WorldWideScience

Sample records for cosmic positrons

  1. Electrons and Positrons in Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Panov, A D

    2013-01-01

    This review concentrates on the results obtained, over the last ten years, on the astrophysics of high-energy cosmic ray electrons and positrons. The anomalies, observed in the data of recent experiments (possible bump in the electron spectrum and the PAMELA anomaly in the positron fraction) are discussed through the systematic use of simple analytical solutions of the transport equations for cosmic ray electrons. Three main ways of explaining the origin of the anomalies are considered: the conservative way supposing the positrons to be pure secondary particles; the nearby sources like pulsars origin; and the dark matter origin. This review discusses, also, the inability to select the pulsars model or the dark matter model to explain the electron anomalies on the basis of the electron spectra with the usual large energy binning ($\\gtrsim15%$). It is argued that the signature of nearby pulsars origin of the anomalies against the dark matter origin could be the fine structure of the cosmic ray electron spectrum...

  2. Extracting the size of the cosmic electron-positron anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Auchettl, Katie; Balázs, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    We isolated the anomalous part of the cosmic electron-positron flux within a Bayesian likelihood analysis. Using 219 recent cosmic ray spectral data points, we inferred the values of selected cosmic ray propagation parameters. In the context of the propagation model coded in GalProp, we found a significant tension between the electron positron related and the rest of the fluxes. Interpreting this tension as the presence of an anomalous component in the electron-positron related data, we calcu...

  3. EXTRACTING THE SIZE OF THE COSMIC ELECTRON-POSITRON ANOMALY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchettl, Katie; Balazs, Csaba [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2012-04-20

    We isolated the anomalous part of the cosmic electron-positron flux within a Bayesian likelihood analysis. Using 219 recent cosmic-ray spectral data points, we inferred the values of selected cosmic-ray propagation parameters. In the context of the propagation model coded in GalProp, we found a significant tension between the electron-positron related and the rest of the fluxes. Interpreting this tension as the presence of an anomalous component in the electron-positron related data, we calculated background predictions for PAMELA and Fermi-LAT based on the non-electron-positron related fluxes. We found a deviation between the data and the predicted background even when uncertainties, including systematics, were taken into account. We identified this deviation with the anomalous electron-positron contribution. We briefly compared this model-independent signal to some theoretical results predicting such an anomaly.

  4. Bremsstrahlung Energy Losses for Cosmic Ray Electrons and Positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Srivastava, R

    2015-01-01

    Recently cosmic ray electrons and positrons, i.e. cosmic ray charged leptons, have been observed. To understand the distances from our solar system to the sources of such lepton cosmic rays, it is important to understand energy losses from cosmic electrodynamic fields. Energy losses for ultra-relativistic electrons and/or positrons due to classical electrodynamic bremsstrahlung are computed. The energy losses considered are (i) due to Thompson scattering from fluctuating electromagnetic fields in the background cosmic thermal black body radiation and (ii) due to the synchrotron radiation losses from quasi-static domains of cosmic magnetic fields. For distances to sources of galactic length proportions, the lepton cosmic ray energy must be lass than about a TeV.

  5. Secondary Cosmic Positrons in an Anisotropic Diffusion Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kappl, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    One aim of cosmic ray measurements is the search for possible signatures of annihilating or decaying dark matter. The so-called positron excess has attracted a lot of attention in this context. On the other hand it has been proposed that the data might challenge the established diffusion model for cosmic ray propagation. We investigate an anisotropic diffusion model by solving the corresponding equations analytically. Depending on the propagation parameters we find that the spectral features of the positron spectrum are affected significantly. We also discuss the influence of the anisotropy on hadronic spectra.

  6. AMS results on positrons and antiprotons in cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounine, Andrei; AMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    AMS-02 is a particle physics detector collecting data on the International Space Station since May 2011. Precision measurements of charged cosmic ray particles have been performed by AMS using a data sample of 85 billion cosmic ray events collected during the first five years of operations on the Station. The latest AMS results on the fluxes and flux ratios of the cosmic ray particles are presented with the emphasis on the measurements of positrons and antiprotons. They show unique features that require accurate theoretical interpretation as to their origin, be it from dark matter collisions or new astrophysical sources. On behalf of AMS.

  7. A new look at the cosmic ray positron fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaud, M.; Aupetit, S.; Caroff, S.; Putze, A.; Belanger, G.; Genolini, Y.; Goy, C.; Poireau, V.; Poulin, V.; Rosier, S.; Salati, P.; Tao, L.; Vecchi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The positron fraction in cosmic rays has recently been measured with improved accuracy up to 500 GeV, and it was found to be a steadily increasing function of energy above ~10 GeV. This behaviour contrasts with standard astrophysical mechanisms, in which positrons are secondary particles, produced in the interactions of primary cosmic rays during their propagation in the interstellar medium. The observed anomaly in the positron fraction triggered a lot of excitement, as it could be interpreted as an indirect signature of the presence of dark matter species in the Galaxy, the so-called weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Alternatively, it could be produced by nearby sources, such as pulsars. Aims: These hypotheses are probed in light of the latest AMS-02 positron fraction measurements. As regards dark matter candidates, regions in the annihilation cross section to mass plane, which best fit the most recent data, are delineated and compared to previous measurements. The explanation of the anomaly in terms of a single nearby pulsar is also explored. Methods: The cosmic ray positron transport in the Galaxy is described using a semi-analytic two-zone model. Propagation is described with Green functions as well as with Bessel expansions. For consistency, the secondary and primary components of the positron flux are calculated together with the same propagation model. The above mentioned explanations of the positron anomaly are tested using χ2 fits. The numerical package MicrOMEGAs is used to model the positron flux generated by dark matter species. The description of the positron fraction from conventional astrophysical sources is based on the pulsar observations included in the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) catalogue. Results: The masses of the favoured dark matter candidates are always larger than 500 GeV, even though the results are very sensitive to the lepton flux. The Fermi measurements point systematically to much heavier

  8. Interpretation of the cosmic ray positron and antiproton fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Lipari, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The spectral shape of cosmic ray positrons and antiprotons has been accurately measured in the broad kinetic energy range 1-350 GeV. In the higher part of this range (E > 30 GeV) the e+ and pbar are both well described by power laws with spectral indices gamma[e+] = 2.77 +-0.02 and gamma[pbar] = 2.78 +- 0.04 that are approximately equal to each other and to the spectral index of protons. In the same energy range the positron/antiproton flux ratio has the approximately constant value 2.04+-0.04, that is consistent with being equal to the ratio e_/pbar calculated for the conventional mechanism of production, where the antiparticles are created as secondaries in the inelastic interactions of primary cosmic rays with interstellar gas. The positron/antiproton ratio at lower energy is significantly higher (reaching the approximate value e+/pbar = 100 for E around 1 GeV), but in the entire energy range 1-350 GeV, the flux ratio is consistent with being equal to ratio of the production rates in the conventional mecha...

  9. Positron Anomaly in Galactic Cosmic Rays: Constraining Dark Matter Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdeev, Roald; Malkov, Mikhail; Diamond, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    An explanation of the unexpected rise in the positron fraction of the cosmic ray (CR) leptonic energy spectrum, is proposed. It is argued that the e+/- spectra are different because they are accelerated by a charge-sign selective mechanism. This premise was hinted at by a recent result from the AMS-02 spectrometer that revealed a difference between e+ and antiproton spectra, which both are secondary CRs but of the opposite charges. The new mechanism extends the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) to make it charge-sign selective. The DSA, operating in Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) shocks, is held responsible for the production of the bulk of the CRs. The new mechanism was found to account for the positron data with an excellent agreement, except in a limited energy range between 100-300 GeV. In this range, the data exceed the theoretical prediction systematically, thus opening a window for a contribution from dark matter decay or annihilation as well as nearby pulsars. The charge-sign selectivity of the DSA arises from an electric field induced by the CR protons illuminating the neutral gas clumps in the SNR surroundings. The electric field expels positrons from the clump but traps electrons and secondary antiprotons, thus suppressing their acceleration in such SNRs. Work supported by NASA ATP-program under Grant NNX14AH36G, and by the US Department of Energy under Award No. DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  10. Excess of positrons in cosmic rays: A Lindbladian model of quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Campos, Andre G; Bondar, Denys I; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-01-01

    The fraction of positrons and electrons in cosmic rays recently observed on the International Space Station unveiled an unexpected excess of the positrons, undermining the current foundations of cosmic rays sources. We provide a quantum electrodynamics phenomenological model explaining the observed data. This model incorporates electroproduction, in which cosmic ray electrons decelerating in the interstellar medium emit photons that turn into electron-positron pairs. These findings not only advance our knowledge of cosmic ray physics, but also pave the way for computationally efficient formulations of quantum electrodynamics, critically needed in physics and chemistry.

  11. New Limits on Dark Matter Annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Cosmic Ray Positron Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergström, L.; Bringmann, T.; Cholis, I.; Hooper, D.; Weniger, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with

  12. New Limits on Dark Matter Annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Cosmic Ray Positron Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergström, L.; Bringmann, T.; Cholis, I.; Hooper, D.; Weniger, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with

  13. Decaying WIMP dark matter for AMS-02 cosmic positron excess

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Ki-Young; Shin, Chang Sub

    2013-01-01

    For explaining the AMS-02 cosmic positron excess, which was recently reported, we consider a scenario of thermally produced and decaying dark matter (DM) into the standard model (SM) leptons with an extremely small decay rate, \\Gamma_{DM} \\sim 10^{-26} sec.^{-1}. Since the needed DM mass is relatively heavy (700 GeV < m_{DM} < 3000 GeV), we introduce another DM component apart from the lightest supersymmetric particle ("LSP"). For its (meta-) stability and annihilation into other particles, the new DM should be accompanied with another Z_2 symmetry apart from the R-parity. Sizable renormalizable couplings of the new DM with SM particles, which are necessary for its thermalization in the early universe, cannot destabilize the new DM because of the new Z_2 symmetry. Since the new DM was thermally produced, it can naturally explain the present energy density of the universe. The new DM can decay into the SM leptons (and the LSP) only through non-renormalizable operators suppressed by a superheavy squared m...

  14. Galactic electron and positron properties from cosmic ray and radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Grasso, D; Evoli, C; Gaggero, D; Maccione, L

    2013-01-01

    We perform a consistent modeling of cosmic ray electrons, positrons and of the radio emission of the Galaxy. For the time we reproduce all relevant data sets between 1 GeV and 1 TeV including the recent AMS-02 positron fraction results. We show that below few GeV cosmic ray and radio data require that electron primary spectrum to be drastically suppressed and the propagated spectrum be dominated by secondary particles. Above 10 GeV an electron + positron extra-component with a hard spectrum is required. The positron spectrum measured below few GeV is consistently reproduced only within low reacceleration models. We also constrain the scale-height of the cosmic-ray distribution showing that a thin halo ($z_t \\lsim 2 \\kpc$) is excluded.

  15. HAWC Observations Strongly Favor Pulsar Interpretations of the Cosmic-Ray Positron Excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermilab; Cholis, Ilias [Johns Hopkins U.; Linden, Tim [Ohio State U., CCAPP; Fang, Ke [Maryland U.

    2017-02-27

    Recent measurements of the Geminga and B0656+14 pulsars by the gamma-ray telescope HAWC (along with earlier measurements by Milagro) indicate that these objects generate significant fluxes of very high-energy electrons. In this paper, we use the very high-energy gamma-ray intensity and spectrum of these pulsars to calculate and constrain their expected contributions to the local cosmic-ray positron spectrum. Among models that are capable of reproducing the observed characteristics of the gamma-ray emission, we find that pulsars invariably produce a flux of high-energy positrons that is similar in spectrum and magnitude to the positron fraction measured by PAMELA and AMS-02. In light of this result, we conclude that it is very likely that pulsars provide the dominant contribution to the long perplexing cosmic-ray positron excess.

  16. Possible Contribution of Mature γ-ray Pulsars to Cosmic-ray Positrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Gui Gao; Ze-Jun Jiang; Li Zhang

    2008-01-01

    We restudy the possible contribution of mature gamma-ray pulsars to cosmic ray positrons based on the new version of outer gap model. In this model, the inclination angle and average properties of the outer gap are taken into account, and more mature pulsars can have the outer gap and emit high energy photons. Half of the primary particles in the outer gaps will flow back toward the star surface and emit synchrotron photons, which can produce electron/positron pairs by the cascade of pair production. Some of these pairs will escape from the light cylinder and be accelerated to relativistic energies in the pulsar wind driven by low-frequency electromagnetic waves. Using a Monte Carlo method, we obtain a sample of mature gamma-ray pulsars and then calculate the production of the positrons from these pulsars. The observed excess of cosmic positrons can be well explained by this model.

  17. Cosmic-ray positron fraction measurement from 1 to 30 GeV with AMS-01

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Allaby, James V; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Bene, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, M; Brocco, L; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Cardano, F; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Cho, K; Choi, M J; Choi, Y Y; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Cortina, E; Cristinziani, M; Dai, T S; Delgado, C; Difalco, S; Djambazov, L; D'Antone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, P; Favier, Jean; Fiandrini, E; Fisher, P H; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gast, H; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Grimm, O; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Hungerford, W; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kim, M Y; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kraeber, M; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Lanciotti, E; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lechanoine-Leluc, C; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Liu, C L; Liu, H T; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mihul, A; Mujunen, A; Oliva, A; Olzem, J; Palmonari, F; Park, H B; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pilo, F; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Pohl, M; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Ro, S; Röser, U; Rossin, C; Sagdeev, R; Santos, D; Sartorelli, G; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schultzvon Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shin, J W; Shoumilov, E; Shoutko, V; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torsti, J; Trumper, J; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Valtonen, E; Vandenhirtz, J; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Vite, D; Von Gunten, H; Waldmeier-Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Xu, S; Yan, J L; Yan, L G; Yang, C G; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, S W; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zuccon, P

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the cosmic ray positron fraction e+/(e+ + e-) in the energy range of 1-30 GeV is presented. The measurement is based on data taken by the AMS-01 experiment during its 10 day Space Shuttle flight in June 1998. A proton background suppression on the order of 10^6 is reached by identifying converted bremsstrahlung photons emitted from positrons.

  18. Cosmic-ray positron fraction measurement from 1 to 30 GeV with AMS-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    AMS-01 Collaboration; Aguilar, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Allaby, J.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Ao, L.; Arefiev, A.; Azzarello, P.; Baldini, L.; Basile, M.; Barancourt, D.; Barao, F.; Barbier, G.; Barreira, G.; Battiston, R.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Béné, P.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Biland, A.; Blasko, S.; Boella, G.; Boschini, M.; Bourquin, M.; Brocco, L.; Bruni, G.; Buénerd, M.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Cai, X. D.; Camps, C.; Cannarsa, P.; Capell, M.; Cardano, F.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Z. G.; Chernoplekov, N. A.; Chiueh, T. H.; Cho, K.; Choi, M. J.; Choi, Y. Y.; Cindolo, F.; Commichau, V.; Contin, A.; Cortina-Gil, E.; Cristinziani, M.; Dai, T. S.; Delgado, C.; Difalco, S.; Djambazov, L.; D'Antone, I.; Dong, Z. R.; Emonet, P.; Engelberg, J.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Esposito, G.; Extermann, P.; Favier, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fisher, P. H.; Flügge, G.; Fouque, N.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gast, H.; Gervasi, M.; Giusti, P.; Grandi, D.; Grimm, O.; Gu, W. Q.; Hangarter, K.; Hasan, A.; Hermel, V.; Hofer, H.; Hungerford, W.; Jongmanns, M.; Karlamaa, K.; Karpinski, W.; Kenney, G.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, M. Y.; Klimentov, A.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraeber, M.; Laborie, G.; Laitinen, T.; Lamanna, G.; Lanciotti, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lebedev, A.; Lechanoine-Leluc, C.; Lee, M. W.; Lee, S. C.; Levi, G.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, H. T.; Lu, G.; Lu, Y. S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luckey, D.; Lustermann, W.; Maña, C.; Margotti, A.; Mayet, F.; McNeil, R. R.; Meillon, B.; Menichelli, M.; Mihul, A.; Mujunen, A.; Oliva, A.; Olzem, J.; Palmonari, F.; Park, H. B.; Park, W. H.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, E.; Pesci, A.; Pevsner, A.; Pilo, F.; Pimenta, M.; Plyaskin, V.; Pojidaev, V.; Pohl, M.; Produit, N.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Raupach, F.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Ribordy, M.; Richeux, J. P.; Riihonen, E.; Ritakari, J.; Ro, S.; Roeser, U.; Rossin, C.; Sagdeev, R.; Santos, D.; Sartorelli, G.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shin, J. W.; Shoumilov, E.; Shoutko, V.; Siedenburg, T.; Siedling, R.; Son, D.; Song, T.; Spinella, F.; Steuer, M.; Sun, G. S.; Suter, H.; Tang, X. W.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tornikoski, M.; Torsti, J.; Trümper, J.; Ulbricht, J.; Urpo, S.; Valtonen, E.; Vandenhirtz, J.; Velikhov, E.; Verlaat, B.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vezzu, F.; Vialle, J. P.; Viertel, G.; Vité, D.; von Gunten, H.; Waldmeier Wicki, S.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, B. C.; Wang, J. Z.; Wiik, K.; Williams, C.; Wu, S. X.; Xia, P. C.; Xu, S.; Yan, J. L.; Yan, L. G.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, S. W.; Xu, Z. Z.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, D. X.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, W. Z.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zuccon, P.

    2007-03-01

    A measurement of the cosmic ray positron fraction e/(e+e) in the energy range of 1 30 GeV is presented. The measurement is based on data taken by the AMS-01 experiment during its 10 day Space Shuttle flight in June 1998. A proton background suppression on the order of 106 is reached by identifying converted bremsstrahlung photons emitted from positrons.

  19. Model-independent approach for dark matter phenomenology: Signatures in linear colliders and cosmic positron experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shigeki Matsumoto; Nobuchika Okada

    2007-11-01

    We have studied the phenomenology of dark matter at the ILC and cosmic positron experiments based on model-independent approach. We have found a strong correlation between dark matter signatures at the ILC and those in the indirect detection experiments of dark matter. Once the dark matter is discovered in the positron experiments such as the PAMELA, its nature will be investigated in detail at the ILC.

  20. The stationary non-equilibrium plasma of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2016-06-01

    The statistical properties of the two-component plasma of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons measured by the AMS-02 experiment on the International Space Station and the HESS array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes are analyzed. Stationary non-equilibrium distributions defining the relativistic electron-positron plasma are derived semi-empirically by performing spectral fits to the flux data and reconstructing the spectral number densities of the electronic and positronic components in phase space. These distributions are relativistic power-law densities with exponential cutoff, admitting an extensive entropy variable and converging to the Maxwell-Boltzmann or Fermi-Dirac distributions in the non-relativistic limit. Cosmic-ray electrons and positrons constitute a classical (low-density high-temperature) plasma due to the low fugacity in the quantized partition function. The positron fraction is assembled from the flux densities inferred from least-squares fits to the electron and positron spectra and is subjected to test by comparing with the AMS-02 flux ratio measured in the GeV interval. The calculated positron fraction extends to TeV energies, predicting a broad spectral peak at about 1 TeV followed by exponential decay.

  1. Cosmic-Ray Positrons Produced by Pulsar Winds from Mature Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of the γ-ray pulsar outer gap model, e± pairs in the pulsar magnetosphere are produced by the cascade of e+ pairs through synchrotron radiation of the return current from the outer gap. These pairs are accelerated mono-energetically to relativistic energies in the pulsar wind driven by low-frequency electromagnetic waves. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generate a sample of the mature γ-ray pulsars in our Galaxy and calculate the positron production rate from these pulsars. With a simple leaky box model, we calculate the ratio of cosmic-ray positron to total electrons. Our result indicates that the pulsar contribution to the cosmic-ray positron peaks at about 40 GeV and the observed e+ / (e- + e+) ratio can be explained by this model.

  2. Measurement of separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Garde, M Llena; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Ormes, E Orlando J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sbarra, C; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2011-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting the Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to the Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 GeV and 200 GeV. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20--100 GeV range and determine for the first time that it continues to rise between 100 and 200 GeV.

  3. Positive charge prevalence in cosmic rays: Room for dark matter in the positron spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, M. A.; Diamond, P. H.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    2016-09-01

    The unexpected energy spectrum of the positron/electron ratio is interpreted astrophysically, with a possible exception of the 100-300 GeV range. The data indicate that this ratio, after a decline between 0.5 and 8 GeV, rises steadily with a trend towards saturation at 200-400 GeV. These observations (except for the trend) appear to be in conflict with the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism, operating in a single supernova remnant (SNR) shock. We argue that e+/e- ratio can still be explained by the diffusive shock acceleration if positrons are accelerated in a subset of SNR shocks which (i) propagate in clumpy gas media and (ii) are modified by accelerated cosmic ray protons. The protons penetrate into the dense gas clumps upstream to produce positrons and charge the clumps positively. The induced electric field expels positrons into the upstream plasma where they are shock accelerated. Since the shock is modified, these positrons develop a harder spectrum than that of the cosmic ray electrons accelerated in other SNRs. Mixing these populations explains the increase in the e+/e- ratio at E >8 GeV . It decreases at E shock modification. Contrary to the expelled positrons, most of the antiprotons, electrons, and heavier nuclei, are left unaccelerated inside the clumps. Scenarios for the 100-300 GeV AMS-02 fraction exceeding the model prediction, including, but not limited to, possible dark matter contribution, are also discussed.

  4. Systematic study of the uncertainties in fitting the cosmic positron data by AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The launch of AMS-02 opens a new era for cosmic ray physics with unprecedented precision of data, which are comparable with the laboratory measurements. The high precision data allow a quantitative study on the cosmic ray physics and give strict constraints on the nature of cosmic ray sources. However, the intrinsic errors from theoretical models to interpret the data become dominant over the errors in data. In the present work we try to give a systematic study on these uncertainties to explain, as an explicit example, the first AMS-02 positron fraction data, which shows the cosmic ray positron/electron excesses together with the PAMELA, Fermi-LAT measurements. The excesses can be attributed to contributions from new positron/electron sources, like pulsars or dark matter annihilation. The precise data give strict constraints on properties of the new sources. We study the systematic uncertainties from cosmic ray propagation, solar modulation, the $pp$ interaction models, the nuclei injection spectrum and so on...

  5. Astrophysical Uncertainties in the Cosmic Ray Electron and Positron Spectrum From Annihilating Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Simet, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a number of experiments have been conducted with the goal of studying cosmic rays at GeV to TeV energies. This is a particularly interesting regime from the perspective of indirect dark matter detection. To draw reliable conclusions regarding dark matter from cosmic ray measurements, however, it is important to first understand the propagation of cosmic rays through the magnetic and radiation fields of the Milky Way. In this paper, we constrain the characteristics of the cosmic ray propagation model through comparison with observational inputs, including recent data from the CREAM experiment, and use these constraints to estimate the corresponding uncertainties in the spectrum of cosmic ray electrons and positrons from dark matter particles annihilating in the halo of the Milky Way.

  6. Cosmic ray electrons and positrons from supernova explosions of massive stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, P L; Becker, J K; Meli, A; Rhode, W; Seo, E S; Stanev, T

    2009-08-07

    We attribute the recently discovered cosmic ray electron and cosmic ray positron excess components and their cutoffs to the acceleration in the supernova shock in the polar cap of exploding Wolf-Rayet and red supergiant stars. Considering a spherical surface at some radius around such a star, the magnetic field is radial in the polar cap as opposed to most of 4pi (the full solid angle), where the magnetic field is nearly tangential. This difference yields a flatter spectrum, and also an enhanced positron injection for the cosmic rays accelerated in the polar cap. This reasoning naturally explains the observations. Precise spectral measurements will be the test, as this predicts a simple E;{-2} spectrum for the new components in the source, steepened to E;{-3} in observations with an E;{-4} cutoff.

  7. Decaying Dark Atom Constituents and Cosmic Positron Excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Belotsky

    2014-01-01

    μ+μ+ and τ+τ+ produces the observed positron excess. These decays can naturally take place via GUT interactions. If it exists, such a metastable particle can be found in the next run of LHC. The model predicts also the ratio of leptons over baryons in the universe to be close to -3.

  8. The pinching method for Galactic cosmic ray positrons: Implications in the light of precision measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaud, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Caroff, S.; Genolini, Y.; Poulin, V.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Rosier, S.; Salati, P.; Vecchi, M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Two years ago, the Ams-02 collaboration released the most precise measurement of the cosmic ray positron flux. In the conventional approach, in which positrons are considered as purely secondary particles, the theoretical predictions fall way below the data above 10 GeV. One suggested explanation for this anomaly is the annihilation of dark matter particles, the so-called weakly interactive massive particles (WIMPs), into standard model particles. Most analyses have focused on the high-energy part of the positron spectrum, where the anomaly lies, disregarding the complicated GeV low-energy region where Galactic cosmic ray transport is more difficult to model and solar modulation comes into play. Aims: Given the high quality of the latest measurements by Ams-02, it is now possible to systematically re-examine the positron anomaly over the entire energy range, this time taking into account transport processes so far neglected, such as Galactic convection or diffusive re-acceleration. These might impact somewhat on the high-energy positron flux so that a complete and systematic estimate of the secondary component must be performed and compared to the Ams-02 measurements. The flux yielded by WIMPs also needs to be re-calculated more accurately to explore how dark matter might source the positron excess. Methods: We devise a new semi-analytical method to take into account transport processes thus far neglected, but important below a few GeV. It is essentially based on the pinching of inverse Compton and synchrotron energy losses from the magnetic halo, where they take place, inside the Galactic disc. The corresponding energy loss rate is artificially enhanced by the so-called pinching factor, which needs to be calculated at each energy. We have checked that this approach reproduces the results of the Green function method at the per mille level. This new tool is fast and allows one to carry out extensive scans over the cosmic ray propagation parameters. Results

  9. PAMELA's cosmic positron from decaying LSP in SO(10) SUSY GUT

    CERN Document Server

    Kyae, Bumseok

    2010-01-01

    We propose two viable scenarios explaining the recent observations on cosmic positron excess. In both scenarios, the present relic density in the Universe is assumed to be still supported by thermally produced WIMP or LSP (\\chi). One of the scenarios is based on two dark matter (DM) components (\\chi,X) scenario, and the other is on SO(10) SUSY GUT. In the two DM components scenario, extremely small amount of non-thermally produced meta-stable DM component [O(10^{-10}) < n_X /n_\\chi] explains the cosmic positron excess. In the SO(10) model, extremely small R-parity violation for LSP decay to e^\\pm is naturally achieved with a non-zero VEV of the superpartner of one right-handed neutrino (\\tilde{\

  10. Comment on AMS02 results support the secondary origin of cosmic ray positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Recently Blum, Katz and Waxman have claimed that the flux of high energy cosmic ray (CR) positrons near Earth that has been measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) aboard the International Space Station can be produced in the collisions of Galactic CR protons and nuclei with the ambient matter in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM). Their claim was based on an alleged "robust upper limit to the positron flux" which neglected the energy loss of e+'s in the ISM. Inclusion of this energy loss, however, yields a much smaller upper limit, which excludes secondary production in the ISM by the Galactic cosmic rays as the main origin of the CR e^+ flux above 10 GeV.

  11. Cosmic Ray Electrons, Positrons and the Synchrotron emission of the Galaxy: consistent analysis and implications

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bernardo, Giuseppe; Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca

    2012-01-01

    A multichannel analysis of cosmic ray electron and positron spectra and of the diffuse synchrotron emission of the Galaxy is performed by using the DRAGON code. This study is aimed at probing the interstellar electron source spectrum down to E ~ 1 GeV and at constraining several propagation parameters. We find that above 4 GeV the electron source spectrum is compatible with a power-law of index -2.5. Below 4 GeV instead it must be significantly suppressed and the total lepton spectrum is dominated by secondary particles. The positron spectrum and fraction measured below a few GeV are consistently reproduced only within low reacceleration models. We also constrain the scale-height zt of the cosmic-ray distribution using three independent (and, in two cases, original) arguments, showing that values of z_t < 2 kpc are excluded. This result may have strong implications for particle dark matter searches.

  12. Hints of a Charge Asymmetry in the Electron and Positron Cosmic-Ray Excesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    By combining the recent data from AMS-02 with those from Fermi-LAT, we show the emergence of a charge asymmetry in the electron and positron cosmic-ray excesses, slightly favoring the electron component. Astrophysical and dark matter inspired models introduced to explain the observed excesses can...... be classified according to their prediction for the charge asymmetry and its energy dependence. Future data confirming the presence of a charge asymmetry, would imply that an asymmetric production mechanism is at play....

  13. Decaying Dark Atom Constituents and Cosmic Positron Excess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belotsky, K.; Khlopov, M.; Kouvaris, C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a scenario where dark matter is in the form of dark atoms that can accommodate the experimentally observed excess of positrons in PAMELA and AMS-02 while being compatible with the constraints imposed on the gamma-ray ux from Fermi/LAT. This scenario assumes that the dominant component...... of dark matter is in the form of a bound state between a helium nucleus and a -2 particle and a small component is in the form of a WIMP-like dark atom compatible with direct searches in underground detectors. One of the constituents of this WIMP-like state is a +2 metastable particle with a mass of 1 Te...

  14. AMS-02 results support the secondary origin of cosmic ray positrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kfir; Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2013-11-22

    We show that the recent AMS-02 positron fraction measurement is consistent with a secondary origin for positrons and does not require additional primary sources such as pulsars or dark matter. The measured positron fraction at high energy saturates the previously predicted upper bound for secondary production, obtained by neglecting radiative losses. This coincidence, which will be further tested by upcoming AMS-02 data at higher energy, is a compelling indication for a secondary source. Within the secondary model, the AMS-02 data imply a cosmic ray propagation time in the Galaxy of <10(6) yr and an average traversed interstellar matter density of ~1 cm(-3), comparable to the density of the Milky Way gaseous disk, at a rigidity of 300 GV.

  15. AMS02 results support the secondary origin of cosmic ray positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Kfir; Waxman, Eli

    2013-01-01

    We show that the recent AMS02 positron fraction measurement is consistent with a secondary origin for positrons, and does not require additional primary sources such as pulsars or dark matter. The measured positron fraction at high energy saturates the previously predicted upper bound for secondary production (Katz et al 2009), obtained by neglecting radiative losses. This coincidence, which will be further tested by upcoming AMS02 data at higher energy, is a compelling indication for a secondary source. Within the secondary model the AMS02 data imply a cosmic ray propagation time in the Galaxy of < Myr and an average traversed interstellar matter density of order 1/cc, comparable to the density of the Milky Way gaseous disk, at a rigidity of 300 GV.

  16. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  17. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  18. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  19. Cosmic-Ray Positron Fraction Measurement with the AMS-02 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079577

    The study of Cosmic-Rays has proved to be of utmost importance in the understanding of the processes that govern our galaxy and has became a privileged field for the discovery of new physics. The current availability of precision measurements in a number of recent experiments such as PAMELA or Fermi, and in particular AMS-02, has provided a unique opportunity to challenge the theoretical framework that builds our comprehension of Nature. Certainly, the recent advent of new data on Cosmic-Ray electrons and positrons has raised disagreements with our current knowledge of production and propagation of Cosmic-Rays. The observation of an excess in the Cosmic-Ray electron spectrum has triggered enormous efforts to understand the origin of this anomaly, both from the theoretical and experimental points of view. In this context, AMS is a long awaited program, that among other objectives, will provide the most accurate measurement of the Cosmic-Ray electron spectrum, making possible to investigate a fundamental open q...

  20. New limits on dark matter annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer cosmic ray positron data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Lars; Bringmann, Torsten; Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; Weniger, Christoph

    2013-10-25

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with proposed solutions ranging from local pulsars to TeV-scale dark matter. Here, we make use of this high quality data to place stringent limits on dark matter with masses below ~300 GeV, annihilating or decaying to leptonic final states, essentially independent of the origin of this rise. We significantly improve on existing constraints, in some cases by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  1. Impact of the spectral hardening of TeV cosmic rays on the prediction of the secondary positron flux

    CERN Document Server

    Lavalle, Julien

    2010-01-01

    The rise in the cosmic-ray positron fraction measured by the PAMELA satellite is likely due to the presence of astrophysical sources of positrons, e.g. pulsars, on the kpc scale around the Earth. Nevertheless, assessing the properties of these sources from the positron data requires a good knowledge of the secondary positron component generated by the interaction of cosmic rays with the interstellar gas. In this paper, we investigate the impact of the spectral hardening in the cosmic-ray proton and helium fluxes recently reported by the ATIC2 and CREAM balloon experiments, on the predictions of the secondary positron flux. We show that the effect is not negligible, leading to an increase of the secondary positron flux by up to $\\sim$60% above $\\sim$100 GeV. We provide fitting formulae that allow a straightforward utilization of our results, which can help in deriving constraints on one's favorite primary positron source, e.g. pulsars or dark matter.

  2. Cosmic Ray Electron and Positron Excesses from a Fourth Generation Heavy Majorana Neutrino

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Unexpected features in the energy spectra of cosmic rays electrons and positrons have been recently observed by PAMELA and Fermi-LAT satellite experiments, opening to the exciting possibility of an indirect manifestation of new physics. A TeV-scale fourth lepton family is a natural extension of t...... and/or the muon charged leptons as primary decay products fit well the PAMELA and Fermi-LAT lepton excesses while there is tension with respect to the antiproton to proton fraction constrained by PAMELA....

  3. Dipole anisotropy in cosmic electrons and positrons: inspection on local sources

    CERN Document Server

    Manconi, Silvia; Donato, Fiorenza

    2016-01-01

    The cosmic electrons and positrons have been measured with unprecedented statistics up to several hundreds GeV, thus permitting to explore the role that close single sources can have in shaping the flux at different energies. In the present analysis, we consider electrons and positrons in cosmic rays to be produced by spallations of hadron fluxes with the interstellar medium, by a smooth Supernova Remnant (SNR) population, by all the ATNF catalog pulsars, and by few discrete, local SNRs. We test several source models on the $e^++e^-$ and $e^+$ AMS-02 flux data. For the configurations compatible with the data, we compute the dipole anisotropy in $e^++e^-$, $e^+$, $e^+/e^-$ from single sources. Our study includes a dedicated analysis to the Vela SNR. We show that Fermi-LAT present data on dipole anisotropy of $e^++e^-$ start to explore some of the models for the Vela SNR selected by AMS-02 flux data. We also investigate how the observed anisotropy could result from a combination of local sources. Our analysis s...

  4. Cosmic ray electrons, positrons and the synchrotron emission of the Galaxy: consistent analysis and implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardo, Giuseppe Di [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, SE 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Evoli, Carmelo [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Gaggero, Daniele [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Siena, Via Roma 56, I-56100 Siena (Italy); Maccione, Luca, E-mail: giuseppe.dibernardo@physics.gu.se, E-mail: carmelo.evoli@desy.de, E-mail: dgaggero@sissa.it, E-mail: dario.grasso@pi.infn.it, E-mail: luca.maccione@lmu.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    A multichannel analysis of cosmic ray electron and positron spectra and of the diffuse synchrotron emission of the Galaxy is performed by using the DRAGON code. This study is aimed at probing the interstellar electron source spectrum down to E ∼< 1GeV and at constraining several propagation parameters. We find that above 4GeV the e{sup −} source spectrum is compatible with a power-law of index ∼ 2.5. Below 4GeV instead it must be significantly suppressed and the total lepton spectrum is dominated by secondary particles. The positron spectrum and fraction measured below a few GeV are consistently reproduced only within low reacceleration models. We also constrain the scale-height z{sub t} of the cosmic-ray distribution using three independent (and, in two cases, original) arguments, showing that values of z{sub t} ∼< 2kpc are excluded. This result may have strong implications for particle dark matter searches.

  5. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The results show, for the first time, that neither e+ nor e- can be described by a single power law above 27.2 and 52.3 GeV, respectively. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. The dependence of the electron and positron fluxes on time will also be discussed.

  6. Signatures of a two million year old supernova in the spectra of cosmic ray protons, antiprotons and positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, M; Semikoz, D V

    2015-01-01

    The locally observed cosmic ray spectrum has several puzzling features, such as the excess of positrons and antiprotons above $\\sim 20$ GeV and the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range. We show that these features are consistently explained by a nearby source which was active $\\sim 2$ Myr ago and has injected $(1-2)\\times 10^{50}$ erg in cosmic rays. The transient nature of the source and its overall energy budget point to the supernova origin of this local cosmic ray source. The age of the supernova suggests that the local cosmic ray injection was produced by the same supernova that has deposited $^{60}$Fe isotopes in the deep ocean crust.

  7. Bayesian analysis of spatial-dependent cosmic-ray propagation: Astrophysical background of antiprotons and positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Tomassetti, Nicola; Oliva, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    The AMS-02 experiment has reported a new measurement of the antiproton/proton ratio in Galactic cosmic rays (CRs). In the energy range E ˜60 - 450 GeV , this ratio is found to be remarkably constant. Using recent data on CR proton, helium, and carbon fluxes, 10Be/9Be and B/C ratios, we have performed a global Bayesian analysis based on a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithm under a "two halo model" of CR propagation. In this model, CRs are allowed to experience a different type of diffusion when they propagate in the region close to the Galactic disk. We found that the vertical extent of this region is about 900 pc above and below the disk, and the corresponding diffusion coefficient scales with energy as D ∝E0.15 , describing well the observations on primary CR spectra, secondary/primary ratios, and anisotropy. Under this model, we have carried out improved calculations of antiparticle spectra arising from secondary CR production and their corresponding uncertainties. We made use of Monte Carlo generators and accelerator data to assess the antiproton production cross sections and their uncertainties. While the positron excess requires the contribution of additional unknown sources, we found that the new AMS-02 antiproton data are consistent, within the estimated uncertainties, with our calculations based on secondary production.

  8. PAMELA positron and electron spectra are reproduced by 3-dimensional cosmic-ray modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Maccione, Luca; Di Bernardo, Giuseppe; Evoli, Carmelo

    2013-01-01

    The PAMELA collaboration recently released the $e^+$ absolute spectrum between 1 and 300 GeV in addition to the positron fraction and $e^-$ spectrum previously measured in the same time period. We use the newly developed 3-dimensional upgrade of the DRAGON code and the charge dependent solar modulation HelioProp code to consistently describe those data. We obtain very good fits of all data sets if a $e^+$ + $e^-$ hard extra-component peaked at 1 TeV is added to a softer $e^-$ background and the secondary $e^\\pm$ produced by the spallation of cosmic ray proton and helium nuclei. All sources are assumed to follow a realistic spiral arm spatial distribution. Remarkably, PAMELA data do not display any need of charge asymmetric extra-component. Finally, plain diffusion, or low re-acceleration, propagation models which are tuned against nuclear data, nicely describe PAMELA lepton data with no need to introduce a low energy break in the proton and Helium spectra.

  9. Observations of cosmic ray positrons during the 1993 flight of the NMSU/WiZard-TS93 balloon borne apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Circella, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.N. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Brunetti, M.T.; Codini, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy)]|[INFN, Rome (Italy); Aversa, F. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    As a part of a series of experiments to search for antimatter in the primary cosmic ray, the NMSU balloon borne apparatus was configured for a flight dedicated to the search of positrons. Two completely new instruments were added to the magnetic spectrometer: a transition radiation detector (TRD) and a silicon-tungsten tracking calorimeter. The function of these two instruments complemented one another and the combined action provided a proton rejection factor better than 5x10{sup 5}. The paper shows the results from the analysis on the complete set of data. All the presented spectra are at the level of the spectrometer.

  10. Effect of near-earth thunderstorms electric field on the intensity of ground cosmic ray positrons/electrons in Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X. X.; Wang, X. J.; Huang, D. H.; Jia, H. Y.

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study the correlation between the ground cosmic ray intensity and near-earth thunderstorms electric field at YBJ (located at YangBaJing, Tibet, China, 4300 m a. s. l.). The variations of the secondary cosmic ray intensity are found to be highly dependent on the strength and polarity of the electric field. In negative fields and in positive fields greater than 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons increases with increasing electric field strength. And these values increase more obviously when involving a shower with lower primary energy or a higher zenith angle. While in positive fields ranging from 0 to 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons declines and the amplitude is up to 3.1% for vertical showers. A decrease of intensity occurs in inclined showers within the range of 0-500 V/cm, which is accompanied by smaller amplitudes. In this paper, the intensity changes are analyzed, especially concerning those decreasing phenomena in positive electric fields. Our simulation results could be helpful in understanding the decreases observed in some ground-based experiments (such as the Carpet air shower array and ARGO-YBJ), and also be useful in understanding the acceleration mechanisms of secondary charged particles caused by an atmospheric electric field.

  11. Effect of near-earth thunderstorms electric field on the intensity of ground cosmic ray positrons/electrons in Tibet

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, X X; Huang, D H; Jia, H Y

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study the correlation between the ground cosmic ray intensity and near-earth thunderstorms electric field at YBJ (4300 m a.s.l., Tibet, China). The variations of the secondary cosmic ray intensity are found to be highly dependent on the strength and polarity of the electric field. In negative fields and in positive fields greater than 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons increases with increasing electric field strength. And these values increase more obviously when involving a shower with lower primary energy or a higher zenith angle. While in positive fields ranging from 0 to 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons declines and the amplitude is up to 3.1% for vertical showers. A decrease of intensity occurs for inclined showers in positive fields less than 500 V/cm, which is accompanied by smaller amplitudes. In this paper, the intensity changes are discussed, especially concerning the decreases in posi...

  12. Plus Charge Prevalence in Cosmic Rays: Room for Dark Matter in the Positron Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Malkov, M A; Sagdeev, R Z

    2016-01-01

    The unexpected energy spectrum of the positron/electron ratio is interpreted astrophysically, with a possible exception of the 100-300 GeV range. The data indicate that this ratio, after a decline between $0.5-8$ GeV, rises steadily with a trend towards saturation at 200-400GeV. These observations (except for the trend) appear to be in conflict with the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism, operating in a \\emph{single} supernova remnant (SNR) shock. We argue that $e^{+}/e^{-}$ ratio can still be explained by the DSA if positrons are accelerated in a \\emph{subset} of SNR shocks which: (i) propagate in clumpy gas media, and (ii) are modified by accelerated CR \\emph{protons}. The protons penetrate into the dense gas clumps upstream to produce positrons and, \\emph{charge the clumps positively}. The induced electric field expels positrons into the upstream plasma where they are shock-accelerated. Since the shock is modified, these positrons develop a harder spectrum than that of the CR electrons accelerate...

  13. The Theoretical Power Law Exponent for Electron and Positron Cosmic Rays: A Comment on the Recent Letter of the AMS Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Swain, A Widom J

    2015-01-01

    In a recent letter, the AMS collaboration reported the detailed and extensive data concerning the distribution in energy of electron and positron cosmic rays. A central result of the experimental work resides in the energy regime $30\\ {\\rm GeV} < E < 1\\ {\\rm TeV}$ wherein the power law exponent of the energy distribution is measured to be $\\alpha ({\\rm experiment})=3.17$. In virtue of the Fermi statistics obeyed by electrons and positrons, a theoretical value was predicted as $\\alpha ({\\rm theory})=3.151374$ in very good agreement with experimental data. The consequences of this agreement between theory and experiment concerning the sources of cosmic ray electrons and positrons are briefly explored.

  14. Constraining Galactic pγ Interactions with Cosmic Ray Electron and Positron Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nayantara; Bing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    High energy protons produced by various sources of cosmic rays, e.g., supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, participate in Pγ and pp interactions. Although pp interactions may be the dominant mechanism in our Galaxy, it is unclear how important pγ process is. We show that the upper bound on the fraction of total number of protons participating in pγ interactions inside all Galactic astrophysical sources of cosmic rays is 10%.

  15. Leptophilic dark matter confronts AMS-02 cosmic-ray positron flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Gong, Ti

    2017-02-01

    With the measurement of positron flux published recently by AMS-02 collaboration, we show how the leptophilic dark matter fits the observation. We obtain the percentages of different products of dark matter annihilation that can best describe the flux of high energy positrons observed by AMS. We show that dark matter annihilates predominantly into $\\tau\\tau$ pair, while both $ee$ and $\\mu\\mu$ final states should be less than $20\\%$. When gauge boson final states are included, the best branching ratio of needed $\\tau\\tau$ mode reduces.

