string loops. The fraction of cosmic string loops which would collapse to form black holes is determined and used to place a new observational limit on the mass per unit length of cosmic strings.

  5. Analyzing Clickstreams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper; Giversen, Anders; Jensen, Allan H.

    . Extensible Markup Language (XML) is fast becoming the new standard for data representation and exchange on the World Wide Web. The rapid emergence of XML data on the web, e.g., business-to-business (B2B) ecommerce, is making it necessary for OLAP and other data analysis tools to handleXML data as well...

  6. Mendel,MD: A user-friendly open-source web tool for analyzing WES and WGS in the diagnosis of patients with Mendelian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G C C L Cardenas, Raony; D Linhares, Natália; L Ferreira, Raquel; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2017-06-01

    Whole exome and whole genome sequencing have both become widely adopted methods for investigating and diagnosing human Mendelian disorders. As pangenomic agnostic tests, they are capable of more accurate and agile diagnosis compared to traditional sequencing methods. This article describes new software called Mendel,MD, which combines multiple types of filter options and makes use of regularly updated databases to facilitate exome and genome annotation, the filtering process and the selection of candidate genes and variants for experimental validation and possible diagnosis. This tool offers a user-friendly interface, and leads clinicians through simple steps by limiting the number of candidates to achieve a final diagnosis of a medical genetics case. A useful innovation is the "1-click" method, which enables listing all the relevant variants in genes present at OMIM for perusal by clinicians. Mendel,MD was experimentally validated using clinical cases from the literature and was tested by students at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, at GENE-Núcleo de Genética Médica in Brazil and at the Children's University Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. We show in this article how it can simplify and increase the speed of identifying the culprit mutation in each of the clinical cases that were received for further investigation. Mendel,MD proved to be a reliable web-based tool, being open-source and time efficient for identifying the culprit mutation in different clinical cases of patients with Mendelian Disorders. It is also freely accessible for academic users on the following URL: https://mendelmd.org.

  7. Galaxy clusters in the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acebrón, A.; Durret, F.; Martinet, N.; Adami, C.; Guennou, L.

    2014-12-01

    Simulations of large scale structure formation in the universe predict that matter is essentially distributed along filaments at the intersection of which lie galaxy clusters. We have analysed 9 clusters in the redshift range 0.4deep large field multi-band imaging and spectroscopic data, in order to detect filaments and/or structures around these clusters. Based on colour-magnitude diagrams, we have selected the galaxies likely to be in the cluster redshift range and studied their spatial distribution. We detect a number of structures and filaments around several clusters, proving that colour-magnitude diagrams are a reliable method to detect filaments around galaxy clusters. Since this method excludes blue (spiral) galaxies at the cluster redshift, we also apply the LePhare software to compute photometric redshifts from BVRIZ images to select galaxy cluster members and study their spatial distribution. We then find that, if only galaxies classified as early-type by LePhare are considered, we obtain the same distribution than with a red sequence selection, while taking into account late-type galaxies just pollutes the background level and deteriorates our detections. The photometric redshift based method therefore does not provide any additional information.

  8. The structural elements of the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Bernard J T

    2016-01-01

    In 1970 Zel'dovich published a far-reaching paper presenting a simple equation describing the nonlinear growth of primordial density inhomogeneities. The equation was remarkably successful in explaining the large scale structure in the Universe that we observe: a Universe in which the structure appears to be delineated by filaments and clusters of galaxies surrounding huge void regions. In order to concretise this impression it is necessary to define these structural elements through formal techniques with which we can compare the Zel'dovich model and N-body simulations with the observational data. We present an overview of recent efforts to identify voids, filaments and clusters in both the observed galaxy distribution and in numerical simulations of structure formation. We focus, in particular, on methods that involve no fine-tuning of parameters and that handle scale dependence automatically. It is important that these techniques should result in finding structures that relate directly to the dynamical mec...

  9. The structural elements of the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    In 1970 Zel'dovich published a far-reaching paper presenting a simple equation describing the nonlinear growth of primordial density inhomogeneities. The equation was remarkably successful in explaining the large scale structure in the Universe that we observe: a Universe in which the structure appears to be delineated by filaments and clusters of galaxies surrounding huge void regions. In order to concretise this impression it is necessary to define these structural elements through formal techniques with which we can compare the Zel'dovich model and N-body simulations with the observational data. We present an overview of recent efforts to identify voids, filaments and clusters in both the observed galaxy distribution and in numerical simulations of structure formation. We focus, in particular, on methods that involve no fine-tuning of parameters and that handle scale dependence automatically. It is important that these techniques should result in finding structures that relate directly to the dynamical mechanism of structure formation.

  10. Dynamics of The Tranquil Cosmic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusser, Adi

    2016-10-01

    The phase space distribution of matter out to ~ 100 \\rm Mpc is probed by two types of observational data: galaxy redshift surveys and peculiar motions of galaxies. Important information on the process of structure formation and deviations from standard gravity have been extracted from the accumulating data. The remarkably simple Zel'dovich approximation is the basis for much of our insight into the dynamics of structure formation and the development of data analyses methods. Progress in the methodology and some recent results is reviewed.

  11. Giant radio galaxies and cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinämäki, Pekka

    2016-10-01

    Giant radio galaxies create the welldistinguishable class of sources.These sources are characterized with edge-brightened radio lobes withhighly collimated radio jets and large linear sizes which make themthe largest individual structures in the Universe. They are also knownto be hosted by elliptical/disturbed host galaxies and avoid clustersand high galaxy density regions. Because of GRG, large linear sizeslobes extend well beyond the interstellar media and host galaxyhalo the evolution of the radio lobes may depend on interactionwith this environment. Using our method to extract filamentarystructure of the galaxies in our local universe we study whetherradio lobe properties in some giant radio galaxies are determinedon an interaction of this filament ambient.

  12. Alignment of voids in the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the shapes and mutual alignment of voids in the large-scale matter distribution of a Lambda cold dark matter (Lambda CDM) cosmology simulation. The voids are identified using the novel watershed void finder (WVF) technique. The identified voids are quite non-spherical and slightly pro

  13. Dynamics of The Tranquil Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Nusser, Adi

    2014-01-01

    The phase space distribution of matter out to $\\sim 100 \\rm Mpc$ is probed by two types of observational data: galaxy redshift surveys and peculiar motions of galaxies. Important information on the process of structure formation and deviations from standard gravity have been extracted from the accumulating data. The remarkably simple Zel'dovich approximation is the basis for much of our insight into the dynamics of structure formation and the development of data analyses methods. Progress in the methodology and some recent results is reviewed.

  14. Alignment of voids in the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the shapes and mutual alignment of voids in the large-scale matter distribution of a Lambda cold dark matter (Lambda CDM) cosmology simulation. The voids are identified using the novel watershed void finder (WVF) technique. The identified voids are quite non-spherical and slightly

  15. Cosmic Origins Program Annual Technology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Bruce Thai; Neff, Susan Gale

    2016-01-01

    What is the Cosmic Origins (COR) Program? From ancient times, humans have looked up at the night sky and wondered: Are we alone? How did the universe come to be? How does the universe work? COR focuses on the second question. Scientists investigating this broad theme seek to understand the origin and evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present day, determining how the expanding universe grew into a grand cosmic web of dark matter enmeshed with galaxies and pristine gas, forming, merging, and evolving over time.

  16. Energy Zones Study: A Comprehensive Web-Based Mapping Tool to Identify and Analyze Clean Energy Zones in the Eastern Interconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koritarov, Vladimir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kuiper, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hlava, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Orr, Andrew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rollins, Katherine [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunner, Donna [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Green, Herman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makar, Jeffrey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ayers, Andrew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Holm, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Simunich, Kathy [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wang, Jianhui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); McLamore, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shamsuddin, Shabbir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kavicky, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Portante, Edgar [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Conzelmann, Guenter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Molburg, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Clark, Corrie [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Snyder, Seth [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Darling, Seth [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Braun, Joseph [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Botterud, Audun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gasper, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Richmond, Pamela [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Beardsley, Brett [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schlueter, Scott [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Augustine, Chad [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heimiller, Donna [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hurlbut, David J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schneider, Thomas R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hadley, Stanton W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gracia, Jose R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mays, Gary T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Omitaomu, Olufemi A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fernandez, Steven [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hadjerioua, Boualem [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stewart, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kodysh, Jeffrey [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Travis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the work conducted in support of the Eastern Interconnection States’ Planning Council (EISPC) Energy Zones Study and the development of the Energy Zones Mapping Tool performed by a team of experts from three National Laboratories. The multi-laboratory effort was led by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In June 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory published Funding Opportunity Announcement FOA-0000068, which invited applications for interconnection-level analysis and planning. In December 2009, the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) and the EISPC were selected as two award recipients for the Eastern Interconnection. Subsequently, in 2010, DOE issued Research Call RC-BM-2010 to DOE’s Federal Laboratories to provide research support and assistance to FOA-0000068 awardees on a variety of key subjects. Argonne was selected as the lead laboratory to provide support to EISPC in developing a methodology and a mapping tool for identifying potential clean energy zones in the Eastern Interconnection. In developing the EISPC Energy Zones Mapping Tool (EZ Mapping Tool), Argonne, NREL, and ORNL closely collaborated with the EISPC Energy Zones Work Group which coordinated the work on the Energy Zones Study. The main product of the Energy Zones Study is the EZ Mapping Tool, which is a web-based decision support system that allows users to locate areas with high suitability for clean power generation in the U.S. portion of the Eastern Interconnection. The mapping tool includes 9 clean (low- or no-carbon) energy resource categories and 29 types of clean energy technologies. The EZ Mapping Tool contains an extensive geographic information system database and allows the user to apply a flexible modeling approach for the identification and analysis of potential energy zones

  17. ALICE Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Fernandez Tellez, A; Martinez Hernandez, M; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE underground cavern provides an ideal place for the detection of high energy atmospheric muons coming from cosmic ray showers. ACORDE detects cosmic ray showers by triggering the arrival of muons to the top of the ALICE magnet.

  18. Cosmic rays on earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allkofer, O. C.; Grieder, P. K. F.

    Contents: Cosmic rays in the atmosphere: Charged hadron data. Neutron data. Gamma-ray data. Electron data. Muon data. Data on nuclei. Data on antiparticles. Cosmic rays at sea level: Muon data. Charged hadron data.Neutron data. Electron data. Gamma-ray data. Data on nuclei. Cosmic rays underground: Muon data. Neutrino data.

  19. COSMIC monthly progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of May 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Nine articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) WFI - Windowing System for Test and Simulation; (2) HZETRN - A Free Space Radiation Transport and Shielding Program; (3) COMGEN-BEM - Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method; (4) IDDS - Interactive Data Display System; (5) CET93/PC - Chemical Equilibrium with Transport Properties, 1993; (6) SDVIC - Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation; (7) TRASYS - Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (HP9000 Series 700/800 Version without NASADIG); (8) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (VAX VMS Version); and (9) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version). Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  20. Analyzing web log files of the health on the net HONmedia search engine to define typical image search tasks for image retrieval evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Henning; Boyer, Célia; Gaudinat, Arnaud; Hersh, William; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    Medical institutions produce ever-increasing amount of diverse information. The digital form makes these data available for the use on more than a single patient. Images are no exception to this. However, less is known about how medical professionals search for visual medical information and how they want to use it outside of the context of a single patient. This article analyzes ten months of usage log files of the Health on the Net (HON) medical media search engine. Key words were extracted from all queries and the most frequent terms and subjects were identified. The dataset required much pre-treatment. Problems included national character sets, spelling errors and the use of terms in several languages. The results show that media search, particularly for images, was frequently used. The most common queries were for general concepts (e.g., heart, lung). To define realistic information needs for the ImageCLEFmed challenge evaluation (Cross Language Evaluation Forum medical image retrieval), we used frequent queries that were still specific enough to at least cover two of the three axes on modality, anatomic region, and pathology. Several research groups evaluated their image retrieval algorithms based on these defined topics.

  1. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  2. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  3. Cosmic string loop shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Shlaer, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the shapes of cosmic string loops found in large-scale simulations of an expanding-universe string network. The simulation does not include gravitational back reaction, but we model that process by smoothing the loop using Lorentzian convolution. We find that loops at formation consist of generally straight segments separated by kinks. We do not see cusps or any cusp-like structure at the scale of the entire loop, although we do see very small regions of string that move with large Lorentz boosts. However, smoothing of the string almost always introduces two cusps on each loop. The smoothing process does not lead to any significant fragmentation of loops that were in non-self-intersecting trajectories before smoothing.

  4. Galactic origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailov, A.A. [Yu.G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Ave., 677980 Yakutsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    The arrival directions of ultrahigh energy extensive air showers (EAS) by Yakutsk, AGASA, P. Auger array data are analyzed. For the first time, the maps of equal exposition of celestial sphere for the distribution of particles by AGASA and P. Auger arrays data have been constructed. The large-scale anisotropy of cosmic particles at E>4x10{sup 19} eV by Yakutsk, AGASA and P. Auger array data has been detected. The problem of cosmic particle origin is discussed.

  5. Computer Programs for Obtaining and Analyzing Daily Mean Steamflow Data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Gregory E.

    2009-01-01

    Research Council, 2004). The USGS maintains the National Water Information System (NWIS), a distributed network of computers and file servers used to store and retrieve hydrologic data (Mathey, 1998; U.S. Geological Survey, 2008). NWISWeb is an online version of this database that includes water data from more than 24,000 streamflow-gaging stations throughout the United States (U.S. Geological Survey, 2002, 2008). Information from NWISWeb is commonly used to characterize streamflows at gaged sites and to help predict streamflows at ungaged sites. Five computer programs were developed for obtaining and analyzing streamflow from the National Water Information System (NWISWeb). The programs were developed as part of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration, to develop a stochastic empirical loading and dilution model. The programs were developed because reliable, efficient, and repeatable methods are needed to access and process streamflow information and data. The first program is designed to facilitate the downloading and reformatting of NWISWeb streamflow data. The second program is designed to facilitate graphical analysis of streamflow data. The third program is designed to facilitate streamflow-record extension and augmentation to help develop long-term statistical estimates for sites with limited data. The fourth program is designed to facilitate statistical analysis of streamflow data. The fifth program is a preprocessor to create batch input files for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency DFLOW3 program for calculating low-flow statistics. These computer programs were developed to facilitate the analysis of daily mean streamflow data for planning-level water-quality analyses but also are useful for many other applications pertaining to streamflow data and statistics. These programs and the associated documentation are included on the CD-ROM accompanying this report. This report and the appendixes on the

  6. Optimal Experience of Web Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiang; Wigand, R. T.; Nilan, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on Web users' optimal flow experiences to examine positive aspects of Web experiences that could be linked to theory applied to other media and then incorporated into Web design. Discusses the use of content-analytic procedures to analyze open-ended questionnaires that examined Web users' perceived flow experiences. (Author/LRW)

  7. The Cosmic DUNE dust astronomy mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grun, E.; Srama, R.; Cosmic Dune Team

    A dust astronomy mission aims at the simultaneous measurement of the origin and the chemical composition of individual dust grains in space. Interstellar dust traversing the solar system constitutes the galactic solid phase of matter from which stars and planetary systems form. Interplanetary dust, from comets and asteroids, represents remnant material from bodies at different stages of early solar system evolution. Thus, studies of interstellar and interplanetary dust with Cosmic DUNE (Cosmic Dust Near Earth) will provide a comparison between the composition of the interstellar medium and primitive planetary objects. Cosmic DUNE will prepare the way for effective collection in near-Earth space of interstellar and interplanetary dust for subsequent return to Earth and analysis in laboratories. Cosmic DUNE establishes the next logical step beyond NASA's Stardust mission, with four major advancements in cosmic dust research: (1) Analysis of the elemental and isotopic composition of individual cosmic dust grains, (2) determination of the size distribution of interstellar dust, (3) characterization of the interstellar dust flow through the planetary system, and (4) analysis of interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin. This mission goal will be reached with novel dust instrumentation. A dust telescope trajectory sensor has been developed which is capable of obtaining precision trajectories of sub-micron sized particles in space. A new high mass resolution dust analyzer of 0.1m2 impact area can cope with the low fluxes expected in interplanetary space. Cosmic DUNE will be proposed to ESA in response to its upcoming call for mission ideas.

  8. Xenia: A Probe of Cosmic Chemical Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Piro, L.

    2008-01-01

    Xenia is a concept study for a medium-size astrophysical cosmology mission addressing the Cosmic Origins key objective of NASA's Science Plan. The fundamental goal of this objective is to understand the formation and evolution of structures on various scales from the early Universe to the present time (stars, galaxies and the cosmic web). Xenia will use X-and y-ray monitoring and wide field X-ray imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy to collect essential information from three major tracers of these cosmic structures: the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), Galaxy Clusters and Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Our goal is to trace the chemo-dynamical history of the ubiquitous warm hot diffuse baryon component in the Universe residing in cosmic filaments and clusters of galaxies up to its formation epoch (at z =0-2) and to map star formation and galaxy metal enrichment into the re-ionization era beyond z 6. The concept of Xenia (Greek for "hospitality") evolved in parallel with the Explorer of Diffuse Emission and GRB Explosions (EDGE), a mission proposed by a multinational collaboration to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015. Xenia incorporates the European and Japanese collaborators into a U.S. led mission that builds on the scientific objectives and technological readiness of EDGE.

  9. High energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    Offers an accessible text and reference (a cosmic-ray manual) for graduate students entering the field and high-energy astrophysicists will find this an accessible cosmic-ray manual Easy to read for the general astronomer, the first part describes the standard model of cosmic rays based on our understanding of modern particle physics. Presents the acceleration scenario in some detail in supernovae explosions as well as in the passage of cosmic rays through the Galaxy. Compares experimental data in the atmosphere as well as underground are compared with theoretical models

  10. Maria Montessori's Cosmic Vision, Cosmic Plan, and Cosmic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazzini, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This classic position of the breadth of Cosmic Education begins with a way of seeing the human's interaction with the world, continues on to the grandeur in scale of time and space of that vision, then brings the interdependency of life where each growing human becomes a participating adult. Mr. Grazzini confronts the laws of human nature in…

  11. Semantic web mining and the representation, analysis, and evolution of web space

    OpenAIRE

    Berendt, Bettina; Hotho, Andreas; Stumme, Gerd

    2005-01-01

    Semantic Web Mining aims at combining the two fast-developing research areas Semantic Web and Web Mining. This survey analyzes the convergence of trends from both areas: Growing numbers of researchers work on improving the results of Web Mining by exploiting semantic structures in the Web, and they use Web Mining techniques for building the Semantic Web. Last but not least, these techniques can be used for mining the Semantic Web itself. The second aim of this paper is to...

  12. Interactions of cosmic superstrings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Mark G.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We develop methods by which cosmic superstring interactions can be studied in detail. These include the reconnection probability and emission of radiation such as gravitons or small string loops. Loop corrections to these are discussed, as well as relationships to (p; q)-strings. These tools should allow a phenomenological study of string models in anticipation of upcoming experiments sensitive to cosmic string radiation.

  13. Cosmic rays on earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allkofer, O.C.; Grieder, P.K.F.

    1984-01-01

    A data collection is presented that covers cosmic rays on earth. Included are all relevant data on flux and intensity measurements, energy spectra, and related data of all primary and secondary components of the cosmic radiation at all levels in the atmosphere, at sea level and underground. In those cases where no useful experimental data have been available, theoretical predictions were substituted.

  14. A Bayesian framework for cosmic string searches in CMB maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuca, Razvan; Hernández, Oscar F.

    2017-08-01

    There exists various proposals to detect cosmic strings from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) or 21 cm temperature maps. Current proposals do not aim to find the location of strings on sky maps, all of these approaches can be thought of as a statistic on a sky map. We propose a Bayesian interpretation of cosmic string detection and within that framework, we derive a connection between estimates of cosmic string locations and cosmic string tension Gμ. We use this Bayesian framework to develop a machine learning framework for detecting strings from sky maps and outline how to implement this framework with neural networks. The neural network we trained was able to detect and locate cosmic strings on noiseless CMB temperature map down to a string tension of Gμ=5 ×10-9 and when analyzing a CMB temperature map that does not contain strings, the neural network gives a 0.95 probability that Gμ<=2.3×10-9.

