WorldWideScience

Sample records for cosmic gamma sources

  1. Are gamma-ray bursts the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays?

    CERN Document Server

    Baerwald, Philipp; Winter, Walter

    2014-01-01

    We reconsider the possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) within the internal shock model, assuming a pure proton composition of the UHECRs. For the first time, we combine the information from gamma-rays, cosmic rays, prompt neutrinos, and cosmogenic neutrinos quantitatively in a joint cosmic ray production and propagation model, and we show that the information on the cosmic energy budget can be obtained as a consequence. In addition to the neutron model, we consider alternative scenarios for the cosmic ray escape from the GRBs, i.e., that cosmic rays can leak from the sources. We find that the dip model, which describes the ankle in UHECR observations by the pair production dip, is strongly disfavored in combination with the internal shock model because a) unrealistically high baryonic loadings (energy in protons versus energy in electrons/gamma-rays) are needed for the individual GRBs and b) the prompt neutrino flux easily overshoots the corres...

  2. An upper limit on the cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources from gamma-ray observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supanitsky, A.D. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), CONICET-UBA (Argentina); Souza, V. de, E-mail: supanitsky@iafe.uba.ar, E-mail: vitor@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-12-01

    Different types of extragalactic objects are known to produce TeV gamma-rays. Some of these objects are the most probable candidates to accelerate cosmic rays up to 10{sup 20} eV. It is very well known that gamma-rays can be produced as a result of the cosmic ray propagation through the intergalactic medium. These gamma-rays contribute to the total flux observed in the direction of the source. In this paper we propose a new method to derive an upper limit on the cosmic-ray luminosity of an individual source based on the measured upper limit on the integral flux of GeV-TeV gamma-rays. We show how it is possible to calculate an upper limit on the cosmic-ray luminosity of a particular source and we explore the parameter space in which the current GeV-TeV gamma-ray measurements can offer a useful determination. We study in detail two particular sources, Pictor A and NGC 7469, and we calculate the upper limit on the proton luminosity of each source based on the upper limit on the integral gamma-ray flux measured by the H.E.S.S. telescopes.

  3. Constraining Dark Matter and Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Sources with Fermi-LAT Diffuse Gamma Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashev, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    We use the recent measurement of the isotropic $\\gamma$-ray background (IGRB) by Fermi LAT and analysis of the contribution of unresolved point $\\gamma$-ray sources to IGRB to build constraints on the models of ultra-high cosmic rays (UHECR) origin. We also calculate the minimal expected diffuse $\\gamma$-ray flux produced by UHECR interactions with an interstellar photon background. Finally, for the subclass of dark matter (DM) models with decaying weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP), we build constraints on the particle decay time using minimal expected contributions to the IGRB from unresolved point $\\gamma$-ray sources and UHECR.

  4. About cosmic gamma ray lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland

    2017-06-01

    Gamma ray lines from cosmic sources convey the action of nuclear reactions in cosmic sites and their impacts on astrophysical objects. Gamma rays at characteristic energies result from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. The gamma-ray line from the annihilation of positrons at 511 keV falls into the same energy window, although of different origin. We present here the concepts of cosmic gamma ray spectrometry and the corresponding instruments and missions, followed by a discussion of recent results and the challenges and open issues for the future. Among the lessons learned are the diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in 26Al and 60Fe gamma rays, which is now being exploited towards the cycle of matter driven by massive stars and their supernovae; large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be of key importance here. Also, constraints on the complex processes making stars explode as either thermonuclear or core-collapse supernovae are being illuminated by gamma-ray lines, in this case from shortlived radioactivities from 56Ni and 44Ti decays. In particular, the three-dimensionality and asphericities that have recently been recognised as important are enlightened in different ways through such gamma-ray line spectroscopy. Finally, the distribution of positron annihilation gamma ray emission with its puzzling bulge-dominated intensity disctribution is measured through spatially-resolved spectra, which indicate that annihilation conditions may differ in different parts of our Galaxy. But it is now understood that a variety of sources may feed positrons into the interstellar medium, and their characteristics largely get lost during slowing down and propagation of positrons before annihilation; a recent microquasar flare was caught as an opportunity to see positrons annihilate at a source.

  5. The distinction between gamma-quanta spectra from both local sources and cosmic rays, and the formation of a uniform cosmic ray spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolsky, S. I.; Sinitsyna, V. G.

    2003-07-01

    The experimental data about gamma-quanta sources with energy > 1 TeV are characterised by the fact that the observed metagalactic sources (active galactic nuclei) are 106 - 107 times more powerful than the galactic ones, but they do not differ in energy spectrum (F(> Eγ)~Eγ-1.3+/-0.15). The power of metagalactic sources and their unlimited number puts into doubt the assumption about the galactic origin of the observable cosmic ray flux. It is possible to assume, that the uniform cosmic ray spectrum is formed (by ``braking'') in an ``infinite'' number of elastic (or inelastic) collisions with relict photons in intergalactic space. Thus, the observable spectral distribution of protons and cosmic ray nuclei with index of (2.72+/-0.02) = 2.718... (the Nipper's number) is the consequence of such ``braking'' warming up the relict photons. RFBR, FNP, GNTP

  6. Galactic gamma-ray bursters - an alternative source of cosmic rays at all energies

    OpenAIRE

    A. Dar; Plaga, R.

    1999-01-01

    We propose a new hypothesis for the origin of the major part of non-solar hadronic cosmic rays (CRs) at all energies: highly relativistic, narrowly collimated jets from the birth or collapse of neutron stars (NSs) in our Galaxy accelerate ambient disk and halo matter to CR energies and disperse it in hot spots which they form when they stop in the Galactic halo. Such events are seen as cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in other galaxies when their beamed radiation happens to point towards ...

  7. BLAZARS AS ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC-RAY SOURCES: IMPLICATIONS FOR TeV GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, Kohta [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Dermer, Charles D. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Takami, Hajime [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany); Migliori, Giulia [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    The spectra of BL Lac objects and Fanaroff-Riley I radio galaxies are commonly explained by the one-zone leptonic synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. Spectral modeling of correlated multiwavelength data gives the comoving magnetic field strength, the bulk outflow Lorentz factor, and the emission region size. Assuming the validity of the SSC model, the Hillas condition shows that only in rare cases such sources accelerate protons to much above 10{sup 19} eV, so {approx}> 10{sup 20} eV ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are likely to be heavy ions if powered by this type of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Survival of nuclei is shown to be possible in TeV BL Lacs and misaligned counterparts with weak photohadronic emissions. Another signature of hadronic production is intergalactic UHECR-induced cascade emission, which is an alternative explanation of the TeV spectra of some extreme non-variable blazars such as 1ES 0229+200 or 1ES 1101-232. We study this kind of cascade signal, taking into account effects of the structured extragalactic magnetic fields in which the sources should be embedded. We demonstrate the importance of cosmic-ray deflections on the {gamma}-ray flux, and show that required absolute cosmic-ray luminosities are larger than the average UHECR luminosity inferred from UHECR observations and can even be comparable to the Eddington luminosity of supermassive black holes. Future TeV {gamma}-ray observations using the Cerenkov Telescope Array and the High Altitude Water Cerenkov detector array can test for UHECR acceleration by observing >25 TeV photons from relatively low redshift sources such as 1ES 0229+200, and {approx}>TeV photons from more distant radio-loud AGNs.

  8. Blazars as Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic-Ray Sources: Implications for TeV Gamma-Ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Kohta; Takami, Hajime; Migliori, Giulia

    2011-01-01

    Spectral fitting of correlated multiwavelength data of BL Lac objects and Fanaroff-Riley I radio galaxies gives the mean comoving magnetic field strength B', the bulk outflow Doppler factor Gamma, and the emission region size R' of the radiating plasma in the one-zone leptonic synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. From the Hillas condition, we show that only in rare cases can these sources accelerate protons to much above 10^19 eV, so >10^20 eV ultra-high-energy cosmic rays are likely to be heavy ions if powered by this type of AGN. One of the signatures of hadronic production by blazars is intergalactic cascade emission initiated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, which can explain TeV spectra of some extreme, apparently non-variable blazars such as 1ES 0229+200. We study this kind of cascade signal from such blazars, taking into account effects of the structured extragalactic magnetic fields in clusters and filaments in which the blazars are embedded. We demonstrate the importance of cosmic-ray deflections o...

  9. Cosmic Rays: What Gamma Rays Can Say

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We will review the main channels of gamma ray emission due to the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, discussing the cases of both galactic and extra-galactic cosmic rays and their connection with gamma rays observations.

  10. Polarimetry of cosmic gamma-ray sources above e{sup +}e{sup −} pair creation threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, D., E-mail: denis.bernard@in2p3.fr

    2013-11-21

    We examine the potential for gamma-ray conversion to electron–positron pairs, either in the field of a nucleus or of an electron of a detector, to measure the fraction P of linear polarization of cosmic gamma sources. For this purpose we implement, validate and use an event generator based on the HELAS amplitude calculator and on the SPRING event generator. We characterize several ways to measure P. Past proposals to increase the polarization sensitivity by the selection of a fraction of the events in a subset of the available phase space are found to be inefficient, due to the loss in statistics. The use of an optimal variable that includes the full 5D probability density function is found to improve the precision of the measurement of P of a factor of approximately 2. We then study the dilution of the asymmetry that parametrize the degradation of the precision due to experimental effects such as multiple scattering. In a detector made with a succession of converter slabs and tracker foils, the dependence of the dilution is found to be different from that predicted assuming a given (the most probable) value of the pair opening angle. The limitations of a slab detector are avoided by the use of an active target, in which conversion and tracking are performed by the same device, in which case the dilution of the measurement of P is found to be manageable. Based on a realistic sizing of the detector, and for an effective exposure of 1 year, we estimate the precision for a Crab-like source on the full energy range to be approximately 1.4%. -- Highlights: •Extend my NIM A701 (2013) 225 to gamma polarimetry. •Develop and validate exact 5D event generator. •Define optimal estimator of polarization fraction. •Determine exact effect of multiple scattering of polarization asymmetry. •Demonstrate gamma polarimetry is possible with nuclear conversion, with a TPC.

  11. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from beta-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of their prime energy sources. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massi...

  12. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  13. High Energy Cosmic Electrons: Messengers from Nearby Cosmic Ray Sources or Dark Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the recent discoveries by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope in reference to high energy cosmic electrons, and whether their source is cosmic rays or dark matter. Specific interest is devoted to Cosmic Ray electrons anisotropy,

  14. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy......, trapped particle streams. These background events may simulate the count rate increases characteristic of cosmic gamma bursts. For 12 of the detected events, their true cosmic nature have been confirmed through consistent localizations of the burst sources based on several independent WATCH data sets...

  15. Cosmic Connections:. from Cosmic Rays to Gamma Rays, Cosmic Backgrounds and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusenko, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Combined data from gamma-ray telescopes and cosmic-ray detectors have produced some new surprising insights regarding intergalactic and galactic magnetic fields, as well as extragalactic background light. We review some recent advances, including a theory explaining the hard spectra of distant blazars and the measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields based on the spectra of distant sources. Furthermore, we discuss the possible contribution of transient galactic sources, such as past gamma-ray bursts and hypernova explosions in the Milky Way, to the observed ux of ultrahigh-energy cosmicrays nuclei. The need for a holistic treatment of gamma rays, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields serves as a unifying theme for these seemingly unrelated phenomena.

  16. News from Cosmic Gamma-ray Line Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays at MeV energies from cosmic radioactivities is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and how they shape objects such as massive stars and supernova explosions. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this same astronomical window, and positrons are often produced from radioactive beta decays. Nuclear gamma-ray telescopes face instrumental challenges from penetrating gamma rays and cosmic-ray induced backgrounds. But the astrophysical benefits of such efforts are underlined by the discoveries of nuclear gamma~rays from the brightest of the expected sources. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivity gamma~rays have been measured in spectral detail, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of origins in deep supernova interiors, from the decay of $^{56}$Ni, $^{56}$Co, and $^{44}$Ti. The diffuse afterglow in gamma rays of radioa...

  17. Cosmic rays from thermal sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wlodarczyk, Z

    2007-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays (CR) exhibits very characteristic power-like behavior with the "knee" structure. We consider a generalized statistical model for the production process of cosmic rays which accounts for such behavior in a natural way either by assuming the existence of temperature fluctuations in the source of CR, or by assuming specific temperature distribution of the CR sources. Both possibilities yield the so called Tsallis statistics and lead to the power-like distribution.

  18. Supernova remnants and gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, D F; Dame, T M; Combi, J A; Butt, Y M; Torres, Diego F.; Romero, Gustavo E.; Dame, Thomas M.; Combi, Jorge A.; Butt, Yousaf M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of the possible relationship between $\\gamma$-ray sources and supernova remnants (SNRs) is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the analysis of the observational status of the problem of cosmic ray acceleration at SNR shock fronts. All positional coincidences between SNRs and unidentified $\\gamma$-ray sources listed in the Third EGRET Catalog at low Galactic latitudes are discussed on a case by case basis. For several coincidences of particular interest, new CO(J=1-0) and radio continuum maps are shown, and the mass content of the SNR surroundings is determined. The contribution to the $\\gamma$-ray flux observed that might come from cosmic ray particles (particularly nuclei) locally accelerated at the SNR shock fronts is evaluated. We discuss the prospects for future research in this field and remark on the possibilities for observations with forthcoming $\\gamma$-ray instruments.

  19. Gamma rays and the origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ona Wilhelmi, Emma

    2015-08-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) are highly energetic nuclei (plus a small fraction of electrons) which fill the Galaxy and carry on average as much energy per unit volume as the energy density of starlight, the interstellar magnetic fields, or the kinetic energy density of interstellar gas. The CR spectrum extends as a featureless power-law up to ~2 PeV (the 'knee') and it is believed to be the result of acceleration of those CRs in Galactic Sources and later diffusion and convection in galactic magnetic fields. Those energetic CRs can interact with the surrounding medium via proton-proton collision resulting in secondary gamma-ray photons, observed from 100 MeV to a few tens of TeV. The results obtained by the current Cherenkov telescopes and gamma-ray satellites with the support of X-ray observations have discovered and identified more than 50 Galactic gamma-ray sources. Among them, the number of Supernova remnants (SNRs) and very-high-energy hard-spectrum sources (natural candidates to originate CRs) are steadily increasing. We expect to increase by a factor 10 at least this population of source with the future CTA experiment. I will review our current knowledge of Galactic gamma-ray sources and their connection with energetic CRs and the scientific prospects for CTA in this field. Those observations, together with a strong multi-wavelenght support from radio to hard X-rays, will finally allow us to establish the origin of the Galactic CRs.

  20. Lower Bound on the Cosmic TeV Gamma-ray Background Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation in the GeV band. However, investigation on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation still remains sparse. Here, we report the lower bound on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background spectrum placed by the cumulative flux of individual detected extragalactic TeV sources including blazars, radio galaxies, and starburst galaxies. The current limit on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background above 0.1 TeV is obtained as $3\\times10^{-8} (E/100~{\\rm GeV})^{-0.6} \\exp(-E/2000~{\\rm GeV})~{\\rm [GeV/cm^2/s/sr]} < E^2dN/dE < 1\\times10^{-7} (E/100~{\\rm GeV})^{-0.5}~{\\rm [GeV/cm^2/s/sr]}$, where the upper bound is set by requirement that the cascade flux from the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation can not exceed the measured cosmic GeV gamma-ray background spectrum (Inoue & Ioka 2012). Two nearby blazars, Mrk 421 and Mrk 501, explain ~70% of the cumulative flux at 0.8-4 TeV, while extreme blaza...

  1. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Bloom, J S; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Price, P A; Fox, D; Reichart, D; Yost, S; Berger, E; Diercks, A H; Goodrich, R; Chaffee, F H

    2001-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean gamma-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 10^51 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host gal...

  2. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy, trap...

  3. XI Multifrequency Behaviour of High Energy Cosmic Sources Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    This was the eleventh edition of the series of Frascati Workshops on "Multifrequency Behaviour of High Energy Cosmic Sources" undoubtedly a largely accepted biennial meeting in which an updated experimental and theoretical panorama is depicted. This edition took place on the 31st anniversary of the first historical "multifrequency" workshop about "Multifrequency Behaviour of Galactic Accreting Sources", held in Vulcano in September 1984. This surely renders the Frascati Workshop Series the oldest among the many devoted to "Multifrequency Studies of Cosmic Sources". The study of the physics governing the cosmic sources was the main goal of the workshop. A session devoted to the ongoing and next generation ground- and space-based experiments gave the actual prospects for the first decades of this millennium. The following items have been reviewed: Cosmology: Cosmic Background, Clusters of Galaxies Extragalactic Sources: Active Galaxies, Normal Galaxies Gamma-Rays Burst: Experiments versus Theories Galactic Sources: Pre-Main-Sequence and Main-Sequence Stars, Cataclysmic Variables and Novae, Supernovae and SNRs, X-Ray Binary Systems, Pulsars, Black Holes, Gamma-Ray Sources,Nucleosynthesis. The Astrophysics with the Ongoing and Future Experiments: Space-Based Experiments, Ground-Based Experiments. The workshop included a few 30-minute general review talks to introduce the current problems, and typically 20-minute talks discussing new experimental and theoretical results. A series of 20-minute talks discussed the ongoing and planned ground- and space-based experiments. The cadence of the workshop is biennial. The participation is only by invitation.

  4. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  5. Ultra-high energy cosmic ray escape from gamma-ray bursts, and the cosmic ray-neutrino connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baerwald, Philipp; Bustamante, Mauricio; Huemmer, Svenja; Winter, Walter [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Spector, Amyad; Waxman, Eli [Physics Faculty, Weizman Institute of Science, POB 26, Rehovot (Israel)

    2013-07-01

    Recent IceCube searches for GRB neutrinos have strongly constrained current models predicting GRBs as the source of UHECR. We show that updated calculations based on the connection of gamma-rays and neutrinos give significantly lower neutrino bounds [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 (2012) 231101]. However additional constraints from the theoretical connection of cosmic rays to neutrinos, based on the assumption that UHECR escape as neutrons, still persist. We therefore explore the possibility of having an additional direct cosmic ray escape component which circumvents these constraints. We show that it is possible to distinguish three distinct regimes with this approach, with the standard (one neutrino per cosmic ray) escape via neutrons only accounting for a small range in the parameter space. Moreover we show how this additional component could improve cosmic ray predictions.

  6. An Absence of Neutrinos Associated with Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Besson, D Bertrand D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Degner, T; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, B; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hülβ, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, M W E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Stüer, M; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a leading candidate for acceleration of ultra high-energy cosmic rays, which would be accompanied by emission of TeV neutrinos produced in proton-photon interactions during acceleration in the GRB fireball. Two analyses using data from two years of the IceCube detector produced no evidence for this neutrino emission, placing strong constraints on models of neutrino and cosmic-ray production in these sources.

  7. Gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray acceleration, propagation, and confinement in the era of CTA

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F; Casanova, S; de Cea, E; Wilhelmi, E de Ona; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y; Hadasch, D; Marcowith, A; Pedaletti, G; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Torres, D F; Volpe, F

    2012-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays are commonly believed to be accelerated at supernova remnants via diffusive shock acceleration. Despite the popularity of this idea, a conclusive proof for its validity is still missing. Gamma-ray astronomy provides us with a powerful tool to tackle this problem, because gamma rays are produced during cosmic ray interactions with the ambient gas. The detection of gamma rays from several supernova remnants is encouraging, but still does not constitute a proof of the scenario, the main problem being the difficulty in disentangling the hadronic and leptonic contributions to the emission. Once released by their sources, cosmic rays diffuse in the interstellar medium, and finally escape from the Galaxy. The diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Galactic disk, as well as the gamma-ray emission detected from a few galaxies is largely due to the interactions of cosmic rays in the interstellar medium. On much larger scales, cosmic rays are also expected to permeate the intracluster medium, since the...

  8. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  9. A simple technique for gamma ray and cosmic ray spectroscopy using plastic scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Nandan, Akhilesh P; Neog, Himangshu; Bhuyan, M R; Biswas, S; Mahapatra, S; Mohanty, B; Mohanty, Rudranarayan; Rout, Subasha; Sahu, P K; Sahu, S; Sakthivel, V A; Samal, P K

    2014-01-01

    A new and simple technique has been developed using plastic scintillator detectors for gamma ray and cosmic ray spectroscopy without single channel analyzer (SCA) or multichannel analyzer (MCA). In these experiments only a leading edge discriminator (LED) and NIM scalers have been used. Energy calibration of gamma spectra in plastic scintillators has been done using Co60 and Cs137 sources. The details experimental technique, analysis procedure and experimental results has been presented in this article.

  10. Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts, Their Afterglows, and Their Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Djorgovski, S G

    2002-01-01

    This is a review article for the book "Compact Stellar X-Ray Sources", Editors W. Lewin and M. van der Klis, to be published by Cambridge University Press in 2003. It covers the phenomenology of cosmic gamma-ray bursts, the theory of their afterglows, and the observations and interpretation of their host galaxies.

  11. Spiral arms as cosmic ray source distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, M.; Kissmann, R.; Strong, A. W.; Reimer, O.

    2015-04-01

    The Milky Way is a spiral galaxy with (or without) a bar-like central structure. There is evidence that the distribution of suspected cosmic ray sources, such as supernova remnants, are associated with the spiral arm structure of galaxies. It is yet not clearly understood what effect such a cosmic ray source distribution has on the particle transport in our Galaxy. We investigate and measure how the propagation of Galactic cosmic rays is affected by a cosmic ray source distribution associated with spiral arm structures. We use the PICARD code to perform high-resolution 3D simulations of electrons and protons in galactic propagation scenarios that include four-arm and two-arm logarithmic spiral cosmic ray source distributions with and without a central bar structure as well as the spiral arm configuration of the NE2001 model for the distribution of free electrons in the Milky Way. Results of these simulation are compared to an axisymmetric radial source distribution. Also, effects on the cosmic ray flux and spectra due to different positions of the Earth relative to the spiral structure are studied. We find that high energy electrons are strongly confined to their sources and the obtained spectra largely depend on the Earth's position relative to the spiral arms. Similar finding have been obtained for low energy protons and electrons albeit at smaller magnitude. We find that even fractional contributions of a spiral arm component to the total cosmic ray source distribution influences the spectra on the Earth. This is apparent when compared to an axisymmetric radial source distribution as well as with respect to the Earth's position relative to the spiral arm structure. We demonstrate that the presence of a Galactic bar manifests itself as an overall excess of low energy electrons at the Earth. Using a spiral arm geometry as a cosmic ray source distributions offers a genuine new quality of modeling and is used to explain features in cosmic ray spectra at the Earth

  12. Indirect dark matter searches in gamma and cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Jan; Reimer, Olaf

    2017-03-01

    Dark matter candidates such as weakly interacting massive particles are predicted to annihilate or decay into Standard Model particles, leaving behind distinctive signatures in gamma rays, neutrinos, positrons, antiprotons, or even antinuclei. Indirect dark matter searches, and in particular those based on gamma-ray observations and cosmic-ray measurements, could detect such signatures. Here we review the strengths and limitations of this approach and look into the future of indirect dark matter searches.

  13. ESA's Integral detects closest cosmic gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    be just sensitive enough to reveal a few more of them in the years to come. These could be just the tip of the iceberg and future gamma-ray observatories, such as the planned NASA's Swift mission, should be able to extend this search to a much larger volume of the Universe and find many more sub-energetic GRBs. Notes for editors The results of this investigation are presented in two articles that have appeared in today's issue of the scientific journal Nature. One of them, by S. Sazonov, A. Lutovinov and R. Sunyaev, is entitled "An apparently normal gamma-ray burst with unusually low luminosity". The other, entitled "The sub-energetic GRB 031203 as a cosmic analogue to GRB 980425", is signed by A. Soderberg, S. Kulkarni, E. Berger, D. Fox, M. Sako, D. Frail, A. Gal-Yam, D. Moon, S. Cenko, S. Yost, M. Phillips, E. Persson, W. Freedman, P. Wyatt, R. Jayawardhana and D. Paulson. The original announcement of the Integral detection of GRB 031203 was made by D. Goetz, S. Mereghetti, M. Beck, J. Borkowski and N. Mowlavi, via the Circular Service of the GRB Co-ordinates Network. More about Integral The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (Integral) is the first space observatory that can simultaneously observe celestial objects in gamma rays, X-rays and visible light. Integral was launched on a Russian Proton rocket on 17 October 2002 into a highly elliptical orbit around Earth. Its principal targets include regions of the galaxy where chemical elements are being produced and compact objects, such as black holes. For more information about Integral please see: http://www.esa.int/esaSC/spk.html More about XMM-Newton ESA's XMM-Newton can detect more X-ray sources than any previous satellite and is helping to solve many cosmic mysteries of the violent Universe, from black holes to the formation of galaxies. It was launched on 10 December 1999, using an Ariane-5 rocket, from French Guiana. It is expected to return data for a decade. XMM-Newton's high-tech design uses

  14. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  15. Primary gamma-rays with E gamma or = to 10(15) eV: Evidence for ultrahigh energy particle acceleration in galactic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonian, F. A.; Mamidjanian, E. A.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Tukish, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    The recently observed primary ultra high energy gamma-rays (UHEGR) testify to the cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in the Galaxy. The available data may be interpreted as gamma-ray production due to photomeson production in CR sources.

  16. Acceleration of cosmic rays and gamma-ray emission from supernova remnants in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofari, P.; Gabici, S.; Casanova, S.; Terrier, R.; Parizot, E.

    2013-10-01

    Galactic cosmic rays are believed to be accelerated at supernova remnant shocks. Though very popular and robust, this conjecture still needs a conclusive proof. The strongest support to this idea is probably the fact that supernova remnants are observed in gamma-rays, which are indeed expected as the result of the hadronic interactions between the cosmic rays accelerated at the shock and the ambient gas. However, also leptonic processes can, in most cases, explain the observed gamma-ray emission. This implies that the detections in gamma-rays do not necessarily mean that supernova remnants accelerate cosmic ray protons. To overcome this degeneracy, the multiwavelength emission (from radio to gamma-rays) from individual supernova remnants has been studied and in a few cases it has been possible to ascribe the gamma-ray emission to one of the two processes (hadronic or leptonic). Here, we adopt a different approach and, instead of a case-by-case study we aim for a population study and we compute the number of supernova remnants which are expected to be seen in TeV gamma-rays above a given flux under the assumption that these objects indeed are the sources of cosmic rays. The predictions found here match well with current observational results, thus providing a novel consistency check for the supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Moreover, hints are presented for the fact that particle spectra significantly steeper than E-2 are produced at supernova remnants. Finally, we expect that several of the supernova remnants detected by HESS in the survey of the Galactic plane should exhibit a gamma-ray emission dominated by hadronic processes (i.e. neutral-pion decay). The fraction of the detected remnants for which the leptonic emission dominates over the hadronic one depends on the assumed values of the physical parameters (especially the magnetic field strength at the shock) and can be as high as roughly a half.

  17. Fundamental Physics With Cosmic High-Energy Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    High-energy photons (above the MeV) are a powerful probe for astrophysics and for fundamental physics under extreme conditions. During the recent years, our knowledge of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has impressively progressed thanks to the advent of new detectors for cosmic gamma rays, at ground (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS, HAWC) and in space (AGILE, Fermi). This presentation reviews the present status of the studies of fundamental physics problems with high-energy gamma rays, and discusses the expected experimental developments.

  18. Spiral Arms as Cosmic Ray Source Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, M; Strong, A W; Reimer, O

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that the distribution of suspected cosmic ray sources are associated with the spiral arm structure of galaxies. It is yet not clearly understood what effect such a cosmic ray source distribution has on the particle transport in our Galaxy. We use the PICARD code to perform high-resolution 3D simulations of electrons and protons in galactic propagation scenarios that include four-arm and two-arm logarithmic spiral cosmic ray source distributions with and without a central bar structure as well as the spiral arm configuration of the NE2001 model for the distribution of free electrons in the Milky Way. Results of these simulation are compared to an axisymmetric radial source distribution. Also, effects on the cosmic ray flux and spectra due to different positions of the Earth relative to the spiral structure are studied. We find that high energy electrons are strongly confined to their sources and the obtained spectra largely depend on the Earth's position relative to the spiral arms. Similar f...

  19. Europe's space camera unmasks a cosmic gamma-ray machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-11-01

    , just one step short of a black hole. A neutron star is created by the force of a supernova explosion in a large star, which crushes the star's core to an unimaginable density. A mass greater than the Sun's is squeezed into a ball no wider than a city. The gravity and magnetic fields are billions of times stronger than the Earth's. The neutron star revolves rapidly, which causes it to wink like a cosmic lighthouse as it swivels its magnetic poles towards and away from the Earth. Pulsar 1055-52 spins at five revolutions per second. At its formation in a supernova explosion, a neutron star is endowed with two main forms of energy. One is heat, at temperatures of millions of degrees, which the neutron star radiates mainly as X-rays, with only a small proportion emerging as visible light. The other power supply for the neutron star comes from its high rate of spin and a gradual slowing of the rotation. By a variety of processes involving the magnetic field and accelerated particles in the neutron star's vicinity, the spin energy of the neutron star is converted into radiation at many different wavelengths, from radio waves to gamma-rays. The exceptional gamma-ray intensity of Pulsar 1055-52 was first appreciated in observations by NASA's Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. The team in Milan recently used the Hubble Space Telescope to find the distance of the peculiar neutron star Geminga, which is not detectable by radio pulses but is a strong source of gamma-rays (see ESA Information Note 04-96, 28 March 1996). Pulsar 1055-52 is even more powerful in that respect. About 50 per cent of its radiant energy is gamma-rays, compared with 15 per cent from Geminga and 0.1 per cent from the famous Crab Pulsar, the first neutron star seen by visible light. Making the gamma-rays requires the acceleration of electrons through billions of volts. The magnetic environment of Pulsar 1055-52 fashions a natural gamma-ray machine of amazing power. The orientation of the neutron star's magnetic

  20. Gamma-Ray Dominated Regions: Extending the Reach of Cosmic Ray Ionization in Starburst Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Lacki, Brian C

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic rays are appealing as a source of ionization in starburst galaxies because of the great columns they can penetrate, but in the densest regions of starbursts, they may be stopped by pion production and ionization energy losses. I argue that gamma rays are the source of ionization in the deepest molecular clouds of dense starbursts, creating Gamma-Ray Dominated Regions (GRDRs). Gamma rays are not deflected by magnetic fields, have a luminosity up to ~1/3 that of the injected cosmic rays, and can easily penetrate column depths of ~100 g/cm^2 before being attenuated by gamma-Z pair production. The ionization rates of GRDRs, <~10^-16 s^-1, are much smaller than in cosmic ray dominated regions, but in the most extreme starbursts, they may still reach values comparable to those in Milky Way molecular clouds. The gas temperatures in GRDRs could be likewise low, <~10 K if there is no additional heating from dust or turbulence, while at high densities, the kinetic temperature will approach the dust tempera...

  1. Gamma-ray emitting supernova remnants as the origin of Galactic cosmic rays?

    CERN Document Server

    Tjus, Julia Becker; Kroll, Mike; Nierstenhöfer, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays is one of the long-standing mysteries in physics and astrophysics. Simple arguments suggest that a scenario of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Milky Way as the dominant sources for the cosmic ray population below the knee could work: in a generic calculation, it can be shown that these objects can provide the energy budget necessary to explain the observed flux of cosmic rays. However, this argument is based on the assumption that all sources behave in the same way, i.e.\\ they all have the same energy budget, spectral behavior and maximum energy. In this paper, we investigate if a realistic population of SNRs is capable of producing the cosmic ray flux as it is observed below the knee. We use 21 SNRs that are well-studied from radio wavelengths up to gamma-ray energies. It could be shown previously (Mandelartz & Becker Tjus 2015) that the high-energy bump in the energy spectrum of these 21 sources can be dominated by hadronic emission. Here, gamma-rays are produced via $\\pi^{0}-...

  2. Cosmic ray composition measurements and cosmic ray background free gamma-ray observations with Cherenkov telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Neronov, A; Vovk, Ie; Mirzoyan, R

    2016-01-01

    Muon component of extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by cosmic ray particles carries information on the primary particle identity. We show that the muon content of EAS could be measured in a broad energy range from 10-100 TeV up to ultra-high-energy cosmic ray range using wide field-of-view imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes observing strongly inclined or nearly horizontal EAS from the ground of from high altitude. Cherenkov emission from muons in such EAS forms a distinct component (halo or tail) of the EAS image in the telescope camera. We show that detection of the muon signal could be used to measure composition of the cosmic ray spectrum in the energy ranges of the knee, the ankle and of the Galactic-to-extragalactic transition. It could also be used to veto the cosmic ray background in gamma-ray observations. This technique provides a possibility for up to two orders of magnitude improvement of sensitivity for gamma-ray flux in the energy band above 10 PeV, compared to KASCADE-Grande, and an or...

  3. Nuclear Physics Meets the Sources of the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncioli, Denise; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Winter, Walter

    2017-07-07

    The determination of the injection composition of cosmic ray nuclei within astrophysical sources requires sufficiently accurate descriptions of the source physics and the propagation - apart from controlling astrophysical uncertainties. We therefore study the implications of nuclear data and models for cosmic ray astrophysics, which involves the photo-disintegration of nuclei up to iron in astrophysical environments. We demonstrate that the impact of nuclear model uncertainties is potentially larger in environments with non-thermal radiation fields than in the cosmic microwave background. We also study the impact of nuclear models on the nuclear cascade in a gamma-ray burst radiation field, simulated at a level of complexity comparable to the most precise cosmic ray propagation code. We conclude with an isotope chart describing which information is in principle necessary to describe nuclear interactions in cosmic ray sources and propagation.

  4. Constraints on Cosmic-Ray Origin Theories from TeV $\\gamma$-Ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lessard, R W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Burdett, A C; Gordo, J B; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cawley, M F; Fegan, D J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Hillas, A M; Krennrich, F; Lamb, R C; Masterson, C; McEnery, J E; Mohanty, G B; Quinn, J; Rodgers, A J; Rose, H J; Samuelson, F W; Sembroski, G H; Srinivasan, R; Weekes, T C; Zweerink, J A

    1997-01-01

    If supernova remnants (SNRs) are the sites of cosmic-ray acceleration, the associated nuclear interactions should result in observable fluxes of TeV gamma-rays from the nearest SNRs. Measurements of the gamma-ray flux from six nearby, radio-bright, SNRs have been made with the Whipple Observatory gamma-ray telescope. No significant emission has been detected and upper limits on the $>$300 GeV flux are reported. Three of these SNRs (IC443, gamma-Cygni and W44) are spatially coincident with low latitude unidentified sources detected with EGRET. These upper limits weaken the case for the simplest models of shock acceleration and energy dependent propagation.

  5. Analysis of Gamma Rays and Cosmic Muons with a Single Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bachri, Abdel G; Goldschmidt, Azriel

    2011-01-01

    We report on the construction and upgrade of a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Cosmic Muons Detector. We modify the electronics and mechanics to achieve a highly efficient gamma-ray and cosmic-ray detector. Each detector module uses a one-inch-thick scintillator, attached to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and mounted on a solid aluminum frame. The detector uses scintillation to transform passing radiation into detectable photons that are guided toward a photocathode surface of the PMT, triggering the release of photoelectrons that are then amplified to yield measurable electronic signals. The modules were connected to an electronics section that compared the signals from the two PMTs and logically determined if they were coincidence events. A data-collection device was added for faster and prolonged count rates. A cobalt-60, which produced two gamma rays and a beta particle has been used as a calibration source. To investigate the isotropic behavior of radiation, two detection modules were adjusted to dif...

  6. Active Galactic Nuclei: Sources for ultra high energy cosmic rays?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermann, Peter L. [MPI for Radioastronomy, Bonn (Germany); Dept. of Phys. and Astron., Univ. of Bonn (Germany); Dept. of Phys. and Astr., Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Dept. of Phys., Univ. of Alabama at Huntsville, AL (United States); Inst. Nucl. Phys. FZ, Karlsruhe Inst. of Techn. (KIT) (Germany); Becker, Julia K. [Institution foer Fysik, Goeteborgs Univ. (Sweden); Dept. of Phys., Univ. Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Caramete, Laurentiu [MPI for Radioastronomy, Bonn (Germany); Institute for Space Studies, Bucharest (Romania); Curutiu, Alex [MPI for Radioastronomy, Bonn (Germany); Engel, Ralph [Inst. Nucl. Phys. FZ, Karlsruhe Inst. of Techn. (KIT) (Germany); Falcke, Heino [Dept. of Astrophys., IMAP, Radboud Univ., Nijmegen (Netherlands); ASTRON, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Gergely, Laszlo A. [Dept. Appl. Sci., London South Bank University (United Kingdom); Dept. of Theoret. and Exp. Phys., Univ. of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Isar, P. Gina [Inst. Nucl. Phys. FZ, Karlsruhe Inst. of Techn. (KIT) (Germany); Institute for Space Studies, Bucharest (Romania); Maris, Ioana C. [Inst. Nucl. Phys. FZ, Karlsruhe Inst. of Techn. (KIT) (Germany); Meli, Athina [Physik. Inst. Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Kampert, Karl-Heinz [Phys. Dept., Univ. Wuppertal (Germany); Stanev, Todor [Bartol Research Inst., Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Tascau, Oana [Phys. Dept., Univ. Wuppertal (Germany); Zier, Christian [MPI for Radioastronomy, Bonn (Germany); Raman Res. Inst., Bangalore (India)

    2009-05-15

    The origin of ultra high energy cosmic rays promises to lead us to a deeper understanding of the structure of matter. This is possible through the study of particle collisions at center-of-mass energies in interactions far larger than anything possible with the Large Hadron Collider, albeit at the substantial cost of no control over the sources and interaction sites. For the extreme energies we have to identify and understand the sources first, before trying to use them as physics laboratories. Here we describe the current stage of this exploration. The most promising contenders as sources are radio galaxies and gamma ray bursts. The sky distribution of observed events yields a hint favoring radio galaxies. Key in this quest are the intergalactic and galactic magnetic fields, whose strength and structure are not yet fully understood. Current data and statistics do not yet allow a final judgement. We outline how we may progress in the near future.

  7. Modeling the Gamma-Ray Emission in the GALACTIC CENTER with a Fading Cosmic-ray Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Prosekin, Anton; Chang, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Recent HESS observations of the ∼200 pc scale diffuse gamma-ray emission from the central molecular zone (CMZ) suggest the presence of a PeV cosmic-ray accelerator (PeVatron) located in the inner 10 pc region of the Galactic center. Interestingly, the gamma-ray spectrum of the point-like source (HESS J1745-290) in the Galactic center shows a cutoff at ∼10 TeV, implying a cutoff around 100 TeV in the cosmic-ray proton spectrum. Here we propose that the gamma-ray emission from the inner and the outer regions may be explained self-consistently by run-away protons from a single yet fading accelerator. In this model, gamma-rays from the CMZ region are produced by protons injected in the past, while gamma-rays from the inner region are produced by protons injected more recently. We suggest that the blast wave formed in a tidal disruption event (TDE) caused by the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) could serve as such a fading accelerator. With typical parameters of the TDE blast wave, gamma-ray spectra of both the CMZ region and HESS J1745-290 can be reproduced simultaneously. Meanwhile, we find that the cosmic-ray energy density profile in the CMZ region may also be reproduced in the fading accelerator model when appropriate combinations of the particle injection history and the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays are adopted.

  8. A quest for sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotera, Kumiko

    2012-03-01

    The origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs, particles arriving on the Earth with energy 10^17- 10^21 eV) is still a mystery. I will review the experimental and theoretical efforts that are being deployed by the community to solve this long-standing enigma, including the recent results from the Auger Observatory. I will discuss the observable signatures that help narrow down the list of possible candidate sources, namely the distribution of the arrival directions of UHECRs in the sky, their energy spectrum, their chemical composition, and their multi-messenger signatures (in neutrinos, gamma-rays and gravitational waves). I will focus in particular on one candidate source that has been little discussed in the literature: young rotation-powered pulsars. The production of UHECRs in these objects could give a picture that is surprisingly consistent with the latest data measured with the Auger Observatory.

  9. High energy radiation from black holes gamma rays, cosmic rays, and neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Bright gamma-ray flares observed from sources far beyond our Milky Way Galaxy are best explained if enormous amounts of energy are liberated by black holes. The highest- energy particles in nature--the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays--cannot be confined by the Milky Way's magnetic field, and must originate from sources outside our Galaxy. Understanding these energetic radiations requires an extensive theoretical framework involving the radiation physics and strong-field gravity of black holes. In High Energy Radiation from Black Holes, Charles Dermer and Govind Menon present a systemat

  10. Fundamental Physics from the Sky: Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays and the Hunt for Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Can we learn about New Physics with astronomical and astro-particle data? Understanding how this is possible is key to unraveling one of the most pressing mysteries at the interface of cosmology and particle physics: the fundamental nature of dark matter. I will discuss some of the recent puzzling findings in cosmic-ray electron-positron data and in gamma-ray observations that might be related to dark matter. I will argue that recent cosmic-ray data, most notably from the Pamela and Fermi satellites, indicate that previously unaccounted-for powerful sources in the Galaxy inject high-energy electrons and positrons. Interestingly, this new source class might be related to new fundamental particle physics, and specifically to pair-annihilation or decay of galactic dark matter. This exciting scenario is directly constrained by Fermi gamma-ray observations, which also inform us on astrophysical source counterparts that could also be responsible for the high-energy electron-positron excess. Observations of gamma-ra...

  11. A new population of very high energy gamma-ray sources in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F A

    2005-01-01

    Very high energy gamma-rays probe the long-standing mystery of the origin of cosmic rays. Produced in the interactions of accelerated particles in astrophysical objects, they can be used to image cosmic particle accelerators. A first sensitive survey of the inner part of the Milky Way with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) reveals a population of eight previously unknown firmly detected sources of very high energy gamma-rays. At least two have no known radio or X-ray counterpart and may be representative of a new class of `dark' nucleonic cosmic ray sources.

  12. Upper limits on the total cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, R.C.; De Souza, V. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Supanitsky, A.D., E-mail: rita@ifsc.usp.br, E-mail: vitor@ifsc.usp.br, E-mail: supanitsky@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), CONICET-UBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, upper limits on the total luminosity of ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays (UHECR) E > 10{sup 18} eV) are determined for five individual sources. The upper limit on the integral flux of GeV--TeV gamma-rays is used to extract the upper limit on the total UHECR luminosity of individual sources. The correlation between upper limit on the integral GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux and upper limit on the UHECR luminosity is established through the cascading process that takes place during propagation of the cosmic rays in the background radiation fields, as explained in reference [1]. Twenty-eight sources measured by FERMI-LAT, VERITAS and MAGIC observatories have been studied. The measured upper limit on the GeV--TeV gamma-ray flux is restrictive enough to allow the calculation of an upper limit on the total UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of five sources. The upper limit on the UHECR cosmic-ray luminosity of these sources is shown for several assumptions on the emission mechanism. For all studied sources an upper limit on the ultra-high-energy proton luminosity is also set.

  13. FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE {gamma}-RAY EMISSION: IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC RAYS AND THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: tporter@stanford.edu, E-mail: gudlaugu@glast2.stanford.edu, E-mail: aws@mpe.mpg.de [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2012-05-01

    The {gamma}-ray sky >100 MeV is dominated by the diffuse emissions from interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar gas and radiation fields of the Milky Way. Observations of these diffuse emissions provide a tool to study cosmic-ray origin and propagation, and the interstellar medium. We present measurements from the first 21 months of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) mission and compare with models of the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission generated using the GALPROP code. The models are fitted to cosmic-ray data and incorporate astrophysical input for the distribution of cosmic-ray sources, interstellar gas, and radiation fields. To assess uncertainties associated with the astrophysical input, a grid of models is created by varying within observational limits the distribution of cosmic-ray sources, the size of the cosmic-ray confinement volume (halo), and the distribution of interstellar gas. An all-sky maximum-likelihood fit is used to determine the X{sub CO} factor, the ratio between integrated CO-line intensity and H{sub 2} column density, the fluxes and spectra of the {gamma}-ray point sources from the first Fermi-LAT catalog, and the intensity and spectrum of the isotropic background including residual cosmic rays that were misclassified as {gamma}-rays, all of which have some dependency on the assumed diffuse emission model. The models are compared on the basis of their maximum-likelihood ratios as well as spectra, longitude, and latitude profiles. We also provide residual maps for the data following subtraction of the diffuse emission models. The models are consistent with the data at high and intermediate latitudes but underpredict the data in the inner Galaxy for energies above a few GeV. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed, including the contribution by undetected point-source populations and spectral variations of cosmic rays throughout the Galaxy. In the outer Galaxy, we find that the data prefer models with a flatter

  14. SAS-2 gamma-ray results from the galactic plane and their implications for galactic structure and galactic cosmic-ray dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The final SAS-2 results related to high energy galactic gamma-ray emission show a strong correlation with galactic structural features seen at other wavelenghts, when the known gamma-ray sources are subtracted. Theoretical considerations and analysis of the gamma-ray data suggest that the galactic cosmic rays are dynamically coupled to the interstellar matter through the magnetic fields, and hence the cosmic ray density is enhanced where the matter density is greatest on the scale of the galactic arms. This concept has been explored in a galactic model that assumes: (1) cosmic rays are galactic and not universal; (2)on the scale of the galactic arms, the cosmic ray column (surface) density is proportional to the total interstellar gas column density; (3)the cosmic ray scale height is significantly larger than the scale height to the matter; and (4) ours is a spiral galaxy characterized by an arm to interarm density ratio of over 2:1.

  15. A Novel Approach in the WIMP Quest: Cross-Correlation of Gamma-Ray Anisotropies and Cosmic Shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Regis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the cross-correlation angular power spectrum of cosmic shear and gamma-rays produced by the annihilation/decay of Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP dark matter (DM, and by astrophysical sources. We show that this observable can provide novel information on the composition of the Extra-galactic Gamma-ray Background (EGB, since the amplitude and shape of the cross-correlation signal depend on which class of sources is responsible for the gamma-ray emission. If the DM contribution to the EGB is significant (at least in a definite energy range, although compatible with current observational bounds, its strong correlation with the cosmic shear (since both signals peak at large halo masses makes such signature potentially detectable by combining Fermi-LAT data with forthcoming galaxy surveys, like Dark Energy Survey and Euclid.

  16. Prospects of detecting gamma-ray emission from galaxy clusters: cosmic rays and dark matter annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Pinzke, Anders; Bergstrom, Lars

    2011-01-01

    We study the possibility for detecting gamma-ray emission in galaxy clusters. We consider 1) cosmic ray (CR) induced pion decay which is thought to dominate the astrophysical signal from clusters, 2) different representative benchmark models of supersymmetric dark matter (DM), and 3) leptophilic models of DM annihilation that include a Sommerfeld enhancement (SFE). To model DM annihilation, we consider hadronization of annihilating neutralinos, internal bremsstrahlung, and inverse Compton emission from the cosmic microwave background as well as from a realistic spatial and spectral distribution of dust and stellar light. We predict the Virgo and Fornax clusters to be the brightest DM sources and find a particularly low CR induced background for Fornax. For a minimum substructure mass given by the DM free-streaming scale, we find a substructure boost factor of more than 1000. Since the annihilation flux of substructures is mostly contributed by the regions around the virial radius, the resulting surface bright...

  17. Cosmic Evolution of Long Gamma-Ray Burst Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Can-Min; Guo, Bei-Bei; Lu, Rui-Jing; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The cosmic evolution of gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity is essential for revealing the GRB physics and for using GRBs as cosmological probes. We investigate the luminosity evolution of long GRBs with a large sample of 258 {\\em Swift}/BAT GRBs. Parameterized the peak luminosity of individual GRBs evolves as $L_{\\rm p}\\propto{\\rm }(1+z)^{k}$, we get $k=1.49\\pm0.19$ using the non-parametric $\\tau$ statistics method without considering observational biases of GRB trigger and redshift measurement. By modeling these biases with the observed peak flux and characterizing the peak luminosity function of long GRBs as a smoothly broken power-law with a break that evolves as $L_{\\rm b}\\propto (1+z)^{k_{\\rm b}}$, we obtain $k_{\\rm b}=1.14^{+0.99}_{-0.47}$ through simulations based on assumption that the long GRB rate follows the star formation rate (SFR) incorporating with cosmic metallicity history. The derived $k$ and $k_b$ values are systematically smaller than that reported in previous papers. By removing the observa...

  18. Revealing Type Ia supernova physics with cosmic rates and nuclear gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2010-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) remain mysterious despite their central importance in cosmology and their rapidly increasing discovery rate. The progenitors of SNIa can be probed by the delay time between stellar birth and death. The explosions and progenitors of SNIa can be probed by MeV nuclear gamma rays emitted in the decays of radioactive nickel and cobalt into iron. We compare the cosmic star formation and SNIa rates, finding that their different redshift evolution requires a large fraction of SNIa to have large delay times. A delay time distribution of the form t^{-1.0+/-0.3} provides a good fit, implying 50% of SNIa explode more than ~ 1 Gyr after progenitor birth. The extrapolation of the cosmic SNIa rate to z = 0 agrees with the rate we deduce from catalogs of local SNIa. We investigate prospects for gamma-ray telescopes to exploit the facts that escaping gamma rays directly reveal the power source of SNIa and uniquely provide tomography of the expanding ejecta. We find large improvements relative to earl...

  19. Shell-type SNRs as sources of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Andreeva, M. S.; Balygin, K. A.; Borisov, S. S.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kirichenko, A. M.; Klimov, A. I.; Kozhukhova, I. P.; Mirzafatikhov, R. M.; Moseiko, N. I.; Ostashev, I. E.; Palamarchuk, A. I.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.; Volokh, I. G.

    2017-06-01

    Investigations of VHE gamma-ray sources by any methods, including mirror Cherenkov telescopes, touch on the problem of the cosmic ray origin and, accordingly, the role of the Galaxy in their generation. SHALON observations have yielded results on Galactic supernova remnants (SNR) of different ages. Among them are: the shell-type SNRs Tycho's SNR (1572y), Cas A (1680y), IC 443 (age ˜ (3 ÷ 30) × 103 y), Cygni SNR (age ˜ (5 ÷ 7) × 103 y), G166.0 + 4.3 (age ˜ 24 × 103 y) and the classical nova GK Per (Nova 1901). Observation results are presented for each of the SNRs with spectral energy distributions by SHALON in comparison with other experiment data and images by SHALON together with data from X-rays by Chandra and radio-data by CGPS. The collected experimental data have confirmed the prediction of the theory about the hadronic generation mechanism of very high energy 800 GeV-100 TeV gamma-rays in Tycho's SNR, Cas A and IC443. For the first time, unique data on GK Per (Nova1901) TeV gamma-ray emission were obtained with the SHALON experiment. The X-ray data shows that the nova remnant of GK Per could be a younger remnant that will resemble older SNRs like IC 443 which interact with molecular clouds. GK Per is supposed to be a candidate for TeV gamma-ray emission due to accelerated particles in the reverse shock region.