  16. Small Steps Towards a Grand Unification and the Electron/Positron Excesses in Cosmic-Ray Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibe, Masahiro; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    We consider a small extension of the standard model by adding two Majorana fermions; those are adjoint representations of the SU(2){sub L} and SU(3){sub c} gauge groups of the standard model. In this extension, the gauge coupling unification at an energy scale higher than 10{sup 15} GeV is realized when the masses of the triplet and the octet fermions are smaller than 10{sup 4} GeV and 10{sup 12} GeV, respectively. We also show that an appropriate symmetry ensures a long lifetime of the neutral component of the triplet fermion whose thermal relic density naturally explains the observed dark matter density. The electron/positron excesses observed in recent cosmic-ray experiments can be also explained by the decay of the triplet fermion.

  17. The Connection Between the Positron Fraction Anomaly and the Spectral Features in Galactic Cosmic-Ray Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Tomassetti, N

    2015-01-01

    Recent data on Galactic cosmic-ray (CR) leptons and hadrons gave rise to two exciting problems: on the lepton side, the origin of the rise of the CR positron fraction e+/(e- + e+) at ~10 - 300 GeV of energy; on the hadron side, the nature of the spectral hardening observed in CR protons and nuclei at ~TeV energies. The lepton anomaly indicates the existence of a nearby e+/- source. It has been proposed that high-energy positrons can be produced inside nearby supernova remnants (SNRs) via interactions of CR hadrons with the ambient medium. A distinctive prediction of this mechanism is a high-energy rise of the boron-to-carbon ratio, which has not been observed. It also requires old SNRs at work (with ineffective magnetic field amplification and slow shock speed), that cannot account for the CR hadronic spectra observed up to the knee energies (~5 PeV). We propose a new picture where, in addition to such a nearby CR accelerator, the high-energy spectrum of CR hadrons is provided by the large-scale population of...

  18. Cosmic-Ray Electron Excess from Pulsars is Spiky or Smooth?: Continuous and Multiple Electron/Positron injections

    CERN Document Server

    Kawanaka, Norita; Nojiri, Mihoko M

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the observed spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from astrophysical sources, especially pulsars, and the physical processes for making the spectrum spiky or smooth via continuous and multiple cosmic-ray injections. We find that (1) the average spectrum with the local birth rate of pulsars (including the off-axis ones) is relatively smooth, consistent with the PAMELA data, but requires an energetic source for the ATIC/PPB-BETS peak. Such a source should not occur repeatedly at the same rate. (2) A continuous injection produces a broad peak and a high energy tail above the peak, which can constrain the source duration ($\\lesssim 10^5$yr with the current data). (3) The H.E.S.S. data in the TeV range suggest that young sources with age less than $\\sim 3 \\times 10^4$yr are an order-of-magnitude less energetic than the average. (4) We also expect a large dispersion in the TeV spectrum due to the small number of sources, that is potentially a smoking-gun for the astrophysical origin. These ...

  19. Identification of positrons and electrons in the cosmic radiation with the electromagnetic calorimeter ECAL for the AMS-02 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080883

    2011-07-19

    In May 2011 AMS-02 detector has been successfully installed on the International Space Station (ISS), where it will take data on cosmic radiation from 1 to 1000 GeV for at least 10 years. Among all scientific objectives of the experiment, one of the most important is the search for Dark Matter (DM), which constitutes 80% of the Universe matter, but its nature is still unknown. A DM signal can be identified by studying the combined fluxes of positrons, photons, antiprotons and antideuterium. Thanks to its high acceptance and its performances, AMS-02 detector can extend primary cosmic ray physics search to a new energy range with high accuracy. A key role for these measurements, in particular for the electromagnetic channels, is played by ECAL calorimeter. This subdetector has been developed to measure e− and e+ energy with an accuracy of few %. Thanks to its 3D shower reconstruction imaging capabilities, it also has a high separation power between electromagnetic and hadronic showers (e/p rejection), essent...

  20. First Result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: Precision Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5-350 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Alberti, G.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Anderhub, H.; Arruda, L.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Baret, B.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Basili, A.; Batalha, L.; Bates, J.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Biland, A.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bolmont, J.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Boudoul, G.; Bourquin, M.; Brun, P.; Buénerd, M.; Burger, J.; Burger, W.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, C. R.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chernoplyiokov, N.; Chikanian, A.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Commichau, V.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Costado Dios, M. T.; Coste, B.; Crespo, D.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirkoz, B.; Dennett, P.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Diao, X. H.; Diago, A.; Djambazov, L.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Dubois, J. M.; Duperay, R.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; van Es, J.; Esser, H.; Falvard, A.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Flood, K.; Foglio, R.; Fohey, M.; Fopp, S.; Fouque, N.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallilee, M.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García, J.; García-López, R.; García-Tabares, L.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gentile, S.; Gervasi, M.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Girard, L.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy-Henningsen, C.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Grechko, A.; Gross, A.; Guerri, I.; de la Guía, C.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Hauler, F.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Heilig, J.; Hermel, R.; Hofer, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Hungerford, W.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Jongmanns, M.; Journet, L.; Jungermann, L.; Karpinski, W.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Koulemzine, A.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lauritzen, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, M. W.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; León Vargas, H.; Lepareur, V.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. H.; Lipari, P.; Lin, C. H.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, Y. S.; Lucidi, S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luo, J. Z.; Lustermann, W.; Lv, S.; Madsen, J.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masciocchi, F.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Menichelli, M.; Mereu, I.; Millinger, M.; Mo, D. C.; Molina, M.; Mott, P.; Mujunen, A.; Natale, S.; Nemeth, P.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oh, S.; Oliva, A.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Park, W. H.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pauss, F.; Pauw, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Perrin, E.; Pessina, G.; Pierschel, G.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pochon, J.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Porter, S.; Pouxe, J.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. N.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ren, Z. L.; Ricol, J. S.; Riihonen, E.; Rodríguez, I.; Roeser, U.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rossi, L.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sabellek, A.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Santos, B.; Saouter, P.; Sarchioni, M.; Schael, S.; Schinzel, D.; Schmanau, M.; Schwering, G.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Siedling, R.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Steuer, M.; Stiff, K.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Sun, X. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tassan-Viol, J.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Titus, C.; Tomassetti, N.; Toral, F.; Torsti, J.; Tsai, J. R.; Tutt, J. C.; Ulbricht, J.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vargas Trevino, M.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Vergain, M.; Verlaat, B.; Vescovi, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Viertel, G.; Volpini, G.; Wang, D.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Wallraff, W.; Weng, Z. L.; Willenbrock, M.; Wlochal, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, K. Y.; Wu, Z. S.; Xiao, W. J.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. G.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, M. M.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8×106 positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ˜250GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena.

  1. First Result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: Precision Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5350 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8×106 positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron...

  2. High statistics measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, L; Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  3. High Statistics Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5-500 GeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, L.; Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200 GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  4. High Statistics Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5–500 GeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Accardo, L; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ∼200  GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  5. Bayesian analysis of spatial-dependent cosmic-ray propagation: astrophysical background of antiprotons and positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jie; Oliva, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The AMS-02 experiment has reported a new measurement of the antiproton/proton ratio in Galactic cosmic rays (CRs). In the energy range $E\\sim\\,$60-450 GeV, this ratio is found to be remarkably constant. Using recent data on CR proton, helium, carbon, 10Be/9Be, and B/C ratio, we have performed a global Bayesian analysis based on a Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo sampling algorithm under a "two halo model" of CR propagation. In this model, CRs are allowed to experience a different type of diffusion when they propagate in the region close of the Galactic disk. We found that the vertical extent of this region is about 900 pc above and below the disk, and the corresponding diffusion coefficient scales with energy as $D\\sim\\,E^{0.15}$, describing well the observations on primary CR spectra, secondary/primary ratios and anisotropy. Under this model we have carried out improved calculations of antiparticle spectra arising from secondary CR production and their corresponding uncertainties. We made use of Monte-Carlo generato...

  6. The discrimination between cosmic positrons and protons with the Transition Radiation Detector of the AMS experiment on the International Space Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millinger, Mark

    2012-10-08

    The aim of this thesis is the development and validation of a particle identification method with the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02 to allow for the determination of the positron fraction in the cosmic lepton flux. Independent measurements indicate that a significant amount of about 23% of the energy density in the universe consists of an unknown mass contribution, the so-called Dark Matter. The Neutralino, as the most popular Dark Matter particle candidate, may produce an additional signal in the spectrum of cosmic rays. The fraction of positrons in the cosmic lepton flux possibly contains such a Dark Matter signal at high particle momenta. The currently most precise measurements in the region of this excess are provided by the satellite-borne PAMELA and Fermi detectors. Momentumdependent systematic uncertainties, especially the mis-identification of protons as positrons, could imitate the signal. However, if this positron excess is produced by Dark Matter the fraction should decrease above a theoretical energy threshold to the expectations, based on particle propagation. The energy region measured up to now does not show such a progress. Due to its significantly increased event statistics and its capability to measure up to higher particle energies, this signature could be observed with AMS-02. The number of events, which can be recorded by a detector, is limited by the combination of aperture and observable solid angle, quantified by the geometrical acceptance, and the observation time. As the cosmic particle flux follows a power-law in particle momentum with exponent {gamma} {approx} -3, the observable momentum interval is thus constrained by statistics. Due to its large geometrical acceptance of about 0.5 m{sup 2}sr, its long observation time of at least 9 years and its high proton suppression factor of >or similar 10{sup 6} AMS-02 will record large and clean lepton samples and thus provide a precise measurement

  7. Use of neural network techniques to identify cosmic ray electrons and positrons during the 1993 balloon flight of the NMSU/Wizard-TS93 instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellotti, R.; Castellano, M. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Candusso, M.; Casolino, M.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy)]|[INFN, Rome (Italy); Aversa, F.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy); Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    The detectors used in the TS93 balloon flight produced a large volume of information for each cosmic ray trigger. Some of the data was visual in nature, other portions contained energy deposition and timing information. The data sets are amenable to conventional analysis techniques but there is no assurance that conventional techniques make full use of subtle correlations and relations amongst the detector responses. With the advent of neural network technologies, particularly adept at classification of complex phenomena, it would seem appropriate to explore the utility of neural network techniques to classify particles observed with the instruments. In this paper neural network based methodology for signal/background discrimination in a cosmic ray space experiment is discussed. Results are presented for electron and positron classification in the TS93 flight data set and will be compared to conventional analyses.

  8. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼ 250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena.

  9. Measurement of the cosmic positrons' spectrum with the experiment AMS-02 and search for exotic signals; Mesure du spectre de positons cosmiques avec l'experience AMS-02 et recherche de signaux exotiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochon, J

    2005-06-15

    The AMS-02 experiment is a particle detector that will be installed on the international space station (ISS) in 2008 for at least 3 years. The physics motivations are cosmic ray measurements (e-, e+, p, p-bar, {gamma}, He, C,...), antimatter search for Z>2 and gamma ray studies from GeV to TeV. The HEAT experiment has measured positron spectrum up to 30 GeV, and shown a possible distortion around 8 GeV, which can be interpreted as a dark matter signal. The cosmic positrons spectrum measurement needs positron/proton separation close to 10{sup 5}, which will be obtained combining all AMS-02 sub-detectors. A neural network analysis has been developed on test beam data taken in 2002, to estimate the electron/proton rejection for the electromagnetic calorimeter. This technique, based on discriminant variables and which was tuned on data, was used to determine the positron acceptance combining other sub-detectors information. The number of conventional positrons can be estimated and AMS ability to detect cold dark matter signals has been determined. This study was presented for signal from supersymmetric neutralinos and from Kaluza-Klein stable particles. Fluxes are naturally too low to be detected. Signal can be enhanced thanks to local dark matter over-densities which appear naturally in galaxy formation models. A model for those over-densities has been tuned and presented. (author)

  10. Cosmic Sum Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Frandsen, Mads; Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We introduce new sum rules allowing to determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays and show how it can be used to predict the positron fraction at energies not yet explored by current experiments and to constrain specific models.......We introduce new sum rules allowing to determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays and show how it can be used to predict the positron fraction at energies not yet explored by current experiments and to constrain specific models....

  11. Positron production within our atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Positrons are commonly produced within our atmosphere by cosmic rays and the decay radioactive isotopes. Energetic positrons are also produced by pair production from the gamma rays generated by relativistic runaway electrons. Indeed, such positrons have been detected in Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs) in the inner magnetosphere by Fermi/GBM. In addition, positrons play an important role in relativistic feedback discharges (also known as dark lightning). Relativistic feedback models suggest that these discharges may be responsible for Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) and some gamma-ray glows. When producing TGFs, relativistic feedback discharges may generate large, lightning-like currents with current moments reaching hundreds of kA-km. In addition, relativistic feedback discharges also may limit the electric field that is possible in our atmosphere, affecting other mechanisms for generating runaway electrons. It is interesting that positrons, often thought of as exotic particles, may play an important role in thunderstorm processes. In this presentation, the role of positrons in high-energy atmospheric physics will be discussed. The unusual observation of positron clouds inside a thunderstorm by the ADELE instrument on an NCAR/NSF Gulfstream V aircraft will also be described. These observations illustrate that we still have much to learn about positron production within our atmosphere.

  12. Positron Channeling

    CERN Document Server

    Badikyan, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of channeling the low-energy relativistic positrons around separate crystallographic axes with coaxial symmetry of negative ions in some types of crystals is shown. The process of annihilation of positrons with electrons of medium was studied in detail.

  13. Dark Matter detection via lepton cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Lineros, Roberto A

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations of lepton cosmic rays, coming from the PAMELA and FERMI experiments, have pushed our understanding of the interstellar medium and cosmic rays sources to unprecedented levels. The imprint of dark matter on lepton cosmic rays is the most exciting explanation of both PAMELA's positron excess and FERMI's total flux of electrons. Alternatively, supernovae are astrophysical objects with the same potential to explain these observations. In this work, we present an updated study of the astrophysical sources of lepton cosmic rays and the possible trace of a dark matter signal on the positron excess and total flux of electrons.

  14. Identifying electrons and positrons with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Nikolas [RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The AMS-02 experiment is a multi-purpose detector for cosmic ray particles mounted on the International Space Station. It recorded over 40 billion events since its installation in 2011. The bulk of these events are protons, which are most abundant in cosmic rays. Electrons are 100 times and positrons 1000 times less abundant. Measuring the positrons as function of energy is especially interesting, as an excess over the expected astrophysical background may hint at an additional source of positrons in the galaxy or a new phenomena responsible for the excess, e.g. dark-matter annihilation. In order to measure positrons accurately with a small uncertainty, a large proton rejection of 10{sup 6} is needed. AMS-02 offers a transition radiation detector to separate positrons from protons and an electromagnetic calorimeter allowing a precise measurement of the kinetic energy of an incoming lepton. This talk covers the general strategy of identifying electrons/positrons with AMS-02 and presents the so-obtained electron/positron fluxes that were recently published.

  15. Cosmic Ray Antimatter

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, space-born experiments have delivered new measurements of high energy cosmic-ray (CR) antiprotons and positrons, opening new frontiers in energy reach and precision. While being a promising discovery tool for new physics or exotic astrophysical phenomena, an irreducible background of antimatter comes from CR collisions with interstellar matter in the Galaxy. Understanding this irreducible source or constraining it from first principles is an interesting challenge: a game of hide-and-seek where the objective is to identify the laws of basic particle physics among the forest of astrophysical uncertainties. I describe an attempt to obtain such understanding, combining information from a zoo of CR species including massive nuclei and relativistic radioisotopes. I show that: (i) CR antiprotons most likely come from CR-gas collisions; (ii) positron data is consistent with, and suggestive of the same astrophysical production mechanism responsible for antiprotons and dominated by proton-proton c...

  16. The Cosmic Ray Lepton Puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, Pierre; Cirelli, Marco; Moulin, Emmanuel; Glicenstein, Jean-Francois; Iocco, Fabio; Pieri, Lidia

    2010-01-01

    Recent measurements of cosmic ray electrons and positrons by PAMELA, ATIC, Fermi and HESS have revealed interesting excesses and features in the GeV-TeV range. Many possible explanations have been suggested, invoking one or more nearby primary sources such as pulsars and supernova remnants, or dark matter. Based on the output of the TANGO in PARIS --Testing Astroparticle with the New GeV/TeV Observations in Positrons And electRons : Identifying the Sources-- workshop held in Paris in May 2009, we review here the latest experimental results and we discuss some virtues and drawbacks of the many theoretical interpretations proposed so far.

  17. Transmission positron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyama, Masao [Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Uenohara, Yamanashi 409-0193 (Japan)]. E-mail: doyama@ntu.ac.jp; Kogure, Yoshiaki [Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Uenohara, Yamanashi 409-0193 (Japan); Inoue, Miyoshi [Teikyo University of Science and Technology, Uenohara, Yamanashi 409-0193 (Japan); Kurihara, Toshikazu [Institute of Materials Structure Science (IMSS), High Energy Accelerator, Research Organization (KEK), Ohno 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yoshiie, Toshimasa [Reactor Research Institute, Kyoto University, Noda, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0451 (Japan); Oshima, Ryuichiro [Research Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Osaka Prefecture University (Japan); Matsuya, Miyuki [Electron Optics Laboratory (JEOL) Ltd., Musashino 3-1-2, Akishima 196-0021 (Japan)

    2006-02-28

    Immediate and near-future plans for transmission positron microscopes being built at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan, are described. The characteristic feature of this project is remolding a commercial electron microscope to a positron microscope. A point source of electrons kept at a negative high voltage is changed to a point source of positrons kept at a high positive voltage. Positional resolution of transmission microscopes should be theoretically the same as electron microscopes. Positron microscopes utilizing trapping of positrons have always positional ambiguity due to the diffusion of positrons.

  18. Neutralino Clumps and Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Salati, P

    2007-01-01

    The halo of the Miky Way might contain numerous and dense substructures inside which the putative weakly interacting massive particles (suggested as the main constituent of the astronomical dark matter) would produce a stronger annihilation signal than in the smooth regions. The closer the nearest clump, the larger the positron and antiproton cosmic ray fluxes at the Earth. But the actual distribution of these substructures is not known. The predictions on the antimatter yields at the Earth are therefore affected by a kind of cosmic variance whose analysis is the subject of this contribution. The statistical tools to achieve that goal are presented and Monte Carlo simulations are compared to analytic results.

  19. Positrons in the Galaxy: Their Births, Marriages and Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    High energy (approximately GeV) positrons are seen within cosmic rays and observation of a narrow line at 511 keV shows that positrons are annihilating in the galaxy after slowing down to approximately keV energies or less. Our state of knowledge of the origin of these positrons, of the formation of positronium 'atoms', and of the circumstances of their annihilation or escape from the galaxy are reviewed and the question of whether the two phenomena are linked is discussed.

  20. About cosmic gamma ray lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2017-06-01

    Gamma ray lines from cosmic sources convey the action of nuclear reactions in cosmic sites and their impacts on astrophysical objects. Gamma rays at characteristic energies result from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. The gamma-ray line from the annihilation of positrons at 511 keV falls into the same energy window, although of different origin. We present here the concepts of cosmic gamma ray spectrometry and the corresponding instruments and missions, followed by a discussion of recent results and the challenges and open issues for the future. Among the lessons learned are the diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in 26Al and 60Fe gamma rays, which is now being exploited towards the cycle of matter driven by massive stars and their supernovae; large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be of key importance here. Also, constraints on the complex processes making stars explode as either thermonuclear or core-collapse supernovae are being illuminated by gamma-ray lines, in this case from shortlived radioactivities from 56Ni and 44Ti decays. In particular, the three-dimensionality and asphericities that have recently been recognised as important are enlightened in different ways through such gamma-ray line spectroscopy. Finally, the distribution of positron annihilation gamma ray emission with its puzzling bulge-dominated intensity disctribution is measured through spatially-resolved spectra, which indicate that annihilation conditions may differ in different parts of our Galaxy. But it is now understood that a variety of sources may feed positrons into the interstellar medium, and their characteristics largely get lost during slowing down and propagation of positrons before annihilation; a recent microquasar flare was caught as an opportunity to see positrons annihilate at a source.

  1. Cosmic Rays and Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisser, Thomas K.; Engel, Ralph; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; 1. Cosmic rays; 2. Cosmic ray data; 3. Particle physics; 4. Hadronic interactions and accelerator data; 5. Cascade equations; 6. Atmospheric muons and neutrinos; 7. Neutrino masses and oscillations; 8. Muons and neutrinos underground; 9. Cosmic rays in the Galaxy; 10. Extragalactic propagation of cosmic rays; 11. Astrophysical - rays and neutrinos; 12. Acceleration; 13. Supernovae in the Milky Way; 14. Astrophysical accelerators and beam dumps; 15. Electromagnetic cascades; 16. Extensive air showers; 17. Very high energy cosmic rays; 18. Neutrino astronomy; A.1. Units, constants and definitions; A.2. References to flux measurements; A.3. Particle flux, density, and interaction cross section; A.4. Fundamentals of scattering theory; A.5. Regge amplitude; A.6. Glauber model of nuclear cross sections; A.7. Earth's atmosphere; A.8. Longitudinal development of air showers; A.9. Secondary positrons and electrons; A.10. Liouville's theorem and cosmic ray propagation; A.11. Cosmology and distances measures; A.12. The Hillas splitting algorithm; References; Index.

  2. Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Vachaspati, Tanmay; Steer, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    This article, written for Scolarpedia, provides a brief introduction into the subject of cosmic strings, together with a review of their main properties, cosmological evolution and observational signatures.

  3. Positrons in Surface Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Within the last decade powerful methods have been developed to study surfaces using bright low-energy positron beams. These novel analysis tools exploit the unique properties of positron interaction with surfaces, which comprise the absence of exchange interaction, repulsive crystal potential and positron trapping in delocalized surface states at low energies. By applying reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) one can benefit from the phenomenon of total reflection below a critical angle that is not present in electron surface diffraction. Therefore, RHEPD allows the determination of the atom positions of (reconstructed) surfaces with outstanding accuracy. The main advantages of positron annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy (PAES) are the missing secondary electron background in the energy region of Auger-transitions and its topmost layer sensitivity for elemental analysis. In order to enable the investigation of the electron polarization at surfaces low-energy spin-polarized positron...

  4. High energy physics in cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Lawrence W. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-02-07

    In the first half-century of cosmic ray physics, the primary research focus was on elementary particles; the positron, pi-mesons, mu-mesons, and hyperons were discovered in cosmic rays. Much of this research was carried out at mountain elevations; Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees, Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, and Mt. Evans/Echo Lake in Colorado, among other sites. In the 1960s, claims of the observation of free quarks, and satellite measurements of a significant rise in p-p cross sections, plus the delay in initiating accelerator construction programs for energies above 100 GeV, motivated the Michigan-Wisconsin group to undertake a serious cosmic ray program at Echo Lake. Subsequently, with the succession of higher energy accelerators and colliders at CERN and Fermilab, cosmic ray research has increasingly focused on cosmology and astrophysics, although some groups continue to study cosmic ray particle interactions in emulsion chambers.

  5. Status of cosmic-ray antideuteron searches

    CERN Document Server

    von Doetinchem, P; Boggs, S; Bufalino, S; Dal, L; Donato, F; Fornengo, N; Fuke, H; Grefe, M; Hailey, C; Hamilton, B; Ibarra, A; Mitchell, J; Mognet, I; Ong, R A; Pereira, R; Perez, K; Putze, A; Raklev, A; Salati, P; Sasaki, M; Tarle, G; Urbano, A; Vittino, A; Wild, S; Xue, W; Yoshimura, K

    2015-01-01

    The precise measurement of cosmic-ray antiparticles serves as important means for identifying the nature of dark matter. Recent years showed that identifying the nature of dark matter with cosmic-ray positrons and higher energy antiprotons is difficult, and has lead to a significantly increased interest in cosmic-ray antideuteron searches. Antideuterons may also be generated in dark matter annihilations or decays, offering a potential breakthrough in unexplored phase space for dark matter. Low-energy antideuterons are an important approach because the flux from dark matter interactions exceeds the background flux by more than two orders of magnitude in the low-energy range for a wide variety of models. This review is based on the "dbar14 - dedicated cosmic-ray antideuteron workshop", which brought together theorists and experimentalists in the field to discuss the current status, perspectives, and challenges for cosmic-ray antideuteron searches and discusses the motivation for antideuteron searches, the theor...

  6. Cosmic Magnification

    CERN Document Server

    Ménard, B

    2002-01-01

    I present the current status of the cosmic magnification produced by systematic amplification of background sources by large-scale structures. After introducing its principle, I focus on its interests for cosmology and underline its complementary aspect to cosmic shear and galaxy auto-correlations. I finally discuss recent investigations using higher-order statistics.

  7. Cosmic superstrings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2008-08-28

    Cosmic superstrings are expected to be formed at the end of brane inflation, within the context of brane-world cosmological models inspired from string theory. By studying the properties of cosmic superstring networks and comparing their phenomenological consequences against observational data, we aim to pin down the successful and natural inflationary model and get an insight into the stringy description of our Universe.

  8. Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; van den Berg, Ad; Ebert, Ute

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms Cosmic rays are protons and heavier nuclei that constantly bombard the Earth's atmosphere with energies spanning a vast range from 109 to 1021 eV. At typical altitudes up to 10-20 km they initiate large particle cascades, called extensive air showers, that contain millions to billions of secondary particles depending on their initial energy. These particles include electrons, positrons, hadrons and muons, and are concentrated in a compact particle front that propagates at relativistic speed. In addition, the shower leaves behind a trail of lower energy electrons from ionization of air molecules. Under thunderstorm conditions these electrons contribute to the electrical and ionization processes in the cloud. When the local electric field is strong enough the secondary electrons can create relativistic electron run-away avalanches [1] or even non-relativistic avalanches. Cosmic rays could even trigger lightning inception. Conversely, strong electric fields also influence the development of the air shower [2]. Extensive air showers emit a short (tens of nanoseconds) radio pulse due to deflection of the shower particles in the Earth's magnetic field [3]. Antenna arrays, such as AERA, LOFAR and LOPES detect these pulses in a frequency window of roughly 10-100 MHz. These systems are also sensitive to the radiation from discharges associated to thunderstorms, and provide a means to study the interaction of cosmic ray air showers and the electrical processes in thunderstorms [4]. In this presentation we discuss the involved radiation mechanisms and present analyses of thunderstorm data from air shower arrays [1] A. Gurevich et al., Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992) [2] S. Buitink et al., Astropart. Phys. 33, 1 (2010) [3] H. Falcke et al., Nature 435, 313 (2005) [4] S. Buitink et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 467, 385 (2007)

  9. Positron Interactions with Atoms and Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2012-01-01

    Dirac, in 1928, combining the ideas of quantum mechanics and the ideas of relativity invented the well-known relativistic wave equation. In his formulation, he predicted an antiparticle of the electron of spin n-bar/2. He thought that this particle must be a proton. Dirac published his interpretation in a paper 'A theory of electrons and protons.' It was shown later by the mathematician Hermann Weyl that the Dirac theory was completely symmetric between negative and positive particles and the positive particle must have the same mass as that of the electron. In his J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Prize Acceptance Speech, Dirac notes that 'Blackett was really the first person to obtain hard evidence for the existence of a positron but he was afraid to publish it. He wanted confirmation, he was really over cautious.' Positron, produced by the collision of cosmic rays in a cloud chamber, was detected experimentally by Anderson in 1932. His paper was published in Physical Review in 1933. The concept of the positron and its detection were the important discoveries of the 20th century. I have tried to discuss various processes involving interactions of positrons with atoms and ions. This includes scattering, bound states and resonances. It has not been possible to include the enormous work which has been carried out during the last 40 or 50 years in theory and measurements.

  10. Cold Positrons from Decaying Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boubekeur, Lotfi [Universitate de Valencia (Spain); Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Vives, Oscar [Universitate de Valencia (Spain)

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here we explore the possibilities that arise if one of the products in a (Heavy Particle) $\\rightarrow$ (Dark Matter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  11. Solvated Positron Chemistry. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction of the hydrated positron, eaq+ with Cl−, Br−, and I− ions in aqueous solutions was studied by means of positron The measured angular correlation curves for [Cl−, e+], [Br−, e+, and [I−, e+] bound states were in good agreement with th Because of this agreement and the fact that the ca...

  12. Positron annihilation microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canter, K.F. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Advances in positron annihilation microprobe development are reviewed. The present resolution achievable is 3 {mu}m. The ultimate resolution is expected to be 0.1 {mu}m which will enable the positron microprobe to be a valuable tool in the development of 0.1 {mu}m scale electronic devices in the future. (author)

  13. Positrons in surface physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Within the last decade powerful methods have been developed to study surfaces using bright low-energy positron beams. These novel analysis tools exploit the unique properties of positron interaction with surfaces, which comprise the absence of exchange interaction, repulsive crystal potential and positron trapping in delocalized surface states at low energies. By applying reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) one can benefit from the phenomenon of total reflection below a critical angle that is not present in electron surface diffraction. Therefore, RHEPD allows the determination of the atom positions of (reconstructed) surfaces with outstanding accuracy. The main advantages of positron annihilation induced Auger-electron spectroscopy (PAES) are the missing secondary electron background in the energy region of Auger-transitions and its topmost layer sensitivity for elemental analysis. In order to enable the investigation of the electron polarization at surfaces low-energy spin-polarized positrons are used to probe the outermost electrons of the surface. Furthermore, in fundamental research the preparation of well defined surfaces tailored for the production of bound leptonic systems plays an outstanding role. In this report, it is envisaged to cover both the fundamental aspects of positron surface interaction and the present status of surface studies using modern positron beam techniques.

  14. What can we learn from a sharply falling positron fraction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delahaye Timur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results from the AMS-02 data have confirmed that the cosmic ray positron fraction increases with energy between 10 and 200 GeV. This quantity should not exceed 50%, and it is hence expected that it will either converge towards 50% or fall. We study the possibility that future data may show the positron fraction dropping down abruptly to the level expected with only secondary production, and forecast the implications of such a feature in term of possible injection mechanisms that include both Dark Matter and pulsars.

  15. What can we learn from a sharply falling positron fraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahaye, Timur; Kotera, Kumiko; Silk, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Recent results from the AMS-02 data have confirmed that the cosmic ray positron fraction increases with energy between 10 and 200 GeV. This quantity should not exceed 50%, and it is hence expected that it will either converge towards 50% or fall. We study the possibility that future data may show the positron fraction dropping down abruptly to the level expected with only secondary production, and forecast the implications of such a feature in term of possible injection mechanisms that include both Dark Matter and pulsars.

  16. What can we learn from a sharply falling positron fraction?

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, Timur; Silk, Jospeh

    2015-01-01

    Recent results from the AMS-02 data have confirmed that the cosmic ray positron fraction increases with energy between 10 and 200GeV. This quantity should not exceed 50%, and it is hence expected that it will either converge towards 50% or fall. We study the possibility that future data may show the positron fraction dropping down abruptly to the level expected with only secondary production, and forecast the implications of such a feature in term of possible injection mechanisms that include both Dark Matter and pulsars.

  17. The Separation of Secondary Positrons Produced in the Galaxy from the High Energy Positrons that are Observed Recent Space Experiments on PAMELA and AMS2

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R

    2015-01-01

    The large intensity of greater than 10 GeV positrons which apparently come from sources outside the Earth-Sun system observed recently by many spacecraft (PAMELA, FERMI, AMS2) is still a mystery with broad implications. In our attempts to solve this mystery we have first tried to define reasonable limits to the positrons produced in our own galaxy by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays. This is best done by using the secondary B/C ratio produced by these same cosmic rays in order to define the amount of matter traversed by galactic cosmic ray nuclei. Using new values of the B/C ratio together with earlier calculations of positron production by Moskalenko and Strong, 1998, we find that at 10 GeV this galactic production is from 70% to almost 100% of the positrons observed by the above experiments. At 100 GeV these fractions are still from 20 to 33% of the positrons observed. The resulting excess positron spectrum above this normal galactic background is found to have an exponent -2.75, possibly flattening at l...

  18. Supernovae and Positron Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Milne, P A; Kinzer, R L; Leising, M D

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive nuclei, especially those created in SN explosion, have long been suggested to be important contributors of galactic positrons. In this paper we describe the findings of three independent OSSE/SMM/TGRS studies of positron annihilation radiation, demonstrating that the three studies are largely in agreement as to the distribution of galactic annihilation radiation. We then assess the predicted yields and distributions of SN-synthesized radionuclei, determining that they are marginally compatible with the findings of the annihilation radiation studies.

  19. Advanced positron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Variola, A., E-mail: variola@lal.in2p3.fr

    2014-03-11

    Positron sources are a critical system for the future lepton colliders projects. Due to the large beam emittance at the production and the limitation given by the target heating and mechanical stress, the main collider parameters fixing the luminosity are constrained by the e{sup +} sources. In this context also the damping ring design boundary conditions and the final performance are given by the injected positron beam. At present different schemes are being taken into account in order to increase the production and the capture yield of the positron sources, to reduce the impact of the deposited energy in the converter target and to increase the injection efficiency in the damping ring. The final results have a strong impact not only on the collider performance but also on its cost optimization. After a short introduction illustrating their fundamental role, the basic positron source scheme and the performance of the existing sources will be illustrated. The main innovative designs for the future colliders advanced sources will be reviewed and the different developed technologies presented. Finally the positrons-plasma R and D experiments and the futuristic proposals for positron sources will reviewed.

  20. The Cosmic Ray Electron Excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Christl, M.; Ganel, O.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kuznetsov, E. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Seo, E. S.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Watts, J. W.; Wefel, J. P.; Wu, J.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the possible sources for the apparent excess of Cosmic Ray Electrons. The presentation reviews the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) instrument, the various parts, how cosmic ray electrons are measured, and shows graphs that review the results of the ATIC instrument measurement. A review of Cosmic Ray Electrons models is explored, along with the source candidates. Scenarios for the excess are reviewed: Supernova remnants (SNR) Pulsar Wind nebulae, or Microquasars. Each of these has some problem that mitigates the argument. The last possibility discussed is Dark Matter. The Anti-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) mission is to search for evidence of annihilations of dark matter particles, to search for anti-nuclei, to test cosmic-ray propagation models, and to measure electron and positron spectra. There are slides explaining the results of Pamela and how to compare these with those of the ATIC experiment. Dark matter annihilation is then reviewed, which represent two types of dark matter: Neutralinos, and kaluza-Kline (KK) particles, which are next explained. The future astrophysical measurements, those from GLAST LAT, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and HEPCAT are reviewed, in light of assisting in finding an explanation for the observed excess. Also the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could help by revealing if there are extra dimensions.

  1. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from beta-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of their prime energy sources. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massi...

  2. Cosmic Forms

    CERN Document Server

    Kleman, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    The continuous 1D defects of an isotropic homogeneous material in an Euclidean 3D space are classified by a construction method, the Volterra process (VP). We employ the same method to classify the continuous 2D defects (which we call \\textit{cosmic forms}) of a vacuum in a 4D maximally symmetric spacetime. These defects fall into three different classes: i)- $m$-forms, akin to 3D space disclinations, related to ordinary rotations and analogous to Kibble's global cosmic strings (except that being continuous any deficit angle is allowed); ii)- $t$-forms, related to Lorentz boosts (hyperbolic rotations); iii)- $r$-forms, never been considered so far, related to null rotations. A detailed account of their metrics is presented. Their inner structure in many cases appears as a non-singular \\textit{core} separated from the outer part by a timelike hypersurface with distributional curvature and/or torsion, yielding new types of geometrical interactions with cosmic dislocations and other cosmic disclinations. Whereas...

  3. Electron and Positron solar modulation and prediction for AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Bobik, P; Consolandi, C; Della Torre, S; Gervasi, M; Grandi, D; Kudela, K; Pensotti, S; Rancoita, P G

    2011-01-01

    The solar modulation, a combination of diffusion, convection, magnetic drift and energy loss inside the heliosphere is usually seen as a depletion in the Galactic cosmic ray (CR) flux at low energy (less than 10 GeV/nuc). Antiparticles such as antiprotons or positrons undergo the same processes of respective particles but with a different magnitude depending on the Solar magnetic field polarity. For electrons and positrons, due to the small mass, energy loss mechanisms as inverse compton, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung and ionization have to be taken into account, together with the typical adiabatic losses considered in the heliosphere. We developed a Monte Carlo stochastic simulation with the aim to compare the solar modulation of particles and antiparticles in the same observation period. We are able to estimate the different behaviours associated to the charge sign dependent processes of the heliospheric modulation. We compared the simulated positron fraction with measurements performed by AMS-01 and PAMELA. ...

  4. Annihilating dark matter and the galactic positron excess

    CERN Document Server

    Maor, I

    2006-01-01

    The possibility that the Galactic dark matter is composed of neutralinos that are just above half the $Z^o$ mass is examined, in the context of the Galactic positron excess. In particular, we check if the anomalous bump in the cosmic ray positron to electron ratio at $10~GeV$ can be explained with the ``decay'' of virtual $Z^o$ bosons produced when the neutralinos annihilate. We find that the low energy behaviour of our prediction fits well the existing data. Assuming the neutralinos annihilate primarily in the distant density concentration in the Galaxy and allowing combination of older, diffused positrons with young free-streaming ones, produces a fit which is not satisfactory on its own but is significantly better than the one obtained with homogeneous injection.

  5. Probing the Pulsar Origin of the Anomalous Positron Fraction with AMS-02 and Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations by PAMELA, Fermi-LAT, and AMS-02 have conclusively indicated a rise in the cosmic-ray positron fraction above 10 GeV, a feature which is impossible to mimic under the paradigm of secondary positron production with self-consistent Galactic cosmic-ray propagation models. A leading explanation for the rising positron fraction is an additional source of electron-positron pairs, for example one or more mature, energetic, and relatively nearby pulsars. We point out that any one of two well-known nearby pulsars, Geminga and Monogem, can satisfactorily provide enough positrons to reproduce AMS-02 observations. A smoking-gun signature of this scenario is an anisotropy in the arrival direction of the cosmic-ray electrons and positrons, which may be detectable by existing, or future, telescopes. The predicted anisotropy level is, at present, consistent with limits from Fermi-LAT and AMS-02. We argue that the large collecting area of Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACTs) makes them optimal tools for...

  6. Alternative positron-target design for electron-positron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donahue, R.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Nelson, W.R. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1991-04-01

    Current electron-positron linear colliders are limited in luminosity by the number of positrons which can be generated from targets presently used. This paper examines the possibility of using an alternate wire-target geometry for the production of positrons via an electron-induced electromagnetic cascade shower. 39 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  8. Positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehllehner, Gerd; Karp, Joel S [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2006-07-07

    The developments in positron emission tomography (PET) are reviewed with an emphasis on instrumentation for clinical PET imaging. After a brief summary of positron imaging before the advent of computed tomography, various improvements are highlighted including the move from PET scanners with septa to fully 3D scanners, changes in the preferred scintillators, efforts to improve the energy discrimination, and improvements in attenuation correction. Time-of-flight PET imaging is given special attention due to the recent revival of this technique, which promises significant improvement. Besides technical instrumentation efforts, other factors which influenced the acceptance of clinical PET are also discussed. (review)

  9. Atomic collisions involving pulsed positrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J. P.; Bluhme, H.; Field, D.

    2000-01-01

    Conventional slow positron beams have been widely and profitably used to study atomic collisions and have been instrumental in understanding the dynamics of ionization. The next generation of positron atomic collision studies are possible with the use of charged particle traps. Not only can large...... of accelerators for producing intense positron pulses will be discussed in the context of atomic physics experiments....

  10. Cosmic confusion

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J

    1994-01-01

    We propose to minimise the cosmic confusion between Gaussian and non Gaussian theories by investigating the structure in the m's for each multipole of the cosmic radiation temperature anisotropies. We prove that Gaussian theories are (nearly) the only theories which treat all the m's equally. Hence we introduce a set of invariant measures of ``m-preference'' to be seen as non-Gaussianity indicators. We then derive the distribution function for the quadrupole ``m-preference'' measure in Gaussian theories. A class of physically motivated toy non Gaussian theories is introduced as an example. We show how the quadrupole m-structure is crucial in reducing the confusion between these theories and Gaussian theories.

  11. Positron clouds within thunderstorms

    CERN Document Server

    Dwyer, Joseph R; Hazelton, Bryna J; Grefenstette, Brian W; Kelley, Nicole A; Lowell, Alexander W; Schaal, Meagan M; Rassoul, Hamid K

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of two isolated clouds of positrons inside an active thunderstorm. These observations were made by the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE), an array of six gamma-ray detectors, which flew on a Gulfstream V jet aircraft through the top of an active thunderstorm in August 2009. ADELE recorded two 511 keV gamma-ray count rate enhancements, 35 seconds apart, each lasting approximately 0.2 seconds. The enhancements, which were about a factor of 12 above background, were both accompanied by electrical activity as measured by a flat-plate antenna on the underside of the aircraft. The energy spectra were consistent with a source mostly composed of positron annihilation gamma rays, with a prominent 511 keV line clearly visible in the data. Model fits to the data suggest that the aircraft was briefly immersed in clouds of positrons, more than a kilometer across. It is not clear how the positron clouds were created within the thunderstorm, but it is possible they were ca...

  12. Positron implantation in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  13. Positron excitation of neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  14. Cosmic Ether

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1998-01-01

    A prerelativistic approach to particle dynamics is explored in an expanding Robertson-Walker cosmology. The receding galactic background provides a distinguished frame of reference and a unique cosmic time. In this context the relativistic, purely geometric space-time concept is criticized. Physical space is regarded as a permeable medium, the cosmic ether, which effects the world-lines of particles and rays. We study in detail a Robertson-Walker universe with linear expansion factor and negatively curved, open three-space; we choose the permeability tensor of the ether in such a way that the semiclassical approximation is exact. Galactic red-shifts depend on the refractive index of the ether. In the local Minkowskian limit the ether causes a time variation of mass, which scales inversely proportional to cosmic time. In the globally geodesic rest frames of galactic observers the ether manifests itself in an unbounded speed of signal transfer, in bifurcations of world-lines, and in time inversion effects.

  15. Cosmic ray physics with the ALEPH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Besier, H; Kempa, J; Luitz, S; Maggi, M; Maier, D; Misiejuk, A; Müller, A S; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Schmelling, M; Schreiber, V; Wachsmuth, H W; Ziegler, T; Zuber, K

    2000-01-01

    ALEPH is one of the four detectors at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) at a depth of about 320 m.w.e. Its hadron calorimeter and scintillator arrays installed at distances up to about 1 km away from ALEPH are used to measure cosmic muon induced time coincidences over large distances. The aim of this experiment (CosmoALEPH) is (1) to study the muon component above 70 GeV of extensive air showers (EAS) and (2) to test the feasibility of searching for time correlations over even larger distances (up to 8 km) between the four LEP detectors. Layout and first results of CosmoALEPH are presented demonstrating the potential for cosmic ray physics in the LEP tunnel. The multiplicity distribution of muons in cosmic events recorded in ALEPH's tracking detector is presented. (28 refs).

  16. PRECISE COSMIC RAYS MEASUREMENTS WITH PAMELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The PAMELA experiment was launched on board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. The apparatus was designed to conduct precision studies of charged cosmic radiation over a wide energy range, from tens of MeV up to several hundred GeV, with unprecedented statistics. In five years of continuous data taking in space, PAMELA accurately measured the energy spectra of cosmic ray antiprotons and positrons, as well as protons, electrons and light nuclei, sometimes providing data in unexplored energetic regions. These important results have shed new light in several astrophysical fields like: an indirect search for Dark Matter, a search for cosmological antimatter (anti-Helium, and the validation of acceleration, transport and secondary production models of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Some of the most important items of Solar and Magnetospheric physics were also investigated. Here we present the most recent results obtained by the PAMELA experiment.

  17. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  18. Cosmic radioactivities

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M; Arnould, Marcel; Prantzos, Nikos

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclides with half-lives ranging from some years to billions of years presumably synthesized outside of the solar system are now recorded in ``live'' or ``fossil'' form in various types of materials, like meteorites or the galactic cosmic rays. They bring specific astrophysical messages the deciphering of which is briefly reviewed here, with special emphasis on the contribution of Dave Schramm and his collaborators to this exciting field of research. Short-lived radionuclides are also present in the Universe today, as directly testified by the gamma-ray lines emitted by the de-excitation of their daughter products. A short review of recent developments in this field is also presented.

  19. Cosmic radioactivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, Marcel; Prantzos, Nikos

    1999-07-01

    Radionuclides with half-lives ranging from some years to billions of years presumably synthesized outside of the solar system are now recorded in "live" or "fossil" form in various types of materials, like meteorites or the galactic cosmic rays. They bring specific astrophysical messages, the deciphering of which is briefly reviewed here, with special emphasis on the contribution of Dave Schramm and his collaborators to this exciting field of research. Short-lived radionuclides are also present in the Universe today, as directly testified by the γ-ray lines emitted by the de-excitation of their daughter products. A short review of recent developments in this field is also presented.