  15. A cosmic watershed : the WVF void detection technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2007-01-01

    On megaparsec scales the Universe is permeated by an intricate filigree of clusters, filaments, sheets and voids, the cosmic web. For the understanding of its dynamical and hierarchical history it is crucial to identify objectively its complex morphological components. One of the most characteristic

  16. A database of charged cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, D.; Melot, F.; Taillet, R.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: This paper gives a description of a new online database and associated online tools (data selection, data export, plots, etc.) for charged cosmic-ray measurements. The experimental setups (type, flight dates, techniques) from which the data originate are included in the database, along with the references to all relevant publications. Methods: The database relies on the MySQL5 engine. The web pages and queries are based on PHP, AJAX and the jquery, jquery.cluetip, jquery-ui, and table-sorter third-party libraries. Results: In this first release, we restrict ourselves to Galactic cosmic rays with Z ≤ 30 and a kinetic energy per nucleon up to a few tens of TeV/n. This corresponds to more than 200 different sub-experiments (i.e., different experiments, or data from the same experiment flying at different times) in as many publications. Conclusions: We set up a cosmic-ray database (CRDB) and provide tools to sort and visualise the data. New data can be submitted, providing the community with a collaborative tool to archive past and future cosmic-ray measurements. http://lpsc.in2p3.fr/crdb; Contact: crdatabase@lpsc.in2p3.fr

  17. Eleventh European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific program was organized under three main headings: cosmic rays in the heliosphere, cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, and properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database.

  18. Light scattering by cosmic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenier, J.W.; Min, M.

    2008-01-01

    We define cosmic particles as particles outside the Earth. Two types of cosmic particles can be distinguished, namely liquid and solid particles. The solid particles are often called grains or cosmic dust particles. Cosmic particles occur in a great variety of astronomical objects and environments.

  19. Supermassive cosmic string compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Reina, Borja; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon, E-mail: josejuan.blanco@ehu.es, E-mail: borja.reina@ehu.es, E-mail: kepa.sousa@ehu.es, E-mail: jon.urrestilla@ehu.es [Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4d Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N = 1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  20. Supermassive Cosmic String Compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4D Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N=1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  1. Cosmic Strings and Superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    Copeland, Edmund J

    2009-01-01

    Cosmic strings are predicted by many field-theory models, and may have been formed at a symmetry-breaking transition early in the history of the universe, such as that associated with grand unification. They could have important cosmological effects. Scenarios suggested by fundamental string theory or M-theory, in particular the popular idea of brane inflation, also strongly suggest the appearance of similar structures. Here we review the reasons for postulating the existence of cosmic strings or superstrings, the various possible ways in which they might be detected observationally, and the special features that might discriminate between ordinary cosmic strings and superstrings.

  2. Characterizing web heuristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Menno D.T.; van der Geest, Thea

    2000-01-01

    This article is intended to make Web designers more aware of the qualities of heuristics by presenting a framework for analyzing the characteristics of heuristics. The framework is meant to support Web designers in choosing among alternative heuristics. We hope that better knowledge of the

  3. Habitability and cosmic catastrophes

    CERN Document Server

    Hanslmeier, Arnold; McKay, Christopher P

    2008-01-01

    Catastrophic cosmic events such as asteroid impacts appear in the range of some 100 million years and have drastically affected evolution. The author discusses whether and how such events could have occurred in recently found extrasolar planetary systems.

  4. Astrophysics: Cosmic jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andy

    2010-02-01

    In some galaxies, matter falling onto a supermassive black hole is ejected in narrow jets moving at close to the speed of light. New observations provide insight into the workings of these cosmic accelerators.

  5. Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Frampton, Paul H

    1998-01-01

    It is proposed that the highest energy $\\sim 10^{20}$eV cosmic ray primaries are protons, decay products of a long-lived progenitor whose high kinetic energy arises from decay of a distant (cosmological) superheavy particle, G. Such a scenario can occur in e.g. SU(15) grand unification and in some preon models, but is more generic; if true, these unusual cosmic rays provide a window into new physics.

  6. Dynamic Web Pages: Performance Impact on Web Servers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Bhupesh; Claypool, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of Web servers and requests for dynamic pages focuses on experimentally measuring and analyzing the performance of the three dynamic Web page generation technologies: CGI, FastCGI, and Servlets. Develops a multivariate linear regression model and predicts Web server performance under some typical dynamic requests. (Author/LRW)

  7. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  8. WebCom: A Model for Understanding Web Site Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godsk, Mikkel; Petersen, Anja Bechmann

    2008-01-01

    This chapter presents a model (WebCom) for understanding and analyzing Web site-mediated communication, also referred to as Web site communication. The model combines three theoretical approaches - communication, medium, and activity theory - into one generic model that benefits from each...... of the approaches' strengths. Furthermore, it is discussed and shortly demonstrated how WebCom can be used for analytical and design purposes with YouTube as an example. The chapter concludes that WebCom is able to serve as a theoretically-based model for understanding complex Web site communication situations...

  9. Evaluation Method of Web Site Based on Web Structure Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiJun-e; ZhouDong-ru

    2003-01-01

    The structure of Web site became more complex than before. During the design period of a Web site, the lack of model and method results in improper Web structure,which depend on the designer's experience. From the point of view of software engineering, every period in the software life must be evaluated before starting the next period's work. It is very important and essential to search relevant methods for evaluating Web structure before the site is completed. In this work, after studying the related work about the Web structure mining and analyzing the major structure mining methods (Page-rank and Hub/Authority), a method based on the Page-rank for Web structure evaluation in design stage is proposed. A Web structure modeling language WSML is designed, and the implement strategies for evaluating system of the Web site structure are given out. Web structure mining has being used mainly in search engines before. It is the first time to employ the Web structure mining technology to evaluate a Web structure in the design period of a Web site. It contributes to the formalization of the design documents for Web site and the improving of software engineering for large scale Web site, and the evaluating system is a practical tool for Web site construction.

  10. Analyzing the Facebook Friendship Graph

    OpenAIRE

    Catanese, Salvatore; De Meo, Pasquale; Ferrara, Emilio; Fiumara, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    Online Social Networks (OSN) during last years acquired a huge and increasing popularity as one of the most important emerging Web phenomena, deeply modifying the behavior of users and contributing to build a solid substrate of connections and relationships among people using the Web. In this preliminary work paper, our purpose is to analyze Facebook, considering a significant sample of data reflecting relationships among subscribed users. Our goal is to extract, from this platform, relevant ...

  11. Thin shells joining local cosmic string geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria Pabellon I, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rubin de Celis, Emilio; Simeone, Claudio [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria Pabellon I, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ciudad Universitaria Pabellon I, IFIBA-CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-10-15

    In this article we present a theoretical construction of spacetimes with a thin shell that joins two different local cosmic string geometries. We study two types of global manifolds, one representing spacetimes with a thin shell surrounding a cosmic string or an empty region with Minkowski metric, and the other corresponding to wormholes which are not symmetric across the throat located at the shell. We analyze the stability of the static configurations under perturbations preserving the cylindrical symmetry. For both types of geometries we find that the static configurations can be stable for suitable values of the parameters. (orig.)

  12. Cosmic multimuon bundles detected by DELPHI

    CERN Document Server

    Rídky, J

    2004-01-01

    The DELPHI detector located at LEP accelerator has been used also to measure multimuon bundles originated from cosmic ray interactions. Two subdetectors-hadron calorimeter and time projection chamber, are used for this purpose. The 1999 and 2000 data are analyzed over wide range of multiplicities. The multiplicity distribution is compared with prediction of Monte Carlo simulation based on CORSIKA/QGSJET. The Monte-Carlo does not describe the large multiplicity part of data. Even the extreme assumption on the cosmic ray composition (pure iron nuclei) hardly predicts comparable number of high-multiplicity events.

  13. ANGDelMut – a web-based tool for predicting and analyzing functional loss mechanisms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-associated angiogenin mutations [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2yt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya K Padhi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available ANGDelMut is a web-based tool for predicting the functional consequences of missense mutations in the angiogenin (ANG protein, which is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Missense mutations in ANG result in loss of either ribonucleolytic activity or nuclear translocation activity or both of these functions, and in turn cause ALS. However, no web-based tools are available to predict whether a newly identified ANG mutation will possibly lead to ALS. More importantly, no web-implemented method is currently available to predict the mechanisms of loss-of-function(s of ANG mutants. In light of this observation, we developed the ANGDelMut web-based tool, which predicts whether an ANG mutation is deleterious or benign. The user selects certain attributes from the input panel, which serves as a query to infer whether a mutant will exhibit loss of ribonucleolytic activity or nuclear translocation activity or whether the overall stability will be affected. The output states whether the mutation is deleterious or benign, and if it is deleterious, gives the possible mechanism(s of loss-of-function. This web-based tool, freely available at http://bioschool.iitd.ernet.in/DelMut/, is the first of its kind to provide a platform for researchers and clinicians, to infer the functional consequences of ANG mutations and correlate their possible association with ALS ahead of experimental findings.

  14. Analyzing Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Archaeoastronomical field survey typically involves the measurement of structural orientations (i.e., orientations along and between built structures) in relation to the visible landscape and particularly the surrounding horizon. This chapter focuses on the process of analyzing the astronomical potential of oriented structures, whether in the field or as a desktop appraisal, with the aim of establishing the archaeoastronomical "facts". It does not address questions of data selection (see instead Chap. 25, "Best Practice for Evaluating the Astronomical Significance of Archaeological Sites", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_25) or interpretation (see Chap. 24, "Nature and Analysis of Material Evidence Relevant to Archaeoastronomy", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_22). The main necessity is to determine the azimuth, horizon altitude, and declination in the direction "indicated" by any structural orientation. Normally, there are a range of possibilities, reflecting the various errors and uncertainties in estimating the intended (or, at least, the constructed) orientation, and in more formal approaches an attempt is made to assign a probability distribution extending over a spread of declinations. These probability distributions can then be cumulated in order to visualize and analyze the combined data from several orientations, so as to identify any consistent astronomical associations that can then be correlated with the declinations of particular astronomical objects or phenomena at any era in the past. The whole process raises various procedural and methodological issues and does not proceed in isolation from the consideration of corroborative data, which is essential in order to develop viable cultural interpretations.

  15. Cosmic Rays and Climate

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2007-01-01

    Among the most puzzling questions in climate change is that of solar-climate variability, which has attracted the attention of scientists for more than two centuries. Until recently, even the existence of solar-climate variability has been controversial—perhaps because the observations had largely involved correlations between climate and the sunspot cycle that had persisted for only a few decades. Over the last few years, however, diverse reconstructions of past climate change have revealed clear associations with cosmic ray variations recorded in cosmogenic isotope archives, providing persuasive evidence for solar or cosmic ray forcing of the climate. However, despite the increasing evidence of its importance, solar-climate variability is likely to remain controversial until a physical mechanism is established. Although this remains a mystery, observations suggest that cloud cover may be influenced by cosmic rays, which are modulated by the solar wind and, on longer time scales, by the geomagnetic fiel...

  16. Constraints On Cosmic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mbonye, M R

    2003-01-01

    Observationally, the universe appears virtually critical. Yet, there is no simple explanation for this state. In this article we advance and explore the premise that the dynamics of the universe always seeks equilibrium conditions. Vacuum-induced cosmic accelerations lead to creation of matter-energy modes at the expense of vacuum energy. Because they gravitate, such modes constitute inertia against cosmic acceleration. On the other extreme, the would-be ultimate phase of local gravitational collapse is checked by a phase transition in the collapsing matter fields leading to a de Sitter-like fluid deep inside the black hole horizon, and at the expense of the collapsing matter fields. As a result, the universe succumbs to neither vacuum-induced run-away accelerations nor to gravitationally induced spacetime curvature singularities. Cosmic dynamics is self-regulating. We discuss the physical basis for these constraints and the implications, pointing out how the framework relates and helps resolve standing puzzl...

  17. Mapping the Cosmic Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlanetto, Steven

    The following sections are included: * A Brief History of Our Universe: From Soup to Galaxies * The Hidden Cosmic Dawn * The Solution: Flipping Spins * The Spin-Flip Transition as an Astronomical Tool * Foiled!: Early Cosmology with the Spin-Flip Transition * Spin-Flip Radiation Holds the Key to Observing the Cosmic Dawn * The Spin-Flip Background: The First Stars * The Spin-Flip Background: The First Black Holes * The Spin-Flip Background: The Epoch of Reionization * FM Radio Antennae as Cosmic Observatories * Piles and Tiles of Antennae: Mapping the Spin-Flip Background * Mountains to Scale: Challenges to Observing the Spin-Flip Background * Sound and Fury, Signifying Statistics * An Explosion of Telescopes * Dreams for the Future * An Unfinished Story

  18. A cosmic book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, P. J. E.; Silk, Joseph

    1988-10-01

    A system of assigning odds to the basic elements of cosmological theories is proposed in order to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the theories. A figure of merit for the theories is obtained by counting and weighing the plausibility of each of the basic elements that is not substantially supported by observation or mature fundamental theory. The magnetized strong model is found to be the most probable. In order of decreasing probability, the ranking for the rest of the models is: (1) the magnetized string model with no exotic matter and the baryon adiabatic model; (2) the hot dark matter model and the model of cosmic string loops; (3) the canonical cold dark matter model, the cosmic string loops model with hot dark matter, and the baryonic isocurvature model; and (4) the cosmic string loops model with no exotic matter.

  19. Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, Asantha; Burgarella, Denis; Chary, Ranga; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Doré, Olivier; Fazio, Giovanni; Ferrara, Andrea; Gong, Yan; Santos, Mario; Silva, Marta; Zemcov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper is a "Probe Class" mission concept for reionization studies of the universe. It will be capable of spectroscopic imaging observations between 0.7 to 6-7 microns in the near-Infrared. The primary observational objective is pioneering observations of spectral emission lines of interest throughout the cosmic history, but especially from the first generation of distant, faint galaxies when the universe was less than 800 million years old. With spectro-imaging capabilities, using a set of linear variable filters (LVFs), CDIM will produce a three-dimensional tomographic view of the epoch of reionization (EoR). CDIM will also study galaxy formation over more than 90% of the cosmic history and will move the astronomical community from broad-band astronomical imaging to low-resolution (R=200-300) spectro-imaging of the universe.

  20. The simulation of cosmic dust collection process with little damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Danming; Li, Yali; Wu, Qingxiao; Dai, Peng

    2016-07-01

    To built a cosmic dust collector according to a predetermined concept, mateirals that can be used to buffer the poential high speed collision of the cosmic dust have been studied. In this study, aerogel was chosen as an ideal buffer material and analyzed with SPH modeling method which is embedded in ABAQUS FE code. This report presents the interactions of cosmic dust, varing composition, shape and velocity, with the buffer material. The results show that cosmic dust that moves at 6 Km/s or less can be captured with minor damage to the buffer material of certain length. The simulation provides favorable technical support for the structural design of the cosmic dust collector.

  1. A disintegrating cosmic string

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, J B

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple sandwich gravitational wave of the Robinson-Trautman family. This is interpreted as representing a shock wave with a spherical wavefront which propagates into a Minkowski background minus a wedge. (i.e. the background contains a cosmic string.) The deficit angle (the tension) of the string decreases through the gravitational wave, which then ceases. This leaves an expanding spherical region of Minkowski space behind it. The decay of the cosmic string over a finite interval of retarded time may be considered to generate the gravitational wave.

  2. Cosmic Sum Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Frandsen, Mads; Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We introduce new sum rules allowing to determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays and show how it can be used to predict the positron fraction at energies not yet explored by current experiments and to constrain specific models.......We introduce new sum rules allowing to determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays and show how it can be used to predict the positron fraction at energies not yet explored by current experiments and to constrain specific models....

  3. Dynamic Cosmic Strings, 1

    CERN Document Server

    Sjodin, K R P; Vickers, J A

    2001-01-01

    The field equations for a time dependent cylindrical cosmic string coupled togravity are reformulated in terms of geometrical variables defined on a2+1-dimensional spacetime by using the method of Geroch decomposition. Unlikethe 4-dimensional spacetime the reduced case is asymptotically flat. Anumerical method for solving the field equations which involves conformallycompactifying the space and including null infinity as part of the grid isdescribed. It is shown that the code reproduces the results of a number ofvacuum solutions with one or two degrees of freedom. In the final section theinteraction between the cosmic string and a pulse of gravitational radiation isbriefly described. This will be fully analysed in the sequel.

  4. Association Rule Mining for Web Recommendation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Suguna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Web usage mining is the application of web mining to discover the useful patterns from the web in order to understand and analyze the behavior of the web users and web based applications. It is theemerging research trend for today’s researchers. It entirely deals with web log files which contain the user website access information. It is an interesting thing to analyze and understand the user behaviorabout the web access. Web usage mining normally has three categories: 1. Preprocessing, 2. Pattern Discovery and 3. Pattern Analysis. This paper proposes the association rule mining algorithms for betterWeb Recommendation and Web Personalization. Web recommendation systems are considered as an important role to understand customers’ behavior, interest, improving customer convenience, increasingservice provider profits and future needs.

  5. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    This set of lectures provides an overview of the basic theory and phenomenology of the cosmic microwave background. Topics include a brief historical review; the physics of temperature and polarization fluctuations; acoustic oscillations of the primordial plasma; the space of inflationary cosmological models; current and potential constraints on these models from the microwave background; and constraints on inflation.

  6. Simulating Cosmic Reionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlik, Andreas Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The first stars formed a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, when the Universe was only a small fraction of its present age. Their radiation transformed the previously cold and neutral hydrogen that filled intergalactic space into the hot and ionised cosmic plasma that is observed today. T

  7. Simulating Cosmic Reionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlik, Andreas Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The first stars formed a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, when the Universe was only a small fraction of its present age. Their radiation transformed the previously cold and neutral hydrogen that filled intergalactic space into the hot and ionised cosmic plasma that is observed today.

  8. Antarctic Cosmic Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duldig, Marc

    Cosmic ray observations related to Antarctica commenced in the austral summer of 1947-48 from sub-Antarctic Heard and Macquarie Islands and from the HMAS Wyatt Earp. Muon telescope observations from Mawson station Antarctica commenced in 1955. The International Geophysical Year was the impetus for the installation of a number of neutron monitors around Antarctica observing the lowest energy cosmic rays accessible by ground based instruments. In 1971 a new observatory was built at Mawson including the only underground muon telescope system at polar latitudes in either hemisphere. In the 1980s the South Pole Air Shower Experiment (SPASE) opened the highest energy cosmic ray window over Antarctica and this was followed by the in-ice neutrino experiment AMANDA. Over more than half a century cosmic ray astronomy has been undertaken from Antarctica and its surrounding regions and these observations have been critical to our growing understanding of nearby astrophysical structures. For example the Parker spiral magnetic field of the sun was confirmed through Mawson observations of a Solar flare induced Ground Level Enahncement in 1960 long before spacecraft were able to directly observe the interplanetary magnetic field. A summary of the Antarctic instrumental developments and the scientific advances that resulted will be presented.

  9. Hydrology and Cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mie

    and calibration. Yet, soil moisture measurements are traditionally provided on either point or kilometer scale from electromagnetic based sensors and satellite retrievals, respectively. Above the ground surface, the cosmic-ray neutron intensity (eV range) is inversely correlated to all hydrogen present...

  10. Cosmic rays and climate

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Inside the new chamber the CLOUD team will be able to recreate the conditions of any part of the atmosphere, from the polar stratosphere to the low level tropics (top). The new chamber safely in position in the East hall. Once carefully cleaned the chamber will be turned sideways onto its legs ready for the beam of 'cosmic rays' (bottom).

  11. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  12. High-energy cosmic rays measured with KASCADE-Grande

    CERN Document Server

    Haungs, A; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Curcio, C; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Oehlschlaeger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, D; Wochele, J

    2013-01-01

    The detection of high-energy cosmic rays above a few hundred TeV is realized by the observation of extensive air-showers. By using the multi-detector setup of KASCADE-Grande, energy spectrum, elemental composition, and anisotropies of high-energy cosmic rays in the energy range from below the knee up to 2 EeV are investigated. In addition, the large high-quality data set permits distinct tests of the validity of hadronic interaction models used in interpreting air-shower measurements. After more than 16 years, the KASCADE-Grande experiment terminated measurements end of 2012. This contribution will give an overview of the main results of the data analysis achieved so far, and will report about the status of KCDC, the KASCADE Cosmic-ray Data Center, where via a web-based interface the data will be made available for the interested public.