  20. A strategy to unveil transient sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takami Hajime

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transient generation of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs has been motivated from promising candidates of UHECR sources such as gamma-ray bursts, flares of active galactic nuclei, and newly born neutron stars and magnetars. Here we propose a strategy to unveil transient sources of UHECRs from UHECR experiments. We demonstrate that the rate of UHECR bursts and/or flares is related to the apparent number density of UHECR sources, which is the number density estimated on the assumption of steady sources, and the time-profile spread of the bursts produced by cosmic magnetic fields. The apparent number density strongly depends on UHECR energies under a given rate of the bursts, which becomes observational evidence of transient sources. It is saturated at the number density of host galaxies of UHECR sources. We also derive constraints on the UHECR burst rate and/or energy budget of UHECRs per source as a function of the apparent source number density by using models of cosmic magnetic fields. In order to obtain a precise constraint of the UHECR burst rate, high event statistics above ∼ 1020 eV for evaluating the apparent source number density at the highest energies and better knowledge on cosmic magnetic fields by future observations and/or simulations to better estimate the time-profile spread of UHECR bursts are required. The estimated rate allows us to constrain transient UHECR sources by being compared with the occurrence rates of known energetic transient phenomena.

  1. From cosmic ray source to the Galactic pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schure, K. M.; Bell, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic cosmic ray spectrum is a remarkably straight power law. Our current understanding is that the dominant sources that accelerate cosmic rays up to the knee (3 × 1015 eV) or perhaps even the ankle (3 × 1018 eV), are young Galactic supernova remnants. In theory, however, there are various reasons why the spectrum may be different for different sources, and may not even be a power law if non-linear shock acceleration applies during the most efficient stages of acceleration. We show how the spectrum at the accelerator translates to the spectrum that makes up the escaping cosmic rays that replenish the Galactic pool of cosmic rays. We assume that cosmic ray confinement, and thus escape, is linked to the level of magnetic field amplification, and that the magnetic field is amplified by streaming cosmic rays according to the non-resonant hybrid or resonant instability. When a fixed fraction of the energy is transferred to cosmic rays, it turns out that a source spectrum that is flatter than E-2 will result in an E-2 escape spectrum, whereas a steeper source spectrum will result in an escape spectrum with equal steepening. This alleviates some of the concern that may arise from expected flat or concave cosmic ray spectra associated with non-linear shock modification.

  2. Supernova Remnants as the Sources of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays holds still manymysteries hundred years after they were first discovered. Supernova remnants have for long been the most likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. I discuss here some recent evidence that suggests that supernova remnants can indeed efficiently accelerate cosmi

  3. Supernova Remnants as the Sources of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vink

    2012-01-01

    The origin of cosmic rays holds still manymysteries hundred years after they were first discovered. Supernova remnants have for long been the most likely sources of Galactic cosmic rays. I discuss here some recent evidence that suggests that supernova remnants can indeed efficiently accelerate cosmi

  4. COS-B gamma-ray sources and interstellar gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, A. M. T.; Bennett, K.; Bignami, G. F.; Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Buccheri, R.; Caraveo, P. A.; Hermsen, W.; Kanbach, G.; Lebrun, F.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Of the gamma-radiation observed above 100 MeV only a few percent is due to the catalogued sources which are viewed against intense background mission from the Galactic plane. There has been considerable recent success in modelling the Galactic plane emission as the interactions of cosmic rays with atomic and molecular interstellar gas; Bloemen, et al., demonstrate that large angular scale features of the observations are well reproduced in this way. By extending the analysis to small angular scales, which of the eCG sources might be due to conventional levels of cosmic rays within clumps of gas are shown and which cannot be so explained. With the use of a more sophisticated model the results presented improve and extend those of an earlier report. So far only the data above 300 MeV is used where the instrument's angular resolution is at its best.

  5. Primordial flares, flux tubes, MHD waves in the early universe and genesis of cosmic gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hiremath, K M

    2009-01-01

    It is conjectured that energy sources of the gamma ray bursts are similar to energy sources which trigger solar and stellar transient activity phenomena like flares, plasma accelerated flows in the flux tubes and, dissipation of energy and acceleration of particles by the MHD waves. Phenomenologically we examine in detail the following energy sources which may trigger gamma ray bursts : (i) cosmic primordial flares which could be solar flare like phenomena in the region of inter galactic or inter galactic cluster regions, (ii) primordial magnetic flux tubes that might have been formed from the convective collapse of the primordial magnetic flux (iii) nonlinear interaction and dissipation of MHD waves that are produced from the perturbations of large-scale inter galactic or inter cluster magnetic field of primordial origin. We examine in detail each of the afore mentioned phenomena keeping in mind that whether such processes are responsible for energy sources of the gamma ray bursts. By considering the similar...

  6. Time structure of gamma-ray signals generated in line-of-sight interactions of cosmic rays from distant blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Prosekin, Anton; Kusenko, Alexander; Aharonian, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Blazars are expected to produce both gamma rays and cosmic rays. Therefore, observed high-energy gamma rays from distant blazars may contain a significant contribution from secondary gamma rays produced along the line of sight by the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons. Unlike the standard models of blazars that consider only the primary photons emitted at the source, models which include the cosmic-ray contribution predict that even ~10 TeV photons should be detectable from distant objects with redshifts as high as z> 0.1. Secondary photons contribute to signals of point sources only if the intergalactic magnetic fields are very small, below ~10 femtogauss, and their detection can be used to set upper bounds on magnetic fields along the line of sight. Secondary gamma rays have distinct spectral and temporal features. We explore the temporal properties of such signals using a semi-analytical formalism and detailed numerical simulations, which account for all the relevant processes, incl...

  7. Cosmic ray diffusion in the galaxy and diffuse gamma emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaggero, Daniele [Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    The original work presented in this thesis constitutes an important contribution to modern Cosmic Ray (CR) physics, and comes during one of the most exciting periods of this field. The first part introduces a new numerical code (DRAGON) to model the CR propagation in our Galaxy. The code is then used to perform a combined analysis of CR data, making it possible to determine their propagation properties with unprecedented accuracy. The second part is dedicated to a theoretical interpretation of the recent crucial experimental results on cosmic electron and positron spectra (PAMELA, Fermi-LAT experiments). Using the tools developed in the first part of the thesis, the author convincingly argues for the existence of a new spectral component, which could arise either from local astrophysical sources, such as pulsars, or from Dark Matter annihilation or decay. This thesis is a highly advanced work; the methods, analysis and results are clearly and carefully presented. This work is set to become an important reference document for any future work in this area.

  8. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays, The Diffuse High Energy Gamma Ray Background and Anti-protons

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, David; Gavish, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Theories for the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) may imply a significant diffuse background in secondary $\\gamma$-rays from the pair cascads the UHECR initiate when interacting with background light. It is shown that, because the spectrum of these secondary $\\gamma$-rays is softer than the measured diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background in the 10-1000 GeV range, the addition of a hard component from the decay of TeV dark matter particles, subject to the implied constraints on its parameters, improves the fit. It is further argued that any compact astrophysical source of $\\bar p$s is unlikely to be as strong as decay of TeV dark matter particles, given bounds set by neutrino observations. The diffuse $\\gamma$-ray background presently sets the strongest lower bound on the lifetime of TeV dark matter particles, and hence on attendant anti-proton production, and further identification of other contributors to this background will further tighten these constraints.

  9. Observation of TeV gamma ray extended sources with ARGO-YBJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetto, Silvia, E-mail: vernetto@to.infn.it

    2014-04-01

    More than 80% of TeV galactic gamma ray sources are spatially extended and many of them are still unidentified. The extended emission could be the result of cosmic ray interactions with the ambient medium which provides the target to produce TeV gamma rays. The sensitivity of ground based gamma ray detectors decreases for extended sources; shower detectors, due to their large field of view, are less affected with respect to Cherenkov telescopes. The ARGO-YBJ experiment (Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Laboratory, Tibet, China, 4300 m of altitude) is an air shower detector devoted to gamma ray astronomy at energies above a few hundred GeV, with an integrated sensitivity ranging from 0.24 to ∼1 Crab units, depending on the source declination. In this paper the observation of galactic extended sources with ARGO-YBJ during 5 years is reviewed.

  10. Neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts: propagation of cosmic rays in their host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are proposed as candidate sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). We study the possibility that the PeV neutrinos recently observed by IceCube are produced by GRB cosmic rays interacting with the interstellar gas in the host galaxies. By studying the relation between the X-ray absorption column density N_H and the surface star-formation rate of GRB host galaxies, we find that N_H is a good indicator of the surface gas density of the host galaxies. Then we are able to calculate the neutrino production efficiency of CRs for GRBs with known N_H. We collect a sample of GRBs that have both measurements of N_H and accurate gamma-ray fluence, and attempt to calculate the accumulated neutrino flux based on the current knowledge about GRBs and their host galaxies. When the CR intensity produced by GRBs is normalized with the observed UHECR flux above $10^{19}{\\rm eV}$, the accumulated neutrino flux at PeV energies is estimated to be about $(0.3\\pm0.2)\\times10^{-8} \\rm{GeV\\ cm^{-2}\\ s...

  11. Cosmic-ray induced gamma-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D. [Department of Astronomy, MC-221, 1002 W. Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Cosmic rays in galaxies interact with the interstellar medium and give us a direct view of nuclear and particle interactions in the cosmos. For example, cosmic-ray proton interactions with interstellar hydrogen produce gamma rays via PcrPism→π{sup 0}→γγ. For a 'normal' star-forming galaxy like the Milky Way, most cosmic rays escape the Galaxy before such collisions, but in starburst galaxies with dense gas and huge star formation rate, most cosmic rays do suffer these interactions [1,2]. We construct a 'thick-target' model for starburst galaxies, in which cosmic rays are accelerated by supernovae, and escape is neglected. This model gives an upper limit to the gamma-ray emission. Only two free parameters are involved in the model: cosmic-ray proton acceleration energy rate from supernova and the proton injection spectral index. The pionic gamma-radiation is calculated from 10 MeV to 10 TeV for the starburst galaxy NGC 253, and compared to Fermi and HESS data. Our model fits NGC 253 well, suggesting that cosmic rays in this starburst are in the thick target limit, and that this galaxy is a gamma-ray calorimeter.

  12. Modeling the gamma-ray emission in the Galactic Center with a fading cosmic-ray accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Prosekin, Anton; Chang, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Recent HESS observations of the ~200 pc scale diffuse gamma-ray emission from the central molecular zone (CMZ) suggest the presence of a PeV cosmic-ray accelerator (PeVatron) located in the inner 10 pc region of the Galactic Center. Interestingly, the gamma-ray spectrum of the point-like source (HESS J1745-290) in the Galactic Center shows a cutoff at ~10 TeV, implying a cutoff around 100 TeV in the cosmic-ray proton spectrum. Here we propose that the gamma-ray emission from the inner and the outer regions may be explained self-consistently by run-away protons from a single, yet fading accelerator. In this model, gamma rays from the CMZ region are produced by protons injected in the past, while gamma rays from the inner region are produced by protons injected more recently. We suggest that the blast wave formed in a tidal disruption event (TDE) caused by the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) could serve as such a fading accelerator. With typical parameters of the TDE blast wave, gamma-ray spectra of both the C...

  13. Spectrum and anisotropy of cosmic rays at TeV-PeV-energies and contribution of nearby sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveshnikova, L. G.; Strelnikova, O. N.; Ptuskin, V. S.

    2013-12-01

    The role of nearby galactic sources, the supernova remnants, in formation of observed energy spectrum and large-scale anisotropy of high-energy cosmic rays is studied. The list of these sources is made up based on radio, X-ray and gamma-ray catalogues. The distant sources are treated statistically as ensemble of sources with random positions and ages. The source spectra are defined based on the modern theory of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants while the propagation of cosmic rays in the interstellar medium is described in the frameworks of galactic diffusion model. Calculations of dipole component of anisotropy are made to reproduce the experimental procedure of "two-dimensional" anisotropy measurements. The energy dependence of particle escape time in the process of acceleration in supernova remnants and the arm structure of sources defining the significant features of anisotropy are also taken into account. The essential new trait of the model is a decreasing number of core collapse SNRs being able to accelerate cosmic rays up to the given energy, that leads to steeper total cosmic ray source spectrum in comparison with the individual source spectrum. We explained simultaneously the new cosmic ray data on the fine structure of all particle spectrum around the knee and the amplitude and direction of the dipole component of anisotropy in the wide energy range 1 TeV-1 EeV. Suggested assumptions do not look exotic, and they confirm the modern understanding of cosmic ray origin.

  14. Detecting dark matter in the Milky Way with cosmic and gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Eric C.

    Over the last decade, experiments in high-energy astroparticle physics have reached unprecedented precision and sensitivity which span the electromagnetic and cosmic-ray spectra. These advances have opened a new window onto the universe for which little was previously known. Such dramatic increases in sensitivity lead naturally to claims of excess emission, which call for either revised astrophysical models or the existence of exotic new sources such as particle dark matter. Here we stand firmly with Occam, sharpening his razor by (i) developing new techniques for discriminating astrophysical signatures from those of dark matter, and (ii) by developing detailed foreground models which can explain excess signals and shed light on the underlying astrophysical processes at hand. We concentrate most directly on observations of Galactic gamma and cosmic rays, factoring the discussion into three related parts which each contain significant advancements from our cumulative works. In Part I we introduce concepts which are fundamental to the Indirect Detection of particle dark matter, including motivations, targets, experiments, production of Standard Model particles, and a variety of statistical techniques. In Part II we introduce basic and advanced modelling techniques for propagation of cosmic-rays through the Galaxy and describe astrophysical gamma-ray production, as well as presenting state-of-the-art propagation models of the Milky Way.Finally, in Part III, we employ these models and techniques in order to study several indirect detection signals, including the Fermi GeV excess at the Galactic center, the Fermi 135 GeV line, the 3.5 keV line, and the WMAP-Planck haze.

  15. From cosmic ray source to the Galactic pool

    CERN Document Server

    Schure, K M

    2013-01-01

    The Galactic cosmic ray spectrum is a remarkably straight power law. Our current understanding is that the dominant sources that accelerate cosmic rays up to the knee ($3 \\times 10^{15}$ eV) or perhaps even the ankle ($3 \\times 10^{18}$ eV), are young Galactic supernova remnants. In theory, however, there are various reasons why the spectrum may be different for different sources, and may not even be a power law if nonlinear shock acceleration applies during the most efficient stages of acceleration. We show how the spectrum at the accelerator translates to the spectrum that make up the escaping cosmic rays that replenish the Galactic pool of cosmic rays. We assume that cosmic ray confinement, and thus escape, is linked to the level of magnetic field amplification, and that the magnetic field is amplified by streaming cosmic rays according to the non-resonant hybrid or resonant instability. When a fixed fraction of the energy is transferred to cosmic rays, it turns out that a source spectrum that is flatter t...

  16. Angular Anisotropies in the Cosmic Gamma-ray Background as a Probe of its Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Miniati, Francesco; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2007-01-01

    Notwithstanding the advent of the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope, theoretical models predict that a significant fraction of the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB), at the level of 20% of the currently measured value, will remain unresolved. The angular power spectrum of intensity fluctuations of the CGB contains information on its origin. We show that probing the latter from a few tens of arcmin to several degree scales, together with complementary GLAST observations of gamma-ray emission from galaxy clusters and the blazars luminosity function, can discriminate between a background that originates from unresolved blazars or cosmic rays accelerated at structure formation shocks.

  17. The LHAASO experiment: from Gamma-Ray Astronomy to Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, G

    2016-01-01

    LHAASO is expected to be the most sensitive project to face the open problems in Galactic cosmic ray physics through a combined study of photon- and charged particle-induced extensive air showers in the energy range 10$^{11}$ - 10$^{17}$ eV. This new generation multi-component experiment will be able of continuously surveying the gamma-ray sky for steady and transient sources from about 100 GeV to PeV energies, thus opening for the first time the 10$^2$--10$^3$ TeV range to the direct observations of the high energy cosmic ray sources. In addition, the different observables (electronic, muonic and Cherenkov components) that will be measured in LHAASO will allow the study of the origin, acceleration and propagation of the radiation through a measurement of energy spectrum, elemental composition and anisotropy with unprecedented resolution. The installation of the experiment started at very high altitude in China (Daocheng site, Sichuan province, 4410 m a.s.l.). The commissioning of one fourth of the detector w...

  18. Markov Stochastic Technique to Determine Galactic Cosmic Ray Sources Distribution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashraf Farahat

    2010-06-01

    A new numerical model of particle propagation in the Galaxy has been developed, which allows the study of cosmic-ray production and propagation in 2D. The model has been used to solve cosmic ray diffusive transport equation with a complete network of nuclear interactions using the time backward Markov stochastic process by tracing the particles’ trajectories starting from the Solar System back to their sources in the Galaxy. This paper describes a further development of the model to calculate the contribution of various galactic locations to the production of certain cosmic ray nuclei observed at the Solar System.

  19. Cosmic-ray source of runaway electrons in thundercloud electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2008-12-01

    To increase an accuracy of numerical simulations of the high-altitude and high-energy electric phenomena in thunderstorm atmosphere basing on the electric breakdown combining the cosmic-ray effects and relativistic runaway electron (RE) avalanches it is necessary to have accurate source of seed REs produced by cosmic rays. We calculated the source using the Monte-Carlo technique. Actually a number of secondary electrons was calculated with energies above the runaway threshold depending on the field overvoltage relative to the minimum of the drag force affecting electrons. The cosmic radiation propagation through the atmosphere was simulated based on simplified model of the nuclear cascade: a cosmic proton was assumed to completely lose its energy in the first interaction with air nuclei, producing 15 pions with equal energies. The flux of primary radiation was divided into 20 angular groups containing equal number of particles. In view of the lack of the experimental data on the RE source it is impossible to directly estimate the accuracy of the obtained source. Therefore the model reliability was verified by comparing results of secondary radiation calculations with known experimental altitude variations in the secondary cosmic rays and their spectra. The source was calculated as the specific generation rate of the secondary electrons by cosmic radiation dependent on electric field overvoltage and the altitude above the Earth's surface. It is recommended as a source of relativistic runaway electron avalanches in numerical simulations of electric discharges in atmosphere controlled by REs in thunderstorm fields and their emissions: optical, gamma and neutrons. The source already was used to simulate the high-altitude discharge and its emissions. In particular, the calculated gamma-ray pulses (photon numbers and spectra, pulse duration) agree with detected terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). Conclusions of the published analyses (Cummer and Lyons, 2005; Cummer et

  20. Cosmic ray injection spectrum at the galactic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagutin, Anatoly; Tyumentsev, Alexander; Volkov, Nikolay

    The spectra of cosmic rays measured at Earth are different from their source spectra. A key to understanding this difference, being crucial for solving the problem of cosmic-ray origin, is the determination of how cosmic-ray (CR) particles propagate through the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). If the medium is a quasi-homogeneous the propagation process can be described by a normal diffusion model. However, during a last few decades many evidences, both from theory and observations, of the existence of multiscale structures in the Galaxy have been found. Filaments, shells, clouds are entities widely spread in the ISM. In such a highly non-homogeneous (fractal-like) ISM the normal diffusion model certainly is not kept valid. Generalization of this model leads to what is known as "anomalous diffusion". The main goal of the report is to retrieve the cosmic ray injection spectrum at the galactic sources in the framework of the anomalous diffusion (AD) model. The anomaly in this model results from large free paths ("Levy flights") of particles between galactic inhomogeneities. In order to evaluate the CR spectrum at the sources, we carried out new calculation of the CR spectra at Earth. AD equation in terms of fractional derivatives have been used to describe CR propagation from the nearby (r≤1 kpc) young (t≤ 1 Myr) and multiple old distant (r > 1 kpc) sources. The assessment of the key model parameters have been based on the results of the particles diffusion in the cosmic and laboratory plasma. We show that in the framework of the anomalous diffusion model the locally observed basic features of the cosmic rays (difference between spectral exponents of proton, He and other nuclei, "knee" problem, positron to electron ratio) can be explained if the injection spectrum at the main galactic sources of cosmic rays has spectral exponent p˜ 2.85. The authors acknowledge support from The Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant No. 14-02-31524.

  1. Can galactic dark matter substructure contribute to the cosmic gamma-ray anisotropy?

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, J U

    2014-01-01

    The annihilation of dark matter (DM) particles in the Milky Way can contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray background (DGRB). Due to the presence of substructures, this emission will appear anisotropic in a predictable way. We generate full-sky maps of the gamma-ray emission in galactic substructures from results of the high-resolution Via Lactea II N-body simulation of the Milky Way DM halo. We calculate the anisotropy pattern, taking into account different radial profiles of the DM distribution in substructures, cosmic variance, and the detection threshold, and compare it to the anisotropy in the DGRB observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). By comparing the upper limits on the DM self-annihilation cross-section, , implied by the anisotropy to the intensity of the DGRB and detected sources in the LAT 2-yr Point Source Catalog, we find that galactic substructure cannot contribute to the anisotropies in the DGRB without strongly violating these observations. Our results challenge the perception that sma...

  2. The TAIGA experiment: From cosmic-ray to gamma-ray astronomy in the Tunka valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnev, N.; Astapov, I.; Barbashina, N.; Barnyakov, A.; Bezyazeekov, P.; Bogdanov, A.; Boreyko, V.; Brückner, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Chvalaev, O.; Dyachok, A.; Epimakhov, S.; Fedorov, O.; Fedoseev, E.; Gafarov, A.; Gorbunov, N.; Grebenyuk, V.; Gress, O.; Gress, T.; Grinyuk, A.; Grishin, O.; Haungs, A.; Hiller, R.; Horns, D.; Huege, T.; Ivanova, A.; Karpov, N.; Kalmykov, N.; Kazarina, Yu.; Kirilenko, P.; Kirichkov, N.; Kiryuhin, S.; Kleifges, M.; Kokoulin, R.; Kompaniets, K.; Korosteleva, E.; Kostunin, D.; Kozhin, V.; Kravchenko, E.; Kunnas, M.; Kuzmichev, L.; Lenok, V.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lubsandorzhiev, N.; Mirgazov, R.; Mirzoyan, R.; Monkhoev, R.; Nachtigall, R.; Osipova, E.; Pakhorukov, A.; Panasyuk, M.; Pankov, L.; Perevalov, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pivovarov, S.; Platonov, V.; Poleschuk, V.; Popova, E.; Porelli, A.; Postnikov, E.; Prosin, V.; Ptuskin, V.; Pushnin, A.; Rubtsov, G.; Rybov, E.; Samoliga, V.; Saunkin, A.; Schröder, F.; Semeney, Yu.; Silaev, A.; Silaev, A.; Skurikhin, A.; Sokolov, A.; Spiering, C.; Sveshnikova, L.; Tabolenko, V.; Tarashchansky, B.; Tikhonov, Yu.; Tkachenko, A.; Tkachev, L.; Tluczykont, M.; Voronin, D.; Wischnewski, R.; Yashin, I.; Yurin, K.; Zagorodnikov, A.; Zirakashvili, V.; Zurbanov, V.

    2017-02-01

    We present physical motivations and advantages of the new gamma-observatory TAIGA (Tunka Advanced Instrument for cosmic ray physics and gamma-ray astronomy). TAIGA will be located in the Tunka valley, 50 km to the west of Lake Baikal, at the same place as the integrating air Cherenkov detector for cosmic rays Tunka-133. The TAIGA array is a complex, hybrid detector for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy for energies from a few TeV to several PeV as well as for cosmic ray studies from 100 TeV to several EeV. The array will consist of a wide angle Cherenkov array - TAIGA-HiSCORE with 5km2 area, a net of 16 IACT telescopes (with FOV of about 9.72°×9.72°) as well as muon and other detectors. We present the current status of the array construction.

  3. Inter-galactic Shock Acceleration and the Cosmic Gamma-ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Miniati, F

    2002-01-01

    We investigate numerically the contribution to the cosmic gamma-ray background from cosmic-rays ions and electrons accelerated at inter-galactic (IG) shocks associated with cosmological structure formation. We show that the kinetic energy of accretion flows in the low-red-shift IG medium is thermalized primarily through moderately strong shocks, which allow for an efficient conversion of shock ram pressure into cosmic-ray pressure. Cosmic-rays accelerated at these shocks produce a diffuse gamma-ray flux which is dominated by inverse Compton emission from electrons scattering off cosmic microwave background photons. Decay of neutral pions generated in p-p inelastic collisions of the ionic cosmic-ray component with the thermal gas contribute about 30% of the computed emission. Based on experimental upper limits on the photon flux above 100 MeV from nearby clusters we constrain the efficiency of conversion of shock energy into relativistic CR electrons to less than 1%. Thus, we find that cosmic-rays of cosmologi...

  4. Cosmic Radiation Fields: Sources in the early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, Martin; Kneiske, Tanja; Horns, Dieter; Elsaesser, Dominik; Hauschildt, Peter

    The workshop "Cosmic Radiation Fields - Sources in the Early Universe" (CRF 2010) focuses on the connection between the extragalactic infrared background and sources in the early universe, in particular stars powered by dark matter burning (Dark Stars; DS). The workshop covers the following topics: the cosmic infrared background, formation of early stars, dark stars, effect of dark matter in the early universe, dark matter halos, primordial star formation rate, and reionization. Further information can be found on the conference webpage: http://www.desy.de/crf2010/. Organizing committee: Tanja Kneiske, Martin Raue, Dominik Elsaesser, Alexander Gewering-Peine, Peter Hausschildt, Dieter Horns, and Andreas Maurer.

  5. A search for flaring Very-High-Energy cosmic-ray sources with the L3+C muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Van den Akker, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bähr, J; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiarusi, T; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; De Asmundis, R; Dglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Ding, L K; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Durán, I; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Faber, G; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, H; Grabosch, G; Grimm, O; Groenstege, H; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Haller, C; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Huo, A X; Ito, N; Jin, B N; Jindal, P; Jing, C L; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberría, M I; Kantserov, V A; Kaur, i; Kawakami, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kok, E; Korn, A; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M; Kuang, H H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kuijpers, J; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Li, L; Li, Z C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Meng, X W; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Parriaud, J F; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Qing, C R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Ravindran, K C; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Rewiersma, P A M; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Saidi, R; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmitt, V; Schöneich, B; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shen, C Q; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sulanke, H; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Trowitzsch, G; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Unger, M; Valente, E; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, G; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, R G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Van Wijk, R F; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Y P; Xu, J S; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J

    2006-01-01

    The L3+C muon detector at the Cern electron-position collider, LEP, is used for the detection of very-high-energy cosmic \\gamma-ray sources through the observation of muons of energies above 20, 30, 50 and 100 GeV. Daily or monthly excesses in the rate of single-muon events pointing to some particular direction in the sky are searched for. The periods from mid July to November 1999, and April to November 2000 are considered. Special attention is also given to a selection of known \\gamma-ray sources. No statistically significant excess is observed for any direction or any particular source.

  6. New Tests of Lorentz Invariance Following from Observations of the Highest Energy Cosmic Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W; Glashow, Sheldon L.

    2001-01-01

    We use the recent reanalysis of multi-TeV gamma-ray observations of Mrk 501 to constrain the Lorentz invariance breaking parameter involving the maximum electron velocity. Our limit is two orders of magnitude better than that obtained from the maximum observed cosmic-ray electron energy.

  7. Acceleration of cosmic rays and gamma-ray emission from supernova remnant/molecular cloud associations

    CERN Document Server

    Gabici, S; Morlino, G; Nava, L

    2015-01-01

    The gamma-ray observations of molecular clouds associated with supernova remnants are considered one of the most promising ways to search for a solution of the problem of cosmic ray origin. Here we briefly review the status of the field, with particular emphasis on the theoretical and phenomenological aspects of the problem.

  8. Acceleration of cosmic rays and gamma-ray emission from supernova remnant/molecular cloud associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabici Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gamma-ray observations of molecular clouds associated with supernova remnants are considered one of the most promising ways to search for a solution of the problem of cosmic ray origin. Here we briefly review the status of the field, with particular emphasis on the theoretical and phenomenological aspects of the problem.

  9. Cosmic-ray world with gamma-ray astronomy: a wealth on information, an even more open issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardillo Martina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since from their discovery in 1912, Cosmic-Rays (CRs are one of the most debated issues of the high energy astrophysics. Their origin is still a fundamental problem and is the subject of very intense research. Until now, the best candidate sources of Galactic CR component are Supernova Remnants (SNRs but final proof for the origin of CRs up to the knee can only be obtained through two fundamental signatures, the detection of a clear gamma-ray signature of π0 decay in Galactic sources and the identification of sources emitting a photon spectrum up to PeV energies. Both indications are quite difficult to obtain. The two gamma-ray satellites, AGILE and Fermi, together with ground telescopes operating in the TeV energy range (HESS, VERITAS and MAGIC, collected a great amount of data from SNRs. In spite of the recent discovery of the neutral pion spectral signature in the SNR W44 spectrum by AGILE (and confirmed by Fermi-LAT, all gamma-ray data collected at GeV and TeV energies for several young and middle-aged SNRs provide interesting challenges to current theoretical models. The emerging view from gamma-ray and particle detection is intriguing and lead to revisit the CR-SNR paradigm, considering also the contribution of other kind of sources.

  10. Constraining gamma-ray propagation on cosmic distances

    CERN Document Server

    Biteau, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Studying the propagation of gamma rays on cosmological distances encompasses a variety of scientific fields, focusing on diffuse radiation fields such as the extragalactic background light, on the probe of the magnetism of the Universe on large scales, and on physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and particle physics. The measurements, constraints and hints from observations of gamma-ray blazars by airborne and ground-based instruments are briefly reviewed. These observations point to gamma-ray cosmology as one of the major science cases of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA.

  11. Fluxes of diffuse gamma rays and neutrinos from cosmic-ray interactions with circumgalactic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashev, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    The Milky Way is surrounded by a gravitationally bound gas corona extending up to the Galaxy's virial radius. Interactions of cosmic-ray particles with this gas give rise to energetic secondary gamma rays and neutrinos. We present a quantitative analysis of the neutrino and gamma-ray fluxes from the corona of the Milky Way together with a combined contribution of coronae of other galaxies. The high-energy neutrino flux is insufficient to explain the IceCube results, while the contribution to the FERMI-LAT diffuse gamma-ray flux is not negligible.

  12. Constraining gamma-ray propagation on cosmic distances

    OpenAIRE

    Biteau, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Studying the propagation of gamma rays on cosmological distances encompasses a variety of scientific fields, focusing on diffuse radiation fields such as the extragalactic background light, on the probe of the magnetism of the Universe on large scales, and on physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and particle physics. The measurements, constraints and hints from observations of gamma-ray blazars by airborne and ground-based instruments are briefly reviewed. These observations point ...

  13. Do Gamma-Ray Burst Sources Repeat?

    OpenAIRE

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and...

  14. Clustering properties of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and the search for their astrophysical sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Hannestad, Steen; Haugboelle, Troels; /Aarhus U.; Kachelriess, Michael; /Norwegian U. Sci. Tech.; Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) may show anisotropies on all scales, from just above the experimental angular resolution up to medium scales and dipole anisotropies. We find that a global comparison of the two-point auto-correlation function of the data with the one of catalogues of potential sources is a powerful diagnostic tool. In particular, this method is far less sensitive to unknown deflections in magnetic fields than cross-correlation studies while keeping a strong discrimination power among source candidates. We illustrate these advantages by considering ordinary galaxies, gamma ray bursts and active galactic nuclei as possible sources. Already the sparse publicly available data suggest that the sources of UHECRs may be a strongly clustered sub-sample of galaxies or of active galactic nuclei. We present forecasts for various cases of source distributions which can be checked soon by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  15. Excesses of Cosmic Ray Spectra from A Single Nearby Source

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Lin, Su-Jie; Wang, Bing-Bing; Yin, Peng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence reveals universal hardening on various cosmic ray spectra, e.g. proton, positron, as well as antiproton fraction. Such universality may indicate they have a common origin. In this paper, we argue that these widespread excesses can be accounted for by a nearby supernova remnant surrounded by a giant molecular cloud. Secondary cosmic rays ($\\rm p$, $\\rm e^+$) are produced through the collisions between the primary cosmic ray nuclei from this supernova remnant and the molecular gas. Different from the background, which is produced by the ensemble of large amount of sources in the Milky Way, the local injected spectrum can be harder. The time-dependent transport of particles would make the propagated spectrum even harder. Under this scenario, the anomalies of both primary ($\\rm p$, $\\rm e^-$) and secondary ($\\rm e^+$, $\\rm \\bar{p}/p$) cosmic rays can be properly interpreted. We further show that the TeV to sub-PeV anisotropy of proton is consistent with the observations if the local source is rel...

  16. Excesses of cosmic ray spectra from a single nearby source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Lin, Su-Jie; Wang, Bing-Bing; Yin, Peng-Fei

    2017-07-01

    Growing evidence reveals universal hardening on various cosmic ray spectra, e.g., proton, positron, as well as antiproton fractions. Such universality may indicate they have a common origin. In this paper, we argue that these widespread excesses can be accounted for by a nearby supernova remnant surrounded by a giant molecular cloud. Secondary cosmic rays (p , e+ ) are produced through the collisions between the primary cosmic-ray nuclei from this supernova remnant and the molecular gas. Different from the background, which is produced by the ensemble of a large number of sources in the Milky Way, the local injected spectrum can be harder. The time-dependent transport of particles would make the propagated spectrum even harder. Under this scenario, the anomalies of both primary (p , e-) and secondary (e+, p ¯ /p ) cosmic rays can be properly interpreted. We further show that the TeV to sub-PeV anisotropy of the proton is consistent with the observations if the local source is relatively young and lying at the anti-Galactic center direction.

  17. Extragalactic sources in Cosmic Microwave Background maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zotti, G.; Castex, G.; González-Nuevo, J.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Negrello, M.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Clemens, M.; Delabrouille, J.; Herranz, D.; Bonavera, L.; Melin, J.-B.; Tucci, M.; Serjeant, S.; Bilicki, M.; Andreani, P.; Clements, D. L.; Toffolatti, L.; Roukema, B. F.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the potential of a next generation space-borne CMB experiment for studies of extragalactic sources with reference to COrE+, a project submitted to ESA in response to the call for a Medium-size mission (M4). We consider three possible options for the telescope size: 1 m, 1.5 m and 2 m (although the last option is probably impractical, given the M4 boundary conditions). The proposed instrument will be far more sensitive than Planck and will have a diffraction-limited angular resolution. These properties imply that even the 1 m telescope option will perform substantially better than Planck for studies of extragalactic sources. The source detection limits as a function of frequency have been estimated by means of realistic simulations taking into account all the relevant foregrounds. Predictions for the various classes of extragalactic sources are based on up-to-date models. The most significant improvements over Planck results are presented for each option. COrE+ will provide much larger samples of truly local star-forming galaxies (by about a factor of 8 for the 1 m telescope, of 17 for 1.5 m, of 30 for 2 m), making possible analyses of the properties of galaxies (luminosity functions, dust mass functions, star formation rate functions, dust temperature distributions, etc.) across the Hubble sequence. Even more interestingly, COrE+ will detect, at |b| > 30°, thousands of strongly gravitationally lensed galaxies (about 2,000, 6,000 and 13,000 for the 1 m, 1.5 m and 2 m options, respectively). Such large samples are of extraordinary astrophysical and cosmological value in many fields. Moreover, COrE+ high frequency maps will be optimally suited to pick up proto-clusters of dusty galaxies, i.e. to investigate the evolution of large scale structure at larger redshifts than can be reached by other means. Thanks to its high sensitivity COrE+ will also yield a spectacular advance in the blind detection of extragalactic sources in polarization: we expect that it

  18. Cosmic Rays, Gamma-Rays, & Neutrinos in the Starburst Nuclei of Arp 220

    CERN Document Server

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M; Zweibel, Ellen G

    2015-01-01

    The cores of Arp 220, the closest ultra-luminous infrared starburst galaxy, provide an opportunity to study interactions of cosmic rays under extreme conditions. In this paper, we model the populations of cosmic rays produced by supernovae in the central molecular zones of both starburst nuclei. We find that ~65 - 100% of cosmic rays are absorbed in these regions due to their huge molecular gas contents, and thus, the nuclei of Arp 220 nearly complete proton calorimeters. As the cosmic ray protons collide with the interstellar medium, they produce secondary electrons that are also contained within the system and radiate synchrotron emission. Using results from chi-squared tests between the model and the observed radio spectral energy distribution, we predict the emergent gamma-ray and high-energy neutrino spectra and find the magnetic field to be at milligauss levels. Because of the extremely intense far-infrared radiation fields, the gamma-ray spectrum steepens significantly at TeV energies due to gamma-gamm...

  19. Laser source for the gamma-gamma collider

    CERN Document Server

    Early, J T

    2001-01-01

    The production of high energy gammas from collisions between the NLC high energy electrons and low energy photons places difficult requirements on the laser low energy photon source. The electrons are produced in macro-pulses at 120 Hz. Each macro-pulse consists of around 100 subpulses separated by 2.8 nanoseconds. To interact efficiently with the electrons the laser subpulses must have approximately a 2 picosecond pulse duration. The laser macro-pulse energy must be 100 joules per beam at 120 Hz, or a total laser average power of 24 kW. The Mercury laser consists of a Yb:S-FAP laser instead of the usual Nd-glass as it has better thermal conductivity for cooling, longer storage lifetime for efficient pumping, and a high quantum efficiency to minimise waste heat. The laser will operate at 10 Hz with 100 J pulses. Twelve such laser would have to be multiplexed to achieve the gamma - gamma laser requirements. (2 refs).

  20. Multiple Cosmic Sources for Meteorite Macromolecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sephton, Mark A; Watson, Jonathan S; Meredith, William; Love, Gordon D; Gilmour, Iain; Snape, Colin E

    2015-10-01

    The major organic component in carbonaceous meteorites is an organic macromolecular material. The Murchison macromolecular material comprises aromatic units connected by aliphatic and heteroatom-containing linkages or occluded within the wider structure. The macromolecular material source environment remains elusive. Traditionally, attempts to determine source have strived to identify a single environment. Here, we apply a highly efficient hydrogenolysis method to liberate units from the macromolecular material and use mass spectrometric techniques to determine their chemical structures and individual stable carbon isotope ratios. We confirm that the macromolecular material comprises a labile fraction with small aromatic units enriched in (13)C and a refractory fraction made up of large aromatic units depleted in (13)C. Our findings suggest that the macromolecular material may be derived from at least two separate environments. Compound-specific carbon isotope trends for aromatic compounds with carbon number may reflect mixing of the two sources. The story of the quantitatively dominant macromolecular material in meteorites appears to be made up of more than one chapter.

  1. Extragalactic sources in Cosmic Microwave Background maps

    CERN Document Server

    De Zotti, G; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Lopez-Caniego, M; Negrello, M; Cai, Z -Y; Clemens, M; Delabrouille, J; Herranz, D; Bonavera, L; Melin, J -B; Tucci, M; Serjeant, S; Bilicki, M; Andreani, P; Clements, D L; Toffolatti, L; Roukema, B F

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the potential of a next generation space-borne CMB experiment for studies of extragalactic sources with reference to COrE+, a project submitted to ESA in response to the M4 call. We consider three possible options for the telescope size: 1m, 1.5m and 2m (although the last option is probably impractical, given the M4 boundary conditions). The proposed instrument will be far more sensitive than Planck and will have a diffraction-limited angular resolution. These properties imply that even the 1m telescope option will perform substantially better than Planck for studies of extragalactic sources. The source detection limits as a function of frequency have been estimated by means of realistic simulations. The most significant improvements over Planck results are presented for each option. COrE+ will provide much larger samples of truly local star-forming galaxies, making possible analyses of the properties of galaxies (luminosity functions, dust mass functions, star formation rate functions, dust temper...

  2. On the spectrum of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and the Gamma Ray Burst Origin Hypothesis

    CERN Document Server

    Scully, S T

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can produce the observed flux of cosmic rays at the highest energies. However, recent studies of GRBs indicate that their redshift distribution likely follows that of the average star formation rate and that GRBs were more numerous at high redshifts. As a consequence, we show that photomeson production energy losses suffered by ultrahigh energy cosmic rays coming from GRBs would produce too sharp a spectral high energy cutoff to be consistent with the air shower data.

  3. Tunka Advanced Instrument for cosmic rays and Gamma Astronomy (TAIGA: Status, results and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmichev L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the current status of high-energy cosmic-ray physics and gamma-ray astronomy at the Tunka Astrophysical Center (AC. This complex is located in the Tunka Valley, about 50 km from Lake Baikal. Present efforts are focused on the construction of the first stage of the gamma-ray observatory TAIGA - the TAIGA prototype. TAIGA (Tunka Advanced Instrument for cosmic ray physics and Gamma Astronomy is designed for the study of gamma rays and charged cosmic rays in the energy range 1013 eV–1018 eV. The array includes a network of wide angle timing Cherenkov stations (TAIGA-HiSCORE, each with a FOV = 0.6 sr, plus up to 16 IACTs (FOV - 10∘× 10∘. This part covers an area of 5 km2. Additional muon detectors (TAIGA-Muon, with a total coverage of 2000 m2, are distributed over an area of 1 km2.

  4. Detection of cosmic gamma-rays using a heliostat field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arqueros, F.; Ballestrin, J.; Borque, D. M.; Diaz Trigo, M.; Enriquez, R.; Gebauer, H.-J.; Plaga, R.

    2001-08-01

    Gamma-Ray telescopes based on a solar plant are able to accurately measure the spatial distribution and time structure of the Cherenkov shower front. Although this information should be sufficient for the reconstruction of several primary parameters, it will be shown that the restricted field of view of the optical detection system and the limited sampling of a realistic heliostat array impose severe limitations.

  5. Very-High-Energy Solar Gamma Rays From Cosmic-Ray Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bei; Ng, Kenny; Beacom, John; Peter, Annika; Rott, Cartsen

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic-ray induced gamma rays from the Sun has been observed up to 100 GeV. However, there are no theoretical predictions beyond 10 GeV. We provide the first calculation of the hadronic disk component in TeV-PeV, where solar magnetic fields can be ignored. We also consider the leptonic gamma-ray halo, taking into account electrons from local pulsars. With Fermi and soon HAWC & LHAASO observations, our results provide new insights on local cosmic rays, solar magnetic fields, and solar dark matter studies. BZ is supported by OSU Fowler Fellowship. KN and FB are supported by NSF Grant PHY-1404311. AK is supported by NSF GRFP Grant No. DGE-1321846. CR is supported by the Korea Neutrino Research Center. KN is also supported by the OSU Presidential Fellowship.

  6. Cosmic Forensics Confirms Gamma-Ray Burst And Supernova Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Scientists announced today that they have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to confirm that a gamma-ray burst was connected to the death of a massive star. This result is an important step in understanding the origin of gamma-ray bursts, the most violent events in the present-day universe. "If a gamma-ray burst were a crime, then we now have strong circumstantial evidence that a supernova explosion was at the scene," said Nathaniel Butler of Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, lead author of a paper presented today at the meeting of the High Energy Division of the American Astronomical Society. Chandra was able to obtain an unusually long observation (approximately 21 hours) of the afterglow of GRB 020813 (so named because the High-Energy Transient Explorer, HETE, discovered it on August 13, 2002.) A grating spectrometer aboard Chandra revealed an overabundance of elements characteristically dispersed in a supernova explosion. Narrow lines, or bumps, due to silicon and sulfur ions (atoms stripped of most of their electrons) were clearly identified in the X-ray spectrum of GRB 020813. "Our observation of GRB 020813 supports two of the most important features of the popular supra-nova model for gamma-ray bursts," said Butler. "An extremely massive star likely exploded less than two months prior to the gamma-ray burst, and the radiation from the gamma-ray burst was beamed into a narrow cone." An analysis of the data showed that the ions were moving away from the site of the gamma-ray burst at a tenth the speed of light, probably as part of a shell of matter ejected in the supernova explosion. The line features were observed to be sharply peaked, indicating that they were coming from a narrow region of the expanding shell. This implies that only a small fraction of the shell was illuminated by the gamma-ray burst, as would be expected if the burst was beamed into a narrow cone. The observed duration of the afterglow suggests a delay of about 60 days

  7. Cosmic rays and molecular clouds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the cosmic-ray penetration into molecular clouds and with the related gamma--ray emission. High energy cosmic rays interact with the dense gas and produce neutral pions which in turn decay into two gamma rays. This makes molecular clouds potential sources of gamma rays, especially if they are located in the vicinity of a powerful accelerator that injects cosmic rays in the interstellar medium. The amplitude and duration in time of the cosmic--ray overdensity around a giv...

  8. Classifying Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, David

    2016-01-01

    During its first 2 years of mission the Fermi-LAT instrument discovered more than 1,800 gamma-ray sources in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Despite the application of advanced techniques to identify and associate the Fermi-LAT sources with counterparts at other wavelengths, about 40% of the LAT sources have no a clear identification remaining "unassociated". The purpose of my Ph.D. work has been to pursue a statistical approach to identify the nature of each Fermi-LAT unassociated source. To this aim, we implemented advanced machine learning techniques, such as logistic regression and artificial neural networks, to classify these sources on the basis of all the available gamma-ray information about location, energy spectrum and time variability. These analyses have been used for selecting targets for AGN and pulsar searches and planning multi-wavelength follow-up observations. In particular, we have focused our attention on the search of possible radio-quiet millisecond pulsar (MSP) candidates in the sample of...

  9. Fermi bubble $\\gamma$-rays as a result of diffusive injection of Galactic cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Thoudam, Satyendra

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the {\\it{Fermi}} space telescope has discovered two large $\\gamma$-ray emission regions, the so-called "Fermi bubbles", that extend up to $\\sim 50^\\circ$ above and below the Galactic center. The $\\gamma$-ray emission from the bubbles are found to follow a hard spectrum with no significant spatial variation in intensity and spectral shape. The origin of the emission is still not clearly understood. Suggested explanations include injection of cosmic-ray nuclei from the Galactic center by high-speed Galactic winds, electron acceleration by multiple shocks and stochastic electron acceleration inside the bubbles. In this letter, it is proposed that the $\\gamma$-rays can be the result of diffusive injection of Galactic cosmic-ray protons during their propagation through the Galaxy. Considering that cosmic rays undergo much slower diffusion inside the bubbles than in the averaged Galaxy and at the same time suffer from inelastic collisions with the bubble plasma, this model can explain the observed intensi...

  10. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays from Compact Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z

    2001-01-01

    The clustering of ultra high energy (above 10^20 eV) cosmic rays (UHECR) suggests that they might be emitted by compact sources. Statistical analysis of Dubovsky et al. (astro-ph/0001317) estimated the source density. We extend their analysis to give also the confidence intervals for the number of sources using a.) no assumptions on the relationship between clustered and unclustered events; b.) nontrivial distributions for the source intensities and energies; c.) the energy dependence of the propagation. We determine the probability that a proton created at a distance r with energy E arrives at earth above a threshold E_c. The observed 14 UHECR events above 10^20 eV with one doublet gives for the source densities 6.43_-6.05^+136*10^-3 Mpc^-3 (on the 68% confidence level). We present detailed results for future experiments with larger UHECRs statistics.

  11. Propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and compact sources

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z

    2001-01-01

    The clustering of ultrahigh energy (>10^{20} eV) cosmic rays (UHECR) suggests that they might be emitted by compact sources. Statistical analysis (Dubovsky et al., 2000) estimated the source density. We extend their analysis to give also the confidence intervals (CI) for the source density using a.) no assumptions on the relationship between clustered and unclustered events; b.) nontrivial distributions for the source luminosities and energies; c.) the energy dependence of the propagation. We also determine the probability that a proton created at a distance r with energy E arrives at earth above a threshold E_c. Using this function one can determine the observed spectrum just by one numerical integration for any injection spectrum. The observed 14 UHECR events above 10^{20} eV with one doublet gives for the source densities 180_{-165}^{+2730}\\cdot 10^{-3} Mpc^{-3} (on the 68% confidence level).

  12. Fermi LAT Observation of Diffuse Gamma-Rays Produced through Interactions Between Local Interstellar Matter and High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U., OKC /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari; /more authors..

    2012-03-30

    Observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi mission of diffuse {gamma}-rays in a mid-latitude region in the third quadrant (Galactic longitude l from 200{sup o} to 260{sup o} and latitude |b| from 22{sup o} to 60{sup o}) are reported. The region contains no known large molecular cloud and most of the atomic hydrogen is within 1 kpc of the solar system. The contributions of {gamma}-ray point sources and inverse Compton scattering are estimated and subtracted. The residual {gamma}-ray intensity exhibits a linear correlation with the atomic gas column density in energy from 100 MeV to 10 GeV. The measured integrated {gamma}-ray emissivity is (1.63 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -26} photons s{sup -1}sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1} and (0.66 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup -26} photons s{sup -1}sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1} above 100 MeV and above 300 MeV, respectively, with an additional systematic error of {approx}10%. The differential emissivity from 100 MeV to 10 GeV agrees with calculations based on cosmic ray spectra consistent with those directly measured, at the 10% level. The results obtained indicate that cosmic ray nuclei spectra within 1 kpc from the solar system in regions studied are close to the local interstellar spectra inferred from direct measurements at the Earth within {approx}10%.

  13. Gamma-ray bursts and their use as cosmic probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schady, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    Since the launch of the highly successful and ongoing Swift mission, the field of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has undergone a revolution. The arcsecond GRB localizations available within just a few minutes of the GRB alert has signified the continual sampling of the GRB evolution through the prompt to afterglow phases revealing unexpected flaring and plateau phases, the first detection of a kilonova coincident with a short GRB, and the identification of samples of low-luminosity, ultra-long and highly dust-extinguished GRBs. The increased numbers of GRB afterglows, GRB-supernova detections, redshifts and host galaxy associations has greatly improved our understanding of what produces and powers these immense, cosmological explosions. Nevertheless, more high-quality data often also reveal greater complexity. In this review, I summarize some of the milestones made in GRB research during the Swift era, and how previous widely accepted theoretical models have had to adapt to accommodate the new wealth of observational data.

  14. Antideuterons in cosmic rays: sources and discovery potential

    CERN Document Server

    Herms, Johannes; Vittino, Andrea; Wild, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Antibaryons are produced in our Galaxy in collisions of high energy cosmic rays with the interstellar medium and in old supernova remnants, and possibly, in exotic sources such as primordial black hole evaporation or dark matter annihilations and decays. The search for signals from exotic sources in antiproton data is hampered by large backgrounds from spallation which, within theoretical errors, can solely account for the current data. Due to the higher energy threshold for antideuteron production, which translates into a suppression of the low energy flux from spallations, antideuteron searches have been proposed as a probe for exotic sources. We perform in this paper a comprehensive analysis of the antideuteron fluxes at the Earth expected from known and hypothetical sources in our Galaxy, and we calculate their maximal values consistent with current antiproton data from AMS-02. We find that supernova remnants generate a negligible flux, whereas primordial black hole evaporation and dark matter annihilatio...