  20. Novel designs for undulator based positron sources

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Mike; Bailey, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Proposed high energy electron-positron linear colliders require a high ux of positrons. To achieve this a number of new positron source designs have been proposed. One of these is an undulator-based positron source, which is the baseline positron source design for the International Linear Collider. The undulator-based positron source for the International Linear Collider uses a helical undulator to produce a intense photon beam that generates positrons through the pairproduction mechanism. As...

  1. Generation of monoenergetic positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Dale, J.M.; Miller, P.D. Jr.; Moak, C.D.; Pendyala, S.; Triftshaeuser, W.; Howell, R.H.; Alvarez, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments have been performed in the generation and application of monoenergetic positron beams using annealed tungsten moderators and fast sources of /sup 58/Co, /sup 22/Na, /sup 11/C, and LINAC bremstrahlung. This paper will compare the degrees of success from our various approaches. Moderators made from both single crystal and polycrystal tungsten have been tried. Efforts to grow thin films of tungsten to be used as transmission moderators and brightness enhancement devices are in progress.

  2. A no-go theorem for the dark matter interpretation of the positron anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Laletin, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    The overabundance of high-energy cosmic positrons, observed by PAMELA and AMS-02, can be considered as the consequence of dark matter decays or annihilations. We show that recent FERMI/LAT measurements of the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background impose severe constraints on dark matter explanations and make them practically inconsistent.

  3. Direct Measurements of Cosmic Rays (up to ~TeV and beyond)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, Stéphane; Cabezas, Denis; Salinas, C. J. Solano; Xoxocotzi, Reyna

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a brief overview of selected experimental measurements in the field of cosmic rays. Galactic cosmic rays are composed of primary and secondary particles. Primary cosmic rays are thought to be energized by supernova shocks within our Galaxy. The cosmic rays that eventually arrive at the Earth are mainly protons and atomic nuclei, but also contain electrons. Secondary cosmic rays are produced in collisions of primary particles with the diffuse interstellar gas and are scarce but carry important information on the Galactic propagation of the primary particles. The secondary component includes a small fraction of antimatter particles, antiprotons and positrons; these may also come from unusual sources and could possibly provide a window into new physics. For example, in the Galactic halo there could take place annihilations of heavy supersymmetric dark matter particles, which could lead to positrons or antiprotons.

  4. Decaying LSP in SO(10) GUT and PAMELA's Cosmic Positron

    CERN Document Server

    Kyae, Bumseok

    2009-01-01

    We suppose that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) is dark matter. The bino-like LSP can decay through the SO(10) gauge interactions, if one right-handed (RH) neutrino (\

  5. Low energy positron injector (LEPI)

    CERN Document Server

    Antropov, V K; Korotaev, Yu V

    2003-01-01

    The LEPI for the LEP storage ring is described. A radioactive source **2**2Na is the positron source. After deceleration in a solid target, in a magnetic trap and in a gas medium to the thermal velocity the positrons are stored during approximately equals 100 s. For injection into the storage ring the positrons are extracted by a pulse electric field and accelerated to the required energy. (Edited abstract) 4 Refs.

  6. Applications of positron depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakvoort, R.A.

    1993-12-23

    In this thesis some contributions of the positron-depth profiling technique to materials science have been described. Following studies are carried out: Positron-annihilation measurements on neon-implanted steel; Void creation in silicon by helium implantation; Density of vacancy-type defects present in amorphous silicon prepared by ion implantation; Measurements of other types of amorphous silicon; Epitaxial cobalt disilicide prepared by cobalt outdiffusion. Positron-annihilation experiments on low-pressure CVD silicon-nitride films. (orig./MM).

  7. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  8. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  9. Efficient Cryosolid Positron Moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Howell, and Mr. Roy Larsen for infrastructure and equipment support. Mrs. Karen Clayton for administrative support. Mr. Byron Allmon for critical...showing explicitly the long, bent slow positron transport tube scaled to fit onto a 4x4-foot optical table. The sharp 90° bend in this tube is intended...half-cycle RPA scan of an N2 moderator. The ≈ 0.15 cps CEM signal is clearly visible above the ≈ 0.03 cps background. The very sharp absorption lines

  10. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  11. TeV Gamma Rays from Geminga and the Origin of the GeV Positron Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Yuksel, Hasan; Stanev, Todor

    2008-01-01

    The Geminga pulsar has long been one of the most intriguing MeV-GeV gamma-ray point sources. We examine the implications of the recent Milagro detection of extended, multi-TeV gamma-ray emission from Geminga, finding that this reveals the existence of an ancient, powerful cosmic-ray accelerator that also can plausibly account for the multi-GeV positron excess that has evaded explanation. We explore a number of testable predictions for gamma-ray, electron/positron, and neutrino experiments that can confirm the first direct detection of a cosmic-ray source.

  12. Positron lifetime in polycrystalline gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, A.M.; Serna, J. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica del Estado Solido)

    1984-06-16

    Positron lifetimes are measured on polycrystalline gadolinium between 15 and 25 /sup 0/C taking into account the microstructure of the specimens, especially the grain sizes of untreated or annealed sheets. Results show the existence of a trapping effect of positrons in Gd due to different trapping centers such as point defects, dislocations, grain boundaries, and other defects.

  13. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  14. A review of Cosmic-ray electrons and fermi-LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Tinivella, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The study of Galactic Cosmic-ray electrons (CREs) saw important developments in recent years, with the assumption of positron production only in interaction of hadronic Cosmic-rays with interstellar matter challenged by new measurements of CRE spectrum and related quantities. Indeed, all recent experiments seem to confirm an hardening in the positrons, a feature that is totally in contrast with the all-secondaries hypothesis, even if significant disagreements are present about the CRE spectral behavior and the possible presence of spectral features. Together with insufficient precision of current measurements, these disagreements prevent the identification of the primary positron source, with models involving Dark matter or astrophysical sources like Super Nova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebula all able to explain current data. The fermi-LAT contribution to the CRE study was fundamental, with the 2009 measurement of the positron + electron spectrum extended to the 7 MeV - 1TeV range with a statistics already ex...

  15. Cosmic Ray Results from the CosmoALEPH Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Grupen, C; Jost, B; Maciuc, F; Luitz, S; Mailov, A; Müller, A S; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Schmelling, M; Tcaciuc, R; Wachsmuth, H; Ziegler, T; Zuber, K

    2008-01-01

    CosmoALEPH is an experiment operated in conjunction with the ALEPH detector. The ALEPH experiment took data from 1989 until the year 2000 at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) at CERN. It provides, among others, high resolution tracking and calorimetry. CosmoALEPH used this e+e− detector for cosmic ray studies. In addition, six scintillator telescopes were installed in the ALEPH pit and the LEP tunnel. The whole experiment operated underground at a vertical depth of 320 meter water equivalent. Data from ALEPH and the scintillator telescopes provide informaton on the lateral distribution of energetic cosmic ray muons in extensive air showers. The decoherence curve of these remnant air shower muons is sensitive to the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays and to the interaction characteristics of energetic hadrons in the atmosphere. An attempt is made to extract the various interdependencies in describing the propagation of primary and secondary cosmic rays through the atmosphere and the rock ov...

  16. Positron emission mammography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.

    2003-10-02

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammography, as well as PEM and x-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Positron Emission Mammography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, William W.

    2004-06-01

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and X-ray mammography, as well as PEM and X-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  18. ALICE Cosmic Ray Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Fernandez Tellez, A; Martinez Hernandez, M; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE underground cavern provides an ideal place for the detection of high energy atmospheric muons coming from cosmic ray showers. ACORDE detects cosmic ray showers by triggering the arrival of muons to the top of the ALICE magnet.

  19. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image the distribution of positron-emitting radionuclides in the...

  20. News from Cosmic Gamma-ray Line Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays at MeV energies from cosmic radioactivities is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and how they shape objects such as massive stars and supernova explosions. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this same astronomical window, and positrons are often produced from radioactive beta decays. Nuclear gamma-ray telescopes face instrumental challenges from penetrating gamma rays and cosmic-ray induced backgrounds. But the astrophysical benefits of such efforts are underlined by the discoveries of nuclear gamma~rays from the brightest of the expected sources. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivity gamma~rays have been measured in spectral detail, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of origins in deep supernova interiors, from the decay of $^{56}$Ni, $^{56}$Co, and $^{44}$Ti. The diffuse afterglow in gamma rays of radioa...

  1. Precise measurement of cosmic ray fluxes with the AMS-02 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchi, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.vecchi@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. In this document we present precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons, electrons and protons, collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  2. Recent development of positron annihilation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Doyama, M

    2002-01-01

    When positron comes into solid or liquid, it moves in the matter and emitted two gamma rays at the opposite direction, by pair annihilation with electron. Each gamma ray is about 511 keV. The experiments of positron annihilation has been developed by three methods such as angular correlation between two gamma rays, energy analysis of emission gamma ray and positron lifetime. The angular correlation between two gamma rays is determined by gamma ray position detector.The energy analysis was measured by S-W analysis and Coincidence Doppler Broadening (CDB) method. Positron lifetime are determined by gamma-gamma lifetime measurement method, beta sup + -gamma lifetime measurement method and other method using waveform of photomultiplier, and determination of time and frequency of gamma-ray. Positron beam is applied to positron scattering, positron diffraction, low energy positron diffraction (LEPD), PELS, LEPSD, PAES, positron re-emission imaging microscope (PRIM) and positron channeling. The example of CDB method...

  3. Cosmic rays on earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allkofer, O. C.; Grieder, P. K. F.

    Contents: Cosmic rays in the atmosphere: Charged hadron data. Neutron data. Gamma-ray data. Electron data. Muon data. Data on nuclei. Data on antiparticles. Cosmic rays at sea level: Muon data. Charged hadron data.Neutron data. Electron data. Gamma-ray data. Data on nuclei. Cosmic rays underground: Muon data. Neutrino data.

  4. Indirect dark matter searches in gamma and cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Jan; Reimer, Olaf

    2017-03-01

    Dark matter candidates such as weakly interacting massive particles are predicted to annihilate or decay into Standard Model particles, leaving behind distinctive signatures in gamma rays, neutrinos, positrons, antiprotons, or even antinuclei. Indirect dark matter searches, and in particular those based on gamma-ray observations and cosmic-ray measurements, could detect such signatures. Here we review the strengths and limitations of this approach and look into the future of indirect dark matter searches.

  5. Cosmic Ray Excesses from Multi-component Dark Matter Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tsai, Lu-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    We use multi-component decaying dark matter (DM) scenario to explain the possible cosmic ray excesses in the positron fraction recently confirmed by AMS-02 and the total $e^+ +e^-$ flux observed by Fermi-LAT. In the two-component DM models, we find an interesting variation of the flavor structure along with the cutoff of the heavy DM. For the three-component DM case, we focus on a particular parameter range in which the best fits prefer to open only 2 DM decay channels with a third DM contributing nothing to the electron and positron spectra. We show that all models give the reasonable fits to both the AMS-02 positron fraction and the Fermi-LAT total $e^++e^-$ flux, which are also consistent with the measured diffuse $\\gamma$-ray flux by Fermi-LAT.

  6. ‘Excess’ of primary cosmic ray electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the accurate cosmic ray (CR electron and positron spectra (denoted as Φe− and Φe+, respectively measured by AMS-02 Collaboration, the difference between the electron and positron fluxes (i.e., ΔΦ=Φe−−Φe+, dominated by the propagated primary electrons, can be reliably inferred. In the standard model, the spectrum of propagated primary CR electrons at energies ≥30GeV softens with the increase of energy. The absence of any evidence for such a continuous spectral softening in ΔΦ strongly suggests a significant ‘excess’ of primary CR electrons and at energies of 100–400GeV the identified excess component has a flux comparable to that of the observed positron excess. Middle-age but ‘nearby’ supernova remnants (e.g., Monogem and Geminga are favored sources for such an excess.

  7. Charge Asymmetric Cosmic Ray Signals From Dark Matter Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Spencer

    2011-01-01

    The PAMELA and Fermi measurements of the cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra have generated much interest over the past two years, because they are consistent with a significant component of the electron and positron fluxes between 20 GeV and 1 TeV being produced through dark matter annihilation or decay. However, since the measurements are also consistent with astrophysical interpretations, the message is unclear. In this paper, we point out that dark matter can have a more distinct signal in cosmic rays, that of a charge asymmetry. Such charge asymmetry can result if the dark matter's abundance is due to a relic asymmetry, allowing its decay to generate an asymmetry in positrons and electrons. This is analogous to the baryon asymmetry, where decaying neutrons produce electrons and not positrons. We explore benchmark scenarios where the dark matter decays into a leptophilic charged Higgs boson or electroweak gauge bosons. These models have observable signals in gamma rays and neutrinos, which can be tes...

  8. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  9. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  10. [Tau Positron Emission Tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Makoto

    2017-07-01

    Accumulation of fibrillar tau protein aggregates is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative dementias, including a subgroup of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Visualization of tau lesions in the brains of living subjects enables a pathology-based diagnosis of dementing illnesses in the prodromal stage, and offers objective measures of disease progression and outcomes of disease-modifying therapies. With this rationale, diverse classes of low-molecular-weight chemicals capable of binding to a β-pleated sheet structure have been developed to be used for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) of tau pathologies. Clinical PET studies of AD patients with such tau probes have provided the following insights: (1) Tau fibrils accumulate in the hippocampal formation in an age-dependent manner that is independent of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) pathology; (2) The deposition of Aβ may trigger a spatial expansion of tau pathology, in transition from normal aging to advanced AD; and (3) Tau accumulation is intimately associated with local neuronal loss, leading to cortical atrophy and focal symptoms. In contrast, studies of FTLD have shown a limited performance of first-generation PET probes in capturing non-AD-type tau lesions. New compounds have accordingly been developed and clinically tested, proving to yield a high contrast for tau deposits with high specificity. These second-generation probes are being evaluated primarily by pharmaceutical companies, in line with their growing demands for neuroimaging-based biomarkers serving for clinical trials of anti-Aβ and anti-tau therapies. Meanwhile, a consortium flexibly linking academia and industry to facilitate the utilization of research tools, including tau PET probes, has been established in Japan, for the ultimate purpose of elucidating the molecular etiology of tauopathies and creating diagnostic and therapeutic agents based on such an understanding.

  11. AMS-02 data confront acceleration of cosmic ray secondaries in nearby sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the model proposed earlier to account for the observed increase in the positron fraction in cosmic rays with increasing energy, in the light of new data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) experiment. The model accounts for the production and acceleration of secondary electrons...

  12. Positron-alkali atom scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.; Ward, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron-alkali atom scattering was recently investigated both theoretically and experimentally in the energy range from a few eV up to 100 eV. On the theoretical side calculations of the integrated elastic and excitation cross sections as well as total cross sections for Li, Na and K were based upon either the close-coupling method or the modified Glauber approximation. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the total cross section for both Na and K. Resonance structures were also found in the L = 0, 1 and 2 partial waves for positron scattering from the alkalis. The structure of these resonances appears to be quite complex and, as expected, they occur in conjunction with the atomic excitation thresholds. Currently both theoretical and experimental work is in progress on positron-Rb scattering in the same energy range.

  13. AMS-02 Positron Excess and Indirect Detection of Three-body Decaying Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Low, Ian; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Yuan, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We consider indirect detection of meta-stable dark matter particles decaying into a stable neutral particle and a pair of standard model fermions. Due to the softer energy spectra from the three-body decay, such models could potentially explain the AMS-02 positron excess without being constrained by the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray data and the cosmic ray anti-proton measurements. We scrutinize over different final state fermions, paying special attention to handling of the cosmic ray background and including various contributions from cosmic ray propagation with the help of the \\textsc{LikeDM} package. It is found that primary decays into an electron-positron pair and a stable neutral particle could give rise to the AMS-02 positron excess and, at the same time, stay unscathed against the gamma-ray and anti-proton constraints. Decays to a muon pair or a mixed flavor electron-muon pair may also be viable depending on the propagation models. Decays to all other standard model fermions are severely disfavored.

  14. AMS-02 positron excess and indirect detection of three-body decaying dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Huang, Wei-Chih; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Low, Ian; Sming Tsai, Yue-Lin; Yuan, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    We consider indirect detection of meta-stable dark matter particles decaying into a stable neutral particle and a pair of standard model fermions. Due to the softer energy spectra from the three-body decay, such models could potentially explain the AMS-02 positron excess without being constrained by the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray data and the cosmic ray anti-proton measurements. We scrutinize over different final state fermions, paying special attention to handling of the cosmic ray background and including various contributions from cosmic ray propagation with the help of the LIKEDM package. It is found that primary decays into an electron-positron pair and a stable neutral particle could give rise to the AMS-02 positron excess and, at the same time, stay unscathed against the gamma-ray and anti-proton constraints. Decays to a muon pair or a mixed flavor electron-muon pair may also be viable depending on the propagation models. Decays to all other standard model fermions are severely disfavored.

  15. Prospects for Detection of Synchrotron Emission from Secondary Electrons and Positrons in Starless Cores: Application to G0.216+0.016

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, D I

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the diffusion of cosmic rays into molecular cloud complexes. Using the cosmic-ray diffusion formalism of Protheroe, et al. (2008), we examine how cosmic rays diffuse into clouds exhibiting different density structures, including a smoothed step-function, as well as Gaussian and inverse-$r$ density distributions, which are well known to trace the structure of star-forming regions. These density distributions were modelled as an approximation to the Galactic centre cloud G0.216+0.016, a recently-discovered massive dust clump that exhibits limited signs of massive star formation and thus may be the best region in the Galaxy to observe synchrotron emission from secondary electrons and positrons. Examination of the resulting synchrotron emission, produced by the interaction of cosmic ray protons interacting with ambient molecular matter producing secondary electrons and positrons reveals that, due to projection effects, limb-brightened morphology results in all cases. However, we find that the Gauss...

  16. High energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    Offers an accessible text and reference (a cosmic-ray manual) for graduate students entering the field and high-energy astrophysicists will find this an accessible cosmic-ray manual Easy to read for the general astronomer, the first part describes the standard model of cosmic rays based on our understanding of modern particle physics. Presents the acceleration scenario in some detail in supernovae explosions as well as in the passage of cosmic rays through the Galaxy. Compares experimental data in the atmosphere as well as underground are compared with theoretical models

  17. NMF on positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bödvarsson, Bjarni; Hansen, Lars Kai; Svarer, Claus;

    2007-01-01

    In positron emission tomography, kinetic modelling of brain tracer uptake, metabolism or binding requires knowledge of the cerebral input function. Traditionally, this is achieved with arterial blood sampling in the arm or as shown in (Liptrot, M, et al., 2004) by non-invasive K-means clustering....... We propose another method to estimate time-activity curves (TAC) extracted directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Since the scaling of the basis curves is lost in the NMF the estimated TAC is scaled by a vector alpha which...

  18. Spectral Intensities of Antiprotons and the lifetime of Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Cowsik, Ramanath

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we note that the spectral intensities of antiprotons observed in Galactic cosmic rays in the energy range ~ 1-100 GeV by BESS, PAMELA and AMS instruments display nearly the same spectral shape as that generated by primary cosmic rays through their interaction with matter in the interstellar medium, without any significant modifications. More importantly, a constant residence time of ~ 2.5 +/-0.7 million years in the Galactic volume, independent of the energy of cosmic rays, matches the observed intensities. A small additional component of secondary antiprotons in the energy below 10 GeV, generated in cocoon-like regions surrounding the cosmic-ray sources, seems to be present. We discuss this result in the context of observations of other secondary components like positrons and Boron, and conclude with general remarks about the origins and propagation of cosmic rays.

  19. Study on low-energy positron polarimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Schälicke; G Alexander; R Dollan; K Laihem; T Lohse; S Riemann; P Starovoitov; A Ushakov

    2007-12-01

    A polarised positron source has been proposed for the design of the international linear collider (ILC). In order to optimise the positron beam, a measurement of its degree of polarisation close to the positron creation point is desired. In this contribution, methods for determining the positron polarisation at low energies are reviewed. A newly developed polarisation extension to GEANT4 will provide the basis for further polarimeter investigations.

  20. Maria Montessori's Cosmic Vision, Cosmic Plan, and Cosmic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazzini, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This classic position of the breadth of Cosmic Education begins with a way of seeing the human's interaction with the world, continues on to the grandeur in scale of time and space of that vision, then brings the interdependency of life where each growing human becomes a participating adult. Mr. Grazzini confronts the laws of human nature in…

  1. Contribution from individual nearby sources to the spectrum of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedrati, R., E-mail: rafik.sedrati@univ-annaba.org; Attallah, R.

    2014-04-01

    In the last few years, very important data on high-energy cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from high-precision space-born and ground-based experiments have attracted a great deal of interest. These particles represent a unique probe for studying local comic-ray accelerators because they lose energy very rapidly. These energy losses reduce the lifetime so drastically that high-energy cosmic-ray electrons can attain the Earth only from rather local astrophysical sources. This work aims at calculating, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the contribution from some known nearby astrophysical sources to the cosmic-ray electron/positron spectra at high energy (≥10GeV). The background to the electron energy spectrum from distant sources is determined with the help of the GALPROP code. The obtained numerical results are compared with a set of experimental data.

  2. Interactions of cosmic superstrings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Mark G.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We develop methods by which cosmic superstring interactions can be studied in detail. These include the reconnection probability and emission of radiation such as gravitons or small string loops. Loop corrections to these are discussed, as well as relationships to (p; q)-strings. These tools should allow a phenomenological study of string models in anticipation of upcoming experiments sensitive to cosmic string radiation.

  3. Cosmic rays on earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allkofer, O.C.; Grieder, P.K.F.

    1984-01-01

    A data collection is presented that covers cosmic rays on earth. Included are all relevant data on flux and intensity measurements, energy spectra, and related data of all primary and secondary components of the cosmic radiation at all levels in the atmosphere, at sea level and underground. In those cases where no useful experimental data have been available, theoretical predictions were substituted.

  4. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M. J., E-mail: josim.phys2007@gmail.com; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-06-15

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  5. Study of electron-positron interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-09-15

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model.

  6. Winds, Clumps, and Interacting Cosmic Rays in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M; Gallagher, J S; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2013-01-01

    We construct a family of models for the evolution of energetic particles in the starburst galaxy M82 and compare them to observations to test the calorimeter assumption that all cosmic ray energy is radiated in the starburst region. Assuming constant cosmic ray acceleration efficiency with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations as a function of energy. Cosmic rays are injected with Galactic energy distributions and electron-to-proton ratio via type II supernovae at the observed rate of 0.07/yr. From the cosmic ray spectra, we predict the radio synchrotron and \\gamma-ray spectra. To more accurately model the radio spectrum, we incorporate a multiphase interstellar medium in the starburst region of M82. Our model interstellar medium is highly fragmented with compact dense molecular clouds and dense photoionized gas, both embedded in a hot, low density medium in overall pressure equilibrium. The spectra predicted by this one-zone model are...

  7. Cosmic radiations; A la rencontre des rayons cosmiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-09-15

    Cosmic radiations were discovered one century ago, they were detected indirectly by their positive effect on the conductivity of the air through the ionization of atoms and molecules composing the air. The first measurement made on balloons showed that the ionization was increasing with altitude which discredited the idea that the radiations were coming from the earth itself. Other measurement campaigns showed that the cosmic radiations were very low at the equator which supported the idea that cosmic radiations were made up of charged particles that are deflected by the earth magnetic field. During the forties and the fifties the study of cosmic radiations led to the discovery of a broad range of particles: positrons, muons, pions, kaons and hyperons. The first observations on stratospheric balloons confirmed the origin of the showers of particles that had been detected with a series of ground detectors dispatched on a large area a few years before. These showers of particles are produced by primary cosmic rays mainly energetic protons colliding with nitrogen and oxygen atoms of the atmosphere. (A.C.)

  8. Eleventh European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific program was organized under three main headings: cosmic rays in the heliosphere, cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, and properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database.

  9. Light scattering by cosmic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenier, J.W.; Min, M.

    2008-01-01

    We define cosmic particles as particles outside the Earth. Two types of cosmic particles can be distinguished, namely liquid and solid particles. The solid particles are often called grains or cosmic dust particles. Cosmic particles occur in a great variety of astronomical objects and environments.

  10. Supermassive cosmic string compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Reina, Borja; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon, E-mail: josejuan.blanco@ehu.es, E-mail: borja.reina@ehu.es, E-mail: kepa.sousa@ehu.es, E-mail: jon.urrestilla@ehu.es [Department of Theoretical Physics and History of Science, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4d Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N = 1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  11. Supermassive Cosmic String Compactifications

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4D Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N=1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  12. Cosmic Strings and Superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    Copeland, Edmund J

    2009-01-01

    Cosmic strings are predicted by many field-theory models, and may have been formed at a symmetry-breaking transition early in the history of the universe, such as that associated with grand unification. They could have important cosmological effects. Scenarios suggested by fundamental string theory or M-theory, in particular the popular idea of brane inflation, also strongly suggest the appearance of similar structures. Here we review the reasons for postulating the existence of cosmic strings or superstrings, the various possible ways in which they might be detected observationally, and the special features that might discriminate between ordinary cosmic strings and superstrings.

  13. Electron-Positron Accumulator (EPA)

    CERN Document Server

    Photographic Service

    1986-01-01

    After acceleration in the low-current linac LIL-W, the electrons and positrons are accumulated in EPA to obtain a sufficient intensity and a suitable time-structure, before being passed on to the PS for further acceleration to 3.5 GeV. Electrons circulate from right to left, positrons in the other direction. Dipole bending magnets are red, focusing quadrupoles blue, sextupoles for chromaticity-control orange. The vertical tube at the left of the picture belongs to an optical transport system carrying the synchrotron radiation to detectors for beam size measurement. Construction of EPA was completed in spring 1986. LIL-W and EPA were conceived for an energy of 600 MeV, but operation was limited to 500 MeV.

  14. Cosmic ray injection spectrum at the galactic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagutin, Anatoly; Tyumentsev, Alexander; Volkov, Nikolay

    The spectra of cosmic rays measured at Earth are different from their source spectra. A key to understanding this difference, being crucial for solving the problem of cosmic-ray origin, is the determination of how cosmic-ray (CR) particles propagate through the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). If the medium is a quasi-homogeneous the propagation process can be described by a normal diffusion model. However, during a last few decades many evidences, both from theory and observations, of the existence of multiscale structures in the Galaxy have been found. Filaments, shells, clouds are entities widely spread in the ISM. In such a highly non-homogeneous (fractal-like) ISM the normal diffusion model certainly is not kept valid. Generalization of this model leads to what is known as "anomalous diffusion". The main goal of the report is to retrieve the cosmic ray injection spectrum at the galactic sources in the framework of the anomalous diffusion (AD) model. The anomaly in this model results from large free paths ("Levy flights") of particles between galactic inhomogeneities. In order to evaluate the CR spectrum at the sources, we carried out new calculation of the CR spectra at Earth. AD equation in terms of fractional derivatives have been used to describe CR propagation from the nearby (r≤1 kpc) young (t≤ 1 Myr) and multiple old distant (r > 1 kpc) sources. The assessment of the key model parameters have been based on the results of the particles diffusion in the cosmic and laboratory plasma. We show that in the framework of the anomalous diffusion model the locally observed basic features of the cosmic rays (difference between spectral exponents of proton, He and other nuclei, "knee" problem, positron to electron ratio) can be explained if the injection spectrum at the main galactic sources of cosmic rays has spectral exponent p˜ 2.85. The authors acknowledge support from The Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant No. 14-02-31524.

  15. Habitability and cosmic catastrophes

    CERN Document Server

    Hanslmeier, Arnold; McKay, Christopher P

    2008-01-01

    Catastrophic cosmic events such as asteroid impacts appear in the range of some 100 million years and have drastically affected evolution. The author discusses whether and how such events could have occurred in recently found extrasolar planetary systems.

  16. Astrophysics: Cosmic jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andy

    2010-02-01

    In some galaxies, matter falling onto a supermassive black hole is ejected in narrow jets moving at close to the speed of light. New observations provide insight into the workings of these cosmic accelerators.

  17. Small Explorer (SMEX) POsitron Electron Magnet Spectrometer (POEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    LHeureux, Jacques; Evenson, Paul A.; Aleman, R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the activities of Louisiana State University (LSU) under subcontract 26053-EX between LSU and the Bartol Research Institute (Bartol), which began January 1, 1994. The purpose of this subcontract was for LSU to participate in and support Bartol in the work to define the SMEX (Small Explorer)/POEMS (Positron Electron Magnet Spectrometer) spaceflight mission under NASA Contract NAS5-38098 between NASA and Bartol. The conclusions of this study were that for a 1998 launch into a 600km altitude, 98 degrees, approximately sun synchronous orbit, (a) the total radiation dose would be typically a few k-rad per year, certainly less than 20 k-rad per year for the anticipated shielding and potential solar flare environment, (b) detector counting rates would be dominated by the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and the horns of the Van Allen belts, (c) the galactic electron and positron 'signal' can be extracted from the albedo background and the trapped populations by detailed evaluation of the geomagnetic transmission function (cut-off) for each event, (d) POEMS could make significant contributions to magnetospheric science if sufficient downlink capacity were provided and, (e) a fully functioning, cost efficient, data processing and analysis facility design was developed for the mission. Overall, POEMS was found to be a relatively simple experiment to manifest, operate and analyze and had potential for fundamental new discoveries in cosmic, heliospheric, solar and magnetospheric science.

  18. Highest Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Frampton, Paul H

    1998-01-01

    It is proposed that the highest energy $\\sim 10^{20}$eV cosmic ray primaries are protons, decay products of a long-lived progenitor whose high kinetic energy arises from decay of a distant (cosmological) superheavy particle, G. Such a scenario can occur in e.g. SU(15) grand unification and in some preon models, but is more generic; if true, these unusual cosmic rays provide a window into new physics.

  19. Nonplanar positron-acoustic Gardner solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M. J., E-mail: josim.phys2007@gmail.com; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-02-15

    Nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) positron-acoustic (PA) Gardner solitary waves (SWs) in an unmagnetized plasma system consisting of immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated. The modified Gardner equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation technique. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, superthermal parameter of hot positrons and electrons, relative temperature ratios, and relative number density ratios on the PA Gardner SWs are studied by using the numerical simulations. The implications of our results in various space and laboratory plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  20. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  1. Development of an Electron-Positron Source for Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-19

    boosted frame where electric field reaches the Schwinger limit for production of electron-positron pairs from vacuum. The theoretical framework...were directed toward radiative shock hydrodynamics. Lowering the threshold for Schwinger electron-positron pair production (Stepan Bulanov

  2. Limits on the Dark Matter from AMS-02 antiproton and positron fraction data

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Bo-Qiang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2015-01-01

    We derive limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section and lifetime using measurements of the AMS-02 antiproton ratio and positron fraction data. In deriving the limits, we consider the scenario of secondary particles accelerated in supernova remnants (SNRs) which has been argued to be able to reasonably account for the AMS-02 high energy positron/antiproton fraction data. We parameterize the contribution of secondary particles accelerated in SNRs and then fit the observational data within the conventional cosmic ray propagation model by adopting the GALPROP code. We use the likelihood ratio test to determine the 95$\\%$ confidence level upper limits of the possible dark matter (DM) contribution to the antiproton/positron fractions measured by AMS-02. Our limits are stronger than that set by the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray Pass 8 data of the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. We also show that the solar modulation (cosmic ray propagation) parameters can play a non-negligible role in modifying the constraints...

  3. Investigating the origin of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons with Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, R.

    2017-06-01

    Due to severe radiative energy losses during propagation, high-energy cosmic-ray electrons can reach Earth only from nearby sources. Although these sources clearly manifest themselves in the special features of the energy spectrum observed by recent space-borne experiments, especially the increase in the positron fraction, their exact nature is still a matter of debate. The standard method for interpreting cosmic-ray electron data consists in solving appropriate transport equations. It can be supplemented with a Monte Carlo approach taking advantage of the intrinsic random nature of cosmic-ray diffusive propagation. This analysis gives valuable information on the electron-by-electron fluctuations and hence allows to address the issue from a different angle. Here we show how to implement a fully three-dimensional time-dependent Monte Carlo simulation of the propagation of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons from nearby sources and discuss the “single-source” astrophysical scenario.

  4. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, R., LLNL

    1998-03-18

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center, the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques would play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of stockpile stewardship. The Livermore facilities now include the world`s highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. It was concluded that the positron microprobe under development at LLNL and other new instruments that would be relocated at LLNL at the high current keV source are an exciting step forward in providing results for the positron technique. These new data will impact a wide variety of applications.

  5. Toward a European Network of Positron Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karwasz Grzegorz P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some applications of controlled-energy positron beams in material studies are discussed. In porous organic polysilicates, measurements of 3γ annihilation by Doppler broadening (DB method at the Trento University allowed to trace pore closing and filling by water vapor. In silicon coimplanted by He+ and H+, DB data combined with positron lifetime measurements at the München pulsed positron beam allowed to explain Si blistering. Presently measured samples of W for applications in thermonuclear reactors, irradiated by W+ and electrons, show vast changes of positron lifetimes, indicating complex dynamics of defects.

  6. A Benchmark Construction of Positron Crystal Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhomirov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of a positron crystal undulator (CU) is addressed. The ways to assure both the maximum intensity and minimum spectral width of positron CU radiation are outlined. We claim that the minimum CU spectrum width of 3 -- 4% is reached at the positron energies of a few GeV and that the optimal bending radius of crystals planes in CU ranges from 3 to 5 critical bending radii for channeled particles. Following suggested approach a benchmark positron CU construction is devised and its functioning is illustrated using the simulation method widely tested by experimental data.

  7. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, T; Wada, K; Yagishita, A; Kosuge, T; Saito, Y; Kurihara, T; Kikuchi, T; Shirakawa, A; Sanami, T; Ikeda, M; Ohsawa, S; Kakihara, K; Shidara, T, E-mail: toshio.hyodo@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps{sup -}). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a {sup 22}Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  8. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Yagishita, A.; Kosuge, T.; Saito, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shirakawa, A.; Sanami, T.; Ikeda, M.; Ohsawa, S.; Kakihara, K.; Shidara, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps-). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a 22Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  9. Search for antimatter and dark matter and precision studies of cosmic ray fluxes on the International Space Station. AMS experiment. Results of four-year exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaktionov, Yu V.

    2017-04-01

    The results of cosmic rays studies obtained in the AMS experiment in 2011-2015 on the International Space Station are discussed. Research on the energy spectra of electrons and positrons at TeV energies and precision measurements of fluxes were performed. The growth of the positron fraction with energy was observed. Proton and helium spectra were also obtained. A review of theoretical models with possible explanations of the observed phenomena is presented.

  10. Solvated Positron Chemistry. The Reaction of Hydrated Positrons with Chloride Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Shantarovich, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    The reaction of hydrated positrons (caq+ with cloride ions in aqueous solutions has been studied by means of positron annihilation angular correlation measurements. A rate constant of k = (2.5 ± 0.5) × 1010 M−1 s−1 was found. Probably the reacting positrons annihilated from an e+ Cl− bound state...

  11. The 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prantzos, N.; Boehm, C.; Bykov, A. M.; Diehl, R.; Ferriere, K.; Guessoum, N.; Jean, P.; Knoedlseder, J.; Marcowith, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Strong, A.; Weidenspointner, G. [CNRS, UMR7095, UMPC and Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014, Paris (France) and LAPP, 9 Chemin de Bellevue, BP 110 F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); A. F. Ioffe Institute of Physics and Technology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Toulouse-Tarbes, Universite de Toulouse, CNRS, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); American University of Sharjah, College of Arts and Sciences/Physics Department, P.O. Box 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); CESR, Universite de Toulouse, CNRS, 9, Avenue du Colonel Roche, Boite Postal 4346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); L.U.P.M., Universite Montpellier II, CNRS, Place Eugene Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741, Garching (Germany); Max Planck Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching, D-85741 Germany, and MPI Halbleiterlabor, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, D-81739 Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The first {gamma}-ray line originating from outside the Solar System that was ever detected is the 511 keV emission from positron annihilation in the Galaxy. Despite 30 years of intense theoretical and observational investigation, the main sources of positrons have not been identified up to now. Observations in the 1990s with OSSE/CGRO (Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment on GRO satellite/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory) showed that the emission is strongly concentrated toward the Galactic bulge. In the 2000s, the spectrometer SPI aboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) allowed scientists to measure that emission across the entire Galaxy, revealing that the bulge-to-disk luminosity ratio is larger than observed at any other wavelength. This mapping prompted a number of novel explanations, including rather ''exotic'' ones (e.g., dark matter annihilation). However, conventional astrophysical sources, such as type Ia supernovae, microquasars, or x-ray binaries, are still plausible candidates for a large fraction of the observed total 511 keV emission of the bulge. A closer study of the subject reveals new layers of complexity, since positrons may propagate far away from their production sites, making it difficult to infer the underlying source distribution from the observed map of 511 keV emission. However, in contrast to the rather well-understood propagation of high-energy (>GeV) particles of Galactic cosmic rays, understanding the propagation of low-energy ({approx}MeV) positrons in the turbulent, magnetized interstellar medium still remains a formidable challenge. The spectral and imaging properties of the observed 511 keV emission are reviewed and candidate positron sources and models of positron propagation in the Galaxy are critically discussed.

  12. Interactions of Cosmic Rays in the Atmosphere: Growth Curves Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Obermeier, A; Hörandel, J; Müller, D

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of cosmic-ray abundances on balloons are affected by interactions in the residual atmosphere above the balloon. Corrections for such interactions are particularly important for observations of rare secondary particles such as boron, antiprotons and positrons. These corrections can either be calculated if the relevant cross sections in the atmosphere are known, or may be empirically determined by extrapolation of the "growth curves", i. e. the individual particle intensities as functions of atmospheric depth. The growth-curve technique is particularly attractive for long-duration balloon flights where the periodic daily altitude variations permit rather precise determinations of the corresponding particle intensity variations. We determine growth curves for nuclei from boron (Z=5) to iron (Z=26), using data from the 2006 Arctic balloon flight of the TRACER detector for cosmic-ray nuclei, and we compare the growth curves with predictions from published cross section values. In general, good agreeme...

  13. Detection of muon bundles from cosmic ray showers at medium depth underground

    CERN Document Server

    Rídky, J

    2003-01-01

    The DELPHI detector at Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) at CERN near Geneva, has been used to detect multimuon bundles originated from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere. The muon multiplicity distribution has been measured over a wide range of multiplicities. The cosmic events registered during the years 1999 and 2000 correspond roughly to 1.6 10/sup 6/ s of effective run time. This paper provides a preliminary comparison between the data and a prediction of the QGSJET model implemented to the CORSIKA simulation package. (6 refs).

  14. Excesses of Cosmic Ray Spectra from A Single Nearby Source

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Lin, Su-Jie; Wang, Bing-Bing; Yin, Peng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence reveals universal hardening on various cosmic ray spectra, e.g. proton, positron, as well as antiproton fraction. Such universality may indicate they have a common origin. In this paper, we argue that these widespread excesses can be accounted for by a nearby supernova remnant surrounded by a giant molecular cloud. Secondary cosmic rays ($\\rm p$, $\\rm e^+$) are produced through the collisions between the primary cosmic ray nuclei from this supernova remnant and the molecular gas. Different from the background, which is produced by the ensemble of large amount of sources in the Milky Way, the local injected spectrum can be harder. The time-dependent transport of particles would make the propagated spectrum even harder. Under this scenario, the anomalies of both primary ($\\rm p$, $\\rm e^-$) and secondary ($\\rm e^+$, $\\rm \\bar{p}/p$) cosmic rays can be properly interpreted. We further show that the TeV to sub-PeV anisotropy of proton is consistent with the observations if the local source is rel...

  15. Observing The Cosmic Ray Moon Shadow With VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The Earth is subjected to a uniform flux of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) cosmic rays unless they are obscured by an object, such as the Moon, in which case a deficit or shadow is created. Since cosmic rays are charged this deficit is deflected by the Earth's magnetic field, enabling the rigidity of the obstructed cosmic rays to be determined. Measurement of the relative deficits of different species enables the positron fraction and the antiproton ratio to be measured. The April 15, 2014 lunar eclipse was visible with the VERITAS Cherenkov telescopes, which allowed (with special UV bandpass filters) 74 minutes of direct observations of the Moon and the associated deficit in the cosmic-ray flux. The results of this observation are presented. In addition VERITAS has been conducting a series of observations by pointing close to a partially illuminated Moon, with a reduced photomultiplier tube high voltage and UV bandpass filters. We present the technique developed for these observations and their current ...

  16. Understanding cosmic rays with Balloon and Space Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picozza, P., E-mail: piergiorgio.picozza@roma2.infn.it [University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Physics, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Di Felice, V. [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Measurements of cosmic rays provide important information on their sources and on the mechanisms of acceleration and propagation of cosmic particles through the Galaxy. Positrons and antiprotons in cosmic rays are also the major candidates for searching signals from annihilation of dark matter and contributions from other exotic sources as nearby pulsars. Many balloon-borne experiments have been performed since the sixties, obtaining important results that strongly suggested the realization of the PAMELA and Fermi satellite missions, the latter mainly for gamma rays, and AMS-02 on the ISS. The precision of the measurements and the high statistics highlighted unexpected features in the cosmic particle energy spectra that are setting strong constraints to the nature of Dark Matter and are contributing to change our basic vision of their origin and propagation. The continuous particle detection in space experiments is allowing a constant monitoring of the solar activity and detailed study of the solar modulation for a long period, giving important improvements to the comprehension of the heliosphere mechanisms.

  17. Excesses of cosmic ray spectra from a single nearby source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Lin, Su-Jie; Wang, Bing-Bing; Yin, Peng-Fei

    2017-07-01

    Growing evidence reveals universal hardening on various cosmic ray spectra, e.g., proton, positron, as well as antiproton fractions. Such universality may indicate they have a common origin. In this paper, we argue that these widespread excesses can be accounted for by a nearby supernova remnant surrounded by a giant molecular cloud. Secondary cosmic rays (p , e+ ) are produced through the collisions between the primary cosmic-ray nuclei from this supernova remnant and the molecular gas. Different from the background, which is produced by the ensemble of a large number of sources in the Milky Way, the local injected spectrum can be harder. The time-dependent transport of particles would make the propagated spectrum even harder. Under this scenario, the anomalies of both primary (p , e-) and secondary (e+, p ¯ /p ) cosmic rays can be properly interpreted. We further show that the TeV to sub-PeV anisotropy of the proton is consistent with the observations if the local source is relatively young and lying at the anti-Galactic center direction.

  18. Distribution of Positron Annihilation Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Milne, P A

    2006-01-01

    The SPI instrument on-board the ESA/INTEGRAL satellite is engaged in a mission-long study of positron annihilation radiation from the Galaxy. Early results suggest that the disk component is only weakly detected at 511 keV by SPI. We review CGRO/OSSE, TGRS and SMM studies of 511 keV line and positronium continuum emission from the Galaxy in light of the early INTEGRAL/SPI findings. We find that when similar spatial distributions are compared, combined fits to the OSSE/SMM/TGRS data-sets produce bulge and disk fluxes similar in total flux and in B/D ratio to the fits reported for SPI observations. We further find that the 511 keV line width reported by SPI is similar to the values reported by TGRS, particularly when spectral fits include both narrow-line and broad-line components. Collectively, the consistency between these four instruments suggests that all may be providing an accurate view of positron annihilation in the Galaxy.

  19. WINDS, CLUMPS, AND INTERACTING COSMIC RAYS IN M82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.; Everett, John E.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States); Gallagher, J. S. III, E-mail: yoasthull@wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We construct a family of models for the evolution of energetic particles in the starburst galaxy M82 and compare them to observations to test the calorimeter assumption that all cosmic ray energy is radiated in the starburst region. Assuming constant cosmic ray acceleration efficiency with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations as a function of energy. Cosmic rays are injected with Galactic energy distributions and electron-to-proton ratio via Type II supernovae at the observed rate of 0.07 yr{sup -1}. From the cosmic ray spectra, we predict the radio synchrotron and {gamma}-ray spectra. To more accurately model the radio spectrum, we incorporate a multiphase interstellar medium in the starburst region of M82. Our model interstellar medium is highly fragmented with compact dense molecular clouds and dense photoionized gas, both embedded in a hot, low density medium in overall pressure equilibrium. The spectra predicted by this one-zone model are compared to the observed radio and {gamma}-ray spectra of M82. {chi}{sup 2} tests are used with radio and {gamma}-ray observations and a range of model predictions to find the best-fit parameters. The best-fit model yields constraints on key parameters in the starburst zone of M82, including a magnetic field strength of {approx}250 {mu}G and a wind advection speed in the range of 300-700 km s{sup -1}. We find that M82 is a good electron calorimeter but not an ideal cosmic-ray proton calorimeter and discuss the implications of our results for the astrophysics of the far-infrared-radio correlation in starburst galaxies.