  13. Dark Web

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsinchun

    2012-01-01

    The University of Arizona Artificial Intelligence Lab (AI Lab) Dark Web project is a long-term scientific research program that aims to study and understand the international terrorism (Jihadist) phenomena via a computational, data-centric approach. We aim to collect "ALL" web content generated by international terrorist groups, including web sites, forums, chat rooms, blogs, social networking sites, videos, virtual world, etc. We have developed various multilingual data mining, text mining, and web mining techniques to perform link analysis, content analysis, web metrics (technical

  14. Search for patterns by combining cosmic-ray energy and arrival directions at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schroeder, F. G.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Kowski, A. Smial; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-01-01

    Energy-dependent patterns in the arrival directions of cosmic rays are searched for using data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We investigate local regions around the highest-energy cosmic rays with E >= 6 x 10(19) eV by analyzing cosmic rays with energies above E >= 5 x 10(18) eV arriving within a

  15. Search for patterns by combining cosmic-ray energy and arrival directions at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schroeder, F. G.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Kowski, A. Smial; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2015-01-01

    Energy-dependent patterns in the arrival directions of cosmic rays are searched for using data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We investigate local regions around the highest-energy cosmic rays with E >= 6 x 10(19) eV by analyzing cosmic rays with energies above E >= 5 x 10(18) eV arriving within a

  16. Economic analysis of spider web airline networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The distinct network organization, management, service and operating characteristics of US Southwest Airlines are key elements of its success compared with other airlines. As a network organization type, the spider web airline network has received more attention. In this paper, we analyzed the relation between the spider web airline network and spider web, and the structure of spider web airline network, built the assignment model of the spider web airline network,and investigated the economics concerned.

  17. Dual Phase Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Shurtleff, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A calculation based on flat spacetime symmetries shows how there can be two quantum phases. For one, extreme phase change determines a conventional classical trajectory and four-momentum, i.e. mass times four-velocity. The other phase occurs in an effective particle state, with the effective energy and momentum being the rate of change of the phase with respect to time and distance. A cosmic ray proton moves along a classical trajectory, but exists in an effective particle state with an effective energy that depends on the local gravitational potential. Assumptions are made so that a cosmic ray proton in an ultra-high energy state detected near the Earth was in a much less energetic state in interstellar space. A 300 EeV proton incident on the Earth was a 2 PeV proton in interstellar space. The model predicts such protons are in states with even more energy near the Sun than when near the Earth.

  18. Cosmic structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschinger, Edumund

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews the prevailing paradigm for how galaxies and larger structures formed in the universe: gravitational instability. Basic observational facts are summarized to motivate the standard cosmological framework underlying most detailed investigations of structure formation. The observed univers approaches spatial uniformity on scales larger than about 10(exp 26) cm. On these scales gravitational dynamics is almost linear and therefore relatively easy to relate to observations of large-scale structure. On smaller scales cosmic structure is complicated not only by nonlinear gravitational clustering but also by nonlinear nongravitational gas dynamical processes. The complexity of these phenomena makes galaxy formation one of the grand challenge problems of the physical sciences. No fully satisfactory theory can presently account in detail for the observed cosmic structure. However, as this article summarizes, significant progress has been made during the last few years.

  19. Cosmic rays and climate

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The current understanding of climate change in the industrial age is that it is predominantly caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, with relatively small natural contributions due to solar irradiance and volcanoes. However, palaeoclimatic reconstructions show that the climate has frequently varied on 100-year time scales during the Holocene (last 10 kyr) by amounts comparable to the present warming - and yet the mechanism or mechanisms are not understood. Some of these reconstructions show clear associations with solar variability, which is recorded in the light radio-isotope archives that measure past variations of cosmic ray intensity. However, despite the increasing evidence of its importance, solar-climate variability is likely to remain controversial until a physical mechanism is established. Estimated changes of solar irradiance on these time scales appear to be too small to account for the climate observations. This raises the question of whether cosmic rays may directly affect the climate, provi...

  20. Note on cosmic censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, F. J.

    1985-05-01

    A number of recent theorems by Krolak (1983) and Newman (1983) purport to prove cosmic censorship by showing that strong-curvature singularities must be hidden behind horizons. It is shown that the 'null strong-curvature' condition which Newman imposes on certain classes of null geodesics to restrict curvature growth in the space-time does not hold in many physically realistic space-times: it is not satisfied by any null geodesic in the relevant class in any open Friedmann cosmological model, nor does it hold for any null geodesic in the relevant class in maximal Schwarzschild space. More generally it is argued that the singularity predicted by the Penrose singularity theorem is unlikely to be of the type eliminated by Newman. Thus the Newman theorems are probably without physical significance. The Krolak theorems, although based on a physically significant definition of strong curvature singularity, are mathematically invalid, and this approach cannot be used to obtain a cosmic-censorship theorem.

  1. Cosmic Tidal Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Yu, Yu; Er, Xinzhong; Chen, Xuelei

    2015-01-01

    The gravitational coupling of a long wavelength tidal field with small scale density fluctuations leads to anisotropic distortions of the locally measured small scale matter correlation function. Since the local correlation function is statistically isotropic in the absence of such tidal interactions, the tidal distortions can be used to reconstruct the long wavelength tidal field and large scale density field in analogy with the cosmic microwave background lensing reconstruction. In this paper we present in detail a formalism for the cosmic tidal reconstruction and test the reconstruction in numerical simulations. We find that the density field on large scales can be reconstructed with good accuracy and the cross correlation coefficient between the reconstructed density field and the original density field is greater than 0.9 on large scales ($k\\lesssim0.1h/\\mathrm{Mpc}$). This is useful in the 21cm intensity mapping survey, where the long wavelength radial modes are lost due to foreground subtraction proces...

  2. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  3. Cosmic Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P

    2004-04-26

    Recently we proposed a new cosmic acceleration mechanism which was based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically owing plasma. In this paper we include some omitted details, and show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f({epsilon}) {proportional_to} 1/{epsilon}{sup 2}. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations.

  4. Cosmic Strings and Quintessence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段一士; 任继荣; 杨捷

    2003-01-01

    Using torsion two-form we present a new Lorentz gauge invariant U (1) topological field theory in Riemann-Cartan space-time manifold U4. By virtue of the decomposition theory of U(1) gauge potential and the φ-mapping topological current theory, it is proven that the U(1) complex scalar field φ(x) can be looked upon as the order parameter field in our Universe, and a set of zero points of φ(x) create the cosmic strings as the space-time defects in the early Universe. In the standard cosmology, this complex scalar order parameter field possesses negative pressure, provides an accelerating expansion of Universe, and be able to explain the inflation in the early Universe. Therefore this complex scalar field is not only the order parameter field created the cosmic strings in the early universe, but also reasonably behaves as the quintessence, the dark energy.

  5. Modeling cosmic void statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the internal structure and spatial distribution of cosmic voids is crucial when considering them as probes of cosmology. We present recent advances in modeling void density- and velocity-profiles in real space, as well as void two-point statistics in redshift space, by examining voids identified via the watershed transform in state-of-the-art ΛCDM n-body simulations and mock galaxy catalogs. The simple and universal characteristics that emerge from these statistics indicate the self-similarity of large-scale structure and suggest cosmic voids to be among the most pristine objects to consider for future studies on the nature of dark energy, dark matter and modified gravity.

  6. Strong cosmic censorship and Misner spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Denaro, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Misner spacetime is among the simplest solutions of Einstein's equation that exhibits a Cauchy horizon with a smooth extension beyond it. Besides violating strong cosmic censorship, this extension contains closed timelike curves. We analyze the stability of the Cauchy horizon, and prove that neighboring spacetimes in one parameter families of solutions through Misner's in pure gravity, gravity coupled to a scalar field, or Einstein-Maxwell theory, end at the Cauchy horizon developing a curvature singularity.

  7. Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Agel, Jerome

    2000-08-01

    Foreword Freeman Dyson; Personal reflections Ann Druyan; Preface; Part I. Cosmic Perspective: 1. A transitional animal; 2. The Unicorn of Cetus; 3. A message from earth; 4. A message to earth; 5. Experiments in utopias; 6. Chauvinism; 7. Space exploration as a human enterprise I. The scientific interest; 8. Space exploration as a human enterprise II. The public interest; 9. Space exploration as a human enterprise III. The historical interest; Part II. The Solar System: 10. On teaching the first grade; 11. 'The ancient and legendary Gods of old'; 12. The Venus detective story; 13. Venus is hell; 14. Science and 'intelligence'; 15. The moons of Barsoom; 16. The mountains of Mars I. Observations from earth; 17. The mountains of Mars II. Observations from space; 18. The canals of Mars; 19. The lost pictures of Mars; 20. The Ice Age and the cauldron; 21. Beginnings and ends of the Earth; 22. Terraforming the plants; 23. The exploration and utlization of the solar system; Part III. Beyond the Solar System: 24. Some of my best friends are dolphins; 25. 'Hello, central casting? Send me twenty extraterrestrials'; 26. The cosmic connection; 27. Extraterrestrial life: an idea whose time has come; 28. Has the Earth been visited?; 29. A search strategy for detecting extraterrestrial intelligence; 30. If we succeed 31. Cables, drums, and seashells; 32. The night freight to the stars; 33. Astroengineering; 34. Twenty questions: a classification of cosmic civilisations; 35. Galactic cultural exchanges; 36. A passage to elsewhere; 37. Starfolk I. A Fable; 38. Starfolk II. A future; 39. Starfolk III. The cosmic Cheshire cats; Epilog David Morrison; Index.

  8. Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; van den Berg, Ad; Ebert, Ute

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms Cosmic rays are protons and heavier nuclei that constantly bombard the Earth's atmosphere with energies spanning a vast range from 109 to 1021 eV. At typical altitudes up to 10-20 km they initiate large particle cascades, called extensive air showers, that contain millions to billions of secondary particles depending on their initial energy. These particles include electrons, positrons, hadrons and muons, and are concentrated in a compact particle front that propagates at relativistic speed. In addition, the shower leaves behind a trail of lower energy electrons from ionization of air molecules. Under thunderstorm conditions these electrons contribute to the electrical and ionization processes in the cloud. When the local electric field is strong enough the secondary electrons can create relativistic electron run-away avalanches [1] or even non-relativistic avalanches. Cosmic rays could even trigger lightning inception. Conversely, strong electric fields also influence the development of the air shower [2]. Extensive air showers emit a short (tens of nanoseconds) radio pulse due to deflection of the shower particles in the Earth's magnetic field [3]. Antenna arrays, such as AERA, LOFAR and LOPES detect these pulses in a frequency window of roughly 10-100 MHz. These systems are also sensitive to the radiation from discharges associated to thunderstorms, and provide a means to study the interaction of cosmic ray air showers and the electrical processes in thunderstorms [4]. In this presentation we discuss the involved radiation mechanisms and present analyses of thunderstorm data from air shower arrays [1] A. Gurevich et al., Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992) [2] S. Buitink et al., Astropart. Phys. 33, 1 (2010) [3] H. Falcke et al., Nature 435, 313 (2005) [4] S. Buitink et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 467, 385 (2007)

  9. Cosmic microwave background theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, J R

    1998-01-06

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in -space are consistent with a DeltaT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are approximately (10(-5))2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Lambda cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 +/- 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 +/- 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 +/- 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 +/- 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Lambda and moderate constraints on Omegatot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant.

  10. Frontiers in Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Ringwald, Andreas; Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Dermer, Charles D.; Ringwald, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    This rapporteur review covers selected results presented in the Parallel Session HEA2 (High Energy Astrophysics 2) of the 10th Marcel Grossmann Meeting on General Relativity, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 2003. The subtopics are: ultra high energy cosmic ray anisotropies, the possible connection of these energetic particles with powerful gamma ray bursts, and new exciting scenarios with a strong neutrino-nucleon interaction in the atmosphere.

  11. Cosmic ray modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of cosmic rays to and inside the heliosphere, encounter an outward moving solar wind with cyclic magnetic field fluctuation and turbulence, causing convection and diffusion in the heliosphere. Cosmic ray counts from the ground ground-based neutron monitors at different cut of rigidity show intensity changes, which are anti-correlated with sunspot numbers. They also lose energy as they propagate towards the Earth and experience various types of modulations due to different solar activity indices. In this work, we study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-2014 for Beijing, Moscow and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations located at different cut off rigidity. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for low cutoff rigidity as compared to high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station as compared to the high cut off rigidity station on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days does not show any significant dependence on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of different cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics, amplitude, phase.

  12. A Cosmic Microwave Background feature consistent with a cosmic texture

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, M.; Turok, N.; Vielva, P.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Hobson, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background provides our most ancient image of the Universe and our best tool for studying its early evolution. Theories of high energy physics predict the formation of various types of topological defects in the very early universe, including cosmic texture which would generate hot and cold spots in the Cosmic Microwave Background. We show through a Bayesian statistical analysis that the most prominent, 5 degree radius cold spot observed in all-sky images, which is otherw...

  13. Analyzing Math and Science Pre-Service Teachers School Experience Course Journals Shared in Web-Based Platforms [Web Destekli Ortamlarda Fen ve Matematik Öğretmen Adaylarının Paylaştıkları Öğretmenlik Uygulaması Günlüklerinin İncelenmesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem İnel Ekici

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to investigate pre-service math and science teachers during teaching practicum course by analyzing daily journals shared in a web-based environment. 65 seniors participated in the study (41 pre-service math teachers and 24 pre-service science teachers. Within qualitative case study approach, the study focused on descriptive and content analysis during the data analysis. By looking at the findings of the study, pre-service math teachers provided more details in discussing the teaching methods and emphasizing on lesson preparations compared to pre-service science teachers. On the other hand, pre-service science teachers included more specific activity examples than did pre-service math teachers in their daily journal entries. Another important finding of the study showed that pre-service teachers tended to evaluate themselves and their friends positively, but negatively criticized their teachers. In light of these findings, we recommend offering teaching practicum course when pre-service teachers take their theoretical courses. [Bu araştırmada fen ve matematik öğretmen adaylarının “öğretmenlik uygulaması” dersi kapsamında web destekli ortamlarda paylaştıkları günlüklerin incelenmesi amaçlanmıştır. Araştırmaya dördüncü sınıfta öğrenim görmekte olan 65 öğretmen adayı katılmıştır (24 Fen öğretmen adayı ve 41 Matematik öğretmen adayı. Nitel verilere dayalı bir durum çalışması olan araştırma verilerinin analizinde betimsel analiz ve içerik analizi yöntemleri kullanılmıştır. Araştırma bulguları incelendiğinde, öğrenme sürecinde kullanılan öğretim yöntemlerini değerlendirme ve ders öncesi hazırlıkları vurgulama konularında matematik öğretmen adaylarının günlüklerinde, fen öğretmen adaylarından daha detaylı bilgiler sundukları belirlenmiştir. Buna karşılık fen öğretmen adayları günlüklerinde, matematik öğretmen adaylarından daha fazla

  14. Web Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Bebo

    2003-06-23

    Web Engineering is the application of systematic, disciplined and quantifiable approaches to development, operation, and maintenance of Web-based applications. It is both a pro-active approach and a growing collection of theoretical and empirical research in Web application development. This paper gives an overview of Web Engineering by addressing the questions: (a) why is it needed? (b) what is its domain of operation? (c) how does it help and what should it do to improve Web application development? and (d) how should it be incorporated in education and training? The paper discusses the significant differences that exist between Web applications and conventional software, the taxonomy of Web applications, the progress made so far and the research issues and experience of creating a specialization at the master's level. The paper reaches a conclusion that Web Engineering at this stage is a moving target since Web technologies are constantly evolving, making new types of applications possible, which in turn may require innovations in how they are built, deployed and maintained.

  15. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, S.; Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.

    2016-11-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfvén waves, that in turn determines the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here, we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the implications for the spectrum of cosmic rays by solving together the hydrodynamical equations for the wind and the transport equation for cosmic rays under the action of self-generated diffusion and advection with the wind and the self-excited Alfvén waves.

  16. Cosmic ray: Studying the origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabelski, J. [Cosmic Ray Laboratory, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Lodz (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations of the origin of cosmic rays are presented. Different methods are discussed: studies of cosmic gamma rays of energy from 30 MeV to about 10{sup 15} eV (since photons point to their places of origin), studies of the mass composition of cosmic rays (because it reflects source morphology), and studies of cosmic rays with energy above 1O{sup 19} eV (for these are the highest energies observed in nature). (author) 101 refs, 19 figs, 7 tabs

  17. Cosmic rays and molecular clouds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the cosmic-ray penetration into molecular clouds and with the related gamma--ray emission. High energy cosmic rays interact with the dense gas and produce neutral pions which in turn decay into two gamma rays. This makes molecular clouds potential sources of gamma rays, especially if they are located in the vicinity of a powerful accelerator that injects cosmic rays in the interstellar medium. The amplitude and duration in time of the cosmic--ray overdensity around a giv...

  18. CORRELATIVE ANALYSIS OF COSMIC RAY INTENSITY AND SOLAR ACTIVITY PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. ROY

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Incoming cosmic ray shows significant intensity modulation in association with different solar geo parameters during their passage through heliosphere. Cosmic ray intensity is found anticorrelated with solar activity parameters. Using pressure corrected data of Mcmurdo neutron monitor, modulation of cosmic ray is analyzed covering solar cycles 21, 22, 23 and 24 (from 1976 to 2013. Negative and high correlations are obtained with some time lag for most of the solar parameters. Difference in shapes of hysteresis curves CRI~SSN, CRI~SRF. CRI~CI and CRI~FI for odd and even cycles pointed out that different mechanisms convection and diffusion are the dominating factors to drift cosmic ray particles.

  19. Constraints on high energy interaction models from LHC and cosmic ray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostapchenko Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of popular cosmic ray interaction models for some basic characteristics of cosmic ray-induced extensive air showers are analyzed in view of experimental data on proton-proton collisions, obtained at the Large Hadron Collider. The differences between the results are traced down to different approaches for the treatment of hadronic interactions, implemented in those models. Potential measurements by LHC and cosmic ray experiments, which could be able to discriminate between the alternative approaches, are proposed.

  20. Constraints on high energy interaction models from LHC and cosmic ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapchenko, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    Predictions of popular cosmic ray interaction models for some basic characteristics of cosmic ray-induced extensive air showers are analyzed in view of experimental data on proton-proton collisions, obtained at the Large Hadron Collider. The differences between the results are traced down to different approaches for the treatment of hadronic interactions, implemented in those models. Potential measurements by LHC and cosmic ray experiments, which could be able to discriminate between the alternative approaches, are proposed.

  1. Web Similarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, A.R.; Vitányi, P.M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Normalized web distance (NWD) is a similarity or normalized semantic distance based on the World Wide Web or any other large electronic database, for instance Wikipedia, and a search engine that returns reliable aggregate page counts. For sets of search terms the NWD gives a similarity on a scale fr

  2. The Emergence of Cosmic Education. Spotlight: Cosmic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Sr. Christina Marie

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the influence of Hindu, Moslem, and Buddhist metaphysics on Maria Montessori's own pedagogical philosophy of Cosmic Education, which she regarded as the core of all learning experiences, after her visit to India. Considers the relationship between Montessori's ideas of child development and Cosmic Education, and the effect of Indian…

  3. Understanding User-Web Interactions via Web Analytics

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, Bernard J

    2009-01-01

    This lecture presents an overview of the Web analytics process, with a focus on providing insight and actionable outcomes from collecting and analyzing Internet data. The lecture first provides an overview of Web analytics, providing in essence, a condensed version of the entire lecture. The lecture then outlines the theoretical and methodological foundations of Web analytics in order to make obvious the strengths and shortcomings of Web analytics as an approach. These foundational elements include the psychological basis in behaviorism and methodological underpinning of trace data as an empir

  4. Cosmic baldness and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchapakesan, N.; Lohiya, D.

    1985-04-01

    The stability of the de Sitter metric and the relevance of the initial state of a domain which approaches a de Sitter universe asymptotically are investigated analytically, adapting the one-dimensional wave equation with effective potential derived by Khanal and Panchapakesan (1981), for the perturbations of the de Sitter-Schwarzschild metric, to the de Sitter case. It is demonstrated that initial nonspherical perturbations do not increase exponentially with time but rather decay, the frozen modes exponentially and the backscattered perturbations of finite angular momentum l as t to the -(2l - l). It is concluded that the cosmic horizon is stable and has no hair. 14 references.

  5. Wormhole cosmic strings

    CERN Document Server

    Clément, G

    1995-01-01

    We construct regular multi-wormhole solutions to a gravitating \\sigma model in three space-time dimensions, and extend these solutions to cylindrical traversable wormholes in four and five dimensions. We then discuss the possibility of identifying wormhole mouths in pairs to give rise to Wheeler wormholes. Such an identification is consistent with the original field equations only in the absence of the \\sigma-model source, but with possible naked cosmic string sources. The resulting Wheeler wormhole space-times are flat outside the sources and may be asymptotically Minkowskian.

  6. Pulsars: Cosmic Permanent 'Neutromagnets'?

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We argue that pulsars may be spin-polarized neutron stars, i.e. cosmic permanent magnets. This would simply explain several observational facts about pulsars, including the 'beacon effect' itself i.e. the static/stable misalignment of rotational and magnetic axes, the extreme temporal stability of the pulses and the existence of an upper limit for the magnetic field strength - coinciding with the one observed in "magnetars". Although our model admittedly is speculative, this latter fact seems to us unlikely to be pure coincidence.