  15. Antideuterons in cosmic rays: sources and discovery potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herms, Johannes; Ibarra, Alejandro; Vittino, Andrea; Wild, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    Antibaryons are produced in our Galaxy in collisions of high energy cosmic rays with the interstellar medium and in old supernova remnants, and possibly, in exotic sources such as primordial black hole evaporation or dark matter annihilations and decays. The search for signals from exotic sources in antiproton data is hampered by large backgrounds from spallation which, within theoretical errors, can solely account for the current data. Due to the higher energy threshold for antideuteron production, which translates into a suppression of the low energy flux from spallations, antideuteron searches have been proposed as a probe for exotic sources. We perform in this paper a comprehensive analysis of the antideuteron fluxes at the Earth expected from known and hypothetical sources in our Galaxy, and we calculate their maximal values consistent with current antiproton data from AMS-02. We find that supernova remnants generate a negligible flux, whereas primordial black hole evaporation and dark matter annihilations or decays may dominate the total flux at low energies. On the other hand, we find that the {detection of cosmic antideuterons} would require, for the scenarios studied in this paper and assuming optimistic values of the coalescence momentum and solar modulation, an increase of the experimental sensitivity compared to ongoing and planned instruments by at least a factor of 2. Finally, we briefly comment on the prospects for antihelium-3 detection.

  16. Improved Cosmic-Ray Injection Models and the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, Eric; Profumo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Fermi-LAT observations of the Galactic Center (GC) have revealed a spherically- symmetric excess of GeV gamma rays extending to at least 10 deg from the dynamical center of the Galaxy. A critical uncertainty in extracting the intensity, spectrum, and morphology of this excess concerns the accuracy of astrophysical diffuse gamma-ray emission models near the GC. Recently, it has been noted that many diffuse emission models utilize a cosmic-ray injection rate far below that predicted based on the observed star formation rate in the Central Molecular Zone. In this study, we add a cosmic-ray injection component which non-linearly traces the Galactic H2 density determined in three-dimensions, and find that the associated gamma-ray emission is degenerate with many properties of the GC gamma-ray excess. In models that utilize a large sideband (40x40 deg surrounding the GC) to normalize the best-fitting diffuse emission models, the intensity of the GC excess decreases by a factor of 2, and the morphology of the excess...

  17. Source abundances and propagation of relativistic cosmic rays up to Z equals 30 - HEAO 3 results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch-Miramond, L.

    Results from the cosmic ray isotope experiment on board the HEAO 3 satellite are reviewed, noting their impact on astrophysics. The gamma ray telescope comprised 5 Cerenkov detectors and a flash tube hodoscope with 4 trays, and collected data on 7 million events in the energy range 0.7-20 GeV/nucleon during the 1.6 yr mission duration. Three ranges of momentum were detected, and it was found that the ratios of secondary to primary species decreased steeply with increasing energy. A progressive steepening of the energy dependence of abundance ratios from Al/Si and K/Fe was observed, which has been interpreted as a progressive decrease of the amount of primary component from Al to Na and K. The secondary to primary ratios are accounted for with an exponential pathlength distribution from Fe down to Na and N. Comparisons are made of elemental abundances in cosmic ray sources, the local galactic environment, and the solar energetic particle composition. The data is noted to be compatible with a model of an injection of cosmic ray particles by stellar flares in a two-stage acceleration process.

  18. Constraints on the Local Sources of Ultra High-Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, Eli

    2008-01-01

    Ultra high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are believed to be protons accelerated in magnetized plasma outflows of extra-Galactic sources. The acceleration of protons to ~10^{20} eV requires a source power L>10^{47} erg/s. The absence of steady sources of sufficient power within the GZK horizon of 100 Mpc, implies that UHECR sources are transient. We show that UHECR "flares" should be accompanied by strong X-ray and gamma-ray emission, and that X-ray and gamma-ray surveys constrain flares which last less than a decade to satisfy at least one of the following conditions: (i) L>10^{50} erg/s; (ii) the power carried by accelerated electrons is lower by a factor >10^2 than the power carried by magnetic fields or by >10^3 than the power in accelerated protons; or (iii) the sources exist only at low redshifts, z10^{50} erg/s.

  19. The cosmic-ray and gas content of the Cygnus region as measured in gamma rays by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The Cygnus region hosts a giant molecular-cloud complex which actively forms massive stars. Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar gas and radiation fields make it shine at gamma-ray energies. Several gamma-ray pulsars and other energetic sources are seen in this direction. In this paper we analyse the gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the energy range from 100 MeV to 100 GeV in order to probe the gas and cosmic-ray content over the scale of the whole Cygnus complex. The signal from bright pulsars is largely reduced by selecting photons in their off-pulse phase intervals. We compare the diffuse gamma-ray emission with interstellar gas maps derived from radio/mm-wave lines and visual extinction data, and a global model of the region, including other pulsars and gamma-ray sources, is sought. The integral HI emissivity and its spectral energy distribution are both consistent within the systematics with LAT measurements in the interstellar space near the solar system. The ave...

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The cosmic TeV gamma-ray background spectrum (Inoue+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Y.; Tanaka, Y. T.

    2016-05-01

    We select 35 known extragalactic TeV sources which are located at Galactic latitude |b|>=10° and whose low activity state flux is available, since our aim is to give conservative constraints on the total cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB) in the TeV band. For each source, we select the lowest fluxes among several TeV measurements by modern imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs; H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS) and further restrict samples showing no significant variability in the TeV band during observations. The sample contains 30 blazars, 3 radio galaxies, and 2 starburst galaxies from the default TeVcat catalog (Wakely & Horan 2008ICRC....3.1341W) which include published sources only. We also include the Fermi third source (3FGL) catalog data (Acero et al. 2015, J/ApJS/218/23) to cover GeV gamma-ray spectra. The 3FGL catalog is based on its first 48 months of survey data. All of our sample have counterparts in the 3FGL catalog. (2 data files).

  1. Cosmic ray spectral hardening due to dispersion of source injection spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Qiang; Bi, Xiao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The cosmic ray (CR) energy spectra measured with ATIC, CREAM and PAMELA showed that there is remarkable hardening for rigidity of several hundred GV. We propose that this hardening is due to the superposition of spectra from a population of sources, e.g., supernova remnants (SNRs), whose injection spectral indices have a dispersion. Adopting proper model parameters the observational data can be well explained. It is interesting that the injection source parameters are similar with that derived from gamma-ray observations of SNRs, which may support the SNR-origin of CRs. Furthermore this mechanism provides an alternative explanation of the "ankle-cutoff" structure of the ultra high energy CR spectra.

  2. Disentangling cosmic-ray and dark matter induced gamma-rays in galaxy clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Maurin, D; Nezri, E; Pointecouteau, E

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are among the best targets for indirect dark matter detection in gamma-rays, despite the large astrophysical background expected from these objects. Detection is now within reach of current observatories (Fermi-LAT or Cerenkov telescopes), however, assessing the origin of this signal might be difficult. We investigate whether the `number of stacked objects - flux' dependence (log N-log F) could be a signature of the dominant process at stake. We use the CLUMPY code to integrate the signal from decaying/annihilating DM and cosmic rays along the line of sight. We assume the standard NFW profile for the dark matter density and rely on a parametrised emissivity for the cosmic-ray component. In this context, the consequences of stacking are explored using the MCXC meta-catalog of galaxy clusters. The log N-log F power-law behaviour may be a clear signature to disentangle decaying dark matter from cosmic-ray induced gamma-rays (and DM annihilation), contrarily to DM annihilation that has the same sl...

  3. High-energy neutrino production from photo-hadronic interactions of gamma rays from Active Galactic Nuclei at source

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga-Velazquez, J C

    2013-01-01

    Recent astronomical observations reveal that Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are sources of high-energy radiation. For example, the Fermi-LAT and Hess telescopes have detected gamma-ray emissions from the cores of several types of AGN's. Even more, the Pierre Auger observatory has found a correlation of ultra-high energy cosmic ray events with the position of Active Galactic Nuclei, such as Centaurus A. In this way, according to particle physics, a flux of high-energy neutrinos should be expected from the interactions of cosmic and gamma-rays with the ambient matter and radiation at the source. In this work, estimations of the diffuse neutrino flux from AGN's arising from interactions of the gamma radiation with the gas and dust of the sources will be presented.

  4. Pinpointing the knee of cosmic rays with diffuse PeV gamma-rays and neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Y Q; Yuan, Q; Tian, Z; Gao, X J

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the knee in cosmic ray spectrum remains to be an unsolved fundamental problem. There are various kinds of models which predict different break positions and the compositions of the knee. In this work, we suggest to use diffuse $\\gamma$-rays and neutrinos as probes to test these models. Based on several typical types of the composition models, the diffuse $\\gamma$-ray and neutrino spectra are calculated, which show distinctive cutoff behaviours at energies from tens of TeV to multi-PeV. The expected flux will be observable by the newly upgraded Tibet-AS$\\gamma$+MD (muon detector) experiment as well as more sensitive future projects, such as LHAASO and HiSCORE. By comparing the neutrino spectrum with the recent observations by IceCube experiment, we find that the diffuse neutrinos from interactions between the cosmic rays and the interstellar medium may not be responsible to the majority of the IceCube events. Future measurements of the neutrinos may be able to identify the Galactic diffuse compon...

  5. Cosmic veto gamma-spectrometry for Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, J.L., E-mail: jonathan.burnett@awe.co.uk; Davies, A.V.

    2014-05-21

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is supported by a global network of monitoring stations that perform high-resolution gamma-spectrometry on air filter samples for the identification of 85 radionuclides. At the UK CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory (GBL15), a novel cosmic veto gamma-spectrometer has been developed to improve the sensitivity of station measurements, providing a mean background reduction of 80.8% with mean MDA improvements of 45.6%. The CTBT laboratory requirement for a {sup 140}Ba MDA is achievable after 1.5 days counting compared to 5–7 days using conventional systems. The system consists of plastic scintillation plates that detect coincident cosmic-ray interactions within an HPGe gamma-spectrometer using the Canberra Lynx{sup TM} multi-channel analyser. The detector is remotely configurable using a TCP/IP interface and requires no dedicated coincidence electronics. It would be especially useful in preventing false-positives at remote station locations (e.g. Halley, Antarctica) where sample transfer to certified laboratories is logistically difficult. The improved sensitivity has been demonstrated for a CTBT air filter sample collected after the Fukushima incident.

  6. Gamma Ray Bursts: recent results and connections to very high energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, Péter; Veres, Péter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most concentrated explosions in the Universe. They have been detected electromagnetically at energies up to tens of GeV, and it is suspected that they could be active at least up to TeV energies. It is also speculated that they could emit cosmic rays and neutrinos at energies reaching up to the $10^{18}-10^{20}$ eV range. Here we review the recent developments in the photon phenomenology in the light of \\swift and \\fermi satellite observations, as well as recent IceCube upper limits on their neutrino luminosity. We discuss some of the theoretical models developed to explain these observations and their possible contribution to a very high energy cosmic ray and neutrino background.

  7. Gamma ray astronomy and the origin of the light nuclei. [cosmic ray and interstellar gas reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, H.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear reactions induced by the collisions of the protons and alphas of the galactic cosmic ray with heavy nuclei of the interstellar gas are responsible for the continuous production of the light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron in the galaxy. To better than one order of magnitude, the observed ratios of these abundances to hydrogen abundance and the nuclidic abundance ratios between themselves are accounted for by simply considering the effect of fast protons and alphas with a flux and an energy spectrum as observed in galactic cosmic rays, for a period comparable with the life of our galaxy. The role of gamma ray astronomy in solving problems that occur when accurate agreement is sought with increasingly accurate data is discussed.

  8. High-Latitude Molecular Clouds as (Gamma)-ray Sources for GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, D F; Dame, T M; Digel, S W

    2005-01-05

    For about two decades, a population of relative small and nearby molecular clouds has been known to exist at high Galactic latitudes. Lying more than 10{sup o} from the Galactic plane, these clouds have typical distances of {approx}150 pc, angular sizes of {approx}1{sup o}, and masses of order tens of solar masses. These objects are passive sources of high-energy {gamma}-rays through cosmic ray-gas interactions. Using a new wide-angle CO survey of the northern sky, we show that typical high-latitude clouds are not bright enough in {gamma}-rays to have been detected by EGRET, but that of order 100 of them will be detectable by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST. Thus, we predict a new steady population of {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes, perhaps the most numerous after active galactic nuclei.

  9. Theory of cosmic ray and gamma-ray production in the supernova remnant RX J0852.0-4622

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhko, E G; Völk, H J

    2009-01-01

    Aims. The properties of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622 are theoretically analysed. Methods. An explicitly time-dependent, nonlinear kinetic model of cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in SNRs is used to describe the properties of SNR RX J0852.0-4622, the accelerated CRs and the nonthermal emission. The source is assumed to be at a distance of ~1 kpc in the wind bubble of a massive progenitor star. An estimate of the thermal X-ray flux in such a configuration is given. Results. We find that the overall synchrotron spectrum of RX J0852.0-4622 as well as the filamentary structures in hard X-rays lead to an amplified magnetic field B > 100 muG in the SNR interior. This implies that the leptonic very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission is suppressed, and that the VHE gamma-rays are hadronically dominated. The energy spectrum of protons produced over the life-time of the remnant until now may well reach ''knee'' energies. The derived gamma-ray morphology is consistent with the H.E.S.S. measurements...

  10. Gamma Rays from Clusters and Groups of Galaxies: Cosmic Rays versus Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E; Profumo, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies have not yet been detected at gamma-ray frequencies; however, the recently launched Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly known as GLAST, could provide the first detections in the near future. Clusters are expected to emit gamma rays as a result of (1) a population of high-energy primary and re-accelerated secondary cosmic rays (CR) fueled by structure formation and merger shocks, active galactic nuclei and supernovae, and (2) particle dark matter (DM) annihilation. In this paper, we ask the question of whether the Fermi telescope will be able to discriminate between the two emission processes. We present data-driven predictions for a large X-ray flux limited sample of galaxy clusters and groups. We point out that the gamma ray signals from CR and DM can be comparable. In particular, we find that poor clusters and groups are the systems predicted to have the highest DM to CR emission at gamma-ray energies. Based on detailed Fermi simulations, we study observational handles that might ...

  11. Exploring Galactic TeV {gamma}-ray sources with H.E.S.S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eger, Peter A., E-mail: peter.eger@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics (ECAP), Physikalisches Institut, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-11-11

    The H.E.S.S. array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes continues to observe the southern sky with unprecedented sensitivity at very-high-energy (VHE, E>100GeV){gamma}-rays. This leads to a steady increase in the number of detected VHE {gamma}-ray sources as well as the discovery of sources with fluxes even below 1% of the flux of the Crab nebula. Up to now, well more than 100 VHE {gamma}-ray sources are known, which allow to study not only individual objects, but also whole populations of source classes, such as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and shell-type supernova remnants (SNRs). This paper focuses on Galactic sources, highlighting some aspects of the recent progress in this field. After discussing the general status and the future of the H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane survey, four individual sources related to recent discoveries are presented in detail in this contribution: (a) the PWNe HESS J1825-137 and HESS J1303-631 which show intriguing energy-dependent morphologies, (b) the formerly unidentified source HESS J1626-490 which is most likely associated to a molecular cloud illuminated with hadronic cosmic rays by a nearby SNR, and (c) Terzan 5 which is the first Galactic globular cluster that features a VHE {gamma}-ray source in direct vicinity.

  12. Search for cosmic gamma rays with the Carpet-2 extensive air shower array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhappuev, D. D.; Petkov, V. B.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Klimenko, N. F.; Lidvansky, A. S.; Troitsky, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The present-day status of the problem of searching for primary cosmic gamma rays at energies above 100 TeV is discussed, as well as a proposal for a new experiment in this field. It is shown that an increase of the area of the muon detector of the Carpet-2 air shower array up to 410 square meters, to be realized in 2016, will make this array quite competitive with past and existing experiments, especially at modest energies. Some preliminary results of measurements made with smaller area of the muon detector are presented together with estimates of expected results to be obtained with a coming large-area muon detector.

  13. Search for cosmic gamma rays with the Carpet-2 extensive air shower array

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhappuev, D D; Kudzhaev, A U; Klimenko, N F; Lidvansky, A S; Troitsky, S V

    2015-01-01

    The present-day status of the problem of searching for primary cosmic gamma rays at energies above 100 TeV is discussed, as well as a proposal for a new experiment in this field. It is shown that an increase of the area of the muon detector of the Carpet-2 air shower array up to 410 square meters, to be realized in 2016, will make this array quite competitive with past and existing experiments, especially at modest energies. Some preliminary results of measurements made with smaller area of the muon detector are presented together with estimates of expected results to be obtained with the coming large-area muon detector.

  14. Constraining cosmic reionization with quasar, gamma ray burst, and Lya emitter observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gallerani, S; Choudhury, T R; Fan, X; Salvaterra, R; Dayal, P

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the cosmic reionization history by comparing semi-analytical models of the Lya forest with observations of high-z quasars and gamma ray bursts absorption spectra. In order to constrain the reionization epoch z_rei, we consider two physically motivated scenarios in which reionization ends either early (ERM, z_rei>= 7) or late (LRM, z_rei~6). We analyze the transmitted flux in a sample of 17 quasars spectra at 5.7=11 and completes at z_rei>=7, in agreement with the recent WMAP5 data.

  15. The gamma-ray sky points to radial gradients in cosmic-ray transport

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Valli, Mauro; Ullio, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The standard approach to cosmic-ray (CR) propagation in the Galaxy is based on the assumption that local transport properties can be extrapolated to the whole CR confining volume. Such models tend to underestimate the gamma-ray flux above few GeV measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope towards the inner Galactic plane. We consider here for the first time a phenomenological scenario allowing for both the rigidity scaling of the diffusion coefficient and convective effects to be position-dependent. We show that within this approach we can reproduce the observed gamma-ray spectra at both low and mid Galactic latitudes - including the Galactic center - without spoiling any local CR observable.

  16. Gamma-Ray, Cosmic Ray and Neutrino Tests of Lorentz Invariance and Quantum Gravity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd

    2011-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics observations provide the best possibilities to detect a very small violation of Lorentz invariance such as may be related to the structure of space-time near the Planck scale of approximately 10(exp -35) m. I will discuss here the possible signatures of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) from observations of the spectra, polarization, and timing of gamma-rays from active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. Other sensitive tests are provided by observations of the spectra of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Using the latest data from the Pierre Auger Observatory one can already derive an upper limit of 4.5 x 10(exp -23) to the amount of LIV of at a proton Lorentz factor of approximately 2 x 10(exp 11). This result has fundamental implications for quantum gravity models. I will also discuss the possibilities of using more sensitive space based detection techniques to improve searches for LIV in the future.

  17. Search for cosmic-ray induced $\\gamma$-ray emission in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Ajello, M; Albert, A; Allafort, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cavazzuti, E; Chaves, R C G; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Franckowiak, A; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Hewitt, J; Hughes, R E; Jeltema, T E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Garde, M Llena; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ruan, J; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Storm, E; Strong, A W; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Zimmer, S; Pfrommer, C; Pinzke, A

    2013-01-01

    Current theories predict relativistic hadronic particle populations in clusters of galaxies in addition to the already observed relativistic leptons. In these scenarios hadronic interactions give rise to neutral pions which decay into $\\gamma$ rays, that are potentially observable with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi space telescope. We present a joint likelihood analysis searching for spatially extended $\\gamma$-ray emission at the locations of 50 galaxy clusters in 4 years of Fermi-LAT data under the assumption of the universal cosmic-ray model proposed by Pinzke & Pfrommer (2010). We find an excess at a significance of $2.7\\,\\sigma$, which upon closer inspection is however correlated to individual excess emission towards three galaxy clusters: Abell 400, Abell 1367 and Abell 3112. We discuss these cases in detail and conservatively attribute the emission to unmodeled background (for example, radio galaxies within the clusters). Through the combined analysis of 50 clusters we exclude h...

  18. Measurement of natural radionuclides in phosphgypsum using an anti-cosmic gamma-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreux, Laurent [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)], E-mail: laurent.ferreux@cea.fr; Moutard, Gerard; Branger, Thierry [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2009-05-15

    Gamma-ray spectrometry measurements have been carried out to determine the activity of natural radionuclides in a phosphogypsum sample included in a specific tight container. The gamma spectrometer includes an N-type coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector equipped with an anti-cosmic system. This measurement required the determination of linear attenuation coefficients of phosphogypsum to calculate self-absorption correction between efficiency calibration conditions and measurement ones. The results are given for the three natural chains and for {sup 40}K, in term of specific activity/g of dry material, ranging from a few Bq kg{sup -1} to a few hundreds Bq kg{sup -1}. The equilibrium within the different families and the {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratio are discussed.

  19. Constraints on the cosmic ray diffusion coefficient in the W28 region from gamma-ray observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabici, S.; Casanova, S.; Aharonian, F. A.; Rowell, G.

    2010-12-01

    GeV and TeV gamma rays have been detected from the supernova remnant W28 and its surroundings. Such emission correlates quite well with the position of dense and massive molecular clouds and thus it is often interpreted as the result of hadronic cosmic ray interactions in the dense gas. Constraints on the cosmic ray diffusion coefficient in the region can be obtained, under the assumption that the cosmic rays responsible for the gamma ray emission have been accelerated in the past at the supernova remnant shock, and subsequently escaped in the surrounding medium. In this scenario, gamma ray observations can be explained only if the diffusion coefficient in the region surrounding the supernova remnant is significantly suppressed with respect to the average galactic one.

  20. Strong magnetic fields and SGRs/AXPs as white dwarf pulsar: a source of ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, M.

    2016-04-01

    The origin of highest energy cosmic rays still remains a mystery in Astrophysics. In this work we consider the Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) as possible sources of ultra-high cosmic rays. These stars described as white dwarfs pulsars can achieved large electric potential differences in their surface and accelerate particles up to Lorentz factors γ ∼ 1010. Pulsars offer favorable sites for the injection of electrons and heavy nuclei, and accelerate them to ultrahigh energies. Once accelerated in the pulsar this particles can escape from the magnetosphere and produce the radiation observed. Here, we discuss the possibility of SGRs/AXPs as white dwarf pulsars to be possible sources of ultra-high energetic photons with E ∼ 1021eV.

  1. The source of cosmic radiations; A la source des rayons cosmiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letessier-Selvon, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et Hautes Energies, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-11-15

    The existence of the GZD (Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin) limit comes from the fact that the cosmological diffuse background interacts with cosmological radiations and can reduce dramatically their energy. As a consequence cosmic radiations traveling over large intergalactic distances can not have an energy over 60*10{sup 18} eV (the GZK limit). Another consequence is that a cosmic radiation with an energy greater that the GZK limit comes necessarily from a region no more than 500 million light-years away. The Auger observatory that at term will cover a surface of 3000 km{sup 2} has been designed to study high energy cosmic radiations through the detection of the huge particle showers they trigger when interacting with particles from the upper part of the atmosphere. The first results of the Auger observatory shows three important things. First, the Auger detector's ability to detect is 30 times greater than that of previous experiments. Secondly, 27 events with an energy greater than the GZK limit have been detected and for 20 of them a very active galaxy is located in their incident direction within a distance of 300*10{sup 6} km, these galaxies are then highly suspected to be the source of very high energy cosmic radiations. Thirdly, the graph of the measured cosmic radiation flux shows a brutal drop around 60*10{sup 18} eV which is the GZK limit. (A.C.)

  2. A Cosmic Bell Test with Measurement Settings from Astronomical Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Handsteiner, Johannes; Rauch, Dominik; Gallicchio, Jason; Liu, Bo; Hosp, Hannes; Kofler, Johannes; Bricher, David; Fink, Matthias; Leung, Calvin; Mark, Anthony; Nguyen, Hien T; Sanders, Isabella; Steinlechner, Fabian; Ursin, Rupert; Wengerowsky, Sören; Guth, Alan H; Kaiser, David I; Scheidl, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Bell's theorem states that some predictions of quantum mechanics cannot be reproduced by a local-realist theory. That conflict is expressed by Bell's inequality, which is usually derived under the assumption that there are no statistical correlations between the choices of measurement settings and anything else that can causally affect the measurement outcomes. In previous experiments, this "freedom of choice" was addressed by ensuring that selection of measurement settings via conventional "quantum random number generators" (QRNGs) was space-like separated from the entangled particle creation. This, however, left open the possibility that an unknown cause affected both the setting choices and measurement outcomes as recently as mere microseconds before each experimental trial. Here we report on a new experimental test of Bell's inequality that, for the first time, uses distant astronomical sources as "cosmic setting generators." In our tests with polarization-entangled photons, measurement settings were chos...

  3. Correlation Analysis between Tibet AS-$\\gamma$ TeV Cosmic Ray and WMAP Nine-year Data

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Qian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team subtracted template-based foreground models to produce foreground-reduced maps, and masked point sources and uncertain sky regions directly; however, whether foreground residuals exist in the WMAP foreground-reduced maps is still an open question. Here, we use Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) analysis with AS-$\\gamma$ TeV cosmic ray (CR) data to probe possible foreground residuals in the WMAP nine-year data. The correlation results between the CR and foreground-contained maps (WMAP foreground-unreduced maps, WMAP template-based and MEM foreground models) suggest that: (1) CRs can trace foregrounds in the WMAP data; (2) at least some TeV CRs originate from the Milky Way; (3) foregrounds may be related to the existence of CR anisotropy (loss-cone and tail-in structures); (4) there exist differences among different types of foregrounds in the declination range of $< 15^{\\circ}$. Then, we generate 10,000 mock CMB sky maps to describe the cosmic variance...

  4. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays from a Magnetized Strange Star Central Engine for Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, O

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) have been tried to be related to the most varied and powerful sources known in the universe. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are natural candidates. Here, we argue that cosmic rays can be accelerated by large amplitude electromagnetic waves (LAEMWs) when the MHD approximation of the field in the wind generated by the GRB's magnetized central engine breaks down. The central engine considered here is a strange star born with differential rotation from the accretion induced conversion of a neutron star into a strange star in a low-mass X-ray binary system. The LAEMWs generated this way accelerate light ions to the highest energies $E = q\\eta\\Delta\\Phi_{max}$ with an efficiency $\\eta \\sim 10^{-1}$ that accounts for all plausible energy losses. Alternatively, we also consider the possibility that, once formed, the LAEMWs are unstable to creation of a relativistically strong electromagnetic turbulence due to an overturn instability. Under this assumption, a lower limit to the efficien...

  5. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts from primordial stars: A new renaissance in astrophysics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardonnet, Pascal; Filina, Anastasia; Chechetkin, Valery; Popov, Mikhail; Baranov, Andrey

    2015-10-01

    The cosmic gamma-ray bursts are certainly an enigma in astrophysics. The “standard fireball” scenario developed during many years has provided a possible explanation of this phenomena. The aim of this work is simply to explore a new possible interpretation by developing a coherent scenario inside the global picture of stellar evolution. At the basis of our scenario, is the fact that maybe we have not fully understood how the core of a pair instability supernova explodes. In such way, we have proposed a new paradigm assuming that the core of such massive star, instead of doing a symmetrical explosion, is completely fragmented in hot spots of burning nuclear matter. We have tested our scenario with observational data like GRB spectra, lightcurves, Amati relation and GRB-SN connection, and for each set of data we have proposed a possible physical interpretation. We have also suggested some possible test of this scenario by measurement at high redshifts. If this scenario is correct, it tells us simply that the cosmic gamma-ray bursts are a missing link in stellar evolution, related to an unusual explosion.

  6. Connections between cosmic-ray physics, gamma-ray data analysis and Dark Matter detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic-ray (CR) physics has been a prolific field of research for over a century. The open problems related to CR acceleration, transport and modulation are deeply connected with the indirect searches for particle dark matter (DM). In particular, the high-quality gamma-ray data released by Fermi-LAT are under the spotlight in the scientific community because of a recent claim about a inner Galaxy anomaly: The necessity to disentangle the astrophysical emission due to CR interactions from a possible DM signal is therefore compelling and requires a deep knowledge of several non-trivial aspects regarding CR physics. I review all these connections in this contribution. In the first part, I present a detailed overview on recent results regarding modeling of cosmic-ray (CR) production and propagation: I focus on the necessity to go beyond the standard and simplified picture of uniform and homogeneous diffusion, showing that gamma-ray data point towards different transport regimes in different regions of the Galaxy;...

  7. AGNs and microquasars as high energy gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, J M

    2004-01-01

    The extragalactic analogs of the microquasars, the quasars, are strong gamma-ray emitters at GeV energies. It is expected that microquasars are also gamma-ray sources, because of the analogy with quasars and because theoretical models predict the high-energy emission. There are two microquasars that appear as the possible counterparts for two unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources.

  8. A celestial gamma-ray foreground due to the albedo of small solar system bodies and a remote probe of the interstellar cosmic ray spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; Digel, Seth W.; Michelson, Peter F.; Ormes, Jonathan F.

    2007-12-17

    We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. If detected, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic, especially near the Galactic center and for signals at high Galactic latitudes, such as the extragalactic {gamma}-ray emission. Additionally, it can be used to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions, and the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center.

  9. Ultrahigh-energy photons as a probe of nearby transient ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray sources and possible Lorentz-invariance violation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kohta

    2009-08-21

    Detecting neutrinos and photons is crucial to identifying the sources of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), especially for transient sources. We focus on ultrahigh-energy gamma-ray emission from transient sources such as gamma-ray bursts, since >EeV gamma rays can be more direct evidence of UHECRs than approximately PeV neutrinos and GeV-TeV gamma rays. We demonstrate that coincident detections of approximately 1-100 events can be expected by current and future UHECR detectors such as Auger and JEM-EUSO, and the detection probability can be higher than that of neutrinos for nearby transient sources at Lorentz-invariance violation than current constraints.

  10. GNSS Radio Occultation Observations as a data source for Ionospheric Assimilation: COSMIC-1 & COSMIC-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.; Kuo, Y. H.

    2014-12-01

    Since the pioneer GPS/MET mission, low Earth orbit (LEO) based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) Radio Occultation (RO) technique has been a powerful technique in ionosphere monitoring. After that, many LEO satellites were launched with RO payload, include: CHAMP , GRACE, SAC-C/D, COSMIC, C/NOFS, Metop-A/B, TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X, and etc. COSMIC was the first constellation of satellites dedicated primarily to RO and delivering RO data in near real time. Currently in UCAR CDAAC, we process most of these missions' RO data for the community. Due to the success of COSMIC mission, a follow on mission called COSMIC-2 will be launched in 2016 and 2018, respectively. The COSMIC-2 RO data will be 4-6 times of COSMIC due to the doubled satellite and GNSS signals. In this paper we will describe: (1) Data process and quality in UCAR/CDAAC; (2) Ionospheric data assimilation results based on COSMIC data; (3) OSSE study for COSMIC-2.

  11. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Band, D.L.; /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bignami, G.F.; /Pavia U.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  12. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  13. Gamma-ray emission from Cassiopeia A produced by accelerated cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhko, E G; Völk, H J

    2003-01-01

    The nonlinear kinetic model of cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) is used to describe the relevant properties of Cassiopeia A (Cas A). In order to reproduce the SNR's observed size, expansion rate and thermal X-ray emission we employ a piecewise homogeneous model for the progenitor's circumstellar medium developed by Borkowski et al. (1996). It consists of a tenuous inner wind bubble, a dense shell of swept-up red supergiant wind material, and a subsequent red supergiant wind region. A quite large SNR interior magnetic field B_d approx 1 mG is required to give a good fit for the radio and X-ray synchrotron emission. The steep radio spectrum is consistent with efficient proton acceleration which produces a significant shock modification and leads to a steep electron spectrum at energies E_e < 1 GeV. The calculated integral gamma-ray flux from Cas A, F propto E_gamma^-1, is dominated by pi^0-decay gamma-rays due to relativistic protons. It extends up to roughly 30 TeV if CR diffusion i...

  14. Search for Cosmic-Ray-Induced Gamma-Ray Emission in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Kuss, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Spandre, G.; Tinivella, M.

    2014-01-01

    Current theories predict relativistic hadronic particle populations in clusters of galaxies in addition to the already observed relativistic leptons. In these scenarios hadronic interactions give rise to neutral pions which decay into gamma rays that are potentially observable with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi space telescope. We present a joint likelihood analysis searching for spatially extended gamma-ray emission at the locations of 50 galaxy clusters in four years of Fermi-LAT data under the assumption of the universal cosmic-ray (CR) model proposed by Pinzke & Pfrommer. We find an excess at a significance of 2.7 delta, which upon closer inspection, however, is correlated to individual excess emission toward three galaxy clusters: A400, A1367, and A3112. We discuss these cases in detail and conservatively attribute the emission to unmodeled background systems (for example, radio galaxies within the clusters).Through the combined analysis of 50 clusters, we exclude hadronic injection efficiencies in simple hadronic models above 21% and establish limits on the CR to thermal pressure ratio within the virial radius, R(sub 200), to be below 1.25%-1.4% depending on the morphological classification. In addition, we derive new limits on the gamma-ray flux from individual clusters in our sample.

  15. Implications of supernova remnant origin model of galactic cosmic rays on gamma rays from young supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Prabir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2017-06-01

    It is widely believed that Galactic cosmic rays are originated in supernova remnants (SNRs), where they are accelerated by a diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) process in supernova blast waves driven by expanding SNRs. In recent theoretical developments of the DSA theory in SNRs, protons are expected to accelerate in SNRs at least up to the knee energy. If SNRs are the true generators of cosmic rays, they should accelerate not only protons but also heavier nuclei with the right proportions, and the maximum energy of the heavier nuclei should be the atomic number (Z ) times the mass of the proton. In this work, we investigate the implications of the acceleration of heavier nuclei in SNRs on energetic gamma rays produced in the hadronic interaction of cosmic rays with ambient matter. Our findings suggest that the energy conversion efficiency has to be nearly double for the mixed cosmic ray composition compared to that of pure protons to explain observations. In addition, the gamma-ray flux above a few tens of TeV would be significantly higher if cosmic ray particles could attain energies Z times the knee energy in lieu of 200 TeV, as suggested earlier for nonamplified magnetic fields. The two stated maximum energy paradigms will be discriminated in the future by upcoming gamma-ray experiments like the Cherenkov telescope array (CTA).

  16. $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts Cannot Produce the Observed Cosmic Rays Above $10^{19} eV$

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    2000-01-01

    Using recent results indicating that the redshift distribution of gamma-ray bursts most likely follows the redshift evolution of the star formation rate, I show that the energy input from these bursts at low redshifts is insufficient to account for the observed flux of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with energies above $10^{19}$ eV.

  17. Choked Jets and Low-Luminosity Gamma-Ray Bursts as Hidden Neutrino Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Senno, Nicholas; Meszaros, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We consider choked gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets as possible sources of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. We take into account the jet propagation physics and radiation constraints, which are relevant for high-energy neutrino production in dense environments. Efficient shock acceleration of cosmic rays inside a high density stellar environment is possible for sufficiently low-power jets and/or jets buried in an extended envelope, and such conditions are favorable also for the GRB jets to become stalled. Such choked jets may explain transrelativistic SNe and low-luminosity (LL) GRBs. Focusing on this possibility, we calculate the resulting neutrino spectra including the relevant microphysical processes such as multipion production in pp and pgamma interactions, as well as the energy losses of mesons and muons. We obtain diffuse neutrino spectra using the latest results on the luminosity function of LL GRBs. Although current uncertainties are large, we confirm that LL GRBs can potentially give a significant contributi...

  18. Low energy secondary cosmic ray flux (gamma rays) monitoring and its constrains

    CERN Document Server

    Raghav, Anil; Yadav, Virendra; Bijewar, Nitinkumar

    2014-01-01

    Temporal variation of secondary cosmic rays (SCR) flux was measured during the several full and new moon and days close to them at Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Mumbai (Geomagnetic latitude: 10.6 N), India. The measurements were done by using NaI (Tl) scintillation detector with energy threshold of 200 keV. The SCR flux shows sudden enhancement for approximately about 2 hour in counts during couple of events out of all experimental observations. The maximum Enhancement SCR flux is about 200% as compared to the diurnal trend of SCR temporal variations. Weather parameters (temperature and relative humidity) were continuously monitored during all observation. The influences of geomagnetic field, interplanetary parameters and tidal effect on SCR flux have been considered. Summed spectra corresponding to enhancement duration indicates appearance of atmospheric radioactivity which shows single gamma ray line. Detail investigation revealed the presence of radioactive Ar 41 . This measurements puts lim...

  19. Stellar nucleosynthesis and the cosmic-ray source composition up to Zn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M.

    1984-01-01

    A critical review is presented of the predictions of various nucleosynthetic models which may be relevant to the elemental and isotopic cosmic ray source composition. In particular, the yields of the elements between helium and zinc expected from various supernova models are compared with the bulk galactic cosmic ray source elemental composition. The origin of the C, Ne-22, Mg-25, and Mg-26 excess with respect to the solar system inferred at the cosmic ray sources is examined in the light of some specific scenarios, and especially in the framework of Wolf-Rayet star nucleosynthesis. 60 references.

  20. Localization of the gamma-radiation sources using the gamma-visor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Kirill E.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The search of the main gamma-radiation sources at the site of the temporary storage of solid radioactive wastes was carried out. The relative absorbed dose rates were measured for some of the gamma-sources before and after the rehabilitation procedures. The effectiveness of the rehabilitation procedures in the years 2006-2007 was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The decrease of radiation background at the site of the temporary storage of the solid radioactive wastes after the rehabilitation procedures allowed localizing the new gamma-source.

  1. Hypernova and Gamma-Ray Burst Remnants as TeV Unidentified Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ioka, Kunihito

    2009-01-01

    We investigate hypernova (hyper-energetic supernova) and gamma-ray burst (GRB) remnants in our Galaxy as TeV gamma-ray sources, particularly in the role of potential TeV unidentified sources, which have no clear counterpart at other wavelengths. We show that the observed bright sources in the TeV sky could be dominated by GRB/hypernova remnants, even though they are fewer than supernova remnants (SNRs). If this is the case, TeV SNRs are more extended (and more numerous) than deduced from current observations. In keeping with their role as cosmic ray accelerators, we discuss hadronic gamma-ray emission from pi^0 decay, from beta decay followed by inverse Compton emission, and propose a third, novel process of TeV gamma-ray emission arising from the decay of accelerated radioactive isotopes such as 56Co entrained by relativistic or semi-relativistic jets in GRBs/hypernovae. We discuss the relevant observational signatures which could discriminate between these three mechanisms.

  2. Probing cosmic opacity at high redshifts with gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L

    2014-01-01

    Probing the evolution of the universe at high redshifts with standard candles is a powerful way to discriminate dark energy models, where an open question nowadays is whether this component is constant or evolves with time. One possible source of ambiguity in this kind of analyses comes from cosmic opacity, which can mimick a dark enery behaviour. However, most tests of cosmic opacity have been restricted to the redshift range $z2$) for a flat $\\Lambda$CDM model. A possible degenerescence of the results with the adopted cosmological model is also investigated by considering a flat XCDM model. The limits on cosmic opacity in the redshift range $0

  3. Cosmic ray nuclei detection in the balloon borne nuclear emulsion gamma ray telescope flight in Australia (GRAINE 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyono, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Saya; Aoki, Shigeki; Hara, Toshio; Kuretsubo, Kenji; Marushima, Toshitsugu; Matsumoto, Haruka; Mizutani, Fukashi; Ozaki, Keita; Shibayama, Emi; Suzuki, Atsumu; Takahashi, Satoru; Tateishi, Yurie; Yabu, Misato; Yamada, Kyohei; Kodama, Koichi; Hamada, Kaname; Kawahara, Hiroaki; Komatani, Ryosuke; Komatsu, Masahiro; Miyanishi, Motoaki; Morishita, Misaki; Morishima, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Nanano, Toshiyuki; Nishio, Akira; Niwa, Kimio; Otsuka, Naoto; Rokujo, Hiroki; Sato, Osamu; Yoshimoto, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear emulsion plates for studying elementary particle physics as well as cosmic ray physics are very powerful tracking tools with sub-micron spatial resolutions of charged particle trajectories. Even if gamma rays have to be detected, electron-positron pair tracks can provide precise information to reconstruct their direction and energy with high accuracy. Recent developments of emulsion analysis technology can digitally handle almost all tracks recorded in emulsion plates by using the Hyper Track Selector of the OPERA group at NAGOYA University. On the other hand, the potential of time resolutions have been equipped by emulsion multilayer shifter technology in the GRAINE (Gamma Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion) experiments, the aims of which are to detect cosmic gamma rays such as the Vela pulsar stellar object by precise emulsion tracking analysis and to study cosmic ray particle interactions and chemical compositions. In this paper, we focus on the subject of cosmic ray nuclei detection in the GRAINE balloon flight experiments launched at Alice Springs, Australia in May 2015.

  4. Particle Acceleration Inside Thunderstorms and the Variation in Source Spectra of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Eric; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Briggs, Michael S.; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2016-03-01

    One of the unresolved questions in the atmospheric sciences is the origin of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs). These flashes are short but intense gamma ray bursts emanating from Earth's atmosphere. This phenomenon has been observed by gamma ray detectors on orbiting satellites, e.g. NASA Fermi, intended to study astrophysical phenomena such as Gamma-ray Bursts. TGFs are thought to originate inside thunderstorms where electrons can be accelerated and emit radiation in the multi MeV range due to bremsstrahlung interactions with air molecules. These so called ``runaway electrons'' are seeded from cosmic ray air showers hitting the Earth's atmosphere from (extra) galactic sources. In this work, we present a Monte Carlo model that simulates particle physics inside a thunderstorm region. The subsequent transport of high energy gamma rays through the Earth's atmosphere and up to satellite orbit is also included. We show that by varying both the potential difference and the ambient electric field inside the thundercloud, different electron and photon energy distributions are produced. This effect may be detectable by orbiting spacecraft, and therefore serves as a method to remote sense the electric fields that exist inside thunderstorms.

  5. Localization of the gamma-radiation sources using the gamma-visor

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov Kirill E.; Ponomaryev-Stepnoi Nikolai N.; Stepennov Boris S.; Teterin Yury A.; Teterin Anton Y.; Kharitonov Vladimir V.

    2008-01-01

    The search of the main gamma-radiation sources at the site of the temporary storage of solid radioactive wastes was carried out. The relative absorbed dose rates were measured for some of the gamma-sources before and after the rehabilitation procedures. The effectiveness of the rehabilitation procedures in the years 2006-2007 was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The decrease of radiation background at the site of the temporary storage of the solid radioactive wastes after the rehab...

  6. Some Aspects of Galactic Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Y M

    2003-01-01

    I give a synopsis of two aspects of the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) acceleration problem: the importance of the medium energy gamma-ray window, and several specific astrophysical sources which merit further investigation.

  7. The Multi-Messenger Approach to High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, Josep M; Torres, Diego F

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a theoretical and observational overview of the state of the art of gamma-ray astrophysics, and their impact and connection with the physics of cosmic rays and neutrinos. With the aim of shedding new and fresh light on the problem of the nature of the gamma-ray sources, particularly those yet unidentified, this book summarizes contributions to a workshop that continues with the series initiated by the meeting held at Tonantzintla in October 2000, and Hong-Kong in May 2004. This books will be of interest for all active researchers in the field of high energy astrophysics and astroparticle physics, as well as for graduate students entering into the subject.

  8. Extragalactic background light from hierarchical galaxy formation. Gamma-ray attenuation up to the epoch of cosmic reionization and the first stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; Inoue, Susumu [Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R. [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution; Makiya, Ryu [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Astronomy; Niino, Yuu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka (Tokyo). Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division; Totani, Tomonori [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Astronomy

    2013-04-26

    Here, we present a new model of the extragalactic background light (EBL) and corresponding γγ opacity for intergalactic gamma-ray absorption from z = 0 up to z = 10, based on a semi-analytical model of hierarchical galaxy formation that reproduces key observed properties of galaxies at various redshifts. Including the potential contribution from Population III stars and following the cosmic reionization history in a simplified way, the model is also broadly consistent with available data concerning reionization, particularly the Thomson scattering optical depth constraints from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). In comparison with previous EBL studies up to z ~ 3-5, our predicted γγ opacity is in general agreement for observed gamma-ray energy below 400/(1 + z) GeV, whereas it is a factor of ~2 lower above this energy because of a correspondingly lower cosmic star formation rate, even though the observed ultraviolet (UV) luminosity is well reproduced by virtue of our improved treatment of dust obscuration and direct estimation of star formation rate. Moreover, the horizon energy at which the gamma-ray opacity is unity does not evolve strongly beyond z ~ 4 and approaches ~20 GeV. The contribution of Population III stars is a minor fraction of the EBL at z = 0, and is also difficult to distinguish through gamma-ray absorption in high-z objects, even at the highest levels allowed by the WMAP constraints. Nevertheless, the attenuation due to Population II stars should be observable in high-z gamma-ray sources by telescopes such as Fermi or the Cherenkov Telescope Array and provide a valuable probe of the evolving EBL in the rest-frame UV. Our detailed results of our model are publicly available in numerical form at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/~yinoue/Download.html.

  9. A search for extragalactic sources of Ultrahigh-Energy Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knurenko, S.P.; Ivanov, A.A.; Sabourov, A.V. [Yu. G. Shafer Institute for Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Yakutsk, 677980 (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-15

    Possible extragalactic sources of cosmic rays at energies above 4x10{sup 19} eV detected with the Yakutsk array are sought. Correlation of the shower arrival directions with objects from Veron's catalog that are located closer than 100 Mpc from the Earth confirms the observations at the Pierre Auger observatory, as well as the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin effect on ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. The detailed analysis of the data reveals the classes of objects belonging to the active galactic nuclei that are probable sources of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays.

  10. Cosmic Ray-Dark Matter Scattering: a New Signature of (Asymmetric) Dark Matter in the Gamma Ray Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Profumo, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    We consider the process of scattering of Galactic cosmic-ray electrons and protons off of dark matter with the radiation of a final-state photon. This process provides a novel way to search for Galactic dark matter with gamma rays. We argue that for a generic weakly interacting massive particle, barring effects such as co-annihilation or a velocity-dependent cross section, the gamma-ray emission from cosmic-ray scattering off of dark matter is typically smaller than that from dark matter pair-annihilation. However, if dark matter particles cannot pair-annihilate, as is the case for example in asymmetric dark matter scenarios, cosmic-ray scattering with final state photon emission provides a unique window to detect a signal from dark matter with gamma rays. We estimate the expected flux level and its spectral features for a generic supersymmetric setup, and we also discuss dipolar and luminous dark matter. We show that in some cases the gamma-ray emission might be large enough to be detectable with the Fermi L...

  11. On Gamma Ray Burst and Blazar AGN Origins of the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays in Light of First Results from Auger

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2007-01-01

    The discoveries of the GZK cutoff with the HiRes and Auger Observatories and the discovery by Auger of clustering of >~60 EeV ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) towards nearby <~75 Mpc) AGNs along the supergalactic plane establishes the astrophysical origin of the UHECRs. The likely sources of the UHECRs are gamma-ray bursts and radio-loud AGNs because: (1) they are extragalactic; (2) they are sufficiently powerful; (3) acceleration to ultra-high energies can be achieved in their relativistic ejecta; (4) anomalous X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray features can be explained by nonthermal hadron acceleration in relativistic blast waves; and (5) sources reside within the GZK radius. Two arguments for acceleration to UHE are presented, and limits on UHECR ion acceleration are set. UHECR ions are shown to be able to survive without photodisintegrating while passing through the AGN scattered radiation field, even if launched deep in the broad line region. UHECR injection throughout cosmic time fits the measured energy ...

  12. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Sahakyan, N

    2015-01-01

    The recent results from ground based $\\gamma$-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) provide a population of TeV galactic $\\gamma$-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE) neutrinos. Since the $\\gamma$-rays and $\

  13. Powerful sources, extragalactic magnetic fields, astro-particles: astrophysical puzzles seen through ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectacles; Sources energetiques, champs magnetiques extra-galactiques, astroparticules: enigmes astrophysiques vues par les rayons cosmiques de ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotera, K.

    2009-09-15

    This work explores the relationships between powerful sources in the Universe, extragalactic magnetic fields and secondary cosmos particles (neutrinos and gamma rays), through the study of the propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. In this manuscript, I first review the experimental and theoretical status of the cosmic ray field. I then present a detailed review of the secondary particle emission mechanisms during cosmic ray propagation, and on the current knowledge of the extragalactic magnetic fields. In regards of all the uncertainties on the distribution of those field and the complexity of the existing models, I introduce parametrized semi-analytical and analytical modeling of cosmic ray transport in these fields. These models enables one to take into account key phenomena that are often neglected in the literature (for example the effects of the magnetic enrichment from astrophysical sources or of the small scale turbulence). I also developed a numerical tool that combines and improve existing codes, in order to treat interaction processes during cosmic ray propagation. I make use of these techniques to consider many paramount problems concerning ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, like the effect of the extragalactic magnetic field in the region of the second knee, the interpretation of the anisotropy detected by the Auger Observatory and multi-messenger aspects from sources located in magnetized environments. (author)

  14. Energy spectrum and mass composition of primary cosmic radiation in the region above the knee from the GAMMA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Martirosov, R M; Vardanyan, H S; Erlykin, A D; Nikolskaya, N M; Gallant, Y A; Jones, L W; Babayan, H A

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the primary cosmic radiation in the energy range 1 - 100 PeV and the extensive air shower (EAS) characteristics obtained on the basis of the expanded data bank of the GAMMA experiment (Mt. Aragats, Armenia) are presented. With increased statistics we confirm our previous results on the energy spectrum. The spectral index above the knee is about -3.1, but at energies beyond 20 PeV a flattening of the spectrum is observed. The existence of the 'bump' at about 70 PeV is confirmed with a significance of more than 4{\\sigma}. In the energy range of 10 - 100 PeV the shower age becomes energy independent and we observe a direct proportionality of the EAS size to the primary energy. This suggests an approximately constant depth of the EAS maximum in this energy range. This is evidence in favour of an increasing average mass of primary particles at energies above 20 PeV. The additional source scenario, which is a possible explanation of the 'bump' in the spectrum, also leads to the conclusion of ...

  15. Probing the Cosmic X-Ray and MeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once the future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve the sensitivity better than 10-12 erg/cm2/s-1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV - although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors - angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  16. Probing the cosmic x-ray and MeV gamma ray background radiation through the anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve a sensitivity better than 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV—although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors—angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  17. Cosmic ray: Studying the origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabelski, J. [Cosmic Ray Laboratory, Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Lodz (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations of the origin of cosmic rays are presented. Different methods are discussed: studies of cosmic gamma rays of energy from 30 MeV to about 10{sup 15} eV (since photons point to their places of origin), studies of the mass composition of cosmic rays (because it reflects source morphology), and studies of cosmic rays with energy above 1O{sup 19} eV (for these are the highest energies observed in nature). (author) 101 refs, 19 figs, 7 tabs

  18. Gamma-ray Source Stacking Analysis at Low Galactic Latitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cillis, Analia N.; /NASA, Goddard; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL; Torres, Diego F.; /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC

    2007-04-25

    We studied the problematic of uncertainties in the diffuse gamma radiation apparent in stacking analysis of EGRET data at low Galactic latitudes. Subsequently, we co-added maps of counts, exposure and diffuse background, and residuals, in varying numbers for different sub-categories of putatively and known source populations (like PSRs). Finally we tested for gamma-ray excess emission in those maps and attempt to quantify the systematic biases in such approach. Such kind of an analysis will help the classification processes of sources and source populations in the GLAST era.