  20. Cosmic Rays and Climate

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2007-01-01

    Among the most puzzling questions in climate change is that of solar-climate variability, which has attracted the attention of scientists for more than two centuries. Until recently, even the existence of solar-climate variability has been controversial—perhaps because the observations had largely involved correlations between climate and the sunspot cycle that had persisted for only a few decades. Over the last few years, however, diverse reconstructions of past climate change have revealed clear associations with cosmic ray variations recorded in cosmogenic isotope archives, providing persuasive evidence for solar or cosmic ray forcing of the climate. However, despite the increasing evidence of its importance, solar-climate variability is likely to remain controversial until a physical mechanism is established. Although this remains a mystery, observations suggest that cloud cover may be influenced by cosmic rays, which are modulated by the solar wind and, on longer time scales, by the geomagnetic fiel...

  1. Constraints On Cosmic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mbonye, M R

    2003-01-01

    Observationally, the universe appears virtually critical. Yet, there is no simple explanation for this state. In this article we advance and explore the premise that the dynamics of the universe always seeks equilibrium conditions. Vacuum-induced cosmic accelerations lead to creation of matter-energy modes at the expense of vacuum energy. Because they gravitate, such modes constitute inertia against cosmic acceleration. On the other extreme, the would-be ultimate phase of local gravitational collapse is checked by a phase transition in the collapsing matter fields leading to a de Sitter-like fluid deep inside the black hole horizon, and at the expense of the collapsing matter fields. As a result, the universe succumbs to neither vacuum-induced run-away accelerations nor to gravitationally induced spacetime curvature singularities. Cosmic dynamics is self-regulating. We discuss the physical basis for these constraints and the implications, pointing out how the framework relates and helps resolve standing puzzl...

  2. Mapping the Cosmic Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlanetto, Steven

    The following sections are included: * A Brief History of Our Universe: From Soup to Galaxies * The Hidden Cosmic Dawn * The Solution: Flipping Spins * The Spin-Flip Transition as an Astronomical Tool * Foiled!: Early Cosmology with the Spin-Flip Transition * Spin-Flip Radiation Holds the Key to Observing the Cosmic Dawn * The Spin-Flip Background: The First Stars * The Spin-Flip Background: The First Black Holes * The Spin-Flip Background: The Epoch of Reionization * FM Radio Antennae as Cosmic Observatories * Piles and Tiles of Antennae: Mapping the Spin-Flip Background * Mountains to Scale: Challenges to Observing the Spin-Flip Background * Sound and Fury, Signifying Statistics * An Explosion of Telescopes * Dreams for the Future * An Unfinished Story

  3. A cosmic book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, P. J. E.; Silk, Joseph

    1988-10-01

    A system of assigning odds to the basic elements of cosmological theories is proposed in order to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the theories. A figure of merit for the theories is obtained by counting and weighing the plausibility of each of the basic elements that is not substantially supported by observation or mature fundamental theory. The magnetized strong model is found to be the most probable. In order of decreasing probability, the ranking for the rest of the models is: (1) the magnetized string model with no exotic matter and the baryon adiabatic model; (2) the hot dark matter model and the model of cosmic string loops; (3) the canonical cold dark matter model, the cosmic string loops model with hot dark matter, and the baryonic isocurvature model; and (4) the cosmic string loops model with no exotic matter.

  4. Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, Asantha; Burgarella, Denis; Chary, Ranga; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Doré, Olivier; Fazio, Giovanni; Ferrara, Andrea; Gong, Yan; Santos, Mario; Silva, Marta; Zemcov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic Dawn Intensity Mapper is a "Probe Class" mission concept for reionization studies of the universe. It will be capable of spectroscopic imaging observations between 0.7 to 6-7 microns in the near-Infrared. The primary observational objective is pioneering observations of spectral emission lines of interest throughout the cosmic history, but especially from the first generation of distant, faint galaxies when the universe was less than 800 million years old. With spectro-imaging capabilities, using a set of linear variable filters (LVFs), CDIM will produce a three-dimensional tomographic view of the epoch of reionization (EoR). CDIM will also study galaxy formation over more than 90% of the cosmic history and will move the astronomical community from broad-band astronomical imaging to low-resolution (R=200-300) spectro-imaging of the universe.

  5. Propagation of Cosmic Rays: Nuclear Physics in Cosmic-ray Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2004-01-01

    The nuclei fraction in cosmic rays (CR) far exceeds the fraction of other CR species, such as antiprotons, electrons, and positrons. Thus the majority of information obtained from CR studies is based on interpretation of isotopic abundances using CR propagation models where the nuclear data and isotopic production cross sections in p- and alpha-induced reactions are the key elements. This paper presents an introduction to the astrophysics of CR and diffuse gamma-rays and dimsses some of the puzzles that have emerged recently due to more precise data and improved propagation models. Merging with cosmology and particle physics, astrophysics of CR has become a very dynamic field with a large potential of breakthrough and discoveries in the near fume. Exploiting the data collected by the CR experiments to the fullest requires accurate nuclear cross sections.

  6. Positron Emission Mammotomography with Dual Planar Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Smith; Raymond Raylman; Stanislaw Majewski

    2003-06-29

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) is usually performed with two stationary planar detectors above and below a compressed breast. There is image blurring normal to the detectors due to the limited angular range of the lines of response. Positron emission mammotomography (PEM-T) with dual planar detectors rotating about the breast can obtain complete angular sampling and has the potential to improve activity estimation.

  7. Consequences of Dirac Theory of the Positron

    CERN Document Server

    Heisenberg, W K

    1936-01-01

    According to Dirac's theory of the positron, an electromagnetic field tends to create pairs of particles which leads to a change of Maxwell's equations in the vacuum. These changes are calculated in the special case that no real electrons or positrons are present and the field varies little over a Compton wavelength.

  8. Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 7 NIST Electron and Positron Stopping Powers of Materials (PC database for purchase)   The EPSTAR database provides rapid calculations of stopping powers (collisional, radiative, and total), CSDA ranges, radiation yields and density effect corrections for incident electrons or positrons with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 10 GeV, and for any chemically defined target material.

  9. Slow positron beam at the JINR, Dubna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horodek Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Low Energy Positron Toroidal Accumulator (LEPTA at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR proposed for generation of positronium in flight has been adopted for positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS. The positron injector generates continuous slow positron beam with positron energy range between 50 eV and 35 keV. The radioactive 22Na isotope is used. In distinction to popular tungsten foil, here the solid neon is used as moderator. It allows to obtain the beam intensity of about 105 e+/s width energy spectrum characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM of 3.4 eV and a tail to lower energies of about 30 eV. The paper covers the characteristic of variable energy positron beam at the LEPTA facility: parameters, the rule of moderation, scheme of injector, and transportation of positrons into the sample chamber. Recent status of the project and its development in the field of PAS is discussed. As an example, the measurement of the positron diffusion length in pure iron is demonstrated.

  10. Positron collisions with alkali-metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gien, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The total cross sections for positron and electron collisions with potassium, sodium, lithium and rubidium are calculated, employing the modified Glauber approximation. The Modified Glauber cross sections for positron collision with potassium and sodium at low intermediate energies are found to agree reasonably well with existing experimental data.

  11. LEP - Large Electron Positron Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) is 27 km long. Its four detectors (ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, OPAL) measure precisely what happens in the collisions of electrons and positrons. These conditions only exist-ed in the Universe when it was about 10 -10 sec old.

  12. A disintegrating cosmic string

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, J B

    2002-01-01

    We present a simple sandwich gravitational wave of the Robinson-Trautman family. This is interpreted as representing a shock wave with a spherical wavefront which propagates into a Minkowski background minus a wedge. (i.e. the background contains a cosmic string.) The deficit angle (the tension) of the string decreases through the gravitational wave, which then ceases. This leaves an expanding spherical region of Minkowski space behind it. The decay of the cosmic string over a finite interval of retarded time may be considered to generate the gravitational wave.

  13. Dynamic Cosmic Strings, 1

    CERN Document Server

    Sjodin, K R P; Vickers, J A

    2001-01-01

    The field equations for a time dependent cylindrical cosmic string coupled togravity are reformulated in terms of geometrical variables defined on a2+1-dimensional spacetime by using the method of Geroch decomposition. Unlikethe 4-dimensional spacetime the reduced case is asymptotically flat. Anumerical method for solving the field equations which involves conformallycompactifying the space and including null infinity as part of the grid isdescribed. It is shown that the code reproduces the results of a number ofvacuum solutions with one or two degrees of freedom. In the final section theinteraction between the cosmic string and a pulse of gravitational radiation isbriefly described. This will be fully analysed in the sequel.

  14. Galactic Confinement Time of Iron-Group Cosmic Rays Derived from the {sup 54}Mn Chronometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaerpoor, K.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Krane, K.S. [Physics Department, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Chan, Y.D.; Isaac, M.C.; Larimer, R.M.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Macleod, R.W.; Norman, E.B. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); DiGregorio, D.E. [Laboratorio TANDAR-Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires, 1429 (Argentina); Hindi, M.M. [Physics Department, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee 38505 (United States); Miocinovic, P. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The {beta} -decay half-life of {sup 54}Mn is needed to employ this isotope as a cosmic ray chronometer. We have determined the partial half-life of {sup 54}Mn for positron emission by counting a highly purified 35-{mu}Ci source of {sup 54}Mn in GAMMASPHERE to search for the astrophysically interesting {beta}{sup +} decay branch through the observation of coincident positron-annihilation {gamma} rays. A careful analysis of 97hours of source counting and 61hours of background shows a net signal of 24{plus_minus}10 back-to-back 511-511keV coincident events. Based on this result, the branch for this decay mode is (2.2{plus_minus}0.9){times}10{sup {minus}7}{percent} . The implications of this result for the {sup 54}Mn cosmic-ray chronometer problem are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Positron excess in the center of the Milky Way from short-lived $\\beta^+$ emitting isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Pshirkov, Maxim S

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the INTEGRAL satellite revealed the presence of yet unexplained excess in the central region of the Galaxy at the energies around 511 keV. These gamma-rays are produced in the process of positron annihilation, the needed rate is around $10^{42}~\\mathrm{s^{-1}}$. In this short paper it is shown that \\pos -emitting isotopes that are formed in interactions of subrelativistic cosmic rays (CRs) with light nuclei (CNONe) can account for a considerable fraction -- up to several tens of percent -- of $e^{+}$ production rate in the central region.

  16. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    OpenAIRE

    Silk, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    This set of lectures provides an overview of the basic theory and phenomenology of the cosmic microwave background. Topics include a brief historical review; the physics of temperature and polarization fluctuations; acoustic oscillations of the primordial plasma; the space of inflationary cosmological models; current and potential constraints on these models from the microwave background; and constraints on inflation.

  17. Simulating Cosmic Reionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlik, Andreas Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The first stars formed a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, when the Universe was only a small fraction of its present age. Their radiation transformed the previously cold and neutral hydrogen that filled intergalactic space into the hot and ionised cosmic plasma that is observed today. T

  18. Simulating Cosmic Reionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawlik, Andreas Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The first stars formed a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, when the Universe was only a small fraction of its present age. Their radiation transformed the previously cold and neutral hydrogen that filled intergalactic space into the hot and ionised cosmic plasma that is observed today.

  19. Antarctic Cosmic Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duldig, Marc

    Cosmic ray observations related to Antarctica commenced in the austral summer of 1947-48 from sub-Antarctic Heard and Macquarie Islands and from the HMAS Wyatt Earp. Muon telescope observations from Mawson station Antarctica commenced in 1955. The International Geophysical Year was the impetus for the installation of a number of neutron monitors around Antarctica observing the lowest energy cosmic rays accessible by ground based instruments. In 1971 a new observatory was built at Mawson including the only underground muon telescope system at polar latitudes in either hemisphere. In the 1980s the South Pole Air Shower Experiment (SPASE) opened the highest energy cosmic ray window over Antarctica and this was followed by the in-ice neutrino experiment AMANDA. Over more than half a century cosmic ray astronomy has been undertaken from Antarctica and its surrounding regions and these observations have been critical to our growing understanding of nearby astrophysical structures. For example the Parker spiral magnetic field of the sun was confirmed through Mawson observations of a Solar flare induced Ground Level Enahncement in 1960 long before spacecraft were able to directly observe the interplanetary magnetic field. A summary of the Antarctic instrumental developments and the scientific advances that resulted will be presented.

  20. Hydrology and Cosmic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mie

    and calibration. Yet, soil moisture measurements are traditionally provided on either point or kilometer scale from electromagnetic based sensors and satellite retrievals, respectively. Above the ground surface, the cosmic-ray neutron intensity (eV range) is inversely correlated to all hydrogen present...

  1. Cosmic rays and climate

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Inside the new chamber the CLOUD team will be able to recreate the conditions of any part of the atmosphere, from the polar stratosphere to the low level tropics (top). The new chamber safely in position in the East hall. Once carefully cleaned the chamber will be turned sideways onto its legs ready for the beam of 'cosmic rays' (bottom).

  2. On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Petrosian, Vahe; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Blandford, Roger D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-08-19

    Recent observations of cosmic ray electrons from several instruments have revealed various degrees of deviation in the measured electron energy distribution from a simple power-law, in a form of an excess around 0.1 to 1 TeV energies. An even more prominent deviation and excess has been observed in the fraction of cosmic ray positrons around 10 and 100 GeV energies. These observations have received considerable attention and many theoretical models have been proposed to explain them. The models rely on either dark matter annihilation/decay or specific nearby astrophysical sources, and involve several additional assumptions regarding the dark matter distribution or particle acceleration. In this paper we show that the observed excesses in the electron spectrum may be easily reproduced without invoking any unusual sources other than the general diffuse Galactic components of cosmic rays. The model presented here assumes a power-law injection of electrons (and protons) by supernova remnants, and evaluates their expected energy spectrum based on a simple kinetic equation describing the propagation of charged particles in the interstellar medium. The primary physical effect involved is the Klein-Nishina suppression of the electron cooling rate around TeV energies. With a very reasonable choice of the model parameters characterizing the local interstellar medium, we can reproduce the most recent observations by Fermi and HESS experiments. Interestingly, in our model the injection spectral index of cosmic ray electrons becomes comparable to, or even equal to that of cosmic ray protons. The Klein-Nishina effect may also affect the propagation of the secondary e{sup {+-}} pairs, and therefore modify the cosmic ray positron-to-electron ratio. We have explored this possibility by considering two mechanisms for production of e{sup {+-}} pairs within the Galaxy. The first is due to the decay of {pi}{sup {+-}}'s produced by interaction of cosmic ray nuclei with ambient

  3. Positron emission tomography basic sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, D W; Valk, P E; Maisey, M N

    2003-01-01

    Essential for students, science and medical graduates who want to understand the basic science of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), this book describes the physics, chemistry, technology and overview of the clinical uses behind the science of PET and the imaging techniques it uses. In recent years, PET has moved from high-end research imaging tool used by the highly specialized to an essential component of clinical evaluation in the clinic, especially in cancer management. Previously being the realm of scientists, this book explains PET instrumentation, radiochemistry, PET data acquisition and image formation, integration of structural and functional images, radiation dosimetry and protection, and applications in dedicated areas such as drug development, oncology, and gene expression imaging. The technologist, the science, engineering or chemistry graduate seeking further detailed information about PET, or the medical advanced trainee wishing to gain insight into the basic science of PET will find this book...

  4. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  5. Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronberg, J; Brooksby, C; Piggott, T; Abbott, R; Javedani, J; Cook, E

    2012-02-29

    The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

  6. Key scientific problems from Cosmic Ray History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Dorman

    2016-07-01

    -1911, before CR were discovered). 8. Moreover, in the 1930s it was shown by investigations of West-East CR asymmetry that the largest part of primary CR must be positive energetic particles. Later, in the 1940s - 1950s, it was established by direct measurements at high altitudes on balloons and rockets that the most part of cosmic rays are energetic protons, about 10% He nuclei, 1% more heavy nuclei, 1% energetic electrons, and only about 1% energetic gamma rays. Nevertheless, the name 'cosmic rays' (for short, CR) continues to be used up to now (sometimes they are called astroparticles). 9. The importance of CR for fundamental science was understood in the 1930s - 1950s, when has been discovered the first antiparticle predicted by the Quantum Electrodynamics - positron (in 1932), and then muons (1937), pions, K+, K0 mesons (in 1947), Λ0, Ξ-, Σ+ hyperons (accordingly in 1951, 1952, 1953). Cosmic rays became considered as very important natural source of high and very high energies. 10. In 1940s-1950s formatted also geophysical and astrophysical aspects of CR research. In 1936, the Nobel Prize in Physics received Victor Hess for CR discovery and Charles Anderson for discovery of positrons in CR. Later, many other great scientists in CR research received Nobel Prizes.

  7. Characterization of lacunar defects by positrons annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Barthe, M F; Blondiaux, G

    2003-01-01

    Among the nondestructive methods for the study of matter, the positrons annihilation method allows to sound the electronic structure of materials by measuring the annihilation characteristics. These characteristics depend on the electronic density as seen by the positon, and on the electron momentums distribution which annihilate with the positon. The positon is sensible to the coulombian potential variations inside a material and sounds preferentially the regions away from nuclei which represent potential wells. The lacunar-type defects (lack of nuclei) represent deep potential wells which can trap the positon up to temperatures close to the melting. This article describes the principles of this method and its application to the characterization of lacunar defects: 1 - positrons: matter probes (annihilation of electron-positon pairs, annihilation characteristics, positrons sources); 2 - positrons interactions in solids (implantation profiles, annihilation states, diffusion and trapping, positon lifetime spec...

  8. Polymeric membrane studied using slow positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, W.-S.; Lo, C.-H. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Cheng, M.-L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan (China); Chen Hongmin; Liu Guang; Chakka, Lakshmi [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Nanda, D.; Tung, K.-L.; Huang, S.-H.; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Lai, J.-Y. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Sun Yiming [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan (China); Yu Changcheng [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Zhang Renwu [Physical Science Department, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, UT 84720 (United States); Jean, Y.C. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)], E-mail: jeany@umkc.edu

    2008-10-31

    A radioisotope slow positron beam has been built at the Chung Yuan Christian University in Taiwan for the research and development in membrane science and technology. Doppler broadening energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime have been measured as a function of positron energy up to 30 keV in a polyamide membrane prepared by the interfacial polymerization between triethylenetetraamine (TETA) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC) on modified porous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) asymmetric membrane. The multilayer structures and free-volume depth profile for this asymmetric membrane system are obtained. Positron annihilation spectroscopy coupled with a slow beam could provide new information about size selectivity of transporting molecules and guidance for molecular designs in polymeric membranes.

  9. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry for positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, PH

    2002-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical chemistry includes the selection, preparation, and preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled compounds. This paper describes selection criteria for candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. Practical aspects of nucleophilic and electrophilic F-18-fluorination

  10. Dual Phase Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Shurtleff, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A calculation based on flat spacetime symmetries shows how there can be two quantum phases. For one, extreme phase change determines a conventional classical trajectory and four-momentum, i.e. mass times four-velocity. The other phase occurs in an effective particle state, with the effective energy and momentum being the rate of change of the phase with respect to time and distance. A cosmic ray proton moves along a classical trajectory, but exists in an effective particle state with an effective energy that depends on the local gravitational potential. Assumptions are made so that a cosmic ray proton in an ultra-high energy state detected near the Earth was in a much less energetic state in interstellar space. A 300 EeV proton incident on the Earth was a 2 PeV proton in interstellar space. The model predicts such protons are in states with even more energy near the Sun than when near the Earth.

  11. Cosmic structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschinger, Edumund

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews the prevailing paradigm for how galaxies and larger structures formed in the universe: gravitational instability. Basic observational facts are summarized to motivate the standard cosmological framework underlying most detailed investigations of structure formation. The observed univers approaches spatial uniformity on scales larger than about 10(exp 26) cm. On these scales gravitational dynamics is almost linear and therefore relatively easy to relate to observations of large-scale structure. On smaller scales cosmic structure is complicated not only by nonlinear gravitational clustering but also by nonlinear nongravitational gas dynamical processes. The complexity of these phenomena makes galaxy formation one of the grand challenge problems of the physical sciences. No fully satisfactory theory can presently account in detail for the observed cosmic structure. However, as this article summarizes, significant progress has been made during the last few years.

  12. Understanding the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; Jones, Bernard J T; Frenk, Carlos S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the characteristics and the time evolution of the cosmic web from redshift, z=2, to present time, within the framework of the NEXUS+ algorithm. This necessitates the introduction of new analysis tools optimally suited to describe the very intricate and hierarchical pattern that is the cosmic web. In particular, we characterize filaments (walls) in terms of their linear (surface) mass density. This is very good in capturing the evolution of these structures. At early times the cosmos is dominated by tenuous filaments and sheets, which, during subsequent evolution, merge together, such that the present day web is dominated by fewer, but much more massive, structures. We also show that voids are more naturally described in terms of their boundaries and not their centres. We illustrate this for void density profiles, which, when expressed as a function of the distance from void boundary, show a universal profile in good qualitative agreement with the theoretical shell-crossing framework of expandin...

  13. Cosmic rays and climate

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    The current understanding of climate change in the industrial age is that it is predominantly caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, with relatively small natural contributions due to solar irradiance and volcanoes. However, palaeoclimatic reconstructions show that the climate has frequently varied on 100-year time scales during the Holocene (last 10 kyr) by amounts comparable to the present warming - and yet the mechanism or mechanisms are not understood. Some of these reconstructions show clear associations with solar variability, which is recorded in the light radio-isotope archives that measure past variations of cosmic ray intensity. However, despite the increasing evidence of its importance, solar-climate variability is likely to remain controversial until a physical mechanism is established. Estimated changes of solar irradiance on these time scales appear to be too small to account for the climate observations. This raises the question of whether cosmic rays may directly affect the climate, provi...

  14. Note on cosmic censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, F. J.

    1985-05-01

    A number of recent theorems by Krolak (1983) and Newman (1983) purport to prove cosmic censorship by showing that strong-curvature singularities must be hidden behind horizons. It is shown that the 'null strong-curvature' condition which Newman imposes on certain classes of null geodesics to restrict curvature growth in the space-time does not hold in many physically realistic space-times: it is not satisfied by any null geodesic in the relevant class in any open Friedmann cosmological model, nor does it hold for any null geodesic in the relevant class in maximal Schwarzschild space. More generally it is argued that the singularity predicted by the Penrose singularity theorem is unlikely to be of the type eliminated by Newman. Thus the Newman theorems are probably without physical significance. The Krolak theorems, although based on a physically significant definition of strong curvature singularity, are mathematically invalid, and this approach cannot be used to obtain a cosmic-censorship theorem.

  15. Cosmic Tidal Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Yu, Yu; Er, Xinzhong; Chen, Xuelei

    2015-01-01

    The gravitational coupling of a long wavelength tidal field with small scale density fluctuations leads to anisotropic distortions of the locally measured small scale matter correlation function. Since the local correlation function is statistically isotropic in the absence of such tidal interactions, the tidal distortions can be used to reconstruct the long wavelength tidal field and large scale density field in analogy with the cosmic microwave background lensing reconstruction. In this paper we present in detail a formalism for the cosmic tidal reconstruction and test the reconstruction in numerical simulations. We find that the density field on large scales can be reconstructed with good accuracy and the cross correlation coefficient between the reconstructed density field and the original density field is greater than 0.9 on large scales ($k\\lesssim0.1h/\\mathrm{Mpc}$). This is useful in the 21cm intensity mapping survey, where the long wavelength radial modes are lost due to foreground subtraction proces...

  16. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  17. Cosmic Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P

    2004-04-26

    Recently we proposed a new cosmic acceleration mechanism which was based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically owing plasma. In this paper we include some omitted details, and show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f({epsilon}) {proportional_to} 1/{epsilon}{sup 2}. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations.

  18. Cosmic Strings and Quintessence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段一士; 任继荣; 杨捷

    2003-01-01

    Using torsion two-form we present a new Lorentz gauge invariant U (1) topological field theory in Riemann-Cartan space-time manifold U4. By virtue of the decomposition theory of U(1) gauge potential and the φ-mapping topological current theory, it is proven that the U(1) complex scalar field φ(x) can be looked upon as the order parameter field in our Universe, and a set of zero points of φ(x) create the cosmic strings as the space-time defects in the early Universe. In the standard cosmology, this complex scalar order parameter field possesses negative pressure, provides an accelerating expansion of Universe, and be able to explain the inflation in the early Universe. Therefore this complex scalar field is not only the order parameter field created the cosmic strings in the early universe, but also reasonably behaves as the quintessence, the dark energy.

  19. Modeling cosmic void statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the internal structure and spatial distribution of cosmic voids is crucial when considering them as probes of cosmology. We present recent advances in modeling void density- and velocity-profiles in real space, as well as void two-point statistics in redshift space, by examining voids identified via the watershed transform in state-of-the-art ΛCDM n-body simulations and mock galaxy catalogs. The simple and universal characteristics that emerge from these statistics indicate the self-similarity of large-scale structure and suggest cosmic voids to be among the most pristine objects to consider for future studies on the nature of dark energy, dark matter and modified gravity.

  20. Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Agel, Jerome

    2000-08-01

    Foreword Freeman Dyson; Personal reflections Ann Druyan; Preface; Part I. Cosmic Perspective: 1. A transitional animal; 2. The Unicorn of Cetus; 3. A message from earth; 4. A message to earth; 5. Experiments in utopias; 6. Chauvinism; 7. Space exploration as a human enterprise I. The scientific interest; 8. Space exploration as a human enterprise II. The public interest; 9. Space exploration as a human enterprise III. The historical interest; Part II. The Solar System: 10. On teaching the first grade; 11. 'The ancient and legendary Gods of old'; 12. The Venus detective story; 13. Venus is hell; 14. Science and 'intelligence'; 15. The moons of Barsoom; 16. The mountains of Mars I. Observations from earth; 17. The mountains of Mars II. Observations from space; 18. The canals of Mars; 19. The lost pictures of Mars; 20. The Ice Age and the cauldron; 21. Beginnings and ends of the Earth; 22. Terraforming the plants; 23. The exploration and utlization of the solar system; Part III. Beyond the Solar System: 24. Some of my best friends are dolphins; 25. 'Hello, central casting? Send me twenty extraterrestrials'; 26. The cosmic connection; 27. Extraterrestrial life: an idea whose time has come; 28. Has the Earth been visited?; 29. A search strategy for detecting extraterrestrial intelligence; 30. If we succeed 31. Cables, drums, and seashells; 32. The night freight to the stars; 33. Astroengineering; 34. Twenty questions: a classification of cosmic civilisations; 35. Galactic cultural exchanges; 36. A passage to elsewhere; 37. Starfolk I. A Fable; 38. Starfolk II. A future; 39. Starfolk III. The cosmic Cheshire cats; Epilog David Morrison; Index.

  1. Cosmic microwave background theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, J R

    1998-01-06

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in -space are consistent with a DeltaT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are approximately (10(-5))2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Lambda cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 +/- 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 +/- 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 +/- 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 +/- 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Lambda and moderate constraints on Omegatot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant.

  2. Frontiers in Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Ringwald, Andreas; Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Dermer, Charles D.; Ringwald, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    This rapporteur review covers selected results presented in the Parallel Session HEA2 (High Energy Astrophysics 2) of the 10th Marcel Grossmann Meeting on General Relativity, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 2003. The subtopics are: ultra high energy cosmic ray anisotropies, the possible connection of these energetic particles with powerful gamma ray bursts, and new exciting scenarios with a strong neutrino-nucleon interaction in the atmosphere.

  3. Cosmic ray modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of cosmic rays to and inside the heliosphere, encounter an outward moving solar wind with cyclic magnetic field fluctuation and turbulence, causing convection and diffusion in the heliosphere. Cosmic ray counts from the ground ground-based neutron monitors at different cut of rigidity show intensity changes, which are anti-correlated with sunspot numbers. They also lose energy as they propagate towards the Earth and experience various types of modulations due to different solar activity indices. In this work, we study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-2014 for Beijing, Moscow and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations located at different cut off rigidity. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for low cutoff rigidity as compared to high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station as compared to the high cut off rigidity station on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days does not show any significant dependence on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of different cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics, amplitude, phase.

  4. Positron-impact ionization of Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, K.K. (Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalaya, Ramchandraghat, West Tripura 799207, Tripura (India)); Singh, N.R. (Thambal Marik College, Oinam, Bishanpur, Manipur (India)); Choudhury, K.B. (Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Calcutta 700032, West Bengal (India)); Mazumdar, P.S. (Department of Physics, Manipur University, Canchipur, Imphal 795003, Manipur (India))

    1992-07-01

    In this paper we present the total cross sections for the positron-impact ionization of Na in the range 8--30 eV of the energy of the incident positron. Calculations are done by using a distorted-wave approximation incorporating the effects of screening and distortion. The present results are compared with the experimental results for the electron-impact ionization of Na.

  5. Modulation of a quantum positron acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M. R.

    2015-09-01

    Amplitude modulation of a positron acoustic wave is considered in a four-component electron-positron plasma in the quantum magnetohydrodynamic regime. The important ingredients of this study are the inclusion of the particle exchange-correlation potential, quantum diffraction effects via the Bohm potential, and dissipative effect due to viscosity in the momentum balance equation of the charged carriers. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the evolution of the slowly varying amplitude of the quantum positron acoustic wave by employing the standard reductive perturbation technique. Detailed analysis of the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the quantum positron acoustic wave is presented. For a typical parameter range, relevant to some dense astrophysical objects, it is found that the quantum positron acoustic wave is modulationally unstable above a certain critical wavenumber. Effects of the exchange-correlation potential and the Bohm potential in the wave dynamics are also studied. It is found that the quantum effect due to the particle exchange-correlation potential is significant in comparison to the effect due to the Bohm potential for smaller values of the carrier wavenumber. However, for comparatively larger values of the carrier wavenumber, the Bohm potential effect overtakes the effect of the exchange-correlation potential. It is found that the critical wavenumber for the modulation instability depends on the ratio of the equilibrium hot electron number density and the cold positron number density and on the ratio of the equilibrium hot positron number density and the cold positron number density. A numerical result on the growth rate of the modulation instability is also presented.

  6. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, G.; Barley, J; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y; K. Flöttmann; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.

    2009-01-01

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and elect...

  7. A Cosmic Microwave Background feature consistent with a cosmic texture

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, M.; Turok, N.; Vielva, P.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Hobson, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background provides our most ancient image of the Universe and our best tool for studying its early evolution. Theories of high energy physics predict the formation of various types of topological defects in the very early universe, including cosmic texture which would generate hot and cold spots in the Cosmic Microwave Background. We show through a Bayesian statistical analysis that the most prominent, 5 degree radius cold spot observed in all-sky images, which is otherw...

  8. Spin Tracking at the ILC Positron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Hartin, A; Staufenbiel, F

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve the physics goals of future Linear Colliders, it is important that electron and positron beams are polarized. The baseline design at the International Linear Collider (ILC) foresees an e+ source based on helical undulator. Such a source provides high luminosity and polarizations. The positron source planned for ILC is based on a helical undulator system and can deliver a positron polarization of 60%. To ensure that no significant polarization is lost during the transport of the e- and e+ beams from the source to the interaction region, precise spin tracking has to be included in all transport elements which can contribute to a loss of polarization, i.e. the initial accelerating structures, the damping rings, the spin rotators, the main linac and the beam delivery system. In particular, the dynamics of the polarized positron beam is required to be investigated. In the talk recent results of positron spin tracking simulation at the source are presented. The positron yield and polarization ar...

  9. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, G.; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Flöttmann, K.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J. W.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K. T.; Mikhailichenko, A. A.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Pahl, P.; Pitthan, R.; Pöschl, R.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riemann, S.; Schälicke, A.; Schüler, K. P.; Schweizer, T.; Scott, D.; Sheppard, J. C.; Stahl, A.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D. R.; Weidemann, A.

    2009-11-01

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9 MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and electrons. The experiment was carried out with a 1-m-long, 400-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) operated at 46.6 GeV. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at five positron energies from 4.5 to 7.5 MeV. In addition, the electron polarization has been determined at 6.7 MeV, and the effect of operating the undulator with a ferrofluid was also investigated. To compare the measurements with expectations, detailed simulations were made with an upgraded version of G EANT4 that includes the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons with matter. The measurements agree with calculations, corresponding to 80% polarization for positrons near 6 MeV and 90% for electrons near 7 MeV.

  10. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G. [Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Barley, J. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Batygin, Y. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Berridge, S. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Bugg, W. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Decker, F.-J. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Dollan, R. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Efremenko, Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Floettmann, K. [DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Gharibyan, V. [DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); YerPhI, Yerevan 375036 (Armenia); Hast, C.; Iverson, R. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Kolanoski, H. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kovermann, J.W. [RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Laihem, K. [DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Lohse, T. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); McDonald, K.T. [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Mikhailichenko, A.A. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9 MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and electrons. The experiment was carried out with a 1-m-long, 400-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) operated at 46.6 GeV. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at five positron energies from 4.5 to 7.5 MeV. In addition, the electron polarization has been determined at 6.7 MeV, and the effect of operating the undulator with a ferrofluid was also investigated. To compare the measurements with expectations, detailed simulations were made with an upgraded version of GEANT4 that includes the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons with matter. The measurements agree with calculations, corresponding to 80% polarization for positrons near 6 MeV and 90% for electrons near 7 MeV.

  11. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel); Barley, J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Batygin, Y. [SLAC, Menlo Park, CA (US)] (and others)

    2009-05-15

    Full exploitation of the physics potential of a future International Linear Collider will require the use of polarized electron and positron beams. Experiment E166 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which an electron beam passes through a helical undulator to generate photons (whose first-harmonic spectrum extended to 7.9 MeV) with circular polarization, which are then converted in a thin target to generate longitudinally polarized positrons and electrons. The experiment was carried out with a one-meter-long, 400-period, pulsed helical undulator in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) operated at 46.6 GeV. Measurements of the positron polarization have been performed at five positron energies from 4.5 to 7.5 MeV. In addition, the electron polarization has been determined at 6.7MeV, and the effect of operating the undulator with a ferrofluid was also investigated. To compare the measurements with expectations, detailed simulations were made with an upgraded version of GEANT4 that includes the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons, and photons with matter. The measurements agree with calculations, corresponding to 80% polarization for positrons near 6 MeV and 90% for electrons near 7 MeV. (orig.)

  12. Canny Algorithm, Cosmic Strings and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danos, Rebecca J.; Brandenberger, Robert H.

    We describe a new code to search for signatures of cosmic strings in cosmic microwave anisotropy maps. The code implements the Canny algorithm, an edge detection algorithm designed to search for the lines of large gradients in maps. Such a gradient signature which is coherent in position-space is produced by cosmic strings via the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We test the power of our new code to set limits on the tension of the cosmic strings by analyzing simulated data, with and without cosmic strings. We compare maps with a pure Gaussian scale-invariant power spectrum with maps which have a contribution of a distribution of cosmic strings obeying a scaling solution. The maps have angular scale and angular resolution comparable to what current and future ground-based small-scale cosmic microwave anisotropy experiments will achieve. We present tests of the codes, indicate the limits on the string tension which could be set with the current code, and describe various ways to refine the analysis. Our results indicate that when applied to the data of ongoing cosmic microwave experiments such as the South Pole Telescope project, the sensitivity of our method to the presence of cosmic strings will be more than an order of magnitude better than the limits from existing analyses.

  13. Secondary cosmic ray nuclei in the light of the Single Source Model

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for a local 'Single Source' of cosmic rays is amassing by way of the recent precise measurements of various cosmic ray energy spectra from the AMS-02 instrument. To observations of individual cosmic ray nuclei, electrons, positrons and antiprotons must now be added the determination of the boron-to-carbon ratio and the energy spectrum of lithium to 2000 GV with high precision. Our analysis leads us to claim that, with certain assumptions about the propagation in the Galaxy, the results confirm our arguments regarding the presence of a local single source, perhaps, a supernova remnant (SNR). An attempt is made to determine some of the properties of this SNR and its progenitor star.

  14. Secondary Cosmic Ray Nuclei in the Light of the Single Source Model

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for a local 'Single Source' of cosmic rays is amassing by way of the recent precise measurements of various cosmic ray energy spectra from the AMS-02 instrument. To observations of individual cosmic ray nuclei, electrons, positrons and antiprotons must now be added the determination of the boron-to-carbon ratio and the energy spectrum of lithium to 2000 GV with high precision. Our analysis leads us to claim that, with certain assumptions about propagation in the Galaxy, the results confirm our arguments regarding the presence of a local single source, perhaps, a supernova remnant (SNR). An attempt is made to determine some of the properties of this SNR and its progenitor star.

  15. Cosmic rays and radiations from the cosmos; Rayons cosmiques et rayonnement du cosmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizot, E

    2005-12-01

    This document gathers a lot of recent information concerning cosmic radiations, it is divided into 4 parts. Part I: energy, mass and angular spectra of cosmic rays. Part II: general phenomenology of cosmic rays, this part deals with the standard model, the maximal energy of protons inside supernova remnants, nucleosynthesis of light elements, and super-bubbles. Part III: radiations from the cosmos, this part deals with high energy gamma rays, non-thermal radiation of super-bubbles, positron transport, and the Compton trail of gamma-ray bursts. Part IV: the Pierre Auger observatory (OPA), this part deals with the detection of gamma ray bursts at OPA, the measurement of anisotropy, and top-down models. (A.C.)

  16. Probing the astrophysical origin of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons with Monte Carlo simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Attallah, Reda

    2016-01-01

    High-energy cosmic-ray electrons reveal some remarkable spectral features, the most noteworthy of which is the rise in the positron fraction above 10 GeV. Due to strong energy loss during propagation, these particles can reach Earth only from nearby sources. Yet, the exact nature of these sources, which most likely manifest themselves in the observed anomalies, remains elusive. The many explanations put forward to resolve this case range from standard astrophysics to exotic physics. In this paper, we discuss the possible astrophysical origin of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons through a fully three-dimensional time-dependent Monte Carlo simulation. This approach takes advantage of the intrinsic random nature of cosmic-ray diffusive propagation. It provides valuable information on the electron-by-electron fluctuations, making it particularly suitable for analyzing in depth the single-source astrophysical scenario.

  17. Probing the astrophysical origin of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons with Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, R.

    2016-12-01

    High-energy cosmic-ray electrons reveal some remarkable spectral features, the most noteworthy of which is the rise in the positron fraction above 10 GeV. Due to strong energy loss during propagation, these particles can reach Earth only from nearby sources. Yet, the exact nature of these sources, which most likely manifest themselves in the observed anomalies, remains elusive. The many explanations put forward to resolve this case range from standard astrophysics to exotic physics. In this paper, we discuss the possible astrophysical origin of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons through a fully three-dimensional time-dependent Monte Carlo simulation. This approach, which takes advantage of the intrinsic random nature of cosmic-ray diffusive propagation, provides valuable information on the electron-by-electron fluctuations, making it particularly suitable for analyzing in depth the single-source scenario.

  18. Review of the theoretical and experimental status of dark matter identification with cosmic-ray antideuterons

    CERN Document Server

    Aramaki, T; Bufalino, S; Dal, L; von Doetinchem, P; Donato, F; Fornengo, N; Fuke, H; Grefe, M; Hailey, C; Hamilton, B; Ibarra, A; Mitchell, J; Mognet, I; Ong, R A; Pereira, R; Perez, K; Putze, A; Raklev, A; Salati, P; Sasaki, M; Tarle, G; Urbano, A; Vittino, A; Wild, S; Xue, W; Yoshimura, K

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen increased theoretical and experimental effort towards the first-ever detection of cosmic-ray antideuterons, in particular as an indirect signature of dark matter annihilation or decay. In contrast to indirect dark matter searches using positrons, antiprotons, or gamma-rays, which suffer from relatively high and uncertain astrophysical backgrounds, searches with antideuterons benefit from very suppressed conventional backgrounds, offering a potential breakthrough in unexplored phase space for dark matter. This article is based on the first dedicated cosmic-ray antideuteron workshop, which was held at UCLA in June 2014. It reviews broad classes of dark matter candidates that result in detectable cosmic-ray antideuteron fluxes, as well as the status and prospects of current experimental searches. The coalescence model of antideuteron production and the influence of antideuteron measurements at particle colliders are discussed. This is followed by a review of the modeling of antideuteron pr...

  19. Generation of a high-brightness pulsed positron beam for the Munich scanning positron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piochacz, Christian

    2009-11-20

    Within the present work the prerequisites for the operation of the Munich scanning positron microscope (SPM) at the high intense neutron induced positron source Munich (NEPOMUC) were established. This was accomplished in two steps: Firstly, a re-moderation device was installed at the positron beam facility NEPOMUC, which enhances the brightness of the positron beam for all connected experiments. The second step was the design, set up and initial operation of the SPM interface for the high efficient conversion of the continuous beam into a bunched beam. The in-pile positron source NEPOMUC creates a positron beam with a diameter of typically 7 mm, a kinetic energy of 1 keV and an energy spread of 50 eV. The NEPOMUC re-moderator generates from this beam a low energy positron beam (20 - 200 eV) with a diameter of less than 2 mm and an energy spread well below 2.5 eV. This was achieved with an excellent total efficiency of 6.55{+-}0.25 %. The re-moderator was not only the rst step to implement the SPM at NEPOMUc, it enables also the operation of the pulsed low energy positron beam system (PLEPS). Within the present work, at this spectrometer rst positron lifetime measurements were performed, which revealed the defect types of an ion irradiated uranium molybdenum alloy. Moreover, the instruments which were already connected to the positron beam facility bene ts considerably of the high brightness enhancement. In the new SPM interface an additional re-moderation stage enhances the brightness of the beam even more and will enable positron lifetime measurements at the SPM with a lateral resolution below 1 {mu}m. The efficiency of the re-moderation process in this second stage was 24.5{+-}4.5 %. In order to convert high efficiently the continuous positron beam into a pulsed beam with a repetition rate of 50 MHz and a pulse duration of less than 50 ps, a sub-harmonic pre-bucher was combined with two sine wave bunchers. Furthermore, the additional re-moderation stage of the

  20. Possible primary-electron-spectrum hardening at $\\sim 240$ GeV: Implications for AMS-02 observation and the physical origin of cosmic ray excesses

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Lei; He, Hao-Ning; Dong, Tie-Kuang; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Chang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The data collected by ATIC, CREAM and PAMELA all display remarkable cosmic-ray-nuclei spectrum hardening above the magnetic rigidity $\\sim$ 240 GV. One natural speculation is that the primary electron spectrum also gets hardened at $\\sim 240$ GeV, which can partly account for the electron/positron total spectrum excess discovered by ATIC, HESS and Fermi-LAT. The subsequent positron-to-electron ratio may get flattened or even decreased, depending on the degree of the primary electron spectrum hardening. Such modification is detectable for AMS-02, a mission dedicated to measure the high energy cosmic ray spectra with unprecedented accuracy. The spectrum hardening of both primary-electrons and nuclei at $\\sim 240$ GV, if confirmed by AMS-02 in the future, is likely attributed to a "nearby" supernova-remnant-like source with a lifetime $\\lesssim 10^{13}$ s. Possible dark matter origin of the positron excess revealed by PAMELA is also investigated.

  1. Cosmic Rays Report from the Structure of Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Annila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectrum of cosmic rays follows a broken power law over twelve orders of magnitude. Since ubiquitous power laws are manifestations of the principle of least action, we interpret the spectrum accordingly. Our analysis complies with understanding that low-energy particles originate mostly from rapidly receding sources throughout the cosmos. The flux peaks about proton rest energy whereafter it decreases because fewer and fewer receding sources are energetic enough to provide particles with high enough velocities to compensate for the recessional velocities. Above 1015.6 eV the flux from the expanding Universe diminishes below the flux from the nearby nonexpanding part of the Universe. In this spectral feature, known as the “knee,” we relate to a distance of about 1.3 Mpc where the gravitational potential tallies the energy density of free space. At higher energies particles decelerate in a dissipative manner to attain thermodynamic balance with the vacuum. At about 1017.2 eV a distinct dissipative mechanism opens up for protons to slow down by electron-positron pair production. At about 1019.6 eV a more effective mechanism opens up via pion production. All in all, the universal principle discloses that the broad spectrum of cosmic rays probes the structure of space from cosmic distances down to microscopic details.