  7. Garden of cosmic speculation

    CERN Document Server

    Jencks, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This book tells the story of one of the most important gardens in Europe, created by the architectural critic and designer Charles Jencks and his late wife, the landscape architect and author Maggie Keswick. The Garden of Cosmic Speculation is a landscape that celebrates the new sciences of complexity and chaos theory and consists of a series of metaphors exploring the origins, the destiny and the substance of the Universe. The book is illustrated with year-round photography, bringing the garden's many dimensions vividly to life.

  8. Discovery of cosmic fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshev, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This is the first book to present the fascinating new results on the largest fractal structures in the universe. It guides the reader, in a simple way, to the frontiers of astronomy, explaining how fractals appear in cosmic physics, from our solar system to the megafractals in deep space. It also offers a personal view of the history of the idea of self-similarity and of cosmological principles, from Plato's ideal architecture of the heavens to Mandelbrot's fractals in the modern physical cosmos. In addition, this invaluable book presents the great fractal debate in astronomy (after Luciano Pi

  9. Superconducting Cosmic String with Propagating Torsion

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, C N; Garcia de Andrade, L C

    2000-01-01

    We show that it is possible to construct a consistent model describing a current-carrying cosmic string endowed with torsion. The torsion contribution to the gravitational force and geodesics of a test-particle moving around the SCCS are analyzed. In particular, we point out two interesting astrophysical phenomena in which the higher magnitude force we derived may play a critical role: the dynamics of compact objects orbiting the torsioned SCCS and accretion of matter onto it. The deficit angle associated to the SCCS can be obtained and compared with data from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite. We also derived a value for the torsion contribution to matter density fluctuations in the early Universe.

  10. Cosmic Acceleration, Dark Energy and Fundamental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Michael Stanley

    2007-01-01

    A web of interlocking observations has established that the expansion of the Universe is speeding up and not slowing, revealing the presence of some form of repulsive gravity. Within the context of general relativity the cause of cosmic acceleration is a highly elastic (p\\sim -rho), very smooth form of energy called ``dark energy'' accounting for about 75% of the Universe. The ``simplest'' explanation for dark energy is the zero-point energy density associated with the quantum vacuum; however, all estimates for its value are many orders-of-magnitude too large. Other ideas for dark energy include a very light scalar field or a tangled network of topological defects. An alternate explanation invokes gravitational physics beyond general relativity. Observations and experiments underway and more precise cosmological measurements and laboratory experiments planned for the next decade will test whether or not dark energy is the quantum energy of the vacuum or something more exotic, and whether or not general relati...

  11. A Cooperative Schema between Web Sever and Search Engine for Improving Freshness of Web Repository

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Because the web is huge and web pages are updated frequently, the index maintained by a search engine has to refresh web pages periodically. This is extremely resource consuming because the search engine needs to crawl the web and download web pages to refresh its index. Based on present technologies of web refreshing, we present a cooperative schema between web server and search engine for maintaining freshness of web repository. The web server provides meta-data defined through XML standard to describe web sites. Before updating the web page the crawler visits the meta-data files. If the meta-data indicates that the page is not modified, then the crawler will not update it. So this schema can save bandwidth resource. A primitive model based on the schema is implemented. The cost and efficiency of the schema are analyzed.

  12. WebCom: A Model for Understanding Web Site Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godsk, Mikkel; Petersen, Anja Bechmann

    2008-01-01

    This chapter presents a model (WebCom) for understanding and analyzing Web site-mediated communication, also referred to as Web site communication. The model combines three theoretical approaches - communication, medium, and activity theory - into one generic model that benefits from each...... of the approaches' strengths. Furthermore, it is discussed and shortly demonstrated how WebCom can be used for analytical and design purposes with YouTube as an example. The chapter concludes that WebCom is able to serve as a theoretically-based model for understanding complex Web site communication situations...... in their entirety, and that such thoroughly approach is required for successful computer mediated communication (CMC) when communicating across cultures and contexts....

  13. Cosmic Ray ^3He Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmic ray ^3He/^4He observations, including a new measurement at ~65 MeV/nucleon from ISEE-3, are compared with interstellar propagation and solar modulation models in an effort to understand the origin of cosmic ray He nuclei.

  14. Self--gravitating cosmic rings

    OpenAIRE

    Clément, Gérard

    1998-01-01

    The classical Einstein--Maxwell field equations admit static horizonless wormhole solutions with only a circular cosmic string singularity. We show how to extend these static solutions to exact rotating asymptotically flat solutions. For a suitable range of parameter values, these solutions describe charged or neutral rotating closed cosmic strings, with a perimeter of the order of their Schwarzschild radius.

  15. Web Page Recommendation Using Web Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modraj Bhavsar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available On World Wide Web various kind of content are generated in huge amount, so to give relevant result to user web recommendation become important part of web application. On web different kind of web recommendation are made available to user every day that includes Image, Video, Audio, query suggestion and web page. In this paper we are aiming at providing framework for web page recommendation. 1 First we describe the basics of web mining, types of web mining. 2 Details of each web mining technique.3We propose the architecture for the personalized web page recommendation.

  16. Web analytics tools and web metrics tools: An overview and comparative analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Bekavac; Daniela Garbin Praničević

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to compare and analyze the impact of web analytics tools for measuring the performance of a business model. Accordingly, an overview of web analytics and web metrics tools is given, including their characteristics, main functionalities and available types. The data acquisition approaches and proper choice of web tools for particular business models are also reviewed. The research is divided in two sections. First, a qualitative focus is placed on reviewing web analytic...

  17. George's cosmic treasure hunt

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Lucy; Parsons, Gary

    2009-01-01

    George and Annie explore the galaxy in this cosmic adventure from Stephen Hawking and Lucy Hawking, complete with essays from Professor Hawking about the latest in space travel. George is heartbroken when he learns that his friend Annie and her father are moving to the US. Eric has a new job working for the space program, looking for signs of life in the Universe. Eric leaves George with a gift—a book called The User’s Guide to the Universe. But Annie and Eric haven’t been gone for very long when Annie believes that she is being contacted by aliens, who have a terrible warning for her. George joins her in the US to help her with her quest—and before he knows it, he, Annie, Cosmos, and Annie’s annoying cousin Emmett have been swept up in a cosmic treasure hunt, spanning the whole galaxy and beyond. Lucy Hawking's own experiences in zero-gravity flight and interviews with astronauts at Cape Kennedy and the Johnson Space Center lend the book a sense of realism and excitement that is sure to fire up ima...

  18. Note on cosmic censorship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipler, F.J.

    1985-05-01

    A number of recent theorems by Krolak and Newman purport to prove cosmic censorship by showing that ''strong curvature'' singularities must be hidden behind horizons. It is proved that Newman's ''null, strong curvature'' condition, which is imposed on certain classes of null geodesics to restrict curvature growth in the space-time, does not hold in many physically realistic space-times: it is not satisfied by any null geodesic in the relevant class in any open Friedmann cosmological model, nor does it hold for any null geodesic in the relevant class in maximal Schwarzschild space. More generally, it is argued that the singularity predicted by the Penrose singularity theorem is unlikely to be of the type eliminated by Newman. Thus the Newman theorems are probably without physical significance. The Krolak theorems, although based on a physically significant definition of strong curvature singularity, are mathematically invalid, and this approach cannot be used to obtain a cosmic censorship theorem. (author).

  19. Evolution Of Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Vanchurin, V

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of finite loops and infinite strings as a part of a complete cosmic string network. We give dynamical arguments showing that the structures on infinite strings should obey a scaling law. We perform a simulation of the network which uses functional forms for the string position and thus is exact to the limits of computer arithmetic. The effective box size of our simulation is at least two orders of magnitude larger than what was previously reached. Our results confirm that the wiggles on the strings obey a scaling law described by universal power spectrum. The average distance between long strings also scales accurately with the time. Production functions of string loops do not show scaling. With low intercommutation probability p the true scaling régime is not reached until very late cosmic times, which makes it difficult to simulate such evolutions. Via the expansion of the box technique, we were able to reach scaling with a wide range of p. The physical correlation ...

  20. Cosmic particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimbardo, Gaetano; Perri, Silvia [Universita della Calabria, Dipartimento di Fisica, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The most popular mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays, which is thought to operate in supernova remnant shocks as well as at heliospheric shocks, is the diffusive shock acceleration, which is a Fermi mechanism based on normal diffusion. On the other hand, in the last few years it has been shown that the transport of plasma particles in the presence of electric and magnetic turbulence can be superdiffusive rather than normal diffusive. The term 'superdiffusive' refers to the mean square displacement of particle positions growing superlinearly with time, as compared to the normal linear growth. In particular, superdiffusion is characterized by a non Gaussian statistical process called Levy random walk. We show how diffusive shock acceleration is modified by superdiffusion, and how this yields new predictions for the cosmic ray spectral index, for the acceleration time, and for the spatial profile of energetic particles. A comparison with observations of particle acceleration at heliospheric shocks and at supernova remnant shocks is done. We discuss how superdiffusive shock acceleration allows to explain the observations of hard ion spectra at the solar wind termination shock detected by Voyager 2, of hard radio spectra due to synchrotron emission of electrons accelerated at supernova remnant shocks, and how it can help to explain the observations of 'thin rims' in the X-ray synchrotron emission.

  1. Genuine cosmic hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastor, David; Ray, Sourya; Traschen, Jennie

    2017-02-01

    We show that asymptotically future de Sitter (AFdS) spacetimes carry ‘genuine’ cosmic hair; information that is analogous to the mass and angular momentum of asymptotically flat spacetimes and that characterizes how an AFdS spacetime approaches its asymptotic form. We define new ‘cosmological tension’ charges associated with future asymptotic spatial translation symmetries, which are analytic continuations of the ADM mass and tensions of asymptotically planar AdS spacetimes, and which measure the leading anisotropic corrections to the isotropic, exponential de Sitter expansion rate. A cosmological Smarr relation, holding for AFdS spacetimes having exact spatial translation symmetry, is derived. This formula relates cosmological tension, which is evaluated at future infinity, to properties of the cosmology at early times, together with a ‘cosmological volume’ contribution that is analogous to the thermodynamic volume of AdS black holes. Smarr relations for different spatial directions imply that the difference in expansion rates between two directions at late times is related in a simple way to their difference at early times. Hence information about the very early universe can be inferred from cosmic hair, which is potentially observable in a late time de Sitter phase. Cosmological tension charges and related quantities are evaluated for Kasner–de Sitter spacetimes, which serve as our primary examples.

  2. L3 + Cosmics Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE4 %title\\\\ \\\\The L3+C experiment takes advantage of the unique properties of the L3 muon spectrometer to get an accurate measurement of cosmic ray muons 30 m underground. A new muon trigger, readout and DAQ system have been installed, as well as a scintillator array covering the upper surfaces of the L3 magnet for timing purposes. The acceptance amounts to 200 $m^2 sr$. The data are collected independently in parallel with L3 running. In spring 2000 a scintillator array will be installed on the roof of the SX hall in order to estimate the primary energy of air showers associated with events observed in L3+C.\\\\ \\\\The cosmic ray muon momentum spectrum, the zenith angular dependence and the charge ratio are measured with high accuracy between 20 and 2000 GeV/c. The results will provide new information about the primary composition, the shower development in the atmosphere, and the inclusive pion and kaon (production-) cross sections (specifically the "$\\pi$/K ratio") at high energies. These data will also hel...

  3. Web Personalization Using Web Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms.Kavita D.Satokar,

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The information on the web is growing dramatically. The users has to spend lots of time on the web finding the information they are interested in. Today, he traditional search engines do not give users enough personalized help but provide the user with lots of irrelevant information. In this paper, we present a personalize Web searchsystem, which can helps users to get the relevant web pages based on their selection from the domain list. Thus, users can obtain a set of interested domains and the web pages from the system. The system is based on features extracted from hyperlinks, such as anchor terms or URL tokens. Our methodology uses an innovative weighted URL Rank algorithm based on user interested domains and user query.

  4. Cosmic rays and global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlykin, A.D. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sloan, T. [Lancaster University (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A.W. [Durham University (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds could contribute to global warming. The argument is that the observed increased solar activity during the last century caused a decrease in the ionization due to cosmic rays since the lower energy cosmic particles are deflected by the magnetic field created by the increasing solar wind. This would lead to a decrease in cloud cover allowing more heating of the earth by the sun. Meteorological data combined to solar activity observations and simulations show that any effect of solar activity on clouds and the climate is likely to be through irradiance rather than cosmic rays. Since solar irradiance transfers 8 orders of magnitude more energy to the atmosphere than cosmic rays it is more plausible that this can produce a real effect. The total contribution of variable solar activity to global warming is shown to be less than 14% of the total temperature rise. (A.C.)

  5. Semantic web services for web databases

    CERN Document Server

    Ouzzani, Mourad

    2011-01-01

    Semantic Web Services for Web Databases introduces an end-to-end framework for querying Web databases using novel Web service querying techniques. This includes a detailed framework for the query infrastructure for Web databases and services. Case studies are covered in the last section of this book. Semantic Web Services For Web Databases is designed for practitioners and researchers focused on service-oriented computing and Web databases.

  6. Sensor web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delin, Kevin A. (Inventor); Jackson, Shannon P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A Sensor Web formed of a number of different sensor pods. Each of the sensor pods include a clock which is synchronized with a master clock so that all of the sensor pods in the Web have a synchronized clock. The synchronization is carried out by first using a coarse synchronization which takes less power, and subsequently carrying out a fine synchronization to make a fine sync of all the pods on the Web. After the synchronization, the pods ping their neighbors to determine which pods are listening and responded, and then only listen during time slots corresponding to those pods which respond.

  7. Location-based Web Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, Dirk; Boll, Susanne

    In recent years, the relation of Web information to a physical location has gained much attention. However, Web content today often carries only an implicit relation to a location. In this chapter, we present a novel location-based search engine that automatically derives spatial context from unstructured Web resources and allows for location-based search: our focused crawler applies heuristics to crawl and analyze Web pages that have a high probability of carrying a spatial relation to a certain region or place; the location extractor identifies the actual location information from the pages; our indexer assigns a geo-context to the pages and makes them available for a later spatial Web search. We illustrate the usage of our spatial Web search for location-based applications that provide information not only right-in-time but also right-on-the-spot.

  8. Galactic cosmic rays on extrasolar Earth-like planets I. Cosmic ray flux

    CERN Document Server

    Grießmeier, J -M; Stadelmann, A; Grenfell, J L; Atri, D

    2015-01-01

    (abridged abstract) Theoretical arguments indicate that close-in terrestial exoplanets may have weak magnetic fields, especially in the case of planets more massive than Earth (super-Earths). Planetary magnetic fields, however, constitute one of the shielding layers that protect the planet against cosmic-ray particles. In particular, a weak magnetic field results in a high flux of Galactic cosmic rays that extends to the top of the planetary atmosphere. We wish to quantify the flux of Galactic cosmic rays to an exoplanetary atmosphere as a function of the particle energy and of the planetary magnetic moment. We numerically analyzed the propagation of Galactic cosmic-ray particles through planetary magnetospheres. We evaluated the efficiency of magnetospheric shielding as a function of the particle energy (in the range 16 MeV $\\le$ E $\\le$ 524 GeV) and as a function of the planetary magnetic field strength (in the range 0 ${M}_\\oplus$ $\\le$ {M} $\\le$ 10 ${M}_\\oplus$). Combined with the flux outside the planeta...

  9. COMPARISON ANALYSIS OF WEB USAGE MINING USING PATTERN RECOGNITION TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanhay Singh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Web usage mining is the application of data mining techniques to better serve the needs of web-based applications on the web site. In this paper, we analyze the web usage mining by applying the pattern recognition techniques on web log data. Pattern recognition is defined as the act of taking in raw data and making an action based on the ‘category’ of the pattern. Web usage mining is divided into three partsPreprocessing, Pattern discovery and Pattern analysis. Further, this paper intended with experimental work in which web log data is used. We have taken the web log data from the “NASA” web server which is analyzed with “Web Log Explorer”. Web Log Explorer is a web usage mining tool which plays the vital role to carry out this work.

  10. The role of VHE muons in an explanation of unusual events observed in cosmic rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogdanov, AG; Petrukhin, AA; Shalabaeva, AV

    2005-01-01

    Unusual events observed in cosmic-ray experiments that cannot be explained in the context of modern theories and models are considered. The peculiarities of VHE (>= 100 TeV) muon interactions and their possible contribution to the production of various unusual events in cosmic rays are analyzed. Som

  11. Gravitational Waves and Light Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Depies, Matthew R

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational wave signatures from cosmic strings are analyzed numerically. Cosmic string networks form during phase transistions in the early universe and these networks of long cosmic strings break into loops that radiate energy in the form of gravitational waves until they decay. The gravitational waves come in the form of harmonic modes from individual string loops, a "confusion noise" from galactic loops, and a stochastic background of gravitational waves from a network of loops. In this study string loops of larger size $\\alpha$ and lower string tensions $G\\mu$ (where $\\mu$ is the mass per unit length of the string) are investigated than in previous studies. Several detectors are currently searching for gravitational waves and a space based satellite, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), is in the final stages of pre-flight. The results for large loop sizes ($\\alpha=0.1$) put an upper limit of about $G\\mu<10^{-9}$ and indicate that gravitational waves from string loops down to $G\\mu \\approx...

  12. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    CERN Document Server

    Recchia, S; Morlino, G

    2016-01-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfven waves, that in turn determine the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the impli...

  13. Cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, Philipp P

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important in the Universe and their effects contain the key to many astrophysical phenomena that are otherwise impossible to understand. This book presents an up-to-date overview of this fast-growing topic and its interconnections to plasma processes, astroparticle physics, high energy astrophysics, and cosmic evolution. The phenomenology and impact of magnetic fields are described in diverse astrophysical contexts within the Universe, from galaxies to the filaments and voids of the intergalactic medium, and out to the largest redshifts. The presentation of mathematical formulae is accessible and is designed to add insight into the broad range of topics discussed. Written for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics and related disciplines, this volume will inspire readers to devise new ways of thinking about magnetic fields in space on galaxy scales and beyond.

  14. Microphysics of cosmic plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, Andrei; Cargill, Peter; Dendy, Richard; Wit, Thierry; Raymond, John

    2014-01-01

    This title presents a review of the detailed aspects of the physical processes that underlie the observed properties, structures and dynamics of cosmic plasmas. An assessment of the status of understanding of microscale processes in all astrophysical collisionless plasmas is provided. The topics discussed include  turbulence in astrophysical and solar system plasmas as a phenomenological description of their dynamic properties on all scales; observational, theoretical and modelling aspects of collisionless magnetic reconnection; the formation and dynamics of shock waves; and a review and assessment of microprocesses, such as the hierarchy of plasma instabilities, non-local and non-diffusive transport processes and ionisation and radiation processes.  In addition, some of the lessons that have been learned from the extensive existing knowledge of laboratory plasmas as applied to astrophysical problems are also covered.   This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in the areas of cosmi...

  15. Cosmic Ray Antimatter

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, space-born experiments have delivered new measurements of high energy cosmic-ray (CR) antiprotons and positrons, opening new frontiers in energy reach and precision. While being a promising discovery tool for new physics or exotic astrophysical phenomena, an irreducible background of antimatter comes from CR collisions with interstellar matter in the Galaxy. Understanding this irreducible source or constraining it from first principles is an interesting challenge: a game of hide-and-seek where the objective is to identify the laws of basic particle physics among the forest of astrophysical uncertainties. I describe an attempt to obtain such understanding, combining information from a zoo of CR species including massive nuclei and relativistic radioisotopes. I show that: (i) CR antiprotons most likely come from CR-gas collisions; (ii) positron data is consistent with, and suggestive of the same astrophysical production mechanism responsible for antiprotons and dominated by proton-proton c...

  16. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Aled

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a brief review of current theory and observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB. New predictions for cosmological defect theories and an overview of the inflationary theory are discussed. Recent results from various observations of the anisotropies of the microwave background are described and a summary of the proposed experiments is presented. A new analysis technique based on Bayesian statistics that can be used to reconstruct the underlying sky fluctuations is summarised. Current CMB data is used to set some preliminary constraints on the values of fundamental cosmological parameters $Omega$ and $H_circ$ using the maximum likelihood technique. In addition, secondary anisotropies due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are described.