  19. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  20. Possible application of scintillation detectors with semiconductor PMT for cosmic-neutron and gamma-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrousov, M. I.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Karpushkina, N. E.; Malakhov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    Solar system planets exploration and cosmic neutrons and gamma-ray flux research have been dynamically evolving for several decades. Different scintillation crystals are used for this purpose along with photo signal receivers, such as vacuum photomultiplier tubes (PMT). Many studies are being performed in order to provide alternative devices for photon signal capture: PIN-diodes,avalanche photodiodes, semiconductor silicon photomultipliers. We study the applicability of a silicon PMT in employing highresolution crystals in space applications.

  1. Possible application of scintillation detectors with semiconductor PMT for cosmic-neutron and gamma-ray detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokrousov, M. I., E-mail: mokromax@iki.rssi.ru; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Karpushkina, N. E.; Malakhov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (IKI) (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Solar system planets exploration and cosmic neutrons and gamma-ray flux research have been dynamically evolving for several decades. Different scintillation crystals are used for this purpose along with photo signal receivers, such as vacuum photomultiplier tubes (PMT). Many studies are being performed in order to provide alternative devices for photon signal capture: PIN-diodes,avalanche photodiodes, semiconductor silicon photomultipliers. We study the applicability of a silicon PMT in employing highresolution crystals in space applications.

  2. Constraining sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and shear acceleration mechanism of particles in relativistic jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruoyu

    2015-06-10

    Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are extreme energetic particles from outer space. They have aroused great interest among scientists for more than fifty years. However, due to the rarity of the events and complexity of the process of their propagation to Earth, they are still one of the biggest puzzles in modern high energy astrophysics. This dissertation is dedicated to study the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from various aspects. Firstly, we discuss a possible link between recently discovered sub-PeV/PeV neutrinos and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. If these two kinds of particles share the same origin, the observation of neutrinos may provide additional and non-trivial constraints on the sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. Secondly, we jointly employ the chemical composition measurement and the arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, and find a robust upper limit for distances of sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays above ∝55 EeV, as well as a lower limit for their metallicities. Finally, we study the shear acceleration mechanism in relativistic jets, which is a more efficient mechanism for the acceleration of higher energy particle. We compute the acceleration efficiency and the time-dependent particle energy spectrum, and explore the feature of synchrotron radiation of the accelerated particles. The possible realizations of this mechanism for acceleration of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in different astrophysical environments is also discussed.

  3. Nuclear Physics Meets the Sources of the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Boncioli, Denise; Winter, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We study the implications of nuclear data and models for cosmic-ray astrophysics, which involves the photodisintegration of nuclei up to iron in astrophysical environments. We demonstrate that data on photo-absorption cross sections are sparse in that mass range by screening nuclear databases, such as EXFOR; these cross sections are needed to compute the photodisintegration rates. We also test the prediction power of models, such as TALYS, and find uncertainties of the order of a factor two. If however the radiation fields are strong enough such that the nuclear cascade in the astrophysical source can develop, we find that differences among different models average out -- unless there is a systematic offset in the interaction model. We conclude with an isotope chart describing which information is in principle necessary to describe nuclear interactions, supported by simulating the entire disintegration chain in a gamma-ray burst. We also point out that a first consistency check may be the measurement of the a...

  4. Cosmic Strings as the Source of Small-Scale Microwave Background Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Pogosian, Levon; Wasserman, Ira; Wyman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Cosmic string networks generate cosmological perturbations actively throughout the history of the universe. Thus, the string sourced anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background is not affected by Silk damping as much as the anisotropy seeded by inflation. The spectrum of perturbations generated by strings does not match the observed CMB spectrum on large angular scales (l2000) will dominate over that created by the primary inflationary perturbations. This range of angular scales in the CMB is presently being measured by a number of experiments; their results will test this prediction of cosmic string networks soon.

  5. The TeV-scale cosmic ray proton and helium spectra: Contributions from the local sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yong-Yeon Keum; Pierre Salati

    2016-02-01

    Recent measurements of cosmic ray proton and helium spectra show a hardening above a few hundreds of GeV. This excess is hard to understand in the framework of the conventional models of galactic cosmic ray production and propagation. Here, we propose to explain this anomaly by the presence of local sources. Cosmic ray propagation is described as a diffusion process taking place inside a two-zone magnetic halo. We calculate the proton and helium fluxes at the Earth between 50 GeV and 100 TeV. Improving over a similar analysis, we consistently derive these fluxes by taking into account both local and remote sources for which a unique injection rate is assumed. We find cosmic ray propagation parameters for which the proton and helium spectra remarkably agree with the PAMELA and CREAM measurements over four decades in energy.

  6. Study of {sup 60}Co as gamma source in backscatter gamma densitometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour Peyvandi, R.; Taheri, A.; Rahmanzadeh Tootkaleh, S.; Askari Lehdarboni, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Islami Rad, S.Z. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Univ. of Qom (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physic

    2015-07-15

    In this work the performance of backscatter gamma densitometer is studied using {sup 60}Co as gamma source. The ability of the densitometer to determine the liquid's interfaces in multi-phase flows was assessed. The aim mainly was to investigate the possibility of using {sup 60}Co in this system. Furthermore, a comparison between {sup 60}Co and was done. The obtained results indicate that {sup 60}Co can be advantageous in this regard.

  7. GAMSOR: Gamma Source Preparation and DIF3D Flux Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lee, C. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Nuclear reactors that rely upon the fission reaction have two modes of thermal energy deposition in the reactor system: neutron absorption and gamma absorption. The gamma rays are typically generated by neutron absorption reactions or during the fission process which means the primary driver of energy production is of course the neutron interaction. In conventional reactor physics methods, the gamma heating component is ignored such that the gamma absorption is forced to occur at the gamma emission site. For experimental reactor systems like EBR-II and FFTF, the placement of structural pins and assemblies internal to the core leads to problems with power heating predictions because there is no fission power source internal to the assembly to dictate a spatial distribution of the power. As part of the EBR-II support work in the 1980s, the GAMSOR code was developed to assist analysts in calculating the gamma heating. The GAMSOR code is a modified version of DIF3D and actually functions within a sequence of DIF3D calculations. The gamma flux in a conventional fission reactor system does not perturb the neutron flux and thus the gamma flux calculation can be cast as a fixed source problem given a solution to the steady state neutron flux equation. This leads to a sequence of DIF3D calculations, called the GAMSOR sequence, which involves solving the neutron flux, then the gamma flux, then combining the results to do a summary edit. In this manuscript, we go over the GAMSOR code and detail how it is put together and functions. We also discuss how to setup the GAMSOR sequence and input for each DIF3D calculation in the GAMSOR sequence. With the GAMSOR capability, users can take any valid steady state DIF3D calculation and compute the power distribution due to neutron and gamma heating. The MC2-3 code is the preferable companion code to use for generating neutron and gamma cross section data, but the GAMSOR code can accept cross section data from other sources. To further

  8. GAMSOR: Gamma Source Preparation and DIF3D Flux Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M. A. [TerraPower, Bellevue, WA (United States); Lee, C. H. [TerraPower, Bellevue, WA (United States); Hill, R. N. [TerraPower, Bellevue, WA (United States)

    2017-06-28

    Nuclear reactors that rely upon the fission reaction have two modes of thermal energy deposition in the reactor system: neutron absorption and gamma absorption. The gamma rays are typically generated by neutron capture reactions or during the fission process which means the primary driver of energy production is of course the neutron interaction. In conventional reactor physics methods, the gamma heating component is ignored such that the gamma absorption is forced to occur at the gamma emission site. For experimental reactor systems like EBR-II and FFTF, the placement of structural pins and assemblies internal to the core leads to problems with power heating predictions because there is no fission power source internal to the assembly to dictate a spatial distribution of the power. As part of the EBR-II support work in the 1980s, the GAMSOR code was developed to assist analysts in calculating the gamma heating. The GAMSOR code is a modified version of DIF3D and actually functions within a sequence of DIF3D calculations. The gamma flux in a conventional fission reactor system does not perturb the neutron flux and thus the gamma flux calculation can be cast as a fixed source problem given a solution to the steady state neutron flux equation. This leads to a sequence of DIF3D calculations, called the GAMSOR sequence, which involves solving the neutron flux, then the gamma flux, and then combining the results to do a summary edit. In this manuscript, we go over the GAMSOR code and detail how it is put together and functions. We also discuss how to setup the GAMSOR sequence and input for each DIF3D calculation in the GAMSOR sequence.

  9. Cosmic microwave background anisotropies seeded by incoherent sources

    CERN Document Server

    Riazuelo, A; Riazuelo, Alain; Deruelle, Nathalie

    2000-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background anisotropies produced by active seeds, such as topological defects, have been computed recently for a variety of models by a number of authors. In this paper we show how the generic features of the anisotropies caused by active, incoherent, seeds (that is the absence of acoustic peaks at small scales) can be obtained semi-analytically, without entering into the model dependent details of their formation, structure and evolution.

  10. Monopolonium decay as a source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Gibilisco, M

    2001-01-01

    In this contribution, I will discuss the possibility to produce ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) from the collapse of monopolonium: such a particular bound state of monopoles having an opposite magnetic charge would be formed during the early inflationary stages of the Universe; subsequently, the monopolonium would decay due to the annihilation of its constituents, so releasing its energy in the form of ultrahigh energy particles.

  11. Pulsar Populations and Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Grenier, I A; Perrot, C A

    2003-01-01

    The EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory detected over 200 sources and the majority of these are still unidentified. At least three subpopulations of EGRET sources have been associated with the Galaxy: bright sources lying along the Galactic plane, weaker sources spatially correlated with the Gould Belt and a high-latitude, halo population. Many of these sources may be pulsars and there are more than two-dozen radio pulsars in or near EGRET source error boxes, most of them recently discovered in the Parkes Multibeam Survey. We present results from several population synthesis studies of pulsars in the Galaxy, which predict the number of pulsars detected by gamma-ray and radio surveys assuming models for the high-energy emission beam and its relation to the radio beam. Future gamma-ray pulsar detections by AGILE and GLAST together with the recent large rise in the radio pulsar population will give greatly improved statistics. The relative numbers of radio and gamma-ray pulsars detected in the p...

  12. Galactic cosmic ray propagation models using Picard

    CERN Document Server

    Kissmann, Ralf; Strong, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from our newly developed Galactic cosmic-ray transport code PICARD, that solves the cosmic-ray transport equation. This code allows for the computation of cosmic-ray spectra and the resulting gamma-ray emission. Relying on contemporary numerical solvers allows for efficient computation of models with deca-parsec resolution. PICARD can handle locally anisotropic spatial diffusion acknowledging a full diffusion tensor. We used this framework to investigate the transition from axisymmetric to spiral-arm cosmic-ray source distributions. Wherever possible we compare model predictions with constraining observables in cosmic-ray astrophysics.

  13. The Highest-Energy Cosmic Rays Cannot be Dominantly Protons from Steady Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    The bulk of observed ultrahigh energy cosmic rays could be light or heavier elements, and originate from an either steady or transient population of sources. This leaves us with four general categories of sources. Energetic requirements set a lower limit on single source luminosities, while the distribution of particle arrival directions in the sky sets a lower limit on the source number density. The latter constraint depends on the angular smearing in the skymap due to the magnetic deflections of the charged particles during their propagation from the source to the Earth. We contrast these limits with the luminosity functions from surveys of existing luminous steady objects in the nearby universe, and strongly constrain one of the four categories of source models, namely, steady proton sources. The possibility that cosmic rays with energy $> 8\\times 10^{19}\\,$eV are dominantly pure protons coming from steady sources is excluded at 95\\% confidence level, under the safe assumption that protons experience less ...

  14. Estimation Prospects of the Source Number Density of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays

    OpenAIRE

    Takami, Hajime; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of accurately estimating the source number density of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) using small-scale anisotropy in their arrival distribution. The arrival distribution has information on their source and source distribution. We calculate the propagation of UHE protons in a structured extragalactic magnetic field (EGMF) and simulate their arrival distribution at the Earth using our previously developed method. The source number density that can best reprodu...

  15. Detection of Point Sources in Cosmic Ray Maps using the Mexican Hat Wavelet Family

    CERN Document Server

    Batista, Rafael Alves; Daniel, Bruno; 10.1142/S0218301311040608

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of the sensitivity of gaussian and mexican hat wavelet family filters to the detection of point sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays was performed. A source embedded in a background was simulated and the number of events and amplitude of this source was varied aiming to check the sensitivity of the method to detect faint sources with low statistic of events.

  16. Demonstration of polarization sensitivity of emulsion-based pair conversion telescope for cosmic gamma-ray polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Ozaki, Keita; Aoki, Shigeki; Kamada, Keiki; Kaneyama, Taichi; Nakagawa, Ryo; Rokujo, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Linear polarization of high-energy gamma-rays (10 MeV-100 GeV) can be detected by measuring the azimuthal angle of electron-positron pairs and observing the modulation of the azimuthal distribution. To demonstrate the gamma-ray polarization sensitivity of emulsion, we conducted a test using a polarized gamma-ray beam at SPring-8/LEPS. Emulsion tracks were reconstructed using scanning data, and gamma-ray events were selected automatically. Using an optical microscope, out of the 2381 gamma-ray conversions that were observed, 1372 remained after event selection, on the azimuthal angle distribution of which we measured the modulation. From the distribution of the azimuthal angles of the selected events, a modulation factor of 0.21 + 0.11 - 0.09 was measured, from which the detection of a non-zero modulation was established with a significance of 3.06 $\\sigma$. This attractive polarimeter will be applied to the GRAINE project, a balloon-borne experiment that observes cosmic gamma-rays with an emulsion-based pair ...

  17. Contribution from individual nearby sources to the spectrum of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedrati, R., E-mail: rafik.sedrati@univ-annaba.org; Attallah, R.

    2014-04-01

    In the last few years, very important data on high-energy cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from high-precision space-born and ground-based experiments have attracted a great deal of interest. These particles represent a unique probe for studying local comic-ray accelerators because they lose energy very rapidly. These energy losses reduce the lifetime so drastically that high-energy cosmic-ray electrons can attain the Earth only from rather local astrophysical sources. This work aims at calculating, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the contribution from some known nearby astrophysical sources to the cosmic-ray electron/positron spectra at high energy (≥10GeV). The background to the electron energy spectrum from distant sources is determined with the help of the GALPROP code. The obtained numerical results are compared with a set of experimental data.

  18. Cosmic gamma ray detection and discovery potential with the AMS-2 spectrometer; Detection de rayons {gamma} cosmiques et potentiel de decouvertes avec le spectrometre AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, L

    2004-12-15

    Yet designed to measure charged component of the cosmic rays, the foreseen Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) could also release {gamma}-ray studies, in the energy range from GeV to TeV, using the tracker system, for {gamma}-rays converted in e{sup +}e{sup -} pair, and the electromagnetic calorimeter. In the first part of the thesis are described the calibrations and the performances of the engineering model of the calorimeter, obtained from the analysis of data taken during a test-beam performed at CERN in July 2002. In the second part of the thesis, the AMS-02 discovery potential for {gamma}-astrophysics is presented. While exposure maps of the {gamma}--sky are computed for one year of data taking with the {gamma}--detectors, the acceptance of the calorimeter is obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations. The AMS-02 potential is then estimated for signals from the Vela pulsar and for some supersymmetric signals from the Galactic Center. (author)

  19. On the time variability of gamma-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Torres, Diego; Pessah, Martin Elias; E. Romero, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo analysis of the recently introduced variability indices $\\tau$ (Tompkins 1999) and $I$ (Zhang et al. 2000 & Torres et al. 2001) for $\\gamma$-ray sources. We explore different variability criteria and prove that these two indices, despite the very different approaches used...

  20. Insights into the Galactic Cosmic-ray Source from the TIGER Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jason T.; Barbier, L. M.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, J. R.; Geier, S.; Israel, M. H.; Lodders, K.; Mewaldt,R. A.; Mitchell, J. W.; deNolfo, G. A.; Rauch, B. F.; Schindler, S. M.; Scott, L. M.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report results from 50 days of data accumulated in two Antarctic flights of the Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (TIGER). With a detector system composed of scintillators, Cherenkov detectors, and scintillating optical fibers, TIGER has a geometrical acceptance of 1.7 sq m sr and a charge resolution of 0.23 cu at Iron. TIGER has obtained abundance measurements of some of the rare galactic cosmic rays heavier than iron, including Zn, Ga, Ge, Se, and Sr, as well as the more abundant lighter elements (down to Si). The heavy elements have long been recognized as important probes of the nature of the galactic cosmic-ray source and accelerator. After accounting for fragmentation of cosmic-ray nuclei as they propagate through the Galaxy and the atmosphere above the detector system, the TIGER source abundances are consistent with a source that is a mixture of about 20% ejecta from massive stars and 80% interstellar medium with solar system composition. This result supports a model of cosmic-ray origin in OB associations previously inferred from ACE-CRIS data of more abundant lighter elements. These TIGER data also support a cosmic-ray acceleration model in which elements present in interstellar grains are accelerated preferentially compared with those found in interstellar gas.

  1. Search for new stellar sources of gamma-rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Josep

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We review and report about the present status of our search for gamma-ray binaries, microquasars, and new kinds of gamma-ray source associated with star forming regions in the Galaxy. The search is being carried out using cross-identification techniques applied to public databases and archives. A few promising candidates have been so far identified. These include the emission line star VES 737 and the central cluster of the Monoceros R2 star forming region. The observational data supporting the proposed associations is shortly presented and discussed.

  2. Galactic gamma ray astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, V.

    1982-05-01

    During the last decade the exploration of the sky in the light of gamma rays has begun by means of satellite-and balloon-borne instruments. Like in other ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum the Milky Way clearly stands out against the rest of the sphere. Part of the galactic ..gamma..-ray emission is due to discrete sources, part is diffuse in origin and is produced in interstellar space. Some of the discrete ..gamma..-ray sources are radio pulsars, the nature of the other sources is still unknown. The intensity distribution of the diffuse galactic ..gamma..-ray component is consistent with a decrease of the cosmic-ray intensity towards the outer part of the galaxy. The identification of the cosmic-ray sources will be one of the main objectives of the next generation of ..gamma..-ray telescopes.

  3. Sourcing and Communicating Cosmic Narratives -- A Role for the IAU?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, William Howard

    2015-08-01

    Communicating astronomy critically depends on crafting competent and engaging stories. IAU Commission 55 has an opportunity to take the lead in exploring and celebrating astronomical narratives. Possibilities include an online "Astro Tales" publication of astronomical stories by IAU members for the general public (that complements the trade-oriented CAP), "Profiles in Astronomy" that feature interviews with IAU members, forums featuring exceptional science communicators and their cosmic stories, writing competitions for students, and an awards program. Through some version of these endeavors, the IAU could become a major arbiter of astronomical information and outreach worldwide. In this session, Dr. Waller will use his online journal "The Galactic Inquirer" at http://galacticinquirer.net as an exemplar and encourage input from participants.

  4. Secondary cosmic ray nuclei in the light of the Single Source Model

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for a local 'Single Source' of cosmic rays is amassing by way of the recent precise measurements of various cosmic ray energy spectra from the AMS-02 instrument. To observations of individual cosmic ray nuclei, electrons, positrons and antiprotons must now be added the determination of the boron-to-carbon ratio and the energy spectrum of lithium to 2000 GV with high precision. Our analysis leads us to claim that, with certain assumptions about the propagation in the Galaxy, the results confirm our arguments regarding the presence of a local single source, perhaps, a supernova remnant (SNR). An attempt is made to determine some of the properties of this SNR and its progenitor star.

  5. Secondary Cosmic Ray Nuclei in the Light of the Single Source Model

    CERN Document Server

    Erlykin, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for a local 'Single Source' of cosmic rays is amassing by way of the recent precise measurements of various cosmic ray energy spectra from the AMS-02 instrument. To observations of individual cosmic ray nuclei, electrons, positrons and antiprotons must now be added the determination of the boron-to-carbon ratio and the energy spectrum of lithium to 2000 GV with high precision. Our analysis leads us to claim that, with certain assumptions about propagation in the Galaxy, the results confirm our arguments regarding the presence of a local single source, perhaps, a supernova remnant (SNR). An attempt is made to determine some of the properties of this SNR and its progenitor star.

  6. Identifying the Sources of the Galactic Cosmic Rays with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, Francis; O'Murchadha, Aongus

    2008-01-01

    We quantitatively address whether IceCube, a kilometer-scale neutrino detector under construction at the South Pole, can observe neutrinos pointing back at the accelerators of the Galactic cosmic rays. The photon flux from candidate sources identified by the Milagro detector in a survey of the TeV sky is consistent with the flux expected from a typical cosmic-ray generating supernova remnant interacting with the interstellar medium. We show here that IceCube can provide incontrovertible evidence of cosmic-ray acceleration in these sources by detecting neutrinos. We find that the signal is optimally identified by specializing to events with energy above 40 TeV where the atmospheric neutrino background is low. We conclude that evidence for a correlation between the Milagro and IceCube sky maps should be conclusive after several years.

  7. High energy cosmic ray self-confinement close to extragalactic sources

    CERN Document Server

    Blasi, P; D'Angelo, M

    2015-01-01

    The ultra-high energy cosmic rays observed at the Earth are most likely accelerated in extra-galactic sources. For the typical luminosities invoked for such sources, the electric current associated to the flux of cosmic rays that leave them is large. The associated plasma instabilities create magnetic fluctuations that can efficiently scatter particles. We argue that this phenomenon forces cosmic rays to be self-confined in the source proximity for energies $Ecosmic rays are confined close to their sources for energies $Esource luminosity in units of $10^{44}$ erg/s.

  8. Limits on the early afterglow phase of gamma-ray burst sources from TAROT-1

    CERN Document Server

    Boër, M; Bringer, M; Gendre, B; Klotz, A H; Malina, R; De Pacheco, J A F; Pedersen, H

    2001-01-01

    The T\\'elescope \\`a Action Rapide pour les Objets Transitoires (TAROT-1) has as prime objective the observation of the prompt and delayed emission of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We have performed a search for optical emission from 6 GRBs detected by BATSE. The positioning error circle was fully covered within typically thirty minutes after the trigger. No detection of the early afterglow phase was made, and magnitude limits in the range of $ \\mathrm{m}_{\\mathrm{R}} = 13-15 $ were estimated using 20s exposures. These limits are compared to optical afterglow data obtained in later phases and the results are interpreted in terms of source distances. They correspond to a median redshift of z = 0.5. With HETE-2 and the planned instrument upgrade, TAROT-1 will be able to detect the early optical emission of GRBs up to a redshift of the order of 5.

  9. High-energy gamma-ray sources of cosmological origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Pierre; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann

    2016-06-01

    The current generation of instruments in gamma-ray astrophysics launched a new era in the search for a dark matter signal in the high-energy sky. Such searches are said indirect, in the sense that the presence of a dark matter particle is inferred from the detection of products of its pair-annihilation or decay. They have recently started to probe the natural domain of existence for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), the favorite dark matter candidates today. In this article, we review the basic framework for indirect searches and we present a status of current limits obtained with gamma-ray observations. We also devote a section to another possible class of cosmological gamma-ray sources, primordial black holes, also considered as a potential constituent of dark matter. xml:lang="fr"

  10. Testing the Correlation of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays with High Redshift Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sigl, G; Anchordoqui, L A; Romero, G; Sigl, Guenter; Torres, Diego; Anchordoqui, Luis; Romero, Gustavo

    2001-01-01

    We study the correlation between compact radio quasars and ultra-high energy cosmic rays using an updated list of air shower detections. We estimate the level of positional correlation between both samples and the probability of pure chance association through simulations of random sets of synthetic cosmic ray events. We find that there are no reasons to claim for a physical association and that some previous results appear to be an effect of the small size of the sample used. This is also true when, instead of compact radio quasars, 3EG gamma-ray blazars are considered. Consequently, unless somehow severely deflected, it is unlikely that the high energy CR primaries are new particles or particles with new interactions beyond the electroweak scale, produced in high-redshift active galactic nuclei.

  11. Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts, Hypernovae and Galactic Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, P

    2014-01-01

    I review gamma-ray burst models (GRBs) and observations, and discuss the possible production of ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos in both the standard internal shock models and the newer generation of photospheric and hadronic GRB models, in the light of current constraints imposed by IceCube, Auger and TA observations. I then discuss models that have been proposed to explain the recent astrophysical PeV neutrino observations, including star-forming and star-burst galaxies, hypernovae and galaxy accretion and merger shocks.

  12. Search for Cosmic Neutrino Point Sources with Four Year Data of the ANTARES Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Albert, A; André, M; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Astraatmadja, T; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bigongiari, C; Bogazzi, C; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouhou, B; Bouwhuis, M C; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Carloganu, C; Carr, J; Cecchini, S; Charif, Z; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Core, L; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; De Bonis, G; Decowski, M P; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Emanuele, U; Enzenhöfer, A; Ernenwein, J -P; Escoffier, S; Fehn, K; Fermani, P; Ferri, M; Ferry, S; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fritsch, U; Fuda, J -L; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geyer, K; Giacomelli, G; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; Hallewell, G; Hamal, M; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hößl, J; Hsu, C C; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, G; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Leonora, E; Lefèvre, D; Lim, G; Presti, D Lo; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Louis, F; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Meli, A; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Motz, H; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; Păvălaş, G E; Payet, K; Petrovic, J; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Presani, E; Racca, C; Reed, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Rivière, C; Robert, A; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Ruiz-Rivas, J; Rujoiu, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sapienza, P; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schuller, J -P; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Shanidze, R; Simeone, F; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Sánchez-Losa, A; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Trovato, A; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Vecchi, M; Vernin, P; Visser, E; Wagner, S; Wijnker, G; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; Yepes, H; Zaborov, D; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a time integrated search for point sources of cosmic neutrinos is presented using the data collected from 2007 to 2010 by the ANTARES neutrino telescope. No statistically significant signal has been found and upper limits on the neutrino flux have been obtained. Assuming an $E_{\

  13. SEARCH FOR COSMIC NEUTRINO POINT SOURCES WITH FOUR YEARS OF DATA FROM THE ANTARES TELESCOPE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J-J; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Carloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Ernenwein, J-P; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J-L; Galata, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hoessl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leonora, E.; Lefevre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Pavalas, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Riviere, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schuller, J-P; Schuessler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallee, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a time-integrated search for point sources of cosmic neutrinos is presented using the data collected from 2007 to 2010 by the ANTARES neutrino telescope. No statistically significant signal has been found and upper limits on the neutrino flux have been obtained. Assuming an E-nu(-2).

  14. Constraining High-Energy Cosmic Neutrino Sources: Implications and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Kohta

    2016-01-01

    We consider limits on the local ($z=0$) density ($n_0$) of extragalactic neutrino sources set by the nondetection of steady high-energy neutrino sources producing $\\gtrsim30$ TeV muon multiplets in the present IceCube data, taking into account the redshift evolution, luminosity function and neutrino spectrum of the sources. We show that the lower limit depends weakly on source spectra and strongly on redshift evolution. We find $n_0\\gtrsim{10}^{-7}~{\\rm Mpc}^{-3}$ for standard candle sources evolving rapidly, $n_s\\propto{(1+z)}^3$, and $n_0\\gtrsim{10}^{-5}~{\\rm Mpc}^{-3}$ for nonevolving sources. The corresponding upper limits on their neutrino luminosity are $L_{{\

  15. OVERVIEW OF MONO-ENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCES & APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O' Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2010-05-18

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGa-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence. In conclusion, we have optimized the design of a high brightness Compton scattering gamma-ray source, specifically designed for NRF applications. Two different parameters sets have been considered: one where the number of photons scattered in a single shot reaches approximately 7.5 x 10{sup 8}, with a focal spot size around 8 {micro}m; in the second set, the spectral brightness is optimized by using a 20 {micro}m spot size, with 0.2% relative bandwidth.

  16. Choked jets and low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts as hidden neutrino sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We consider gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets that are choked by extended material as sources of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. We take into account the jet propagation physics both inside the progenitor star and the surrounding dense medium. Radiation constraints, which are relevant for high-energy neutrino production, are considered as well. Efficient shock acceleration of cosmic rays is possible for sufficiently low-power jets and/or jets buried in a dense, extended wind or outer envelope. Such conditions also favor GRB jets to become stalled, and the necessary conditions for stalling are explicitly derived. Such choked jets may explain transrelativistic supernovae (SNe) and low-luminosity (LL) GRBs, giving a unified picture of GRBs and GRB-SNe. Focusing on this unified scenario for GRBs, we calculate the resulting neutrino spectra from choked jets, including the relevant microphysical processes such as multipion production in p p and p γ interactions, as well as the energy losses of mesons and muons. We obtain diffuse neutrino spectra using the latest results for the luminosity function of LL GRBs. Although uncertainties are large, we confirm that LL GRBs can potentially give a significant contribution to the diffuse neutrino flux. Our results are consistent with the present IceCube data and do not violate the stacking limits on classical high-luminosity GRBs. We find that high-energy neutrino production in choked jets is dominated by p γ interactions. These sources are dark in GeV-TeV gamma rays and do not contribute significantly to the Fermi diffuse gamma-ray background. Assuming stalled jets can launch a quasispherical shock in the dense medium, "precursor" TeV neutrinos emerging prior to the shock breakout gamma-ray emission can be used as smoking-gun evidence for a choked jet model for LL GRBs. Our results strengthen the relevance of wide field-of-view sky monitors with better sensitivities in the 1-100 keV range.

  17. Cosmic Ray e +/(e- + e+), p-bar/p Ratios Explained by an Injection Model Based on 2 Gamma-ray Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamae, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Lee, S.-H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Giordano, F.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Grondin, M.-H.; /Bordeaux U.; Latronico, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; /Bordeaux U.; Sgro, C.; /INFN, Pisa; Tanaka, T.; Uchiyama, Y.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-12-16

    We present a model of cosmic ray (CR) injection into the Galactic space based on recent {gamma}-ray observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi) and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs). Steady-state (SS) injection of nuclear particles and electrons (e{sup -}) from the Galactic ensemble of SNRs, and electrons and positrons (e{sup +}) from the Galactic ensemble of PWNe are assumed, with their spectra deduced from {gamma}-ray observations and recent evolution models. The ensembles of SNRs and PWNe are assumed to share the same spatial distributions and the secondary CR production in dense molecular clouds interacting with SNRs is incorporated in the model. Propagation of CRs to Earth is calculated using GALPROP with 2 source distributions and 2 Galaxy halo sizes. We show that this observation-based model reproduces the positron fraction e{sup +}/(e{sup -} + e{sup +}) and antiproton-to-proton ratio ({bar p}/p) reported by PAMELA reasonably well without calling for new sources. Significant discrepancy is found, however, between our model and the e{sup -} + e{sup +} spectrum measured by Fermi below {approx} 20 GeV. Important quantities for Galactic CRs, including their energy injection, average lifetime, and mean gas density along their typical propagation path are also presented.

  18. Cosmic Ray e^+/(e^- + e^+) and pbar/p Ratios Explained by an Injection Model Based on Gamma-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kamae, T; Baldini, L; Giordano, F; Grondin, M -H; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Sgró, C; Tanaka, T; Uchiyama, Y

    2010-01-01

    We present a model of cosmic ray injection into the Galactic space based on recent gamma-ray observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Steady-state (SS) injection of nuclear particles and electrons (e^-) from the Galactic ensemble of SNRs, and electrons and positrons (e^+) from the Galactic ensemble of PWNe are assumed, with their spectra deduced from gamma-ray observations and recent evolution models. The ensembles of SNRs and PWNe are assumed to share the same spatial distributions and the secondary CR production in dense molecular clouds interacting with SNRs is incorporated in the model. Propagation of CRs to Earth is calculated using GALPROP with 2 source distributions and 2 Galaxy halo sizes. We show that this observation-based model reproduces the positron fraction e^+/(e^- + e^+) and antiproton-to-proton ratio reported by PAMELA reasonably well without calling for new sources. Significant discrepancy...

  19. Exploring Cosmic Origins with CORE: Extragalactic sources in Cosmic Microwave Background maps

    CERN Document Server

    De Zotti, G; Lopez-Caniego, M; Negrello, M; Greenslade, J; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Delabrouille, J; Cai, Z -Y; Biesiada, M; Bilicki, M; Bonaldi, A; Bonato, M; Burigana, C; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Diego, J M; Brun, A Le; Massardi, M; Melin, J B; Pollo, A; Roukema, B; Serjeant, S; Toffolatti, L; Tucci, M

    2016-01-01

    We update and extend our earlier discussion of the potential of a next generation space-borne CMB experiment for studies of extragalactic sources. Our analysis has particular bearing on the definition of a future space project, CORE, that will be submitted in response to ESA's call for a Medium-size mission opportunity (M5) as the successor of the Planck satellite. Even though the effective telescope size will be similar or somewhat smaller than that of Planck, CORE will have a considerably better angular resolution at its highest frequencies, since, at variance with Planck, it will be diffraction limited. The better resolution implies a substantial decrease of the source confusion, i.e. substantially fainter detection limits. In particular, CORE will detect several thousands of strongly lensed high-z galaxies distributed over the full sky. These are the brightest (sub-)mm sources in the sky and, as such, will allow studies of high-z star forming galaxies in exquisite detail. Also, the CORE resolution matches...

  20. Astrophysical Sources of Cosmic Rays and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects in Pierre Auger Observatory data; (2) Discriminating potential astrophysical sources of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Intrinsic anisotropy of the UHECR from the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Ultra-high energy photon studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) Limits on the flux of diffuse ultra high energy neutrinos set using the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) Search for sidereal modulation of the arrival directions of events recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (7) Cosmic Ray Solar Modulation Studies in the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) Investigation of the Displacement Angle of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays Caused by the Galactic Magnetic Field; (9) Search for coincidences with astrophysical transients in Pierre Auger Observatory data; and (10) An alternative method for determining the energy of hybrid events at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  1. Compact Gamma-ray Source Technology Development Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Rusnak, B

    2009-09-25

    This study focuses on the applicability of current accelerator and laser technologies to the construction of compact, narrow bandwidth, gamma-ray sources for DHS missions in illicit materials detection. It also identifies research and development areas in which advancement will directly benefit these light sources. In particular, we review the physics of Compton scattering based light sources and emphasize the source properties most important to Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) applications of interest. The influences of laser and electron beam properties on the light source are examined in order to evaluate the utility of different technologies for this application. Applicable bulk and fiber-based laser systems and laser recirculation technologies are discussed and Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerator (linac) technologies are examined to determine the optimal frequency and pulse formats achievable.

  2. Molecular Beam Dumps as Tracers of Hadronic Cosmic Ray Sources the Case of SNR IC443

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Y M; Combi, J A; Dame, T M; Romero, G E; Butt, Yousaf M.; Torres, Diego F.; Combi, Jorge A.; Dame, Thomas; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2002-01-01

    The gamma-ray & neutrino visibility of cosmic ray (CR) accelerators will be dramatically increased by the presence of molecular material abutting such sites due to the increased probability of pion production -- and, in the case of neutral pions, subsequent gamma-decay. This was recognized by Pinkau, Montmerle, and Black & Fazio, and others in the 1970's. In an effort to examine the long-standing -- but unproven -- conjecture that galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) are indeed the sites of nucleonic CR acceleration to 0) mm wavelength data from the compilation of Dame, Hartmann & Thaddeus (2001), at the best estimates of the various SNR distances. We outline the overall correlative study and examine the interesting case of SNR IC443, a likely accelerator of CR nuclei.

  3. Future plan for observation of cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region with the Tibet air shower array : simulation and sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y -Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2007-01-01

    The Tibet air shower array, which has an effective area of 37,000 square meters and is located at 4300 m in altitude, has been observing air showers induced by cosmic rays with energies above a few TeV. We have a plan to add a large muon detector array to it for the purpose of increasing its sensitivity to cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region by discriminating them from cosmic-ray hadrons. We have deduced the attainable sensitivity of the muon detector array using our Monte Carlo simulation. We report here on the detailed procedure of our Monte Carlo simulation.

  4. Cosmic-ray acceleration and gamma-ray signals from radio supernovæ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcowith, A.; Renaud, M. [Laboratoire Univers et particules de Montpellier, Université Montpellier II/CNRS, place E. Bataillon, cc072, 34095 Montpellier (France); Dwarkadas, V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60637 (United States); Tatischeff, V. [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière, IN2P3/CNRS and Univ Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2014-11-15

    Core collapse supernovae (SNe) are among the most extreme events in the universe. The are known to harbor among the fastest (but non- or midly-relativistic) shock waves. Once it has crossed the stellar atmosphere, the SN blast wave expands in the wind of the massive star progenitor. In type IIb SNe, the progenitor is likely a Red SuperGiant (RSG) star which has a large mass loss rate and a slow stellar wind producing a very dense circumstellar medium. A high velocity shock and a high density medium are both key ingredients to initiate fast particle acceleration, and fast growing instabilities driven by the acceleration process itself. We have reanalyzed the efficiency of particle acceleration at the forward shock right after the SN outburst for the particular case of the well-known SN 1993J. We find that plasma instabilities driven by the energetic particles accelerated at the shock front grow over intraday timescales. This growth, and the interplay of non-linear process, permit a fast amplification of the magnetic field at the shock, that can explain the magnetic field strengths deduced from the radio monitoring of the source. The maximum particle energy is found to reach 1–10 PeV depending on the instability dominating the amplification process. We derive the time dependent particle spectra and the associated hadronic signatures of secondary particles (gamma-ray, leptons and neutrinos) arising from proton proton interactions. We find that the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) should easily detect objects like SN 1993J in particular above 1 TeV, while current generation of Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. could only marginaly detect such events. The gamma-ray signal is found to be heavily absorbed by pair production process during the first week after the outburst. We predict a low neutrino flux above 10 TeV, implying a detectability horizon with a KM3NeT-type telescope of 1 Mpc only. We finally discuss the essential parameters that control the particle

  5. Gamma ray sources observation with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetto, S., E-mail: vernetto@to.infn.it [IFSI-INAF, Corso Fiume 4, 10133 Torino (Italy)

    2012-11-11

    Since November 2007 the air shower detector ARGO-YBJ is continuously monitoring the gamma ray sky in the declination band from -10 Degree-Sign to +70 Degree-Sign at energies E>0.5TeV. In this work we present the results of our observations of galactic and extragalactic sources during more than 3 years, focusing our attention on the Crab Nebula, the blazar Mrk 421 and the galactic extended source MGRO J1908+06, probably associated to the Fermi pulsar PSR J1907+0602.

  6. The GAMMA-400 Space Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cumani, P; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    GAMMA-400 is a new space mission which will be installed on board the Russian space platform Navigator. It is scheduled to be launched at the beginning of the next decade. GAMMA-400 is designed to study simultaneously gamma rays (up to 3 TeV) and cosmic rays (electrons and positrons from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, nuclei up to 10$^{15}$-10$^{16}$ eV). Being a dual-purpose mission, GAMMA-400 will be able to address some of the most impelling science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, cosmic-rays origin and propagation, and the nature of transients. GAMMA-400 will try to solve the unanswered questions on these topics by high-precision measurements of the Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission and the spectra of cosmic-ray electrons + positrons and nuclei, thanks to excellent energy and angular resolutions.

  7. Cosmic rays on earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allkofer, O. C.; Grieder, P. K. F.

    Contents: Cosmic rays in the atmosphere: Charged hadron data. Neutron data. Gamma-ray data. Electron data. Muon data. Data on nuclei. Data on antiparticles. Cosmic rays at sea level: Muon data. Charged hadron data.Neutron data. Electron data. Gamma-ray data. Data on nuclei. Cosmic rays underground: Muon data. Neutrino data.

  8. Neutrinos from active black holes, sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Julia K

    2008-01-01

    A correlation between the highest energy Cosmic Rays (above ~60 EeV) and the distribution of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) gives rise to a prediction of neutrino production in the same sources. In this paper, we present a detailed AGN model, predicting neutrino production near the foot of the jet, where the photon field from the disk creates a high optical depth for proton-photon interactions. The protons escape from later shocks where the emission region is optically thin for proton-photon interactions. Consequently, Cosmic Rays are predicted to come from FR-I galaxies, independent of the orientation of the source. Neutrinos, on the other hand, are only observable from sources directing their jet towards Earth, i.e. flat spectrum radio quasars, due to the strongly beamed neutrino emission.

  9. Sensitivity of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector to Sources of Multi-TeV Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garcia-Luna, J L; Garcia-Torales, G; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garc\\'\\ia, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, O; Mart\\'\\inez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is an array of large water Cherenkov detectors sensitive to gamma rays and hadronic cosmic rays in the energy band between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. The observatory will be used to measure high-energy protons and cosmic rays via detection of the energetic secondary particles reaching the ground when one of these particles interacts in the atmosphere above the detector. HAWC is under construction at a site 4100 meters above sea level on the northern slope of the volcano Sierra Negra, which is located in central Mexico at 19 degrees N latitude. It is scheduled for completion in 2014. In this paper we estimate the sensitivity of the HAWC instrument to point-like and extended sources of gamma rays. The source fluxes are modeled using both unbroken power laws and power laws with exponential cutoffs. HAWC, in one year, is sensitive to point sources with integral power-law spectra as low as 5x10^-13 cm^-2 sec^-1 above 2 TeV (approximately 50 mCrab) over 5 sr of the sky...

  10. Status of Identification of VHE Gamma-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, Stefan; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    With the recent advances made by Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. the field of very high-energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray astronomy has recently entered a new era in which for the first time populations of Galactic sources such as e.g. Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) or Supernova remnants (SNRs) can be studied. However, while some of the new sources can be associated by positional coincidence as well as by consistent multi-wavelength data to a known counterpart at other wavelengths, most of the sources remain not finally identified. In the following, the population of Galactic H.E.S.S. sources will be used to demonstrate the status of the identifications, to classify them into categories according to this status and to point out outstanding problems.

  11. Centaurus A: The Extragalactic Source of Cosmic Rays with Energies above the Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, Peter L.; de Souza, Vitor

    2012-02-01

    The origin of cosmic rays at all energies is still uncertain. In this paper, we present and explore an astrophysical scenario to produce cosmic rays with energy ranging from below 1015 to 3 × 1020 eV. We show here that just our Galaxy and the radio galaxy Cen A, each with their own galactic cosmic-ray particles but with those from the radio galaxy pushed up in energy by a relativistic shock in the jet emanating from the active black hole, are sufficient to describe the most recent data in the PeV to near ZeV energy range. Data are available over this entire energy range from the KASCADE, KASCADE-Grande, and Pierre Auger Observatory experiments. The energy spectrum calculated here correctly reproduces the measured spectrum beyond the knee and, contrary to widely held expectations, no other extragalactic source population is required to explain the data even at energies far below the general cutoff expected at 6 × 1019 eV, the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min turnoff due to interaction with the cosmological microwave background. We present several predictions for the source population, the cosmic-ray composition, and the propagation to Earth which can be tested in the near future.

  12. Studying the Sources of Cosmic Reionization with 21-cm Fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Barkana, Rennan

    2008-01-01

    We explore the ability of measurements of the 21-cm power spectrum during reionization to enable the simultaneous reconstruction of the reionization history and the properties of the ionizing sources. For various sets of simulated 21-cm observations, we perform maximum likelihood fits in order to constrain the reionization and galaxy formation histories. We employ a flexible six-parameter model that parametrizes the uncertainties in the properties of high-redshift galaxies. The computational ...

  13. Gamma Ray Burst as Sources of Exotic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, Ian; De Pree, Erin; Tennyson, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We consider the possible production of stable lightest first level KK particle (LKP) in baryonic gamma ray bursts (GRB) out flows. We numerically computed the energy-dependent cross-sections of Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations for the Standard Model gauge bosons, photon and Z. Next, we determined the feasibility of producing these KK excitations in gamma-ray emitting regions of GRBs. We found that a GRB fireball that accelerates baryons to energies greater than 10^14 eV could produce KK excitations out to approximately 10^12 cm from the central engine, indicating that GRBs may be a significant source of the LKP. Finally, we explore the potential observational consequences of our results.

  14. Cosmic-ray acceleration and gamma-ray signals from radio supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Marcowith, A; Dwarkadas, V; Tatischeff, V

    2014-01-01

    In this work the efficiency of particle acceleration at the forward shock right after the SN outburst for the particular case of the well-known SN 1993J is analyzed. Plasma instabilities driven by the energetic particles accelerated at the shock front grow over intraday timescales and drive a fast amplification of the magnetic field at the shock, that can explain the magnetic field strengths deduced from the radio monitoring of the source. The maximum particle energy is found to reach 1-10 PeV depending on the instability dominating the amplification process. We derive the time dependent particle spectra and the associated hadronic signatures of secondary particles arising from proton proton interactions. We find that the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) should easily detect objects like SN 1993J in particular above 1 TeV, while current generation of Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. could only marginally detect such events. The gamma-ray signal is found to be heavily absorbed by pair production process du...

  15. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the BATSE Catalogs of Untriggered Cosmic Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Kommers, J; Cline, T; Mazets, E; Golenetskii, S; Trombka, J; McClanahan, T; Goldsten, J; Feroci, M; Frontera, F; Guidorzi, C; Montanari, E; Lewin, W; Meegan, C; Fishman, G; Kouveliotou, C; Sinha, S; Seetha, S

    2004-01-01

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) detection and localization information for 211 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed as untriggered events by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), and published in catalogs by Kommers et al. (2001) and Stern et al. (2001). IPN confirmations have been obtained by analyzing the data from 11 experiments. For any given burst observed by BATSE and one other distant spacecraft, arrival time analysis (or ``triangulation'') results in an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between 14 arcseconds and 5.6 degrees, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. This annulus generally intersects the BATSE error circle, resulting in a reduction of the area of up to a factor of ~650. When three widely separated spacecraft observed a burst, the result is an error box whose area is as much as 30000 times smaller than that of the BATSE error circle. Because the IPN instrumen...

  16. VERITAS and Fermi-LAT observations of new TeV gamma-ray sources discovered by HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, John W.; Holder, Jamie; Park, Nahee; Taboada, Ignacio F.

    2017-08-01

    The HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) observatory recently published their second source catalog (2HWC) with over a year of observations at full sensitivity to gamma rays with energies between hundreds of GeV and tens of TeV. Sixteen of the 39 HAWC sources were found to be at least one degree away from any previously known TeV source, representing exciting targets for further study. Here we report on 12 of these unassociated HAWC sources using observations at higher spatial resolution with both VERITAS and Fermi-LAT. We use 8 years of LAT data at energies above 10 GeV and varying exposures with VERITAS. In the case of 2HWC J1953+294, VERITAS finds weak gamma-ray emission from the region and there is no LAT detection. This new TeV source is associated with the supernova remnant DA 495. For the other unassociated HAWC sources no VERITAS or LAT counterpart is found, but the upper limits from our observations can help to constrain the spectrum and spatial extension of the HAWC sources. Additionally, we studied 2HWC J1930+188 for which VERITAS had previously detected a TeV counterpart associated with the remnant G54.1+0.3. Our updated Fermi-LAT analysis also detects emission from this region, consistent with previous models of a pulsar wind nebula origin. Future multi-instrument studies of new HAWC sources promise to uncover the origins of additional cosmic accelerators.

  17. First Search for Point Sources of High Energy Cosmic Neutrinos with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Samarai, I Al; Albert, A; André, M; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Jesus, A C Assis; Astraatmadja, T; Aubert, J-J; Baret, B; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bigi, A; Bigongiari, C; Bogazzi, C; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouhou, B; Bouwhuis, M C; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Camarena, F; Capone, A; Carloganu, C; Carminati, G; Carr, J; Cecchini, S; Charif, Z; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Decowski, M P; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Emanuele, U; Enzenhöfer, A; Ernenwein, J-P; Escoffier, S; Fermani, P; Ferri, M; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fritsch, U; Fuda, J-L; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Giacomelli, G; Giordano, V; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; Halladjian, G; Hallewell, G; van Haren, H; Hartman, J; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hößl, J; Hsu, C C; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Lefèvre, D; Lim, G; Presti, D Lo; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Meli, A; Montaruli, T; Moscoso, L; Motz, H; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; Pavalas, G E; Payet, K; Payre, P; Petrovic, J; Piattelli, P; Picot-Clemente, N; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Presani, E; Racca, C; Reed, C; Richardt, C; Richter, R; Rivière, C; Robert, A; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Ruiz-Rivas, J; Rujoiu, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Samtleben, D F E; Sapienza, P; Schöck, F; Schuller, J-P; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Shanidze, R; Simeone, F; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Sánchez-Losa, A; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Toscano, S; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vannoni, G; Vecchi, M; Vernin, P; Wagner, S; Wijnker, G; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; Yepes, H; Zaborov, D; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented of a search for cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The data were collected during 2007 and 2008 using detector configurations containing between 5 and 12 detection lines. The integrated live time of the analyzed data is 304 days. Muon tracks are reconstructed using a likelihood-based algorithm. Studies of the detector timing indicate a median angular resolution of 0.5 +/- 0.1 degrees. The neutrino flux sensitivity is 7.5 x 10-8 ~ (E/GeV)^-2 GeV^-1 s^-1 cm^-2 for the part of the sky that is always visible (declination < -48 degrees), which is better than limits obtained by previous experiments. No cosmic neutrino sources have been observed.

  18. First Search for Point Sources of High-energy Cosmic Neutrinos with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Aguilar, J. A.; Samarai, I. Al; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigi, A.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartman, J.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2011-12-01

    Results are presented of a search for cosmic sources of high-energy neutrinos with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The data were collected during 2007 and 2008 using detector configurations containing between 5 and 12 detection lines. The integrated live time of the analyzed data is 304 days. Muon tracks are reconstructed using a likelihood-based algorithm. Studies of the detector timing indicate a median angular resolution of 0.5 ± 0.1 deg. The neutrino flux sensitivity is 7.5 × 10-8(E ν/ GeV)-2 GeV-1 s-1 cm-2 for the part of the sky that is always visible (δ < -48 deg), which is better than limits obtained by previous experiments. No cosmic neutrino sources have been observed. We dedicate this Letter to the memory of our colleague and friend Luciano Moscoso, who passed away during the preparation of this Letter.

  19. A transient MHD model applicable for the source of solar cosmic ray acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, M.; Wu, S. T.