  2. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, S.; Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.

    2016-11-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfvén waves, that in turn determines the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here, we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the implications for the spectrum of cosmic rays by solving together the hydrodynamical equations for the wind and the transport equation for cosmic rays under the action of self-generated diffusion and advection with the wind and the self-excited Alfvén waves.

  3. Cosmic ray: Studying the origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabelski, J. [Cosmic Ray Laboratory, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Lodz (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations of the origin of cosmic rays are presented. Different methods are discussed: studies of cosmic gamma rays of energy from 30 MeV to about 10{sup 15} eV (since photons point to their places of origin), studies of the mass composition of cosmic rays (because it reflects source morphology), and studies of cosmic rays with energy above 1O{sup 19} eV (for these are the highest energies observed in nature). (author) 101 refs, 19 figs, 7 tabs

  4. Cosmic rays and molecular clouds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the cosmic-ray penetration into molecular clouds and with the related gamma--ray emission. High energy cosmic rays interact with the dense gas and produce neutral pions which in turn decay into two gamma rays. This makes molecular clouds potential sources of gamma rays, especially if they are located in the vicinity of a powerful accelerator that injects cosmic rays in the interstellar medium. The amplitude and duration in time of the cosmic--ray overdensity around a giv...

  5. Galactic electrons and positrons at the Earth:new estimate of the primary and secondary fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, T; Lineros, R; Donato, F; Fornengo, N

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] The so-called excess of cosmic ray (CR) positrons observed by the PAMELA satellite up to 100 GeV has opened windows for various interpretations involving standard astrophysics and/or a possible exotic contribution from dark matter annihilation or decay. The subsequent Fermi data on CR electrons plus positrons in the range 0.02-1 TeV, and HESS data above 1 TeV have provided additional information on the leptonic content of local Galactic CRs. In this paper, we wish to revisit the full predictions of the so-called "standard" CR lepton fluxes at the Earth of both secondary and primary origins, evaluate the theoretical uncertainties, and determine their level of consistency with respect to the available data. We find that the electron flux in the energy range 5-30 GeV is well reproduced from a smooth distant distribution of sources with index $\\gamma \\sim 2.3-2.4$, while local sources (supernova remnants and pulsars) dominate at higher energy. For positrons, local pulsars have important effect above 5-...

  6. Differential flux measurement of atmospheric pion, muon, electron and positron energy spectra at balloon altitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimani, C.; Brunetti, M.T.; Codino, A. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); Papini, P.; Massimo Brancaccio, F.; Finetti, N. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Stephens, S.A. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Researc, Bombay (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements); Basini, G.; Bongiorno, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ. Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.

    1995-09-01

    The fluxes of atmospheric electrons, positrons, positive and negative muons and negative pions have been determined using the NMSU Wizard-MASS2 balloons-borne instrument. The instrument was launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico, (geomagnetic cut-off about 4.5 GV/c) on september 23, 1991. The flight lasted 9.8 hours and remained above 100.000 ft. Muons and negative pions were observed and their momenta were determined. Since these particles are not a part of the primary component, the measurement of their fluxes provides information regarding production and propagation of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Similarly, observations of electrons and positrons well below the geomagnetic cut-off provides insight into electromagnetic cascade processes in the upper atmosphere. In addition, the determination of the energy spectra of rare particles such as positrons can be used for background subtraction for cosmic ray experiments gathering data below a few g/cm{sup 2} of overlying atmosphere.

  7. Extragalactic Inverse Compton Light from Dark Matter Annihilation and the Pamela Positron Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Profumo, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the extragalactic diffuse emission originating from the up-scattering of cosmic microwave photons by energetic electrons and positrons produced in particle dark matter annihilation events at all redshifts and in all halos. We outline the observational constraints on this emission and we study its dependence on both the particle dark matter model (including the particle mass and its dominant annihilation final state) and on assumptions on structure formation and on the density profile of halos. We find that for low-mass dark matter models, data in the X-ray band provide the most stringent constraints, while the gamma-ray energy range probes models featuring large masses and pair-annihilation rates, and a hard spectrum for the injected electrons and positrons. Specifically, we point out that the all-redshift, all-halo inverse Compton emission from many dark matter models that might provide an explanation to the anomalous positron fraction measured by the Pamela payload severely overproduces the obs...

  8. Extragalactic Inverse Compton Light from Dark Matter annihilation and the Pamela positron excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    We calculate the extragalactic diffuse emission originating from the up-scattering of cosmic microwave photons by energetic electrons and positrons produced in particle dark matter annihilation events at all redshifts and in all halos. We outline the observational constraints on this emission and we study its dependence on both the particle dark matter model (including the particle mass and its dominant annihilation final state) and on assumptions on structure formation and on the density profile of halos. We find that for low-mass dark matter models, data in the X-ray band provide the most stringent constraints, while the gamma-ray energy range probes models featuring large masses and pair-annihilation rates, and a hard spectrum for the injected electrons and positrons. Specifically, we point out that the all-redshift, all-halo inverse Compton emission from many dark matter models that might provide an explanation to the anomalous positron fraction measured by the Pamela payload severely overproduces the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background.

  9. Van de Graaff based positron source production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Kasey Roy

    The anti-matter counterpart to the electron, the positron, can be used for a myriad of different scientific research projects to include materials research, energy storage, and deep space flight propulsion. Currently there is a demand for large numbers of positrons to aid in these mentioned research projects. There are different methods of producing and harvesting positrons but all require radioactive sources or large facilities. Positron beams produced by relatively small accelerators are attractive because they are easily shut down, and small accelerators are readily available. A 4MV Van de Graaff accelerator was used to induce the nuclear reaction 12C(d,n)13N in order to produce an intense beam of positrons. 13N is an isotope of nitrogen that decays with a 10 minute half life into 13C, a positron, and an electron neutrino. This radioactive gas is frozen onto a cryogenic freezer where it is then channeled to form an antimatter beam. The beam is then guided using axial magnetic fields into a superconducting magnet with a field strength up to 7 Tesla where it will be stored in a newly designed Micro-Penning-Malmberg trap. Several source geometries have been experimented on and found that a maximum antimatter beam with a positron flux of greater than 0.55x10 6 e+s-1 was achieved. This beam was produced using a solid rare gas moderator composed of krypton. Due to geometric restrictions on this set up, only 0.1-1.0% of the antimatter was being frozen to the desired locations. Simulations and preliminary experiments suggest that a new geometry, currently under testing, will produce a beam of 107 e+s-1 or more.

  10. Cosmic rays and the search for a Lorentz Invariance Violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2008-11-15

    This is an introductory review about the on-going search for a signal of Lorentz Invariance Violation (LIV) in cosmic rays. We first summarise basic aspects of cosmic rays, focusing on rays of ultra high energy (UHECRs). We discuss the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) energy cutoff for cosmic protons, which is predicted due to photopion production in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This is a process of modest energy in the proton rest frame. It can be investigated to a high precision in the laboratory, if Lorentz transformations apply even at factors {gamma} {proportional_to} O(10{sup 11}). For heavier nuclei the energy attenuation is even faster due to photo-disintegration, again if this process is Lorentz invariant. Hence the viability of Lorentz symmetry up to tremendous {gamma}-factors - far beyond accelerator tests - is a central issue. Next we comment on conceptual aspects of Lorentz Invariance and the possibility of its spontaneous breaking. This could lead to slightly particle dependent ''Maximal Attainable Velocities''. We discuss their effect in decays, Cerenkov radiation, the GZK cutoff and neutrino oscillation in cosmic rays. We also review the search for LIV in cosmic {gamma}-rays. For multi TeV {gamma}-rays we possibly encounter another puzzle related to the transparency of the CMB, similar to the GZK cutoff, due to electron/positron creation and subsequent inverse Compton scattering. The photons emitted in a Gamma Ray Burst occur at lower energies, but their very long path provides access to information not far from the Planck scale. We discuss conceivable non-linear photon dispersions based on non-commutative geometry or effective approaches. No LIV has been observed so far. However, even extremely tiny LIV effects could change the predictions for cosmic ray physics drastically. An Appendix is devoted to the recent hypothesis by the Pierre Auger Collaboration, which identifies nearby Active Galactic Nuclei - or objects

  11. Cylindrical and spherical positron-acoustic shock waves in nonthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M.M.; Alam, M.S.; Mamun, A.A., E-mail: shohelplasma@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2015-06-15

    The nonlinear propagation of cylindrical and spherical positron-acoustic shock waves (PASWs) in an unmagnetized four-component plasma (containing nonthermal distributed hot positrons and electrons, cold mobile viscous positron fluid, and immobile positive ions) is investigated theoretically. The modified Burgers equation is derived by employing the reductive perturbation method. Analytically, the effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, nonthermality of electrons and hot positrons, relative number density and temperature ratios, and cold mobile positron kinematic viscosity on the basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, width, phase speed, etc.) of PASWs are briefly addressed. It is examined that the PASWs in nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry significantly differ from those in planar geometry. The relevance of our results may be useful in understanding the basic characteristics of PASWs in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. (author)

  12. Positron sources for electron-positron colliders application to the ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    The increased demanding qualities for positron sources dedicated to e+e- colliders pushed on investigations oriented on new kinds of e+ sources. The different kinds of positron sources polarized and no polarized are considered. Their main features (intensity, emittance) are described and analysed. Comparison between the different sources is worked out. The characteristics of the positron beam available in the collision point are greatly depending on the capture device and on the positron accelerator. Different kinds of capture systems are considered and their qualities, compared. Intense positron sources which are necessary for the colliders require intense incident beams (electrons or photons). The large number of pairs created in the targets leads to important energy deposition and so, thermal heating, which associated to temperature gradients provoke mechanical stresses often destructive. Moreover, the important Coulomb collisions, can affect the atomic structure in crystal targets and the radiation resist...

  13. The Emergence of Cosmic Education. Spotlight: Cosmic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Sr. Christina Marie

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the influence of Hindu, Moslem, and Buddhist metaphysics on Maria Montessori's own pedagogical philosophy of Cosmic Education, which she regarded as the core of all learning experiences, after her visit to India. Considers the relationship between Montessori's ideas of child development and Cosmic Education, and the effect of Indian…

  14. What can we really learn from positron flux 'anomalies'?

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2009-01-01

    We present a critical analysis of the observational constraints on, and of the theoretical modeling of, aspects of cosmic ray (CR) generation and propagation in the Galaxy, which are relevant for the interpretation of recent positron and anti-proton measurements. We give simple, analytic, model independent expressions for the secondary pbar flux, and an upper limit for the secondary e+ flux, obtained by neglecting e+ radiative losses, e+/(e+ + e-)<0.2\\pm0.1 up to ~300 GeV. These expressions are completely determined by the rigidity dependent grammage, which is measured from stable CR secondaries up to ~150 GeV/nuc, and by nuclear cross sections measured in the laboratory. pbar and e+ measurements, available up to ~100 GeV, are consistent with these estimates, implying that there is no need for new, non-secondary, pbar or e+ sources. The radiative loss suppression factor f_{s,e+} of the e+ flux depends on the e+ propagation in the Galaxy, which is not understood theoretically. A rough, model independent est...

  15. Wormhole cosmic censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Ureña-López, L. Arturo; Miranda, Galaxia

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the properties of a Kerr-like wormhole supported by phantom matter, which is an exact solution of the Einstein-phantom field equations. It is shown that the solution has a naked ring singularity which is unreachable to null geodesics falling freely from the outside. Similarly to Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship, that states that all naked singularities in the Universe must be protected by event horizons, here we conjecture from our results that a naked singularity can also be fully protected by the intrinsic properties of a wormhole's throat.

  16. Cosmic baldness and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panchapakesan, N.; Lohiya, D.

    1985-04-01

    The stability of the de Sitter metric and the relevance of the initial state of a domain which approaches a de Sitter universe asymptotically are investigated analytically, adapting the one-dimensional wave equation with effective potential derived by Khanal and Panchapakesan (1981), for the perturbations of the de Sitter-Schwarzschild metric, to the de Sitter case. It is demonstrated that initial nonspherical perturbations do not increase exponentially with time but rather decay, the frozen modes exponentially and the backscattered perturbations of finite angular momentum l as t to the -(2l - l). It is concluded that the cosmic horizon is stable and has no hair. 14 references.

  17. Wormhole cosmic strings

    CERN Document Server

    Clément, G

    1995-01-01

    We construct regular multi-wormhole solutions to a gravitating \\sigma model in three space-time dimensions, and extend these solutions to cylindrical traversable wormholes in four and five dimensions. We then discuss the possibility of identifying wormhole mouths in pairs to give rise to Wheeler wormholes. Such an identification is consistent with the original field equations only in the absence of the \\sigma-model source, but with possible naked cosmic string sources. The resulting Wheeler wormhole space-times are flat outside the sources and may be asymptotically Minkowskian.

  18. Pulsars: Cosmic Permanent 'Neutromagnets'?

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We argue that pulsars may be spin-polarized neutron stars, i.e. cosmic permanent magnets. This would simply explain several observational facts about pulsars, including the 'beacon effect' itself i.e. the static/stable misalignment of rotational and magnetic axes, the extreme temporal stability of the pulses and the existence of an upper limit for the magnetic field strength - coinciding with the one observed in "magnetars". Although our model admittedly is speculative, this latter fact seems to us unlikely to be pure coincidence.

  19. Garden of cosmic speculation

    CERN Document Server

    Jencks, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This book tells the story of one of the most important gardens in Europe, created by the architectural critic and designer Charles Jencks and his late wife, the landscape architect and author Maggie Keswick. The Garden of Cosmic Speculation is a landscape that celebrates the new sciences of complexity and chaos theory and consists of a series of metaphors exploring the origins, the destiny and the substance of the Universe. The book is illustrated with year-round photography, bringing the garden's many dimensions vividly to life.

  20. Discovery of cosmic fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshev, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    This is the first book to present the fascinating new results on the largest fractal structures in the universe. It guides the reader, in a simple way, to the frontiers of astronomy, explaining how fractals appear in cosmic physics, from our solar system to the megafractals in deep space. It also offers a personal view of the history of the idea of self-similarity and of cosmological principles, from Plato's ideal architecture of the heavens to Mandelbrot's fractals in the modern physical cosmos. In addition, this invaluable book presents the great fractal debate in astronomy (after Luciano Pi

  1. Cosmic Ray ^3He Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmic ray ^3He/^4He observations, including a new measurement at ~65 MeV/nucleon from ISEE-3, are compared with interstellar propagation and solar modulation models in an effort to understand the origin of cosmic ray He nuclei.

  2. Self--gravitating cosmic rings

    OpenAIRE

    Clément, Gérard

    1998-01-01

    The classical Einstein--Maxwell field equations admit static horizonless wormhole solutions with only a circular cosmic string singularity. We show how to extend these static solutions to exact rotating asymptotically flat solutions. For a suitable range of parameter values, these solutions describe charged or neutral rotating closed cosmic strings, with a perimeter of the order of their Schwarzschild radius.

  3. George's cosmic treasure hunt

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Lucy; Parsons, Gary

    2009-01-01

    George and Annie explore the galaxy in this cosmic adventure from Stephen Hawking and Lucy Hawking, complete with essays from Professor Hawking about the latest in space travel. George is heartbroken when he learns that his friend Annie and her father are moving to the US. Eric has a new job working for the space program, looking for signs of life in the Universe. Eric leaves George with a gift—a book called The User’s Guide to the Universe. But Annie and Eric haven’t been gone for very long when Annie believes that she is being contacted by aliens, who have a terrible warning for her. George joins her in the US to help her with her quest—and before he knows it, he, Annie, Cosmos, and Annie’s annoying cousin Emmett have been swept up in a cosmic treasure hunt, spanning the whole galaxy and beyond. Lucy Hawking's own experiences in zero-gravity flight and interviews with astronauts at Cape Kennedy and the Johnson Space Center lend the book a sense of realism and excitement that is sure to fire up ima...

  4. Note on cosmic censorship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipler, F.J.

    1985-05-01

    A number of recent theorems by Krolak and Newman purport to prove cosmic censorship by showing that ''strong curvature'' singularities must be hidden behind horizons. It is proved that Newman's ''null, strong curvature'' condition, which is imposed on certain classes of null geodesics to restrict curvature growth in the space-time, does not hold in many physically realistic space-times: it is not satisfied by any null geodesic in the relevant class in any open Friedmann cosmological model, nor does it hold for any null geodesic in the relevant class in maximal Schwarzschild space. More generally, it is argued that the singularity predicted by the Penrose singularity theorem is unlikely to be of the type eliminated by Newman. Thus the Newman theorems are probably without physical significance. The Krolak theorems, although based on a physically significant definition of strong curvature singularity, are mathematically invalid, and this approach cannot be used to obtain a cosmic censorship theorem. (author).

  5. Evolution Of Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Vanchurin, V

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of finite loops and infinite strings as a part of a complete cosmic string network. We give dynamical arguments showing that the structures on infinite strings should obey a scaling law. We perform a simulation of the network which uses functional forms for the string position and thus is exact to the limits of computer arithmetic. The effective box size of our simulation is at least two orders of magnitude larger than what was previously reached. Our results confirm that the wiggles on the strings obey a scaling law described by universal power spectrum. The average distance between long strings also scales accurately with the time. Production functions of string loops do not show scaling. With low intercommutation probability p the true scaling régime is not reached until very late cosmic times, which makes it difficult to simulate such evolutions. Via the expansion of the box technique, we were able to reach scaling with a wide range of p. The physical correlation ...

  6. Cosmic particle acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimbardo, Gaetano; Perri, Silvia [Universita della Calabria, Dipartimento di Fisica, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The most popular mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic rays, which is thought to operate in supernova remnant shocks as well as at heliospheric shocks, is the diffusive shock acceleration, which is a Fermi mechanism based on normal diffusion. On the other hand, in the last few years it has been shown that the transport of plasma particles in the presence of electric and magnetic turbulence can be superdiffusive rather than normal diffusive. The term 'superdiffusive' refers to the mean square displacement of particle positions growing superlinearly with time, as compared to the normal linear growth. In particular, superdiffusion is characterized by a non Gaussian statistical process called Levy random walk. We show how diffusive shock acceleration is modified by superdiffusion, and how this yields new predictions for the cosmic ray spectral index, for the acceleration time, and for the spatial profile of energetic particles. A comparison with observations of particle acceleration at heliospheric shocks and at supernova remnant shocks is done. We discuss how superdiffusive shock acceleration allows to explain the observations of hard ion spectra at the solar wind termination shock detected by Voyager 2, of hard radio spectra due to synchrotron emission of electrons accelerated at supernova remnant shocks, and how it can help to explain the observations of 'thin rims' in the X-ray synchrotron emission.

  7. Genuine cosmic hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastor, David; Ray, Sourya; Traschen, Jennie

    2017-02-01

    We show that asymptotically future de Sitter (AFdS) spacetimes carry ‘genuine’ cosmic hair; information that is analogous to the mass and angular momentum of asymptotically flat spacetimes and that characterizes how an AFdS spacetime approaches its asymptotic form. We define new ‘cosmological tension’ charges associated with future asymptotic spatial translation symmetries, which are analytic continuations of the ADM mass and tensions of asymptotically planar AdS spacetimes, and which measure the leading anisotropic corrections to the isotropic, exponential de Sitter expansion rate. A cosmological Smarr relation, holding for AFdS spacetimes having exact spatial translation symmetry, is derived. This formula relates cosmological tension, which is evaluated at future infinity, to properties of the cosmology at early times, together with a ‘cosmological volume’ contribution that is analogous to the thermodynamic volume of AdS black holes. Smarr relations for different spatial directions imply that the difference in expansion rates between two directions at late times is related in a simple way to their difference at early times. Hence information about the very early universe can be inferred from cosmic hair, which is potentially observable in a late time de Sitter phase. Cosmological tension charges and related quantities are evaluated for Kasner–de Sitter spacetimes, which serve as our primary examples.

  8. L3 + Cosmics Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE4 %title\\\\ \\\\The L3+C experiment takes advantage of the unique properties of the L3 muon spectrometer to get an accurate measurement of cosmic ray muons 30 m underground. A new muon trigger, readout and DAQ system have been installed, as well as a scintillator array covering the upper surfaces of the L3 magnet for timing purposes. The acceptance amounts to 200 $m^2 sr$. The data are collected independently in parallel with L3 running. In spring 2000 a scintillator array will be installed on the roof of the SX hall in order to estimate the primary energy of air showers associated with events observed in L3+C.\\\\ \\\\The cosmic ray muon momentum spectrum, the zenith angular dependence and the charge ratio are measured with high accuracy between 20 and 2000 GeV/c. The results will provide new information about the primary composition, the shower development in the atmosphere, and the inclusive pion and kaon (production-) cross sections (specifically the "$\\pi$/K ratio") at high energies. These data will also hel...

  9. COSMIC monthly progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of May 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Nine articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) WFI - Windowing System for Test and Simulation; (2) HZETRN - A Free Space Radiation Transport and Shielding Program; (3) COMGEN-BEM - Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method; (4) IDDS - Interactive Data Display System; (5) CET93/PC - Chemical Equilibrium with Transport Properties, 1993; (6) SDVIC - Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation; (7) TRASYS - Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (HP9000 Series 700/800 Version without NASADIG); (8) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (VAX VMS Version); and (9) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version). Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  10. Cosmic rays and global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlykin, A.D. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sloan, T. [Lancaster University (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A.W. [Durham University (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The possible effects of cosmic rays on clouds could contribute to global warming. The argument is that the observed increased solar activity during the last century caused a decrease in the ionization due to cosmic rays since the lower energy cosmic particles are deflected by the magnetic field created by the increasing solar wind. This would lead to a decrease in cloud cover allowing more heating of the earth by the sun. Meteorological data combined to solar activity observations and simulations show that any effect of solar activity on clouds and the climate is likely to be through irradiance rather than cosmic rays. Since solar irradiance transfers 8 orders of magnitude more energy to the atmosphere than cosmic rays it is more plausible that this can produce a real effect. The total contribution of variable solar activity to global warming is shown to be less than 14% of the total temperature rise. (A.C.)

  11. Investigation of Cosmic Ray Transport and Search for Exotic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot-Clemente, Nicolas

    Precise multi-messenger measurements extending to TeV energies provide the means to confirm or refute much of the existing data, in particular, the observed high-energy positron enhancement, which may constitute evidence for dark matter particle annihilations. The proposed analysis effort would focus on galactic cosmic-ray spectra, element abundances, and measurements of cosmic-ray isotopes. A ring imaging Cherenkov detector and Monte Carlo simulations to reduce the signal selection uncertainties enable precise measurements of the radioisotope 10Be, which serves as a chronometer for cosmic-ray propagation models, in addition to secondary-to-primary ratios of B/C and sub-Fe/Fe up to 10 GeV/nucleon. The ratio of radioactive 10Be to stable 9Be is sensitive to the propagation lifetime of the cosmic rays. Ultra- precision detectors now measure these particles with accuracy for the coordinates to 10 micron, the travel time to 100 ps, and the velocity to 0.1%. A powerful magnet with a suite of particle detectors of large geometrical acceptance on the Space Station forms a magnetic spectrometer with resolving power capable of distinguishing an antihelium nucleus among ~10^10 background particles. The possible presence of cosmological antimatter and the nature of dark matter in the universe are fundamental physics questions of modern astrophysics and cosmology. The existence (or absence) of antimatter nuclei in space is tied to the theoretical foundation of elementary particle physics: CP-violation, baryon non-conservation, Grand Unified Theory, etc. Our fundamental research project addresses NASA s 2010 Science Plan for SMD s Science Goal for Astrophysics, specifically, the objective to "Understand the origin and destiny of the universe, and the nature of black holes, dark energy, dark matter, and gravity."

  12. Nonlinear excitations for the positron acoustic shock waves in dissipative nonextensive electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Asit

    2017-03-01

    Positron acoustic shock waves (PASHWs) in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasmas consisting of mobile cold positrons, immobile positive ions, q-nonextensive distributed electrons, and hot positrons are studied. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is considered and the reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the Burgers equation. Applying traveling wave transformation, the Burgers equation is transformed to a one dimensional dynamical system. All possible vector fields corresponding to the dynamical system are presented. We have analyzed the dynamical system with the help of potential energy, which helps to identify the stability and instability of the equilibrium points. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PASHWs. Furthermore, fully nonlinear arbitrary amplitude positron acoustic waves are also studied applying the theory of planar dynamical systems. It is also observed that the fundamental features of the small amplitude and arbitrary amplitude PASHWs are significantly affected by the effect of the physical parameters q e , q h , μ e , μ h , σ , η , and U. This work can be useful to understand the qualitative changes in the dynamics of nonlinear small amplitude and fully nonlinear arbitrary amplitude PASHWs in solar wind, ionosphere, lower part of magnetosphere, and auroral acceleration regions.

  13. Monoenergetic positron beam at the reactor based positron source at FRM-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Kögel, G.; Repper, R.; Schreckenbach, K.; Sperr, P.; Straßer, B.; Triftshäuser, W.

    2002-05-01

    The principle of the in-pile positron source at the Munich research reactor FRM-II is based on absorption of high energy prompt γ-rays from thermal neutron capture in 113Cd. For this purpose, a cadmium cap is placed inside the tip of the inclined beam tube SR-11 in the moderator tank of the reactor, where an undisturbed thermal neutron flux up to 2×10 14n cm-2 s-1 is expected. Inside the cadmium cap a structure of platinum foils is placed for converting high energy γ-radiation into positron-electron pairs. Due to the negative positron work function, moderation in annealed platinum leads to emission of monoenergetic positrons. Therefore, platinum will also be used as moderator, since its moderation property seems to yield long-term stability under reactor conditions and it is much easier to handle than tungsten. Model calculations were performed with SIMION-7.0w to optimise geometry and potential of Pt-foils and electrical lenses. It could be shown that the potentials between the Pt-foils must be chosen in the range of 1-10 V to extract moderated positrons. After successive acceleration to 5 keV by four electrical lenses the beam is magnetically guided in a solenoid field of 7.5 mT resulting in a beam diameter of about 25 mm. An intensity of about 10 10 slow positrons per second is expected in the primary positron beam. Outside of the reactor shield a W(1 0 0) single crystal remoderation stage will lead to an improvement of the positron beam brilliance before the positrons are guided to the experimental facilities.

  14. Imaging the attenuation coefficients of positron beams in matter: positron attenuation tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Charles [Siemens Healthcare, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-05-18

    A new positron annihilation imaging modality is described that enables nondestructive measurement of the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of positron beams in heterogeneous materials. This positron attenuation tomography (PAT) technique utilizes a positron emission tomography (PET) system embedded within a uniform static magnetic field, such as is found in integrated PET/MRI scanners. A Ga68-generated positron beam constrained by a 3T magnetic field penetrates objects placed within the scanner. The positrons slow down and annihilate within the object. The resulting annihilation distribution is tomographically imaged by the PET camera. This image may be interpreted as a map of the product of the positron beam's flux and its LAC at each point in the volume. It is shown that under certain easily achieved conditions this image can be decomposed into separate maps of the flux and the LACs, without need for auxiliary measurements. Although these LACs may depend on both beam and material properties, a beam softening correction is demonstrated that effectively removes the dependence on beam variation, leaving a relative LAC that is characteristic of the material. Unlike x-ray, gamma-ray or other transmission techniques, PAT does not require the penetration of the beam entirely through the object. High resolution and high contrast images of positron beam LACs in objects may be produced over nearly the full range of the positron beam, which for Ga68 beta-rays in a 3T field is about 0.5 g/cm{sup 2}. The first examples of PAT images and an initial characterization of performance will be presented.

  15. Time dependence of electron and positron fluxes measured with the AMS-02 spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Graziani, Maura; Duranti, Matteo

    The electrons (e-) and positrons (e+) are a rare component of Cosmic Rays (CRs) since they constitute respectively only a 1% and 0.1% of cosmic radiation. However, the correct detection of e+- covers a great importance in the astrophysics field since, unlike the hadronic component, they are subjected to strong energy losses through the interaction with Interstellar Medium. As consequence e with energies above GeV that reach the Earth are galactic, with the source inside Kpc and through the study of their primary spectra it is possible to probe the local interstellar medium (LIS) and to indirectly detect new possible sources like pulsar or dark matter. However, these spectra, when measured near Earth, are significantly affected by the solar activity and we have the so-called solar modulation of CRs (SM). The solar activity has a cycle which period is ~11 years, during which it increases reaching a maximum and then decreases again. The intensity of cosmic ray radiation is correlated (or rather anticorrelated...

  16. Vortices in Ionization Collisions by Positron Impact

    CERN Document Server

    Navarrete, F; Fiol, J; Barrachina, R O

    2013-01-01

    The presence of vortices in the ionisation of hydrogen atoms by positrons at intermediate impact energies is investigated. The present findings show that a previously reported minima in the fully-differential cross section is the signature of a vortex in the continuum positron-electron-proton system. The behaviour of the real and imaginary parts of the complex-valued transition matrix is studied in order to determine and characterize the vortex in momentum space. The obtained information is translated to fully-differential ionisation cross sections, feasible of being measured with currently available techniques.

  17. Positronium Formation in Positron-Lithium Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程勇军; 周雅君; 刘芳

    2011-01-01

    The positronium formation process in positron scattering with atomic lithium is investigated using the coupledchannel optical method.The cross sections of positronium formation into the n =1 and n =2 levels from 2 to 60 e V are reported.The present results show reasonable agreement with the available experimental measurements and theoretical calculations.%The positronium formation process in positron scattering with atomic lithium is investigated using the coupled-channel optical method. The cross sections of positronium formation into the n = 1 and n = 2 levels from 2 to 60 e V are reported. The present results show reasonable agreement with the available experimental measurements and theoretical calculations.

  18. A compact positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dao-Wu; LIU Jun-Hui; ZHANG Zhi-Ming; WANG Bao-Yi; ZHANG Tian-Bao; WEI Long

    2011-01-01

    Using LYSO scintillator coupled on HAMAMATSU R9800(a fast photomultiplier)to form the small size γ-ray detectors,a compact lifetime spectrometer has been built for the positron annihilation experiments.The system time resolution FWHM=193 ps and the coincidence counting rate -8 cps/μCi were achieved.A lifetime value of 219±1 ps of positron annihilation in well annealed Si was tested,which is in agreement with the typical values published in the previous lectures.

  19. 89Zr radiochemistry for positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Gregory W; Engle, Jonathan W; Barnhart, Todd E; Nickles, R Jerry

    2011-09-01

    The positron emitting isotope (89)Zr is an ideal radionuclide for use in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). This article reviews the cyclotron physics of (89)Zr production, and the chemical separation methods for isolating it from yttrium target material. (89)Zr coordination with the bifunctional chelate desferrioxamine B is discussed, along with the common procedures for attaching the chelate to mAbs. The review is intended to detail the procedure for creating (89)Zr labeled mAbs, going from cyclotron to PET.

  20. Depolarization in the ILC Linac-to-Ring Positron Beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Riemann, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    To achieve the physics goals of future Linear Colliders, it is important that electron and positron beams are polarized. The positron source planned for the International Linear Collider (ILC) is based on a helical undulator system and can deliver a polarised beam with positron polarization of 60%. To ensure that no significant polarization is lost during the transport of the electron and positron beams from the source to the interaction region, spin tracking has to be included in all transport elements which can contribute to a loss of polarization. These are the positron source, the damping ring, the spin rotators, the main linac and the beam delivery system. In particular, the dynamics of the polarized positron beam is required to be investigated. The results of positron spin tracking and depolarization study at the Positron-Linac-To-Ring (PLTR) beamline are presented.

  1. DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS INTERACTING WITH DETECTOR MATERIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIRING, WJ; VANKLINKEN, J; WICHERS, VA

    1991-01-01

    A theory of multiple scattering, exhibiting differences between electrons and positrons in interactions with matter, is developed. Additional differences in stopping power and annihilation for positrons are briefly discussed. Experimental verification of these differences is reported for plastic sci

  2. Fundamental Physics from the Sky: Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays and the Hunt for Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Can we learn about New Physics with astronomical and astro-particle data? Understanding how this is possible is key to unraveling one of the most pressing mysteries at the interface of cosmology and particle physics: the fundamental nature of dark matter. I will discuss some of the recent puzzling findings in cosmic-ray electron-positron data and in gamma-ray observations that might be related to dark matter. I will argue that recent cosmic-ray data, most notably from the Pamela and Fermi satellites, indicate that previously unaccounted-for powerful sources in the Galaxy inject high-energy electrons and positrons. Interestingly, this new source class might be related to new fundamental particle physics, and specifically to pair-annihilation or decay of galactic dark matter. This exciting scenario is directly constrained by Fermi gamma-ray observations, which also inform us on astrophysical source counterparts that could also be responsible for the high-energy electron-positron excess. Observations of gamma-ra...

  3. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    CERN Document Server

    Recchia, S; Morlino, G

    2016-01-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfven waves, that in turn determine the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the impli...

  4. Decaying Dark Matter in Supersymmetric Model and Cosmic-Ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ishiwata, Koji; Moroi, Takeo

    2010-01-01

    We study cosmic-rays in decaying dark matter scenario, assuming that the dark matter is the lightest superparticle and it decays through a R-parity violating operator. We calculate the fluxes of cosmic-rays from the decay of the dark matter and those from the standard astrophysical phenomena in the same propagation model using the GALPROP package. We reevaluate the preferred parameters characterizing standard astrophysical cosmic-ray sources with taking account of the effects of dark matter decay. We show that, if energetic leptons are produced by the decay of the dark matter, the fluxes of cosmic-ray positron and electron can be in good agreements with both PAMELA and Fermi-LAT data in wide parameter region. It is also discussed that, in the case where sizable number of hadrons are also produced by the decay of the dark matter, the mass of the dark matter is constrained to be less than 200-300 GeV in order to avoid the overproduction of anti-proton. We also show that the cosmic gamma-ray flux can be consiste...

  5. Origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays from Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhko, E G

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the results of recent measurements of Galactic cosmic ray (GCRs) energy spectra and the spectra of nonthermal emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) in order to determine their consistency with GCR origin in SNRs. It is shown that the measured primary and secondary CR nuclei energy spectra as well as the observed positron-to-electron ratio are consistent with the origin of GCRs up to the energy 10^17 eV in SNRs. Existing SNR emission data provide evidences for efficient CR production in SNRs accompanied by significant magnetic field amplification. In some cases the nature of the detected gamma-ray emission is difficult to determine because key SNR parameters are not known or poorly constrained.

  6. Cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kronberg, Philipp P

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are important in the Universe and their effects contain the key to many astrophysical phenomena that are otherwise impossible to understand. This book presents an up-to-date overview of this fast-growing topic and its interconnections to plasma processes, astroparticle physics, high energy astrophysics, and cosmic evolution. The phenomenology and impact of magnetic fields are described in diverse astrophysical contexts within the Universe, from galaxies to the filaments and voids of the intergalactic medium, and out to the largest redshifts. The presentation of mathematical formulae is accessible and is designed to add insight into the broad range of topics discussed. Written for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics and related disciplines, this volume will inspire readers to devise new ways of thinking about magnetic fields in space on galaxy scales and beyond.

  7. Microphysics of cosmic plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, Andrei; Cargill, Peter; Dendy, Richard; Wit, Thierry; Raymond, John

    2014-01-01

    This title presents a review of the detailed aspects of the physical processes that underlie the observed properties, structures and dynamics of cosmic plasmas. An assessment of the status of understanding of microscale processes in all astrophysical collisionless plasmas is provided. The topics discussed include  turbulence in astrophysical and solar system plasmas as a phenomenological description of their dynamic properties on all scales; observational, theoretical and modelling aspects of collisionless magnetic reconnection; the formation and dynamics of shock waves; and a review and assessment of microprocesses, such as the hierarchy of plasma instabilities, non-local and non-diffusive transport processes and ionisation and radiation processes.  In addition, some of the lessons that have been learned from the extensive existing knowledge of laboratory plasmas as applied to astrophysical problems are also covered.   This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in the areas of cosmi...

  8. The Cosmic Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Aled

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a brief review of current theory and observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB. New predictions for cosmological defect theories and an overview of the inflationary theory are discussed. Recent results from various observations of the anisotropies of the microwave background are described and a summary of the proposed experiments is presented. A new analysis technique based on Bayesian statistics that can be used to reconstruct the underlying sky fluctuations is summarised. Current CMB data is used to set some preliminary constraints on the values of fundamental cosmological parameters $Omega$ and $H_circ$ using the maximum likelihood technique. In addition, secondary anisotropies due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are described.

  9. Acceleration of cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhko, E [Yu.G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Ave., 677980 Yakutsk (Russian Federation)], E-mail: berezhko@ikfia.ysn.ru

    2008-07-15

    Cosmic ray (CR) origin problem is briefly discussed. It is argued that CRs with energies up to 10{sup 17} eV are produced in galactic supernova remnants, whereas ultra high energy CRs are extragalactic. CR composition strongly changes within the transition from galactic to extragalactic CR component, therefore precise measurements of CR composition at energies 10{sup 17} - 10{sup 19} eV are needed for the reliable determination of this transition. The possible sources of extragalactic CRs are briefly discussed. It is argued that CR acceleration at the shock created by the expanding cocoons around active galactic nuclei has to be considered as a prime candidate for the sources of extragalactic CRs.

  10. Cosmic string loop shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J; Shlaer, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the shapes of cosmic string loops found in large-scale simulations of an expanding-universe string network. The simulation does not include gravitational back reaction, but we model that process by smoothing the loop using Lorentzian convolution. We find that loops at formation consist of generally straight segments separated by kinks. We do not see cusps or any cusp-like structure at the scale of the entire loop, although we do see very small regions of string that move with large Lorentz boosts. However, smoothing of the string almost always introduces two cusps on each loop. The smoothing process does not lead to any significant fragmentation of loops that were in non-self-intersecting trajectories before smoothing.

  11. Simulating Cosmic Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, D H; Hernquist, L E; Weinberg, David H.; Katz, Neal; Hernquist, Lars

    1997-01-01

    We describe cosmological simulation techniques and their application to studies of cosmic structure formation, with particular attention to recent hydrodynamic simulations of structure in the high redshift universe. Collisionless N-body simulations with Gaussian initial conditions produce a pattern of sheets, filaments, tunnels, and voids that resembles the observed large scale galaxy distribution. Simulations that incorporate gas dynamics and dissipation form dense clumps of cold gas with sizes and masses similar to the luminous parts of galaxies. Models based on inflation and cold dark matter predict a healthy population of high redshift galaxies, including systems with star formation rates of 20 M_{\\sun}/year at z=6. At z~3, most of the baryons in these models reside in the low density intergalactic medium, which produces fluctuating Lyman-alpha absorption in the spectra of background quasars. The physical description of this ``Lyman-alpha forest'' is particularly simple if the absorption spectrum is viewe...

  12. Cosmic Light EDU kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    In 2015 we celebrate the International Year of Light, a great opportunity to promote awareness about the importance of light coming from the Cosmos and what messages it is bringing to mankind. In parallel a unique moment to attract the attention of stakeholders on the dangers of light pollution and its impact in our lives and our pursuit of more knowledge. In this presentation I want to present one of the conrnerstones of IYL2015, a partnership between the Galileo Teacher Training Program, Universe Awareness and Globe at Night, the Cosmic Light EDU kit. The aim of this project is to assemble a core set of tools and resources representing our basic knowledge pilars about the Universe and simple means to preserve our night sky.

  13. On Strong Cosmic Censorship

    CERN Document Server

    Isenberg, James

    2015-01-01

    For almost half of the one hundred year history of Einstein's theory of general relativity, Strong Cosmic Censorship has been one of its most intriguing conjectures. The SCC conjecture addresses the issue of the nature of the singularities found in most solutions of Einstein's gravitational field equations: Are such singularities generically characterized by unbounded curvature? Is the existence of a Cauchy horizon (and the accompanying extensions into spacetime regions in which determinism fails) an unstable feature of solutions of Einstein's equations? In this short review article, after briefly commenting on the history of the SCC conjecture, we survey some of the progress made in research directed either toward supporting SCC or toward uncovering some of its weaknesses. We focus in particular on model versions of SCC which have been proven for restricted families of spacetimes (e.g., the Gowdy spacetimes), and the role played by the generic presence of Asymptotically Velocity Term Dominated behavior in th...

  14. Cosmic ray synergies

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    In laboratories, cosmic rays have been the subject of scientific research for many years. A more recent development is their appearance in schools, as educational tools. A recent workshop at CERN, organised by ASPERA in collaboration with EPPOG and EPPCN, had the goal of bringing together ideas and initiatives with a view to setting up a future common project.   Presentation at the workshop on 15 October. In research, as in education, you can sometimes get things done more rapidly and easily by joining forces. For roughly the past decade, physicists have been taking their particle detectors to secondary schools. “The challenge now is to bring all of these existing projects together in a network,” says Arnaud Marsollier, in charge of communication for the ASPERA network and organiser of the workshop. The workshop held on Friday, 15 October was attended by representatives of major European educational projects and members of the European Particle Physics Communication Network...

  15. Genuine Cosmic Hair

    CERN Document Server

    Kastor, David; Traschen, Jennie

    2016-01-01

    We show that asymptotically future deSitter (AFdS) spacetimes carry 'genuine' cosmic hair; information that is analogous to the mass and angular momentum of asymptotically flat spacetimes and that characterizes how an AFdS spacetime approaches its asymptotic form. We define new 'cosmological tension' charges associated with future asymptotic spatial translation symmetries, which are analytic continuations of the ADM mass and tensions of asymptotically planar AdS spacetimes, and which measure the leading anisotropic corrections to the isotropic, exponential deSitter expansion rate. A cosmological Smarr relation, holding for AFdS spacetimes having exact spatial translation symmetry, is derived. This formula relates cosmological tension, which is evaluated at future infinity, to properties of the cosmology at early times, together with a 'cosmological volume' contribution that is analogous to the thermodynamic volume of AdS black holes. Smarr relations for different spatial directions imply that the difference i...

  16. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voutier Eric

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  17. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, Eric J.-M. [UNIV. JOSEPH FOURNIER, GRENOBLE, France

    2014-06-01

    Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  18. The multilayer Fe/Hf studied with slow positron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Nakajyo, T.; Koizumi, T.; Kanazawa, I.; Komori, F.; Ito, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The positron annihilation parameter versus the incident positron energy is measured in the thin Fe films and the Fe/Hf bilayer on silica substrate, by means of the variable energetic slow-positron beam technique. We have analyzed the change in open-volume spaces and vacancy-type defects among the Fe microcrystals in these thin films with the deposition temperature.

  19. Positron Annihilation Studies of VVER Type Reactor Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Brauer, G.

    1995-01-01

    A summary of recent positron annihilation work on Russian VVER type reactor steels is presented. Thereby, special attention is paid to the outline of basic processes that might help to understand the positron behaviour in this class of industrial material. The idea of positron trapping by irradiation-induced precipitates, which are probably carbides, is discussed in detail.

  20. Positron methods for the study of defects in bulk materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1995-01-01

    The basic principles of positron annihilation physics are briefly discussed and the three most important experimental techniques used for bulk studies are described (i.e. positron lifetime, angular correlation, Doppler broadening). Several examples of the use of the positron methods are discussed...

  1. THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, James C.; Michael Shull, J.; Snow, Theodore P.; Stocke, John [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 391-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Ebbets, Dennis [Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., 1600 Commerce Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Heap, Sara H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 681, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Leitherer, Claus; Sembach, Kenneth [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Savage, Blair D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Siegmund, Oswald H. W. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Spencer, John; Alan Stern, S. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Welsh, Barry [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009 May, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F{sub {lambda}} Almost-Equal-To 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph echelle modes) in 1%-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (2009 September-2011 June) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is nine times than sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of 2011 June. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Ly{alpha} absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the He II reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  2. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J. Michael; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Snow, Theodore P.; Spencer, John; Stern, S. Alan; Stocke, John; Welsh, Barry; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian; McPhate, Jason; Penton, Steven V; Andrews, John; Morse, Jon

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F(sub lambda) approximates 1.0 X 10(exp -14) ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lya absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the HeII reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  3. Test particle trajectories near cosmic strings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Farook Rahaman; Subenoy Chakraborty; K Maity

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the motion of test particle in the gravitational field of cosmic strings in different situations using the Hamilton–Jacobi (H–J) formalism. We have discussed the trajectories near static cosmic string, cosmic string in Brans–Dicke theory and cosmic string in dilaton gravity.