  17. Acceleration of cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhko, E [Yu.G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Ave., 677980 Yakutsk (Russian Federation)], E-mail: berezhko@ikfia.ysn.ru

    2008-07-15

    Cosmic ray (CR) origin problem is briefly discussed. It is argued that CRs with energies up to 10{sup 17} eV are produced in galactic supernova remnants, whereas ultra high energy CRs are extragalactic. CR composition strongly changes within the transition from galactic to extragalactic CR component, therefore precise measurements of CR composition at energies 10{sup 17} - 10{sup 19} eV are needed for the reliable determination of this transition. The possible sources of extragalactic CRs are briefly discussed. It is argued that CR acceleration at the shock created by the expanding cocoons around active galactic nuclei has to be considered as a prime candidate for the sources of extragalactic CRs.

  18. Simulating Cosmic Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, D H; Hernquist, L E; Weinberg, David H.; Katz, Neal; Hernquist, Lars

    1997-01-01

    We describe cosmological simulation techniques and their application to studies of cosmic structure formation, with particular attention to recent hydrodynamic simulations of structure in the high redshift universe. Collisionless N-body simulations with Gaussian initial conditions produce a pattern of sheets, filaments, tunnels, and voids that resembles the observed large scale galaxy distribution. Simulations that incorporate gas dynamics and dissipation form dense clumps of cold gas with sizes and masses similar to the luminous parts of galaxies. Models based on inflation and cold dark matter predict a healthy population of high redshift galaxies, including systems with star formation rates of 20 M_{\\sun}/year at z=6. At z~3, most of the baryons in these models reside in the low density intergalactic medium, which produces fluctuating Lyman-alpha absorption in the spectra of background quasars. The physical description of this ``Lyman-alpha forest'' is particularly simple if the absorption spectrum is viewe...

  19. Cosmic Light EDU kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    In 2015 we celebrate the International Year of Light, a great opportunity to promote awareness about the importance of light coming from the Cosmos and what messages it is bringing to mankind. In parallel a unique moment to attract the attention of stakeholders on the dangers of light pollution and its impact in our lives and our pursuit of more knowledge. In this presentation I want to present one of the conrnerstones of IYL2015, a partnership between the Galileo Teacher Training Program, Universe Awareness and Globe at Night, the Cosmic Light EDU kit. The aim of this project is to assemble a core set of tools and resources representing our basic knowledge pilars about the Universe and simple means to preserve our night sky.

  20. On Strong Cosmic Censorship

    CERN Document Server

    Isenberg, James

    2015-01-01

    For almost half of the one hundred year history of Einstein's theory of general relativity, Strong Cosmic Censorship has been one of its most intriguing conjectures. The SCC conjecture addresses the issue of the nature of the singularities found in most solutions of Einstein's gravitational field equations: Are such singularities generically characterized by unbounded curvature? Is the existence of a Cauchy horizon (and the accompanying extensions into spacetime regions in which determinism fails) an unstable feature of solutions of Einstein's equations? In this short review article, after briefly commenting on the history of the SCC conjecture, we survey some of the progress made in research directed either toward supporting SCC or toward uncovering some of its weaknesses. We focus in particular on model versions of SCC which have been proven for restricted families of spacetimes (e.g., the Gowdy spacetimes), and the role played by the generic presence of Asymptotically Velocity Term Dominated behavior in th...

  1. Cosmic ray synergies

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    In laboratories, cosmic rays have been the subject of scientific research for many years. A more recent development is their appearance in schools, as educational tools. A recent workshop at CERN, organised by ASPERA in collaboration with EPPOG and EPPCN, had the goal of bringing together ideas and initiatives with a view to setting up a future common project.   Presentation at the workshop on 15 October. In research, as in education, you can sometimes get things done more rapidly and easily by joining forces. For roughly the past decade, physicists have been taking their particle detectors to secondary schools. “The challenge now is to bring all of these existing projects together in a network,” says Arnaud Marsollier, in charge of communication for the ASPERA network and organiser of the workshop. The workshop held on Friday, 15 October was attended by representatives of major European educational projects and members of the European Particle Physics Communication Network...

  2. Genuine Cosmic Hair

    CERN Document Server

    Kastor, David; Traschen, Jennie

    2016-01-01

    We show that asymptotically future deSitter (AFdS) spacetimes carry 'genuine' cosmic hair; information that is analogous to the mass and angular momentum of asymptotically flat spacetimes and that characterizes how an AFdS spacetime approaches its asymptotic form. We define new 'cosmological tension' charges associated with future asymptotic spatial translation symmetries, which are analytic continuations of the ADM mass and tensions of asymptotically planar AdS spacetimes, and which measure the leading anisotropic corrections to the isotropic, exponential deSitter expansion rate. A cosmological Smarr relation, holding for AFdS spacetimes having exact spatial translation symmetry, is derived. This formula relates cosmological tension, which is evaluated at future infinity, to properties of the cosmology at early times, together with a 'cosmological volume' contribution that is analogous to the thermodynamic volume of AdS black holes. Smarr relations for different spatial directions imply that the difference i...

  3. Study on End-to-End Web Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ke-li; DAI Li-zhong

    2004-01-01

    While there are lots of papers discussing one or more aspects of web performance, there are few papers talking of web performance as a whole. This paper most thoroughly discusses aspects that influence web performance and current known web techniques. In addition, we discussed the general methods of web performance measurement and explained the discrepancies between our results and those of others. Finally, we analyzed the bottlenecks of web and come up with possible solutions.

  4. The WebStand Project

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Benjamin; Colazzo, Dario; Vion, Antoine; Manolescu, Ioana; Senellart, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the state of advancement of the French ANR WebStand project. The objective of this project is to construct a customizable XML based warehouse platform to acquire, transform, analyze, store, query and export data from the web, in particular mailing lists, with the final intension of using this data to perform sociological studies focused on social groups of World Wide Web, with a specific emphasis on the temporal aspects of this data. We are currently using this system to analyze the standardization process of the W3C, through its social network of standard setters.

  5. THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, James C.; Michael Shull, J.; Snow, Theodore P.; Stocke, John [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 391-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Ebbets, Dennis [Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., 1600 Commerce Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Heap, Sara H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 681, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Leitherer, Claus; Sembach, Kenneth [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Savage, Blair D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Siegmund, Oswald H. W. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Spencer, John; Alan Stern, S. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Welsh, Barry [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009 May, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F{sub {lambda}} Almost-Equal-To 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph echelle modes) in 1%-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (2009 September-2011 June) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is nine times than sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of 2011 June. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Ly{alpha} absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the He II reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  6. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J. Michael; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Snow, Theodore P.; Spencer, John; Stern, S. Alan; Stocke, John; Welsh, Barry; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian; McPhate, Jason; Penton, Steven V; Andrews, John; Morse, Jon

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F(sub lambda) approximates 1.0 X 10(exp -14) ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lya absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the HeII reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  7. Application of Ranganathans Laws to the Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Amoohosseini

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the Web and raises a significant question: Does the Web save the time of the users? This question is analyzed in the context of Five Laws of the Web. What do these laws mean? The laws are meant to be elemental, to convey a deep understanding and capture the essential meaning of the World Wide Web. These laws may seem simplistic, but in fact they express a simple, crystal-clear vision of what the Web ought to be. Moreover, we intend to echo the simplicity of Ranganathans Five Laws of Library Science which inspired them

  8. Application of Ranganathan's Laws to the Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Noruzi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the Web and raises a significant question: "Does the Web save the time of the users?" This question is analyzed in the context of Five Laws of the Web. What do these laws mean? The laws are meant to be elemental, to convey a deep understanding and capture the essential meaning of the World Wide Web. These laws may seem simplistic, but in fact they express a simple, crystal-clear vision of what the Web ought to be. Moreover, we intend to echo the simplicity of Ranganathan's Five Laws of Library Science which inspired them.

  9. Test particle trajectories near cosmic strings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Farook Rahaman; Subenoy Chakraborty; K Maity

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the motion of test particle in the gravitational field of cosmic strings in different situations using the Hamilton–Jacobi (H–J) formalism. We have discussed the trajectories near static cosmic string, cosmic string in Brans–Dicke theory and cosmic string in dilaton gravity.

  10. A cosmic microwave background feature consistent with a cosmic texture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M; Turok, N; Vielva, P; Martínez-González, E; Hobson, M

    2007-12-07

    The Cosmic Microwave Background provides our most ancient image of the universe and our best tool for studying its early evolution. Theories of high-energy physics predict the formation of various types of topological defects in the very early universe, including cosmic texture, which would generate hot and cold spots in the Cosmic Microwave Background. We show through a Bayesian statistical analysis that the most prominent 5 degrees -radius cold spot observed in all-sky images, which is otherwise hard to explain, is compatible with having being caused by a texture. From this model, we constrain the fundamental symmetry-breaking energy scale to be (0) approximately 8.7 x 10(15) gigaelectron volts. If confirmed, this detection of a cosmic defect will probe physics at energies exceeding any conceivable terrestrial experiment.

  11. Spherical Orbifolds for Cosmic Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Harmonic analysis is a tool to infer cosmic topology from the measured astrophysical cosmic microwave background CMB radiation. For overall positive curvature, Platonic spherical manifolds are candidates for this analysis. We combine the specific point symmetry of the Platonic manifolds with their deck transformations. This analysis in topology leads from manifolds to orbifolds. We discuss the deck transformations of the orbifolds and give basis functions for the harmonic analysis as linear combinations of Wigner polynomials on the 3-sphere. They provide new tools for detecting cosmic topology from the CMB radiation.

  12. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    cloud radiative properties. Thus, a moderate influence on atmospheric aerosol distributions from cosmic ray ionisation would have a strong influence on the Earth's radiation budget. Historical evidence over the past 1000 years indicates that changes in climate have occurred in accord with variability...... in the Earth's radiation budget through trapping outgoing radiation and reflecting incoming radiation. If a physical link between these two features can be established, it would provide a mechanism linking solar activity and Earth's climate. Recent satellite observations have further revealed a correlation...... in cosmic ray intensities. Such changes are in agreement with the sign of cloud radiative forcing associated with cosmic ray variability as estimated from satellite observations....

  13. Detecting particles with cell phones: the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Vandenbroucke, Justin; Karn, Peter; Meehan, Matthew; Plewa, Matthew; Ruggles, Tyler; Schultz, David; Peacock, Jeffrey; Simons, Ariel Levi

    2015-01-01

    In 2014 the number of active cell phones worldwide for the first time surpassed the number of humans. Cell phone camera quality and onboard processing power (both CPU and GPU) continue to improve rapidly. In addition to their primary purpose of detecting photons, camera image sensors on cell phones and other ubiquitous devices such as tablets, laptops and digital cameras can detect ionizing radiation produced by cosmic rays and radioactive decays. While cosmic rays have long been understood and characterized as a nuisance in astronomical cameras, they can also be identified as a signal in idle camera image sensors. We present the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory (DECO), a platform for outreach and education as well as for citizen science. Consisting of an app and associated database and web site, DECO harnesses the power of distributed camera image sensors for cosmic-ray detection.

  14. Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography: Japanese SKA Cosmic Magnetism Science

    CERN Document Server

    Akahori, Takuya; Ichaki, Kiyotomo; Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Kudoh, Takahiro; Kudoh, Yuki; Machida, Mami; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takizawa, Motokazu

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play essential roles in various astronomical objects. Radio astronomy has revealed that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our Universe. However, the real origin and evolution of magnetic fields is poorly proven. In order to advance our knowledge of cosmic magnetism in coming decades, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) should have supreme sensitivity than ever before, which provides numerous observation points in the cosmic space. Furthermore, the SKA should be designed to facilitate wideband polarimetry so as to allow us to examine sightline structures of magnetic fields by means of depolarization and Faraday Tomography. The SKA will be able to drive cosmic magnetism of the interstellar medium, the Milky Way, galaxies, AGN, galaxy clusters, and potentially the cosmic web which may preserve information of the primeval Universe. The Japan SKA Consortium (SKA-JP) Magnetism Science Working Group (SWG) proposes the project "Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography"...

  15. Mapping the Cosmic Web with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Vogeley, M S; Rojas, R R; Goldberg, D M; Vogeley, Michael S.; Hoyle, Fiona; Rojas, Randall R.; Goldberg, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Wide-angle, moderately deep redshift surveys such as that conducted as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) allow study of the relationship between the structural elements of the large-scale distribution of galaxies -- including groups, cluster, superclusters, and voids -- and the dependence of galaxy formation and evolution on these enviroments. We present a progress report on mapping efforts with the SDSS and discuss recently constructed catalogs of clusters, voids, and void galaxies, and evidence for a 420Mpc/h supercluster or ``Great Wall.'' Analysis of multi-band photometry and moderate-resolution spectroscopy from the SDSS reveals environmental dependence of the star formation history of galaxies that extends over more than a factor of 100 in density, from clusters all the way to the deep interiors of voids. On average, galaxies in the rarified environments of voids exhibit bluer colors, higher specific star formation rates, lower dust content, and more disk-like morphology than objects in denser...

  16. Star formation and gas phase history of the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snedden, Ali; Coughlin, Jared; Phillips, Lara Arielle; Mathews, Grant; Suh, In-Saeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of tracking and characterizing the environment in which galaxies and their associated circumgalactic medium evolve. We have developed a structure finding algorithm that uses the rate of change of the density gradient to self-consistently parse and follow the evolution of groups/clusters, filaments and voids in large-scale structure simulations. We use this to trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure in our simulated volume. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star-forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, condensed gas in filaments at intermediate redshifts (z ˜ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low-contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to the high-contrast regions, or inner parts, of filaments. Since filaments bridge the void and cluster regions, it suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion on to groups/clusters. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments distinguishing themselves by different distributions of gas phases.

  17. Planes of satellite galaxies and the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libeskind, Noam I.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Tully, R. Brent; Courtois, Helene M.; Pomarède, Daniel; Gottlöber, Stefan; Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    Recent observational studies have demonstrated that the majority of satellite galaxies tend to orbit their hosts on highly flattened, vast, possibly corotating planes. Two nearly parallel planes of satellites have been confirmed around the M31 galaxy and around the Centaurus A galaxy, while the Milky Way also sports a plane of satellites. It has been argued that such an alignment of satellites on vast planes is unexpected in the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of cosmology if not even in contradiction to its generic predictions. Guided by ΛCDM numerical simulations, which suggest that satellites are channelled towards hosts along the axis of the slowest collapse as dictated by the ambient velocity shear tensor, we re-examine the planes of local satellites systems within the framework of the local shear tensor derived from the Cosmicflows-2 data set. The analysis reveals that the Local Group and Centaurus A reside in a filament stretched by the Virgo cluster and compressed by the expansion of the Local Void. Four out of five thin planes of satellite galaxies are indeed closely aligned with the axis of compression induced by the Local Void. Being the less massive system, the moderate misalignment of the Milky Way's satellite plane can likely be ascribed to its greater susceptibility to tidal torques, as suggested by numerical simulations. The alignment of satellite systems in the local Universe with the ambient shear field is thus in general agreement with predictions of the ΛCDM model.

  18. How the cosmic web induces intrinsic alignments of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Codis, Sandrine; Pichon, Christophe; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsic alignments are believed to be a major source of systematics for future generation of weak gravitational lensing surveys like Euclid or LSST. Direct measurements of the alignment of the projected light distribution of galaxies in wide field imaging data seem to agree on a contamination at a level of a few per cent of the shear correlation functions, although the amplitude of the effect depends on the population of galaxies considered. Given this dependency, it is difficult to use dark matter-only simulations as the sole resource to predict and control intrinsic alignments. We report here estimates on the level of intrinsic alignment in the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Horizon-AGN that could be a major source of systematic errors in weak gravitational lensing measurements. In particular, assuming that the spin of galaxies is a good proxy for their ellipticity, we show how those spins are spatially correlated and how they couple to the tidal field in which they are embedded. We also present t...

  19. Clusters, voids and reconstructions of the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Evert Gerardus Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The Universe is filled for 95% with dark matter and energy that we cannot see. Of the remaining 5% normal matter we can only see a small part. However, if we want to study the Universe as a whole, we will have to get to know it for 100%. We have to uncover indirectly where dark matter is hiding and

  20. Multi-stream portrait of the Cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandra, Nesar S

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of the first study of the multi-stream environment of dark matter halos in cosmological N-body simulations in the Lambda-CDM cosmology. The full dynamical state of dark matter can be described as a three-dimensional submanifold in six-dimensional phase space - the dark matter sheet. In our study we use a Lagrangian submanifold x = x (q,t) (where x and q are comoving Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates respectively), which is dynamically equivalent to the dark matter sheet but is more convenient for numerical analysis. Its convenience is two-fold. Firstly, x is a single-valued function of q at any stage including highly non-linear stages while the phase space sheet in any set of three of six phase space axes is not. And secondly, storing the Lagrangian submanifold does not require additional space for Lagrangian coordinates if the uniform state of the simulation is represented by a uniform three-dimensional mesh. Our major results can be summarized as follows: At the resolution of the sim...

  1. How the cosmic web induces intrinsic alignments of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codis, S.; Dubois, Y.; Pichon, C.; Devriendt, J.; Slyz, A.

    2016-10-01

    Intrinsic alignments are believed to be a major source of systematics for future generation of weak gravitational lensing surveys like Euclid or LSST. Direct measurements of the alignment of the projected light distribution of galaxies in wide field imaging data seem to agree on a contamination at a level of a few per cent of the shear correlation functions, although the amplitude of the effect depends on the population of galaxies considered. Given this dependency, it is difficult to use dark matter-only simulations as the sole resource to predict and control intrinsic alignments. We report here estimates on the level of intrinsic alignment in the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation Horizon-AGN that could be a major source of systematic errors in weak gravitational lensing measurements. In particular, assuming that the spin of galaxies is a good proxy for their ellipticity, we show how those spins are spatially correlated and how they couple to the tidal field in which they are embedded. We will also present theoretical calculations that illustrate and qualitatively explain the observed signals.

  2. Cosmic Web Research with KAT-7, MeerKAT & FAST

    CERN Document Server

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-01-01

    The seven-dish KAT-7 array was built as an engineering test-bed for the 64-dish Karoo Array Telescope, known as MeerKAT, which is the South African precursor of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). KAT-7 and MeerKAT are located close to the South African SKA core site in the Northern Cape's Karoo desert region. Construction of the KAT-7 array was completed in December 2010. The short baselines (26 to 185 m) and low system temperature (T$_{\\rm sys} \\sim$ 26 K) of the telescope make it very sensitive to large-scale, low-surface-brightness emission, which is one of the HI science driver for MeerKAT and one of the future strength of FAST. While the main purpose of KAT-7 was to test technical solutions for MeerKAT and the SKA, scientific targets were also observed during commissioning to test the HI line mode and the first results obtained are presented. A description of MeerKAT and an update on its construction is also given. Early science should start in mid-2016 with a partial array and the full array should be co...

  3. KCDC - The KASCADE Cosmic-ray Data Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Haungs, A; Fuchs, B; Kang, D; Schoo, S; Wochele, D; Wochele, J; Apel, W D; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Fuhrmann, D; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K H; Klages, H O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Oehlschlaeger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Zabierowski, J

    2015-01-01

    KCDC, the KASCADE Cosmic-ray Data Centre, is a web portal, where data of astroparticle physics experiments will be made available for the interested public. The KASCADE experiment, financed by public money, was a large-area detector for the measurement of high-energy cosmic rays via the detection of air showers. KASCADE and its extension KASCADE-Grande stopped finally the active data acquisition of all its components including the radio EAS experiment LOPES end of 2012 after more than 20 years of data taking. In a first release, with KCDC we provide to the public the measured and reconstructed parameters of more than 160 million air showers. In addition, KCDC provides the conceptional design, how the data can be treated and processed so that they are also usable outside the community of experts in the research field. Detailed educational examples make a use also possible for high-school students and early stage researchers.

  4. Dark matter and cosmic structure

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We review the current standard model for the evolution of cosmic structure, tracing its development over the last forty years and focusing specifically on the role played by numerical simulations and on aspects related to the nature of dark matter.

  5. Thin shells joining local cosmic string geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Eiroa, Ernesto F; Simeone, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present a theoretical construction of spacetimes with a thin shell that joins two different local cosmic string geometries. We study two types of global manifolds, one representing spacetimes with a standard thin shell and the other corresponding to wormholes which are not symmetric across the throat located at the shell. We analyze the stability of the static configurations under perturbations preserving the cylindrical symmetry. For both types of geometries we find that the static configurations can be stable for suitable values of the parameters.