    1981-01-01

    A two-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic model is used to describe the possible mechanisms for the source of solar cosmic ray acceleration following a solar flare. The hypothesis is based on the propagation of fast mode MHD shocks following a sudden release of energy. In this presentation, the effects of initial magnetic topology and strength on the formation of MHD shocks have been studied. The plasma beta (thermal pressure/magnetic pressure) is considered as a measure of the initial, relative strength of the field. During dynamic mass motion, the Alfven Mach number is the more appropriate measure of the magnetic field's ability to control the outward motion. It is suggested that this model (computed self-consistently) provides the shock waves and the disturbed mass motion behind it as likely sources for solar cosmic ray acceleration.

  20. Prospects of Establishing the Origin of Cosmic Neutrinos using Source Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Bartos, I; Finley, C; Marka, S

    2016-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino flux recently discovered by IceCube will be instrumental in probing the highest-energy astrophysical processes. Nevertheless, the origin of these neutrinos is still unknown. While it would be more straightforward to identify a transient, or galactic source class, finding a population of distant, continuous sources is challenging. Source classification will benefit from using all available information, including catalogs of source candidates. We examine the prospects of using source catalogs to find the neutrinos' origin. Considering a multi-year observation campaign with the proposed IceCube-Gen2, we find that (i) the origin of cosmic neutrinos can be probed if the direction of neutrino track events can be reconstructed with a precision $\\sim0.3^\\circ$ even for the most challenging source populations: starburst galaxies and AGNs; (ii) we quantify the utility of source catalogs as a function of depth; we find that a source catalog of $\\sim100$ Mpc can be sufficient for the most challenging ...

  1. Prospects of establishing the origin of cosmic neutrinos using source catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, I.; Ahrens, M.; Finley, C.; Márka, S.

    2017-07-01

    The cosmic neutrino flux recently discovered by IceCube will be instrumental in probing the highest-energy astrophysical processes. Nevertheless, the origin of these neutrinos is still unknown. While it would be more straightforward to identify a transient, or galactic source, class, finding a population of distant, continuous sources is challenging. We introduce a source-type classification technique that incorporates all available information from catalogs of source candidates. We show that IceCube-Gen2 can statistically establish the origin of cosmic neutrinos, even for the most challenging source populations-starburst galaxies, AGN, or galaxy clusters-if neutrino track directions can be reconstructed with a precision ˜0.3° . We further show that the source catalog out to ˜100 Mpc can be sufficient for the most challenging source types, allowing for more straightforward source surveys. We also characterize the role of detector properties, namely angular resolution, size, and veto power in order to understand the effects of IceCube-Gen2's design specifics.

  2. Neutrino Background Flux from Sources of Ultrahigh-Energy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Kohta

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by Pierre Auger Observatory results favoring a heavy nuclear composition for ultrahigh-energy (UHE) cosmic rays, we investigate implications for the cumulative neutrino background. The requirement that nuclei not be photodisintegrated constrains their interactions in sources, therefore limiting neutrino production via photomeson interactions. Assuming a $dN_{\\rm CR}/dE_{\\rm CR} \\propto E_{\\rm CR}^{-2}$ injection spectrum and photodisintegration via the giant dipole resonance, the background flux of neutrinos is lower than $E_\

  3. Gamma ray sources observed with ARGO-YBJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetto, S., E-mail: vernetto@to.infn.it [INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    The air shower detector ARGO-YBJ is continuously monitoring the gamma ray sky in the declination band from −10° to +70° at energies E>0.5TeV. After ∼4 years of operation, the integrated sensitivity reached the level of ∼28% the Crab Nebula flux. In this work we present a summary of our observations concerning the Crab Nebula, the Cygnus region, the galactic source MGRO J1908+06, and the blazars Mrk421 and Mrk501.

  4. The Molecular Environment of the Gamma-ray Source TeV J2032+4130

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Yousaf M; Dame, T M; Brunt, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The mysterious very high energy gamma-ray source, TeV J2032+4130, is coincident with the powerful Cygnus OB2 stellar association, though a physical association between the two remains uncertain. It is possible that the detected very high energy photons are produced via an overdensity of locally accelerated cosmic rays impinging on molecular clouds in the source region. In order to test this hypothesis, we used the Kitt Peak 12m, the Heinrich-Hertz Submillimeter Telescope (HH-SMT), and the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO), to obtain observations in the J=1-->0 and J=2-->1 lines of both 12CO and 13CO. We report here on the detection of significant molecular material toward the TeV source region which could be acting as the target of locally accelerated CRs. We also find evidence of compact molecular clumps, showing large line widths in the CO spectra, possibly indicative of energetic processes in this region of Cygnus OB2.

  5. Future plan for observation of cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region with the Tibet air shower array : physics goal and overview

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y -Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2007-01-01

    The Tibet air shower array, which has an effective area of 37,000 square meters and is located at 4300 m in altitude, has been observing air showers induced by cosmic rays with energies above a few TeV. We are planning to add a large muon detector array to it for the purpose of increasing its sensitivity to cosmic gamma rays in the 100 TeV (10 - 1000 TeV) energy region by discriminating them from cosmic-ray hadrons. We report on the possibility of detection of gamma rays in the 100 TeV energy region in our field of view, based on the improved sensitivity of our air shower array deduced from the full Monte Carlo simulation.

  6. Propagation and Source Energy Spectra of Cosmic-Ray Nuclei at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M; Hoeppner, C; Marshall, J; Müller, D

    2008-01-01

    A recent measurement of the TRACER instrument on long-duration balloon has determined the individual energy spectra of the major primary cosmic-ray nuclei from oxygen (Z=8) to iron (Z=26). The measurements cover a large range of energies and extend to energies beyond 10^14 eV. We investigate if the data set can be described by a simple but plausible model for acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays. The model assumes a power-law energy spectrum at the source with a common spectral index alpha for all nuclear species, and an energy dependent propagation pathlength (Lambda proportional to E^-0.6) combined with an energy-independent residual pathlength Lambda_0. We find that the data can be fit with a fairly soft source spectrum alpha=2.3-2.4), and with a residual pathlength Lambda_0 as high as 0.3 g cm^-2. We discuss this model in the context of other pertinent information, and we determine the relative abundances of the elements at the cosmic-ray source.

  7. Extragalactic cosmic-ray source composition and the interpretation of the ankle

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, D; Olinto, A V; Khan, E; Goriely, S

    2005-01-01

    We consider the stochastic propagation of high-energy protons and nuclei in the cosmological microwave and infrared backgrounds, using revised photonuclear cross-sections and following primary and secondary nuclei in the full 2D nuclear chart. We confirm earlier results showing that the high-energy data can be fit with a pure proton extragalactic cosmic ray (EGCR) component if the source spectrum is $\\propto E^{-2.6}$. In this case the ankle in the cosmic ray (CR) spectrum may be interpreted as a pair-production dip associated with the propagation. We show that when heavier nuclei are included in the source with a composition similar to that of Galactic cosmic-rays (GCRs), the pair-production dip is not present unless the proton fraction is higher than 85%. In the mixed composition case, the ankle recovers the past interpretation as the transition from GCRs to EGCRs and the highest energy data can be explained by a harder source spectrum $\\propto E^{-2.2}$-- $E^{-2.3}$, reminiscent of relativistic shock accel...

  8. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SOURCE OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS USING ANISOTROPY VERSUS CHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Taylor, Andrew M. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Lemoine, Martin [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Waxman, Eli, E-mail: lemoine@iap.fr [Physics Faculty, Weizmann Institute, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 7600 (Israel)

    2013-10-20

    The joint analysis of anisotropy signals and chemical composition of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays offers strong potential for shedding light on the sources of these particles. Following up on an earlier idea, this paper studies the anisotropies produced by protons of energy >E/Z, assuming that anisotropies at energy >E have been produced by nuclei of charge Z, which share the same magnetic rigidity. We calculate the number of secondary protons produced through photodisintegration of the primary heavy nuclei. Making the extreme assumption that the source does not inject any proton, we find that the source(s) responsible for anisotropies such as reported by the Pierre Auger Observatory should lie closer than ∼20-30, 80-100, and 180-200 Mpc if the anisotropy signal is mainly composed of oxygen, silicon, and iron nuclei, respectively. A violation of this constraint would otherwise result in the secondary protons forming a more significant anisotropy signal at lower energies. Even if the source were located closer than this distance, it would require an extraordinary metallicity ∼> 120, 1600, and 1100 times solar metallicity in the acceleration zone of the source, for oxygen, silicon, and iron, respectively, to ensure that the concomitantly injected protons do not produce a more significant low-energy anisotropy. This offers interesting prospects for constraining the nature and the source of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays with the increase in statistics expected from next-generation detectors.

  9. Characterization of radioactive orphan sources by gamma spectrometry; Caracterizacion de fuentes huerfanas radiactivas por espectrometria gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz W, H., E-mail: wcruz@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (PGRR/IPEN), Lima (Peru). Planta de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos

    2013-07-01

    The sealed radioactive sources are widely applicable in industry. They must have a permanent control and must be registered with the Technical Office of the National Authority (OTAN). However, at times it has identified the presence of abandoned sealed sources unknown to the owner. These sources are called 'orphan sources'. Of course these sources represent a high potential risk because accidents can trigger dire consequences depending on your activity and chemical form in which it presents the radioisotope. This paper describes the process and the actions taken to characterize two orphan radioactive sources from the smelter a Aceros Arequipa. For characterization we used a gamma spectrometry system using a detector NaI(Tl) 3″ x 3″ with a multichannel analyzer Nucleus PCA-II. The radioisotope identified was cesium - 137 ({sup 137}Cs) in both cases. Fortunately, the sources maintained their integrity would otherwise have generated significant pollution considering the chemical form of the radioisotope and easy dispersion. (author)

  10. Probing Individual Sources during Reionization and Cosmic Dawn using Square Kilometre Array HI 21-cm Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kanan K. Datta; Raghunath Ghara; Suman Majumdar; T. Roy Choudhury; Somnath Bharadwaj; Himadri Roy; Abhirup Datta

    2016-12-01

    Detection of individual luminous sources during the reionization epoch and cosmic dawn through their signatures in the HI 21-cm signal is one of the direct approaches to probe the epoch. Here, we summarize our previous works on this and present preliminary results on the prospects of detecting such sources using the SKA1-low experiment. We first discuss the expected HI 21-cm signal around luminous sources at different stages of reionization and cosmic dawn. We then introduce two visibility based estimators for detecting such signals: one based on the matched filtering technique and the other relies on simply combing the visibility signal from different baselines and frequency channels. We find that the SKA1-low should be able to detect ionized bubbles of radius $R_{\\mathrm {b}} \\gtrsim 10$ Mpc with $\\sim100 \\rm h$ of observations at redshift $z\\sim8$ provided that the mean outside neutral hydrogen fraction $\\mathrm {x}_{\\text {HI}} \\gtrsim 0.5$. We also investigate the possibility of detecting HII regions around known bright QSOs such as around ULASJ1120+0641 discovered by Mortlock et al. (Nature 474, 7353 (2011)). We find that a $5σ$ detection is possible with 600 h of SKA1-low observations if the QSO age and the outside $\\mathrm {x}_{\\text {HI}}$ are at least $\\sim2 \\times 10^7$ Myr and $\\sim0.2$ respectively. Finally, we investigate the possibility of detecting the very first X-ray and Ly- α sources during the cosmic dawn. We consider mini-QSOs like sources which emits in X-ray frequency band. We find that with a total $\\sim 1000 \\rm h$ of observations, SKA1-low should be able to detect those sources individually with a $∼ 9σ$ significance at redshift z=15. We summarize how the SNR changes with various parameters related to the source properties.

  11. All-optical Compton gamma-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Phuoc, K Ta; Thaury, C; Malka, V; Tafzi, A; Goddet, J P; Shah, R C; Sebban, S; Rousse, A; 10.1038/nphoton.2012.82

    2013-01-01

    One of the major goals of research for laser-plasma accelerators is the realization of compact sources of femtosecond X-rays. In particular, using the modest electron energies obtained with existing laser systems, Compton scattering a photon beam off a relativistic electron bunch has been proposed as a source of high-energy and high-brightness photons. However, laser-plasma based approaches to Compton scattering have not, to date, produced X-rays above 1 keV. Here, we present a simple and compact scheme for a Compton source based on the combination of a laser-plasma accelerator and a plasma mirror. This approach is used to produce a broadband spectrum of X-rays extending up to hundreds of keV and with a 10,000-fold increase in brightness over Compton X-ray sources based on conventional accelerators. We anticipate that this technique will lead to compact, high-repetition-rate sources of ultrafast (femtosecond), tunable (X- through gamma-ray) and low-divergence (~1 degree) photons from source sizes on the order...

  12. Soft gamma-ray sources detected by INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Petry, D; Halloin, H; Strong, A

    2009-01-01

    We aim to exploit the available INTEGRAL/SPI data to provide time-averaged spectra of the brightest soft gamma-ray sources. Employing a maximum-likelihood fit technique for our SPI data analysis, we take as input to our source model the source catalog derived by Bouchet et al. (2008) from a SPI all-sky study. We use the first four years of public SPI data and extract spectra between 25 keV and 1 MeV for the 20 catalog sources detected by Bouchet et al. at 200 - 600 keV with >= 2.5 sigma. In order to verify our analysis, we also extract spectra for the same sources from the corresponding INTEGRAL/ISGRI data. We fit adequate spectral models to the energy range 25-1000 keV for SPI and 25-600 keV for ISGRI. We use our spectra from the Crab (which is among the 20 sources studied here) and an empty location in a crowded field to derive an estimation of the systematic errors. The agreement between our SPI and ISGRI measurements is good if we normalise them on the Crab spectrum. Our SPI flux measurements also agree w...

  13. THE ORIGIN OF THE COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND IN THE MeV RANGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar [Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, c/. Serrano 121, E-28006, Madrid (Spain); The, Lih-Sin; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Ajello, Marco [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Canal, Ramon [Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (UB-IEEC), c/. Martí i Franqués 1, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain); Röpke, Friedrich K.; Ohlmann, Sebastian T. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Würzburg, D-97074, Würzburg (Germany); Hillebrandt, Wolfgang [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2016-04-01

    There has been much debate about the origin of the diffuse γ-ray background in the MeV range. At lower energies, AGNs and Seyfert galaxies can explain the background, but not above ≃0.3 MeV. Beyond ∼10 MeV blazars appear to account for the flux observed. That leaves an unexplained gap for which different candidates have been proposed, including annihilations of WIMPS. One candidate is Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Early studies concluded that they were able to account for the γ-ray background in the gap, while later work attributed a significantly lower contribution to them. All those estimates were based on SN Ia explosion models that did not reflect the full 3D hydrodynamics of SN Ia explosions. In addition, new measurements obtained since 2010 have provided new, direct estimates of high-z SN Ia rates beyond z ∼ 2. We take into account these new advances to see the predicted contribution to the gamma-ray background. We use here a wide variety of explosion models and a plethora of new measurements of SN Ia rates. SNe Ia still fall short of the observed background. Only for a fit, which would imply ∼150% systematic error in detecting SN Ia events, do the theoretical predictions approach the observed fluxes. This fit is, however, at odds at the highest redshifts with recent SN Ia rate estimates. Other astrophysical sources such as flat-spectrum radio quasars do match the observed flux levels in the MeV regime, while SNe Ia make up to 30%–50% of the observed flux.

  14. Test of a four-gap resistive plate chamber with cosmic muons and high-rate gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.K.; Shin, S.S.; Hong, B.; Jhang, G.; Jeong, M.S.; Jo, M.; Cho, S.W.; Joo, E.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.C. [Department of Physics and Korea Detector Laboratory, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K.S., E-mail: kslee0421@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Korea Detector Laboratory, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K.S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S.K.; Lim, J.K.; Moon, D.H.; Shim, H.H.; Sim, K.S. [Department of Physics and Korea Detector Laboratory, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-11

    We report a new development of a phenolic four-gap resistive plate chamber (RPC) for use as a high-rate particle trigger in high-energy physics experiments. In the current study, a prototype RPC equipped with four 1-mm-thick gaps made from high-pressure-laminated (HPL) resistive plates has been designed and built. The current detector R and D aims to reduce the probability of radiation-induced degradation of the core detector components of the RPCs, the gas gaps, as well as to improve the detection rate capability. The detector characteristics of the four-gap RPC were obtained though a series of tests with cosmic muons and gamma rays and were compared with those of the typical 2-mm thick double-gap RPCs currently used in the CMS experiment at the LHC and in the PHENIX experiment at the RHIC.

  15. On Gamma Ray Instrument On-Board Data Processing Real-Time Computational Algorithm for Cosmic Ray Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhner, Semion; Hunter, Stanley D.; Hanu, Andrei R.; Sheets, Teresa B.

    2016-01-01

    Richard O. Duda and Peter E. Hart of Stanford Research Institute in [1] described the recurring problem in computer image processing as the detection of straight lines in digitized images. The problem is to detect the presence of groups of collinear or almost collinear figure points. It is clear that the problem can be solved to any desired degree of accuracy by testing the lines formed by all pairs of points. However, the computation required for n=NxM points image is approximately proportional to n2 or O(n2), becoming prohibitive for large images or when data processing cadence time is in milliseconds. Rosenfeld in [2] described an ingenious method due to Hough [3] for replacing the original problem of finding collinear points by a mathematically equivalent problem of finding concurrent lines. This method involves transforming each of the figure points into a straight line in a parameter space. Hough chose to use the familiar slope-intercept parameters, and thus his parameter space was the two-dimensional slope-intercept plane. A parallel Hough transform running on multi-core processors was elaborated in [4]. There are many other proposed methods of solving a similar problem, such as sampling-up-the-ramp algorithm (SUTR) [5] and algorithms involving artificial swarm intelligence techniques [6]. However, all state-of-the-art algorithms lack in real time performance. Namely, they are slow for large images that require performance cadence of a few dozens of milliseconds (50ms). This problem arises in spaceflight applications such as near real-time analysis of gamma ray measurements contaminated by overwhelming amount of traces of cosmic rays (CR). Future spaceflight instruments such as the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope instrument (AdEPT) [7-9] for cosmos gamma ray survey employ large detector readout planes registering multitudes of cosmic ray interference events and sparse science gamma ray event traces' projections. The AdEPT science of interest is in the

  16. Cosmic-Ray Positrons Produced by Pulsar Winds from Mature Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of the γ-ray pulsar outer gap model, e± pairs in the pulsar magnetosphere are produced by the cascade of e+ pairs through synchrotron radiation of the return current from the outer gap. These pairs are accelerated mono-energetically to relativistic energies in the pulsar wind driven by low-frequency electromagnetic waves. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generate a sample of the mature γ-ray pulsars in our Galaxy and calculate the positron production rate from these pulsars. With a simple leaky box model, we calculate the ratio of cosmic-ray positron to total electrons. Our result indicates that the pulsar contribution to the cosmic-ray positron peaks at about 40 GeV and the observed e+ / (e- + e+) ratio can be explained by this model.

  17. Search for Cosmic Neutrino Point Sources with Four Years of Data from the ANTARES Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Samarai, I. Al; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leonora, E.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, a time-integrated search for point sources of cosmic neutrinos is presented using the data collected from 2007 to 2010 by the ANTARES neutrino telescope. No statistically significant signal has been found and upper limits on the neutrino flux have been obtained. Assuming an E -2 ν spectrum, these flux limits are at 1-10 ×10-8 GeV cm-2 s-1 for declinations ranging from -90° to 40°. Limits for specific models of RX J1713.7-3946 and Vela X, which include information on the source morphology and spectrum, are also given.

  18. Constraints on Cosmic Rays, Magnetic Fields, and Dark Matter from Gamma-ray Observations of the Coma Cluster of Galaxies with VERITAS and FERMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of radio halos and relics in galaxy clusters indicate efficient electron acceleration. Protons should likewise be accelerated and, on account of weak energy losses, can accumulate, suggesting that clusters may also be sources of very high energy (VHE; E greater than100 GeV) gamma-ray emission. We report here on VHE gamma-ray observations of the Coma galaxy cluster with the VERITAS array of imaging Cerenkov telescopes, with complementing Fermi Large Area Telescope observations at GeV energies. No significant gamma-ray emission from the Coma Cluster was detected. Integral flux upper limits at the 99 confidence level were measured to be on the order of (2-5) x 10(sup -8) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (VERITAS,greater than 220 GeV) and approximately 2 x 10(sup -6) photons m(sup -2) s(sup -1) (Fermi, 1-3 GeV), respectively. We use the gamma-ray upper limits to constrain cosmic rays (CRs) and magnetic fields in Coma. Using an analytical approach, the CR-to-thermal pressure ratio is constrained to be less than 16% from VERITAS data and less than 1.7% from Fermi data (averaged within the virial radius). These upper limits are starting to constrain the CR physics in self-consistent cosmological cluster simulations and cap the maximum CR acceleration efficiency at structure formation shocks to be 50. Alternatively, this may argue for non-negligible CR transport processes such as CR streaming and diffusion into the outer cluster regions. Assuming that the radio-emitting electrons of the Coma halo result from hadronic CR interactions, the observations imply a lower limit on the central magnetic field in Coma of approximately (2-5.5)microG, depending on the radial magnetic field profile and on the gamma-ray spectral index. Since these values are below those inferred by Faraday rotation measurements in Coma (for most of the parameter space), this renders the hadronic model a very plausible explanation of the Coma radio halo. Finally, since galaxy clusters are dark

  19. Active Galactic Nuclei - the Physics of Individual Sources and the Cosmic History of Formation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Treister, Ezequiel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we give a brief review of the astrophysics of active galactic nuclei (AGN). After a general introduction motivating the study of AGNs, we discuss our present understanding of the inner workings of the central engines, most likely accreting black holes with masses between a million and ten billion solar masses. We highlight recent results concerning the jets (collimated outflows) of AGNs derived from X-ray observations (Chandra) of kpc-scale jets and gamma-ray observations of AGNs (Fermi, Cherenkov telescopes) with jets closely aligned with the lines of sight (blazars), and discuss the interpretation of these observations. Subsequently, we summarize our knowledge about the cosmic history of AGN formation and evolution. We conclude with a description of upcoming observational opportunities.

  20. Identification of High Energy Gamma-Ray Sources And Source Populations in the Era of Deep All-Sky Coverage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Torres, Diego F.; /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IEEC

    2007-04-17

    A large fraction of the anticipated source detections by the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST-LAT) will initially be unidentified. We argue that traditional approaches to identify individuals and/or populations of gamma ray sources will encounter procedural limitations. Those limitations are discussed on the background of source identifications from EGRET observations. Generally, our ability to classify (faint) source populations in the anticipated GLAST dataset with the required degree of statistical confidence will be hampered by sheer source wealth. A new paradigm for achieving the classification of gamma ray source populations is discussed.

  1. Cosmic ray penetration in diffuse clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic rays are a fundamental source of ionization for molecular and diffuse clouds, influencing their chemical, thermal, and dynamical evolution. The amount of cosmic rays inside a cloud also determines the $\\gamma$-ray flux produced by hadronic collisions between cosmic rays and cloud material. We study the spectrum of cosmic rays inside and outside of a diffuse cloud, by solving the stationary transport equation for cosmic rays including diffusion, advection and energy losses due to ionization of neutral hydrogen atoms. We found that the cosmic ray spectrum inside a diffuse cloud differs from the one in the interstellar medium for energies smaller than $E_{br}\\approx 100$ MeV, irrespective of the model details. Below $E_{br}$, the spectrum is harder (softer) than that in the interstellar medium if the latter is a power law $\\propto p^{-s}$ with $s$ larger (smaller) than $\\sim0.42$.

  2. The InterPlanetary Network Supplement to the Second Fermi GBM Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, K.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Pal’shin, V. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Meegan, C.; Connaughton, V.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Yamaoka, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ohno, M.; Tashiro, M.; Terada, Y.; Barthelmy, S.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Cummings, J.; Krimm, H. A.; Smith, D. M.; Del Monte, E.; Feroci, M.; Marisaldi, M.

    2017-04-01

    InterPlanetary Network (IPN) data are presented for the gamma-ray bursts in the second Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 462 bursts in that catalog between 2010 July 12 and 2012 July 11, 428, or 93%, were observed by at least 1 other instrument in the 9-spacecraft IPN. Of the 428, the localizations of 165 could be improved by triangulation. For these bursts, triangulation gives one or more annuli whose half-widths vary between about 2.‧3° and 16°, depending on the peak flux, fluence, time history, arrival direction, and the distance between the spacecraft. We compare the IPN localizations with the GBM 1σ, 2σ, and 3σ error contours and find good agreement between them. The IPN 3σ error boxes have areas between about 8 square arcminutes and 380 square degrees, and are an average of 2500 times smaller than the corresponding GBM 3σ localizations. We identify four bursts in the IPN/GBM sample whose origins were given as “uncertain,” but may in fact be cosmic. This leads to an estimate of over 99% completeness for the GBM catalog.

  3. Hans A. Bethe Prize: Cosmic Collisions Online - Compact Binary Mergers, Gravitational Waves and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Hans A. Bethe elucidated our understanding of the fundamental forces of Nature by exploring and explaining countless phenomena occurring in nuclear laboratories and in stars. With the dawn of gravitational wave astronomy we now can probe compact binary mergers - Nature's cosmic collision experiments - to deepen our understanding, especially where strong-field gravitation is involved. In addition to gravitational waves, some mergers are likely to generate observable electromagnetic and/or neutrino radiation, heralding a new era of multimessenger astronomy. Robust numerical algorithms now allow us to simulate these events in full general relativity on supercomputers. We will describe some recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations that show how binary black hole-neutron star and neutron star-neutron star mergers can launch jets, lending support to the idea that such mergers could be the engines that power short gamma-ray bursts. We will also show how the magnetorotational collapse of very massive stars to spinning black holes immersed in magnetized accretion disks can launch jets as well, reinforcing the belief that such ``collapsars'' are the progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts. Computer-generated movies highlighting some of these simulations will be shown. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF Grants 1300903 and 1602536 and NASA Grant NNX13AH44G.

  4. Predicted Extragalactic TeV $\\gamma$-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W; Salamon, M H

    1996-01-01

    We suggest that low-redshift XBLs (X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects) may be the only extragalactic gamma-ray sources observable at TeV energies. We use simple physical considerations involving synchrotron and Compton component spectra for blazars to suggest why the observed TeV sources are XBLs, whereas mostly RBLs and FSRQs are seen at GeV energies. These considerations indicate that the differences between XBLs and RBLs cannot be explained purely as relativistic jet orientation effects. We note that the only extragalactic TeV sources which have been observed are XBLs and that a nearby RBL with a very hard spectrum in the GeV range has not been seen at TeV energies. We also note that of the 14 BL Lacs observed by EGRET, 12 are RBLs, whereas only 2 are XBLs. We give a list of nearby XBLs which we consider to be good candidate TeV sources and predict estimated TeV fluxes for these objects.

  5. Compact sources as the origin of the soft gamma-ray emission of the Milky Way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebrun, F.; Terrier, R.; Bazzano, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Milky Way is known to be an abundant source of gamma-ray photons(1), now determined to be mainly diffuse in nature and resulting from interstellar processes(2). In the soft gamma-ray domain, point sources are expected to dominate, but the lack of sensitive high-resolution observations did...... show that these sources account for the entirety of the Milky Way's emission in soft gamma-rays, leaving at most a minor role for diffuse processes....

  6. Reevaluation of the prospect of observing neutrinos from Galactic sources in the light of recent results in gamma ray and neutrino astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Halzen, F.; Niro, V.

    2014-05-01

    In light of the recent IceCube evidence for a flux of extraterrestrial neutrinos, we revisit the prospect of observing the sources of the Galactic cosmic rays. In particular, we update the predictions for the neutrino flux expected from sources in the nearby star-forming region in Cygnus taking into account recent TeV gamma ray measurements of their spectra. We consider the three Milagro sources: MGRO J2019+37, MGRO J1908+06 and MGRO J2031+41 and calculate the attainable confidence level limits and statistical significance as a function of the exposure time. We also evaluate the prospects for a kilometer-scale detector in the Mediterranean to observe and elucidate the origin of the cosmic neutrino flux measured by IceCube.

  7. Reevaluation of the Prospect of Observing Neutrinos from Galactic Sources in the Light of Recent Results in Gamma Ray and Neutrino Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M C; Niro, V

    2013-01-01

    In light of the recent IceCube evidence for a flux of extraterrestrial neutrinos, we revisit the prospect of observing the sources of the Galactic cosmic rays. In particular, we update the predictions for the neutrino flux expected from sources in the nearby star-forming region in Cygnus taking into account recent TeV gamma ray measurements of their spectra. We consider the three Milagro sources: MGRO J2019+37, MGRO J1908+06 and MGRO J2031+41 and calculate the attainable confidence level limits and statistical significance as a function of the exposure time. We also evaluate the prospects for a kilometer-scale detector in the Mediterranean to observe and elucidate the origin of the cosmic neutrino flux measured by IceCube.

  8. On the angular distribution of cosmic rays from an individual source in a turbulent magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Harari, Diego; Roulet, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the angular distribution of the cosmic rays reaching an observer from an individual source and after propagation through a turbulent magnetic field, for different ratios between the source distance and the diffusion length. We study both the high-energy quasi-rectilinear regime as well as the transition towards the diffusive regime at lower energies where the deflections become large. We consider the impact of energy losses, showing that they tend to enhance the anisotropy of the source at a given energy. We also discuss lensing effects, in particular those that could result from the regular galactic magnetic field component, and show that the effect of the turbulent extragalactic magnetic fields can smooth out the divergent magnification peaks that would result for point-like sources in the limit of no turbulent deflections.

  9. Dipole anisotropy in cosmic electrons and positrons: inspection on local sources

    CERN Document Server

    Manconi, Silvia; Donato, Fiorenza

    2016-01-01

    The cosmic electrons and positrons have been measured with unprecedented statistics up to several hundreds GeV, thus permitting to explore the role that close single sources can have in shaping the flux at different energies. In the present analysis, we consider electrons and positrons in cosmic rays to be produced by spallations of hadron fluxes with the interstellar medium, by a smooth Supernova Remnant (SNR) population, by all the ATNF catalog pulsars, and by few discrete, local SNRs. We test several source models on the $e^++e^-$ and $e^+$ AMS-02 flux data. For the configurations compatible with the data, we compute the dipole anisotropy in $e^++e^-$, $e^+$, $e^+/e^-$ from single sources. Our study includes a dedicated analysis to the Vela SNR. We show that Fermi-LAT present data on dipole anisotropy of $e^++e^-$ start to explore some of the models for the Vela SNR selected by AMS-02 flux data. We also investigate how the observed anisotropy could result from a combination of local sources. Our analysis s...

  10. Section on Supernova remnants and cosmic rays of the White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-based Gamma-ray Astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Pohl, M.; Abdo, A.; Atoyan, A.; Baring, M.; Beacom, J; Blandford, R.; Butt, Y.; Bykov, A.; Ellison, D.; Funk, S.; Halzen, F; Hays, E; Humensky, B.; Jones, T; Kaaret, P.

    2008-01-01

    This is a report on the findings of the SNR/cosmic-ray working group for the white paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper is an APS commissioned document, and the overall version has also been released and can be found on astro-ph. This detailed section of the white paper discusses the status of past and current attempts to observe shell-type supernova remnants and diffuse emission from cosmic rays at GeV-TeV energies. We concentrate on the potenti...

  11. The Ulysses supplement to the Granat/WATCH catalog of cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, K.; Lund, Niels; Brandt, Søren Kristian;

    2000-01-01

    We present third Interplanetary Network (IPN) localization data for 56 gamma-ray bursts in the Granat/WATCH catalog that occurred between 1990 November and 1994 September. These localizations are obtained by triangulation using various combinations of spacecraft and instruments in the IPN, which...

  12. Registration of the signal of a star and PCR sources optical radiation by means of the installation, aimed at the investigation of EAS of high energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Barnaveli, T T; Khaldeeva, I V; Chubenko, A P; Nesterova, N M; Barnaveli, T T

    2013-01-01

    With the help of the experimental installation aimed at the investigation of high energy cosmic rays (Tien-Shan high mountain laboratory) the signal of Solar and star optical radiation is registered. The signal is well provided statistically and possesses the strictly expressed maximum in the region of EAS sizes Ne 1.19 106 particles (primary energy Eo 1.33 1015 eV). This signal is the peak from gamma EAS, generated by gamma quanta from decay of pi zero mesons, photo produced by the Primary Cosmic Radiation (PCR) nuclei on the photons of stars and of PCR sources. The assumption is made, that exactly this process provides the main contribution in the formation of so called knee on the primary spectrum. Due to the universality and distinct maximum of this signal, its usage for independent and reliable calibration of the EAS installations, for the mutual calibration of these installations and, possibly, for the merger of experimental data obtained by means of these installations to increase the statistics, is pr...

  13. Probing individual sources during reionization and cosmic dawn using SKA HI 21-cm observations

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, Kanan K; Majumdar, Suman; Choudhury, T Roy; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Roy, Himadri; Datta, Abhirup

    2016-01-01

    Detection of individual luminous sources during the reionization epoch and cosmic dawn through their signatures in the HI 21-cm signal is one of the direct approaches to probe the epoch. Here, we summarize our previous works on this and present preliminary results on the prospects of detecting such sources using the SKA1-low experiment. We first discuss the expected HI 21-cm signal around luminous sources at different stages of reionization and cosmic dawn. We then introduce two visibility based estimators for detecting such signal: one based on the matched filtering technique and the other relies on simply combing the visibility signal from different baselines and frequency channels. We find that that the SKA1-low should be able to detect ionized bubbles of radius $R_b \\gtrsim 10$ Mpc with $\\sim 100$ hr of observations at redshift $z \\sim 8$ provided that the mean outside neutral Hydrogen fraction $ x_{\\rm HI} \\gtrsim 0.5$. We also investigate the possibility of detecting HII regions around known bright QSOs...

  14. New Associations of Gamma-Ray Sources from the Fermi Second Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Schinzel, Frank K; Taylor, Gregory B; Mahony, Elizabeth K; Edwards, Philip G; Kovalev, Yuri Y

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of an all-sky radio survey between 5 and 9 GHz of the fields surrounding all unassociated gamma-ray objects listed in the Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog (2FGL). The observations were conducted in two steps, first observations with the Very Large Array and the Australia Telescope Compact Array provided localizations of weak radio point sources found in 2FGL fields at arcmin scales. Then a subset of those were followed-up with the Very Long Baseline and the Long Baseline Arrays providing detections at sub-arcsecond resolution. In total we found 865 radio sources at arcsec scales as candidates for association. Our association method is based on the fact that bright VLBI detected compact radio sources with milli-arcsecond structures are rare objects. We quantified association probabilities based on known statistics of source counts and assuming a uniform distribution of background sources. We thus report firm associations for 76 previously unknown gamma-ray active galactic...

  15. Heavy Nuclei Synthesized in Gamma-Ray Burst Outflows as the Source of UHECRs

    CERN Document Server

    Metzger, Brian D; Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2011-01-01

    Recent measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory suggest that the composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) becomes dominated by heavy nuclei at high energies. However, until now there has been no astrophysical motivation for considering a source highly enriched in heavy elements. Here we demonstrate that the outflows from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) may indeed be composed primarily of nuclei with masses A ~ 40-200, which are synthesized as hot material expands away from the central engine. In particular, if the jet is magnetically-dominated (rather than a thermally-driven fireball) its low entropy enables heavy elements to form efficiently. Adopting the millisecond proto-magnetar model for the GRB central engine, we show that heavy nuclei are both synthesized in proto-magnetar winds and can in principle be accelerated to energies >1e20 eV in the shocks or regions of magnetic reconnection that are responsible for powering the GRB. Similar results may apply to accretion-powered GRB models if the jet...

  16. An FEL based high-intensity gamma source at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    CERN Document Server

    Pagani, C; Schneidmiller, E A; Yurkov, M V

    1999-01-01

    One possible extension of the FEL activity at DESY is connected with the installation of an additional FEL beamline providing tunable UV radiation with peak and average power of 220 GW and 7 kW, respectively. This report presents the feasibility study of a high-intensity, polarized, monochromatic gamma source at the TESLA Test Facility. Gamma quanta are produced in the process of Compton backscattering of the UV FEL radiation on 1 GeV electrons of the TTF accelerator. The ultimate intensity of the gamma source can reach a value up to 10 sup 1 sup 2 gamma quanta per second with a maximum energy of about 100 MeV. The energy resolution of the gamma source can be reduced down to a value of about 0.2%. Potential applications of the intense gamma source at the TESLA Test Facility are discussed as well.

  17. Future Extensive Air Shower arrays: From Gamma-Ray Astronomy to Cosmic Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sciascio Giuseppe Di

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite large progresses in building new detectors and in the analysis techniques, the key questions concerning the origin, acceleration and propagation of Galactic Cosmic Rays are still open. A number of new EAS arrays is in progress. The most ambitious and sensitive project between them is LHAASO, a new generation multi-component experiment to be installed at very high altitude in China (Daocheng, Sichuan province, 4400 m a.s.l.. The experiment will face the open problems through a combined study of photon- and charged particle-induced extensive air showers in the wide energy range 1011 – 1018 eV. In this paper the status of the experiment will be summarized, the science program presented and the outlook discussed in comparison with leading new projects.

  18. Future Extensive Air Shower arrays: from Gamma-Ray Astronomy to Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Despite large progresses in building new detectors and in the analysis techniques, the key questions concerning the origin, acceleration and propagation of Galactic Cosmic Rays are still open. A number of new EAS arrays is in progress. The most ambitious and sensitive project between them is LHAASO, a new generation multi-component experiment to be installed at very high altitude in China (Daocheng, Sichuan province, 4400 m a.s.l.). The experiment will face the open problems through a combined study of photon- and charged particle-induced extensive air showers in the wide energy range 10$^{11}$ - 10$^{18}$ eV. In this paper the status of the experiment will be summarized, the science program presented and the outlook discussed in comparison with leading new projects.

  19. Future Extensive Air Shower arrays: From Gamma-Ray Astronomy to Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sciascio, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Despite large progresses in building new detectors and in the analysis techniques, the key questions concerning the origin, acceleration and propagation of Galactic Cosmic Rays are still open. A number of new EAS arrays is in progress. The most ambitious and sensitive project between them is LHAASO, a new generation multi-component experiment to be installed at very high altitude in China (Daocheng, Sichuan province, 4400 m a.s.l.). The experiment will face the open problems through a combined study of photon- and charged particle-induced extensive air showers in the wide energy range 1011 - 1018 eV. In this paper the status of the experiment will be summarized, the science program presented and the outlook discussed in comparison with leading new projects.

  20. Cosmic rays from trans-relativistic supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Budnik, R; MacFadyen, A; Waxman, E

    2007-01-01

    We derive constraints which must be satisfied by the sources of ~10^{15} to ~10^{18} eV cosmic rays, under the assumption that the sources are Galactic. We show that while these constraints are not satisfied by ordinary supernovae, which are believed to be the sources of 10^{-2}, of the explosion energy in mildly relativistic, \\gamma\\beta>1, ejecta. Galactic TRSNe may therefore be the sources of cosmic rays with energies up to ~10^{18} eV.

  1. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE FERMI GBM CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, K. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Pal' shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Svinkin, D. S. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Meegan, C. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Goldsten, J. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K. [University of Arizona, Department of Planetary Sciences, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Rau, A., E-mail: khurley@ssl.berkeley.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2013-08-15

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 427 were observed by at least one other instrument in the nine-spacecraft IPN. Of the 427, the localizations of 149 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or {sup t}riangulation{sup )}. For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.'4 and 32 Degree-Sign , depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1{sigma} GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 Degree-Sign systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If we then multiply the resulting error radii by a factor of three, the two samples agree in slightly over 98% of the cases, providing a good estimate of the GBM 3{sigma} error radius. The IPN 3{sigma} error boxes have areas between about 1 arcmin{sup 2} and 110 deg{sup 2}, and are, on the average, a factor of 180 smaller than the corresponding GBM localizations. We identify two bursts in the IPN/GBM sample that did not appear in the GBM catalog. In one case, the GBM triggered on a terrestrial gamma flash, and in the other, its origin was given as ''uncertain''. We also discuss the sensitivity and calibration of the IPN.

  2. Positional correlation between low-latitude gamma-ray sources and SNRs

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, D F; Romero, G E; Benaglia, P; Torres, Diego F.; Combi, Jorge A.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2000-01-01

    We present the results of a spatial correlation analysis between unidentified gamma-ray sources in the 3EG catalog and candidates to supernova remnants. This work extends a previous study made by Romero, Benaglia & Torres (1999). We also consider the gamma-ray emission variability and the spectral index for the sources with positional coincidence.

  3. The Ulysses supplement to the Granat/WATCH catalog of cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, K.; Lund, Niels; Brandt, Søren Kristian

    2000-01-01

    We present third Interplanetary Network (IPN) localization data for 56 gamma-ray bursts in the Granat/WATCH catalog that occurred between 1990 November and 1994 September. These localizations are obtained by triangulation using various combinations of spacecraft and instruments in the IPN, which ...... consisted of Ulysses, BATSE, Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Mars Observer, WATCH, and PHEBUS. The intersections of the triangulation annuli with the WATCH error circles produce error boxes with areas as small as 16 arcmin(2), reducing the sizes of the error circles by factors of up to 800....

  4. On the air-scattering of gamma rays from thick uranium sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Arthur Y.

    1955-01-01

    Semiquantative interpretation of data from airborne radioactivity surveying requires detailed knowledge of air-scattered gamma-ray intensity at considerable air distances from natural, thick uranium sources. Based on the concept of an elementary source of infinite

  5. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results. 2. Localized sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma-ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR1818-04 and PSR1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma-ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Since the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma-ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma-ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. Using distance estimates it is found that PSR1818-04 has a gamma-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, while the luminosities of PSR1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. This survey of SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations has also yielded upper limits to gamma-ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars.

  6. Computer vision for detecting and quantifying gamma-ray sources in coded-aperture images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaich, P.C.; Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Ziock, K.P.

    1994-11-02

    The authors report the development of an automatic image analysis system that detects gamma-ray source regions in images obtained from a coded aperture, gamma-ray imager. The number of gamma sources in the image is not known prior to analysis. The system counts the number (K) of gamma sources detected in the image and estimates the lower bound for the probability that the number of sources in the image is K. The system consists of a two-stage pattern classification scheme in which the Probabilistic Neural Network is used in the supervised learning mode. The algorithms were developed and tested using real gamma-ray images from controlled experiments in which the number and location of depleted uranium source disks in the scene are known.

  7. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the Fermi GBM Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Mazets, E P; Svinkin, D S; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Goldsten, J; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Zhang, X; Yamaoka, K; Fukazawa, Y; Hanabata, Y; Ohno, M; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Barthelmy, S; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H A; Smith, D M; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Marisaldi, M

    2013-01-01

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 393 were observed by at least one other instrument in the 9-spacecraft IPN. Of the 393, the localizations of 146 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or "triangulation"). For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.4 arcminutes and 32 degrees, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1 sigma GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 degree systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If ...

  8. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, M. J.

    2006-06-01

    The first significant cosmic fields, and the seed field for galactic dynamos probably developed after the formation of the first non-linear structures. The history of star formation and the intergalactic medium is controlled, at least in part, by how and when galaxies and their precursors acquired their fields. The amplification of fields behind shocks, and the diffusivity of the magnetic flux, are crucial to the interpretation of radio sources, gamma ray burst afterglows, and other energetic cosmic phenomena. The build-up of magnetic fields is an important aspect of the overall cosmogonic process.

  9. Constraints on cosmic ray electrons and diffuse gamma rays with AMS-02 and HESS data

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ding; Jin, Hong-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Lately, AMS-02 and HAWC have reported their observations of cosmic rays(CRs), which promote the further exploration of CR origins. We choose some experimental data of CRs to focus the origins of CR electrons and estimate the spectrum of CR electrons. Based on the conventional diffusion model of CRs, we perform a global analysis on the spectrum feature of CR electrons with the data of AMS-02, HESS and Milagro. The results verify that the spectrum of CR electrons has the apparent structure beyond a simple power law. The difference between the power indices above and below the reference rigidity is greater than 0.2, which is near the momentum loss rate of CR electrons. The data of HESS electrons matches the TeV extension of AMS-02 electrons and the relevant spectrum of CR electrons does not have TeV breaks. By use of the difference between the CR electrons and primary electrons constrained by AMS-02 and HESS, the TeV bounds of positron excess are predicted. In the bounds, the flux relevant to the up-limit is bey...

  10. Search for cosmic-ray-induced gamma-ray emission in galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Albert, A. [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica " M. Merlin" dell' Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P., E-mail: olr@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: zimmer@fysik.su.se, E-mail: conrad@fysik.su.se, E-mail: apinzke@fysik.su.se, E-mail: christoph.pfrommer@h-its.org [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Collaboration: Fermi-LAT Collaboration; and others

    2014-05-20

    Current theories predict relativistic hadronic particle populations in clusters of galaxies in addition to the already observed relativistic leptons. In these scenarios hadronic interactions give rise to neutral pions which decay into γ rays that are potentially observable with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi space telescope. We present a joint likelihood analysis searching for spatially extended γ-ray emission at the locations of 50 galaxy clusters in four years of Fermi-LAT data under the assumption of the universal cosmic-ray (CR) model proposed by Pinzke and Pfrommer. We find an excess at a significance of 2.7σ, which upon closer inspection, however, is correlated to individual excess emission toward three galaxy clusters: A400, A1367, and A3112. We discuss these cases in detail and conservatively attribute the emission to unmodeled background systems (for example, radio galaxies within the clusters).Through the combined analysis of 50 clusters, we exclude hadronic injection efficiencies in simple hadronic models above 21% and establish limits on the CR to thermal pressure ratio within the virial radius, R {sub 200}, to be below 1.25%-1.4% depending on the morphological classification. In addition, we derive new limits on the γ-ray flux from individual clusters in our sample.

  11. Cosmic-Ray Models of the Ridge-Like Excess of Gamma Rays in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Macias, Oscar; Gordon, Chris; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) has detected diffuse TeV emission correlated with the distribution of molecular gas along the Galactic Ridge at the Galactic Center. Diffuse, non-thermal emission is also seen by the Fermi large area telescope (Fermi-LAT) in the GeV range and by radio telescopes in the GHz range. Additionally, there is a distinct, spherically symmetric excess of gamma rays seen by Fermi-LAT in the GeV range. A cosmic ray flare, occurring in the Galactic Center, $10^4$ years ago has been proposed to explain the TeV Galactic Ridge (Aharonian et al. 2006). An alternative, steady-state model explaining all three data sets (TeV, GeV, and radio) invokes purely leptonic processes (Yusef-Zadeh et al. 2013). We show that the flare model from the Galactic Center also provides an acceptable fit to the GeV and radio data, provided the diffusion coefficient is energy independent. However, if Kolmogorov-type turbulence is assumed for the diffusion coefficient, we find that two flares are needed, o...

  12. Inferred cosmic-ray spectrum from ${\\it Fermi}$-LAT $\\gamma$-ray observations of the Earth's limb

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Ajello, M; Albert, A; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Bottacini, E; Bouvier, A; Brandt, T J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Dalton, M; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hayashi, K; Hewitt, J W; Horan, D; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Inoue, Y; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Kawano, T; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Roth, M; Schaal, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Tronconi, V; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z

    2014-01-01

    Recent accurate measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) species by ATIC-2, CREAM, and PAMELA reveal an unexpected hardening in the proton and He spectra above a few hundred GeV, a gradual softening of the spectra just below a few hundred GeV, and a harder spectrum of He compared to that of protons. These newly-discovered features may offer a clue to the origin of high-energy CRs. We use the ${\\it Fermi}$ Large Area Telescope observations of the $\\gamma$-ray emission from the Earth's limb for an indirect measurement of the local spectrum of CR protons in the energy range $\\sim 90~$GeV-$6~$TeV (derived from a photon energy range $15~$GeV-$1~$TeV). Our analysis shows that single power law and broken power law spectra fit the data equally well and yield a proton spectrum with index $2.68 \\pm 0.04$ and $2.61 \\pm 0.08$ above $\\sim 200~$GeV, respectively.

  13. Cosmic Magnification

    CERN Document Server

    Ménard, B

    2002-01-01

    I present the current status of the cosmic magnification produced by systematic amplification of background sources by large-scale structures. After introducing its principle, I focus on its interests for cosmology and underline its complementary aspect to cosmic shear and galaxy auto-correlations. I finally discuss recent investigations using higher-order statistics.

  14. GRANAT/WATCH catalogue of cosmic gamma-ray bursts: December 1989 to September 1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sazonov, S.Y.; Sunyaev, R.A.; Terekhov, O.V.;

    1998-01-01

    V. We have determined the celestial positions of the sources of 47 bursts. Their localization regions (at 3 sigma confidence level) are equivalent in area to circles with radii ranging from 0.2 to 1.6 deg. The burst sources appear isotropically distributed on the sky on large angular scales....

  15. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 2: Localized sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Because the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. PSR 1818-04 has a gamma ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, whereas the luminosities of PSR 1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations yielded upper limits to gamma ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars. For five of the closest pulsars, upper limits for gamma ray luminosity are found to be at least three orders of magnitude lower than that of the Crab pulsar. Gamma ray enhancement near the Milky Way satellite galaxy and the galactic plane in the Cygnus region is also discussed.

  16. Magnetospheric Eternally Collapsing Objects (MECOs): Likely New Class of Source of COsmic Particle Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, A

    2005-01-01

    It is known that spinning pulsars could be source of VHE-UHE cosmic particle acceleration. It is also conjectured that (fictitious) spinning Black Holes (BH) could be sites of cosmic particle acceleration. However, it has been shown by Mitra and Leiter and Robertson that General Relativity (GR) actually does not allow the existence or formation of finite mass BHs. It was predicted that the BH Candiadates (BHCs) have strong intrinsic magnetic fields (like pulsars) instead of Event Horizons. And this prediction has tentatively been verified in a series of papers by Robertson & Leiter. Thus all observed BH Candidates are actually not BHs, and, they are expected to be MECOs. Stellar mass MECOs are GR analogs of conventionally known isolated pulsars. While pulsars are/have (i) COLD, i.e., not supported by radiation pressure, MECOs are HOT, i.e., supported primarily by trapped radiation pressure, (ii) upper mass limit of 3-4 $M_solar$ MECOs, being HOT, have no Upper Mass Limit, (iii) surface gravitational red s...

  17. Implications to Sources of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays from their Arrival Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Takami, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    We estimate the local number density of sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) based on the statistical features of their arrival direction distribution. We calculate the arrival distributions of protons above $10^{19}$ eV taking into account their propagation process in the Galactic magnetic field and a structured intergalactic magnetic field, and statistically compare those with the observational result of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The anisotropy in the arrival distribution at the highest energies enables us to estimate the number density of UHECR sources as $\\sim 10^{-4} {\\rm Mpc}^{-3}$ assuming the persistent activity of UHECR sources. We compare the estimated number density of UHECR sources with the number densities of known astrophysical objects. This estimated number density is consistent with the number density of Fanaroff-Reily I galaxies. We also discuss the reproducability of the observed {\\it isotropy} in the arrival distribution above $10^{19}$ eV. We find that the estimated source...