  4. The PAMELA experiment: a decade of Cosmic Ray Physics in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, A. M.; Sparvoli, R.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; Di Felice, V.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S. A.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A. A.; Malakhov, V. V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergè, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Simon, M.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2017-01-01

    The PAMELA detector was launched on June 15 th of 2006 on board the Russian Resurs-DK1 satellite and during ten years of continuous data-taking it has observed very interesting features in cosmic rays, especially in the fluxes of protons, helium and electrons. Moreover, PAMELA measurements of cosmic antiproton and positron fluxes and positron-to-all-electron ratio have set strong constraints to the nature of Dark Matter. Measurements of boron, carbon, lithium and beryllium (together with the isotopic fraction) have also shed new light on the elemental composition of the cosmic radiation. Search for signatures of more exotic processes (such as the ones involving Strange Quark Matter) has also been pursued. Furthermore, over the years the instrument has allowed a constant monitoring of the solar activity and a prolonged study of the solar modulation, improving the comprehension of the heliosphere mechanisms. PAMELA has also measured the radiation environment around the Earth, and detected for the first time the presence of an antiproton radiation belt surrounding our planet. In this highlight paper PAMELA main results will be reviewed.

  5. A cosmic microwave background feature consistent with a cosmic texture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M; Turok, N; Vielva, P; Martínez-González, E; Hobson, M

    2007-12-07

    The Cosmic Microwave Background provides our most ancient image of the universe and our best tool for studying its early evolution. Theories of high-energy physics predict the formation of various types of topological defects in the very early universe, including cosmic texture, which would generate hot and cold spots in the Cosmic Microwave Background. We show through a Bayesian statistical analysis that the most prominent 5 degrees -radius cold spot observed in all-sky images, which is otherwise hard to explain, is compatible with having being caused by a texture. From this model, we constrain the fundamental symmetry-breaking energy scale to be (0) approximately 8.7 x 10(15) gigaelectron volts. If confirmed, this detection of a cosmic defect will probe physics at energies exceeding any conceivable terrestrial experiment.

  6. Spherical Orbifolds for Cosmic Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Harmonic analysis is a tool to infer cosmic topology from the measured astrophysical cosmic microwave background CMB radiation. For overall positive curvature, Platonic spherical manifolds are candidates for this analysis. We combine the specific point symmetry of the Platonic manifolds with their deck transformations. This analysis in topology leads from manifolds to orbifolds. We discuss the deck transformations of the orbifolds and give basis functions for the harmonic analysis as linear combinations of Wigner polynomials on the 3-sphere. They provide new tools for detecting cosmic topology from the CMB radiation.

  7. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    cloud radiative properties. Thus, a moderate influence on atmospheric aerosol distributions from cosmic ray ionisation would have a strong influence on the Earth's radiation budget. Historical evidence over the past 1000 years indicates that changes in climate have occurred in accord with variability...... in the Earth's radiation budget through trapping outgoing radiation and reflecting incoming radiation. If a physical link between these two features can be established, it would provide a mechanism linking solar activity and Earth's climate. Recent satellite observations have further revealed a correlation...... in cosmic ray intensities. Such changes are in agreement with the sign of cloud radiative forcing associated with cosmic ray variability as estimated from satellite observations....

  8. Signatures of SUSY dark matter at the LHC and in the spectra of cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olzem, J.

    2007-02-27

    This thesis discusses the search for supersymmetry at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the ongoing construction of one of the four large LHC experiments, the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), and focuses on the detection of signals from the annihilation of supersymmetric dark matter in the spectra of cosmic rays. The final steps of assembly of 1061 silicon microstrip detector modules for the CMS tracker endcaps are performed at the 1. Physikalisches Institut B at the RWTH Aachen. A laser test facility for these modules was developed and is described in this thesis. In contrast to test procedures based only on the evaluation of pedestal and noise data, the test facility relies on the generation of signals in the silicon sensors by infrared laser illumination. The fully automatic test facility provides high throughput and easy operation for the series production of the modules. Its performance is validated by investigating a reference module with artificially prepared defects of three types: open wirebonds, short-circuited strips and pinholes. It is shown that all defects are clearly detected. In addition to defect detection, an indication for the type of defect is provided. In a further validation step, nine modules from a prototype series are investigated with the laser test facility. Confirming the earlier results on the reference module, defective strips are reliably identified. This thesis describes a novel approach of positron identification with the space-borne AMS-01 experiment, namely through the detection of bremsstrahlung conversion in a silicon microstrip detector. In order to obtain the highest positron selection efficiency possible, novel combinatorial track finding algorithms were developed, particularly optimized for the signature of converted bremsstrahlung. By applying restrictions on the invariant mass of particles the background to the positron sample is largely eliminated. The remaining background contamination is determined from large

  9. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...

  10. A compact positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李道武; 刘军辉; 章志明; 王宝义; 张天保; 魏龙

    2011-01-01

    Using LYSO scintillator coupled on HAMAMATSU R9800 (a fast photomultiplier) to form the small size γ-ray detectors, a compact lifetime spectrometer has been built for the positron annihilation experiments. The system time resolution FWHM=193 ps and the co

  11. Positron production in collision of heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Khriplovich, I B

    2016-01-01

    We consider the electromagnetic production of positron in collision of slow heavy nuclei, with the simultaneously produced electron captured by one of the nuclei. The cross-section of the discussed process exceeds essentially the cross-section of $e^+e^-$ production.

  12. Is positron emission tomography useful in stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeReuck, J; Leys, D; DeKeyser, J

    1997-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in the study of stroke and related cerebrovascular diseases. It has shown the various stages leading to cerebral infarction and defined the significance of the ischaemic penumbra. PET scan can predict the clinical outcome of patients with acute

  13. Positron annihilation with core and valence electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Green, D G

    2015-01-01

    $\\gamma$-ray spectra for positron annihilation with the core and valence electrons of the noble gas atoms Ar, Kr and Xe is calculated within the framework of diagrammatic many-body theory. The effect of positron-atom and short-range positron-electron correlations on the annihilation process is examined in detail. Short-range correlations, which are described through non-local corrections to the vertex of the annihilation amplitude, are found to significantly enhance the spectra for annihilation on the core orbitals. For Ar, Kr and Xe, the core contributions to the annihilation rate are found to be 0.55\\%, 1.5\\% and 2.2\\% respectively, their small values reflecting the difficulty for the positron to probe distances close to the nucleus. Importantly however, the core subshells have a broad momentum distribution and markedly contribute to the annihilation spectra at Doppler energy shifts $\\gtrsim3$\\,keV, and even dominate the spectra of Kr and Xe at shifts $\\gtrsim5$\\,keV. Their inclusion brings the theoretical ...

  14. A positron moderator using porous metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bao-Yi; YU Run-Sheng; ZHAO Fa-Ru; MA Chuang-Xin; ZHANG Tian-Bao; WEI Long

    2004-01-01

    Two types of porous metal moderators (i.e. porous nickel layer and multi-wire tungsten layer) are proposed and tested on a slow positron beam line. A moderation efficiency of about 2×10-4 has been achieved, which is higher than that for W vane geometry moderator by a factor of 4.

  15. Positrons observed to originate from thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2011-05-01

    Thunderstorms are the result of warm, moist air moving rapidly upward, then cooling and condensing. Electrification occurs within thunderstorms (as noted by Benjamin Franklin), produced primarily by frictional processes among ice particles. This leads to lightning discharges; the types, intensities, and rates of these discharges vary greatly among thunderstorms. Even though scientists have been studying lightning since Franklin's time, new phenomena associated with thunderstorms are still being discovered. In particular, a recent finding by Briggs et al. [2011], based on observations by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) instrument on NASA's satellite-based Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), shows that positrons are also generated by thunderstorms. Positrons are the antimatter form of electrons—they have the same mass and charge as an electron but are of positive rather than negative charge; hence the name positron. Observations of positrons from thunderstorms may lead to a new tool for understanding the electrification and high-energy processes occurring within thunderstorms. New theories, along with new observational techniques, are rapidly evolving in this field.

  16. Positron elastic scattering from alkaline earth targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Luis A.; Assafrão, Denise; Mohallem, José R.

    2016-07-01

    A previously reported model potential approach [Poveda et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 052702 (2013)] was extended to study low energy positron elastic scattering from beryllium and magnesium. The cross sections were computed for energies ranging from 10-5 eV up to well above the positronium formation threshold. The present results are in good agreement with previous reports, including the prediction of a p-wave resonance in the cross section for magnesium. The emergence of this shape resonance is connected to a trend observed in the evolution of the partial wave cross section in going from Be to Mg target. This trend lead us to speculate that a sharp d-wave resonance should be observed in positron elastic scattering from calcium. The positron-target binding energies are investigated in detail, both using the scattering information and by direct computation of the bound state energies using the model potentials. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70120-y

  17. Positron source position sensing detector and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Charles A.; Bradshaw, Jr., John F.; Kaufman, David E.; Chesler, David A.; Brownell, Gordon L.

    1985-01-01

    A positron source, position sensing device, particularly with medical applications, in which positron induced gamma radiation is detected using a ring of stacked, individual scintillation crystals, a plurality of photodetectors, separated from the scintillation crystals by a light guide, and high resolution position interpolation electronics. Preferably the scintillation crystals are several times more numerous than the photodetectors with each crystal being responsible for a single scintillation event from a received gamma ray. The light guide will disperse the light emitted from gamma ray absorption over several photodetectors. Processing electronics for the output of the photodetectors resolves the location of the scintillation event to a fraction of the dimension of each photodetector. Because each positron absorption results in two 180.degree. oppositely traveling gamma rays, the detection of scintillation in pairs permits location of the positron source in a manner useful for diagnostic purposes. The processing electronics simultaneously responds to the outputs of the photodetectors to locate the scintillations to the source crystal. While it is preferable that the scintillation crystal include a plurality of stacked crystal elements, the resolving power of the processing electronics is also applicable to continuous crystal scintillators.

  18. Positron analysis of defects in metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, A; Kruseman, AC; Schut, H; Mijnarends, PE; Kooi, BJ; De Hosson, JTM; Jean, YC; Eldrup, M; Schrader, DM; West, RN

    1997-01-01

    New methods are discussed to improve defect analysis. The first method employs mapping of two shape parameters, S and W, of the positron annihilation photopeak. It is demonstrated that the combined use of S and W allows to a better discrimination of defects. The other method is based on background s

  19. Positron Impact Mransitions of Atomic Sodium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Yong-Jun; ZHOU YarJun

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present a new investigation of elastic and inelastic positron-sodium scattering by using the coupled-channel optical method(CCO)at an incident energy region of 2-100eV.The ionization continuum and positronium formation channels have been included via a complex equivalent-local optical potential.The present calculations are compared with available theoretical data and our investigation indicates that the inclusion of ionization and Ps-formation channels in the present calculations has a significant effect on the cross sections of elastic and inelastic positron-sodium scattering at lower energies.%We present a new investigation of elastic and inelastic positron-sodium scattering by using the coupled-channel optical method (CCO) at an incident energy region of 2-100eV. The ionization continuum and positronium formation channels have been included via a complex equivalent-local optical potential. The present calculations are compared with available theoretical data and our investigation indicates that the inclusion of ionization and Ps-formation channels in the present calculations has a significant effect on the cross sections of elastic and inelastic positron-sodium scattering at lower energies.

  20. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  1. Positron emission tomography : measurement of transgene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vaalburg, W

    2002-01-01

    Noninvasive and repetitive imaging of transgene expression can play a pivotal role in the development of gene therapy strategies, as it offers investigators a means to determine the effectiveness of their gene transfection protocols. In the last decade, imaging of transgene expression using positron

  2. Intense positron beam as a source for production of electron-positron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, M. R.; Horn-Stanja, J.; Stenson, E. V.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Saitoh, H.; Hergenhahn, U.; Niemann, H.; Paschkowski, N.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Piochacz, C.

    2016-10-01

    We aim to produce magnetically confined, short Debye length electron-positron plasma and test predicted properties for such systems. A first challenge is obtaining large numbers of positrons; a table-top experiment (system size 5 cm) with a temperature less than 5 eV requires about 1010 positrons to have more than 10 Debye lengths in the system. The NEPOMUC facility at the FRM II research reactor in Germany is one of the world's most intense positron sources. We report on characterization (using a retarding field energy analyzer with magnetic field gradient) of the NEPOMUC beam as delivered to the open beam port at various beam energies and in both the re-moderated and primary beam configurations in order to design optimal trapping (and accumulation) schemes for production of electron-positron plasma. The intensity of the re-moderated (primary) beam is in the range 2 -3 x 107 /s (1 - 5 x 108 /s). The re-moderated beam is currently the most promising for direct injection and confinement experiments; it has a parallel energy spread of 15 - 35% and the transverse energy spread is 6 - 15% of the parallel energy. We report on the implications for injection and trapping in a dipole magnetic field as well as plans for beam development, in situ re-moderation, and accumulation. We also report results demonstrating a difference in phosphor luminescent response to low energy positrons versus electrons.

  3. A CF4 based positron trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanović, Srdjan; Banković, Ana; Cassidy, David; Cooper, Ben; Deller, Adam; Dujko, Saša; Petrović, Zoran Lj

    2016-11-01

    All buffer-gas positron traps in use today rely on N2 as the primary trapping gas due to its conveniently placed {{{a}}}1{{\\Pi }} electronic excitation cross-section. The energy loss per excitation in this process is 8.5 eV, which is sufficient to capture positrons from low-energy moderated beams into a Penning-trap configuration of electric and magnetic fields. However, the energy range over which this cross-section is accessible overlaps with that for positronium (Ps) formation, resulting in inevitable losses and setting an intrinsic upper limit on the overall trapping efficiency of ∼25%. In this paper we present a numerical simulation of a device that uses CF4 as the primary trapping gas, exploiting vibrational excitation as the main inelastic capture process. The threshold for such excitations is far below that for Ps formation and hence, in principle, a CF4 trap can be highly efficient; our simulations indicate that it may be possible to achieve trapping efficiencies as high as 90%. We also report the results of an attempt to re-purpose an existing two-stage N2-based buffer-gas positron trap. Operating the device using CF4 proved unsuccessful, which we attribute to back scattering and expansion of the positron beam following interactions with the CF4 gas, and an unfavourably broad longitudinal beam energy spread arising from the magnetic field differential between the source and trap regions. The observed performance was broadly consistent with subsequent simulations that included parameters specific to the test system, and we outline the modifications that would be required to realise efficient positron trapping with CF4. However, additional losses appear to be present which require further investigation through both simulation and experiment.

  4. Cosmic muon tomography of pure cesium iodide calorimeter crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Frlez, E; Assamagan, Ketevi A; Brönnimann, C; Flügel, T; Krause, B; Lawrence, D W; Mzhavia, D A; Pocanic, D; Renker, D; Ritt, S; Slocum, P L; Soic, N; Br"onnimann, Ch.; Fl"ugel, Th.

    2000-01-01

    Scintillation properties of pure CsI crystals used in the shower calorimeter being built for precise determination of the pi+ -> pi0 e+ nu decay rate are reported. Seventy-four individual crystals, polished and wrapped in Teflon foil, were examined in a multiwire drift chamber system specially designed for transmission cosmic muon tomography. Critical elements of the apparatus and reconstruction algorithms enabling measurement of spatial detector optical nonuniformities are described. Results are compared with a Monte Carlo simulation of the light response of an ideal detector. The deduced optical nonuniformity contributions to the FWHM energy resolution of the PIBETA CsI calorimeter for the pi+ -> e+ nu 69.8 MeV positrons and the monoenergetic 70.8 MeV photons were 2.7% and 3.7%, respectively. The upper limit of optical nonuniformity correction to the 69.8 MeV positron low-energy tail between 5 MeV and 55 MeV was +0.2%, as opposed to the +0.3% tail contribution for the photon of the equivalent total energy. ...

  5. Contributions to cosmic reionization from dark matter annihilation and decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongwan; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Zavala, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Dark matter annihilation or decay could have a significant impact on the ionization and thermal history of the universe. In this paper, we study the potential contribution of dark matter annihilation (s -wave- or p -wave-dominated) or decay to cosmic reionization, via the production of electrons, positrons and photons. We map out the possible perturbations to the ionization and thermal histories of the universe due to dark matter processes, over a broad range of velocity-averaged annihilation cross sections/decay lifetimes and dark matter masses. We have employed recent numerical studies of the efficiency with which annihilation/decay products induce heating and ionization in the intergalactic medium, and in this work extended them down to a redshift of 1 +z =4 for two different reionization scenarios. We also improve on earlier studies by using the results of detailed structure formation models of dark matter haloes and subhaloes that are consistent with up-to-date N -body simulations, with estimates on the uncertainties that originate from the smallest scales. We find that for dark matter models that are consistent with experimental constraints, a contribution of more than 10% to the ionization fraction at reionization is disallowed for all annihilation scenarios. Such a contribution is possible only for decays into electron/positron pairs, for light dark matter with mass mχ≲100 MeV , and a decay lifetime τχ˜1 024- 1 025 s .

  6. Dark matter and cosmic structure

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We review the current standard model for the evolution of cosmic structure, tracing its development over the last forty years and focusing specifically on the role played by numerical simulations and on aspects related to the nature of dark matter.

  7. Inhomogeneous recombinations during cosmic reionization

    OpenAIRE

    Sobacchi, Emanuele; Mesinger, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    By depleting the ionizing photon budget available to expand cosmic HII regions, recombining systems (or Lyman limit systems) can have a large impact during (and following) cosmic reionization. Unfortunately, directly resolving such structures in large-scale reionization simulations is computationally impractical. Instead, here we implement a sub-grid prescription for tracking inhomogeneous recombinations in the intergalactic medium. Building on previous work parameterizing photo-heating feedb...

  8. Cosmic rays from thermal sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wlodarczyk, Z

    2007-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays (CR) exhibits very characteristic power-like behavior with the "knee" structure. We consider a generalized statistical model for the production process of cosmic rays which accounts for such behavior in a natural way either by assuming the existence of temperature fluctuations in the source of CR, or by assuming specific temperature distribution of the CR sources. Both possibilities yield the so called Tsallis statistics and lead to the power-like distribution.

  9. Cosmic rays and Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    During the last solar cycle the Earth's cloud cover underwent a modulation in phase with the cosmic ray flux. Assuming that there is a causal relationship between the two, it is expected and found that the Earth's temperature follows more closely decade variations in cosmic ray flux than other...... solar activity parameters. If the relationship is real the state of the Heliosphere affects the Earth's climate....

  10. Calculation of cosmic ray induced single event upsets: Program CRUP (Cosmic Ray Upset Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, P.

    1983-09-01

    This report documents PROGRAM CRUP, COSMIC RAY UPSET PROGRAM. The computer program calculates cosmic ray induced single-event error rates in microelectronic circuits exposed to several representative cosmic-ray environments.

  11. Fermi LAT Results and Perspectives in Measurements of High Energy Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Real breakthrough during last 1-1.5 years in cosmic ray electrons: ATIC, HESS, Pamela, and finally Fermi-LAT. New quality data have made it possible to start quantitative modeling. With the new data more puzzles than before on CR electrons origin. Need "multi-messenger" campaign: electrons, positrons, gammas, X-ray, radio, neutrino... It is viable that we are dealing with at least two distinct mechanisms of "primary" electron (both signs) production: a softer spectrum of negative electrons, and a harder spectrum of both e(+)+e(-). Exotic (e.g. DM) origin is not ruled out. Upper limits on CR electrons anisotropy are set. Good perspectives to have the Fermi LAT results on proton spectrum and positron fraction.

  12. AMS-02 data confront acceleration of cosmic ray secondaries in nearby sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the model proposed earlier to account for the observed increase in the positron fraction in cosmic rays with increasing energy, in the light of new data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) experiment. The model accounts for the production and acceleration of secondary electrons...... and positrons in nearby supernova remnants which results in an additional, harder component that becomes dominant at high energies. By fitting this to AMS-02 data we can calculate the expected concomitant rise of the boron-to-carbon ratio, as well as of the fraction of antiprotons. If these predictions...... are confirmed by the forthcoming AMS-02 data it would conclusively rule out all other proposed explanations, in particular, dark matter annihilations or decays....

  13. Cosmic Microwave Background Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Doroshkevich, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    The last decade of research in cosmology was connected with the ambitious experiments including space and ground base observations. Among the most impressive results of these investigations are the measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation like WMAP* and Planck. Exactly from the CMB studies, we have started the epoch of the precision cosmology when generally the values of cosmological parameters have been known and present research is devoted to improvement of the precision. These achievements are connected with both the creation of the new facilities in millimeter and submillimeter astronomy (e.g., satellites, receivers, antennas, computers) and development of the methods for the CMB data analysis. Actually, the process of data analysis contains several technical stages including 1. Registration of time-ordered data (TOD) 2. Pixelization of the CMB data - map preparation 3. Component separation 4. Map statistics analysis 5. Map - spherical harmonics transformation 6. C(l)-spectrum calculation and spectrum statistics analysis 7. Cosmological parameters estimation Starting from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) experiment using the so-called Quadrilateralized Sky Cube Projection (see [1-3]), the problem of the whole sky CMB pixelization has attracted great interest and many such schemes were developed. Let us note however that accurate pixelization of the CMB data on the sphere is very important but not the final step of analysis. Usually, the next step implies the determination of the coefficients of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the CMB signal for both anisotropy and polarization. This means that some of the pixelization schemes provide a very accurate map but are inconvenient for further decomposition. This also means that the choice of suitable pixelization schemes depends upon the general goals of the investigation. In this review, we consider several of the most popular sky map pixelization schemes and link them with the

  14. A single particle effective potential for interacting positron and positronium

    CERN Document Server

    Zubiaga, A; Puska, M

    2013-01-01

    We have studied small systems composed by an atom and a positron or a positronium atom. We have used many-body quantum mechanical calculations to describe the correlation effects of light particles. Explicitly correlated gaussian for the basis functions and a stochastical variational optimization method has allowed to obtain accurate wavefunctions and energies. We have discussed the chemistry of positrons in those systems by means of analyzing the densities of the light particles (electrons and positrons). During the discussion, we propose an effective potential that describes the properties of the positron in those systems, valid also when it forms a Ps cluster. The effective potential is a mean field description of the interaction of the positron that can be used to calculate the distribution of the positron and its interaction energy. This potential can be a step forward for an accurate single particle description of the positron in cases when it forms positronium, specially molecular soft matter.

  15. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at a superconducting electron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Attallah, A. G.; Dornberg, G.; Elsayed, M.; Enke, D.; Hussein, A. E. M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Liedke, M. O.; Potzger, K.; Trinh, T. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf operates a superconducting linear accelerator for electrons with energies up to 35 MeV and average beam currents up to 1.6 mA. The electron beam is employed for production of several secondary beams including X-rays from bremsstrahlung production, neutrons, and positrons. The secondary positron beam after moderation feeds the Monoenergetic Positron Source (MePS) where positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) and positron annihilation Doppler-broadening experiments in materials science are performed in parallel. The adjustable repetition rate of the continuous-wave electron beams allows matching of the pulse separation to the positron lifetime in the sample under study. The energy of the positron beam can be set between 0.5 keV and 20 keV to perform depth resolved defect spectroscopy and porosity studies especially for thin films.

  16. Positron Beam Propagation in a Meter Long Plasma Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, K.A.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W.B.; /UCLA; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; O' Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.

    2008-03-17

    Recent experiments and simulations have shown that positron beams propagating in plasmas can be focused and also create wakes with large accelerating gradients. For similar parameters, the wakes driven by positron beams are somewhat smaller compared to the case of an electron beam. Simulations have shown that the wake amplitude can be increased if the positron beam is propagated in a hollow plasma channel (Ref. 1). This paper, compares experimentally, the propagation and beam dynamics of a positron beam in a meter scale homogeneous plasma, to a positron beam hollow channel plasma. The results show that positron beams in hollow channels are less prone to distortions and deflections. Hollow channels were observed to guide the positron beam onto the channel axis. Beam energy loss was also observed implying the formation of a large wake amplitude. The experiments were carried out as part of the E-162 plasma wakefield experiments at SLAC.

  17. Experimental Study of a Positron\\\\ Source Using Channeling

    CERN Multimedia

    Gavrykov, V; Kulibaba, V; Baier, V; Beloborodov, K; Bojenok, A; Bukin, A; Burdin, S; Dimova, T; Druzhinin, V; Dubrovin, M; Seredniakov, S; Shary, V; Strakhovenko, V; Keppler, P; Major, J; Bogdanov, A V; Potylitsin, A; Vnoukov, I; Artru, X; Lautesse, P; Poizat, J-C; Remillieux, J

    2002-01-01

    Many simulations have predicted that the yield of positrons, resulting from the interaction of fast electrons in a solid target, increases if the target is a crystal oriented with a major axis parallel to the electron beam. Tests made at Orsay and Tokyo confirmed these expectations. The experiment WA 103 concerns the determination of the main characteristics (emittance, energy spread) of a crystal positron source which could replace advantageously the conventional positron converters foreseen in some linear collider projects. The main element of the set-up is a magnetic spectrometer, using a drift chamber, where the positron trajectories are reconstructed (see Figure 1) A first run has been operated in july 2000 and the first results showed, as expected, a significant enhancement in photon and positron generation along the $$ axis of the tungsten crystal. Indications about a significant increase in the number of soft photons and positrons were also gathered : this point is of importance for the positron colle...

  18. PROSPECTS FOR DETECTION OF SYNCHROTRON EMISSION FROM SECONDARY ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS IN STARLESS CORES: APPLICATION TO G0.216+0.016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. I., E-mail: d.jones@astro.ru.nl [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525-AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the diffusion of cosmic rays into molecular cloud complexes. Using the cosmic-ray diffusion formalism of Protheroe et al., we examine how cosmic rays diffuse into clouds exhibiting different density structures, including a smoothed step-function, as well as Gaussian and inverse-r density distributions, which are well known to trace the structure of star-forming regions. These density distributions were modeled as an approximation to the Galactic center cloud G0.216+0.016, a recently discovered massive dust clump that exhibits limited signs of massive star formation and thus may be the best region in the Galaxy to observe synchrotron emission from secondary electrons and positrons. Examination of the resulting synchrotron emission, produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray protons interacting with ambient molecular matter producing secondary electrons and positrons reveals that, due to projection effects, limb-brightened morphology results in all cases. However, we find that the Gaussian and inverse-r density distributions show much broader flux density distributions than step-function distributions. Significantly, some of the compact (compared to the 2.''2 resolution, 5.3 GHz Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) observations) sources show non-thermal emission, which may potentially be explained by the density structure and the lack of diffusion of cosmic rays into the cloud. We find that we can match the 5.3 and 20 GHz flux densities of the non-thermal source JVLA 1 and 6 from Rodríguez and Zapata with a local cosmic-ray flux density, a diffusion coefficient suppression factor of χ = 0.1-0.01 for a coefficient of 3 × 10{sup 27} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, and a magnetic field strength of 470 μG.

  19. Secondary cosmic ray nuclei in the light of the single source model and comparison with recent AMS-02 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    Evidence for a local ‘single source’ of cosmic rays is amassing by way of the recent precise measurements of various cosmic ray energy spectra from the AMS-02 instrument. To observations of individual cosmic ray nuclei, electrons, positrons and antiprotons must now be added the determination of the boron-to-carbon ratio and the energy spectrum of lithium to 2000 GV with high precision. Our analysis leads us to claim that, with certain assumptions about propagation in the Galaxy, the results confirm our arguments regarding the presence of a local single source, perhaps, a supernova remnant (SNR). An attempt is made to determine some of the properties of this SNR and its progenitor star.

  20. Measuring extensive air showers with Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array: the energy spectrum of cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A A; Knurenko, S P; Sleptsov, I Ye [Shafer Institute for Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Yakutsk 677980 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ivanov@ikfia.ysn.ru

    2009-06-15

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the range E{approx}10{sup 15} eV to 6x10{sup 19} eV is studied in this paper using air Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array. The total flux of photons produced by the relativistic electrons (including positrons as well, hereafter) of extensive air showers in the atmosphere is used as an energy estimator of the primary particle initiating a shower. The resultant differential flux of cosmic rays exhibits, in agreement with previous measurements, a knee and ankle feature at energies of 3x10{sup 15} and {approx}10{sup 19} eV, respectively. A comparison of observational data with simulations is made in the knee and ankle regions in order to choose the models of galactic and extragalactic components of cosmic rays that describe well the energy spectrum measured.

  1. Illustrated cosmic monopole

    CERN Document Server

    Seagrave, Wyken

    2015-01-01

    Truly bizarre, utterly unique I've never read a novel quite like this before. The author takes you on an exciting adventure full of unforgettable and vivid imagery. Solidly written with each character's personality shining through. If you find physics fascinating you will not be disappointed by the author's keen intellect and clear understanding of this most challenging (for me anyway) scientific subject. This is not a novel I will forget anytime soon, I would highly recommend it. Andrewly Very imaginative tale Anybody interested in a very imaginative and engrossing sci fi story needs to check this one out. I have been reading sci fi for decades and this story has elements that surprise me which is very unusual considering the number of novels and stories I have over the years. ric freeman Summary of the story The cosmic monopole has been wandering the Universe since it was created in the Big Bang. Its existence is fundamental to the way the Universe works. It is finally trapped by the powerful magnetic f...

  2. Cosmic string loop microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Chernoff, David F.

    2014-06-01

    Cosmic superstring loops within the galaxy microlens background point sources lying close to the observer-string line of sight. For suitable alignments, multiple paths coexist and the (achromatic) flux enhancement is a factor of two. We explore this unique type of lensing by numerically solving for geodesics that extend from source to observer as they pass near an oscillating string. We characterize the duration of the flux doubling and the scale of the image splitting. We probe and confirm the existence of a variety of fundamental effects predicted from previous analyses of the static infinite straight string: the deficit angle, the Kaiser-Stebbins effect, and the scale of the impact parameter required to produce microlensing. Our quantitative results for dynamical loops vary by O(1) factors with respect to estimates based on infinite straight strings for a given impact parameter. A number of new features are identified in the computed microlensing solutions. Our results suggest that optical microlensing can offer a new and potentially powerful methodology for searches for superstring loop relics of the inflationary era.

  3. Cosmic ray driven outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasz, Michal; Naab, Thorsten; Gawryszczak, Artur; Kowalik, Kacper; Wóltański, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    We present simulations of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) in models of massive star forming (40 Msun / yr) disk galaxies with high gas surface densities (~100 Msun / pc^2) similar to observed star forming high-redshift disks. We assume that type II supernovae deposit 10 per cent of their energy into the ISM as cosmic rays and neglect the additional deposition of thermal energy or momentum. With a typical Galactic diffusion coefficient for CRs (3e28 cm^2 / s) we demonstrate that this process alone can trigger the local formation of a strong low density galactic wind maintaining vertically open field lines. Driven by the additional pressure gradient of the relativistic fluid the wind speed can exceed 1000 km/s, much higher than the escape velocity of the galaxy. The global mass loading, i.e. the ratio of the gas mass leaving the galactic disk in a wind to the star formation rate becomes of order unity once the system has settled into an equilibrium. We conclude that relativistic particles accelerated i...

  4. Cosmic Ray Helium Hardening

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations by CREAM, ATIC-2 and PAMELA experiments suggest that (1) the spectrum of cosmic ray (CR) helium is harder than that of CR proton below the knee $10^15 eV$ and (2) all CR spectra become hard at $\\gtrsim 10^{11} eV/n$. We propose a new picture that higher energy CRs are generated in more helium-rich region to explain the hardening (1) without introducing different sources for CR helium. The helium to proton ratio at $\\sim 100$ TeV exceeds the Big Bang abundance $Y=0.25$ by several times, and the different spectrum is not reproduced within the diffusive shock acceleration theory. We argue that CRs are produced in the chemically enriched region, such as a superbubble, and the outward-decreasing abundance naturally leads to the hard spectrum of CR helium when escaping from the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. We provide a simple analytical spectrum that also fits well the hardening (2) because of the decreasing Mach number in the hot superbubble with $\\sim 10^6$ K. Our model predicts hard and con...

  5. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James C; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H; Linsky, Claus Leitherer Jeffrey L; Savage, Blair D; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J Michael; Siegmund, Oswald H W; Snow, Theodore P; Spencer, John; Stern, S Alan; Stocke, John; Welsh, Barry; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian; McPhate, Jason; Penton, Steven V; Andrews, John; Brownsberger, Kenneth; Morse, Jon; Wilkinson, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F_lambda ~ 1.0E10-14 ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011....

  6. Detecting light long-lived particle produced by cosmic ray

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Peng-fei

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting light long-lived particle (LLP) produced by high energy cosmic ray colliding with atmosphere. The LLP may penetrate the atmosphere and decay into a pair of muons near/in the neutrino telescope. Such muons can be treated as the detectable signal for neutrino telescope. This study is motivated by recent cosmic electron/positron observations which suggest the existence of $O(TeV)$ dark matter and new light $O(GeV)$ particle. It indicates that dark sector may be complicated, and there may exist more than one light particles, for example the dark gauge boson $A'$ and associated dark Higgs boson $h'$. In this work, we discuss the scenario with $A'$ heavier than $h'$ and $h'$ is treated as LLP. Based on our numerical estimation, we find that the large volume neutrino telescope IceCube has the capacity to observe several tens of di-muon events for favorable parameters if the decay length of LLP can be comparable with the depth of atmosphere. The challenge here is how to sup...

  7. Cosmic ray diffusion in the galaxy and diffuse gamma emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaggero, Daniele [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    The original work presented in this thesis constitutes an important contribution to modern Cosmic Ray (CR) physics, and comes during one of the most exciting periods of this field. The first part introduces a new numerical code (DRAGON) to model the CR propagation in our Galaxy. The code is then used to perform a combined analysis of CR data, making it possible to determine their propagation properties with unprecedented accuracy. The second part is dedicated to a theoretical interpretation of the recent crucial experimental results on cosmic electron and positron spectra (PAMELA, Fermi-LAT experiments). Using the tools developed in the first part of the thesis, the author convincingly argues for the existence of a new spectral component, which could arise either from local astrophysical sources, such as pulsars, or from Dark Matter annihilation or decay. This thesis is a highly advanced work; the methods, analysis and results are clearly and carefully presented. This work is set to become an important reference document for any future work in this area.

  8. Cosmic AntiParticle Ring Imaging Cerenkov Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %RE2A \\\\ \\\\ %title \\\\ \\\\The CAPRICE experiment studies antimatter and light nuclei in the cosmic rays as well as muons in the atmosphere. The experiment is performed with the spectrometer shown in the figure which is lifted by a balloon to an altitude of 35-40 km. At this altitude less than half a percent of the atmosphere is above the 2 ton spectrometer which makes it possible to study the cosmic ray flux without too much background from atmospherically produced particles. The spectrometer includes time-of-flight scintillators, a gaseous RICH counter, a drift chamber tracker and a silicon electromagnetic calorimeter. The important feature of the spectrometer is to discriminate between different particles.\\\\ \\\\ The experiment aims at measuring the flux of the antiparticles (antiprotons and positrons) above about 5 GeV and relate the fluxes to models including exotic production of antiparticles like dark matter supersymmetric particles. The flux of muons is measured during descent of the balloon through the at...

  9. Cosmic-ray half-life of {sup 144}Pm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaerpoor, K.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Krane, K.S. [Physics Department, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon97331 (United States); Chan, Y.D.; Isaac, M.C.; Larimer, R.M.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Macleod, R.W.; Norman, E.B. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California94720 (United States); DiGregorio, D.E. [Laboratorio TANDAR-CNEA, Buenos Aires, 1429 (Argentina); Hindi, M.M.; Robinson, S.J. [Physics Department, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee38505 (United States); Miocinovic, P. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)

    1998-04-01

    In order to test the possibility of using {sup 144}Pm as a clock to measure the mean cosmic-ray confinement time in the Galaxy, we counted a highly purified 1.4 {mu}Ci source of this isotope in GAMMASPHERE and searched for its astrophysically interesting {beta}{sup +} decay branch through the observation of positron-annihilation {gamma} rays in coincidence with the characteristic 697-keV {gamma} ray. Analysis of 57 h of source counting and 15 h of background shows no net signal and results in an upper limit of 3.7 of 511-511-697 keV coincident events. From this result we establish a 90{percent} confidence level upper limit on the branch for this decay mode to be 7.4{times}10{sup {minus}6}{percent}. The implications of this result for the {sup 144}Pm cosmic-ray chronometer problem are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Calculation of Positron Distribution in the Presence of a Uniform Magnetic Field for the Improvement of Positron Emission Tomography (PET Imaging Using GEANT4 Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mashayekhi

    2015-05-01

    Application of a magnetic field perpendicular to the positron diffusion plane prevented the scattering of positrons, and consequently, improved the intrinsic spatial resolution of PET imaging, caused by positron range effects.

  11. Positron annihilation in neutron-irradiated germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartenev, G.M.; Bardyshev, I.I.; Erchak, D.P.; Stel' makh, V.F.; Tsyganov, A.D.

    1979-04-01

    The annealing of radiation defects in a germanium single crystal irradiated with 10/sup 18/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ was studied by positron annihilation, ESR, and resistivity measurements. It was found that positrons are trapped by radiation defects. The intensity of the narrow component of the angular correlation of the annihilation radiation yielded the concentration of defect clusters in the irradiated sample n/sub d/approx. =3 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. Three characteristic annealing stages were identified. At 160--200 /sup 0/C, point defects were annealed within the crystal. At 200--320 /sup 0/C, there was ''loosening'' of the clusters, and the charge state of the defects changed. At 320--550 /sup 0/C, the clusters were annealed.

  12. Study of tungsten based positron moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucio, O.G. de; Pérez, M.; Mendoza, U.; Morales, J.G.; Cruz, J.C. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México DF (Mexico); DuBois, R.D. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Positrons and how they interact with matter has a growing interest in many fields. Most of their uses require the production of slow positron beams with a well-defined energy, but since these particles are usually generated by means of a radioactive source, they are fast and with a broad distribution of energies. For this reason it is necessary to moderate them to lower energies via inelastic collisions. Then, they can be accelerated to the desired energies. This requires the use of a moderator. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods of producing transmission tungsten-based moderators, with particular interest in a combination of tungsten thin foils and grids. We also show results about the characterization of these moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques along with their relative moderation efficiencies.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of electron-positron clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Haas, Fernando; 10.1088/1367-2630/14/7/075012

    2012-01-01

    Electron-positron clusters are studied using a quantum hydrodynamic model that includes Coulomb and exchange interactions. A variational Lagrangian method is used to determine their stationary and dynamical properties. The cluster static features are validated against existing Hartree-Fock calculations. In the linear response regime, we investigate both dipole and monopole (breathing) modes. The dipole mode is reminiscent of the surface plasmon mode usually observed in metal clusters. The nonlinear regime is explored by means of numerical simulations. We show that, by exciting the cluster with a chirped laser pulse with slowly varying frequency (autoresonance), it is possible to efficiently separate the electron and positron populations on a timescale of a few tens of femtoseconds.

  14. Statistical Hadronisation in Positron-proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Urmossy, Karoly

    2016-01-01

    We reproduce charged hadron momentum fraction distributions measured in diffractive positron-proton collisions resulting in hadronic final states with two jets of approximately equal energies. Our hadronisation model is based on microcanonical statistics and negative binomial multiplicity fluctuations. We describe the scale dependence of the fit parameters of the model with formulas obtained by approximating the exact solution of the DGLAP equation in the $\\phi^3$ theory with leading order splitting function and 1-loop coupling.

  15. The L3+C detector, a unique tool-set to study cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O.; Akker, M. van den; Banerjee, S.; Baehr, J.; Betev, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bottai, S.; Bobbink, G.; Cartacci, A.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.S.; Chiarusi, T.; Dai, C.J.; Ding, L.K.; Duran, I.; Faber, G.; Fay, J.; Grabosch, H.J.; Groenstege, H.; Guo, Y.N.; Gupta, S.; Haller, Ch.; Hayashi, Y.; He, Z.X.; Hebbeker, T.; Hofer, H.; Hoferjun, H.; Huo, A.X.; Ito, N.; Jing, C.L.; Jones, L.; Kantserov, V.; Kawakami, S.; Kittel, W.; Koenig, A.C.; Kok, E.; Korn, A.; Kuang, H.H.; Kuijpers, J.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Le Coultre, P. E-mail: pierre.le.coultre@cern.ch; Lei, Y.; Leich, H.; Leiste, R.; Li, D.; Li, L.; Li, Z.C.; Liu, Z.A.; Liu, H.T.; Lohmann, W.; Lu, Y.S.; Ma, X.H.; Ma, Y.Q.; Mil, A. van; Monteleoni, B.; Nahnhauer, R.; Pauss, F.; Parriaud, J.-F.; Petersen, B.; Pohl, M.; Qing, C.R.; Ramelli, R.; Ravindran, K.C.; Rewiersma, P.; Rojkov, A.; Saidi, R.; Schmitt, V.; Schoeneich, B.; Schotanus, D.J.; Shen, C.Q.; Sulanke, H.; Tang, X.W.; Timmermans, C.; Tonwar, S.; Trowitzsch, G.; Unger, M.; Verkooijen, H.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, X.W.; Wang, Z.M.; Wijk, R. van; Wijnen, Th.A.M.; Wilkens, H.; Xu, Y.P.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, X.F.; Yao, Z.G.; Yu, Z.Q.; Zhang, S.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, Q.Q.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zwart, A.N.M

    2002-08-01

    The L3 detector at the CERN electron-positron collider, LEP, has been employed for the study of cosmic ray muons. The muon spectrometer of L3 consists of a set of high-precision drift chambers installed inside a magnet with a volume of about 1000 m{sup 3} and a field of 0.5 T. Muon momenta are measured with a resolution of a few percent at 50 GeV. The detector is located under 30 m of overburden. A scintillator air shower array of 54 m by 30 m is installed on the roof of the surface hall above L3 in order to estimate the energy and the core position of the shower associated with a sample of detected muons. Thanks to the unique properties of the L3+C detector, muon research topics relevant to various current problems in cosmic ray and particle astrophysics can be studied.

  16. The CLIC electron and positron polarized sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rinolfi, Louis; Bulyak, Eugene; Chehab, Robert; Dadoun, Olivier; Gai, Wei; Gladkikh, Peter; Kamitani, Takuya; Kuriki, Masao; Liu, Wanming; Maryuama, Takashi; Omori, Tsunehiko; Poelker, Matt; Sheppard, John; Urakawa, Junji; Variola, Alessandro; Vivoli, Alessandro; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zhou, Feng; Zimmermann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC polarized electron source is based on a DC gun where the photocathode is illuminated by a laser beam. Each micro-bunch has a charge of 6x109 e−, a width of 100 ps and a repetition rate of 2 GHz. A peak current of 10 A in the micro-bunch is a challenge for the surface charge limit of the photo-cathode. Two options are feasible to generate the 2 GHz e− bunch train: 100 ps micro-bunches can be extracted from the photo-cathode either by a 2 GHz laser system or by generating a macro-bunch using a ~200 ns laser pulse and a subsequent RF bunching system to produce the appropriate micro-bunch structure. Recent results obtained by SLAC, for the latter case, are presented. The polarized positron source is based on a positron production scheme in which polarized photons are produced by a laser Compton scattering process. The resulting circularly-polarized gamma photons are sent onto a target, producing pairs of longitudinally polarized electrons and positrons. The Compton backscattering process occurs eithe...

  17. Advances in positron and electron scattering*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limão-Vieira, Paulo; García, Gustavo; Krishnakumar, E.; Petrović, Zoran; Sullivan, James; Tanuma, Hajime

    2016-10-01

    The topical issue on Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering" combines contributions from POSMOL 2015 together with others devoted to celebrate the unprecedented scientific careers of our loyal colleagues and trusted friends Steve Buckman (Australian National University, Australia) and Michael Allan (University of Fribourg, Switzerland) on the occasion of their retirements. POSMOL 2015, the XVIII International Workshop on Low-Energy Positron and Positronium Physics and the XIX International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms, was held at Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal, from 17-20 July 2015. The international workshop and symposium allowed to achieve a very privileged forum of sharing and developing our scientific expertise on current aspects of positron, positronium and antiproton interactions with electrons, atoms, molecules and solid surfaces, and related topics, as well as electron interactions with molecules in both gaseous and condensed phases. Particular topics include studies of electron interactions with biomolecules, electron induced surface chemistry and the study of plasma processes. Recent developments in the study of swarms are also fully addressed.