  6. Superhorizon Perturbations and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Erickcek, Adrienne L; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Superhorizon perturbations induce large-scale temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) via the Grishchuk-Zel'dovich effect. We analyze the CMB temperature anisotropies generated by a single-mode adiabatic superhorizon perturbation. We show that an adiabatic superhorizon perturbation in a LCDM universe does not generate a CMB temperature dipole, and we derive constraints to the amplitude and wavelength of a superhorizon potential perturbation from measurements of the CMB quadrupole and octupole. We also consider constraints to a superhorizon fluctuation in the curvaton field, which was recently proposed as a source of the hemispherical power asymmetry in the CMB.

  7. Cosmic Origin and Theology of the Revelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro, José Francisco

    2007-04-01

    All along cultural history man has asked himself about the origin of man, the origin of life ante the origin of the cosmos. Regarding the question about the origin of the cosmos, any theological research must settle before any other goal the question of its language: what we understand as scientific, mythical or theological language. The biblical texts on Creation are analyzed in their historical, cultural and theological context. It is concluded that the fundamental religious meanings of the biblical texts are not in opposition to scientific interpretation of cosmic origin.

  8. Inhomogeneous recombinations during cosmic reionization

    OpenAIRE

    Sobacchi, Emanuele; Mesinger, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    By depleting the ionizing photon budget available to expand cosmic HII regions, recombining systems (or Lyman limit systems) can have a large impact during (and following) cosmic reionization. Unfortunately, directly resolving such structures in large-scale reionization simulations is computationally impractical. Instead, here we implement a sub-grid prescription for tracking inhomogeneous recombinations in the intergalactic medium. Building on previous work parameterizing photo-heating feedb...

  9. Cosmic rays from thermal sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wlodarczyk, Z

    2007-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays (CR) exhibits very characteristic power-like behavior with the "knee" structure. We consider a generalized statistical model for the production process of cosmic rays which accounts for such behavior in a natural way either by assuming the existence of temperature fluctuations in the source of CR, or by assuming specific temperature distribution of the CR sources. Both possibilities yield the so called Tsallis statistics and lead to the power-like distribution.

  10. Cosmic rays and Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    During the last solar cycle the Earth's cloud cover underwent a modulation in phase with the cosmic ray flux. Assuming that there is a causal relationship between the two, it is expected and found that the Earth's temperature follows more closely decade variations in cosmic ray flux than other...... solar activity parameters. If the relationship is real the state of the Heliosphere affects the Earth's climate....

  11. Calculation of cosmic ray induced single event upsets: Program CRUP (Cosmic Ray Upset Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, P.

    1983-09-01

    This report documents PROGRAM CRUP, COSMIC RAY UPSET PROGRAM. The computer program calculates cosmic ray induced single-event error rates in microelectronic circuits exposed to several representative cosmic-ray environments.

  12. Cosmic Rays and Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisser, Thomas K.; Engel, Ralph; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; 1. Cosmic rays; 2. Cosmic ray data; 3. Particle physics; 4. Hadronic interactions and accelerator data; 5. Cascade equations; 6. Atmospheric muons and neutrinos; 7. Neutrino masses and oscillations; 8. Muons and neutrinos underground; 9. Cosmic rays in the Galaxy; 10. Extragalactic propagation of cosmic rays; 11. Astrophysical - rays and neutrinos; 12. Acceleration; 13. Supernovae in the Milky Way; 14. Astrophysical accelerators and beam dumps; 15. Electromagnetic cascades; 16. Extensive air showers; 17. Very high energy cosmic rays; 18. Neutrino astronomy; A.1. Units, constants and definitions; A.2. References to flux measurements; A.3. Particle flux, density, and interaction cross section; A.4. Fundamentals of scattering theory; A.5. Regge amplitude; A.6. Glauber model of nuclear cross sections; A.7. Earth's atmosphere; A.8. Longitudinal development of air showers; A.9. Secondary positrons and electrons; A.10. Liouville's theorem and cosmic ray propagation; A.11. Cosmology and distances measures; A.12. The Hillas splitting algorithm; References; Index.

  13. Cosmic Microwave Background Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Doroshkevich, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    The last decade of research in cosmology was connected with the ambitious experiments including space and ground base observations. Among the most impressive results of these investigations are the measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation like WMAP* and Planck. Exactly from the CMB studies, we have started the epoch of the precision cosmology when generally the values of cosmological parameters have been known and present research is devoted to improvement of the precision. These achievements are connected with both the creation of the new facilities in millimeter and submillimeter astronomy (e.g., satellites, receivers, antennas, computers) and development of the methods for the CMB data analysis. Actually, the process of data analysis contains several technical stages including 1. Registration of time-ordered data (TOD) 2. Pixelization of the CMB data - map preparation 3. Component separation 4. Map statistics analysis 5. Map - spherical harmonics transformation 6. C(l)-spectrum calculation and spectrum statistics analysis 7. Cosmological parameters estimation Starting from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) experiment using the so-called Quadrilateralized Sky Cube Projection (see [1-3]), the problem of the whole sky CMB pixelization has attracted great interest and many such schemes were developed. Let us note however that accurate pixelization of the CMB data on the sphere is very important but not the final step of analysis. Usually, the next step implies the determination of the coefficients of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the CMB signal for both anisotropy and polarization. This means that some of the pixelization schemes provide a very accurate map but are inconvenient for further decomposition. This also means that the choice of suitable pixelization schemes depends upon the general goals of the investigation. In this review, we consider several of the most popular sky map pixelization schemes and link them with the

  14. Ageing effects on image sensors due to terrestrial cosmic radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nampoothiri, G.G.; Horemans, M.L.R.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the “ageing” effect on image sensors introduced by neutrons present in natural (terrestrial) cosmic environment. The results obtained at sea level are corroborated for the first time with accelerated neutron beam tests and for various image sensor operation conditions. The results reveal

  15. Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays as a Grand Unification signal

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the spectrum of the ultrahigh energy (above \\approx 10^{9} GeV) cosmic rays. With a maximum likelihood analysis we show that the observed spectrum is consistent with the decay of extragalactic GUT scale particles. The predicted mass for these superheavy particles is m_X=10^b GeV, where b=14.6_{-1.7}^{+1.6}.

  16. Users’ recognition in web using web mining techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Ghazanfaripoor

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth of the web and the lack of structure or an integrated schema create various issues to access the information for users. All users’ access on web information are saved in the related server log files. The circumstance of using these files is implemented as a resource for finding some patterns of user's behavior. Web mining is a subset of data mining and it means the mining of the related data from WWW, which is categorized into three parts including web content mining, web structure mining and web usage mining, based on the part of data, which is mined. It seems necessary to have a technique, which is capable of learning the users’ interests and based on the interests, which could filter the unrelated interests automatically or it could offer the related information to the user in reasonable amount of time. The web usage mining makes a profile from users to recognize them and it has direct relationship to web personalizing. The primary objective of personalizing systems is to prepare the thing, which is required by users, without asking them explicitly. In the other way, formal models prepare the possibility of system’s behavior modeling. The Petri and queue nets as some samples of these models can analyze the user's behavior in web. The primary objective of this paper is to present a colored Petri net to model the user's interactions for offering a list of pages recommendation to them in web. Estimating the user's behavior is implemented in some cases like offering the proper pages to continue the browse in web, ecommerce and targeted advertising. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed method is able to improve the accuracy criterion 8.3% rather static method.

  17. Illustrated cosmic monopole

    CERN Document Server

    Seagrave, Wyken

    2015-01-01

    Truly bizarre, utterly unique I've never read a novel quite like this before. The author takes you on an exciting adventure full of unforgettable and vivid imagery. Solidly written with each character's personality shining through. If you find physics fascinating you will not be disappointed by the author's keen intellect and clear understanding of this most challenging (for me anyway) scientific subject. This is not a novel I will forget anytime soon, I would highly recommend it. Andrewly Very imaginative tale Anybody interested in a very imaginative and engrossing sci fi story needs to check this one out. I have been reading sci fi for decades and this story has elements that surprise me which is very unusual considering the number of novels and stories I have over the years. ric freeman Summary of the story The cosmic monopole has been wandering the Universe since it was created in the Big Bang. Its existence is fundamental to the way the Universe works. It is finally trapped by the powerful magnetic f...

  18. Cosmic string loop microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Chernoff, David F.

    2014-06-01

    Cosmic superstring loops within the galaxy microlens background point sources lying close to the observer-string line of sight. For suitable alignments, multiple paths coexist and the (achromatic) flux enhancement is a factor of two. We explore this unique type of lensing by numerically solving for geodesics that extend from source to observer as they pass near an oscillating string. We characterize the duration of the flux doubling and the scale of the image splitting. We probe and confirm the existence of a variety of fundamental effects predicted from previous analyses of the static infinite straight string: the deficit angle, the Kaiser-Stebbins effect, and the scale of the impact parameter required to produce microlensing. Our quantitative results for dynamical loops vary by O(1) factors with respect to estimates based on infinite straight strings for a given impact parameter. A number of new features are identified in the computed microlensing solutions. Our results suggest that optical microlensing can offer a new and potentially powerful methodology for searches for superstring loop relics of the inflationary era.

  19. Cosmic ray driven outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasz, Michal; Naab, Thorsten; Gawryszczak, Artur; Kowalik, Kacper; Wóltański, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    We present simulations of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) in models of massive star forming (40 Msun / yr) disk galaxies with high gas surface densities (~100 Msun / pc^2) similar to observed star forming high-redshift disks. We assume that type II supernovae deposit 10 per cent of their energy into the ISM as cosmic rays and neglect the additional deposition of thermal energy or momentum. With a typical Galactic diffusion coefficient for CRs (3e28 cm^2 / s) we demonstrate that this process alone can trigger the local formation of a strong low density galactic wind maintaining vertically open field lines. Driven by the additional pressure gradient of the relativistic fluid the wind speed can exceed 1000 km/s, much higher than the escape velocity of the galaxy. The global mass loading, i.e. the ratio of the gas mass leaving the galactic disk in a wind to the star formation rate becomes of order unity once the system has settled into an equilibrium. We conclude that relativistic particles accelerated i...

  20. Cosmic Ray Helium Hardening

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations by CREAM, ATIC-2 and PAMELA experiments suggest that (1) the spectrum of cosmic ray (CR) helium is harder than that of CR proton below the knee $10^15 eV$ and (2) all CR spectra become hard at $\\gtrsim 10^{11} eV/n$. We propose a new picture that higher energy CRs are generated in more helium-rich region to explain the hardening (1) without introducing different sources for CR helium. The helium to proton ratio at $\\sim 100$ TeV exceeds the Big Bang abundance $Y=0.25$ by several times, and the different spectrum is not reproduced within the diffusive shock acceleration theory. We argue that CRs are produced in the chemically enriched region, such as a superbubble, and the outward-decreasing abundance naturally leads to the hard spectrum of CR helium when escaping from the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. We provide a simple analytical spectrum that also fits well the hardening (2) because of the decreasing Mach number in the hot superbubble with $\\sim 10^6$ K. Our model predicts hard and con...

  1. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James C; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H; Linsky, Claus Leitherer Jeffrey L; Savage, Blair D; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J Michael; Siegmund, Oswald H W; Snow, Theodore P; Spencer, John; Stern, S Alan; Stocke, John; Welsh, Barry; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian; McPhate, Jason; Penton, Steven V; Andrews, John; Brownsberger, Kenneth; Morse, Jon; Wilkinson, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F_lambda ~ 1.0E10-14 ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011....

  2. Discovering Authorities and Hubs in Different Topological Web Graph Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghabghab, George

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of citation analysis on the Web considers Web hyperlinks as a source to analyze citations. Topics include basic graph theory applied to Web pages, including matrices, linear algebra, and Web topology; and hubs and authorities, including a search technique called HITS (Hyperlink Induced Topic Search). (Author/LRW)

  3. Improving query services of web map by web mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Maojun

    2007-11-01

    Web map is the hybrid of map and the World Wide Web (known as Web). It is usually created with WebGIS techniques. With the rapid social development, web maps oriented the public are facing pressure that dissatisfy the increased demanding. The geocoding database plays a key role in supporting query services effectively. The traditional geocoding method is laborious and time-consuming. And there is much online spatial information, which would be the supplementary information source for geocoding. Therefore, this paper discusses how to improve query services by web mining. The improvement can be described from three facets: first, improving location query by discovering and extracting address information from the Web to extend geocoding database. Second, enhancing the ability of optimum path query of public traffic and buffer query by spatial analyzing and reasoning on the extended geocoding database. Third, adjusting strategies of collecting data according to patterns discovered by web map query mining. Finally, this paper presents the designing of the application system and experimental results.

  4. Web Classification Using DYN FP Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Pratap Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Web mining is the application of data mining techniques to extract knowledge from Web. Web mining has been explored to a vast degree and different techniques have been proposed for a variety of applications that includes Web Search, Classification and Personalization etc. The primary goal of the web site is to provide the relevant information to the users. Web mining technique is used to categorize users and pages by analyzing users behavior, the content of pages and order of URLs accessed. In this paper, proposes an auto-classification algorithm of web pages using data mining techniques. The problem of discovering association rules between terms in a set of web pages belonging to a category in a search engine database, and present an auto – classification algorithm for solving this problem that are fundamentally based on FP-growth algorithm

  5. Cosmic censorship of rotating Anti-de Sitter black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Bogeun; Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    We test the validity of cosmic censorship in the rotating anti-de Sitter black hole. For this purpose, we investigate whether the extremal black hole can be overspun by the particle absorption. The particle absorption will change the mass and angular momentum of the black hole, which is analyzed using the Hamilton-Jacobi equations consistent with the laws of thermodynamics. We have found that the mass of the extremal black hole increases more than the angular momentum. Therefore, the outer horizon of the black hole still exists, and cosmic censorship is valid.

  6. Large area mass analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachev, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg 69117 (Germany)]. E-mail: mikhail.rachev@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Srama, Ralf [Max-Planck-Institut for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg 69117 (Germany); Srowig, Andre [Max-Planck-Institut for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg 69117 (Germany); Gruen, Eberhard [Max-Planck-Institut for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg 69117 (Germany)

    2004-12-11

    A new time-of-flight spectrometer for the chemical analysis of cosmic dust particles in space has been simulated by Simion 7.0. The instrument is based upon impact ionization. This method is a reliable method for in situ dust detection and is well established. Instruments using the impact ionization flew on board of Helios and Galileo and are still in operation on board of the Ulysses and Cassini-Huygens missions. The new instrument has a large sensitive area of 0.1m2 in order to achieve a significant number of measurements. The mass resolution M/{delta}M>100 and the mass range covers the most relevant elements expected in cosmic dust. The instrument has a reflectron configuration which increases the mass resolution. Most of the ions released during the impact are focused to the detector. The ion detector consists of a large area ion-to-electron converter, an electron reflectron and a microchannel plate detector.

  7. Evaluation Method of Web Site Structure Based on Web Structure Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jun-e; Zhou Dong-ru

    2003-01-01

    The structure of Web site hecarne more complex titan before. During the design period of a Web site, the lack of model and method results in improper Web structure,which depend on the designer's experience. From the point of view of software engineering, every period in the software life must be evaluated before starting the next period's work. It is very important and essential to search relevant methods for evaluating Web structure before the site is completed. In this work, after studying the related work about the Web struc lure mining and analyzing the major structure mining methods (Page-rank and Hub/Authority), a method based on the Page-rank for Web structure evaluation in design stage is proposecL A Web structure modeling language WSML is designed, and the implement strategies for evaluating system of the Web site structure are given out. Web structure mining has being used mainly in search engines before. It is the first time to employ the Web structure mining technology to evaluate a Web structure in the design period of a Web site. It contributes to the formalization of the design documents for Web site and the improving of software engineering for large scale Web site, and the evaluating system is a practical tool for Web site construction.

  8. Gestor de contenidos web

    OpenAIRE

    García Populin, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Trabajo final de carrera desarrollado en .NET. Presenta un gestor de contenidos web para generar una web publicitaria. Treball final de carrera desenvolupat en .NET. Presenta un gestor de continguts web per generar una web publicitària.

  9. Investigation of cosmic ray-cloud connections using MISR

    CERN Document Server

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Numerous empirical studies have analyzed International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data and reached contradictory conclusions regarding the influence of solar-modulated galactic cosmic rays on cloud fraction and cloud properties. The Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument on the Terra satellite has been in continuous operation for 13 years and thus provides an independent (and previously unutilized) cloud data set to investigate purported solar-cloud links. Furthermore, unlike many previous solar-climate studies that report cloud fraction MISR measures albedo, which has clearer climatological relevance. Our long-term analysis of MISR data finds no statistically significant correlations between cosmic rays and global albedo or globally averaged cloud height, and no evidence for any regional or lagged correlations. Moreover, epoch superposition analysis of Forbush decreases reveals no detectable albedo response to cosmic ray decreases, thereby placing an upper limit on the possible influ...

  10. Abelian cosmic string in the extended Starobinsky model of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Graça, J P Morais

    2016-01-01

    We analyze numerically the behaviour of the solutions corresponding to an Abelian cosmic string taking into account an extension of the Starobinsky model, where the action of general relativity is replaced by $f(R) = R - 2\\Lambda + \\eta R^2 + \\rho R^m$, with $m > 2$. As an interesting result, we find that the angular deficit which characterizes the cosmic string decreases as the parameters $\\eta$ and $\\rho$ increase. We also find that the cosmic horizon due to the presence of a cosmological constant is affected in such a way that it can grows or shrinks, depending on the vacuum expectation value of the scalar field and on the value of the cosmological constant

  11. Cosmic logic: a computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-02-01

    We initiate a formal study of logical inferences in context of the measure problem in cosmology or what we call cosmic logic. We describe a simple computational model of cosmic logic suitable for analysis of, for example, discretized cosmological systems. The construction is based on a particular model of computation, developed by Alan Turing, with cosmic observers (CO), cosmic measures (CM) and cosmic symmetries (CS) described by Turing machines. CO machines always start with a blank tape and CM machines take CO's Turing number (also known as description number or Gödel number) as input and output the corresponding probability. Similarly, CS machines take CO's Turing number as input, but output either one if the CO machines are in the same equivalence class or zero otherwise. We argue that CS machines are more fundamental than CM machines and, thus, should be used as building blocks in constructing CM machines. We prove the non-computability of a CS machine which discriminates between two classes of CO machines: mortal that halts in finite time and immortal that runs forever. In context of eternal inflation this result implies that it is impossible to construct CM machines to compute probabilities on the set of all CO machines using cut-off prescriptions. The cut-off measures can still be used if the set is reduced to include only machines which halt after a finite and predetermined number of steps.

  12. Cosmic rays and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Fully updated for the second edition, this book introduces the growing and dynamic field of particle astrophysics. It provides an overview of high-energy nuclei, photons and neutrinos, including their origins, their propagation in the cosmos, their detection on Earth and their relation to each other. Coverage is expanded to include new content on high energy physics, the propagation of protons and nuclei in cosmic background radiation, neutrino astronomy, high-energy and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, sources and acceleration mechanisms, and atmospheric muons and neutrinos. Readers are able to master the fundamentals of particle astrophysics within the context of the most recent developments in the field. This book will benefit graduate students and established researchers alike, equipping them with the knowledge and tools needed to design and interpret their own experiments and, ultimately, to address a number of questions concerning the nature and origins of cosmic particles that have arisen in recent resea...

  13. Cosmic Ray Origins: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, Roger; Simeon, Paul; Yuan, Yajie

    2014-11-01

    Physicists have pondered the origin of cosmic rays for over a hundred years. However the last few years have seen an upsurge in the observation, progress in the theory and a genuine increase in the importance attached to the topic due to its intimate connection to the indirect detection of evidence for dark matter. The intent of this talk is to set the stage for the meeting by reviewing some of the basic features of the entire cosmic ray spectrum from GeV to ZeV energy and some of the models that have been developed. The connection will also be made to recent developments in understanding general astrophysical particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, relativistic jets and gamma ray bursts. The prospects for future discoveries, which may elucidate the origin of cosmic rays, are bright.

  14. Cosmic Ray Origins: An Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandford, Roger; Simeon, Paul; Yuan, Yajie

    2014-11-15

    Physicists have pondered the origin of cosmic rays for over a hundred years. However the last few years have seen an upsurge in the observation, progress in the theory and a genuine increase in the importance attached to the topic due to its intimate connection to the indirect detection of evidence for dark matter. The intent of this talk is to set the stage for the meeting by reviewing some of the basic features of the entire cosmic ray spectrum from GeV to ZeV energy and some of the models that have been developed. The connection will also be made to recent developments in understanding general astrophysical particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, relativistic jets and gamma ray bursts. The prospects for future discoveries, which may elucidate the origin of cosmic rays, are bright.