  18. Constraints on the source of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using anisotropy vs chemical composition

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Lemoine, Martin; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Waxman, Eli

    2013-01-01

    The joint analysis of anisotropy signals and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays offers strong potential for shedding light on the sources of these particles. Following up on an earlier idea, this paper studies the anisotropies produced by protons of energy >E/Z, assuming that anisotropies at energy >E have been produced by nuclei of charge Z, which share the same magnetic rigidity. We calculate the number of secondary protons produced through photodisintegration of the primary heavy nuclei. Making the extreme assumption that the source does not inject any proton, we find that the source(s) responsible for anisotropies such as reported by the Pierre Auger Observatory should lie closer than ~20-30, 80-100 and 180-200 Mpc if the anisotropy signal is mainly composed of oxygen, silicon and iron nuclei respectively. A violation of this constraint would otherwise result in the secondary protons forming a more significant anisotropy signal at lower energies. Even if the source were located closer t...

  19. Search for diffuse cosmic gamma-ray flux using Fractal and Wavelet analysis from Galactic region using single imaging Cerenkov telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, C K

    2010-01-01

    We show from a simulations-based study of the TACTIC telescope that fractal and wavelet analysis of Cerenkov images, recorded in a single imaging Cerenkov telescope, enables almost complete segregation of isotropic gamma-ray initiated events from the overwhelming background of cosmic-ray hadron-initiated events. This presents a new method for measuring galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray background above 1 TeV energy. Preliminary results based on this method are reported here. Primary aim is to explore the possibility of using data recorded by a single imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescope(IACT) for making accurate measurements of diffuse galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray flux above ~1 TeV energy. Using simulated data of atmospheric Cerenkov images recorded in an IACT, initiated both by cosmic ray protons and diffuse gamma-rays with energies above 4 TeV and 2 TeV respectively, we identify the most efficient fractal /wavelet parameters of the recorded images for primary identification. The method is based...

  20. Planck Lensing and Cosmic Infrared Background Cross-Correlation with Fermi-LAT: Tracing Dark Matter Signals in the $\\gamma$-ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Chang; Keating, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The extragalactic $\\gamma$-ray background, and its spatial anisotropy, could potentially contain a signature of dark matter annihilation or particle decay. Astrophysical foregrounds, such as blazars and star-forming galaxies, however, dominate the $\\gamma$-ray background, precluding an easy detection of the signal associated with the dark matter annihilation or decay in the background intensity spectrum. The dark matter imprint on the $\\gamma$-ray background is expected to be correlated with large-scale structure tracers. In some cases such a cross-correlation is even expected to have a higher signal-to-noise ratio than the auto-correlation. A reliable tracer of the dark matter distribution in the large-scale structure is lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the cosmic infrared background (CIB) is a reliable tracer of star-forming galaxies. We analyze Fermi-LAT data taken over 92 months and study the cross-correlation with Planck CMB lensing, Planck CIB, and Fermi-$\\gamma$ maps. We put upper l...

  1. Helios-2 Vela-Ariel-5 gamma-ray burst source position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.; Trainor, J. H.; Desai, U. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Ricketts, M.; Heluken, H.

    1979-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst of 28 January 1976, one of 18 events thus far detected in interplanetary space with Helios-2, was also observed with the Vela-5A, -6A and the Ariel-5 satellites. A small source field is obtained from the intersection of the region derived from the observed time delays between Helios-2 and Vela-5A and -6A with the source region independently found with the Ariel-5 X-ray detector. This area contains neither any steady X-ray source as scanned by HEAO-A nor any previously catalogued X-ray, radio or infrared sources, X-ray transients, quasars, seyferts, globular clusters, flare stars, pulsars, white dwarfs or high energy gamma-ray sources. The region is however, within the source field of a gamma-ray transient observed in 1974, which exhibited nuclear gamma-ray line structure.

  2. Interstellar gas towards the TeV gamma-ray sources HESS J1640-465 and HESS J1641-463

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, J C; Burton, M G; Fukui, Y; Aharonian, F A; Oya, I; Vink, J; Ohm, S; Casanova, S

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the interstellar medium towards the TeV $\\gamma$-ray sources HESS J1640$-$465 and HESS J1641$-$463 using results from the Mopra Southern Galactic Plane CO Survey and from a Mopra 7 mm-wavelength study. The $\\gamma$-ray sources are positionally coincident with two supernova remnants G338.3$-$0.0 and G338.5+0.1 respectively. A bright complex of HII regions connect the two SNRs and TeV objects. Observations in the CO(1-0) transition lines reveal substantial amounts of diffuse gas positionally coincident with the $\\gamma$-ray sources at multiple velocities along the line of sight, while 7 mm observations in CS, SiO, HC$_{3}$N and CH$_{3}$OH transition lines reveal regions of dense, shocked gas. Archival HI data from the Southern Galactic Plane Survey was used to account for the diffuse atomic gas. Physical parameters of the gas towards the TeV sources were calculated from the data. We find that for a hadronic origin for the $\\gamma$-ray emission, the cosmic-ray enhancement rates ...

  3. A 3-Dimensional Analysis of the Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Resulting from Cosmic-Ray Interactions with the Interstellar Gas and Radiation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodroski, Thomas J.; Dwek, Eli (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contractor will provide support for the analysis of data under ADP (NRA 96-ADP- 09; Proposal No . 167-96adp). The primary task objective is to construct a 3-D model for the distribution of high-energy (20 MeV - 30 GeV) gamma-ray emission in the Galactic disk. Under this task the contractor will utilize data from the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, H I and CO surveys, radio-continuum surveys at 408 MHz, 1420 MHz, 5 GHz, and 19 GHz, the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIME) all-sky maps from 1 to 240 p, and ground-based B, V, J, H, and K photometry. The respective contributions to the gamma-ray emission from cosmic ray/matter interactions, inverse Compton scattering, and extragalactic emission will be determined.

  4. Gamma Rays from the Inner Milky Way: Dark Matter or Point Sources?

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Studies of data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope have revealed bright gamma-ray emission from the central regions of our galaxy, with a spatial and spectral profile consistent with annihilating dark matter. I will present a new model-independent analysis that suggests that rather than originating from dark matter, the GeV excess may arise from a surprising new population of as-yet-unresolved gamma-ray point sources in the heart of the Milky Way.

  5. Attenuation of Scintillation of Discrete Cosmic Sources during Nonresonant HF Heating of the Upper Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrodny, V. G.; Watkins, B.; Charkina, O. V.; Yampolski, Y. M.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the work is to experimentally investigate the response of scintillation spectra and indices of discrete cosmic sources (DCS) to modification of the ionospheric F-region by powerful electromagnetic fields with frequencies exceeding the Langmuir and upper hybrid ones. The results of a special experiment on the scintillations of radiation from DCS Cygnus A observed with using the 64-beam imaging riometer located near the Gakona village (Alaska, USA) are here presented. The ionosphere was artificially disturbed by powerful HAARP heater. Under the studied conditions of nonresonant heating of the ionospheric plasma, an earlier unknown effect of reducing the level of DCS scintillation was discovered. The theoretical interpretation has been given for the discovered effect, which using allowed the proposed technique of solving the inverse problem (recovery deviations of average electron density and temperature in the modified region from their unperturbed values).

  6. Constraints on secondary 10-100 EeV gamma ray flux in the minimal bottom-up model of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashev, O; Semikoz, Dmitry V

    2007-01-01

    In a recently proposed model the cosmic rays spectrum at energies above EeV can be fitted with a minimal number of unknown parameters assuming that the extragalactic cosmic rays are only protons with a power law source spectrum. Within this minimal model, after fitting the observed HiRes spectrum with four parameters (proton injection spectrum power law index, maximum energy, minimum distance to sources and evolution parameter) we compute the flux of ultra-high energy photons due to photon-pion production and e+e- pair production by protons for several radio background models and a range of average extragalactic magnetic fields.

  7. Towards new analysis of Gamma-Ray sources at HImalayan Gamma-Ray Observatory (HIGRO) in northern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, R. J.; Acharya, B. S.; Anupama, G. C.; Bhatt, N.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chitnis, V. R.; Cowsik, R.; Dorji, N.; Duhan, S. K.; Gothe, K. S.; Kamath, P. U.; Koul, R.; Mahesh, P. K.; Mitra, A.; Nagesh, B. K.; Parmar, N. K.; Prabhu, T. P.; Rannot, R. C.; Rao, S. K.; Saha, L.; Saleem, F.; Saxena, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Shukla, A.; Singh, B. B.; Srinivasan, R.; Srinivasulu, G.; Sudersanan, P. V.; Tickoo, A. K.; Tsewang, D.; Upadhya, S. S.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Yadav, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    The High Altitude GAmma-Ray (HAGAR) array is a wavefront sampling array of 7 telescopes, set-up at Hanle, at 4270 m a.s.l., in the Ladakh region of the Himalayas (North India). It constitutes the first phase of the HImalayan Gamma-Ray Observatory (HIGRO) project. HAGAR is the first array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes established at a so high altitude, and was designed to reach a relatively low threshold (currently around 200 GeV) with quite a low mirror area (31 m^2). Data are acquired using the On-source/Off-source tracking mode, and by comparing these sky regions the strength of the gamma-ray signal is estimated. Regular source observations are running since Sept. 2008 and preliminary results on Crab nebula were reported by 2009. Improvements of our analysis method are still going on, like estimation of arrival direction and estimation of night sky background. New softwares are under development for analysis of flash ADC modules, which provide more information from the incoming Cherenkov light wavefront. We report and discuss our new estimation of the systematics through dark region studies, and present new perspectives in the analysis of gamma-ray sources in this paper.

  8. Nomogram for Determining Shield Thickness for Point and Line Sources of Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joenemalm, C.; Malen, K

    1966-10-15

    A set of nomograms is given for the determination of the required shield thickness against gamma radiation. The sources handled are point and infinite line sources with shields of Pb, Fe, magnetite concrete (p = 3.6), ordinary concrete (p = 2.3) or water. The gamma energy range covered is 0.5 - 10 MeV. The nomograms are directly applicable for source and dose points on the surfaces of the shield. They can easily be extended to source and dose points in other positions by applying a geometrical correction. Also included are data for calculation of the source strength for the most common materials and for fission product sources.

  9. A Common Solution of Two Cosmic Puzzles

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    The origin of the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background, which was measured with the large area telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi satellite at energy below 820 GeV, and of the diffuse cosmic background of neutrinos, which was observed at much higher energies with the IceCube detector deep under the south pole ice, are among the current unsolved major cosmic puzzles. Here we show that their properties indicate a common origin: the decay of mesons produced in collisions of cosmic rays accelerated in relativistic jets with matter in/near source. Moreover, their properties are those expected if their common source is the highly relativistic jets that produce the long duration gamma ray bursts in core collapse supernovae of type Ic, which take place mostly in the densest regions of giant molecular clouds in star forming galaxies.

  10. Peak efficiency calibration for attenuation corrected cylindrical sources in gamma ray spectrometry by the use of a point source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Julio C; Galiano, Eduardo; Fernandez, Jorge

    2006-12-01

    A theoretical method of determining the gamma-ray peak efficiency for a cylindrical source, based on a modified expression for point sources is derived. A term for the photon self-attenuation is included in the calculation. The method is valid for any source material as long as the source activity concentration is considered to be homogeneous. Results of this expression are checked against experimental data obtained with (241)Am, (57)Co, (137)Cs, and (60)Co sources.

  11. Peak efficiency calibration for attenuation corrected cylindrical sources in gamma ray spectrometry by the use of a point source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Julio C. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Laboratorio de Espectrometria Gamma, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, B1802AYA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Galiano, Eduardo [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ont., P3E 2C6 (Canada)]. E-mail: egalianoriveros@laurentian.ca; Fernandez, Jorge [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Laboratorio de Espectrometria Gamma, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, B1802AYA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-12-15

    A theoretical method of determining the gamma-ray peak efficiency for a cylindrical source, based on a modified expression for point sources is derived. A term for the photon self-attenuation is included in the calculation. The method is valid for any source material as long as the source activity concentration is considered to be homogeneous. Results of this expression are checked against experimental data obtained with {sup 241}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 60}Co sources.

  12. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for the Dark Matter Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Galper, A M; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Boezio, M; Bonvicini, V; Boyarchuk, K A; Fradkin, M I; Gusakov, Yu V; Kaplin, V A; Kachanov, V A; Kheymits, M D; Leonov, A A; Longo, F; Mazets, E P; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P; Mereminskiy, I A; Mikhailov, V V; Moiseev, A A; Mocchiutti, E; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Picozza, P; Rodin, V G; Runtso, M F; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Topchiev, N P; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G; Zirakashvili, V N

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. The GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is ~0.01 deg (E{\\gamma} > 100 GeV), the energy resolution ~1% (E{\\gamma} > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor ~10E6. GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  13. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  14. Method and System for Gamma-Ray Localization Induced Spacecraft Navigation Using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Suneel I. (Inventor); Hisamoto, Chuck (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system for spacecraft navigation using distant celestial gamma-ray bursts which offer detectable, bright, high-energy events that provide well-defined characteristics conducive to accurate time-alignment among spatially separated spacecraft. Utilizing assemblages of photons from distant gamma-ray bursts, relative range between two spacecraft can be accurately computed along the direction to each burst's source based upon the difference in arrival time of the burst emission at each spacecraft's location. Correlation methods used to time-align the high-energy burst profiles are provided. The spacecraft navigation may be carried out autonomously or in a central control mode of operation.

  15. Zooming into the Cosmic Horseshoe: new insights on the lens profile and the source shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellagamba, Fabio; Tessore, Nicolas; Metcalf, R. Benton

    2017-02-01

    The gravitational lens SDSS J1148+1930, also known as the Cosmic Horseshoe, is one of the biggest and most detailed Einstein rings ever observed. We use the forward reconstruction method implemented in the lens-fitting code LENSED to investigate in great detail the properties of the lens and background source. We model the lens with different mass distributions, focusing in particular on the determination of the slope of the dark-matter component. The inherent degeneracy between the lens slope and the source size can be broken when we can isolate separate components of each lensed image, as in this case. For an elliptical power-law model, κ(r) ˜ r-t, the results favour a flatter-than-isothermal slope with a maximum-likelihood value of t = 0.08. Instead, when we consider the contribution of the baryonic matter separately, the maximum-likelihood value of the slope of the dark-matter component is t = 0.31 or t = 0.44, depending on the assumed initial mass function. We discuss the origin of this result by analysing in detail how the images and the sources change when the slope t changes. We also demonstrate that these slope values at the Einstein radius are not inconsistent with the recent forecast from the theory of structure formation in the ΛCDM model.

  16. Cosmic meteor dust: potentially the dominant source of bio-available iron in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Marsh, D. R.; Del Castillo, C. E.; Fentzke, J.; Lopez-Rosado, R.; Behrenfeld, M.

    2012-12-01

    Johnson, 2001 [Johnson, Kenneth. S. (2001), Iron supply and demand in the upper ocean: Is extraterrestrial dust a significant source of bioavailable iron?, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 15(1), 61-63, doi:10.1029/2000GB001295], first suggested that meteoric particulate flux could be a significant source of bio-available iron, particularly in regions with little or no eolean sources, such as the Southern Ocean. While these calculations raised intriguing questions, there were many large unknowns in the input calculations between meteor flux and bio-available ocean molecular densities. There has been significant research in the intervening decade on related topics, such as the magnitude (~200 ktons per year) and composition of the meteoric flux, its atmospheric evaporation, transport, mesospheric formation of potentially soluble meteoric smoke, and extraterrestrial iron isotope identification. Paramount of these findings are recent NCAR WACCM atmosphere model results demonstrating that the majority of meteoric constituents are transported towards the winter poles and the polar vortex. This may lead to a focusing of meteoritic iron deposition towards the Southern Ocean. We present a proposed research plan involving Southern Ocean sample collection and analysis and atmospheric and biological modeling to determine both the current relevance of meteoric iron, and examine the past and future consequences of cosmic dust under a changing climate.

  17. Dark Matter Search Perspectives with GAMMA-400

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseev, A A; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Avanesov, G A; Bergstrom, L; Boezio, M; Bonvicini, V; Boyarchuk, K A; Dogiel, V A; Gusakov, Yu V; Fradkin, M I; Fuglesang, Ch; Hnatyk, B I; Kachanov, V A; Kaplin, V A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P; Mazets, E P; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Topchiev, N P; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zarikashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2013-01-01

    GAMMA-400 is a future high-energy gamma-ray telescope, designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of dark matter particles, and to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to ~3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is ~0.01 deg(Eg > 100 GeV), and the energy resolution ~1% (Eg > 10 GeV). GAMMA-400 is planned to be launched on the Russian space platform Navigator in 2019. The GAMMA-400 perspectives in the search for dark matter in various scenarios are presented in this paper

  18. COS-B gamma ray sources beyond the predicted diffuse emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Simpson, G.

    1990-01-01

    COS-B data were reanalyzed using for background subtraction the modeled galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission based on HI- and CO-line surveys and the gamma-ray data itself. A methodology was developed for this purpose with the following three features: automatic generation of source catalogs using correlation analysis, simulation of trials to derive significance thresholds for source detection, and bootstrap sampling to drive error boxes and confidence intervals for source parameters. The analysis shows that about half of the 2CG sources are explained by concentrations in the distribution of molecular hydrogen. Indication for a few weak new sources is also obtained.

  19. Study on Gamma Full-Energy Peak Efficiency Calibration of HPGe Detector for Bulky Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>This paper briefly introduces a method for the calibration of the gamma full-energy peak efficiency of HPGe for bulky sources with different geometries and different matrices. Simultaneously, the effects of

  20. Advanced Spacecraft Navigation and Timing Using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed novel program will use measurements of the high-energy photon output from gamma-ray celestial sources to design a new, unique navigation system. This...

  1. New gamma irradiation source at the research reactor Muenchen FRM II; Neue Gamma-Bestrahlungsanlage am Forschungsreaktor Muenchen FRM II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Gerstenberg, H.; Lichtenstein, K.; Tralmer, F.L.; Zill, V.; Neuhaus, I. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (DE). Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II)

    2009-07-01

    The new research reactor FRM II is a high-performance neutron source. A new gamma irradiation line for high-intensity gamma radiation is planned in spent fuel elements including a heating system that will allow irradiation at temperatures up to 150 C. The design concept considers the experimental boundary conditions, i.e. irradiation inhomogeneity and sample temperatures, but also the spent fuel element safety. The neutron flux was measured in two spent fuel elements with decay times of 90 and 450 days, respectively. A significant neutron activation of the irradiation samples can be excluded. The dose rate profile in the spent fuel element was measured with a special measuring device. The irradiation facility will be started in 2009. An first research program concerning microstructure investigations of gamma irradiated rock salt is described.

  2. Gamma factors of an ambulatory source; Factores gamma de una fuente ambulatoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos P, A.; Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Salas L, M.A.; Hernandez D, V.M. [Unidades Academicas de Estudios Nucleares e Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, C. Cipres 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Barquero, R. [Hospital Universitario del Rio Hortega, E-47010 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Some of the procedures for diagnostic or treatment used in the medicine use radioactive materials as the I{sup 131}. By means of Monte Carlo methods were calculated the doses in the internal organs of a woman, with three months of pregnancy, due to the radioiodine captured by her thyroid, as well as to 1 meter of the gland. A three-dimensional mathematical model of the body of a woman was used and by means of Monte Carlo, the radioiodine photons were transported isotropically from the thyroid toward the whole body and was calculated the absorbed dose by their internal organs, also the Kerma in air (K) was determined and the environmental equivalent dose (H{sup *}(10)) at 1 m of the gland. Two activity factors at dose were determined, Gamma Factors that it allows to estimate the dose that the patient produces to people to its around. Of the gamma radiation that emits the I{sup 131} in the thyroid was found that the thymus receives the biggest dose while the uterus is the organ that smaller dose receives. The determined gamma factors were: {gamma}{sub KAire} = 56 {mu}Gy-m{sup 2}-h{sup -1}-GBq{sup -1}, and {gamma}{sub H}{sup *}{sub (10)} = 73 {mu}Sv-m{sup 2}-h{sup -1}-GBq{sup -1}. The distribution of the absorbed dose by the internal organs is attributed to the relative distance among the thyroid and the other organs, to the inter-organs shielding, its size and to its elementary composition. The {gamma}{sub KAire} and {gamma}{sub H}{sup *}{sub (10)} factors allow to estimate the exposure that the patient produces on the personnel to its around. With this, the nuclear medicus, the medical physicist or the one responsible of the radiological safety in the hospital can give more precise indications on the behavior of people around the patient. (Author)

  3. Fermi Establishes Classical Novae as a Distinct Class of Gamma-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Perkins, J. S.; Thompson, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    A classical nova results from runaway thermonuclear explosions on the surface of a white dwarf that accretes matter from a low-mass main-sequence stellar companion. In 2012 and 2013, three novae were detected in gamma rays and stood in contrast to the first gamma-ray detected nova V407 Cygni 2010, which belongs to a rare class of symbiotic binary systems. Despite likely differences in the compositions and masses of their white dwarf progenitors, the three classical novae are similarly characterized as soft spectrum transient gamma-ray sources detected over 2-3 week durations. The gamma-ray detections point to unexpected high-energy particle acceleration processes linked to the mass ejection from thermonuclear explosions in an unanticipated class of Galactic gamma-ray sources.

  4. Secondary cosmic ray nuclei in the light of the single source model and comparison with recent AMS-02 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    Evidence for a local ‘single source’ of cosmic rays is amassing by way of the recent precise measurements of various cosmic ray energy spectra from the AMS-02 instrument. To observations of individual cosmic ray nuclei, electrons, positrons and antiprotons must now be added the determination of the boron-to-carbon ratio and the energy spectrum of lithium to 2000 GV with high precision. Our analysis leads us to claim that, with certain assumptions about propagation in the Galaxy, the results confirm our arguments regarding the presence of a local single source, perhaps, a supernova remnant (SNR). An attempt is made to determine some of the properties of this SNR and its progenitor star.

  5. On heavy Majorana neutrinos as a source of the highest energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Palle, D

    2002-01-01

    Cosmic ray events beyond the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off represent a great challenge for particle physics and cosmology. We show that the physics of heavy Majorana neutrinos, well defined by their masses, cross sections and lifetimes, could explain the highest energy cosmic rays as a consequence of the galactic annihilation of heavy neutrinos as cold dark matter particles. Galactic nuclei accelerators, colliding neutron stars (black holes) or shocks from the collapsed objects could produce ultra high energy cosmic rays as heavy neutrinos beyond the mass threshold at an arbitrary cosmic distance. We comment and also analyse the DAMA results with regard to heavy neutrinos as galactic halo CDM particles.

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts as Sources of Strong Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Granot, Jonathan; Bromberg, Omer; Racusin, Judith L; Daigne, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the strongest explosions in the Universe, which due to their extreme character likely involve some of the strongest magnetic fields in nature. This review discusses the possible roles of magnetic fields in GRBs, from their central engines, through the launching, acceleration and collimation of their ultra-relativistic jets, to the dissipation and particle acceleration that power their $\\gamma$-ray emission, and the powerful blast wave they drive into the surrounding medium that generates their long-lived afterglow emission. An emphasis is put on particular areas in which there have been interesting developments in recent years.

  7. Does Galactic Magnetic Field Disturb the Correlation of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays with their Sources?

    CERN Document Server

    Takami, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    The propagation trajectories of the highest energy cosmic rays can be deflected by Galactic magnetic field (GMF) and expected correlation between their arrival directions and the positions of their sources can be disturbed. In order to explore whether the possible correlation is disturbed or not, we simulate the arrival distribution of the highest energy protons (HEPs) with energies above $6 \\times 10^{19}$ eV taking 4 different GMF models into account and investigate the cross-correlation between the protons and sources assumed in the simulation. We show that the error of cross-correlation function adopted in this study is sufficiently small by accumulating 200 events. We also find that the correlation is not disturbed largely in many cases after 200 events accumulation and positive signals of the correlation are significantly expected at angular scale of 3-5$^{\\circ}$. Only in the cases of the northern sky with axisymmetric spiral structures of GMF, the cross-correlation functions are consistent with no cor...

  8. Zooming into the Cosmic Horseshoe: new insights on the lens profile and the source shape

    CERN Document Server

    Bellagamba, Fabio; Metcalf, R Benton

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational lens SDSS J1148+1930, also known as the Cosmic Horseshoe, is one of the biggest and of the most detailed Einstein rings ever observed. We use the forward reconstruction method implemented in the lens fitting code Lensed to investigate with great detail the properties of the lens and of the background source. We model the lens with different mass distributions, focusing in particular on the determination of the slope of the dark matter component. The inherent degeneracy between the lens slope and the source size can be broken when we can isolate separate components of each lensed image, as in this case. For an elliptical power law model, $\\kappa(r) \\sim r^{-t}$, the results favour a flatter-than-isothermal slope with a maximum-likelihood value t = 0.08. Instead, when we consider the contribution of the baryonic matter separately, the maximum-likelihood value of the slope of the dark matter component is t = 0.31 or t = 0.44, depending on the assumed Initial Mass Function. We discuss the origin...

  9. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-Reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.55 m. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at 25 m, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 as the universe comes out of the Dark Ages. We apply the proposed tomography to the current SpitzerIRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 m, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z greater than or approx. equal to 30.

  10. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-05-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10≲ z≲ 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)/NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.5-5 μm. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at ˜2-5 μm, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10≲ z≲ 30 as the universe comes out of the “Dark Ages.” We apply the proposed tomography to the current Spitzer/IRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z≳ 30.

  11. Starlight beneath the waves : in search of TeV photon emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astraatmadja, Tri Laksmana

    2013-01-01

    At any given time, cosmic rays constantly shower the Earth from all direction. The origin of cosmic rays is still a mystery as their paths are deflected by magnetic fields to random directions. The most likely sources of cosmic rays are Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB). As the most energetic events known in

  12. Starlight beneath the waves : in search of TeV photon emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astraatmadja, Tri Laksmana

    2013-01-01

    At any given time, cosmic rays constantly shower the Earth from all direction. The origin of cosmic rays is still a mystery as their paths are deflected by magnetic fields to random directions. The most likely sources of cosmic rays are Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB). As the most energetic events known in

  13. EBL Inhomogeneity and Hard-Spectrum Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Hassan; Böttcher, Markus

    2017-02-01

    The unexpectedly hard very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-ray spectra of a few distant blazars have been interpreted as evidence of a reduction of the γγ opacity of the universe due to the interaction of VHE γ-rays with the extragalactic background light (EBL) compared to the expectation from current knowledge of the density and cosmological evolution of the EBL. One of the suggested solutions to this problem involves the inhomogeneity of the EBL. In this paper, we study the effects of such inhomogeneity on the energy density of the EBL (which then also becomes anisotropic) and the resulting γγ opacity. Specifically, we investigate the effects of cosmic voids along the line of sight to a distant blazar. We find that the effect of such voids on the γγ opacity, for any realistic void size, is only of the order of ≲1% and much smaller than expected from a simple linear scaling of the γγ opacity with the line-of-sight galaxy underdensity due to a cosmic void.

  14. Improvement in the practical implementation of neutron source strength calibration using prompt gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz, Rahim; Rene Vega-Carrillo, Hector

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the neutron emission rate from neutron sources using prompt gamma rays in hydrogen was determined, and several improvements were applied. Using Monte Carlo calculations, the best positions for the source, moderator and detector relative to each other were selected. For (241)Am-Be and (252)Cf sources, the sizes for polyethylene spheres with the highest efficiency were 12- and 10-inch, respectively. In addition, a new shielding cone was designed to account for scattered neutrons and gamma rays. The newly designed shielding cone, which is 45 cm in length, provided suitable attenuation for the source radiation.

  15. A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); McDaniel, Floyd Del (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Raber, Thomas N.

    2008-12-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

  16. Cosmic-Ray Background Flux Model based on a Gamma-Ray Large-Area Space Telescope Balloon Flight Engineering Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, T

    2004-09-03

    Cosmic-ray background fluxes were modeled based on existing measurements and theories and are presented here. The model, originally developed for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Balloon Experiment, covers the entire solid angle (4{pi} sr), the sensitive energy range of the instrument ({approx} 10 MeV to 100 GeV) and abundant components (proton, alpha, e{sup -}, e{sup +}, {mu}{sup -}, {mu}{sup +} and gamma). It is expressed in analytic functions in which modulations due to the solar activity and the Earth geomagnetism are parameterized. Although the model is intended to be used primarily for the GLAST Balloon Experiment, model functions in low-Earth orbit are also presented and can be used for other high energy astrophysical missions. The model has been validated via comparison with the data of the GLAST Balloon Experiment.

  17. Fermi bubbles as a source of cosmic rays above 10^{15} eV

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyshov, D O; Dogiel, V A; Ko, C M

    2014-01-01

    Fermi bubbles are giant gamma-ray structures extended north and south of the Galactic center with characteristic sizes of order of 10 kpc recently discovered by Fermi Large Area Telescope. Good correlation between radio and gamma-ray emission in the region covered by Fermi bubbles implies the presence of high-energy electrons in this region. Since it is relatively difficult for relativistic electrons of this energy to travel all the way from the Galactic sources toward Fermi bubbles one can assume that they accelerated in-situ. The corresponding acceleration mechanism should also affect the distribution of the relativistic protons in the Galaxy. Since protons have much larger lifetimes the effect may even be observed near the Earth. In our model we suggest that Fermi bubbles are created by acceleration of electrons on series of shocks born due to periodic star accretions by supermassive black hole Sgr A*. We propose that hadronic CR within the "knee" of the observed CR spectrum are produced by Galactic supern...

  18. Searching for Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates Among the Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; /SLAC; Paggi, A.; D' Abrusco, R.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Tosti, G.; /Perugia U.

    2012-04-02

    The identification of low-energy counterparts for {gamma}-ray sources is one of the biggest challenge in modern {gamma}-ray astronomy. Recently, we developed and successfully applied a new association method to recognize {gamma}-ray blazar candidates that could be possible counterparts for the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources above 100 MeV in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog (2FGL). This method is based on the Infrared (IR) colors of the recent Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. In this letter we applied our new association method to the case of unidentified INTEGRAL sources (UISs) listed in the fourth soft gamma-ray source catalog (4IC). Only 86 UISs out of the 113 can be analyzed, due to the sky coverage of the WISE Preliminary data release. Among these 86 UISs, we found that 18 appear to have a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within their positional error region. Finally, we analyzed the Swift archival data available for 10 out these 18 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates, and we found that 7 out of 10 are clearly detected in soft X-rays and/or in the optical-ultraviolet band. We cannot confirm the associations between the UISs and the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates due to the discrepancies between the INTEGRAL and the soft X-ray spectra. However, the discovery of the soft X-ray counterparts for the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates adds an important clue to help understand their origin and to confirm their blazar nature.

  19. Reconstructing the nature of the first cosmic sources from the anisotropic 21-cm signal

    CERN Document Server

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Cohen, Aviad

    2015-01-01

    The redshifted 21-cm background is expected to be a powerful probe of the early Universe, carrying both cosmological and astrophysical information from a wide range of redshifts. In particular, the power spectrum of fluctuations in the 21-cm brightness temperature is anisotropic due to the line-of-sight velocity gradient, which in principle allows for a simple extraction of this information in the limit of linear fluctuations. However, recent numerical studies suggest that the 21-cm signal is actually rather complex, and its analysis likely depends on detailed model fitting. We present the first realistic simulation of the anisotropic 21-cm power spectrum over a wide period of early cosmic history. We show that on observable scales, the anisotropy is large and thus measurable at most redshifts, and its form tracks the evolution of 21-cm fluctuations as they are produced early on by Lyman-a radiation from stars, then switch to X-ray radiation from early heating sources, and finally to ionizing radiation from s...

  20. A non-perturbative study of the evolution of cosmic magnetised sources

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, I Delgado; Piccinelli, G; Sussman, Roberto A

    2015-01-01

    We undertake a hydrodynamical study of a magnetised cosmic fluid between the end of the leptonic era and the beginning of the radiation-dominated epoch. We assume this fluid to be the source of a Bianchi I model and to be a mixture of tightly coupled primordial radiation, neutrinos, baryons, electrons and positrons, together with a gas of already decoupled dark matter WIMPS and an already existing magnetic field. The interaction of this field with the tightly coupled gas mixture is described by suitable equations of state that are appropriate for the particle species of the mixture. Comparison of our results with those of previous studies based on an FLRW framework reveals that the effects of the anisotropy of the magnetic field on the evolution of the main thermodynamical variables are negligible, thus validating these studies, though subtle differences are found in the evolution of the magnetic field itself. For larger field intensities we find quantitative and qualitative differences from the FLRW based an...

  1. Newly-born pulsars as sources of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Ke; Olinto, Angela V

    2012-01-01

    Newly-born pulsars offer favorable sites for the injection of heavy nuclei, and for their further acceleration to ultrahigh energies. Once accelerated in the pulsar wind, nuclei have to escape from the surrounding supernova envelope. We examine this escape analytically and numerically, and discuss the pulsar source scenario in light of the latest ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHECR) data. Our calculations show that, at early times, when protons can be accelerated to energies E>10^20 eV, the young supernova shell tends to prevent their escape. In contrast, because of their higher charge, iron-peaked nuclei are still accelerated to the highest observed energies at later times, when the envelope has become thin enough to allow their escape. Ultrahigh energy iron nuclei escape newly-born pulsars with millisecond periods and dipole magnetic fields of ~10^(12-13) G, embedded in core-collapse supernovae. Due to the production of secondary nucleons, the envelope crossing leads to a transition of composition from light...

  2. Perspective of monochromatic gamma-ray line detection with the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Qiang; Chang, Jin; Dong, Yong-Wei; Hu, Bing-Liang; Lü, Jun-Guang; Wang, Le; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    HERD is the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to detect energetic cosmic ray nuclei, leptons and photons with a high energy resolution ($\\sim1\\%$ for electrons and photons and $20\\%$ for nuclei) and a large geometry factor ($>3\\, m^2sr$ for electrons and diffuse photons and $>2\\, m^2sr$ for nuclei). In this work we discuss the capability of HERD to detect monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray lines, based on simulations of the detector performance. It is shown that HERD will be one of the most sensitive instruments for monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray searches at energies between $\\sim10$ to a few hundred GeV. Above hundreds of GeV, Cherenkov telescopes will be more sensitive due to their large effective area. As a specific example, we show that a good portion of the parameter space of a supersymmetric dark matter model can be probed with HERD.

  3. Section on Supernova remnants and cosmic rays of the White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-based Gamma-ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, M; Atoyan, A; Baring, M; Beacom, J; Blandford, R; Butt, Y; Bykov, A; Ellison, D; Funk, S; Halzen, F; Hays, E; Humensky, B; Jones, T; Kaaret, Philip; Kieda, D; Le Bohec, S; Mészáros, P; Moskalenko, I; Slane, P; Strong, A; Wakely, S

    2008-01-01

    This is a report on the findings of the SNR/cosmic-ray working group for the white paper on the status and future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper is an APS commissioned document, and the overall version has also been released and can be found on astro-ph. This detailed section of the white paper discusses the status of past and current attempts to observe shell-type supernova remnants and diffuse emission from cosmic rays at GeV-TeV energies. We concentrate on the potential of future ground-based gamma-ray experiments to study the acceleration of relativistic charged particles which is one of the main unsolved, yet fundamental, problems in modern astrophysics. The acceleration of particles relies on interactions between energetic particles and magnetic turbulence. In the case of SNRs we can perform spatially resolved studies in systems with known geometry, and the plasma physics deduced from these observations will help us to understand other systems where rapid particle acceleration is b...

  4. Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy at Energies Above 10 TeV: Searching for Galactic PeV Cosmic-Ray Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rowell, G; Plyasheshnikov, A

    2005-01-01

    The origin of Galactic CRs up the knee energy remains unanswered and provides strong motivation for the study of gamma-ray sources at energies above 10 TeV. We discuss recent results from ground-based gamma-ray Cherenkov imaging systems at these energies as well as future observational efforts in this direction. The exciting results of H.E.S.S. give clues as to the nature of Galactic CR accelerators, and suggest that there is a population of Galactic gamma-ray sources with emission extending beyond 10 TeV. A dedicated system of Cherenkov imaging telescopes optimised for higher energies appears to be a promising way to study the multi-TeV gamma-ray sky.

  5. Variability Analysis of EGRET Gamma-Ray Sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Xia Han; Li Zhang

    2005-01-01

    The variability of γ-ray sources listed in the third EGRET catalog is studied using three variability indices. These indices are found to be statistically equivalent if the observed data are sufficiently accurate. Using the three indices,30 EGRET point sources which are positionally coincident with pulsars and 40 persistent unidentified sources at low latitudes are analyzed for their variability status. It is found that 14 of the 30 point sources may have genuine or plausible associations with pulsars, and 16 of the 40 persistent unidentified sources are possible pulsar candidates.

  6. Review of Past Nuclear Accidents: Source Terms and Recorded Gamma-Ray Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Cresswell, A.; Allyson, J.D.; McConville, P.; Department of the Environment: Radioactive Substances Division

    1997-01-01

    Airborne gamma ray spectrometry using high volume scintillation detectors, optionally in conjunction with Ge detectors, has potential for making rapid environmental measurements in response to nuclear accidents. A literature search on past nuclear accidents has been conducted to define the source terms which have been experienced so far. Selected gamma ray spectra recorded after past accidents have also been collated to examine the complexity of observed behaviour.

  7. An All-Sky Search for Steady VHE Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01

    The Milagrito water Cherenkov detector in the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico took data from February 1997 to April 1998. Milagrito served as a prototype for the larger Milagro detector, which has just begun operations. Milagrito was the first large-aperture gamma-ray detector with sensitivity to gamma rays below 1 TeV. We report here on a search for steady emission from point sources over most of the northern sky using data from Milagrito.

  8. Off-Beam Gamma-Ray Pulsars and Unidentified EGRET Sources in the Gould Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Harding, Alice K.; Zhang, Bing

    2001-01-01

    We investigate whether gamma-ray pulsars viewed at a large angle to the neutron star magnetic pole could contribute to the new population of galactic unidentified EGRET sources associated with the Gould Belt. The faint, soft nature of these sources is distinctly different from both the properties of unidentified EGRET sources along the galactic plane and of the known gamma-ray pulsars. We explore the possibility, within the polar cap model, that some of these sources are emission from pulsars seen at lines of sight that miss both the bright gamma-ray cone beams and the radio beam. The off-beam gamma-rays come from high-altitude curvature emission of primary particles, are radiated over a large solid angle and have a much softer spectrum than that of the main beams. We estimate that the detectability of such off-beam emission is about a factor of 4-5 higher than that of the on-beam emission. At least some of the radio-quiet Gould Belt sources detected by EGRET could therefore be such off-beam gamma-ray pulsars...

  9. Photon flux and spectrum of {gamma}-rays Compton sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrillo, V., E-mail: Petrillo@mi.infn.it [INFN Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy); Bacci, A. [INFN Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy); Ben Ali Zinati, R. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy); Chaikovska, I. [LAL Universite Paris-Sud IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay-Ville (France); Curatolo, C. [INFN Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy); Ferrario, M. [LNF, INFN Via E.Fermi, 40 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Maroli, C. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy); Ronsivalle, C. [ENEA Via E.Fermi, 45 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Rossi, A.R.; Serafini, L. [INFN Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy); Tomassini, P. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy); Vaccarezza, C. [LNF, INFN Via E.Fermi, 40 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Variola, A. [LAL Universite Paris-Sud IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay-Ville (France)

    2012-11-21

    We analyze the characteristics of the {gamma} radiation produced by Compton back-scattering of a high brightness electron beam produced by a photoinjector and accelerated in a linac up to energies of 360-720 MeV and a laser operated at about 500 nm, by comparing classical and quantum models and codes. The interaction produces {gamma} rays in the range 4.9-18.8 MeV. In view of the application to nuclear resonance fluorescence a relative bandwidth of few 10{sup -3} is needed. The bandwidth is reduced by taking advantage of the frequency-angular correlation typical of the phenomenon and selecting the radiation in an angle of tens of {mu}rads. The foreseen spectral density is 20-6 photons per eV in a single shot, a number that can be increased by developing multi-bunch techniques and laser recirculation. In this way a final value of 10{sup 4} photon per eV per second can be achieved.

  10. BALLERINA-Pirouettes in search of gamma burst sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1999-12-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has now been established with reasonable certainty. Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large variability in properties, which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are proposing BALLERINA, a small satellite to provide accurate gamma burst positions at a rate an order of magnitude larger than from Beppo-SAX. On the experimental side, it remains a challenge to ensure the earliest detection of the X-ray afterglow. The mission proposed here allows for the first time systematic studies of the soft X-ray emission in the time interval from only a few minutes after the onset of the burst to a few hours later. In addition to positions of GRBs with accuracy better than 1'reported to the ground within a few minutes of the burst, essential for follow-up work, BALLERINA will on its own provide observations in an uncharted region of parameter space. Secondary objectives of the BALLERINA mission includes observations of the earliest phases of the outbursts of X-ray novae and other X-ray transients. BALLERINA is one of four missions currently under study for the Danish Small Satellite Program. The selection will be announced in 1999 for a planned launch in 2002-2003.

  11. Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources as Ancient Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    De Jager, O C; Djannati-Ataï, A; Dalton, M; Deil, C; Kosack, K; Renaud, M; Schwanke, U; Tibolla, O

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we explore the evolution of a PWN while the pulsar is spinning down. An MHD approach is used to simulate the evolution of a composite remnant. Particular attention is given to the adiabatic loss rate and evolution of the nebular field strength with time. By normalising a two component particle injection spectrum (which can reproduce the radio and X-ray components) at the pulsar wind termination shock to the time dependent spindown power, and keeping track with losses since pulsar/PWN/SNR birth, we show that the average field strength decreases with time as $t^{-1.3}$, so that the synchrotron flux decreases, whereas the IC gamma-ray flux increases, until most of the spindown power has been dumped into the PWN. Eventually adiabatic and IC losses will also terminate the TeV visibility and then eventually the GeV visibility.

  12. Admixtures in Spent Plutonium Sources and Gamma-Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Pelanytė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic composition of several spent smoke detectors containing plutonium has been investigated. The article also presents the calculated results of 241Am and 241Pu activities in smoke detectors. The received values vary from (0.934±0.028 MBq to (91.2±4.6 MBq. The eguivalent dose rate of the established gamma radiation vary from 220 nSv/h to 500 nSv/h. A dose caused by artificial radionuclides in spent smoke detectors was evaluated and compared in the article. It has been found out that due to smoke detectors, an annual dose varies from 0.06 mSv to 0.31 mSv. Article in Lithuanian

  13. Final SAS-2 gamma-ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Final results are presented for SAS-2 observations of high-energy gamma-rays from the galactic anticenter region. Three main gamma-ray features are shown to characterize this region: a localized source associated with the Crab Nebula and its pulsar, another localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg, and a general enhancement of the diffuse background 10 to 15 deg south of the galactic plane, which is associated with the Gould Belt. For the Crab, it is found that the radiation is mostly pulsed, the pulsed fraction increases with energy, and the intensity of the radiation in the main and interpulse peaks is approximately the same. The other localized source, provisionally designated as gamma 195+5, is found to have a harder spectrum than the Crab but no obvious radio counterpart; emission from an external galaxy is ruled out.

  14. The star forming region Monoceros R2 as a gamma-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, Josep; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J; Sánchez-Ayaso, Estrella; Munar-Adrover, Pere; Sánchez-Sutil, Juan R; Romero, Gustavo E; Paredes, Josep M; Combi, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Context. After the release of the gamma-ray source catalog produced by the Fermi satellite during its first two years of operation, a significant fraction of sources still remain unassociated at lower energies. In addition to well-known high-energy emitters (pulsars, blazars, supernova remnants, etc.) theoretical expectations predict new classes of gamma-ray sources. In particular, gamma-ray emission could be associated with some of the early phases of stellar evolution, but this interesting possibility is still poorly understood. Aims. The aim of this paper is to assess the possibility of the Fermi gamma-ray source 2FGL J0607.5-0618c being associated with the massive star forming region Monoceros R2. Methods. A multi-wavelength analysis of the Monoceros R2 region is carried out using archival data at radio, infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths. The resulting observational properties are used to estimate the physical parameters needed to test the different physical scenarios. Results. We confirm the 2FG...

  15. Cosmic ray effects in microcalorimeter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahle, C.K. E-mail: cak@lheapop.gsfc.nasa.gov; Boyce, K.R.; Brown, G.V.; Cottam, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Galeazzi, M.; Kelley, R.L.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F.S.; Szymkowiak, A.E.; Tillotson, W.A

    2004-03-11

    We have identified signals resulting from cosmic rays and environmental gamma rays depositing energy in the pixels and in the silicon frame of the Astro-E2/X-Ray Spectrometer microcalorimeter array. Coincidences between pixels and between the array and an anti-coincidence detector determined the nature of the events. Pulse shapes and amplitudes from the cosmic ray events helped refine the thermal model of the array chip. We discuss how future arrays can be optimized either for the greatest background rejection or for the highest source count rates.

  16. Gamma-Ray Lenses for Astrophysics-and the Gamma-Ray Imager Mission GRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Ballmoos, P. V.; Barriere, N.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles...... are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. While Fermi will take......, albeit at much more modest sensitivities. There will be clearly a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources in the 100-keV to MeV regime. Recent technological advances in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Lane diffraction and multilayer-coated mirror techniques...

  17. Methods of computer experiment in gamma-radiation technologies using new radiation sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bratchenko, M I; Rozhkov, V V

    2001-01-01

    Presented id the methodology of computer modeling application for physical substantiation of new irradiation technologies and irradiators design work flow. Modeling tasks for irradiation technologies are structured along with computerized methods of their solution and appropriate types of software. Comparative analysis of available packages for Monte-Carlo modeling of electromagnetic processes in media is done concerning their application to irradiation technologies problems. The results of codes approbation and preliminary data on gamma-radiation absorbed dose distributions for nuclides of conventional sources and prospective Europium-based gamma-sources are presented.

  18. Optical depth for VHE gamma-rays from distant sources from a generic EBL density

    OpenAIRE

    Raue, M.; Mazin, D.

    2008-01-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE; E>100GeV) gamma-rays from distant sources suffer attenuation through pair-production with low energy photons from the diffuse extragalactic photon fields in the ultraviolet (UV) to far-infrared (FIR) (commonly referred to as Extragalactic Background Light; EBL). When modeling the intrinsic spectra of the VHE gamma-ray sources it is crucial to correctly account for the attenuation. Unfortunately, direct measurements of the EBL are difficult and the knowledge about the EB...

  19. Deep observation of the NGC 1275 region with MAGIC: search of diffuse gamma-ray emission from cosmic rays in the Perseus cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Buson, S; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Di Pierro, F; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gora, D; Guberman, D; Hadasch, D; Hahn, A; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Pedaletti, G; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Acosta, M Vazquez; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R; and,; :,; Pfrommer, C; Pinzke, A; Zandanel, F

    2016-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are expected to be reservoirs of cosmic rays (CRs) that should produce diffuse gamma-ray emission due to their hadronic interactions with the intra-cluster medium. The nearby Perseus cool-core cluster, identified as the most promising target to search for such an emission, has been observed with the MAGIC telescopes at very-high energies (VHE, E>100 GeV) for a total of 253 hr from 2009 to 2014. The active nuclei of NGC 1275, the central dominant galaxy of the cluster, and IC 310, lying at about 0.6$^\\circ$ from the centre, have been detected as point-like VHE gamma-ray emitters during the first phase of this campaign. We report an updated measurement of the NGC 1275 spectrum, which is well described by a power law with a photon index of $3.6\\pm0.2_{stat}\\pm0.2_{syst}$ between 90 GeV and 1.2 TeV. We do not detect any diffuse gamma-ray emission from the cluster and set stringent constraints on its CR population. In order to bracket the uncertainties over the CR spatial and spectral distribu...

  20. Intense inverse compton {gamma}-ray source from Duke storage ring FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    We suggest using FEL intracavity power in the Duke storage ring fortrays production via Inverse Compton Backscattering (ICB). The OK-4 FEL driven by the Duke storage ring will tens of watts of average lasing power in the UV/VUV range. Average intracavity power will be in kilowatt range and can be used to pump ICB source. The {gamma}-rays with maximum energy from 40 MeV to 200 MeV with intensity of 0.1-5 10{sup 10}{gamma} per second can be generated. In this paper we present expected parameters of {gamma}-ray beam parameters including its intensity and distribution. We discuss influence of e-beam parameters on collimated {gamma}-rays spectrum and optimization of photon-electron interaction point.

  1. A separation of electrons and protons in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following scientific goals: search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point and extended sources, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons, and nuclei up to the knee. The main components of cosmic rays are protons and helium nuclei, whereas the part of lepton component in the total flux is ~10E-3 for high energies. In present paper, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is investigated. The individual contribution to the proton rejection is studied for each detector system of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray tel...

  2. Projection of needs for gamma radiation sources and other radioisotopes and assessment of alternatives for providing radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, W.A.; Jensen, G.A.; Clark, L.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Jarrett, J.H.; Katayama, Y.B.; McKee, R.W.; Morgan, L.G.; Nealey, S.M.; Platt, A.M.; Tingey, G.L.

    1989-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed the projected uses and demands for a variety of nuclear byproducts. Because the major large-scale near-term demand is for gamma irradiation sources, this report concentrates on the needs for gamma sources and evaluates the options for providing the needed material. Projections of possible growth in the irradiation treatment industry indicate that there will be a need for 180 to 320 MCi of /sup 60/Co (including /sup 137/Cs equivalent) in service in the year 2000. The largest current and projected use of gamma irradiation is for the sterilization of medical devices and disposable medical supplies. Currently, 40% of US disposable medical products are treated by irradiation, and within 10 years it is expected that 90% will be treated in this manner. Irradiation treatment of food for destruction of pathogens or parasites, disinfestation, or extension of allowable storage periods is estimated to require an active inventory of 75 MCi of /sup 60/Co-equivalent gamma source in about a decade. 90 refs., 7 figs., 25 tabs.

  3. Demystifying an unidentified EGRET source by VHE gamma-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, O; Reimer, Olaf; Funk, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    In a novel approach in observational high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, observations carried out by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes provide necessary templates to pinpoint the nature of intriguing, yet unidentified EGRET gamma-ray sources. Using GeV-photons detected by CGRO EGRET and taking advantage of high spatial resolution images from H.E.S.S. observations, we were able to shed new light on the EGRET observed gamma-ray emission in the Kookaburra complex, whose previous coverage in the literature is somewhat contradictory. 3EGJ1420-6038 very likely accounts for two GeV gamma-ray sources (E>1 GeV), both in positional coincidence with the recently reported pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) by HESS in the Kookaburra/Rabbit complex. PWN associations at VHE energies, supported by accumulating evidence from observations in the radio and X-ray band, are indicative for the PSR/plerionic origin of spatially coincident, but still unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources from EGRET. This not only supports the already s...