  18. Cosmic web imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shahinur; Martin, Chris; McLean, Ryan; Matuszewski, Matt; Chang, Daphne

    2006-06-01

    We are developing the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI) to detect and map emission from the intergalactic medium (IGM). CWI will observe the strong, redshift UV resonance lines of Lyα 1216, CIV 1550, and OVI 1033 over 3600-9000 Å to trace IGM at 1 view of 60 × 40 arcsec2 for observing extended emission over a large region. The spectrograph using Volume-Phase Holographic gratings have high peak diffraction efficiency and are tunable for covering a large bandpass with a single grating. A low read noise CCD combined with source/background shiftand-nod allowing control of systematics and Poisson-imited sky subtraction to observe the low surface brightness universe. With a resolution of R=10,000 CWI is sensitive to limiting surface brightness ranging from 25 - 27.5 mag/arcsec2 (10 min - 8 hours integration). Recent high resolution simulations predict Lyα Fluorescence from IGM at 100 - 1000 LU1. CWI with sensitivity of ~200 LU improves the current observational effort by an order of magnitude and enables us to explore wide range of overdensity (δ ~ 30 - 104) testing the standard model of structure formation in the universe. CWI also serves as the counter part to the balloon borne integral-field spectrograph Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL) currently being built and planned to be launched in Summer 2007. FIREBALL will observe Lyα Fluorescence from IGM at z = 0.7. CWI combined with FIREBALL will enable us to observe the evolution of IGM and the low surface brightness universe.

  19. Cosmic logic: a computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2016-02-01

    We initiate a formal study of logical inferences in context of the measure problem in cosmology or what we call cosmic logic. We describe a simple computational model of cosmic logic suitable for analysis of, for example, discretized cosmological systems. The construction is based on a particular model of computation, developed by Alan Turing, with cosmic observers (CO), cosmic measures (CM) and cosmic symmetries (CS) described by Turing machines. CO machines always start with a blank tape and CM machines take CO's Turing number (also known as description number or Gödel number) as input and output the corresponding probability. Similarly, CS machines take CO's Turing number as input, but output either one if the CO machines are in the same equivalence class or zero otherwise. We argue that CS machines are more fundamental than CM machines and, thus, should be used as building blocks in constructing CM machines. We prove the non-computability of a CS machine which discriminates between two classes of CO machines: mortal that halts in finite time and immortal that runs forever. In context of eternal inflation this result implies that it is impossible to construct CM machines to compute probabilities on the set of all CO machines using cut-off prescriptions. The cut-off measures can still be used if the set is reduced to include only machines which halt after a finite and predetermined number of steps.

  20. Neutrinoless double positron decay and positron emitting electron capture in the interacting boson model

    CERN Document Server

    Barea, J; Iachello, F

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay is of fundamental importance for determining the neutrino mass. Although double electron ($\\beta^-\\beta^-$) decay is the most promising mode, in very recent years interest in double positron ($\\beta^+\\beta^+$) decay, positron emitting electron capture ($EC\\beta^+$), and double electron capture ($ECEC$) has been renewed. We present here results of a calculation of nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double-$\\beta^+$ decay and positron emitting electron capture within the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM-2) for $^{58}$Ni, $^{64}$Zn, $^{78}$Kr, $^{96}$Ru, $^{106}$Cd, $^{124}$Xe, $^{130}$Ba, and $^{136}$Ce decay. By combining these with a calculation of phase space factors we calculate expected half-lives.

  1. Generation and application of slow positrons based on a electron LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurihara, T

    2002-01-01

    History of slow positron in Institute of Materials Structure Science High Energy Accelerator Research Organization is explained. The principle of generation and application of intense positron beam is mentioned. Two sources of intense positron are radioactive decay of radioactive isotopes emitting positron and electron-positron pair creation. The radioactive decay method uses sup 5 sup 8 Co, sup 6 sup 4 Cu, sup 1 sup 1 C, sup 1 sup 3 N, sup 1 sup 5 O and sup 1 sup 8 F. The electron-positron pair creation method uses nuclear reactor or electron linear accelerator (LINAC). The positron experimental facility in this organization consists of electron LINAC, slow positron beam source, positron transport and experimental station. The outline of this facility is started. The intense slow positron beam is applied to research positronium work function, electron structure of surface. New method such as combination of positron lifetime measurement and slow positron beam or Auger electron spectroscopy by positron annihil...

  2. Nonthermal production of WIMPs, cosmic e± excesses, and γ rays from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Xiao-Jun; Gondolo, Paolo; Li, Tianjun; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang, Yuan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose a dark matter model and study aspects of its phenomenology. Our model is based on a new dark matter sector with a U(1)′ gauge symmetry plus a discrete symmetry added to the standard model of particle physics. The new fields of the dark matter sector have no hadronic charges and couple only to leptons. Our model cannot only give rise to the observed neutrino mass hierarchy, but can also generate the baryon number asymmetry via nonthermal leptogenesis. The breaking of the new U(1)′ symmetry produces cosmic strings. The dark matter particles are produced nonthermally from cosmic string loop decay which allows one to obtain sufficiently large annihilation cross sections to explain the observed cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes recently measured by the PAMELA, ATIC, PPB-BETS, Fermi-LAT, and HESS experiments while maintaining the required overall dark matter energy density. The high velocity of the dark matter particles from cosmic string loop decay leads to a low phase space dens...

  3. Active galactic nuclei, neutrinos, and interacting cosmic rays in NGC 253 and NGC 1068

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Gallagher III, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Everett, John E., E-mail: yoasthull@wisc.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Northwestern University, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    The galaxies M82, NGC 253, NGC 1068, and NGC 4945 have been detected in γ-rays by Fermi. Previously, we developed and tested a model for cosmic-ray interactions in the starburst galaxy M82. Now, we aim to explore the differences between starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN) environments by applying our self-consistent model to the starburst galaxy NGC 253 and the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. Assuming a constant cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency by supernova remnants with Milky Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations, predict the radio and γ-ray spectra, and compare with published measurements. We find that our models easily fit the observed γ-ray spectrum for NGC 253 while constraining the cosmic-ray source spectral index and acceleration efficiency. However, we encountered difficultly modeling the observed radio data and constraining the speed of the galactic wind and the magnetic field strength, unless the gas mass is less than currently preferred values. Additionally, our starburst model consistently underestimates the observed γ-ray flux and overestimates the radio flux for NGC 1068; these issues would be resolved if the AGN is the primary source of γ-rays. We discuss the implications of these results and make predictions for the neutrino fluxes for both galaxies.

  4. Active Galactic Nuclei, Neutrinos, and Interacting Cosmic Rays in NGC 253 & NGC 1068

    CERN Document Server

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M; Zweibel, Ellen G; Everett, John E

    2013-01-01

    The galaxies M82, NGC 253, NGC 1068, and NGC 4945 have been detected in gamma-rays by Fermi. Previously, we developed and tested a model for cosmic ray interactions in the starburst galaxy M82. Now, we aim to explore the differences between starburst and active galactic nuclei (AGN) environments by applying our self-consistent model to the starburst galaxy NGC 253 and the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. Assuming constant cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency by supernova remnants with Milky-Way parameters, we calculate the cosmic-ray proton and primary and secondary electron/positron populations, predict the radio and gamma-ray spectra, and compare with published measurements. We find that our models easily fits the observed gamma-ray spectrum for NGC 253 while constraining the cosmic ray source spectral index and acceleration efficiency. However, we encountered difficultly modeling the observed radio data and constraining the speed of the galactic wind and the magnetic field strength, unless the gas mass is less than ...

  5. Review of the theoretical and experimental status of dark matter identification with cosmic-ray antideuterons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, T.; Boggs, S.; Bufalino, S.; Dal, L.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donato, F.; Fornengo, N.; Fuke, H.; Grefe, M.; Hailey, C.; Hamilton, B.; Ibarra, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mognet, I.; Ong, R. A.; Pereira, R.; Perez, K.; Putze, A.; Raklev, A.; Salati, P.; Sasaki, M.; Tarle, G.; Urbano, A.; Vittino, A.; Wild, S.; Xue, W.; Yoshimura, K.

    2016-03-01

    Recent years have seen increased theoretical and experimental effort towards the first-ever detection of cosmic-ray antideuterons, in particular as an indirect signature of dark matter annihilation or decay. In contrast to indirect dark matter searches using positrons, antiprotons, or γ-rays, which suffer from relatively high and uncertain astrophysical backgrounds, searches with antideuterons benefit from very suppressed conventional backgrounds, offering a potential breakthrough in unexplored phase space for dark matter. This article is based on the first dedicated cosmic-ray antideuteron workshop, which was held at UCLA in June 2014. It reviews broad classes of dark matter candidates that result in detectable cosmic-ray antideuteron fluxes, as well as the status and prospects of current experimental searches. The coalescence model of antideuteron production and the influence of antideuteron measurements at particle colliders are discussed. This is followed by a review of the modeling of antideuteron propagation through the magnetic fields, plasma currents, and molecular material of our Galaxy, the solar system, the Earth's geomagnetic field, and the atmosphere. Finally, the three ongoing or planned experiments that are sensitive to cosmic-ray antideuterons, BESS, AMS-02, and GAPS, are detailed. As cosmic-ray antideuteron detection is a rare event search, multiple experiments with orthogonal techniques and backgrounds are essential. Therefore, the combination of AMS-02 and GAPS antideuteron searches is highly desirable. Many theoretical and experimental groups have contributed to these studies over the last decade, this review aims to provide the first coherent discussion of the relevant dark matter theories that antideuterons probe, the challenges to predictions and interpretations of antideuteron signals, and the experimental efforts toward cosmic antideuteron detection.

  6. Review of the Theoretical and Experimental Status of Dark Matter Identification with Cosmic-Ray Antideuterons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, T.; Boggs, S.; Bufalino, S.; Dal, L.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donato, F.; Fornengo, N.; Fuke, H.; Grefe, M.; Hailey, C.; Hamilton, B.; Ibarra, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mognet, I.; Ong, R.A.; Pereira, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen increased theoretical and experimental effort towards the first-ever detection of cosmic-ray antideuterons, in particular as an indirect signature of dark matter annihilation or decay. In contrast to indirect dark matter searches using positrons, antiprotons, or gamma-rays, which suffer from relatively high and uncertain astrophysical backgrounds, searches with antideuterons benefit from very suppressed conventional backgrounds, offering a potential breakthrough in unexplored phase space for dark matter. This article is based on the first dedicated cosmic-ray antideuteron workshop, which was held at UCLA in June 2014. It reviews broad classes of dark matter candidates that result in detectable cosmic-ray antideuteron fluxes, as well as the status and prospects of current experimental searches. The coalescence model of antideuteron production and the influence of antideuteron measurements at particle colliders are discussed. This is followed by a review of the modeling of antideuteron propagation through the magnetic fields, plasma currents, and molecular material of our Galaxy, the solar system, the Earth's geomagnetic field, and the atmosphere. Finally, the three ongoing or planned experiments that are sensitive to cosmic-ray antideuterons, BESS, AMS-02, and GAPS, are detailed. As cosmic-ray antideuteron detection is a rare event search, multiple experiments with orthogonal techniques and backgrounds are essential. Therefore, the combination of AMS-02 and GAPS antideuteron searches is highly desirable. Many theoretical and experimental groups have contributed to these studies over the last decade, this review aims to provide the first coherent discussion of the relevant dark matter theories that antideuterons probe, the challenges to predictions and interpretations of antideuteron signals, and the experimental efforts toward cosmic antideuteron detection.

  7. Clusters and the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Van de Weygaert, R

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the intimate relationship between the filamentary features and the rare dense compact cluster nodes in this network, via the large scale tidal field going along with them, following the cosmic web theory developed Bond et al. The Megaparsec scale tidal shear pattern is responsible for the contraction of matter into filaments, and its link with the cluster locations can be understood through the implied quadrupolar mass distribution in which the clusters are to be found at the sites of the overdense patches. We present a new technique for tracing the cosmic web, identifying planar walls, elongated filaments and cluster nodes in the galaxy distribution. This will allow the practical exploitation of the concept of the cosmic web towards identifying and tracing the locations of the gaseous WHIM. These methods, the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE) and the Morphology Multiscale Filter (MMF) find their basis in computational geometry and visualization.

  8. Cosmic rays and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K; Resconi, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Fully updated for the second edition, this book introduces the growing and dynamic field of particle astrophysics. It provides an overview of high-energy nuclei, photons and neutrinos, including their origins, their propagation in the cosmos, their detection on Earth and their relation to each other. Coverage is expanded to include new content on high energy physics, the propagation of protons and nuclei in cosmic background radiation, neutrino astronomy, high-energy and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, sources and acceleration mechanisms, and atmospheric muons and neutrinos. Readers are able to master the fundamentals of particle astrophysics within the context of the most recent developments in the field. This book will benefit graduate students and established researchers alike, equipping them with the knowledge and tools needed to design and interpret their own experiments and, ultimately, to address a number of questions concerning the nature and origins of cosmic particles that have arisen in recent resea...

  9. Cosmic Ray Origins: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, Roger; Simeon, Paul; Yuan, Yajie

    2014-11-01

    Physicists have pondered the origin of cosmic rays for over a hundred years. However the last few years have seen an upsurge in the observation, progress in the theory and a genuine increase in the importance attached to the topic due to its intimate connection to the indirect detection of evidence for dark matter. The intent of this talk is to set the stage for the meeting by reviewing some of the basic features of the entire cosmic ray spectrum from GeV to ZeV energy and some of the models that have been developed. The connection will also be made to recent developments in understanding general astrophysical particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, relativistic jets and gamma ray bursts. The prospects for future discoveries, which may elucidate the origin of cosmic rays, are bright.

  10. Cosmic Ray Origins: An Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandford, Roger; Simeon, Paul; Yuan, Yajie

    2014-11-15

    Physicists have pondered the origin of cosmic rays for over a hundred years. However the last few years have seen an upsurge in the observation, progress in the theory and a genuine increase in the importance attached to the topic due to its intimate connection to the indirect detection of evidence for dark matter. The intent of this talk is to set the stage for the meeting by reviewing some of the basic features of the entire cosmic ray spectrum from GeV to ZeV energy and some of the models that have been developed. The connection will also be made to recent developments in understanding general astrophysical particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, relativistic jets and gamma ray bursts. The prospects for future discoveries, which may elucidate the origin of cosmic rays, are bright.

  11. Cosmic Ray Origins: An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Blandford, Roger; Yuan, Yajie

    2014-01-01

    Physicists have pondered the origin of cosmic rays for over a hundred years. However the last few years have seen an upsurge in the observation, progress in the theory and a genuine increase in the importance attached to the topic due to its intimate connection to the indirect detection of evidence for dark matter. The intent of this talk is to set the stage for the meeting by reviewing some of the basic features of the entire cosmic ray spectrum from GeV to ZeV energy and some of the models that have been developed. The connection will also be made to recent developments in understanding general astrophysical particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, relativistic jets and gamma ray bursts. The prospects for future discoveries, which may elucidate the origin of cosmic rays, are bright.

  12. Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Baylon cardiel, J L; Wallace, K C; Anderson, T B; Copley, M

    The cosmic-ray energetics and mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to measure cosmic-ray composition to the supernova energy scale of 10$^{15}$ eV in a series of ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) flights. The first flight is planned to be launched from Antarctica in December 2004. The goal is to observe cosmic-ray spectral features and/or abundance changes that might signify a limit to supernova acceleration. The particle ($\\{Z}$) measurements will be made with a timing-based charge detector and a pixelated silicon charge detector to minimize the effect of backscatter from the calorimeter. The particle energy measurements will be made with a transition radiation detector (TRD) for $\\{Z}$ > 3 and a sampling tungsten/scintillator calorimeter for $\\{Z}$ $\\geq$1 particles, allowing inflight cross calibration of the two detectors. The status of the payload construction and flight preparation are reported in this paper.

  13. The lives and deaths of positrons in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Guessoum, N; Gillard, W

    2005-01-01

    We reexamine in detail the various processes undergone by positrons in the ISM from their birth to their annihilation using the most recent results of positron interaction cross sections with H, H2 and He. The positrons' lives are divided into two phases: the 'in-flight' phase and the thermal phase. The first phase is treated with a Monte Carlo simulation that allows us to determine the fraction of positrons that form positronium and annihilate as well as the characteristics of the annihilation emission as a function of the medium conditions. The second phase is treated with a binary reaction rate approach, with cross sections adopted from experimental measurement or theoretical calculations. An extensive search and update of the knowledge of positron processes was thus undertaken. New reaction rates and line widths have been obtained. We investigate the treatment of the complicated interactions between positrons and interstellar dust grains. New reaction rates and widths of the line resulting from the annihi...

  14. Positrons, Positronium, Positron and Positronium Complexes in Crystal. Features of Their Properties in Phonon Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene P. Prokopev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article, Basing on the example of ionic crystals shows that polarization of crystal framework by oppositely charged polarons (positronium atom (ps invokes the change of positronium binding energy and leads to the renormalization of electron and positron effective masses as well. Such interaction of electron and positronium atom of positron with optical phonons leads to additional repelling interaction, besides coulomb attractive. Furthermore, the existence of positronium atom with major and minor radius is possible in the atmosphere of crystal phonons.

  15. Cosmic Rays: What Gamma Rays Can Say

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We will review the main channels of gamma ray emission due to the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, discussing the cases of both galactic and extra-galactic cosmic rays and their connection with gamma rays observations.

  16. The Cosmic Shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Catling, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    in 2004 when there were just two transiting exoplanets to consider. The trend was well-defined by late 2007. Figure 1 shows how matters stood in Dec 2012 with approx.240 exoplanets. The figure shows that the boundary between planets with and without active volatiles - the cosmic shoreline, as it were - is both well-defined and follows a power law.

  17. Simulations of pulses in a buffer gas positron trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tattersall, W; Sullivan, J P; Buckman, S J [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); White, R D; Robson, R E, E-mail: wade.tattersall@anu.edu.au [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    In this study we simulate positron transport properties for various configurations of the gases and electric fields used in the Australian Positron Beamline Facility positron trap, which is based on the Surko buffer-gas trap. In an attempt to further improve the time and energy resolution of the trap and thus the associated scattering experiments, we apply a Monte-Carlo simulation procedure to a variety of possible configurations of the dumping stage of the trap.

  18. Detecting positron-atom bound states through resonant annihilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Gribakin, G F

    2010-11-12

    A method is proposed for detecting positron-atom bound states by observing enhanced positron annihilation due to electronic Feshbach resonances at electron-volt energies. The method is applicable to a range of open-shell transition-metal atoms which are likely to bind the positron: Fe, Co, Ni, Tc, Ru, Rh, Sn, Sb, Ta, W, Os, Ir, and Pt. Estimates of their binding energies are provided.

  19. Detecting Positron-Atom Bound States through Resonant Annihilation

    OpenAIRE

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed for detecting positron-atom bound states by observing enhanced positron annihilation due to electronic Feshbach resonances at electron-volt energies. The method is applicable to a range of open-shell transition metal atoms which are likely to bind the positron: Fe, Co, Ni, Tc, Ru, Rh, Sn, Sb, Ta, W, Os, Ir, and Pt. Estimates of their binding energies are provided.

  20. Cosmic Humanity: Utopia, Realities, Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Krichevsky

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The philosophical foundations of the theory and practice of the creation of cosmic humanity as a process of the evolution of human civilization, the emergence into space, with the prospect of resettlement outside the Earth are considered. There is a connection between myths, fantasies, ideas, concepts and projects aimed at the exploration of outer space, the creation of cosmic humanity. A new and voluminous definition of cosmic humanity in the evolutionary paradigm is given. Cosmic humanity is (essence and 4 stages of evolution: 1. Humanity living on Earth, sensing, knowing, understanding its cosmic origin, relationship with the cosmos and cosmic destiny. 2. Humanity living on Earth, leading aerospace activity for the purposes of exploration and use of aerospace space (Heaven, Space for survival and development. 3. Humanity living on Earth and outside the Earth — in the solar system, preserving the Earth and mastering the Cosmos for survival and development. 4. Humanity, settled and living in the Cosmos. Now humanity is in the process of transition from the second to the third stage. In the process of this evolution, a complex transformation of man and society takes place. The problem-semantic field of cosmic humanity is described and its general model is presented. The meta-goal-setting is the justification of cosmic humanity with the application of the anthropic principle and its “active” super (post anthropic supplement: “Cosmic humanity has an evolutionary purpose to actively manage evolution: change man, humanity and the universe.” The evolution of the “cosmic dream”, goals and technologies of space activities is formalized in the form of a conceptual model. Challenges and negative trends are considered in connection with the crisis of space activity, criticism and attempts to limit the flights of people into space. The prototype of cosmic humanity, its basis and acting model is the cosmonauts’ community. The main

  1. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, M. J.

    2006-06-01

    The first significant cosmic fields, and the seed field for galactic dynamos probably developed after the formation of the first non-linear structures. The history of star formation and the intergalactic medium is controlled, at least in part, by how and when galaxies and their precursors acquired their fields. The amplification of fields behind shocks, and the diffusivity of the magnetic flux, are crucial to the interpretation of radio sources, gamma ray burst afterglows, and other energetic cosmic phenomena. The build-up of magnetic fields is an important aspect of the overall cosmogonic process.

  2. Cosmic Strings with Small Tension

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe cosmic F--term strings with exponentially small tension which are D3 branes wrapped on deformed $A_3$ singularities. We show that brane instanton effects which can be calculated after a geometric transition give rise to an exponentially small volume for the node on which the D3 branes wrap leading to a string with small tension. We generalize our description to the case of non--Abelian cosmic strings and argue that these strings are stable against monopole--anti monopole pair creation.

  3. Aligned interactions in cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempa, J., E-mail: kempa@pw.plock.pl [Warsaw University of Technology Branch Plock (Poland)

    2015-12-15

    The first clean Centauro was found in cosmic rays years many ago at Mt Chacaltaya experiment. Since that time, many people have tried to find this type of interaction, both in cosmic rays and at accelerators. But no one has found a clean cases of this type of interaction.It happened finally in the last exposure of emulsion at Mt Chacaltaya where the second clean Centauro has been found. The experimental data for both the Centauros and STRANA will be presented and discussed in this paper. We also present our comments to the intriguing question of the existence of a type of nuclear interactions at high energy with alignment.

  4. Closing CMS to hunt cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Every second the Earth is bombarded by billions of cosmic rays and occasionally one of these cosmic particles will collide with the Earth's atmosphere generating a shower of particles known as an 'air shower'. This is similiar to the collisions and subsequent particle showers observed in accelerators such as the LHC. Here the CMS detector is closed so that systems can be tested using muon cosmic rays in the 'Cosmic Challenge'.

  5. Cosmic-Ray Detectors With Interdigitated Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Mazed, Mohammed; Holtzman, Melinda J.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1995-01-01

    Detectors measure both positions of incidence and energies of incident charged particles. Stack of detector wafers intercept cosmic ray. Measure positions of incidence to determine cosmic-ray trajectory and charge generated within them (proportional to cosmic-ray energy dissipated within them). Interdigital electrode pattern repeated over many rows and columns on tops of detector wafers in stack. Electrode pattern defines pixels within which points of incidence of incident cosmic rays located.

  6. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depression & spatial complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weygaert, Rien; Shandarin, S.; Saar, E.; Einasto, J.

    2016-01-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do theyrepresent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probesand measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive tothe natu

  7. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  8. Positrons from dark matter annihilation in the galactic halo: uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Fornengo, N; Lineros, R; Donato, F; Salati, P

    2007-01-01

    Indirect detection signals from dark matter annihilation are studied in the positron channel. We discuss in detail the positron propagation inside the galactic medium: we present novel solutions of the diffusion and propagation equations and we focus on the determination of the astrophysical uncertainties which affect the positron dark matter signal. We show that, especially in the low energy tail of the positron spectra at Earth, the uncertainty is sizeable and we quantify the effect. Comparison of our predictions with current available and foreseen experimental data are derived.

  9. Cosmic Ray elimination using the Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Aguilera, M. T.; Cruz, J.; Altamirano, L.; Serrano, A.

    2009-11-01

    In this work, we present a method for the automatic cosmic ray elimination in a single CCD exposure using the Wavelet Transform. The proposed method can eliminate cosmic rays of any shape or size. With this method we can eliminate over 95% of cosmic rays in a spectral image.

  10. COSMIC RAY ELIMINATION USING THE WAVELET TRANSFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Orozco-Aguilera

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a method for the automatic cosmic ray elimination in a single CCD exposure using the Wavelet Transform. The proposed method can eliminate cosmic rays of any shape or size. With this method we can eliminate over 95% of cosmic rays in a spectral image.

  11. Positron CT findings of chronic schizophrenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, Junzo; Miyazaki, Chihiro; Sugai, Yuichi (National Musashi Research Institute for Mental and Nervous Disease, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)); Iio, Masaaki

    1983-12-01

    Positron CT images of 15 chronic schizophrenics (2 females and 13 males) were examined in contrast to 5 male controls. Average age of controls was 36 years and that of schizophrenics was 42 years. Schizophrenic cases were ill over 6 years, averaging 17 years. All were under antipsychotic drug therapy. Tracer compounds were /sup 11/C-CO/sub 2/ and /sup 11/C-glucose photosynthesised, the former being inhaled once just before and the latter being administered orally 10-15 minutes before examinations. On positron CT images of all normal controls, hyper-radioactivities in frontal regions were observed. Some asymmetries of activities were observed but not remarkable. There was no difference between the images with /sup 11/C-CO/sub 2/ and those with /sup 11/C-glucose. In schizophrenic cases, (1) 7 out of 15 cases showed hypo-activities in the frontal regions both with /sup 11/C-CO/sub 2/ and /sup 11/C-glucose. (2) With /sup 11/C-glucose, relative activities in the brain were lower than those in the soft tissues around the scalp, suggesting the lowered selective uptake of /sup 11/C-glucose by the brain. (3) With /sup 11/C-CO/sub 2/, 4 cases showed higher activities in the right temporal regions and their subcortex than the left. By consideration of relationships between these positron CT findings and clinical data such as present age, age of onset of illness, duration of illness, psychiatric symptoms, present drug amount, summed drug amount from administration, EEG and X-ray CT findings, significant correlation was recognized only between low frontal radioactivities and apathy-abulia as main symptom. Limitation on the explanation of the findings with the image alone was discussed.

  12. Evolution of the cosmic web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cautun, Marius; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2014-01-01

    The cosmic web is the largest scale manifestation of the anisotropic gravitational collapse of matter. It represents the transitional stage between linear and non-linear structures and contains easily accessible information about the early phases of structure formation processes. Here we investigate

  13. Cosmic Censorship for Gowdy Spacetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringström, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Due to the complexity of Einstein's equations, it is often natural to study a question of interest in the framework of a restricted class of solutions. One way to impose a restriction is to consider solutions satisfying a given symmetry condition. There are many possible choices, but the present article is concerned with one particular choice, which we shall refer to as Gowdy symmetry. We begin by explaining the origin and meaning of this symmetry type, which has been used as a simplifying assumption in various contexts, some of which we shall mention. Nevertheless, the subject of interest here is strong cosmic censorship. Consequently, after having described what the Gowdy class of spacetimes is, we describe, as seen from the perspective of a mathematician, what is meant by strong cosmic censorship. The existing results on cosmic censorship are based on a detailed analysis of the asymptotic behavior of solutions. This analysis is in part motivated by conjectures, such as the BKL conjecture, which we shall therefore briefly describe. However, the emphasis of the article is on the mathematical analysis of the asymptotics, due to its central importance in the proof and in the hope that it might be of relevance more generally. The article ends with a description of the results that have been obtained concerning strong cosmic censorship in the class of Gowdy spacetimes.

  14. Global diffusion of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Snodin, A P; Sarson, G R; Bushby, P J; Rodrigues, L F S

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of charged particles, including cosmic rays, in a partially ordered magnetic field is characterized by a diffusion tensor whose components depend on the particle's Larmor radius $R_L$ and the degree of order in the magnetic field. This prescription relies explicitly on the assumption of a scale separation between random and mean magnetic fields, which usually applies in laboratory plasmas, but not in most astrophysical environments such as the interstellar medium (ISM). Direct estimates of the cosmic-ray diffusion tensor from test particle simulations have explored the range of particle energies corresponding to $10^{-2} \\lesssim R_L/l_c \\lesssim 10^{3}$, where $l_c$ is the magnetic correlation length. Modern simulations of the ISM have numerical resolution of order 1 pc, so the Larmor radius of the cosmic ray particles that dominate in their energy density is at least $10^{6}$ times smaller than the numerically resolved scales of the random magnetic field. Large-scale simulations of cosmic ra...

  15. Cosmic Logic: a Computational Model

    CERN Document Server

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    We describe a simple computational model of cosmic logic suitable for analysis of, for example, discretized cosmological systems. The construction is based on a particular model of computation, developed by Alan Turing, with cosmic observers (CO), cosmic measures (CM) and cosmic symmetries (CS) described by Turing machines. CO machines always start with a blank tape and CM machines take CO's Turing number (also known as description number or G{\\" o}del number) as input and output the corresponding probability. Similarly, CS machines take CO's Turing number as input, but output either one if the CO machines are in the same equivalence class or zero otherwise. We argue that CS machines are more fundamental than CM machines and, thus, should be used as building blocks in constructing CM machines. We prove the non-computability of a CS machine which discriminates between two classes of CO machines: mortal that halts in finite time and immortal that runs forever. In context of eternal inflation this result implies...

  16. Decoherence, Entanglement and Cosmic Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    The possible imprint of quantum decoherence, in the framework of cosmology, is here investigated. Particular attention is paid to the observational fact that entanglement could lead to the interaction of different eras of cosmic evolution. The role played by decoherence provides the existence of "quantum entanglement" between cosmological eras giving, as observational results, dynamical constraints on the corresponding cosmological models.

  17. Cosmic Rays and Radiative Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Hartquist, T W; Falle, S A E G; Pittard, J M; Van Loo, S

    2011-01-01

    In the absence of magnetic fields and cosmic rays, radiative cooling laws with a range of dependences on temperature affect the stability of interstellar gas. For about four and a half decades, astrophysicists have recognised the importance of the thermal instablity for the formation of clouds in the interstellar medium. Even in the past several years, many papers have concerned the role of the thermal instability in the production of molecular clouds. About three and a half decades ago, astrophysicists investigating radiative shocks noticed that for many cooling laws such shocks are unstable. Attempts to address the effects of cosmic rays on the stablity of radiative media that are initially uniform or that have just passed through shocks have been made. The simplest approach to such studies involves the assumption that the cosmic rays behave as a fluid. Work based on such an approach is described. Cosmic rays have no effect on the stability of initially uniform, static media with respect to isobaric perturb...

  18. The L3+Cosmics experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Le Coultre, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Thanks to the unique properties of the L3+C detector, muon research topics relevant to various current problems in cosmic ray and particle astrophysics can be studied. A short overview of the physics topics is presented as well as a description of the detector. (19 refs).

  19. Cosmology, Relativity and Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Rebeca; Martínez, Humberto; Zepeda, Arnulfo

    2009-04-01

    This is a short review of the evolution of ideas and concepts about the Universe. It is based on the introductory talk given on the 25 of July 2008 within the Third School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics held in Arequipa, Peru.

  20. Fireballs from Superconducting Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Thermalized fireballs should be created by cusp events on superconducting cosmic strings. This simple notion allows to reliably estimate particle emission from the cusps in a given background magnetic field. With plausible assumptions about intergalactic magnetic fields, the cusp events can produce observable fluxes of high-energy photons and neutrinos with unique signatures.

  1. Fireballs from superconducting cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzinov, Andrei; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Thermalized fireballs should be created by cusp events on superconducting cosmic strings. This simple notion allows to reliably estimate particle emission from the cusps in a given background magnetic field. With plausible assumptions about intergalactic magnetic fields, the cusp events can produce observable fluxes of high-energy photons and neutrinos with unique signatures.

  2. Surprising results from cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilk, G. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Wlodarczyk, Z. [Institute for Physics, Pedagogical University, Kielce (Poland)

    1996-10-01

    A number of seemingly exotic phenomena seen in the highest cosmic-ray experiments are briefly discussed. We argue that they indicate existence of non-statistical fluctuations and strong correlations in the fragmentation region of multiparticle production processes unaccessible to the present accelerators. (author) 12 refs, 3 figs

  3. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  4. Semiempirical potentials for positron scattering by atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise; Walters, H. R. J.; Arretche, Felipe; Dutra, Adriano; Mohallem, J. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, 29075-910, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, 89223-100, Joinville, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, PO Box 702, 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    We report calculations of differential and integral cross sections for positron scattering by noble gas and alkaline-earth atoms within the same methodology. The scattering potentials are constructed by scaling adiabatic potentials so that their minima coincide with the covalent radii of the target atoms. Elastic differential and integral cross sections are calculated for Ne, Ar, Be, and Mg, and the results are very close to experimental and best theoretical data. Particularly, elastic differential cross sections for Be and Mg at low energies are reported.

  5. POSITRON ANNIHILATION AND CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS ON POLYANILINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭治林; 刘皓; 等

    1994-01-01

    The positron lifetime spectra and electrical conductivities have been measured for polyaniline as a function of protonation level ([H+] from 10-7-100.8 mol/L)。We observed that (1) the short lifetime τ1,which was related to electron density in bulk,decreased with the protonation level;(2) the intermediate lifetime τ2≈360ps,almost remaining constant,whereas its intensity I2 increased with increasing protonation level which was related to the conductivity of meaterial.These results are discussed in terms of conducting island model.

  6. DHCAL with Minimal Absorber: Measurements with Positrons

    CERN Document Server

    Freund, B; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Antequera, J.Berenguer; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H.L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kolk, N.van der; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G.C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-01-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, pre-clinical and hybrid scanners (, PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  8. Liquid Xenon Detectors for Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Miceli, A; Benard, F; Bryman, D A; Kurchaninov, L; Martin, J P; Muennich, A; Retiere, F; Ruth, T J; Sossi, V; Stoessl, A J

    2011-01-01

    PET is a functional imaging technique based on detection of annihilation photons following beta decay producing positrons. In this paper, we present the concept of a new PET system for preclinical applications consisting of a ring of twelve time projection chambers filled with liquid xenon viewed by avalanche photodiodes. Simultaneous measurement of ionization charge and scintillation light leads to a significant improvement to spatial resolution, image quality, and sensitivity. Simulated performance shows that an energy resolution of <10% (FWHM) and a sensitivity of 15% are achievable. First tests with a prototype TPC indicate position resolution <1 mm (FWHM).

  9. Positron scattering from noble gases future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A C L; Caradonna, P; Makochekanwa, C; Slaughter, D S; Sullivan, J P; Buckman, S J [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Mitroy, J, E-mail: acj107@rsphysse.anu.edu.a [Faculty of Education Health and Science, Charles Darwin University, NT (Australia)

    2009-11-01

    Recent results for positron scattering from noble gases over an energy range from 0.5 to 60eV are presented. Measurements include the grand total ({sigma}{sub GT}), Ps formation ({sigma}{sub Ps}) and Grand total - Ps formation (({sigma}{sub GT}-P{sub s}) cross sections. Some preliminary DCS results will also be presented. Work on a formulation of modified effective range theory (MERT) is being undertaken to determine the value of the scattering length which may be useful for identifying a bound state. Plans for experiments on metal atoms will be outlined.

  10. Galactic cosmic ray propagation models using Picard

    CERN Document Server

    Kissmann, Ralf; Strong, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from our newly developed Galactic cosmic-ray transport code PICARD, that solves the cosmic-ray transport equation. This code allows for the computation of cosmic-ray spectra and the resulting gamma-ray emission. Relying on contemporary numerical solvers allows for efficient computation of models with deca-parsec resolution. PICARD can handle locally anisotropic spatial diffusion acknowledging a full diffusion tensor. We used this framework to investigate the transition from axisymmetric to spiral-arm cosmic-ray source distributions. Wherever possible we compare model predictions with constraining observables in cosmic-ray astrophysics.

  11. Implications of the Cosmic Ray Electron Spectrum and Anisotropy measured with Fermi-LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bernardo, Giuseppe; Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario; Maccione, Luca; Mazziotta, Mario Nicola

    2010-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration recently released the updated results of the measurement of the cosmic ray electron (CRE) spectrum and published its first constraints on the CRE anisotropy. With respect to the previous Fermi-LAT results, the CRE spectrum measurement was extended down from 20 to 7 GeV, thus providing a better lever arm to discriminate theoretical models. Here we show that the new data strengthen the evidence for the presence of two distinct electron and positron spectral components. Furthermore, we show that under such hypothesis most relevant CRE and positron data sets are remarkably well reproduced. Consistent fits of cosmic-ray nuclei and antiproton data, which are crucial to validate the adopted propagation setup(s) and to fix the solar modulation potential, are obtained for the Kraichnan and plain-diffusion propagation setups, while the Kolmogorov one is disfavored. We then confirm that nearby pulsars are viable source candidates of the required $e^\\pm$ extra-component....

  12. Implications of the cosmic ray electron spectrum and anisotropy measured with Fermi-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Bernardo, Giuseppe [Gothenburg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Evoli, Carmelo [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); Gaggero, Daniele; Grasso, Dario [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. die Fisica; INFN, Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Mazziotta, Mario Nicola [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration recently released the updated results of the measurement of the cosmic ray electron (CRE) spectrum and published its first constraints on the CRE anisotropy. With respect to the previous Fermi-LAT results, the CRE spectrum measurement was extended down from 20 to 7 GeV, thus providing a better lever arm to discriminate theoretical models. Here we show that the new data strengthen the evidence for the presence of two distinct electron and positron spectral components. Furthermore, we show that under such hypothesis most relevant CRE and positron data sets are remarkably well reproduced. Consistent fits of cosmic-ray nuclei and antiproton data, which are crucial to validate the adopted propagation setup(s) and to fix the solar modulation potential, are obtained for the Kraichnan and plain-diffusion propagation setups, while the Kolmogorov one is disfavored. We then confirm that nearby pulsars are viable source candidates of the required e{sup {+-}} extra-component. In that case, we show that the predicted CRE anisotropy is compatible with Fermi-LAT constraints and that a positive detection should be at hand of that observatory. Models assuming that only nearby supernova remnants contribute to the high energy tail of the observed CRE spectrum are in contrast with anisotropy limits. (orig.)

  13. Cosmic rays and hadronic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipari Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of cosmic rays, and more in general of the “high energy universe” is at the moment a vibrant field that, thanks to the observations by several innovative detectors for relativistic charged particles, gamma–rays, and neutrinos continue to generate surprising and exciting results. The progress in the field is rapid but many fundamental problems remain open. There is an intimate relation between the study of the high energy universe and the study of the properties of hadronic interactions. High energy cosmic rays can only be studied detecting the showers they generate in the atmosphere, and for the interpretation of the data one needs an accurate modeling of the collisions between hadrons. Also the study of cosmic rays inside their sources and in the Galaxy requires a precise description of hadronic interactions. A program of experimental studies at the LHC and at lower energy, designed to address the most pressing problems, could significantly reduce the existing uncertainties and is very desirable. Such an experimental program would also have a strong intrinsic scientific interest, allowing the broadening and deepening of our understanding of Quantum Chromo Dynamics in the non–perturbative regime, the least understood sector of the Standard Model of particle physics. It should also be noted that the cosmic ray spectrum extends to particles with energy E ∼ 1020 eV, or a nucleon–nucleon c.m. energy √s ≃ 430 TeV, 30 times higher than the current LHC energy. Cosmic ray experiments therefore offer the possibility to perform studies on the properties of hadronic interactions that are impossible at accelerators.

  14. Analytical Model for Estimating Terrestrial Cosmic Ray Fluxes Nearly Anytime and Anywhere in the World: Extension of PARMA/EXPACS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko Sato

    Full Text Available By extending our previously established model, here we present a new model called "PHITS-based Analytical Radiation Model in the Atmosphere (PARMA version 3.0," which can instantaneously estimate terrestrial cosmic ray fluxes of neutrons, protons, ions with charge up to 28 (Ni, muons, electrons, positrons, and photons nearly anytime and anywhere in the Earth's atmosphere. The model comprises numerous analytical functions with parameters whose numerical values were fitted to reproduce the results of the extensive air shower (EAS simulation performed by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS. The accuracy of the EAS simulation was well verified using various experimental data, while that of PARMA3.0 was confirmed by the high R2 values of the fit. The models to be used for estimating radiation doses due to cosmic ray exposure, cosmic ray induced ionization rates, and count rates of neutron monitors were validated by investigating their capability to reproduce those quantities measured under various conditions. PARMA3.0 is available freely and is easy to use, as implemented in an open-access software program EXcel-based Program for Calculating Atmospheric Cosmic ray Spectrum (EXPACS. Because of these features, the new version of PARMA/EXPACS can be an important tool in various research fields such as geosciences, cosmic ray physics, and radiation research.

  15. Analytical Model for Estimating Terrestrial Cosmic Ray Fluxes Nearly Anytime and Anywhere in the World: Extension of PARMA/EXPACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    By extending our previously established model, here we present a new model called “PHITS-based Analytical Radiation Model in the Atmosphere (PARMA) version 3.0,” which can instantaneously estimate terrestrial cosmic ray fluxes of neutrons, protons, ions with charge up to 28 (Ni), muons, electrons, positrons, and photons nearly anytime and anywhere in the Earth’s atmosphere. The model comprises numerous analytical functions with parameters whose numerical values were fitted to reproduce the results of the extensive air shower (EAS) simulation performed by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). The accuracy of the EAS simulation was well verified using various experimental data, while that of PARMA3.0 was confirmed by the high R2 values of the fit. The models to be used for estimating radiation doses due to cosmic ray exposure, cosmic ray induced ionization rates, and count rates of neutron monitors were validated by investigating their capability to reproduce those quantities measured under various conditions. PARMA3.0 is available freely and is easy to use, as implemented in an open-access software program EXcel-based Program for Calculating Atmospheric Cosmic ray Spectrum (EXPACS). Because of these features, the new version of PARMA/EXPACS can be an important tool in various research fields such as geosciences, cosmic ray physics, and radiation research. PMID:26674183

  16. Pulsar Wind Nebulae as a source of the observed electron and positron excess at high energy: the case of Vela-X

    CERN Document Server

    Della Torre, S; Rancoita, P G; Rozza, D; Treves, A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, in terms of production from pulsars and their nebulae, the cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes above $\\sim10$ GeV, observed by the AMS-02 experiment up to 1 TeV. We concentrate on the Vela-X case. Starting from the gamma-ray photon spectrum of the source, generated via synchrotron and inverse Compton processes, we estimated the electron and positron injection spectra. Several features are fixed from observations of Vela-X and unknown parameters are borrowed from the Crab nebula. The particle spectra produced in the pulsar wind nebula are then propagated up to the Solar System, using a diffusion model. Differently from previous works, the omnidirectional intensity excess for electrons and positrons is obtained as a difference between the AMS-02 data and the corresponding local interstellar spectrum. An equal amount of electron and positron excess is observed and we interpreted this excess (above $\\sim$100 GeV in the AMS-02 data) as a supply coming from Vela-X. The particle contribution is c...

  17. Positron annihilation spectroscopy in defects of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Fujinami, M

    2002-01-01

    Interaction of positron and defects, application to research of defects of semiconductor and defects on the surface of semiconductor are explained. Cz (Czochralski)-Si single crystal with 10 sup 1 sup 8 cm sup - sup 3 impurity oxygen was introduced defects by electron irradiation and the positron lifetime was measured at 90K after annealing. The defect size and recovery temperature were determined by the lifetime measurement. The distribution of defects in the depth direction is shown by S-E curve. The chemical state analysis is possible by CBS (Coincidence Doppler Broadening) spectra. The application to silicon-implanted (100 keV, 2x10 sup 1 sup 5 cm sup - sup 2) silicon and oxygen-implanted (180 keV, 2x10 sup 1 sup 5 cm sup - sup 2) silicon are stated. On the oxygen-implanted silicon, the main product was V2 after implantation, V sub 6 O sub 2 at 600degC and V sub 1 sub 0 O sub 6 at 800degC. (S.Y.)

  18. Electron-Positron Flows around Magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-11-01

    The twisted magnetospheres of magnetars must sustain a persistent flow of electron-positron plasma. The flow dynamics is controlled by the radiation field around the hot neutron star. The problem of plasma motion in the self-consistent radiation field is solved using the method of virtual beams. The plasma and radiation exchange momentum via resonant scattering and self-organize into the "radiatively locked" outflow with a well-defined, decreasing Lorentz factor. There is an extended zone around the magnetar where the plasma flow is ultra-relativistic; its Lorentz factor is self-regulated so that it can marginally scatter thermal photons. The flow becomes slow and opaque in an outer equatorial zone, where the decelerated plasma accumulates and annihilates; this region serves as a reflector for the thermal photons emitted by the neutron star. The e ± flow carries electric current, which is sustained by a moderate induced electric field. The electric field maintains a separation between the electron and positron velocities, against the will of the radiation field. The two-stream instability is then inevitable, and the induced turbulence can generate low-frequency emission. In particular, radio emission may escape around the magnetic dipole axis of the star. Most of the flow energy is converted to hard X-ray emission, which is examined in an accompanying paper.