  15. Cosmic Ray Origins: An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Blandford, Roger; Yuan, Yajie

    2014-01-01

    Physicists have pondered the origin of cosmic rays for over a hundred years. However the last few years have seen an upsurge in the observation, progress in the theory and a genuine increase in the importance attached to the topic due to its intimate connection to the indirect detection of evidence for dark matter. The intent of this talk is to set the stage for the meeting by reviewing some of the basic features of the entire cosmic ray spectrum from GeV to ZeV energy and some of the models that have been developed. The connection will also be made to recent developments in understanding general astrophysical particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, relativistic jets and gamma ray bursts. The prospects for future discoveries, which may elucidate the origin of cosmic rays, are bright.

  16. Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Baylon cardiel, J L; Wallace, K C; Anderson, T B; Copley, M

    The cosmic-ray energetics and mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to measure cosmic-ray composition to the supernova energy scale of 10$^{15}$ eV in a series of ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) flights. The first flight is planned to be launched from Antarctica in December 2004. The goal is to observe cosmic-ray spectral features and/or abundance changes that might signify a limit to supernova acceleration. The particle ($\\{Z}$) measurements will be made with a timing-based charge detector and a pixelated silicon charge detector to minimize the effect of backscatter from the calorimeter. The particle energy measurements will be made with a transition radiation detector (TRD) for $\\{Z}$ > 3 and a sampling tungsten/scintillator calorimeter for $\\{Z}$ $\\geq$1 particles, allowing inflight cross calibration of the two detectors. The status of the payload construction and flight preparation are reported in this paper.

  17. WEB 238 Courses Tutorial / indigohelp

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    WEB 238 Week 2 JavaScript Events WEB 238 Week 3 Cookies WEB 238 Week 4 Dynamic HTML WEB 238 Week 5 Web Programming Languages WEB 238 Week 1 DQs WEB 238 Week 2DQs WEB 238 Week 3DQs WEB 238 Week 4DQs WEB 238 Week 5DQs  

  18. Cosmic Rays: What Gamma Rays Can Say

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We will review the main channels of gamma ray emission due to the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, discussing the cases of both galactic and extra-galactic cosmic rays and their connection with gamma rays observations.

  19. The Cosmic Shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Catling, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    in 2004 when there were just two transiting exoplanets to consider. The trend was well-defined by late 2007. Figure 1 shows how matters stood in Dec 2012 with approx.240 exoplanets. The figure shows that the boundary between planets with and without active volatiles - the cosmic shoreline, as it were - is both well-defined and follows a power law.

  20. Usare WebDewey

    OpenAIRE

    Baldi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    This presentation shows how to use the WebDewey tool. Features of WebDewey. Italian WebDewey compared with American WebDewey. Querying Italian WebDewey. Italian WebDewey and MARC21. Italian WebDewey and UNIMARC. Numbers, captions, "equivalente verbale": Dewey decimal classification in Italian catalogues. Italian WebDewey and Nuovo soggettario. Italian WebDewey and LCSH. Italian WebDewey compared with printed version of Italian Dewey Classification (22. edition): advantages and disadvantages o...

  1. Cosmic Humanity: Utopia, Realities, Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Krichevsky

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The philosophical foundations of the theory and practice of the creation of cosmic humanity as a process of the evolution of human civilization, the emergence into space, with the prospect of resettlement outside the Earth are considered. There is a connection between myths, fantasies, ideas, concepts and projects aimed at the exploration of outer space, the creation of cosmic humanity. A new and voluminous definition of cosmic humanity in the evolutionary paradigm is given. Cosmic humanity is (essence and 4 stages of evolution: 1. Humanity living on Earth, sensing, knowing, understanding its cosmic origin, relationship with the cosmos and cosmic destiny. 2. Humanity living on Earth, leading aerospace activity for the purposes of exploration and use of aerospace space (Heaven, Space for survival and development. 3. Humanity living on Earth and outside the Earth — in the solar system, preserving the Earth and mastering the Cosmos for survival and development. 4. Humanity, settled and living in the Cosmos. Now humanity is in the process of transition from the second to the third stage. In the process of this evolution, a complex transformation of man and society takes place. The problem-semantic field of cosmic humanity is described and its general model is presented. The meta-goal-setting is the justification of cosmic humanity with the application of the anthropic principle and its “active” super (post anthropic supplement: “Cosmic humanity has an evolutionary purpose to actively manage evolution: change man, humanity and the universe.” The evolution of the “cosmic dream”, goals and technologies of space activities is formalized in the form of a conceptual model. Challenges and negative trends are considered in connection with the crisis of space activity, criticism and attempts to limit the flights of people into space. The prototype of cosmic humanity, its basis and acting model is the cosmonauts’ community. The main

  2. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, M. J.

    2006-06-01

    The first significant cosmic fields, and the seed field for galactic dynamos probably developed after the formation of the first non-linear structures. The history of star formation and the intergalactic medium is controlled, at least in part, by how and when galaxies and their precursors acquired their fields. The amplification of fields behind shocks, and the diffusivity of the magnetic flux, are crucial to the interpretation of radio sources, gamma ray burst afterglows, and other energetic cosmic phenomena. The build-up of magnetic fields is an important aspect of the overall cosmogonic process.

  3. Neutralino Clumps and Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Salati, P

    2007-01-01

    The halo of the Miky Way might contain numerous and dense substructures inside which the putative weakly interacting massive particles (suggested as the main constituent of the astronomical dark matter) would produce a stronger annihilation signal than in the smooth regions. The closer the nearest clump, the larger the positron and antiproton cosmic ray fluxes at the Earth. But the actual distribution of these substructures is not known. The predictions on the antimatter yields at the Earth are therefore affected by a kind of cosmic variance whose analysis is the subject of this contribution. The statistical tools to achieve that goal are presented and Monte Carlo simulations are compared to analytic results.

  4. Cosmic Strings with Small Tension

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe cosmic F--term strings with exponentially small tension which are D3 branes wrapped on deformed $A_3$ singularities. We show that brane instanton effects which can be calculated after a geometric transition give rise to an exponentially small volume for the node on which the D3 branes wrap leading to a string with small tension. We generalize our description to the case of non--Abelian cosmic strings and argue that these strings are stable against monopole--anti monopole pair creation.

  5. Aligned interactions in cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempa, J., E-mail: kempa@pw.plock.pl [Warsaw University of Technology Branch Plock (Poland)

    2015-12-15

    The first clean Centauro was found in cosmic rays years many ago at Mt Chacaltaya experiment. Since that time, many people have tried to find this type of interaction, both in cosmic rays and at accelerators. But no one has found a clean cases of this type of interaction.It happened finally in the last exposure of emulsion at Mt Chacaltaya where the second clean Centauro has been found. The experimental data for both the Centauros and STRANA will be presented and discussed in this paper. We also present our comments to the intriguing question of the existence of a type of nuclear interactions at high energy with alignment.

  6. The content and design of Web sites : an empirical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizingh, EKRE

    2000-01-01

    To support the emergence of a solid knowledge base for analyzing Web activity, we have developed a framework to analyze and categorize the capabilities of Web sites. This distinguishes content from design. Content refers to the information, features, or services that are offered in the Web site, des

  7. The content and design of Web sites : an empirical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizingh, EKRE

    2000-01-01

    To support the emergence of a solid knowledge base for analyzing Web activity, we have developed a framework to analyze and categorize the capabilities of Web sites. This distinguishes content from design. Content refers to the information, features, or services that are offered in the Web site,

  8. The content and design of Web sites : an empirical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizingh, EKRE

    2000-01-01

    To support the emergence of a solid knowledge base for analyzing Web activity, we have developed a framework to analyze and categorize the capabilities of Web sites. This distinguishes content from design. Content refers to the information, features, or services that are offered in the Web site, des

  9. Closing CMS to hunt cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Every second the Earth is bombarded by billions of cosmic rays and occasionally one of these cosmic particles will collide with the Earth's atmosphere generating a shower of particles known as an 'air shower'. This is similiar to the collisions and subsequent particle showers observed in accelerators such as the LHC. Here the CMS detector is closed so that systems can be tested using muon cosmic rays in the 'Cosmic Challenge'.

  10. Cosmic-Ray Detectors With Interdigitated Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Mazed, Mohammed; Holtzman, Melinda J.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1995-01-01

    Detectors measure both positions of incidence and energies of incident charged particles. Stack of detector wafers intercept cosmic ray. Measure positions of incidence to determine cosmic-ray trajectory and charge generated within them (proportional to cosmic-ray energy dissipated within them). Interdigital electrode pattern repeated over many rows and columns on tops of detector wafers in stack. Electrode pattern defines pixels within which points of incidence of incident cosmic rays located.

  11. The Strategy of Promoting Web-site of the Company

    OpenAIRE

    Babenko Nelya A.

    2012-01-01

    The article analyzes the strategy of promotion web-site of the company. The problems of developing a strategy to promote the company web-site on the Internet. An algorithm for the development of promotion strategy web-site of the procedure and its promotion. Recommended methods for the primary attraction of visitors to the web-site. F model assessing the effectiveness of company web-site is the algorithm for its optimization.

  12. On-line Generation of Suggestions for Web Users

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    One important class of Data Mining applications is the so-called "Web Mining" that analyzes and extracts important and non-trivial knowledge from Web related data. Typical applications of Web Mining are represented by the personalization or recommender systems.These systems are aimed to extract knowledge from the analysis of historical information of a web server in order to improve the web site expressiveness in terms of readability and content availability. Typically, these systems are made...

  13. VOSA: A VO SED Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, C.; Bayo, A.; Solano, E.

    2017-03-01

    VOSA (VO Sed Analyzer, http://svo2.cab.inta-csic.es/theory/vosa) is a public web-tool developed by the Spanish Virtual Observatory (http://svo.cab.inta-csic.es/) and designed to help users to (1) build Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) combining private photometric measurements with data available in VO services, (2) obtain relevant properties of these objects (distance, extinction, etc) from VO catalogs, (3) analyze them comparing observed photometry with synthetic photometry from different collections of theoretical models or observational templates, using different techniques (chi-square minimization, Bayesian analysis) to estimate physical parameters of the observed objects (teff, logg, metallicity, stellar radius/distance ratio, infrared excess, etc), and use these results to (4) estimate masses and ages via interpolation of collections of isochrones and evolutionary tracks from the VO. In particular, VOSA offers the advantage of deriving physical parameters using all the available photometric information instead of a restricted subset of colors. The results can be downloaded in different formats or sent to other VO tools using SAMP. We have upgraded VOSA to provide access to Gaia photometry and give a homogeneous estimation of the physical parameters of thousands of objects at a time. This upgrade has required the implementation of a new computation paradigm, including a distributed environment, the capability of submitting and processing jobs in an asynchronous way, the use of parallelized computing to speed up processes (˜ ten times faster) and a new design of the web interface.

  14. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  15. Cosmic Ray elimination using the Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Aguilera, M. T.; Cruz, J.; Altamirano, L.; Serrano, A.

    2009-11-01

    In this work, we present a method for the automatic cosmic ray elimination in a single CCD exposure using the Wavelet Transform. The proposed method can eliminate cosmic rays of any shape or size. With this method we can eliminate over 95% of cosmic rays in a spectral image.

  16. COSMIC RAY ELIMINATION USING THE WAVELET TRANSFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Orozco-Aguilera

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a method for the automatic cosmic ray elimination in a single CCD exposure using the Wavelet Transform. The proposed method can eliminate cosmic rays of any shape or size. With this method we can eliminate over 95% of cosmic rays in a spectral image.

  17. Analyzing the Web Services and UniFrame Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    B2B e - commerce provides a company with an effective and efficient end-to-end process communication to buy and sell services in an economical way...efficient ways of electronic communication. • HTTP is the preeminent protocol to transfer WS content and is allowed a free access through firewalls. HTTP...Jersey 07458 [5] Dhingra, V., �Business-to-Business Ecommerce ,� http://projects.bus.lsu.edu/independent_study/vdhing1/b2b. [6] A Darwin Partners and

  18. Web Page Categorization Using Artificial Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kamruzzaman, S M

    2010-01-01

    Web page categorization is one of the challenging tasks in the world of ever increasing web technologies. There are many ways of categorization of web pages based on different approach and features. This paper proposes a new dimension in the way of categorization of web pages using artificial neural network (ANN) through extracting the features automatically. Here eight major categories of web pages have been selected for categorization; these are business & economy, education, government, entertainment, sports, news & media, job search, and science. The whole process of the proposed system is done in three successive stages. In the first stage, the features are automatically extracted through analyzing the source of the web pages. The second stage includes fixing the input values of the neural network; all the values remain between 0 and 1. The variations in those values affect the output. Finally the third stage determines the class of a certain web page out of eight predefined classes. This stage i...

  19. Sexual information seeking on web search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spink, Amanda; Koricich, Andrew; Jansen, B J; Cole, Charles

    2004-02-01

    Sexual information seeking is an important element within human information behavior. Seeking sexually related information on the Internet takes many forms and channels, including chat rooms discussions, accessing Websites or searching Web search engines for sexual materials. The study of sexual Web queries provides insight into sexually-related information-seeking behavior, of value to Web users and providers alike. We qualitatively analyzed queries from logs of 1,025,910 Alta Vista and AlltheWeb.com Web user queries from 2001. We compared the differences in sexually-related Web searching between Alta Vista and AlltheWeb.com users. Differences were found in session duration, query outcomes, and search term choices. Implications of the findings for sexual information seeking are discussed.

  20. Tensor anisotropy as a tracer of cosmic voids

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to find voids in cosmological simulations based on the tidal and the velocity shear tensors definitions of the cosmic web. We use the fractional anisotropy (FA) computed from the eigenvalues of each web scheme as a void tracer. We identify voids using a watershed transform based on the local minima of the FA field without making any assumption on the shape or structure of the voids. We test the method on the Bolshoi simulation and report on the abundance and radial averaged profiles for the density, velocity and fractional anisotropy. We find that voids in the velocity shear web are smaller than voids in the tidal web, with a particular overabundance of very small voids in the inner region of filaments/sheets. We classify voids as subcompensated/overcompansated depending on the absence/presence of an overdense matter ridge in their density profile, finding that close to $65\\%$ and $35\\%$ of the total population are classified into each category, respectively. Finally, we find evidence ...

  1. Semantic Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lamandini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The semantic Web is a technology at the service of knowledge which is aimed at accessibility and the sharing of content; facilitating interoperability between different systems and as such is one of the nine key technological pillars of TIC (technologies for information and communication within the third theme, programme specific cooperation of the seventh programme framework for research and development (7°PQRS, 2007-2013. As a system it seeks to overcome overload or excess of irrelevant information in Internet, in order to facilitate specific or pertinent research. It is an extension of the existing Web in which the aim is for cooperation between and the computer and people (the dream of Sir Tim Berners –Lee where machines can give more support to people when integrating and elaborating data in order to obtain inferences and a global sharing of data. It is a technology that is able to favour the development of a “data web” in other words the creation of a space in both sets of interconnected and shared data (Linked Data which allows users to link different types of data coming from different sources. It is a technology that will have great effect on everyday life since it will permit the planning of “intelligent applications” in various sectors such as education and training, research, the business world, public information, tourism, health, and e-government. It is an innovative technology that activates a social transformation (socio-semantic Web on a world level since it redefines the cognitive universe of users and enables the sharing not only of information but of significance (collective and connected intelligence.

  2. The hydrodynamic stability of gaseous cosmic filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Birnboim, Yuval; Zinger, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Virial shocks at edges of cosmic-web structures are a clear prediction of standard structure formation theories. We derive a criterion for the stability of the post-shock gas and of the virial shock itself in spherical, filamentary and planar infall geometries. When gas cooling is important, we find that shocks become unstable, and gas flows uninterrupted towards the center of the respective halo, filament or sheet. For filaments, we impose this criterion on self-similar infall solutions. We find that instability is expected for filament masses between $10^{11}-10^{13}M_\\odot Mpc^{-1}.$ Using a simplified toy model, we then show that these filaments will likely feed halos with $10^{10}M_{\\odot}\\lesssim M_{halo}\\lesssim 10^{13}M_{\\odot}$ at redshift $z=3$, as well as $10^{12}M_{\\odot}\\lesssim M_{halo}\\lesssim 10^{15}M_{\\odot}$ at $z=0$. The instability will affect the survivability of the filaments as they penetrate gaseous halos in a non-trivial way. Additionally, smaller halos accreting onto non-stable filam...

  3. CRIME - cosmic ray interactions in molecular environments

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Julian; Gabici, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Molecular clouds act as targets for cosmic rays (CR), revealing their presence through either gamma-ray emission due to proton-proton interactions, and/or through the ionization level in the cloud, produced by the CR flux. The ionization rate is a unique tool, to some extent complementary to the gamma-ray emission, in that it allows to constrain the CR spectrum especially for energies below the pion production rate ($\\approx 280$ MeV). Here we study the effect of ionization on $H_2$ clouds due to both CR protons and electrons, using the fully relativistic ionization cross sections, which is important to correctly account for the contribution due to relativistic CRs. The contribution to ionization due to secondary electrons is also included self-consistently. The whole calculation has been implemented into a numerical code which is publicly accessible through a web-interface. The code also include the calculation of gamma-ray emission once the CR spectrum

  4. The Cosmic Ray Electron Excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Christl, M.; Ganel, O.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kuznetsov, E. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Seo, E. S.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Watts, J. W.; Wefel, J. P.; Wu, J.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the possible sources for the apparent excess of Cosmic Ray Electrons. The presentation reviews the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) instrument, the various parts, how cosmic ray electrons are measured, and shows graphs that review the results of the ATIC instrument measurement. A review of Cosmic Ray Electrons models is explored, along with the source candidates. Scenarios for the excess are reviewed: Supernova remnants (SNR) Pulsar Wind nebulae, or Microquasars. Each of these has some problem that mitigates the argument. The last possibility discussed is Dark Matter. The Anti-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) mission is to search for evidence of annihilations of dark matter particles, to search for anti-nuclei, to test cosmic-ray propagation models, and to measure electron and positron spectra. There are slides explaining the results of Pamela and how to compare these with those of the ATIC experiment. Dark matter annihilation is then reviewed, which represent two types of dark matter: Neutralinos, and kaluza-Kline (KK) particles, which are next explained. The future astrophysical measurements, those from GLAST LAT, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and HEPCAT are reviewed, in light of assisting in finding an explanation for the observed excess. Also the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could help by revealing if there are extra dimensions.

  5. Cosmic Censorship for Gowdy Spacetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringström, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Due to the complexity of Einstein's equations, it is often natural to study a question of interest in the framework of a restricted class of solutions. One way to impose a restriction is to consider solutions satisfying a given symmetry condition. There are many possible choices, but the present article is concerned with one particular choice, which we shall refer to as Gowdy symmetry. We begin by explaining the origin and meaning of this symmetry type, which has been used as a simplifying assumption in various contexts, some of which we shall mention. Nevertheless, the subject of interest here is strong cosmic censorship. Consequently, after having described what the Gowdy class of spacetimes is, we describe, as seen from the perspective of a mathematician, what is meant by strong cosmic censorship. The existing results on cosmic censorship are based on a detailed analysis of the asymptotic behavior of solutions. This analysis is in part motivated by conjectures, such as the BKL conjecture, which we shall therefore briefly describe. However, the emphasis of the article is on the mathematical analysis of the asymptotics, due to its central importance in the proof and in the hope that it might be of relevance more generally. The article ends with a description of the results that have been obtained concerning strong cosmic censorship in the class of Gowdy spacetimes.

  6. Global diffusion of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Snodin, A P; Sarson, G R; Bushby, P J; Rodrigues, L F S

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of charged particles, including cosmic rays, in a partially ordered magnetic field is characterized by a diffusion tensor whose components depend on the particle's Larmor radius $R_L$ and the degree of order in the magnetic field. This prescription relies explicitly on the assumption of a scale separation between random and mean magnetic fields, which usually applies in laboratory plasmas, but not in most astrophysical environments such as the interstellar medium (ISM). Direct estimates of the cosmic-ray diffusion tensor from test particle simulations have explored the range of particle energies corresponding to $10^{-2} \\lesssim R_L/l_c \\lesssim 10^{3}$, where $l_c$ is the magnetic correlation length. Modern simulations of the ISM have numerical resolution of order 1 pc, so the Larmor radius of the cosmic ray particles that dominate in their energy density is at least $10^{6}$ times smaller than the numerically resolved scales of the random magnetic field. Large-scale simulations of cosmic ra...