  4. Experiment to search for ultra high energy. gamma. -ray sources from the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, N.J.T.; Perrett, J.C.; Pomerantz, M.A.; Hillas, A.M.; Ogden, P.A.; Patel, M.; Reid, R.J.O.; Watson, A.A.

    1989-04-01

    We describe the construction and performance characteristics of an extensive air shower array which has been established at the geographic South Pole. The experiment has been designed to search for sources for cosmic rays with primary energies above 50 TeV with an angular resolution of about 1/sup 0/. The array has an enclosed area of 6235 m/sup 2/ and is at an altitude of 2835 m (695 g cm/sup -2/). The unique advantage of the site is the circumpolar nature of all candidate sources, including SN1987A, which lie at a constant zenith angle.

  5. Constraining Galactic pγ Interactions with Cosmic Ray Electron and Positron Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nayantara; Bing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    High energy protons produced by various sources of cosmic rays, e.g., supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, participate in Pγ and pp interactions. Although pp interactions may be the dominant mechanism in our Galaxy, it is unclear how important pγ process is. We show that the upper bound on the fraction of total number of protons participating in pγ interactions inside all Galactic astrophysical sources of cosmic rays is 10%.

  6. Solar wind interaction with the Reiner Gamma crustal magnetic anomaly: Connecting source magnetization to surface weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Andrew R.; Fatemi, Shahab; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Hemingway, Doug; Holmström, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Remanent magnetization has long been known to exist in the lunar crust, yet both the detailed topology and ultimate origin(s) of these fields remains uncertain. Some crustal magnetic fields coincide with surface albedo anomalies, known as lunar swirls, which are thought to be formed by differential surface weathering of the regolith underlying crustal fields due to deflection of incident solar wind protons. Here, we present results from a three-dimensional, self-consistent, plasma hybrid model of the solar wind interaction with two different possible source magnetizations for the Reiner Gamma anomaly. We characterize the plasma interaction with these fields and the resulting spatial distribution of charged-particle weathering of the surface and compare these results to optical albedo measurements of Reiner Gamma. The model results constrain the proposed source magnetizations for Reiner Gamma and suggest that vertical crustal magnetic fields are required to produce the observed "dark lanes."

  7. Chandra Resolves Cosmic X-ray Glow and Finds Mysterious New Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    While taking a giant leap towards solving one of the greatest mysteries of X-ray astronomy, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory also may have revealed the most distant objects ever seen in the universe and discovered two puzzling new types of cosmic objects. Not bad for being on the job only five months. Chandra has resolved most of the X-ray background, a pervasive glow of X-rays throughout the universe, first discovered in the early days of space exploration. Before now, scientists have not been able to discern the background's origin, because no X-ray telescope until Chandra has had both the angular resolution and sensitivity to resolve it. "This is a major discovery," said Dr. Alan Bunner, Director of NASA's Structure andEvolution of the universe science theme. "Since it was first observed thirty-seven years ago, understanding the source of the X-ray background has been aHoly Grail of X-ray astronomy. Now, it is within reach." The results of the observation will be discussed today at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, Georgia. An article describing this work has been submitted to the journal Nature by Dr. Richard Mushotzky, of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., Drs. Lennox Cowie and Amy Barger at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, and Dr. Keith Arnaud of the University of Maryland, College Park. "We are all very excited by this finding," said Mushotzky. "The resolution of most of the hard X-ray background during the first few months of the Chandra mission is a tribute to the power of this observatory and bodes extremely well for its scientific future," Scientists have known about the X-ray glow, called the X-ray background, since the dawn of X-ray astronomy in the early 1960s. They have been unable to discern its origin, however, for no X-ray telescope until Chandra has had both the angular resolution and sensitivity to resolve it. The German-led ROSAT mission, now completed, resolved much of the lower

  8. Study of diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma radiation using a spark chamber in the energy range 4 MeV--100 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavigne, J.M.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Agrinier, B.; Bonfand, E.; Parlier, B.; Rao, K.R.

    1982-10-15

    The Agathe Balloon experiment performed by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (C.E.A.) of Saclay and the Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements (C.E.S.R.) of Toulouse was launched in 1976 November and 1977 February in Brazil during a campaign organized by the Centre National d'Etudes Spatials (C.N.E.S.) and the Instituto de Pesquisas Espacias (I.N.P.E.). The total atmospheric and cosmic ..gamma..-ray flux for various energy ranges was found using flux measurements during the balloon's ascent. In each case, it was possible to deduce the flux values of the diffuse and atmospheric components.

  9. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; Sreekumar, P.; Thompson, D. J.; Jones, B. B.; Lin, Y. C.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.; Tompkins, W. F.; Kanbach, G.; Mayer-Hasselwander, A.; Muecke, A.

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog and its supplement, this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  10. Astrophysical Sources of Cosmic Rays and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barber, K B; Barbosa-Ademarlaudo, F; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Bérat, C; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Chye, J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; De Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; De Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; DiGiulio, C; Diaz, J C; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; GarcíaGámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Amaral, M Gonçalves do; González, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kühn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, K; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; LaRosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lucero, A; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Martello, D; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Müller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nhung, P T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Rídky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Rodríguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suárez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcuau, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; vandenBerg, A M; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the correlations of ultra-high energy cosmic ray directions with extra-Galactic objects, of general anisotropy, of photons and neutrinos, and of other astrophysical effects, with the Pierre Auger Observatory. Contributions to the 31st ICRC, Lodz, Poland, July 2009.

  11. Astrophysical Sources of Cosmic Rays and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; DiGiulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; GarcíaGámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; LaRosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcuau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; vandenBerg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the correlations of ultra-high energy cosmic ray directions with extra-Galactic objects, of general anisotropy, of photons and neutrinos, and of other astrophysical effects, with the Pierre Auger Observatory. Contributions to the 31st ICRC, Lodz, Poland, July 2009.

  12. AMS-02 data confront acceleration of cosmic ray secondaries in nearby sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the model proposed earlier to account for the observed increase in the positron fraction in cosmic rays with increasing energy, in the light of new data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) experiment. The model accounts for the production and acceleration of secondary electrons...

  13. Self-consistent evolution of gas and cosmic rays in Cygnus A and similar FR II classic double radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Mathews, William G

    2010-01-01

    In Cygnus A and other classical FR II double radio sources, powerful opposing jets from the cores of halo-centered galaxies drive out into the surrounding cluster gas, forming hotspots of shocked and compressed cluster gas at the jet extremities. The moving hotspots are sandwiched between two shocks. An inner-facing shock receives momentum and cosmic rays from the jet and creates additional cosmic rays that form a radio lobe elongated along the jet axis. An outer-facing bow shock moves directly into the undisturbed group or cluster gas, creating a cocoon of shocked gas enclosing the radio lobe. We describe computations that follow the self-consistent dynamical evolution of the shocked cluster gas and the relativistic synchrotron-emitting gas inside the lobes. Relativistic and non-relativistic components exchange momentum by interacting with small magnetic fields having dynamically negligible energy densities. The evolution of Cygnus A is governed almost entirely by cosmic ray energy flowing from the hotspots....

  14. Neutron beam design for low intensity neutron and gamma-ray radioscopy using small neutron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, T

    2003-01-01

    Two small neutron sources of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be radioisotopes were used for design of neutron beams applicable to low intensity neutron and gamma ray radioscopy (LINGR). In the design, Monte Carlo code (MCNP) was employed to generate neutron and gamma ray beams suited to LINGR. With a view to variable neutron spectrum and neutron intensity, various arrangements were first examined, and neutron-filter, gamma-ray shield and beam collimator were verified. Monte Carlo calculations indicated that with a suitable filter-shield-collimator arrangement, thermal neutron beam of 3,900 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with neutron/gamma ratio of 7x10 sup 7 , and 25 ncm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 with very large neutron/gamma ratio, respectively, could be produced by using sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf(122 mu g) and a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be(37GBq)radioisotopes at the irradiation port of 35 cm from the neutron sources.

  15. Mapping Correlation of Two Point Sources in the Gamma-Ray Sky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Alexander [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-20

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has been taking data on high energy photons or γ rays since June 11th, 2008, and people have been cataloging and profiling point sources of these γ rays ever since. After roughly one year of being in operation over 1400 sources were cataloged. Now, in 2015 we have 3033 sources cataloged. With the increasing amount of sources it’s important to think about the limitations of likelihood analysis for highly correlated sources. In this paper I will present the problems of using likelihood analysis for sources that are highly correlated as well as show under what circumstances sources can be considered highly correlated. Dark matter over densities may show up as a point source, so it is a necessary step to learn how the two signals will interact to allow for a proper search for dark matter.

  16. TeV Gamma-Ray Sources from a Survey of the Galactic Plane with Milagro

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Berley, D; Casanova, S; Chen, C; Coyne, D G; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Hopper, B; Huntemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Noyes, D; Némethy, P; Parkinson, P M Saz; Ryan, J M; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2007-01-01

    A survey of Galactic gamma-ray sources at a median energy of ~20 TeV has been performed using the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory. Eight candidate sources of TeV emission are detected with pre-trials significance $>4.5\\sigma$ in the region of Galactic longitude $l\\in[30^\\circ,220^\\circ]$ and latitude $b\\in[-10^\\circ,10^\\circ]$. Four of these sources, including the Crab nebula and the recently published MGRO J2019+37, are observed with significances $>4\\sigma$ after accounting for the trials involved in searching the 3800 square degree region. All four of these sources are also coincident with EGRET sources. Two of the lower significance sources are coincident with EGRET sources and one of these sources is Geminga. The other two candidates are in the Cygnus region of the Galaxy. Several of the sources appear to be spatially extended. The fluxes of the sources at 20 TeV range from ~25% of the Crab flux to nearly as bright as the Crab.

  17. Connecting blazars with ultra high energy cosmic rays and astrophysical neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Resconi, Elisa; Padovani, Paolo; Giommi, Paolo; Caccianiga, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    We present evidence of a direct connection between high energy $\\gamma$-ray emitting blazars, very high energy neutrinos, and ultra high energy cosmic rays. We first identify potential hadronic sources by selecting $\\gamma$-ray emitters, that are in spatial coincidence with neutrinos detected by IceCube. These are then correlated with ultra high energy cosmic rays from the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array scanning in $\\gamma$-ray flux $F_{\\gamma}$ and angular separation between sources and cosmic rays $\\theta$. A maximal excess of 80 cosmic rays (41.9 expected) is observed for the second catalog of hard Fermi-LAT (2FHL) objects with $F_\\gamma\\left(>50\\:\\mathrm{GeV}\\right)\\geq1.8\\times10^{-11}\\:\\mathrm{ph}\\,\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\,\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ and $\\theta\\leq10^{\\circ}$. The probability for this to happen is $1.6 \\times 10^{-5}$, which translates to $5.5 \\times 10^{-4}$ ($3.26\\sigma$) after compensation for trials. No excess of cosmic rays is instead observed for $\\gamma$-ray blazars not in spati...

  18. Cosmic radioactivities

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M; Arnould, Marcel; Prantzos, Nikos

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclides with half-lives ranging from some years to billions of years presumably synthesized outside of the solar system are now recorded in ``live'' or ``fossil'' form in various types of materials, like meteorites or the galactic cosmic rays. They bring specific astrophysical messages the deciphering of which is briefly reviewed here, with special emphasis on the contribution of Dave Schramm and his collaborators to this exciting field of research. Short-lived radionuclides are also present in the Universe today, as directly testified by the gamma-ray lines emitted by the de-excitation of their daughter products. A short review of recent developments in this field is also presented.

  19. On the Additional Absorption of Radio Emission from Discrete Cosmic Sources Under HF Modification of the Lower Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrodny, V. G.; Charkina, O. V.; Yampolski, Yu. M.

    2015-12-01

    The possibilities of modification of a weakly ionized plasma are investigated theoretically and experimentally within different electron density behavior models. The dependence of the additional absorption of radiation of discreet cosmic sources Cassiopeia A and Cygnus A in the artificially disturbed ionospheric D-region on the amplitude of heating signal during the special measuring campaigns of February and October 2008 has been analyzed. The ionosphere has been modified with using the world most powerful HAARP heater, Alaska, USA. The 64 beam riometer located in the immediate vicinity of the heater was used as the recording system.

  20. Search for Sources of Primary Cosmic Rays at Energies Above 0.1 Pev at Tien Shan

    CERN Document Server

    Benko, J; Nikolsky, S I; Nesterova, N M; Romakhin, V A; Chubenko, A P; Shepetov, A L; Somogyi, A; Varga, A

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of the experimental data of joint Russian - Hungrian research was carried out at Tien Shan station on the search of sources of primary cosmic rays (PCR) at energies 0.1-1.0 PeV. Maps of extensive air shower arrival directions were presented where the standard deviation of mean event numbers in equatorial co-ordinates exceeded a definite value. The excess of EAS number was observed from an Galaxy object - the SN remnant and some other directions. The young pulsar PSR 0656+14 located near the centre of this object.

  1. Material recognition using neutron/gamma interrogation with time tagged fission sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, X.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Stevanato, L.; Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Fabris, D.; Nebbia, G; Pesente, S. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon-Bolivar, Laboratorio Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 8900, 1080 A. Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    Material recognition is studied by measuring simultaneously the transmission of neutron and gamma rays produced by a time-tagged {sup 252}Cf source. The possibility to derive direct signatures to identify light elements (C,N,O) by using the measured transmission versus neutron time of flight is demonstrated. The yield of the transmitted gamma ray as a function of energy in the range 0.1-5.5 MeV provides high precision identification of the atomic number of the sample. A tomography system, currently under construction, is described. (authors)

  2. SAS-2 observations of high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The SAS-2 identified six localized high energy (greater than 35 MeV) gamma ray sources. Four of these are the radio pulsars, PSR 0531+21, PSR 0833-45, PSR 1818-04, and PSR 1717-46 discovered in a search of 75 radio pulsars. The fact that only one of these is observed in X-rays, and the significant differences in pulse profiles in the gamma ray and radio observations, leads to the speculation that different mechanisms are involved.

  3. Discovery of the VHE gamma-ray source HESS J1832-093 in the vicinity of SNR G22.7-0.2

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de O na; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zabalza, V; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2014-01-01

    The region around the supernova remnant (SNR) W41 contains several TeV sources and has prompted the H.E.S.S. Collaboration to perform deep observations of this field of view. This resulted in the discovery of the new very high energy (VHE) source HESS J1832-093, at the position $\\rm RA=18^h 32^m 50^s \\pm 3^s_{stat} \\pm 2^s_{syst}, \\rm Dec=-9^\\circ 22' 36'' \\pm 32''_{stat} \\pm 20''_{syst} (J2000)$, spatially coincident with a part of the radio shell of the neighboring remnant G22.7-0.2. The photon spectrum is well described by a power-law of index $\\Gamma = 2.6 \\pm 0.3_{\\rm stat} \\pm 0.1_{\\rm syst}$ and a normalization at 1 TeV of $\\Phi_0=(4.8 \\pm 0.8_{\\rm stat}\\pm 1.0_{\\rm syst})\\,\\times\\,10^{-13}\\,\\rm{cm} ^{-2}\\,s^{-1}\\,TeV^{-1}$. The location of the gamma-ray emission on the edge of the SNR rim first suggested a signature of escaping cosmic-rays illuminating a nearby molecular cloud. Then a dedicated XMM-Newton observation led to the discovery of a new X-ray point source spatially coincident with the TeV ex...

  4. Selective source blocking for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia based on analytical dose modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaile; Ma, Lijun

    2004-08-01

    We have developed an automatic critical region shielding (ACRS) algorithm for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia. The algorithm selectively blocks 201 Gamma Knife sources to minimize the dose to the brainstem while irradiating the root entry area of the trigeminal nerve with 70-90 Gy. An independent dose model was developed to implement the algorithm. The accuracy of the dose model was tested and validated via comparison with the Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) calculations. Agreements of 3% or 3 mm in isodose distributions were found for both single-shot and multiple-shot treatment plans. After the optimized blocking patterns are obtained via the independent dose model, they are imported into the LGP for final dose calculations and treatment planning analyses. We found that the use of a moderate number of source plugs (30-50 plugs) significantly lowered (~40%) the dose to the brainstem for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. Considering the small effort involved in using these plugs, we recommend source blocking for all trigeminal neuralgia treatments with Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  5. A New Paradigm for Identification of Classes of High Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, D F; Reimer, O

    2005-04-08

    A large fraction of the expected number of source detections of the forthcoming observatory Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be initially unidentified. We argue that traditional methodological approaches to identify individual detections and/or populations of gamma-ray sources present procedural limitations. These limitations will hamper our ability to classify the populations lying in the anticipated dataset with the required degree of confidence, in particular for those for which no member has yet been detected convincingly with the predecessor experiment EGRET. Here we suggest a new paradigm for achieving the classification of gamma-ray source populations that is based on implementing an a priori protocol to search for theoretically-motivated candidates. It is essential that such paradigm will be defined before the data is unblinded, in order to protect the discovery potential of the sample. Key to the new procedure is a quantitative assessment of the confidence level by which new populations can be claimed to have been discovered. When needed, small number statistics is applied for population studies in gamma-ray astronomy. Although we refer here explicitly only to the case of GLAST, the scheme we present can certainly be adapted to other experiments confronted with a similar combination of problems.

  6. Selective source blocking for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia based on analytical dose modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Kaile; Ma Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21210 (United States)

    2004-08-07

    We have developed an automatic critical region shielding (ACRS) algorithm for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia. The algorithm selectively blocks 201 Gamma Knife sources to minimize the dose to the brainstem while irradiating the root entry area of the trigeminal nerve with 70-90 Gy. An independent dose model was developed to implement the algorithm. The accuracy of the dose model was tested and validated via comparison with the Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) calculations. Agreements of 3% or 3 mm in isodose distributions were found for both single-shot and multiple-shot treatment plans. After the optimized blocking patterns are obtained via the independent dose model, they are imported into the LGP for final dose calculations and treatment planning analyses. We found that the use of a moderate number of source plugs (30-50 plugs) significantly lowered ({approx}40%) the dose to the brainstem for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. Considering the small effort involved in using these plugs, we recommend source blocking for all trigeminal neuralgia treatments with Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  7. Cosmic rays from active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhko, E G

    2008-01-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) acceleration at the shock created by the expanding cocoons around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is studied. It is shown that above the energy $10^{18}$ eV the overall energy spectrum of CRs, produced during the AGN evolution and released in the intergalactic space, has the form $N\\propto \\epsilon^{-\\gamma}$, with $\\gamma\\approx 2.6$, which extends up to $\\epsilon_{max}\\sim 10^{20}$ eV. It is concluded that cocoons shocks have to be considered as a main source of extragalactic CRs, which together with Galactic supernova remnants provide the observed CR spectrum.

  8. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  9. Multi-Tev Gamma-Ray Observation from the Crab Nebula Using the Tibet-III Air Shower Array Finely Tuned by the Cosmic-Ray Moon's Shadow

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M

    2008-01-01

    The Tibet-III air shower array, consisting of 533 scintillation detectors, has been operating successfully at Yangbajing in Tibet, China since 1999. Using the dataset collected by this array from 1999 November through 2005 November, we obtained the energy spectrum of $\\gamma$-rays from the Crab Nebula, expressed by a power law as $(dJ/dE) = (2.09\\pm0.32)\\times10^{-12} (E/{\\rm 3 TeV})^{-2.96\\pm0.14} {\\rm cm}^{-2} {\\rm s}^{-1} {\\rm TeV}^{-1}$ in the energy range of 1.7 to 40 TeV. This result is consistent with other independent $\\gamma$-ray observations by imaging air Cherenkov telescopes. In this paper, we carefully checked and tuned the performance of the Tibet-III array using data on the moon's shadow in comparison with a detailed Monte Carlo simulation. The shadow is shifted to the west of the moon's apparent position as an effect of the geomagnetic field, although the extent of this displacement depends on the primary energy positively charged cosmic rays. This finding enables us to estimate the systematic...

  10. "Discrepant hardenings" in cosmic ray spectra: a first estimate of the effects on secondary antiproton and diffuse gamma-ray yields

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, Fiorenza

    2010-01-01

    Recent data from CREAM seem to confirm early suggestions that primary cosmic ray spectra at few TeV/nucleon are harder than in the 10-100 GeV range. Also, helium and heavier nuclei spectra appear systematically harder than the proton fluxes at corresponding energies. We note here that if the measurements reflect intrinsic features in the interstellar fluxes, appreciable modifications are expected in the sub-TeV range for the secondary yields, such as antiprotons and diffuse gamma-rays. Presently, this effect represents a systematic error in the extraction of astrophysical parameters as well as for background estimates for indirect dark matter searches. We find that the spectral modifications are appreciable above 100 GeV, and can be responsible for ~30% effects for antiprotons at energies close to 1 TeV or for gamma's at energies close to 300 GeV, compared to currently considered predictions based on simple extrapolation of input fluxes from low energy data.

  11. Quantifying the Interstellar Medium and Cosmic Rays in the MBM 53, 54, and 55 Molecular Clouds and the Pegasus Loop using Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuno, T; Fukui, Y; Hayashi, K; Okumura, A; Tajima, H; Yamamoto, H

    2016-01-01

    A study of the interstellar medium (ISM) and cosmic rays (CRs) using Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data, in a region encompassing the nearby molecular clouds MBM 53, 54, and 55 and a far-infrared loop-like structure in Pegasus, is reported. By comparing Planck dust thermal emission model with Fermi-LAT gamma-ray data, it was found that neither the dust radiance (R) nor the dust opacity at 353 GHz (tau353) were proportional to the total gas column density N(Htot) primarily because N(Htot)/R and N(Htot)/tau353 depend on the dust temperature (Td). The N(Htot) distribution was evaluated using gamma-ray data by assuming the regions of high Td} to be dominated by optically thin atomic hydrogen (HI) and by employing an empirical linear relation of N(Htot)/R to Td. It was determined that the mass of the gas not traced by the 21-cm or 2.6-mm surveys is ~25% of the mass of HI in the optically thin case and is larger than the mass of the molecular gas traced by carbon monoxide by a factor of up to 5. The measured gam...

  12. A method to improve observations of gamma-ray sources near 10 (15) eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, P.; Elbert, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Now that sources of gamma rays near 10 to the 15th power eV have been identified, there is a need for telescopes which can study in detail the high energy gamma ray emissions from these sources. The capabilities of a Cerenkov detector which can track a source at large zenith angle (small elevation angle) are analyzed. Because the observed showers must then develop far from the detector, the effective detection area is very large. During a single half-hour hot phase of Cygnus X-3, for example, it may be possible to detect 45 signal showers compared with 10 background showers. Time structure within the hot phase may then be discernible. The precise capabilities of the detector depend on its mirror size, angular acceptance, electronic speed, coincidence properties, etc. Calculations are presented for one feasible design using mirrors of an improved Fly's Eye type.

  13. Monitoring TeV Gamma-ray Sources for Flaring States with HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisher, Ian; Weisgarber, Thomas; HAWC Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The flux of many TeV gamma-ray emitters exhibits time variability. Detection of these flaring states across multiple wavelengths will lead to a better understanding of the acceleration processes occurring in the source. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is an extensive air-shower detector located near Pico de Orizaba in Mexico which is sensitive to TeV gamma rays. Designed as a survey instrument, the HAWC detector has a large field of view and nearly 100% uptime. This makes HAWC an ideal instrument to monitor sources for transient flaring states. We will present a method of monitoring sources using a Bayesian blocks algorithm to detect changes in the flux and report on the sensitivity of the method. We also discuss results from several bright AGN flares which occurred during the construction phase of HAWC.

  14. Compact Electron-Linac Design Concept for a Gamma Ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, K C D; Dale, G; Garnett, R; Kirbie, C; Krawczyk, F L; Russell, S J; Wangler, T P

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray sources, particularly sources that are easily transportable, are in high demand for different homeland security applications. We have carried out a review of commercially available electron-linac-based sources, and have investigated alternative compact electron-linac systems that use updated technologies compared with sources that are available commercially. As the results, we propose to develop a new source using an electron linac operating at 17 GHz. It uses a klystron, instead of a magnetron, and a IGBT-switched HV power supply. The source design takes advantages of the advances in X-band linac technology and solid-state HV technology. The higher frequency and upgraded technologies offer smaller size, lighter weight, better efficiency, easier operation, and higher reliability, compared with commercially-available linacs. In this paper, we will describe the source design and our choice of technologies.

  15. A virtual source method for Monte Carlo simulation of Gamma Knife Model C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun Tai [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The Monte Carlo simulation method has been used for dosimetry of radiation treatment. Monte Carlo simulation is the method that determines paths and dosimetry of particles using random number. Recently, owing to the ability of fast processing of the computers, it is possible to treat a patient more precisely. However, it is necessary to increase the simulation time to improve the efficiency of accuracy uncertainty. When generating the particles from the cobalt source in a simulation, there are many particles cut off. So it takes time to simulate more accurately. For the efficiency, we generated the virtual source that has the phase space distribution which acquired a single gamma knife channel. We performed the simulation using the virtual sources on the 201 channel and compared the measurement with the simulation using virtual sources and real sources. A virtual source file was generated to reduce the simulation time of a Gamma Knife Model C. Simulations with a virtual source executed about 50 times faster than the original source code and there was no statistically significant difference in simulated results.

  16. Unveiling the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources VI: gamma-ray blazar candidates in the WISH survey and their radio properties

    CERN Document Server

    Nori, M; Massaro, F; D'Abrusco, R; Paggi, A; Tosti, G; Funk, S

    2015-01-01

    According to the second Fermi LAT Catalog (2FGL), about one third of the gamma-ray sources listed have no assigned counterparts at lower energies. Many statistical methods have been developed to find proper counterparts for these sources. We explore the sky area covered at low radio frequency by Westerbork in the Southern Hemisphere (WISH) survey to search for blazar-like associations among the unidentified gamma-ray sources listed in the 2FGL (UGSs). Searching the WISH and NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) radio surveys within the positional uncertainty regions of the 2FGL UGSs, we select as gamma-ray blazar candidates the radio sources characterized by flat radio spectra between 352 MHz and 1400 MHz. We propose new gamma-ray blazar associations for eight UGSs and we also discuss their spectral properties at low radio frequencies. We compare the radio flux density distribution of the low radio frequency gamma-ray blazar candidates with that of gamma-ray blazars associated with other methods. We find significant dif...

  17. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Nori, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  18. Cosmic ray penetration in diffuse clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Krause, J

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic rays are a fundamental source of ionization for molecular and diffuse clouds, influencing their chemical, thermal, and dynamical evolution. The amount of cosmic rays inside a cloud also determines the $\\gamma$-ray flux produced by hadronic collisions between cosmic rays and cloud material. We study the spectrum of cosmic rays inside and outside of a diffuse cloud, by solving the stationary transport equation for cosmic rays including diffusion, advection and energy losses due to ionization of neutral hydrogen atoms. We found that the cosmic ray spectrum inside a diffuse cloud differs from the one in the interstellar medium (ISM) for energies smaller than $E_{br}\\approx 100$ MeV, irrespective of the model details. Below $E_{br}$, the spectrum is harder (softer) than that in the ISM if the latter is a power law $\\propto p^{-s}$ with $s$ larger (smaller) than $\\sim0.42$. As a consequence also the ionization rate due to CRs is strongly affected. Assuming an average Galactic spectrum similar to the one infe...

  19. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Earth Occultation Catalog of Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Harmon, B A; Fishman, G J; Connaughton, V; Henze, W; Paciesas, W S; Finger, M H; McCollough, M L; Sahi, M; Peterson, B; Shrader, C R; Grindlay, J E; Barret, D

    2004-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the low-energy gamma-ray sky (20-1000 keV) between 1991 April and 2000 May (9.1y). Using the Earth Occultation Technique to extract flux information, a catalog of sources using data from the BATSE large area detectors has been prepared. The first part of the catalog consists of results from the monitoring of 58 sources, mostly Galactic. For these sources, we have included tables of flux and spectral data, and outburst times for transients. Light curves (or flux histories) have been placed on the world wide web. We then performed a deep-sampling of 179 objects (including the aforementioned 58 objects) combining data from the entire 9.1y BATSE dataset. Source types considered were primarily accreting binaries, but a small number of representative active galaxies, X-ray-emitting stars, and supernova remnants were also included. The deep sample results include definite detections of 83 objects ...

  20. Mapping correlation of a simulated dark matter source and a point source in the gamma-ray sky - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Alexander [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-23

    In my research, I analyzed how two gamma-ray source models interact with one another when optimizing to fit data. This is important because it becomes hard to distinguish between the two point sources when they are close together or looking at low energy photons. The reason for the first is obvious, the reason why they become harder to distinguish at lower photon energies is the resolving power of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope gets worse at lower energies. When the two point sources are highly correlated (hard to distinguish between), we need to change our method of statistical analysis. What I did was show that highly correlated sources have larger uncertainties associated with them, caused by an optimizer not knowing which point source’s parameters to optimize. I also mapped out where their is high correlation for 2 different theoretical mass dark matter point sources so that people analyzing them in the future knew where they had to use more sophisticated statistical analysis.

  1. Probing Large-scale Coherence between Spitzer IR and Chandra X-Ray Source-subtracted Cosmic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, N.; Arendt, R.; Kashlinsky, A.; Li, Y.; Hasinger, G.; Helgason, K.; Urry, M.; Natarajan, P.; Finoguenov, A.

    2017-09-01

    We present new measurements of the large-scale clustering component of the cross-power spectra of the source-subtracted Spitzer-IRAC cosmic infrared background and Chandra-ACIS cosmic X-ray background surface brightness fluctuations Our investigation uses data from the Chandra Deep Field South, Hubble Deep Field North, Extended Groth Strip/AEGIS field, and UDS/SXDF surveys, comprising 1160 Spitzer hours and ∼12 Ms of Chandra data collected over a total area of 0.3 deg2. We report the first (>5σ) detection of a cross-power signal on large angular scales >20″ between [0.5–2] keV and the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, at ∼5σ and 6.3σ significance, respectively. The correlation with harder X-ray bands is marginally significant. Comparing the new observations with existing models for the contribution of the known unmasked source population at z < 7, we find an excess of about an order of magnitude at 5σ confidence. We discuss possible interpretations for the origin of this excess in terms of the contribution from accreting early black holes (BHs), including both direct collapse BHs and primordial BHs, as well as from scattering in the interstellar medium and intra-halo light.

  2. Unveiling the Gamma-ray Source Count Distribution below the Fermi Detection Limit with Photon Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Zechlin, Hannes-S; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Vittino, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The source-count distribution as a function of their flux, dN/dS, is one of the main quantities characterizing gamma-ray source populations. We employ statistical properties of the Fermi-LAT photon counts map to measure the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray sky at high latitudes (|b|>30 deg) between 1 GeV and 10 GeV. We present a new method, generalizing the use of standard pixel-count statistics, to decompose the total observed gamma-ray emission into: (a) point-source contributions, (b) the Galactic foreground contribution, and (c) a truly diffuse isotropic background contribution. Using the 6-year Fermi-LAT data set (P7REP), we show that the dN/dS distribution in the regime of so far undetected point sources can be consistently described with a power-law of index between 1.9 and 2.0. We measure dN/dS down to an integral flux of ~2x10^{-11} cm^{-2}s^{-1}, improving beyond the 3FGL catalog detection limit by about one order of magnitude. The overall dN/dS distribution is consistent with a broken pow...

  3. Overview of Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray Sources and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, Fred; /LLNL, Livermore; Albert, Felicie; /LLNL, Livermore; Anderson, Scott; /LLNL, Livermore; Barty, Christopher; /LLNL, Livermore; Bayramian, Andy; /LLNL, Livermore; Chu, Tak Sum; /LLNL, Livermore; Cross, R.; /LLNL, Livermore; Ebbers, Chris; /LLNL, Livermore; Gibson, David; /LLNL, Livermore; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore; McNabb, Dennis; /LLNL, Livermore; Messerly, Michael; /LLNL, Livermore; Shverdin, Miroslav; /LLNL, Livermore; Siders, Craig; /LLNL, Livermore; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Semenov, Vladimir; /UC, Berkeley

    2012-06-25

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGaray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  4. Statistical Measurement of the Gamma-ray Source-count Distribution as a Function of Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Zechlin, Hannes-S; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Statistical properties of photon count maps have recently been proven as a new tool to study the composition of the gamma-ray sky with high precision. We employ the 1-point probability distribution function of 6 years of Fermi-LAT data to measure the source-count distribution dN/dS and the diffuse components of the high-latitude gamma-ray sky as a function of energy. To that aim, we analyze the gamma-ray emission in five adjacent energy bands between 1 GeV and 171 GeV. It is demonstrated that the source-count distribution as a function of flux is compatible with a broken power law up to energies of 50 GeV. The index below the break is between 1.95 and 2.0. For higher energies, a simple power law fits the data, with an index of 2.2^{+0.7}_{-0.3} in the energy band between 50 GeV and 171 GeV. Upper limits on further possible breaks as well as the angular power of unresolved sources are derived. We find that point source populations probed by this method can explain 83^{+7}_{-13}% (81^{+52}_{-19}%) of the extrag...

  5. High-mass microquasars and low-latitude gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch-Ramon, V; Paredes, J M

    2004-01-01

    Population studies of unidentified EGRET sources suggest that there exist at least three different populations of galactic gamma-ray sources. One of these populations is formed by young objects distributed along the galactic plane with a strong concentration toward the inner spiral arms of the Galaxy. Variability, spectral and correlation analysis indicate that this population is not homogeneous. In particular, there is a subgroup of sources that display clear variability in their gamma-ray fluxes on timescales from days to months. Following the proposal by Kaufman Bernad\\'o et al. (2002), we suggest that this group of sources might be high-mass microquasars, i.e. accreting black holes or neutron stars with relativistic jets and early-type stellar companions. We present detailed inhomogeneous models for the gamma-ray emission of these systems that include both external and synchrotron self-Compton interactions. We have included effects of interactions between the jet and all external photon fields to which it...

  6. Final SAS-2 gamma ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of SAS-2 high energy Gamma ray data from the direction of the galactic anticenter shows that this region is characterized by: a diffuse emission from the galactic plane which has a maximum along b=0 deg and an enhancement toward negative latitudes associated with Gould's Belt, a strong point source in the direction of the Crab nebula, and a second intense localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg. Gamma ray emission from the Crab source is dominated by a pulsed flux from PSR 0531+21. The total flux above 100MeV is 3.7 + or - 0.8 million/sq cm s. The source near 195 deg, + 5 deg has a flux above 100 MeV of 4.3 + or - 0.9 million/sq cm s. Its spectrum appears flatter than that of the Crab. The diffuse galactic plane emission at negative lattitudes shows a general correlation with the local matter distribution associated with Gould's Belt. The calculated Gamma ray intensity agrees well with the SAS-2 observations.

  7. Two Dimensional Verification of the Dose Distribution of Gamma Knife Model C using Monte Carlo Simulation with a Virtual Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Dong Geon; Choi, Joonbum; Jang, Jae Yeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun-Tai [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Gamma Knife model C contains 201 {sup 60}Co sources located on a spherical surface, so that each beam is concentrated on the center of the sphere. In the last work, we simulated the Gamma Knife model C through Monte Carlo simulation code using Geant4. Instead of 201 multi-collimation system, we made one single collimation system that collects source parameter passing through the collimator helmet. Using the virtual source, we drastically reduced the simulation time to transport 201 gamma circle beams to the target. Gamma index has been widely used to compare two dose distributions in cancer radiotherapy. Gamma index pass rates were compared in two calculated results using the virtual source method and the original method and measured results obtained using radiocrhomic films. A virtual source method significantly reduces simulation time of a Gamma Knife Model C and provides equivalent absorbed dose distributions as that of the original method showing Gamma Index pass rate close to 100% under 1mm/3% criteria. On the other hand, it gives a little narrow dose distribution compared to the film measurement showing Gamma Index pass rate of 94%. More accurate and sophisticated examination on the accuracy of the simulation and film measurement is necessary.

  8. PeV neutrinos from intergalactic interactions of cosmic rays emitted by active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashev, Oleg E; Essey, Warren

    2013-01-01

    The observed spectra of distant blazars are well described by secondary gamma rays produced in line-of-sight interactions of cosmic rays with background photons. In the absence of the cosmic-ray contribution, these spectra would appear surprisingly hard, but the cosmic ray interactions generate very high energy gamma rays relatively close to the observer, and the spectra agree with the data. The same interactions of cosmic rays are expected to produce a flux of neutrinos with energies peaked around 1 PeV. We show that the predicted diffuse isotropic neutrino background from many distant sources can explain the neutrino events recently detected by the IceCube experiment. We also find that the flux from any individual nearby source is insufficient to account for these events. The narrow spectrum around 1 PeV implies that a typical active galactic nucleus can accelerate protons to EeV energies.

  9. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. II. RADIO, INFRARED, AND OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF THE GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Giroletti, M. [INAF-Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2013-06-01

    A significant fraction ({approx}30%) of the high-energy gamma-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) are still of unknown origin, being not yet associated with counterparts at low energies. We recently developed a new association method to identify if there is a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic 2FGL source. This method is entirely based on the discovery that blazars have distinct infrared colors with respect to other extragalactic sources found, thanks to the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky observations. Several improvements have also been performed to increase the efficiency of our method in recognizing {gamma}-ray blazar candidates. In this paper we applied our method to two different samples, the first constituted by unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs), and the second by active galaxies of uncertain type, both listed in the 2FGL. We present a catalog of IR counterparts for {approx}20% of the UGSs investigated. Then, we also compare our results for the associated sources with those present in the literature. In addition, we illustrate the extensive archival research carried out to identify the radio, infrared, optical, and X-ray counterparts of the WISE-selected, {gamma}-ray blazar candidates. Finally, we discuss the future developments of our method based on ground-based follow-up observations.

  10. Imaging the redshifted 21-cm pattern around the first sources during the cosmic dawn using the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Ghara, Raghunath; Datta, Kanan K; Choudhuri, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Understanding properties of the first sources in the Universe using the redshifted \\HI ~21-cm signal is one of the major aims of present and upcoming low-frequency experiments. We investigate the possibility of imaging the redshifted 21-cm pattern around the first sources during the cosmic dawn using the SKA1-low. We model the \\HI ~21-cm image maps, appropriate for the SKA1-low, around the first sources consisting of stars and X-ray sources within galaxies. In addition to the system noise, we account also for the astrophysical foregrounds by adding them to the signal maps. We find that after subtracting the foregrounds using a polynomial fit and suppressing the noise by smoothing the maps over $10^{'} - 30^{'}$ angular scale, the isolated sources at $z \\sim 15$ are detectable with $\\sim 4 - 9 \\, \\sigma$ confidence level in 2000 h of observation with the SKA1-low. Although the 21-cm profiles around the sources get altered because of the Gaussian smoothing, the images can still be used to extract some of the so...

  11. A Survey of Fermi Catalog Sources using data from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    The Fermi LAT has released a list of the most significant 205 sources with three months of Fermi data (Bright Source List). The Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays above 100 GeV with a peak sensitivity between 10 and 30 TeV, overlapping and extending the energy range of Fermi. Of the 34 Galactic LAT sources in the field of view of Milagro, 6 are observed with significance greater than 5 sigma and 14 are observed at greater than 3 sigma. Of these 14 sources, 9 are pulsars. Since the VHE emission detected by Milagro is often found to be extended and likely un-pulsed, the VHE component presumably arises from the pulsar winds. Six of the 14 sources have not been previously detected at TeV energies. The details of the Milagro survey will be presented. We will also present the energy spectra of the high-significance detections. Should the full 1-year source list be available prior to the symposium, we will expand our analysis to include the larger Fermi catalog.

  12. Quantum collapse as a source of the seeds of cosmic structure during the radiation era

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Gabriel; Landau, Susana J.; Piccirilli, María Pía

    2014-10-01

    The emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure, from a perfect isotropic and homogeneous Universe, has not been clearly explained by the standard version of inflationary models as the dynamics involved preserve the homogeneity and isotropy at all times. A proposal that attempts to deal with this problem, by introducing "the self-induced collapse hypothesis," has been introduced by D. Sudarsky and collaborators in previous papers. In all these works, the collapse of the wave function of the inflaton mode is restricted to occur during the inflationary period. In this paper, we analyze the possibility that the collapse happens during the radiation era. A viable model can be constructed under the condition that the inflaton field variable must be affected by the collapse while the momentum variable can or cannot be affected. Another condition to be fulfilled is that the time of collapse must be independent of k . However, when comparing with recent observational data, the predictions of the model cannot be distinguished from the ones provided by the standard inflationary scenario. The main reason for this arises from the requirement that primordial power spectrum obtained for the radiation era matches the amplitude of scalar fluctuations consistent with the latest cosmic microwave background observations. This latter constraint results in a limit on the possible times of collapse and ensures that the contribution of the inflaton field to the energy-momentum tensor is negligible compared to the contribution of the radiation fields.

  13. Radiative feedback and cosmic molecular gas: the role of different radiative sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maio, Umberto; Petkova, Margarita; De Lucia, Gabriella; Borgani, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    We present results from multifrequency radiative hydrodynamical chemistry simulations addressing primordial star formation and related stellar feedback from various populations of stars, stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and initial mass functions. Spectra for massive stars, intermediate-mass stars and regular solar-like stars are adopted over a grid of 150 frequency bins and consistently coupled with hydrodynamics, heavy-element pollution and non-equilibrium species calculations. Powerful massive Population III stars are found to be able to largely ionize H and, subsequently, He and He+, causing an inversion of the equation of state and a boost of the Jeans masses in the early intergalactic medium. Radiative effects on star formation rates are between a factor of a few and 1 dex, depending on the SED. Radiative processes are responsible for gas heating and photoevaporation, although emission from soft SEDs has minor impacts. These findings have implications for cosmic gas preheating, primordial direct-collapse black holes, the build-up of `cosmic fossils' such as low-mass dwarf galaxies, the role of active galactic nuclei during reionization, the early formation of extended discs and angular-momentum catastrophe.

  14. The intriguing nature of the high energy gamma ray source XSSJ12270-4859

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, D; Bonnet-Bidaud, J -M; Belloni, T; Mouchet, M; Masetti, N; Andruchow, I; Cellone, S A; Mukai, K; Matt, G

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the hard X-ray source XSSJ12270-4859 is still unclear though it was claimed to be a magnetic Cataclysmic Variable. We here present a broad-band X-ray and gamma ray study based on a recent XMM-Newton observation and archival INTEGRAL and RXTE data. From the Fermi/LAT 1-year point source catalogue, we tentatively associate XSSJ12270-4859 with 1FGLJ1227.9-4852, a source of high energy gamma rays with emission up to 10GeV. We complement the study with UV photometry from XMM-Newton and ground-based optical and near-IR photometry. The X-ray emission is highly variable showing flares and intensity dips. The X-ray flares consist of flare-dip pairs. Flares are also detected in the UV range but not the dips. Aperiodic dipping behaviour is also observed during X-ray quiescence but not in the UV. The 0.2-100keV spectrum is featureless and described by a power law model with Gamma=1.7. The 100MeV-10GeV spectrum is instead represented by a power law index of 2.45. The luminosity ratio between 0.1-100GeV and 0...

  15. Recent VERITAS Results on VHE Gamma-ray Sources in Cygnus

    CERN Document Server

    Ong, Rene A

    2013-01-01

    The Cygnus region of the Galactic plane is a promising target for high-energy and very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray telescopes as it is home to many potential sources, such as supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, X-ray binaries and massive star clusters. The VHE gamma-ray observatory VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) is an array of four 12 m diameter imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes located at Mt. Hopkins, AZ, USA. Over the period of 2007 to 2012, VERITAS has carried out extensive observations in the direction of Cygnus. These observations were initiated by a sky survey that covered Galactic longitudes between 67 and 82 degrees and Galactic latitudes between -1 and 4 degrees. Additional deep observations have been made near specific sources, including TeV J2032+4130, Cygnus X-3, VER J2019+407 (SNR G78.2+2.1/gamma-Cygni), CTB 87, and MGRO J2019+37. This paper summarizes the latest VERITAS results on the various source detections in the direction of Cygnus and our curr...

  16. Parkes radio searches of Fermi gamma-ray sources and millisecond pulsar discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Ray, P S; Ransom, S M; Sarkissian, J; Cromartie, H T; Johnston, S; Reynolds, J E; Wolff, M T; Freire, P C C; Bhattacharyya, B; Ferrara, E C; Keith, M; Michelson, P F; Parkinson, P M Saz; Wood, K S

    2015-01-01

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported in Kerr et al. (2012). We did not detect radio pulsations from another six pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets done to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs, and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in >1 d circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 Msun presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 d orbit with a ~0.25 Msun companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recentl...

  17. Aberrant gamma band cortical sources and functional connectivity in adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, Shreekantiah; Tikka, Sai Krishna; Goyal, Nishant; Sinha, Vinod Kumar; Nizamie, Shamshul Haque

    2017-01-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) resemble epileptic seizures, but lack clinically evident abnormal electrical activity in the brain. We aimed to assess resting gamma spectral power, current source distribution and functional connectivity in adolescents with PNES. Interictal, 32 channels electroencephalographic recording of 15 adolescents with PNES was compared with 10 matched healthy controls. Spectral power, current source distribution and lagged linear coherence were assessed. Statistically significant gamma spectral power, cortical sources and connectivity pattern was found in some brain areas. Region specific aberrant gamma activity and its relationship to psychopathology are discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Modulated method for efficient, narrow-bandwidth, laser Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2017-07-11

    A method of x-ray and gamma-ray generation via laser Compton scattering uses the interaction of a specially-formatted, highly modulated, long duration, laser pulse with a high-frequency train of high-brightness electron bunches to both create narrow bandwidth x-ray and gamma-ray sources and significantly increase the laser to Compton photon conversion efficiency.

  19. The Space-Based Gamma-Ray Telescope GAMMA-400 and Its Scientific Goals

    CERN Document Server

    Galper, A M; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Avanesov, G A; Bergstrom, L; Bogomolov, E A; Boezio, M; Bonvicini, V; Boyarchuk, K A; Dogiel, V A; Gusakov, Yu V; Fradkin, M I; Fuglesang, Ch; Hnatyk, B I; Kachanov, V A; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Topchiev, N P; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasiliev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zarikashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2013-01-01

    The design of the new space-based gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-400 is presented. GAMMA-400 is optimized for the energy 100 GeV with the best parameters: the angular resolution ~0.01 deg, the energy resolution ~1%, and the proton rejection factor ~10E6, but is able to measure gamma-ray and electron + positron fluxes in the energy range from 100 MeV to 10 TeV. GAMMA-400 is aimed to a broad range of science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, studies of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, gamma-ray bursts, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, and nuclei.

  20. Low-{\\Gamma} jets from Compact Binary Mergers as Candidate Electromagnetic Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lamb, Gavin P

    2016-01-01

    Compact binary mergers, with neutron stars or neutron star and black-hole components, are thought to produce various electromagnetic counterparts: short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from ultra-relativistic jets followed by broadband afterglow; semi-isotropic kilonova from radioactive decay of r-process elements; and late time radio flares; etc. If the jets from such mergers follow a similar power-law distribution of Lorentz factors as other astrophysical jets then the population of merger jets will be dominated by low-{\\Gamma} values. The prompt gamma-rays associated with short GRBs would be suppressed for a low-{\\Gamma} jet and the jet energy will be released as X-ray/optical/radio transients when a shock forms in the ambient medium. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the properties of such transients as candidate electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave sources detectable by LIGO/Virgo. Approximately 78% of merger-jets result in failed GRB with optical peaks 14-22 magnitude and an all-sky rate of ...

  1. Embedded star clusters as sources of high-energy cosmic rays: Modelling and constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Maurin, Gilles; Komin, Nukri; Lamanna, Fabien Krayzeland Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars are mainly found in stellar associations. These massive star clusters occur in the heart of giant molecular clouds. The strong stellar wind activity in these objects generates large bubbles and induces collective effects that could accelerate particles up to high energy and produce gamma rays. The best way to input an acceleration origin to the stellar wind interaction in massive stellar cluster is to observe young massive star clusters in which no supernova explosion has occurred yet. This work aims to constrain the part of stellar wind mechanical energy that is converted into energetic particles using the sensitivity of the ongoing Fermi/LAT instrument. This work further provides detailed predictions of expected gamma-ray fluxes in the view of the on-set of the next generation of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. A one-zone model where energetic particles are accelerated by repeated interactions with strong supersonic shocks occurring in massive star clusters was developed. The particl...

  2. The South Pole as a site for monitoring 100 TeV cosmic gamma rays by means of an air shower array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillas, A.M. (Physics Department, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom))

    1990-01-15

    The South Pole has special advantages as a site for monitoring spasmodic or weak periodic emission of ultra high energy gamma rays from many X-ray binaries, since those sources which are within view can be seen continuously with only slow varying conditions of attenuation, and the very high altitude favors a high counting rate. It is well placed to view the large concentration of X-ray sources at southern declinations. It has proved possible to operate an air shower array efficiently in this hostile environment. Its view overlaps that from other Southern Hemisphere stations, but with higher posssible exposure.

  3. Is the Galactic Cosmic Ray Spectrum Constant in Time?

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, David; Pohl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis is considered that the present Galactic cosmic ray spectrum is at present softer than its time average due to source intermittency. Measurements of muogenic nuclides underground could provide an independent measurement of the time averaged spectrum. Source intermittency could also account for the surprising low anisotropy reported by the IceCube collaboration. Predictions for Galactic emission of ultrahigh-energy quanta, such as UHE gamma rays and neutrinos, might be higher or lower than previously estimated.

  4. Contribution from unresolved discrete sources to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debbijoy Bhattacharya; Parameswaran Sreekumar; Reshmi Mukherjee

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB) is still an open question,even nearly forty years after its discovery.The emission could originate either from truly diffuse processes or from unresolved point sources.Although the majority of the 271 point sources detected by EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope)are unidentified,of the identified sources,blazars are the dominant candidates.Therefore,unresolved blazars may be considered the main contributor to the EGRB,and many studies have been carried out to understand their distribution,evolution and contribution to the EGRB.Considering that γ-ray emission comes mostly from jets of blazars and that the jet emission decreases rapidly with increasing jet to line-of-sight angle,it is not surprising that EGRET was not able to detect many large inclination angle active galactic nuclei (AGNs).Though Fermi could only detect a few large inclination angle AGNs during the first three months of its survey,it is expected to detect many such sources in the near future.Since non-blazar AGNs are expected to have higher density as compared to blazars,these could also contribute significantly to the EGRB.In this paper,we discuss contributions from unresolved discrete sources including normal galaxies,starburst galaxies,blazars and off-axis AGNs to the EGRB.