  19. ELECTRON-POSITRON FLOWS AROUND MAGNETARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M., E-mail: amb@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    The twisted magnetospheres of magnetars must sustain a persistent flow of electron-positron plasma. The flow dynamics is controlled by the radiation field around the hot neutron star. The problem of plasma motion in the self-consistent radiation field is solved using the method of virtual beams. The plasma and radiation exchange momentum via resonant scattering and self-organize into the 'radiatively locked' outflow with a well-defined, decreasing Lorentz factor. There is an extended zone around the magnetar where the plasma flow is ultra-relativistic; its Lorentz factor is self-regulated so that it can marginally scatter thermal photons. The flow becomes slow and opaque in an outer equatorial zone, where the decelerated plasma accumulates and annihilates; this region serves as a reflector for the thermal photons emitted by the neutron star. The e {sup ±} flow carries electric current, which is sustained by a moderate induced electric field. The electric field maintains a separation between the electron and positron velocities, against the will of the radiation field. The two-stream instability is then inevitable, and the induced turbulence can generate low-frequency emission. In particular, radio emission may escape around the magnetic dipole axis of the star. Most of the flow energy is converted to hard X-ray emission, which is examined in an accompanying paper.

  20. Towards laboratory produced relativistic electron-positron pair plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Cauble, R.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Hazi, A.; Moses, E. I.; Murphy, C. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Seely, J.; Shepherd, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Szabo, C. I.; Tommasini, R.; Zulick, C.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2011-12-01

    We review recent experimental results on the path to producing electron-positron pair plasmas using lasers. Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the past few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 10 16 cm -3 and 10 13 cm -3, respectively. With the increasing performance of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a high-density, up to 10 18 cm -3, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter.

  1. A STUDY OF FINE PRECIPITATES IN ALLOYS BY POSITRON ANNIHILATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王景成; 尤富强; 殷俊林; 高国华; 梁玲; 段勇

    2001-01-01

    Measurements were performed using the positron annihilation technique associated with physical metallurgical techniques for several engineering alloys containing fine precipitates. It is shown that positron annihilation is an effective method to detect fine precipitates, providing a sound basis for a further intense research of these.

  2. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  3. Towards laboratory produced relativistic electron–positron pair plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Cauble, R.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Hazi, A.; Moses, E. I.; Murphy, C. D.; Myatt, J.; Park, J.; Seely, J.; Shepherd, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Szabo, C. I.; Tommasini, R.; Zulick, C.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2011-12-01

    We review recent experimental results on the path to producing electron–positron pair plasmas using lasers. Relativistic pair-plasmas and jets are believed to exist in many astrophysical objects and are often invoked to explain energetic phenomena related to Gamma Ray Bursts and Black Holes. On earth, positrons from radioactive isotopes or accelerators are used extensively at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science positron emission tomography and basic antimatter science. Experimental platforms capable of producing the high-temperature pair-plasma and high-flux jets required to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. In the past few years, we performed extensive experiments generating positrons with intense lasers where we found that relativistic electron and positron jets are produced by irradiating a solid gold target with an intense picosecond laser pulse. The positron temperatures in directions parallel and transverse to the beam both exceeded 0.5 MeV, and the density of electrons and positrons in these jets are of order 1016 cm-3 and 1013 cm-3, respectively. With the increasing performance of high-energy ultra-short laser pulses, we expect that a high-density, up to 1018 cm-3, relativistic pair-plasma is achievable, a novel regime of laboratory-produced hot dense matter.

  4. First platinum moderated positron beam based on neutron capture

    CERN Document Server

    Hugenschmidt, C; Repper, R; Schreckenbach, K; Sperr, P; Triftshaeuser, W

    2002-01-01

    A positron beam based on absorption of high energy prompt gamma-rays from thermal neutron capture in sup 1 sup 1 sup 3 Cd was installed at a neutron guide of the high flux reactor at the ILL in Grenoble. Measurements were performed for various source geometries, dependent on converter mass, moderator surface and extraction voltages. The results lead to an optimised design of the in-pile positron source which will be implemented at the Munich research reactor FRM-II. The positron source consists of platinum foils acting as gamma-e sup + e sup - -converter and positron moderator. Due to the negative positron work function moderation in heated platinum leads to emission of monoenergetic positrons. The positron work function of polycrystalline platinum was determined to 1.95(5) eV. After acceleration to several keV by four electrical lenses the beam was magnetically guided in a solenoid field of 7.5 mT leading to a NaI-detector in order to detect the 511 keV gamma-radiation of the annihilating positrons. The posi...

  5. Three-photon annihilation of the electron-positron pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Frolov, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Three-photon annihilation of the electron-positron pairs (= $(e^{-}, e^{+})-$pairs) is considered in the electron rest frame. The energy of the incident positron can be arbitrary. The analytical expression for the cross-section of three-photon annihilation of the $(e^{-},e^{+})-$pair has been derived and investigated.

  6. Recent Developments in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors.

  7. Application of positron emitters to studies on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishioka, N.S.; Matsuoka, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sekine, T. [and others

    1998-10-01

    A newly developed positron emitting tracer imaging system enables us to study dynamically the physiological function of plants, although this system covers, at present, a limited area in a plant. Production of the positron emitters {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, {sup 18}F and {sup 48}V for this application, using an AVF cyclotron, is described. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo modelling of positron transport in real world applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanović, S.; Banković, A.; Šuvakov, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2014-05-01

    Due to the unstable nature of positrons and their short lifetime, it is difficult to obtain high positron particle densities. This is why the Monte Carlo simulation technique, as a swarm method, is very suitable for modelling most of the current positron applications involving gaseous and liquid media. The ongoing work on the measurements of cross-sections for positron interactions with atoms and molecules and swarm calculations for positrons in gasses led to the establishment of good cross-section sets for positron interaction with gasses commonly used in real-world applications. Using the standard Monte Carlo technique and codes that can follow both low- (down to thermal energy) and high- (up to keV) energy particles, we are able to model different systems directly applicable to existing experimental setups and techniques. This paper reviews the results on modelling Surko-type positron buffer gas traps, application of the rotating wall technique and simulation of positron tracks in water vapor as a substitute for human tissue, and pinpoints the challenges in and advantages of applying Monte Carlo simulations to these systems.

  9. Application of positrons to the study of thin technological films

    CERN Document Server

    Nathwani, M

    2001-01-01

    Positron Doppler broadening experiments using variable-energy positron beams with positron implantation energy range 0-25 keV and 0-30 keV, respectively, have been performed on a selection of thin technological films. By measuring the spectrum of the 511 keV annihilation gamma-rays photopeak the profile of the Doppler broadening of the photopeak, due to the motion of the annihilating positron-electron pair, can be analysed. Varying the incident positron energy enables the positron t$ probe a sample at different depths which makes it possible to study samples by analysing the Doppler broadening of the photopeak as a function of positron depth. The Doppler broadening experiments on gallium nitride films with different crystallographic orientations revealed distortions in the Doppler broadened profile at low energies. The distortions were identified to be a consequence of significant para-positronium annihilation taking place near the sample surface. A parameter based on the proportion of positrons trapped at an...

  10. Positron emission tomography in drug development and drug evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ; Vaalburg, W

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an imaging modality which can determine biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitting radionuclides as C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18 and by measuring the annihilation radiation usin

  11. Cosmic vacuum energy decay and creation of cosmic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fahr, H J

    2016-01-01

    In the more recent literature on cosmological evolutions of the universe the cosmic vacuum energy has become a non-renouncable ingredient. The cosmological constant $\\Lambda$, first invented by Einstein, but later also rejected by him, presently experiences an astonishing revival. Interestingly enough it acts, like a constant vacuum energy density would also do. Namely, it has an accelerating action on cosmic dynamics without which, as it appears, presently obtained cosmological data cannot be conciliated with theory. As we are going to show in this review, however, the concept of a constant vacuum energy density is unsatisfactory for very basic reasons, since it would claim for a physical reality that acts upon spacetime and matter dynamics without itself being acted upon by spacetime or matter.

  12. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depressions & spatial complexity

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-01-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do they represent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probes and measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive to the nature of dark energy, while their substructure and galaxy population provides a direct key to the nature of dark matter. Also, the pristine environment of void interiors is an important testing ground for our understanding of environmental influences on galaxy formation and evolution. In this paper, we review the key aspects of the structure and dynamics of voids, with a particular focus on the hierarchical evolution of the void population. We demonstrate how the rich structural pattern of the Cosmic Web is related to the complex evolution and buildup of voids.

  13. Dynamic Cosmic Strings Numerical evolution of excited Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Sperhake, U; Vickers, J A

    2001-01-01

    An implicit, fully characteristic, numerical scheme for solving the field equations of a cosmic string coupled to gravity is described. The inclusion of null infinity as part of the numerical grid allows us to apply suitable boundary conditions on the metric and matter fields to suppress unphysical divergent solutions. The code is tested by comparing the results with exact solutions, checking that static cosmic string initial data remain constant when evolved and undertaking a time dependent convergence analysis of the code. It is shown that the code is accurate, stable and exhibits clear second order convergence. The code is used to analyse the interaction between a Weber--Wheeler pulse of gravitational radiation with the string. The interaction causes the string to oscillate at frequencies inversely proportional to the masses of the scalar and vector fields of the string. After the pulse has largely radiated away the string continues to ring but the oscillations slowly decay and eventually the variables ret...

  14. Voids and the Cosmic Web: cosmic depression & spatial complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    Voids form a prominent aspect of the Megaparsec distribution of galaxies and matter. Not only do theyrepresent a key constituent of the Cosmic Web, they also are one of the cleanest probesand measures of global cosmological parameters. The shape and evolution of voids are highly sensitive tothe nature of dark energy, while their substructure and galaxy population provides a direct key to thenature of dark matter. Also, the pristine environment of void interiors is an important testing groundfor our understanding of environmental influences on galaxy formation and evolution. In this paper, we reviewthe key aspects of the structure and dynamics ofvoids, with a particular focus on the hierarchical evolution of the void population. We demonstratehow the rich structural pattern of the Cosmic Web is related to the complex evolution and buildupof voids.

  15. Quantum resonances in reflection of relativistic electrons and positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eykhorn, Yu.L.; Korotchenko, K.B. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Pivovarov, Yu.L. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Takabayashi, Y. [SAGA Light Source, 8-7 Yayoigaoka, Tosu, Saga 841-0005 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Calculations based on the use of realistic potential of the system of crystallographic planes confirm earlier results on existence of resonances in reflection of relativistic electrons and positrons by the crystal surface, if the crystallographic planes are parallel to the surface.The physical reason of predicted phenomena, similar to the band structure of transverse energy levels, is connected with the Bloch form of the wave functions of electrons (positrons) near the crystallographic planes, which appears both in the case of planar channeling of relativistic electrons (positrons) and in reflection by a crystal surface. Calculations show that positions of maxima in reflection of relativistic electrons and positrons by crystal surface specifically depend on the angle of incidence with respect to the crystal surface and relativistic factor of electrons/positrons. These maxima form the Darwin tables similar to that in ultra-cold neutron diffraction.

  16. Relativistic Quasimonoenergetic Positron Jets from Intense Laser-Solid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Bonlie, J.; Chen, C. D.; Chen, S. N.; Courtois, C.; Elberson, L.; Gregori, G.; Kruer, W.; Landoas, O.; Mithen, J.; Myatt, J.; Murphy, C. D.; Nilson, P.; Price, D.; Schneider, M.; Shepherd, R.; Stoeckl, C.; Tabak, M.; Tommasini, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2010-07-01

    Detailed angle and energy resolved measurements of positrons ejected from the back of a gold target that was irradiated with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse reveal that the positrons are ejected in a collimated relativistic jet. The laser-positron energy conversion efficiency is ˜2×10-4. The jets have ˜20 degree angular divergence and the energy distributions are quasimonoenergetic with energy of 4 to 20 MeV and a beam temperature of ˜1MeV. The sheath electric field on the surface of the target is shown to determine the positron energy. The positron angular and energy distribution is controlled by varying the sheath field, through the laser conditions and target geometry.

  17. Positron Energy Levels in Cd-Based Semiconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Abbar; S.Mé(c)abih; S.Amari; N.Benosman; B.Bouhafs

    2013-01-01

    Using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave FP-LAPW method within local density approximation LDA,we have studied positron diffusion and surface emission in Cd-based semiconductors.This requires the calculation of electron and positron band structures.In the absence of experimental and theoretical data for CdX (X=S,Se,Te) we have treated the Si,which has been studied by several authors,as a test case.Predictive results on positron effective masses,deformation potentials,positron work functions,diffusion constants and positron mobilities axe presented for CdX (X=S,Se,Te).Our calculated data for Si axe compared with experimental and recent theoretical results.

  18. Development of a Positron Source for JLab at the IAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forest, Tony [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2013-10-12

    We report on the research performed towards the development of a positron sour for Jefferson Lab's (JLab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, VA. The first year of work was used to benchmark the predictions of our current simulation with positron production efficiency measurements at the IAC. The second year used the benchmarked simulation to design a beam line configuration which optimized positron production efficiency while minimizing radioactive waste as well as design and construct a positron converter target. The final year quantified the performance of the positron source. This joint research and development project brought together the experiences of both electron accelerator facilities. Our intention is to use the project as a spring board towards developing a program of accelerator based research and education which will train students to meet the needs of both facilities as well as provide a pool of trained scientists.

  19. Positron Source Simulations for ILC 1 TeV Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ushakov, Andriy; Riemann, Sabine; Liu, Wanming; Gai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The generation and capture of polarized positrons at a source with a superconducting helical undulator having 4.3 cm period and 500 GeV electron drive beam have been simulated. The positron polarization has been calculated for the different undulator K values (up to K = 2.5). Without applying a photon collimator, the maximal polarization of positrons is about 25% for 231 meters active magnet length of undulator with K = 0.7. Using an undulator with K = 2.5 and a collimator with an aperture radius of 0.9 mm results in increase of positron polarization to 54%. The energy deposition, temperature rise and stress induced by high intense photon beam in the rotated titanium-alloy target have been estimated. The maximal thermal stress in the target is about 224 MPa for the source with photon collimation to achieve a positron polarization of 54%.

  20. Multi-pair states in electron-positron pair creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllert, Anton; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    Ultra strong electromagnetic fields can lead to spontaneous creation of single or multiple electron-positron pairs. A quantum field theoretical treatment of the pair creation process combined with numerical methods provides a description of the fermionic quantum field state, from which all observables of the multiple electron-positron pairs can be inferred. This allows to study the complex multi-particle dynamics of electron-positron pair creation in-depth, including multi-pair statistics as well as momentum distributions and spin. To illustrate the potential benefit of this approach, it is applied to the intermediate regime of pair creation between nonperturbative Schwinger pair creation and perturbative multiphoton pair creation where the creation of multi-pair states becomes nonnegligible but cascades do not yet set in. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how spin and helicity of the created electrons and positrons are affected by the polarization of the counterpropagating laser fields, which induce the creation of electron-positron pairs.

  1. Positron lifetimes in Cu-based {beta}-phase alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plazaola, F. [Bilbo, Euskal Herrilo Unibertsitatea (Spain). Elektrika eta Elektronika Saila; Romero, R.; Somoza, A. [Tandil, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina). IFIMAT

    1997-05-01

    Experimental and theoretical characterization of the positron lifetimes for bulk and vacancy-type defects are considered in the ordered {beta}-phase Cu-Zn-Al alloys. The general trend exhibits the same behaviour in both cases, in which the bulk positron lifetimes vary very little with alloy`s composition. The ordered structure can be described as two interpenetrating sublattices: however, within the theoretical approach, there is no preferential positron trapping at the mono vacancies of one of the two sublattices. The calculated lifetimes of positrons trapped at mono vacancies depend mainly on the Al content in the next near-neighbourhood. The lifetimes of positrons trapped at divacancies are 10-25 ps larger than the ones at mono vacancies. The experimental vacancy-type defect lifetimes are in good agreement with the ones calculated for mono vacancies.

  2. Positron-molecule interactions: resonant attachment, annihilation, and bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Gribakin, G F; Surko, C M; 10.1103/RevModPhys.82.2557

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of current understanding of the interaction of low-energy positrons with molecules with emphasis on resonances, positron attachment and annihilation. Annihilation rates measured as a function of positron energy reveal the presence of vibrational Feshbach resonances (VFR) for many polyatomic molecules. These resonances lead to strong enhancement of the annihilation rates. They also provide evidence that positrons bind to many molecular species. A quantitative theory of VFR-mediated attachment to small molecules is presented. It is tested successfully for selected molecules (e.g., methyl halides and methanol) where all modes couple to the positron continuum. Combination and overtone resonances are observed and their role is elucidated. In larger molecules, annihilation rates from VFR far exceed those explicable on the basis of single-mode resonances. These enhancements increase rapidly with the number of vibrational degrees of freedom. While the details are as yet unclear, intr...

  3. Modelling of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marianne

    2011-06-01

    Cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere induce extensive air showers consisting of up to billions of secondary particles. Among them, a multitude of electrons and positrons are generated. These get deflected in the Earth's magnetic field, creating time-varying transverse currents. Thereby, the air shower emits coherent radiation in the MHz frequency range measured by radio antenna arrays on the ground such as LOPES at the KIT. This detection method provides a possibility to study cosmic rays with energies above 1017 eV. At this time, the radio technique undergoes the change from prototype experiments to large scale application. Thus, a detailed understanding of the radio emission process is needed more than ever. Before starting this work, different models made conflicting predictions on the pulse shape and the amplitude of the radio signal. It turned out that a radiation component caused by the variation of the number of charged particles within the air shower was missed in several models. The Monte Carlo code REAS2 superposing the radiation of the individual air shower electrons and positrons was one of those. At this time, it was not known how to take the missing component into account. For REAS3, we developed and implemented the endpoint formalism, a universal approach, to calculate the radiation from each single particle. For the first time, we achieve a good agreement between REAS3 and MGMR, an independent and completely different simulation approach. In contrast to REAS3, MGMR is based on a macroscopic approach and on parametrisations of the air shower. We studied the differences in the underlying air shower models to explain the remaining deviations. For comparisons with LOPES data, we developed a new method which allows "top-down" simulations of air showers. From this, we developed an air shower selection criterion based on the number of muons measured with KASCADE to take shower-to-shower fluctuations for a single event analysis into account. With

  4. Evolution of the cosmic web

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; Jones, Bernard J T; Frenk, Carlos S

    2014-01-01

    The cosmic web is the largest scale manifestation of the anisotropic gravitational collapse of matter. It represents the transitional stage between linear and non-linear structures and contains easily accessible information about the early phases of structure formation processes. Here we investigate the characteristics and the time evolution of morphological components since. Our analysis involves the application of the NEXUS Multiscale Morphology Filter (MMF) technique, predominantly its NEXUS+ version, to high resolution and large volume cosmological simulations. We quantify the cosmic web components in terms of their mass and volume content, their density distribution and halo populations. We employ new analysis techniques to determine the spatial extent of filaments and sheets, like their total length and local width. This analysis identifies cluster and filaments as the most prominent components of the web. In contrast, while voids and sheets take most of the volume, they correspond to underdense environ...

  5. Nexus of the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Cautun, Marius; Jones, Bernard J T; Frenk, Carlos S; Hellwing, Wojcieh A

    2012-01-01

    One of the important unknowns of current cosmology concerns the effects of the large scale distribution of matter on the formation and evolution of dark matter haloes and galaxies. One main difficulty in answering this question lies in the absence of a robust and natural way of identifying the large scale environments and their characteristics. This work summarizes the NEXUS+ formalism which extends and improves our multiscale scale-space MMF method. The new algorithm is very successful in tracing the Cosmic Web components, mainly due to its novel filtering of the density in logarithmic space. The method, due to its multiscale and hierarchical character, has the advantage of detecting all the cosmic structures, either prominent or tenuous, without preference for a certain size or shape. The resulting filamentary and wall networks can easily be characterized by their direction, thickness, mass density and density profile. These additional environmental properties allows to us to investigate not only the effect...

  6. Aerosols Produced by Cosmic Rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker

    , it will be possible to develop the experiment to cover additional processes involved in the route to cloud droplet formation. The experiment will be conducted at the Danish National Space Center where a clean room facility has been provided. It comprises a 7 m3 reaction chamber across which an electric field......Satellite observations have shown that the Earth’s cloud cover is strongly correlated with the galactic cosmic ray flux. While this correlation is indicative of a possible physical connection, there is currently no confirmation that a physical mechanism exists. We are therefore setting up...... mechanism linking cosmic rays to clouds and climate is currently speculative, there have been various suggestions of the role atmospheric ions may play; these involve any one of a number of processes from the nucleation of aerosols up to the collection processes of cloud droplets. We have chosen to start...

  7. The Imperatives of Cosmic Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Carl H

    2010-01-01

    The transformation of organic molecules into the simplest self-replicating living system,a microorganism, is accomplished from a unique event or rare events that occurred early in the Universe. The subsequent dispersal on cosmic scales and evolution of life is guaranteed, being determined by well-understood processes of physics and biology. Entire galaxies and clusters of galaxies can be considered as connected biospheres, with lateral gene transfers, as initially theorized by Joseph (2000), providing for genetic mixing and Darwinian evolution on a cosmic scale. Big bang cosmology modified by modern fluid mechanics suggests the beginning and wide intergalactic dispersal of life occurred immediately after the end of the plasma epoch when the gas of protogalaxies in clusters fragmented into clumps of planets. Stars are born from binary mergers of such planets within such clumps. When stars devour their surrounding planets to excess they explode, distributing necessary fertilizing chemicals created only in stars...

  8. Cosmic Strings on the Lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Bukenov, A K; Polikarpov, M I; Polley, L; Wiese, U J

    1992-01-01

    We develop a formalism for the quantization of topologically stable excitations in the 4-dimensional abelian lattice gauge theory. The excitations are global and local (Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen) strings and monopoles. The operators of creation and annihilation of string states are constructed; the string Green functions are represented as a path integral over random surfaces. Topological excitations play an important role in the early universe. In the broken symmetry phase of the $U(1)$ spin model, closed global cosmic strings arise, while in the Higgs phase of the noncompact gauge-Higgs model, local cosmic strings are present. The compact gauge-Higgs model also involves monopoles. Then the strings can break if their ends are capped by monopoles. The topology of the Euclidean string world sheets are studied by numerical simulations.

  9. Cosmic Revelation: Making Astroparticles Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, T. O.; Haungs, A.; Schieler, H.; Weindl, A.

    2010-06-01

    Cosmic Revelation is a prime example of a successful art and science project connecting art and astroparticle physics. One of the main reasons for its success might be that the collaboration between the KArlsruhe Shower Core and Array DEtector (KASCADE) experiment and Tim Otto Roth is both a minimalist light art project and a scientific experiment. In a field of 16 flashing mirror sculptures connected to the KASCADE detector field at KIT (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany) the impact of high energy cosmic rays on Earth can be experienced directly. In just one year the project has developed from the initial concept to its first presentation in a public space in autumn 2008. We explain how the project developed, and also highlight the practical and conceptual conditions for its realisation.

  10. Emergent Spacetime and Cosmic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2015-01-01

    We propose a background-independent formulation of cosmic inflation. The inflation in this picture corresponds to a dynamical process to generate space and time while the conventional inflation is simply an (exponential) expansion of a preexisting spacetime owing to the vacuum energy carried by an inflaton field. We observe that the cosmic inflation is triggered by the condensate of Planck energy into vacuum responsible for the generation of spacetime and must be a single event according to the exclusion principle of noncommutative spacetime caused by the Planck energy condensate in vacuum. The emergent spacetime picture admits a background-independent formulation so that the inflation can be described by a conformal Hamiltonian system characterized by an exponential phase space expansion without introducing any inflaton field as well as an ad hoc inflation potential. This implies that the emergent spacetime may incapacitate all the rationales to introduce the multiverse hypothesis.

  11. Cosmic Visions Dark Energy: Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Heitmann, Katrin [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hirata, Chris [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Honscheid, Klaus [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Roodman, Aaron [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Seljak, Uroš [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Slosar, Anže [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Trodden, Mark [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-04-26

    A strong instrumentation and detector R&D program has enabled the current generation of cosmic frontier surveys. A small investment in R&D will continue to pay dividends and enable new probes to investigate the accelerated expansion of the universe. Instrumentation and detector R&D provide critical training opportunities for future generations of experimentalists, skills that are important across the entire Department of Energy High Energy Physics program.

  12. Electromagnetic field and cosmic censorship

    CERN Document Server

    Düztaş, Koray

    2013-01-01

    We construct a gedanken experiment in which an extremal Kerr black hole interacts with a test electromagnetic field. Using Teukolsky's solutions for electromagnetic perturbations in Kerr spacetime, and the conservation laws imposed by the energy momentum tensor of the electromagnetic field and the Killing vectors of the spacetime, we prove that this interaction cannot convert the black hole into a naked singularity, thus cosmic censorship conjecture is not violated in this case.

  13. Cosmic crystallography in a circle

    CERN Document Server

    Teixeira, A F F

    2000-01-01

    In a circle (an $S^1$) with circumference 1 assume $m$ objects distributed pseudo-randomly. In the universal covering $R^1$ assume the objects replicated accordingly, and take an interval $L>1$. In this interval, make the normalized histogram of the pair separations which are not an integer. The theoretical (expected) such histogram is obtained in this report, as well as its difference to a similar histogram for non-replicated objects. The whole study is of interest for the cosmic crystallography.

  14. Racetrack Inflation and Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Davis, Stephen C; Jeannerot, Rachel; Postma, Marieke

    2008-01-01

    We consider the coupling of racetrack inflation to matter fields as realised in the D3/D7 brane system. In particular, we investigate the possibility of cosmic string formation in this system. We find that string formation before or at the onset of racetrack inflation is possible, but they are then inflated away. Furthermore, string formation at the end of inflation is prevented by the presence of the moduli sector. As a consequence, no strings survive racetrack inflation.

  15. Charged Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachelrieß, M.

    2013-04-15

    High-energy neutrino astronomy has grown up, with IceCube as one of its main experiments having sufficient sensitivity to test “vanilla” models of astrophysical neutrinos. I review predictions of neutrino fluxes as well as the status of cosmic ray physics. I comment also briefly on an improvement of the Fermi-LAT limit for cosmogenic neutrinos and on the two neutrino events presented by IceCube first at “Neutrino 2012”.

  16. Cosmic microwave background theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, J. Richard

    1998-01-01

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in ℓ-space are consistent with a ΔT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are ∼(10−5)2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at ℓ ≳ 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Λ cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 ± 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 ± 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 ± 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 ± 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Λ and moderate constraints on Ωtot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant. PMID:9419321

  17. Fundamental limits of positron emission mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2001-06-01

    We explore the causes of performance limitation in positron emission mammography cameras. We compare two basic camera geometries containing the same volume of 511 keV photon detectors, one with a parallel plane geometry and another with a rectangular geometry. We find that both geometries have similar performance for the phantom imaged (in Monte Carlo simulation), even though the solid angle coverage of the rectangular camera is about 50 percent higher than the parallel plane camera. The reconstruction algorithm used significantly affects the resulting image; iterative methods significantly outperform the commonly used focal plane tomography. Finally, the characteristics of the tumor itself, specifically the absolute amount of radiotracer taken up by the tumor, will significantly affect the imaging performance.

  18. Instrumentation optimization for positron emission mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, William W.; Qi, Jinyi

    2003-06-05

    The past several years have seen designs for PET cameras optimized to image the breast, commonly known as Positron Emission Mammography or PEM cameras. The guiding principal behind PEM instrumentation is that a camera whose field of view is restricted to a single breast has higher performance and lower cost than a conventional PET camera. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules, although geometries that encircle the breast have also been proposed. The ability of the detector modules to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) is also a relevant feature. This paper finds that while both the additional solid angle coverage afforded by encircling the breast and the decreased blurring afforded by the DOI measurement improve performance, the ability to measure DOI is more important than the ability to encircle the breast.

  19. Positron emission tomography of the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelbert, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  20. Motion correction in thoracic positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gigengack, Fabian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion leads to image degradation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which impairs quantification. In this book, the authors present approaches to motion estimation and motion correction in thoracic PET. The approaches for motion estimation are based on dual gating and mass-preserving image registration (VAMPIRE) and mass-preserving optical flow (MPOF). With mass-preservation, image intensity modulations caused by highly non-rigid cardiac motion are accounted for. Within the image registration framework different data terms, different variants of regularization and parametric and non-parametric motion models are examined. Within the optical flow framework, different data terms and further non-quadratic penalization are also discussed. The approaches for motion correction particularly focus on pipelines in dual gated PET. A quantitative evaluation of the proposed approaches is performed on software phantom data with accompanied ground-truth motion information. Further, clinical appl...

  1. Image-reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W; CERN. Geneva

    1993-01-01

    Physics and mathematics for medical imaging In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-rays but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes and nuclear magnetic resonance. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimentional distributions to be reconstructed from projection data acquired by radiation detectors suitably positioned around the patient will be described in detail. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simpleradiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo boichemistry. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function that are cur...

  2. Positron emission tomography and radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, PhD, Gary D.; Fox, MD, Peter; Phillips, MD, William T.

    2001-10-01

    Medical physics research is providing new avenues for addressing the fundamental problem of radiation therapy-how to provide a tumor-killing dose while reducing the dose to a non-lethal level for critical organs in adjacent portions of the patient anatomy. This talk reviews the revolutionary impact of Positron Emission Tomography on the practice of radiation oncology. The concepts of PET imaging and the development of "tumor" imaging methods using 18F-DG flouro-deoxyglucose are presented to provide the foundation for contemporary research and application to therapy. PET imaging influences radiation therapy decisions in multiple ways. Imaging of occult but viable tumor metastases eliminates misguided therapy attempts. The ability to distinguish viable tumor from scar tissue and necroses allows reduction of treatment portals and more selective treatments. Much research remains before the clinical benefits of these advances are fully realized.

  3. Electron-positron outflow from black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Van Putten, M H P M

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) appear as the brightest transient phenomena in the Universe. The nature of the central engine in GRBs is a missing link in the theory of fireballs to their stellar mass progenitors. Here it is shown that rotating black holes produce electron-positron outflow when brought into contact with a strong magnetic field. The outflow is produced by a coupling of the spin of the black hole to the orbit of the particles. For a nearly extreme Kerr black hole, particle outflow from an initial state of electrostatic equilibrium has a normalized isotropic emission of $\\sim external magnetic field strength, B_c=4.4 x 10^{13}G, and M is the mass of the black hole. This initial outflow has a half-opening angle given.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography of the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  5. Cosmic ray physics goes to school

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    With the help of a CERN physicist, German Schools bring the Largest Cosmic Ray Detector in Europe one step closer to reality   Eric Berthier and Robert Porret (CERN, ST/HM), Frej Torp and Christian Antfolk from the Polytechnics Arcada in Finland, and Karsten Eggert, physicist at CERN who initiated this project, during the installation of cosmic ray detectors in the Pays de Gex, at point 4. Niina Patrikainen and Frej Torp, Finnish students from Rovaniemi and Arcada Polytechnics, installing cosmic ray counters at the Fachhochschule in Duesseldorf. The science of cosmic ray detection is growing, literally. Cosmic rays, energetic particles from space, strike our planet all the time. They collide with the air molecules in our upper atmosphere and initiate large showers of elementary particles (mainly electrons, photons, hadrons and muons) which rain down upon the earth. The shower size and the particle density in the showers reflect the initial energy of the cosmic ray particle, a detail which makes d...

  6. Cosmic ray penetration in diffuse clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic rays are a fundamental source of ionization for molecular and diffuse clouds, influencing their chemical, thermal, and dynamical evolution. The amount of cosmic rays inside a cloud also determines the $\\gamma$-ray flux produced by hadronic collisions between cosmic rays and cloud material. We study the spectrum of cosmic rays inside and outside of a diffuse cloud, by solving the stationary transport equation for cosmic rays including diffusion, advection and energy losses due to ionization of neutral hydrogen atoms. We found that the cosmic ray spectrum inside a diffuse cloud differs from the one in the interstellar medium for energies smaller than $E_{br}\\approx 100$ MeV, irrespective of the model details. Below $E_{br}$, the spectrum is harder (softer) than that in the interstellar medium if the latter is a power law $\\propto p^{-s}$ with $s$ larger (smaller) than $\\sim0.42$.

  7. Positron scattering measurements for application to medical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, James

    2015-09-01

    While the use of positrons in medical imaging is now well established, there is still much to learn regarding the transport of positrons through the body, and the subsequent damage induced. Current models of dosimetry use only a crude approximation of the collision physics involved, and at low energies misrepresent the thermalisation process to a considerable degree. Recently, collaborative work has commenced to attempt to refine these models, incorporating a better representation of the underlying physics and trying to gain a better understanding of the damage done after the emission of a positron from a medical radioisotope. This problem is being attacked from several different angles, with new models being developed based upon established techniques in plasma and swarm physics. For all these models, a realistic representation of the collision processes of positrons with relevant molecular species is required. At the Australian National University, we have undertaken a program of measurements of positron scattering from a range of molecules that are important in biological systems, with a focus on analogs to DNA. This talk will present measurements of positron scattering from a range of these molecules, as well as describing the experimental techniques employed to make such measurements. Targets have been measured that are both liquid and solid at room temperature, and new approaches have been developed to get absolute cross section data. The application of the data to various models of positron thermalisation will also be described.

  8. A combined matrix isolation spectroscopy and cryosolid positron moderation apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molek, Christopher D.; Michael Lindsay, C.; Fajardo, Mario E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, Ordnance Division, Energetic Materials Branch, AFRL/RWME, 2306 Perimeter Road, Eglin AFB, Florida 32542-5910 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a novel apparatus for investigating efficiency improvements in thin-film cryogenic solid positron moderators. We report results from solid neon, argon, krypton, and xenon positron moderators which illustrate the capabilities and limitations of our apparatus. We integrate a matrix isolation spectroscopy diagnostic within a reflection-geometry positron moderation system. We report the optical thickness, impurity content, and impurity trapping site structures within our moderators determined from infrared absorption spectra. We use a retarding potential analyzer to modulate the flow of slow positrons, and report positron currents vs. retarding potential for the different moderators. We identify vacuum ultraviolet emissions from irradiated Ne moderators as the source of spurious signals in our channel electron multiplier slow positron detection channel. Our design is also unusual in that it employs a sealed radioactive Na-22 positron source which can be translated relative to, and isolated from, the cryogenic moderator deposition substrate. This allows us to separate the influences on moderator efficiency of surface contamination by residual gases from those of accumulated radiation damage.

  9. Positron separators in Superomega muon beamline at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikedo, Y., E-mail: ikedo@post.kek.jp [Institute of Materials and Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tokai Campus, 230-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Miyake, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Kawamura, N.; Nishiyama, K.; Makimura, S.; Fujimori, H.; Koda, A.; Nakamura, J.; Nagatomo, T.; Kobayashi, Y. [Institute of Materials and Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tokai Campus, 230-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Adachi, T. [Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0501 (Japan); Pant, A.D. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Yamanashi University, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Ogitsu, T.; Nakamoto, T.; Sasaki, K.; Ohata, H.; Okada, R.; Yamamoto, A. [Cryogenics Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0501 (Japan); Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Three stage positron separators was installed onto the U-line in the MLF/J-PARC. • The separators can be applied 400 kV to the both electrodes. • The separators were tested and were confirmed to successfully eliminate the positrons from the beam. -- Abstract: A positron separator is one of the essential components of a muon beamline to eliminate contamination in the beam, mainly positrons that have the same momentum as muons and are transported together with the beam. In order to eliminate positrons efficiently, we selected a Wien filter type three-stage positron separator for the new muon beamline, called Superomega, that is under construction in the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) of the Japan Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The Superomega muon beamline is the second muon beamline at MLF/J-PARC, and started operation in October of 2012. Here, we report on the features and the test results of the positron separators installed in the Superomega muon beamline.

  10. Development of the positron-induced ion-desorption apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    Kanazawa, I

    2002-01-01

    The principle of the positron-induced ion-desorption, which is developed recently, and experimental apparatus are explained and study of desorption of positron-induced hydrogen ion from surface of Ni is reported as an example. The slow positron beam system in the positron-induced ion-desorption spectroscopy is consisted of two stages, moderator and transformation from magnetic transport type to electrostatic transport type. Positron is antiparticle of electron and localized both outside and monolayer of surface, which is special futures and used to analyze the surface. The number of emission positive charge particles from the clean Ni surface was changed by coil current at 1.9 keV and 2.9 keV incident positron energy. The number of re-emission positron at 1.9 keV was larger than at 2.9 keV. The number of emission positive charge particles from the clean Ni surface adsorbed monolayer hydrogen atom were decreased with coil current at 1.9 keV and 2.9 keV. The number of desorption hydrogen particle at 1.9 keV was...

  11. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  12. The Calibration of the PEPPo Polarimeter for Electrons and Positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeyemi, Adeleke Hakeem [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Voutier, Eric J-.M. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie, Grenoble (France)

    2013-06-01

    The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) experiment at Jefferson Laboratory investigated the polarization transfer from longitudinally polarized electrons to longitudinally polarized positrons, with the aim of developing this technology for a low energy (~MeV) polarized positron source. Polarization of the positrons was measured by means of a Compton transmission polarimeter where incoming positrons transfer their polarization into circularly polarized photons that were subsequently analyzed by a thick polarized iron target. The measurement of the transmitted photon flux with respect to the orientation of the target polarization (+-) or the helicity (+-) of the incoming leptons provided the measurement of their polarization. Similar measurements with a known electron beam were also performed for calibration purposes. This presentation will describe the apparatus and calibrations performed at the injector at the Jefferson Laboratory to measure positron polarization in the momentum range 3.2-6.2 MeV/c, specifically to quantify the positron analyzing power from electron experimental data measured over a comparable momentum range.

  13. Scattering of positrons and electrons by alkali atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. S.; Kauppila, W. E.; Kwan, C. K.; Lukaszew, R. A.; Parikh, S. P.; Wan, Y. J.; Zhou, S.; Dababneh, M. S.

    1990-01-01

    Absolute total scattering cross sections (Q sub T's) were measured for positrons and electrons colliding with sodium, potassium, and rubidium in the 1 to 102 eV range, using the same apparatus and experimental approach (a beam transmission technique) for both projectiles. The present results for positron-sodium and -rubidium collisions represent the first Q sub T measurements reported for these collision systems. Features which distinguish the present comparisons between positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's from those for other atoms and molecules (room-temperature gases) which have been used as targets for positrons and electrons are the proximity of the corresponding positron- and electron-alkali atom Q sub T's over the entire energy range of overlap, with an indication of a merging or near-merging of the corresponding positron and electron Q sub T's near (and above) the relatively low energy of about 40 eV, and a general tendency for the positron-alkali atom Q sub T's to be higher than the corresponding electron values as the projectile energy is decreased below about 40 eV.

  14. Cosmic Connections:. from Cosmic Rays to Gamma Rays, Cosmic Backgrounds and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusenko, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Combined data from gamma-ray telescopes and cosmic-ray detectors have produced some new surprising insights regarding intergalactic and galactic magnetic fields, as well as extragalactic background light. We review some recent advances, including a theory explaining the hard spectra of distant blazars and the measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields based on the spectra of distant sources. Furthermore, we discuss the possible contribution of transient galactic sources, such as past gamma-ray bursts and hypernova explosions in the Milky Way, to the observed ux of ultrahigh-energy cosmicrays nuclei. The need for a holistic treatment of gamma rays, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields serves as a unifying theme for these seemingly unrelated phenomena.

  15. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  16. Cosmic Censorship: the Role of Quantum Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Hod, Shahar

    1999-01-01

    The cosmic censorship hypothesis introduced by Penrose thirty years ago is still one of the most important open questions in {\\it classical} general relativity. The main goal of this paper is to put forward the idea that cosmic censorship is intrinsically a {\\it quantum} phenomena. We construct a gedanken experiment which seems to violate the cosmic censorship principle within the purely {\\it classical} framework of general relativity. We prove, however, that {\\it quantum} physics restores th...

  17. On the Properties of Cosmic String Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Paul Henry

    1996-01-01

    When coupled with the prevailing ideas of cosmology, the standard model of particle physics implies that the early universe underwent a sequence of phase transitions. Such phase transitions can lead to topological defects such as magnetic monopoles, domain walls and cosmic strings. The formation and subsequent evolution of a network of cosmic strings may have played a key role in the development of the early universe. One of the most crucial elements in the evolution of the cosmic string network is the formation and decay of closed loops of cosmic string. After formation, the loops lose their energy by emitting gravitational radiation. This provides the primary energy loss mechanism for the cosmic string network. In addition, the cosmic string loops may display a number of observable features through which the cosmic string model may be constrained. In this dissertation a number of the key properties of cosmic string loops are investigated. A general method for determining the rates at which cosmic string loops radiate both energy and linear momentum is developed and implemented. Exact solutions for the radiation rates of a several new classes of loops are derived and used to test the validity of using the piecewise linear method on smooth loop trajectories. A large set of representative loop trajectories is produced using the method of loop fragmentation. These trajectories are analyzed to provide useful information on the properties of realistic cosmic string loops. The fraction of cosmic string loops which would collapse to form black holes is determined and used to place a new observational limit on the mass per unit length of cosmic strings.

  18. ACORDE - A Cosmic Ray Detector for ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00247175; Pagliarone, C.

    2006-01-01

    ACORDE, the ALICE COsmic Ray DEtector is one of the ALICE detectors, presently under construction. It consists of an array of plastic scintillator counters placed on the three upper faces of the ALICE magnet. This array will act as Level 0 cosmic ray trigger and, together with other ALICE sub-detectors, will provide precise information on cosmic rays with primary energies around $10^{15-17}$ eV. In this paper we will describe the ACORDE detector, trigger design and electronics.

  19. Interacting holographic generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Jalil

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we consider a correspondence between the holographic dark energy density and interacting generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas energy density in flat FRW universe. Then, we reconstruct the potential of the scalar field which describe the generalized cosmic Chaplygin cosmology. In the special case we obtain time-dependent energy density and study cosmological parameters. We find stability condition of this model which is depend on cosmic parameter.

  20. Observation of a VHE Cosmic-Ray Flare-Signal with the L3+C Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, O; Aziz, T; Bähr, J; Banerjee, S; Becattini, F; Bellucci, L; Betev, B L; Blaising, J J; Bobbink, G J; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Cartacci, A; Chemarin, M; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chiarusi, T; Coignet, G; Ding, L K; Duran, I; Eline, A; El Mamouni, H; Faber, G; Fay, J; Filthaut, F; Ganguli, S N; Gong, Z F; Grabosch, H J; Groenstege, H; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S; Gurtu, A; Haller, Ch; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Herve, A; Hofer, H; Hoferjun, H; Huo, A X; Ito, N; Jing, C L; Jones, L W; Kantserov, V; Kawakami, S; Kittel, W; König, A C; Kok, E; Kuang, H H; Kuijpers, J; Ladron de Guevara, P; Le Coultre, P; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Li, L; Li, Z C; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Lu, Y S; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Mele, S; Meng, X W; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Nowak, H; Parriaud, J -F; Pauss, F; Petersen, B; Pieri, M; Pohl, M; Pojidaev, V; Qing, C R; Ramelli, R; Ranieri, R; Ravindran, K C; Rewiersma, P; Riemann, S; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Schmitt, V; Schoeneich, B; Schotanus, D J; Shen, C Q; Spillantini, P; Sulanke, H; Tang, X W; Timmermans, C; Tonwar, S C; Trowitzsch, G; Unger, M; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vogt, H; Wang, R G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Wijk, R van; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Xu, Y P; Xu, J S; Xu, Z Z; Yang, C G; Yang, X F; Yao, Z G; Yu, Z Q; Zhang, C; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhou, S J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, Q Q; Zhuang, H L; Zwart, A N M

    2010-01-01

    The data collected by the L3+C muon spectrometer at the CERN Large Electron-Positron collider, LEP, have been used to search for short duration signals emitted by cosmic point sources. A sky survey performed from July to November 1999 and from April to November 2000 has revealed one single flux enhancement (chance probability = 2.6X10^{-3}) between the 17th and 20th of August 2000 from a direction with a galactic longitude of (265.02+-0.42)^° and latitude of (55.58+-0.24)^°. The energy of the detected muons was above 15 GeV.