  7. Cosmic Logic: a Computational Model

    CERN Document Server

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    We describe a simple computational model of cosmic logic suitable for analysis of, for example, discretized cosmological systems. The construction is based on a particular model of computation, developed by Alan Turing, with cosmic observers (CO), cosmic measures (CM) and cosmic symmetries (CS) described by Turing machines. CO machines always start with a blank tape and CM machines take CO's Turing number (also known as description number or G{\\" o}del number) as input and output the corresponding probability. Similarly, CS machines take CO's Turing number as input, but output either one if the CO machines are in the same equivalence class or zero otherwise. We argue that CS machines are more fundamental than CM machines and, thus, should be used as building blocks in constructing CM machines. We prove the non-computability of a CS machine which discriminates between two classes of CO machines: mortal that halts in finite time and immortal that runs forever. In context of eternal inflation this result implies...

  8. Decoherence, Entanglement and Cosmic Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    The possible imprint of quantum decoherence, in the framework of cosmology, is here investigated. Particular attention is paid to the observational fact that entanglement could lead to the interaction of different eras of cosmic evolution. The role played by decoherence provides the existence of "quantum entanglement" between cosmological eras giving, as observational results, dynamical constraints on the corresponding cosmological models.

  9. Cosmic Rays and Radiative Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Hartquist, T W; Falle, S A E G; Pittard, J M; Van Loo, S

    2011-01-01

    In the absence of magnetic fields and cosmic rays, radiative cooling laws with a range of dependences on temperature affect the stability of interstellar gas. For about four and a half decades, astrophysicists have recognised the importance of the thermal instablity for the formation of clouds in the interstellar medium. Even in the past several years, many papers have concerned the role of the thermal instability in the production of molecular clouds. About three and a half decades ago, astrophysicists investigating radiative shocks noticed that for many cooling laws such shocks are unstable. Attempts to address the effects of cosmic rays on the stablity of radiative media that are initially uniform or that have just passed through shocks have been made. The simplest approach to such studies involves the assumption that the cosmic rays behave as a fluid. Work based on such an approach is described. Cosmic rays have no effect on the stability of initially uniform, static media with respect to isobaric perturb...

  10. The L3+Cosmics experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Le Coultre, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Thanks to the unique properties of the L3+C detector, muon research topics relevant to various current problems in cosmic ray and particle astrophysics can be studied. A short overview of the physics topics is presented as well as a description of the detector. (19 refs).

  11. Cosmology, Relativity and Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Rebeca; Martínez, Humberto; Zepeda, Arnulfo

    2009-04-01

    This is a short review of the evolution of ideas and concepts about the Universe. It is based on the introductory talk given on the 25 of July 2008 within the Third School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics held in Arequipa, Peru.

  12. Fireballs from Superconducting Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Thermalized fireballs should be created by cusp events on superconducting cosmic strings. This simple notion allows to reliably estimate particle emission from the cusps in a given background magnetic field. With plausible assumptions about intergalactic magnetic fields, the cusp events can produce observable fluxes of high-energy photons and neutrinos with unique signatures.

  13. Fireballs from superconducting cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzinov, Andrei; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Thermalized fireballs should be created by cusp events on superconducting cosmic strings. This simple notion allows to reliably estimate particle emission from the cusps in a given background magnetic field. With plausible assumptions about intergalactic magnetic fields, the cusp events can produce observable fluxes of high-energy photons and neutrinos with unique signatures.

  14. Surprising results from cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilk, G. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Wlodarczyk, Z. [Institute for Physics, Pedagogical University, Kielce (Poland)

    1996-10-01

    A number of seemingly exotic phenomena seen in the highest cosmic-ray experiments are briefly discussed. We argue that they indicate existence of non-statistical fluctuations and strong correlations in the fragmentation region of multiparticle production processes unaccessible to the present accelerators. (author) 12 refs, 3 figs

  15. Three types of children’s informational web sites: an inventory of design conventions

    OpenAIRE

    Jochmann-Mannak, Hanna; Lentz, Leo; Huibers, Theo W.C.; Sanders, Ted

    2012-01-01

    "Purpose: Research on Web design conventions has an almost exclusive focus on Web design for adults. There is far less knowledge about Web design for children. For the first time, an overview is presented of the current design conventions for children's informational Web sites. Method: In this study a large corpus of 100 children's international, informational Web sites from four different domains (science, pets, arts, and health) is analyzed. The instrument for analyzing the Web sites includ...

  16. Galactic cosmic ray propagation models using Picard

    CERN Document Server

    Kissmann, Ralf; Strong, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from our newly developed Galactic cosmic-ray transport code PICARD, that solves the cosmic-ray transport equation. This code allows for the computation of cosmic-ray spectra and the resulting gamma-ray emission. Relying on contemporary numerical solvers allows for efficient computation of models with deca-parsec resolution. PICARD can handle locally anisotropic spatial diffusion acknowledging a full diffusion tensor. We used this framework to investigate the transition from axisymmetric to spiral-arm cosmic-ray source distributions. Wherever possible we compare model predictions with constraining observables in cosmic-ray astrophysics.

  17. Summary of Web-Database Technologies%Web数据库技术综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周军

    2000-01-01

    Web-Database is the base of many network applications such as Web information retrieval system, Web information publishing and Electronic Commerce. This article focuses on several popular Web-Database technologies such as CGI, ISAPI, IDC, ASP and Java Applet, analyzing and comparing their structure, characteristics, advantages and disadvantages. Finally, it discusses the main structure of the Web-Database technology.

  18. Cosmic rays and hadronic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipari Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of cosmic rays, and more in general of the “high energy universe” is at the moment a vibrant field that, thanks to the observations by several innovative detectors for relativistic charged particles, gamma–rays, and neutrinos continue to generate surprising and exciting results. The progress in the field is rapid but many fundamental problems remain open. There is an intimate relation between the study of the high energy universe and the study of the properties of hadronic interactions. High energy cosmic rays can only be studied detecting the showers they generate in the atmosphere, and for the interpretation of the data one needs an accurate modeling of the collisions between hadrons. Also the study of cosmic rays inside their sources and in the Galaxy requires a precise description of hadronic interactions. A program of experimental studies at the LHC and at lower energy, designed to address the most pressing problems, could significantly reduce the existing uncertainties and is very desirable. Such an experimental program would also have a strong intrinsic scientific interest, allowing the broadening and deepening of our understanding of Quantum Chromo Dynamics in the non–perturbative regime, the least understood sector of the Standard Model of particle physics. It should also be noted that the cosmic ray spectrum extends to particles with energy E ∼ 1020 eV, or a nucleon–nucleon c.m. energy √s ≃ 430 TeV, 30 times higher than the current LHC energy. Cosmic ray experiments therefore offer the possibility to perform studies on the properties of hadronic interactions that are impossible at accelerators.

  19. Particle Physics Outreach: Engaging Students by Chartering a Plane for Cosmic Ray Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvojka, Jesse

    2011-04-01

    New York State has a very prescriptive physics curriculum with little room for adding material from frontier research, but significant requirements for laboratory projects. As a beginning PhD student, I collaborated with a teacher and her classroom on a project to study the variation of cosmic rays with altitude. The students helped build a cosmic ray detector that was flown on a chartered plane which took data at various altitudes. The students analyzed the data to verify relativistic time dilation in cosmic ray muons and then presented the results to their peers. I discuss the outcome of the project and lessons that I took away from the effort.

  20. Advanced Techniques in Web Intelligence-2 Web User Browsing Behaviour and Preference Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Palade, Vasile; Jain, Lakhmi

    2013-01-01

    This research volume focuses on analyzing the web user browsing behaviour and preferences in traditional web-based environments, social  networks and web 2.0 applications,  by using advanced  techniques in data acquisition, data processing, pattern extraction and  cognitive science for modeling the human actions.  The book is directed to  graduate students, researchers/scientists and engineers  interested in updating their knowledge with the recent trends in web user analysis, for developing the next generation of web-based systems and applications.

  1. Cosmic vacuum energy decay and creation of cosmic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fahr, H J

    2016-01-01

    In the more recent literature on cosmological evolutions of the universe the cosmic vacuum energy has become a non-renouncable ingredient. The cosmological constant $\\Lambda$, first invented by Einstein, but later also rejected by him, presently experiences an astonishing revival. Interestingly enough it acts, like a constant vacuum energy density would also do. Namely, it has an accelerating action on cosmic dynamics without which, as it appears, presently obtained cosmological data cannot be conciliated with theory. As we are going to show in this review, however, the concept of a constant vacuum energy density is unsatisfactory for very basic reasons, since it would claim for a physical reality that acts upon spacetime and matter dynamics without itself being acted upon by spacetime or matter.

  2. Dynamic Cosmic Strings Numerical evolution of excited Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Sperhake, U; Vickers, J A

    2001-01-01

    An implicit, fully characteristic, numerical scheme for solving the field equations of a cosmic string coupled to gravity is described. The inclusion of null infinity as part of the numerical grid allows us to apply suitable boundary conditions on the metric and matter fields to suppress unphysical divergent solutions. The code is tested by comparing the results with exact solutions, checking that static cosmic string initial data remain constant when evolved and undertaking a time dependent convergence analysis of the code. It is shown that the code is accurate, stable and exhibits clear second order convergence. The code is used to analyse the interaction between a Weber--Wheeler pulse of gravitational radiation with the string. The interaction causes the string to oscillate at frequencies inversely proportional to the masses of the scalar and vector fields of the string. After the pulse has largely radiated away the string continues to ring but the oscillations slowly decay and eventually the variables ret...

  3. C2Analyzer:Co-target-Co-function Analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md Aftabuddin; Chittabrata Mal; Arindam Deb; Sudip Kundu

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with their target mRNAs and regulate biological pro-cesses at post-transcriptional level. While one miRNA can target many mRNAs, a single mRNA can also be targeted by a set of miRNAs. The targeted mRNAs may be involved in different bio-logical processes that are described by gene ontology (GO) terms. The major challenges involved in analyzing these multitude regulations include identification of the combinatorial regulation of miR-NAs as well as determination of the co-functionally-enriched miRNA pairs. The C2Analyzer:Co-target-Co-function Analyzer, is a Perl-based, versatile and user-friendly web tool with online instructions. Based on the hypergeometric analysis, this novel tool can determine whether given pairs of miRNAs are co-functionally enriched. For a given set of GO term(s), it can also identify the set of miRNAs whose targets are enriched in the given GO term(s). Moreover, C2Analyzer can also identify the co-targeting miRNA pairs, their targets and GO processes, which they are involved in. The miRNA-miRNA co-functional relationship can also be saved as a .txt file, which can be used to further visualize the co-functional network by using other software like Cytoscape. C2Analyzer is freely available at www.bioinformatics.org/c2analyzer.

  4. Endnote web

    OpenAIRE

    Uezu, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Представлено краткое руководство по работе с сетевой сервисной программой EndNote Web на платформе Web of Knowledge издательства Thomson Reuters на русском языке. EndNote Web разработана для предоставления помощи исследователям и студентам в процессе написания научных публикаций. Позволяет создавать свои базы данных с собственными библиографическими списками для цитирования в научных работах....

  5. Gravitating non-Abelian cosmic strings

    CERN Document Server

    Santo, Antônio de Padua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study regular cosmic string solutions of the non-Abelian Higgs model coupled with the Einstein gravity. In order to do that, we constructed a set of coupled differential ordinary equation. Because there is no closed solution for this set of equations, we solve it numerically. The solutions that we are interested in asymptote to a flat space-time with a planar angle deficit. This model under consideration present two bosonic sectors, besides the non-Abelian gauge one, coupled minimally with the gravitational fields. The two bosonic sectors may present a direct coupling, which plays an important role on the behavior of the matter and gauge fields and also on the behavior on the geometry of the spacetime. We explicitly analyze the behaviors of the energy density and planar angle deficit as function of the energy scale where the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken and the coupling interaction between the bosonic sectors.

  6. Is cosmic expansion of the universe accelerating?

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, D C

    2006-01-01

    Currently available Type Ia distant supernovae observed data seem to support evidence that the cosmic expansion of the universe is accelerating. This unexpected result is beyond any standard model of modern cosmology. The new concept advanced to account for the acceleration is dark energy or quintessence with negative pressure. Most analyses using this new form of energy describe the observed data with great accuracy, although there has been no laboratory confirmation of it. The present work analyzes the consequences of Thomson scattering on Type Ia supernovae data for two significant reasons; (i) recently observed data reveal the existence of sufficient amount of ionized baryonic (hydrogen) dark matter in the intergalactic medium, a necessary ingredient for Thomson scattering, and (ii) its effects have not been considered previously in determining distances to the supernovae from their observed distance moduli. Quantitative results of the present investigation based on observed data and corrected for Thomson...

  7. The SDSS Coadd: Cosmic Shear Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Huan; /Fermilab; Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U., KICP; Seo, Hee-Jong; /UC, Berkeley; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; /Fermilab; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Hao, Jiangang; /Fermilab; Johnston, David; /Fermilab; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; /Fermilab; Reis, Ribamar R.R.; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Federal U.; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U., KICP

    2011-11-01

    Stripe 82 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey was observed multiple times, allowing deeper images to be constructed by coadding the data. Here we analyze the ellipticities of background galaxies in this 275 square degree region, searching for evidence of distortions due to cosmic shear. The E-mode is detected in both real and Fourier space with > 5-{sigma} significance on degree scales, while the B-mode is consistent with zero as expected. The amplitude of the signal constrains the combination of the matter density {Omega}{sub m} and fluctuation amplitude {sigma}{sub 8} to be {Omega}{sub m}{sup 0.7} {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.276{sub -0.050}{sup +0.036}.

  8. Systematic distortion in cosmic microwave background maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To minimize instrumentally the induced systematic errors,cosmic microwave background(CMB)anisotropy experiments measure temperature differences across the sky using pairs of horn antennas, temperature map is recovered from temperature difference obtained in sky survey through a map-making procedure.To inspect and calibrate residual systematic errors in the recovered temperature maps is important as most previous studies of cosmology are based on these maps.By analyzing pixel-ring coupling and latitude dependence of CMB temperatures,we find notable systematic devia- tion from CMB Gaussianity in released Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe(WMAP)maps.The detected deviation cannot be explained by the best-fit LCDM cosmological model at a confidence level above 99%and cannot be ignored for a precision cosmology study.

  9. Gravitating non-Abelian cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pádua Santos, Antônio; Bezerra de Mello, Eugênio R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study regular cosmic string solutions of the non-Abelian Higgs model coupled with gravity. In order to develop this analysis, we constructed a set of coupled non-linear differential equations. Because there is no closed solution for this set of equations, we solve it numerically. The solutions we are interested in asymptote to a flat spacetime with a planar angle deficit. The model under consideration presents two bosonic sectors, besides the non-Abelian gauge field. The two bosonic sectors may present a direct coupling, so we investigate the relevance of this coupling on the system, specifically in the linear energy density of the string and on the planar angle deficit. We also analyze the behaviors of these quantities as a function of the energy scale where the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken.

  10. Cosmological Constraints from the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Le Dour, M D M; Bartlett, J G; Blanchard, A

    2000-01-01

    Using an approximate likelihood method adapted to band-power estimates, we analyze the ensemble of first generation cosmic microwave background anisotropy experiments to deduce constraints over a six-dimensional parameter space describing Inflation-generated adiabatic, scalar fluctuations. The basic preferences of simple Inflation scenarios are consistent with the data set: flat geometries $(\\OmT \\equiv 1-\\Omk \\sim 1)$ and a scale-invariant primeval spectrum ($n\\sim 1$) are favored. Models with significant negative curvature ($\\OmT < 0.7$) are eliminated, while constraints on postive curvature are less stringent. Degeneracies among the parameters prevent independent determinations of the matter density $\\OmM$ and the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$, and the Hubble constant $\\Ho$ remains relatively unconstrained. We also find that the relative height of the first Doppler peak suggests a high baryon content ($\\Omb h^2$), almost independently of the other parameters; besides the overall qualitative advance ex...

  11. Engineering Web Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casteleyn, Sven; Daniel, Florian; Dolog, Peter

    Nowadays, Web applications are almost omnipresent. The Web has become a platform not only for information delivery, but also for eCommerce systems, social networks, mobile services, and distributed learning environments. Engineering Web applications involves many intrinsic challenges due...

  12. Localized starbursts in dwarf galaxies produced by impact of low metallicity cosmic gas clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Munoz-Tunon, C; Elmegreen, D M; Perez-Montero, E; Amorin, R; Filho, M E; Ascasibar, Y; Papaderos, P; Vilchez, J M

    2015-01-01

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter haloes. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local Universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) optical spectra of ten XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60 % solar on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6 % solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possib...

  13. Data analysis of cosmic microwave background experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abroe, Matthew Edmund

    2004-12-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a powerful tool for determining and constraining the fundamental properties of our universe. In this thesis we present various computational and statistical techniques used to analyze datasets from CMB experiments, and apply them to both simulated and actual datasets. The algorithms presented in this thesis perform a variety of tasks in relation to the goal of extracting scientific information from CMB data sets. The CMB anisotropy power spectrum is sensitive to numerous parameters that determine the evolutionary and large scale properties of our universe. Now that numerous experiments have mapped the CMB intensity fluctuations on overlapping regions of the sky it is important to ensure that the various experiments are indeed observing the same signal. We cross-correlate the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy maps from the WMAP, MAXIMA-I, and MAXIMA-II experiments. The results conclusively show that the three experiments not only display the same statistical properties of the CMB anisotropy, but also detect the same features wherever the observed sky areas overlap. We conclude that the contribution of systematic errors to these maps is negligible and that MAXIMA and WMAP have accurately mapped the cosmic microwave background anisotropy. Due to a quadrapole anisotropy at last scattering it is predicted that the CMB photons should be linearly polarized, and that the polarization intensity will be roughly an order of magnitude lower than the intensity fluctuations. Two computationally intensive methods for simulating the CMB polarization signal on the sky are presented. Now that CMB polarization experiments are currently producing data sets new algorithms for analyzing polarization time stream data must be developed and tested. We demonstrate how to generate simulations of a polarization experiment in the temporal domain and apply these simulations to the MAXIPOL case. We develop a maximum likelihood map making

  14. Web Interactive Campus Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylene S. Eder

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interactive campus map is a web based application that can be accessed through a web browser. With the Google Map Application Programming Interface availability of the overlay function has been taken advantage to create custom map functionalities. Collection of building points were gathered for routing and to create polygons which serves as a representation of each building. The previous campus map provides a static visual representation of the campus. It uses legends building name and its corresponding building number in providing information. Due to its limited capabilities it became a realization to the researchers to create an interactive campus map.Storing data about the building room and staff information and university events and campus guide are among the primary features that this study has to offer. Interactive Web-based Campus Information System is intended in providing a Campus Information System.It is open to constant updates user-friendly for both trained and untrained users and capable of responding to all needs of users and carrying out analyses. Based on the data gathered through questionnaires researchers analyzed the results of the test survey and proved that the system is user friendly deliver information to users and the important features that the students expect.

  15. Towards semantic web mining

    OpenAIRE

    Berendt, Bettina; Hotho, Andreas; Stumme, Gerd

    2002-01-01

    Semantic Web Mining aims at combining the two fast-developing research areas Semantic Web and Web Mining. The idea is to improve, on the one hand, the results of Web Mining by exploiting the new semantic structures in the Web; and to make use of Web Mining, on overview of where the two areas meet today, and sketches ways of how a closer integration could be profitable.

  16. WEB BASED TRANSLATION OF CHINESE ORGANIZATION NAME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Muyun; Liu Daxin; Zhao Tiejun; Qi Haoliang; Lin Kaiming

    2009-01-01

    A web-based translation method for Chinese organization name is proposed. After analyzing the structure of Chinese organization name, the methods of bilingual query formulation and maximum entropy based translation re-ranking are suggested to retrieve the English translation from the web via public search engine. The experiments on Chinese university names demonstrate the validness of this approach.

  17. Intelligent Overload Control for Composite Web Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenhoff, P.J.; Ostendorf, D.R.; Zivkovic, M.; Meeuwissen, H.B.; Gijsen, B.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze overload control for composite web services in service oriented architectures by an orchestrating broker, and propose two practical access control rules which effectively mitigate the effects of severe overloads at some web services in the composite service. These two rules

  18. Intelligent overload control for composite web services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenhoff, P.J.; Ostendorf, D.R.; Živković, M.; Meeuwissen, H.B.; Gijsen, B.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze overload control for composite web services in service oriented architectures by an orchestrating broker, and propose two practical access control rules which effectively mitigate the effects of severe overloads at some web services in the composite service. These two rules

  19. DISTANCE LEARNING ONLINE WEB 3 .0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Petryk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the existing methods of identification information in the semantic web, outlines the main problems of its implementation and researches the use of Semantic Web as the part of distance learning. Proposed alternative variant of identification and relationship construction of information and acquired knowledge based on the developed method “spectrum of knowledge”

  20. Web TA Production (WebTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — WebTA is a web-based time and attendance system that supports USAID payroll administration functions, and is designed to capture hours worked, leave used and...