  5. SIX NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM ARECIBO SEARCHES OF FERMI GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cromartie, H. T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kerr, M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Deneva, J. S.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ferrara, E. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Michelson, P. F., E-mail: thankful@virginia.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We have discovered six radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a search with the Arecibo telescope of 34 unidentified gamma-ray sources from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) four year point source catalog. Among the 34 sources, we also detected two MSPs previously discovered elsewhere. Each source was observed at a center frequency of 327 MHz, typically at three epochs with individual integration times of 15 minutes. The new MSP spin periods range from 1.99 to 4.66 ms. Five of the six pulsars are in interacting compact binaries (period ≤ 8.1 hr), while the sixth is a more typical neutron star-white dwarf binary with an 83 day orbital period. This is a higher proportion of interacting binaries than for equivalent Fermi-LAT searches elsewhere. The reason is that Arecibo's large gain afforded us the opportunity to limit integration times to 15 minutes, which significantly increased our sensitivity to these highly accelerated systems. Seventeen of the remaining 26 gamma-ray sources are still categorized as strong MSP candidates, and will be re-searched.

  6. Radiative feedback and cosmic molecular gas: the role of different radiative sources

    CERN Document Server

    Maio, U; De Lucia, G; Borgani, S

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multifrequency radiative hydrodynamical chemistry simulations addressing primordial star formation and related stellar feedback from various populations of stars, stellar energy distributions (SEDs) and initial mass functions. Spectra for massive stars, intermediate-mass stars and regular solar-like stars are adopted over a grid of 150 frequency bins and consistently coupled with hydrodynamics, heavy-element pollution and non-equilibrium species calculations. Powerful massive population III stars are found to be able to largely ionize H and, subsequently, He and He$^+$, causing an inversion of the equation of state and a boost of the Jeans masses in the early intergalactic medium. Radiative effects on star formation rates are between a factor of a few and 1 dex, depending on the SED. Radiative processes are responsible for gas heating and photoevaporation, although emission from soft SEDs has minor impacts. These findings have implications for cosmic gas preheating, primordial direct-c...

  7. Uncovering neutrinos from cosmic ray factories: the Multi Point Source method

    CERN Document Server

    Sestayo, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for the search of high energy extraterrestrial neutrinos in extended regions. The method is based on the study of the spatial correlations between the events recorded by neutrino telescopes. Extended regions radiating neutrinos may exist in the Galaxy due to the hierarchical clustering of massive stars, the progenitors of all the Galactic accelerators known so far. The neutrino emission associated to such extended regions might be faint and complex due to both the escape of cosmic rays and the intricate distribution of gas in the environment of the accelerators. We have simulated extended neutrino emission over an area of 10deg x 10deg, where the intensity fluctuations across the region are modelled as a Gaussian random field with a given correlation structure. We tested our proposed method over realizations of this intensity field plus a uniform random field representative of the spatial distribution of the atmospheric neutrino background. Our results indicate that the method propos...

  8. AMS-02 data confront acceleration of cosmic ray secondaries in nearby sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the model proposed earlier to account for the observed increase in the positron fraction in cosmic rays with increasing energy, in the light of new data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) experiment. The model accounts for the production and acceleration of secondary electrons...... and positrons in nearby supernova remnants which results in an additional, harder component that becomes dominant at high energies. By fitting this to AMS-02 data we can calculate the expected concomitant rise of the boron-to-carbon ratio, as well as of the fraction of antiprotons. If these predictions...... are confirmed by the forthcoming AMS-02 data it would conclusively rule out all other proposed explanations, in particular, dark matter annihilations or decays....

  9. Unveiling the Gamma-Ray Source Count Distribution Below the Fermi Detection Limit with Photon Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Vittino, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The source-count distribution as a function of their flux, {dN}/{dS}, is one of the main quantities characterizing gamma-ray source populations. We employ statistical properties of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) photon counts map to measure the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray sky at high latitudes (| b| ≥slant 30°) between 1 and 10 GeV. We present a new method, generalizing the use of standard pixel-count statistics, to decompose the total observed gamma-ray emission into (a) point-source contributions, (b) the Galactic foreground contribution, and (c) a truly diffuse isotropic background contribution. Using the 6 yr Fermi-LAT data set (P7REP), we show that the {dN}/{dS} distribution in the regime of so far undetected point sources can be consistently described with a power law with an index between 1.9 and 2.0. We measure {dN}/{dS} down to an integral flux of ˜ 2× {10}-11 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1, improving beyond the 3FGL catalog detection limit by about one order of magnitude. The overall {dN}/{dS} distribution is consistent with a broken power law, with a break at {2.1}-1.3+1.0× {10}-8 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1. The power-law index {n}1={3.1}-0.5+0.7 for bright sources above the break hardens to {n}2=1.97+/- 0.03 for fainter sources below the break. A possible second break of the {dN}/{dS} distribution is constrained to be at fluxes below 6.4× {10}-11 {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1 at 95% confidence level. The high-latitude gamma-ray sky between 1 and 10 GeV is shown to be composed of ˜25% point sources, ˜69.3% diffuse Galactic foreground emission, and ˜6% isotropic diffuse background.

  10. Selected Theoretical Studies Group contributions to the 14th International Cosmic Ray conference. [including studies on galactic molecular hydrogen, interstellar reddening, and on the origin of cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The galactic distribution of H2 was studied through gamma radiation and through X-ray, optical, and infrared absorption measurements from SAS-2 and other sources. A comparison of the latitude distribution of gamma-ray intensity with reddening data shows reddening data to give the best estimate of interstellar gas in the solar vicinity. The distribution of galactic cosmic ray nucleons was determined and appears to be identical to the supernova remnant distribution. Interactions between ultrahigh energy cosmic-ray nuclei and intergalactic photon radiation fields were calculated, using the Monte Carlo method.

  11. Determination of the optimum-size californium-252 neutron source for borehole capture gamma-ray analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senftle, F.E.; Macy, R.J.; Mikesell, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fast- and thermal-neutron fluence rates from a 3.7 ??g 252Cf neutron source in a simulated borehole have been measured as a function of the source-to-detector distance using air, water, coal, iron ore-concrete mix, and dry sand as borehole media. Gamma-ray intensity measurements were made for specific spectral lines at low and high energies for the same range of source-to-detector distances in the iron ore-concrete mix and in coal. Integral gamma-ray counts across the entire spectrum were also made at each source-to-detector distance. From these data, the specific neutron-damage rate, and the critical count-rate criteria, we show that in an iron ore-concrete mix (low hydrogen concentration), 252Cf neutron sources of 2-40 ??g are suitable. The source size required for optimum gamma-ray sensitivity depends on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium such as coal, similar measurements were made. The results show that sources from 2 to 20 ??g are suitable to obtain the highest gamma-ray sensitivity, again depending on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium, significant improvement in sensitivity can be achieved by using faster electronics; in iron ore, it cannot. ?? 1979 North-Holland Publishing Co.

  12. Compact FEL-driven inverse compton scattering gamma-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placidi, M.; Di Mitri, S.; Pellegrini, C.; Penn, G.

    2017-05-01

    Many research and applications areas require photon sources capable of producing gamma-ray beams in the multi-MeV energy range with reasonably high fluxes and compact footprints. Besides industrial, nuclear physics and security applications, a considerable interest comes from the possibility to assess the state of conservation of cultural assets like statues, columns etc., via visualization and analysis techniques using high energy photon beams. Computed Tomography scans, widely adopted in medicine at lower photon energies, presently provide high quality three-dimensional imaging in industry and museums. We explore the feasibility of a compact source of quasi-monochromatic, multi-MeV gamma-rays based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) from a high intensity ultra-violet (UV) beam generated in a free-electron laser by the electron beam itself. This scheme introduces a stronger relationship between the energy of the scattered photons and that of the electron beam, resulting in a device much more compact than a classic ICS for a given scattered energy. The same electron beam is used to produce gamma-rays in the 10-20 MeV range and UV radiation in the 10-15 eV range, in a 4×22 m2 footprint system.

  13. Investigating the peculiar emission from the new VHE gamma-ray source H1722+119

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Buson, S; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Ona; Di Pierro, F; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Ramazani, V Fallah; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinović, N; Munoz, A González; Gora, D; Guberman, D; Hadasch, D; Hahn, A; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Nogués, L; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Pedaletti, G; Perri, L; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R; D'Ammando, F; Hovatta, T; Max-Moerbeck, W; Raiteri, C M; Readhead, A C S; Reinthal, R; Richards, J L; Verrecchia, F; Villata, M

    2016-01-01

    The MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov) telescopes observed the BL Lac object H1722+119 (redshift unknown) for six consecutive nights between 2013 May 17 and 22, for a total of 12.5 h. The observations were triggered by high activity in the optical band measured by the KVA (Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien) telescope. The source was for the first time detected in the very high energy (VHE, $E > 100$ GeV) $\\gamma$-ray band with a statistical significance of 5.9 $\\sigma$. The integral flux above 150 GeV is estimated to be $(2.0\\pm 0.5)$ per cent of the Crab Nebula flux. We used contemporaneous high energy (HE, 100 MeV $ < E < 100$ GeV) $\\gamma$-ray observations from Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) to estimate the redshift of the source. Within the framework of the current extragalactic background light models, we estimate the redshift to be $z = 0.34 \\pm 0.15$. Additionally, we used contemporaneous X-ray to radio data collected by the instruments on board the Swift satellite, the KVA, and t...

  14. Abstracts of papers to be presented at the fifth symposium on x- and gamma-ray sources and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The program and abstracts of papers are presented. Topics include radiation sources, radiation detectors, mathematical models and data analysis, gamma-ray spectroscopy, instrumentation, applications of x-ray fluorescence, PIXE, and x-ray absorption. (ACR)

  15. CHANDRA/VLA Follow-up of TeV J2032+4131, the Only Unidentified TeV Gamma-ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Y; Combi, J; Corcoran, M; Dame, T M; Drake, J; Bernado, M M K; Milne, P; Miniati, F; Pohl, M; Reimer, O; Romero, G; Rupen, M P; Butt, Yousaf; Benaglia, Paula; Combi, Jorge; Corcoran, Michael; Dame, Thomas; Drake, Jeremy; Bernado, Marina Kaufman; Milne, Peter; Miniati, Francesco; Pohl, Martin; Reimer, Olaf; Romero, Gustavo; Rupen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The HEGRA Cherenkov telescope array group recently reported a steady and extended unidentified TeV gamma-ray source lying at the outskirts of Cygnus OB2. This is the most massive stellar association known in the Galaxy, estimated to contain ~2600 OB type members alone. It has been previously argued that the large scale shocks and turbulence in such associations may play a role in accelerating Galactic cosmic rays. Indeed, Cyg OB2 also coincides with the non-variable MeV-GeV range unidentified EGRET source, 3EG 2033+4118. We report on the near-simultaneous follow-up observations of the extended TeV source region with the CHANDRA X-ray Observatory and the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope obtained in order to explore this possibility. Analysis of the CO, HI, and IRAS 100 micron emissions shows that the TeV source region coincides with an outlying sub-group of powerful OB stars which have evacuated or destroyed much of the ambient atomic, molecular and dust material, and which may be related to the very hig...

  16. Gamma ray emission from SNR RX J1713.7-3946 and the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Blasi, P

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the flux of non-thermal radiations from the supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946 in the context of the non-linear theory of particle acceleration at shocks, which allows us to take into account self-consistently the dynamical reaction of the accelerated particles, the generation of magnetic fields in the shock proximity and the dynamical reaction of the magnetic field on the plasma. When the fraction of particles which get accelerated is of order $\\sim 10^{-4}$, we find that the strength of the magnetic field obtained as a result of streaming instability induced by cosmic rays is compatible with the interpretation of the X-ray emitting filaments being produced by strong synchrotron losses in $\\sim 100 \\mu G$ magnetic fields. If the X-ray filaments are explained in alternative ways, the constraint on the magnetic field downstream of the shock disappears and the HESS data can be marginally fit with ICS of relativistic electrons off a complex population of photons, tailored to comprise CMB and ambient ...

  17. Inferred Cosmic-Ray Spectrum from Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Observations of the Earths Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Brandt, T. J.; Hewitt, J.W.; Perkins, J. S.; Thompson, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent accurate measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) species by ATIC-2, CREAM, and PAMELA reveal an unexpected hardening in the proton and He spectra above a few hundred GeV, a gradual softening of the spectra just below a few hundred GeV, and a harder spectrum of He compared to that of protons. These newly-discovered features may offer a clue to the origin of high-energy CRs. We use the Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of the -ray emission from the Earth's limb for an indirect measurement of the local spectrum of CR protons in the energy range approx. 90 GeV-6 TeV (derived from a photon energy range 15 GeV-1 TeV). Our analysis shows that single power law and broken power law spectra fit the data equally well and yield a proton spectrum with index 2.68 +/- 0.04 and 2.61 +/- 0.08 above approx. 200 GeV, respectively.

  18. Discovery of an extended source of gamma-ray emission in the Southern hemisphere

    CERN Document Server

    Araya, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of a $\\sim$ 3.$^{\\circ}$4-wide region of high-energy emission in data from the Fermi LAT satellite is reported. The region is located in the Southern hemisphere and relatively far from the plane of the Galaxy, around the Galactic coordinates l=350.6, b=-4.7. It shows a hard spectrum that is compatible with a power-law, $\\frac{dN}{dE}\\propto E^{-\\Gamma}$, with a spectral index $\\Gamma = 1.68 \\pm 0.04_{stat}$ above 200 MeV and a total integrated flux above 1 GeV of $(3.76 \\pm 0.33_{stat}) \\times 10^{-9}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. Two hypotheses about the nature of the source are discussed, namely that the emission comes from the shell of an unknown supernova remnant or from a pulsar wind nebula.

  19. Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

  20. Interstellar gas towards CTB 37A and the TeV gamma-ray source HESS J1714-385

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxted, Nigel I.; Rowell, Gavin P.; Dawson, Bruce R.; Burton, Michael G.; Fukui, Yasuo; Walsh, Andrew; Kawamura, Akiko; Horachi, Hirotaka; Sano, Hidetoshi; Yoshiike, Satoshi; Fukuda, Tatsuya

    2013-09-01

    Observations of dense molecular gas towards the supernova remnants CTB 37A (G348.5+0.1) and G348.5-0.0 were carried out using the Mopra and Nanten2 radio telescopes. We present CO(2-1) and CS(1-0) emission maps of a region encompassing the CTB 37A TeV gamma-ray emission, HESS J1714-385, revealing regions of dense gas within associated molecular clouds. Some gas displays good overlap with gamma-ray emission, consistent with hadronic gamma-ray emission scenarios. Masses of gas towards the HESS J1714-385 TeV gamma-ray emission region were estimated, and were of the order of 103-104 M⊙. In the case of a purely hadronic origin for the gamma-ray emission, the cosmic ray flux enhancement is ˜80-1100 times the local solar value. This enhancement factor and other considerations allow a discussion of the age of CTB 37A, which is consistent with ˜104 yr.

  1. Interstellar gas towards CTB 37A and the TeV gamma-ray source HESS J1714-385

    CERN Document Server

    Maxted, Nigel I; Dawson, Bruce R; Burton, Michael G; Fukui, Yasuo; Walsh, Andrew; Kawamura, Akiko; Horachi, Hirotaka; Sano, Hidetoshi; Yoshiike, Satoshi; Fukuda, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Observations of dense molecular gas towards the supernova remnants CTB 37A (G348.5+0.1) and G348.5-0.0 were carried out using the Mopra and Nanten2 radio telescopes. We present CO(2-1) and CS(1-0) emission maps of a region encompassing the CTB 37A TeV gamma-ray emission, HESS J1714-385, revealing regions of dense gas within associated molecular clouds. Some gas displays good overlap with gamma-ray emission, consistent with hadronic gamma-ray emission scenarios. Masses of gas towards the HESS J1714-385 TeV gamma-ray emission region were estimated, and were of the order of 10^3-10^4 solar masses. In the case of a purely hadronic origin for the gamma-ray emission, the cosmic ray flux enhancement is ~80-1100 times the local solar value. This enhancement factor and other considerations allow a discussion of the age of CTB 37A, which is consistent with ~10^4 yr.

  2. Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

  3. Two-Component Jet Models of Gamma-Ray Burst Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, F; Granot, J; Peng, Fang; Konigl, Arieh; Granot, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical studies have raised the possibility that the collimated outflows in gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources have two distinct components: a narrow (opening half-angle $\\theta_{\\rm n}$), highly relativistic (initial Lorentz factor $\\eta_\\rmn \\gtrsim 10^2$) outflow, from which the $\\gamma$-ray emission originates, and a wider ($\\theta_{\\rm w} \\lesssim 3 \\theta_{\\rm n}$), moderately relativistic ($\\eta_{\\rm w}\\sim 10$) surrounding flow. Using a simple synchrotron emission model, we calculate the R-band afterglow lightcurves expected in this scenario and derive algebraic expressions for the flux ratios of the emission from the two jet components at the main transition times in the lightcurve. We apply this model to GRB sources, for explaining the structure of afterglows and source energetics, as well as to X-ray flash sources, which we interpret as GRB jets viewed at an angle $\\theta_{\\rm obs} > \\theta_{\\rm n}$. Finally, we argue that a neutron-rich hydromagnetic outflow may naturally g...

  4. Distinguishing mechanisms of gamma frequency oscillations in human current source signals using a computational model of a laminar neocortical network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane eLee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gamma frequency rhythms have been implicated in numerous studies for their role in healthy and abnormal brain function. The frequency band has been described to encompass as broad a range as 30–150 Hz. Crucial to understanding the role of gamma in brain function is an identification of the underlying neural mechanisms, which is particularly difficult in the absence of invasive recordings in macroscopic human signals such as those from magnetoencephalography (MEG and electroencephalography (EEG. Here, we studied features of current dipole (CD signals from two distinct mechanisms of gamma generation, using a computational model of a laminar cortical circuit designed specifically to simulate CDs in a biophysically principled manner (Jones et al., 2007; Jones et al., 2009. We simulated spiking pyramidal interneuronal gamma (PING whose period is regulated by the decay time constant of GABAA-mediated synaptic inhibition and also subthreshold gamma driven by gamma-periodic exogenous excitatory synaptic drive. Our model predicts distinguishable CD features created by spiking PING compared to subthreshold driven gamma that can help to disambiguate mechanisms of gamma oscillations in human signals. We found that gamma rhythms in neocortical layer 5 can obscure a simultaneous, independent gamma in layer 2/3. Further, we arrived at a novel interpretation of the origin of high gamma frequency rhythms (100–150 Hz, showing that they emerged from a specific temporal feature of CDs associated with single cycles of PING activity and did not reflect a separate rhythmic process. Last we show that the emergence of observable subthreshold gamma required highly coherent exogenous drive. Our results are the first to demonstrate features of gamma oscillations in human current source signals that distinguish cellular and circuit level mechanisms of these rhythms and may help guide understanding of their functional role.

  5. Simulation study on original characteristic spectrum of gamma radiation field cosmic-induced on lunabase rocks%月表岩石诱发γ辐射场原始谱特征模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵剑锟; 葛良全; 张庆贤; 卢贞瑞; 罗耀耀

    2015-01-01

    Background: With large differences in mass density, Basalt, KREEP and Dunite are representative and widely distributed on lunar surface. Cosmic-inducedg-ray is produced after energetic particles (Galactic Cosmic Rays, GCR; Solar Particle Event, SPE) impacting on lunabase rocks.Purpose:This study aims at discovering the factors of cosmic-inducedg-ray spectrum and then utilizing the gamma ray data for lunar exploration more efficiency.Methods: A Monte Carlo model for proton-induced gamma ray is designed for the FLUKA simulation software to research cosmic-induced gamma original spectrum. Data analysis is applied to find the relationship between the characteristic spectrum and the densities of lunabase rocks.Results: The model is appropriate to simulate cosmic-inducedg-ray original spectrum. A great variety of original spectrum characteristics, such as energies of main elements, positron annihilation peak and radiation balanced peak, are acquired.Conclusion: A positive correlation is found between mass density of lunabase rock and characteristic peak intensity. These researches for original spectrum can be applied to comparing different lunar gamma-ray spectrum and rock mass density mapping on lunar surface as a reference.%玄武岩、克里普岩、橄榄岩在月球表面广泛分布,并具有一定的代表性,并且岩石密度差异较大,高能粒子(Galactic Cosmic Rays, GCR;Solar Particle Event, SPE)与岩石相互作用后激发g射线。利用蒙特卡罗软件FLUKA开展了月表高能质子诱发g射线的研究,获取了月表多种成岩主元素的特征g射线能量峰、正电子湮灭峰和g辐射平衡峰等原始谱特征信息。通过数据分析表明特征峰强度与月表岩石密度呈正相关。原始谱特征的研究不仅可以为不同系列绕月g数据的对比研究提供参考,也可为在全月表面进行基于核辐射方法的岩石密度填图研究提供理论支撑。

  6. The GeV-TeV Connection in Galactic gamma-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Reimer, O.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Torres, Diego F.; /ICREA, Barcelona; Hinton, J.A.; /Leeds U.

    2007-09-28

    Recent observations by atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. and MAGIC have revealed a large number of new sources of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-rays above 100 GeV, mostly concentrated along the Galactic plane. At lower energies (100 MeV - 10 GeV) the satellite-based instrument EGRET revealed a population of sources clustering along the Galactic Plane. Given their adjacent energy bands a systematic correlation study between the two source classes seems appropriate. While only a few of the sources connect, both in terms of positional coincidence and spectral consistency, most of the detections occur only in one or the other energy domain. In these cases, for the first time consistent upper limits in the other energy band have been derived. Here, the populations of Galactic sources in both energy domains are characterized on observational as well as on theoretical grounds, followed by an interpretation on their similarities and differences. The observational data at this stage suggest rather different major source populations at GeV and TeV energies. With regards to preparations for the upcoming GLAST mission that will cover the energy range bridging GeV and TeV instruments this paper investigates the connection between the population of sources in these bands and concludes with predictions for commonly observable sources for GLAST-LAT detections.

  7. Identification of the TeV gamma-ray source ARGO J2031+4157 with the Cygnus Cocoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S.; D' Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Di Girolamo, T. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Napoli " Federico II," Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant' Angelo, via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Bernardini, P.; D' Amone, A.; De Mitri, I. [Dipartimento Matematica e Fisica " Ennio De Giorgi," Università del Salento, via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z. [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918, 100049 Beijing (China); Branchini, P.; Budano, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Camarri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Università di Roma " Tor Vergata," via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Cardarelli, R.; Di Sciascio, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Chen, T. L.; Danzengluobu [Tibet University, 850000 Lhasa, Xizang (China); Creti, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Lecce, via per Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cui, S. W. [Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050016, Hebei (China); Dai, B. Z., E-mail: chensz@ihep.ac.cn [Yunnan University, 2 North Cuihu Road, 650091 Kunming, Yunnan (China); Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

    2014-08-01

    The extended TeV gamma-ray source ARGO J2031+4157 (or MGRO J2031+41) is positionally consistent with the Cygnus Cocoon discovered by Fermi-LAT at GeV energies in the Cygnus superbubble. Reanalyzing the ARGO-YBJ data collected from 2007 November to 2013 January, the angular extension and energy spectrum of ARGO J2031+4157 are evaluated. After subtracting the contribution of the overlapping TeV sources, the ARGO-YBJ excess map is fitted with a two-dimensional Gaussian function in a square region of 10° × 10°, finding a source extension σ{sub ext}= 1.°8 ± 0.°5. The observed differential energy spectrum is dN/dE = (2.5 ± 0.4) × 10{sup –11}(E/1 TeV){sup –2.6±0.3} photons cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} TeV{sup –1}, in the energy range 0.2-10 TeV. The angular extension is consistent with that of the Cygnus Cocoon as measured by Fermi-LAT and the spectrum also shows a good connection with the one measured in the 1-100 GeV energy range. These features suggest to identify ARGO J2031+4157 as the counterpart of the Cygnus Cocoon at TeV energies. The Cygnus Cocoon, located in the star-forming region of Cygnus X, is interpreted as a cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays related to the Cygnus superbubble. The spectral similarity with supernova remnants (SNRs) indicates that the particle acceleration inside a superbubble is similar to that in an SNR. The spectral measurements from 1 GeV to 10 TeV allows for the first time to determine the possible spectrum slope of the underlying particle distribution. A hadronic model is adopted to explain the spectral energy distribution.

  8. The GAMMA-400 space observatory: status and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Galper, A M; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Boyarchuk, K A; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2014-01-01

    The present design of the new space observatory GAMMA-400 is presented in this paper. The instrument has been designed for the optimal detection of gamma rays in a broad energy range (from ~100 MeV up to 3 TeV), with excellent angular and energy resolution. The observatory will also allow precise and high statistic studies of the electron component in the cosmic rays up to the multi TeV region, as well as protons and nuclei spectra up to the knee region. The GAMMA-400 observatory will allow to address a broad range of science topics, like search for signatures of dark matter, studies of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, gamma-ray bursts and charged cosmic rays acceleration and diffusion mechanism up to the knee.

  9. Discovery of new X-ray sources near the unidentified gamma-ray source HESS J1841-055

    CERN Document Server

    Nobukawa, K K; Tsuru, T G; Koyama, K

    2015-01-01

    HESS J1841$-$055 is a diffuse unidentified gamma-ray source with the size of $\\sim\\,1.3^{\\circ}\\times\\,1^{\\circ}$. No conclusive counterpart in other wavelengths has so far detected. To search for X-rays responsible for the TeV emission, the Suzaku observations were conducted, which covered a half region of the HESS source. In the soft band (0.5-2.0 keV), we discovered a diffuse emission, Suzaku J1840.2$-$0552, with the size of $\\sim10'$. Since its spectrum was fitted by an optically thin thermal plasma model, Suzaku J1840.2$-$0552 is likely to be a supernova remnant. We also discovered an extended source, Suzaku J1840.2$-$0544, in the hard band (2.0-8.0 keV) with an emission line at 6.1 keV. From the spectral feature and large interstellar absorption, this source is likely to be a cluster of galaxies behind the Galactic plane at the red-shift of $\\sim$0.09. The other diffuse source spatially overlaps with the SNR candidate G26.6$-$0.2, which shows a non-thermal dominant spectrum. Since no other candidate is ...

  10. The GAMMA-400 Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongi, M.

    2014-06-01

    GAMMA-400 is a new space experiment which will study gamma rays and cosmic rays from about 100 MeV up to some TeVs. The proposed instrument has an angular resolution ˜ 0.1 degrees at 10 GeV and better than ˜ 0.02 degrees above 100 GeV, and an energy resolution ˜ 1% at E > 100 GeV for gamma rays. With these characteristics the experiment will be able to contribute to the search for signatures of Dark Matter, and to the study of Galactic and ex-tragalactic gamma sources and diffuse emission. A large segmented calorimeter more than 25 X0 deep will allow the study of high-energy electrons, and the measurement of the flux of protons and nuclei up to the "knee" region.

  11. Is there a common origin for the cosmic. gamma. -ray lines at 0. 51 and 1. 81 MeV near the galactic centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, W.R.; Schoenfelder, V.; Diehl, R.

    1986-10-23

    The authors consider the possibility that the cosmic 0.51 MeV positron annihilation line and the 1.81 MeV /sup 26/Al decay line near the galactic centre have a common origin. The relationship between the two lines may involve an initial decay of /sup 26/Al to /sup 26/Mg with the most probable emission of a positron which eventually annihilates producing the 0.51 MeV line, followed by the decay of /sup 26/Mg to the ground state with the emission of the 1.81 MeV line. This hypothesis is discussed with respect to the time-integrated intensities of the lines. Also the properties of the lines are examined to determine their possible common source region. (U.K.).

  12. Phenomenological analysis of quantum collapse as source of the seeds of cosmic structure

    CERN Document Server

    De Unánue, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    The standard inflationary version of the origin of the cosmic structure as the result of the quantum fluctuations during the early universe is less than fully satisfactory as has been argued in [A. Perez, H. Sahlmann, and D. Sudarsky, Class. Quantum Grav., 23, 2317, (2006)]. A proposal is made there of a way to address the shortcomings by invoking a process similar to the collapse of the quantum mechanical wave function of the various modes of the inflaton field. This in turn was inspired on the ideas of R. Penrose about the role that quantum gravity might play in bringing about such breakdown of the standard unitary evolution of quantum mechanics. In this paper we study in some detail the two schemes of collapse considered in the original work together with an alternative scheme, which can be considered as "more natural" than the former two. The new scheme, assumes that the collapse follows the correlations indicated in the Wigner functional of the initial state. We end with considerations regarding the degr...

  13. Quantum collapse as source of the seeds of cosmic structure during the radiation era

    CERN Document Server

    León, Gabriel; Piccirilli, María Pía

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure, from a perfect isotropic and homogeneous Universe, has not been clearly explained by the standard version of inflationary models as the dynamics involved preserve the homogeneity and isotropy at all times. A proposal that attempts to deal with this problem, by introducing "the self-induced collapse hypothesis," has been introduced by D. Sudarsky and collaborators in previous papers. In all these works, the collapse of the wave function of the inflaton mode is restricted to occur during the inflationary period. In this paper, we analyse the possibility that the collapse happens during the radiation era. A viable model can be constructed under the condition that the inflaton field variable must be affected by the collapse while the momentum variable can or cannot be affected. Another condition to be fulfilled is that the time of collapse must be independent of $k$. However, when comparing with recent observational data, the predictions of the model cannot be disti...

  14. Modelling the Multifrequency SED of AGN Candidates among the Unidentied EGRET and Fermi Gamma-Ray Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter J. Meintjes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Of the 271 sources in the 3rd EGRET catalogue, 131 were reported as unidentied, i.e. not associated with any particular class of point source in the sky. Since the largest fraction of the EGRET sources were extragalactic, a sample of 13 extragalactic unidentied sources have been selected for multi-wavelength follow-up studies. Five of the selected EGRET sources coincide with gamma-ray flux enhancements seen in the Fermi-LAT data after one year of operation. In this article, we report the multi-wavelength properties of, among others, the 5 sources detected by Fermi-LAT from our sample of high galactic latitude unidentied EGRET sources. Recent spectroscopic observations with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT conrmed one of the unidentied EGRET sources as a possible Seyfert 2 galaxy, or alternatively, a narrow line radio galaxy. The detected gamma-ray emission (Eγ > 30 MeV of the 5 coinciding EGRET/Fermi-LAT sources are tted with external Compton and Synchrotron Self Compton (SSC models to investigate the energetics required to produce the EGRET/Fermi gamma-ray flux. In all the models the inclination angle of the jet with respect to the observer is jet 60, between those of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2/radio galaxies. These results confirm the possibility of Seyfert and radio galaxies sources are constituting a new class of gamma-ray source in the energy range Eγ > 30 MeV.

  15. Unveiling the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources III: gamma-ray blazar-like counterparts at low radio frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; Giroletti, M; Paggi, A; Masetti, N; Tosti, G; Nori, M; Funk, S

    2013-01-01

    About one third of the gamma-ray sources listed in the second Fermi LAT catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies so being classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) in the northern hemisphere. First we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of gamma-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO VLA Sky survey (NVSS). We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the gamma-ray blazar candidates selected with the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the ...

  16. Use of gamma radiation with cobalt 60 source in the disinfection of documentary collections; Uso da radiacao gamma com fonte de cobalto 60 na desinfestacao de acervos documentais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Conceicao Linda de; Barboza, Kleumanery de Melo

    2011-07-01

    This article aims to conduct a comparative study between disinfection methods (anoxia and freezing) of documentary collections and the application of gamma radiation, with cobalt 60 source, by analyzing the pros and cons of each methods. This study is part of research developed by the authors that study the effect of radiation on materials

  17. Design of a 2 MeV Compton scattering gamma-ray source for DNDO missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F

    2009-08-24

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence-based isotope-specific detection and imaging is a powerful new technology that can enable access to new mission spaces for DNDO. Within this context, the development of advanced mono-energetic gamma ray sources plays an important role in the DNDO R&D portfolio, as it offers a faster, more precise, and safer alternative to conventional Bremsstrahlung sources. In this report, a specific design strategy is presented, along with a series of theoretical and computational tools, with the goal of optimizing source parameters for DNDO applications. In parallel, key technologies are outlined, along with discussions justifying specific choices and contrasting those with other alternatives. Finally, a complete conceptual design is described, and machine parameters are presented in detail.

  18. Establishing a connection between high-power pulsars and very-high-energy gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Carrigan, S; Hofmann, W; Kosack, K; Lohse, T; Reimer, O

    2007-01-01

    In the very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray wave band, pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) represent to date the most populous class of Galactic sources. Nevertheless, the details of the energy conversion mechanisms in the vicinity of pulsars are not well understood, nor is it known which pulsars are able to drive PWNe and emit high-energy radiation. In this paper we present a systematic study of a connection between pulsars and VHE gamma-ray sources based on a deep survey of the inner Galactic plane conducted with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). We find clear evidence that pulsars with large spin-down energy flux are associated with VHE gamma-ray sources. This implies that these pulsars emit on the order of 1% of their spin-down energy as TeV gamma-rays.

  19. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Earth Occultation Catalog of Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Connaughton, V.; Henze, W.; Paciesas, W. S.; Finger, M. H.; McCollough, M. L.; Sahi, M.; Peterson, B.; Shrader, C. R.; Grindlay, J. E.; Barret, D.

    2004-10-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the low-energy gamma-ray sky (~20-1000 keV) between 1991 April and 2000 May (9.1 yr). BATSE monitored the high-energy sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT) for point sources whose emission extended for times on the order of the CGRO orbital period (~92 min) or greater. Using the EOT to extract flux information, a catalog of sources using data from the BATSE Large Area Detectors has been prepared. The first part of the catalog consists of results from the all-sky monitoring of 58 sources, mostly Galactic, with intrinsic variability on timescales of hours to years. For these sources, we have included tables of flux and spectral data, and outburst times for transients. Light curves (or flux histories) have been placed on the World Wide Web. We then performed a deep-sampling of these 58 objects, plus a selection of 121 more objects, combining data from the entire 9.1 yr BATSE data set. Source types considered were primarily accreting binaries, but a small number of representative active galaxies, X-ray-emitting stars, and supernova remnants were also included. The sample represents a compilation of sources monitored and/or discovered with BATSE and other high-energy instruments between 1991 and 2000, known sources taken from the HEAO 1 A-4 and Macomb & Gehrels catalogs. The deep sample results include definite detections of 83 objects and possible detections of 36 additional objects. The definite detections spanned three classes of sources: accreting black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies, and supernova remnants. The average fluxes measured for the fourth class, the X-ray emitting stars, were below the confidence limit for definite detection. Flux data for the deep sample are presented in four energy bands: 20-40, 40-70, 70-160, and 160-430 keV. The limiting average flux level (9.1 yr) for the sample varies from 3.5 to 20

  20. On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Source 2FGL J1823.8 4312: The Discovery of a New Class of Extragalactic X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, Francesco

    2012-08-03

    One of the unsolved mysteries of gamma-ray astronomy concerns the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Recently, using the Second Fermi LAT source catalog (2FGL) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive, we discovered that the WISE counterparts of gamma-ray blazars, a class of active galactic nuclei, delineate a region (the WISE Gamma-ray Strip) in the 3-dimensional infrared color space well separated from the locus of the other astronomical objects. Based on this result, we built an association procedure to recognize if there areWISE blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Here we report on our analysis of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus of uncertain type associated with the X-ray source 1RXS J182418.7+430954 according to the 2FGL, to verify whether it is a blazar. Applying our association method we found two sources with IR colors typical of gamma-ray blazars, located within the 99.9% confidence region of 2FGL J1823.8+4312: WISE J182352.33+431452.5 and WISE J182409.25+431404.7. Then we searched in the Chandra, NVSS and SDSS archival observations for their counterparts. We discovered that WISE J182352.33+431452.5, our preferred gamma-ray blazar candidate according to our WISE association procedure, is detected in the optical and in the X-rays but not in the radio, making it extremely unusual if it is a blazar. Given its enigmatic spectral energy distribution, we considered the possibility that it is a 'radio faint blazar' or the prototype of a new class of extragalactic sources, our conclusion is independent of whether WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is the actual counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312.

  1. Analysis and optimization of minor actinides transmutation blankets with regards to neutron and gamma sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooyman Timothée

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous loading of minor actinides in radial blankets is a potential solution to implement minor actinides transmutation in fast reactors. However, to compensate for the lower flux level experienced by the blankets, the fraction of minor actinides to be loaded in the blankets must be increased to maintain acceptable performances. This severely increases the decay heat and neutron source of the blanket assemblies, both before and after irradiation, by more than an order of magnitude in the case of neutron source for instance. We propose here to implement an optimization methodology of the blankets design with regards to various parameters such as the local spectrum or the mass to be loaded, with the objective of minimizing the final neutron source of the spent assembly while maximizing the transmutation performances of the blankets. In a first stage, an analysis of the various contributors to long- and short-term neutron and gamma source is carried out whereas in a second stage, relevant estimators are designed for use in the effective optimization process, which is done in the last step. A comparison with core calculations is finally done for completeness and validation purposes. It is found that the use of a moderated spectrum in the blankets can be beneficial in terms of final neutron and gamma source without impacting minor actinides transmutation performances compared to more energetic spectrum that could be achieved using metallic fuel for instance. It is also confirmed that, if possible, the use of hydrides as moderating material in the blankets is a promising option to limit the total minor actinides inventory in the fuel cycle. If not, it appears that focus should be put upon an increased residence time for the blankets rather than an increase in the acceptable neutron source for handling and reprocessing.

  2. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. I. A NEW METHOD FOR THE ASSOCIATION OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, H. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Massaro, F. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Masetti, N. [INAF/IASF di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-4019 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-06-01

    We present a new method for identifying blazar candidates by examining the locus, i.e., the region occupied by the Fermi {gamma}-ray blazars in the three-dimensional color space defined by the WISE infrared colors. This method is a refinement of our previous approach that made use of the two-dimensional projection of the distribution of WISE {gamma}-ray-emitting blazars (the Strip) in the three WISE color-color planes. In this paper, we define the three-dimensional locus by means of a principal component analysis of the color distribution of a large sample of blazars composed of all the ROMA-BZCAT sources with counterparts in the WISE All-Sky Catalog associated with {gamma}-ray sources in the second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL; the WISE Fermi blazars sample, WFB). Our new procedure yields a total completeness of c {sub tot} {approx} 81% and a total efficiency of e {sub tot} {approx} 97%. We also obtain local estimates of the efficiency and completeness as functions of the WISE colors and galactic coordinates of the candidate blazars. The catalog of all WISE candidate blazars associated with the WFB sample is also presented, complemented by archival multi-frequency information for the alternative associations. Finally, we apply the new association procedure to all {gamma}-ray blazars in the 2FGL and provide a catalog containing all the {gamma}-ray candidate blazars selected according to our procedure.

  3. DISCOVERY OF A NEW TeV GAMMA-RAY SOURCE: VER J0521+211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T.; Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Behera, B.; Federici, S. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Falcone, A., E-mail: fortin@veritas.sao.arizona.edu, E-mail: errando@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: jholder@physics.udel.edu, E-mail: sfegan@llr.in2p3.fr [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2013-10-20

    We report the detection of a new TeV gamma-ray source, VER J0521+211, based on observations made with the VERITAS imaging atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope Array. These observations were motivated by the discovery of a cluster of >30 GeV photons in the first year of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. VER J0521+211 is relatively bright at TeV energies, with a mean photon flux of (1.93 ± 0.13{sub stat} ± 0.78{sub sys}) × 10{sup –11} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} above 0.2 TeV during the period of the VERITAS observations. The source is strongly variable on a daily timescale across all wavebands, from optical to TeV, with a peak flux corresponding to ∼0.3 times the steady Crab Nebula flux at TeV energies. Follow-up observations in the optical and X-ray bands classify the newly discovered TeV source as a BL Lac-type blazar with uncertain redshift, although recent measurements suggest z = 0.108. VER J0521+211 exhibits all the defining properties of blazars in radio, optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths.

  4. A simplified model of the source channel of the Leksell GammaKnife tested with PENELOPE

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Dweri, F M O; Vilches, M; Al-Dweri, Feras M.O.; Lallena, Antonio M.; Vilches, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations using the code PENELOPE have been performed to test a simplified model of the source channel geometry of the Leksell GammaKnife$^{\\circledR}$. The characteristics of the radiation passing through the treatment helmets are analysed in detail. We have found that only primary particles emitted from the source with polar angles smaller than 3$^{\\rm o}$ with respect to the beam axis are relevant for the dosimetry of the Gamma Knife. The photons trajectories reaching the output helmet collimators at $(x,y,z=236 {\\rm mm})$, show strong correlations between $\\rho=(x^2+y^2)^{1/2}$ and their polar angle $\\theta$, on one side, and between $\\tan^{-1}(y/x)$ and their azimuthal angle $\\phi$, on the other. This enables us to propose a simplified model which treats the full source channel as a mathematical collimator. This simplified model produces doses in excellent agreement with those found for the full geometry. In the region of maximal dose, the relative differences between both calculations are ...

  5. Discovery of the hard spectrum VHE gamma-ray source HESS J1641-463

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E O; Backes, M; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Berge, D; Bernhard, S; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Bregeon, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bryan, M; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chakraborty, N; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Donath, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Gottschall, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Hadasch, D; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Ivascenko, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung-Richardt, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lau, J; Lefaucheur, J; Lefranc, V; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Mitchell, A M W; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Morå, K; Moulin, E; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Salek, D; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spanier, F; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, {Ł }; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Veh, J; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vink, J; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zaborov, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; Fukui, Y; Sano, H; Fukuda, T; Yoshiike, S

    2014-01-01

    This letter reports the discovery of a remarkably hard spectrum source, HESS J1641-463, by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) in the very-high energy (VHE) domain. HESS J1641-463 remained unnoticed by the usual analysis techniques due to confusion with the bright nearby source HESS J1640-465. It emerged at a significance level of 8.5 standard deviations after restricting the analysis to events with energies above 4 TeV. It shows a moderate flux level of F(E > 1 TeV) = (3.64 +/- 0.44_stat +/- 0.73_sys) x 10^-13 cm^-2s-1, corresponding to 1.8% of the Crab Nebula flux above the same energy, and a hard spectrum with a photon index of Gamma = 2.07 +/- 0.11_stat +/- 0.20_sys. It is a point-like source, although an extension up to Gaussian width of sigma = 0.05 deg cannot be discounted due to uncertainties in the H.E.S.S. PSF. The VHE gamma-ray flux of HESS J1641-463 is found to be constant over the observed period when checking time binnings from year-by-year to the 28 min exposures timescales. HESS J16...

  6. A simplified model of the source channel of the Leksell GammaKnife tested with PENELOPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dweri, Feras M O; Lallena, Antonio M; Vilches, Manuel

    2004-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations using the code PENELOPE have been performed to test a simplified model of the source channel geometry of the Leksell GammaKnife. The characteristics of the radiation passing through the treatment helmets are analysed in detail. We have found that only primary particles emitted from the source with polar angles smaller than 3 degrees with respect to the beam axis are relevant for the dosimetry of the Gamma Knife. The photon trajectories reaching the output helmet collimators at (x, v, z = 236 mm) show strong correlations between rho = (x2 + y2)(1/2) and their polar angle theta, on one side, and between tan(-1)(y/x) and their azimuthal angle phi, on the other. This enables us to propose a simplified model which treats the full source channel as a mathematical collimator. This simplified model produces doses in good agreement with those found for the full geometry. In the region of maximal dose, the relative differences between both calculations are within 3%, for the 18 and 14 mm helmets, and 10%, for the 8 and 4 mm ones. Besides, the simplified model permits a strong reduction (larger than a factor 15) in the computational time.

  7. Inference of Dim Gamma-Ray Point Sources Using Probabilistic Catalogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daylan, Tansu; Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2016-07-01

    Poisson regression of the Fermi-LAT data in the inner Milky Way reveals an extended gamma-ray excess. The anomalous emission falls steeply away from the galactic center and has an energy spectrum that peaks at 1-2 GeV. An important question is whether the signal is coming from a collection of unresolved point sources, possibly recycled pulsars, or constitutes a truly diffuse emission component. Previous analyses have relied on non-Poissonian template fits or wavelet decomposition of the Fermi-LAT data, which find evidence for a population of dim point sources just below the 3FGL flux limit. In order to draw conclusions about a potentially dim population, we propose to sample from the catalog space of point sources, where the model dimensionality, i.e., the number of sources, is unknown. Although being a computationally expensive sampling problem, this approach allows us to infer the number, flux and radial distribution of the point sources consistent with the observed count data. Probabilistic cataloging is specifically useful in the crowded field limit, such as in the galactic disk, where the typical separation between point sources is comparable to the PSF. Using this approach, we recover the results of the deterministic Fermi-LAT 3FGL catalog, as well as sub-detection threshold information and fold the point source parameter degeneracies into the model-choice problem of whether an emission is coming from unresolved MSPs or dark matter annihilation.

  8. Shock acceleration and gamma radiation in the intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Gabici, S

    2004-01-01

    Particle acceleration is expected to take place at shocks that form during the process of large scale structure formation. Electrons accelerated at such shocks can upscatter a small fraction of the photons in the cosmic microwave background up to the gamma ray band. Here we make predictions about the detectability of the $\\gamma$--ray emission from forming clusters of galaxies with future GeV and TeV gamma ray telescopes. We also estimate the contribution of these sources to the extragalactic diffuse gamma ray background.

  9. BL Lac A New Ultrahigh-Energy Gamma-Ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Neshpor, Y I; Stepanian, A A; Kalekin, O R; Jogolev, N A; Fomin, V P; Shitov, V G; Neshpor, Yu. I.

    2001-01-01

    The active galactic nucleus BL Lac was observed with the Gt-48 atmospheric Cherenkov detector of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory from July 23-September 1, 1998, in order to search for ultrahigh-energy gamma-ray (>1 TeV) emission. The object was in the field of view of the detector for more than 24 hours. The source was detected with a high level of confidence (7.2 sigma), with a flux equal to (2.1+/-0.4)x10^{-11} photons cm^{-2}s^{-1}.

  10. A biotechnological project with a gamma radiation source of 100,000 Ci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, J.H.; Smolko, E.E. (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1990-01-01

    A project for the production of radiovaccines and other bio-medical products is presented which includes a radiation facility provided with a gamma ray source equivalent to 100,000 Ci of Co-60. The whole process incorporates novel basic features in virus production and inactivation steps. The former is carried out in animals previously subjected to immunodepression through electromagnetic radiation. The latter is obtained at low temperatures by using either electromagnetic or particle radiations. A vaccine manufacture process is shown to illustrate the utilization of ionizing radiations to obtain a foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine with good antigenic quality and low cost. (author).

  11. Elemental analysis of a concrete sample by capture gamma rays with a radioisotope neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collico Savio, D.L. [Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Fisica Nuclear; Mariscotti, M.A.J. [Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Fisica Nuclear; Ribeiro Guevara, S. [Laboratorio Analisis por Activacion Neutronica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    1995-03-15

    Gamma radiation from capture of neutrons in concrete has been studied in the energy region from 0.3 to 10.5 MeV with a HPGe spectrometer and an AmBe neutron source. A careful analysis of the Fe, Si, Ca, and Cl peak intensities made it possible to determine their relative concentrations in the sample. A comparison has been made between this nuclear method and chemical techniques, resulting in good agreement. The employment of these nuclear reactions constitutes a promising technique for the bulk analysis of samples in the concrete industry, because of its nondestructive and in-situ nature. ((orig.)).

  12. IceCube astrophysical neutrinos without a spectral cutoff and (10^15-10^17) eV cosmic gamma radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashev, O E

    2014-01-01

    We present a range of unbroken power-law fits to the astrophysical-neutrino spectrum consistent with the most recent published IceCube data at the 68\\% confidence level. Assuming that the neutrinos originate in decays of pi mesons, we estimate accompanying gamma-ray fluxes for various distributions of sources, taking propagation effects into account. We then briefly discuss existing experimental results constraining PeV to EeV diffuse gamma-ray flux and their systematic uncertainties. Several scenarios are marginally consistent both with the KASKADE and CASA-MIA upper limits at (10^15-10^16) eV and with the EAS-MSU tentative detection at ~10^17 eV, given large systematic errors of the measurements. Future searches for the diffuse gamma-ray background at sub-PeV to sub-EeV energies just below present upper limits will give a crucial diagnostic tool for distinguishing between the Galactic and extragalactic models of the origin of the IceCube events.

  13. Extinction of gamma-ray burst afterglows as a diagnostic of the location of cosmic star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Blain, A W; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Trentham, Neil

    2002-01-01

    The properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows are used to investigate the location of star formation activity through the history of the Universe. This approach is motivated by the following: (i) GRBs are thought to be associated with the deaths of massive stars and so the GRB rate ought to follow the massive star formation rate, (ii) GRBs are the final evolutionary phase of these short-lived stars, which do not travel far from their birthplace, and so should be located where the stars formed, and (iii) The differential effects of dust extinction on GRB afterglows between the X-ray and optical wavebands can reveal whether or not large amounts of gas and dust are present in GRB host galaxies. From recent evidence, we estimate that a significant fraction (about 75%) of stars in the Universe formed in galaxies that are brightest at rest-frame far-infrared (IR) wavelengths. This value is marginally consistent with observations: 60 +/- 15% of GRBs have no detected optical afterglow, whereas almost...

  14. Infrared-faint radio sources: a cosmological view. AGN number counts, the cosmic X-ray background and SMBH formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Ibar, E.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5σ sensitivities as low as 1 μJy. Aims: Spectral energy distribution (hereafter SED) modelling and analyses of their radio properties indicate that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. We demonstrate some astrophysical implications of this population and compare them to predictions from models of galaxy evolution and structure formation. Methods: We compiled a list of IFRS from four deep extragalactic surveys and extrapolated the IFRS number density to a survey-independent value of (30.8 ± 15.0) deg-2. We computed the IFRS contribution to the total number of AGN in the Universe to account for the cosmic X-ray background. By estimating the black hole mass contained in IFRS, we present conclusions for the SMBH mass density in the early universe and compare it to relevant simulations of structure formation after the Big Bang. Results: The number density of AGN derived from the IFRS density was found to be ~310 deg-2, which is equivalent to a SMBH mass density of the order of 103 M⊙ Mpc-3 in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. This produces an X-ray flux of 9 × 10-16 W m-2 deg-2 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band and 3 × 10-15 W m-2 deg-2 in the 2.0-10 keV band, in agreement with the missing unresolved components of the Cosmic X-ray Background. To address SMBH formation after the Big Bang we invoke a scenario involving both halo gas accretion and major mergers.

  15. Procedure for the elaboration of extended sources beta and/or gamma emitting; Procedimiento para la elaboracion de fuentes extendidas emisoras beta y/o gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejera R, A.; Cortes P, A.; Becerril V, A

    1991-12-15

    In the laboratory of radioactive standards they have been come manufacturing punctual sources gauged gamma emitting during several years. Before the demand of extended radioactive homogeneous sources of beta particles emitting, in particular with nuclides that are simultaneously gamma and beta emitting, it was designed a procedure for it elaboration based on the one that we use at the moment for the elaboration of the punctual gamma sources. This procedure consists on the integration of a compact group of this type of sources on a single extended support, sealed one of its faces with a film of transparent material in satisfactory grade to the beta particles. In this work this procedure is described and it is applied in the elaboration of two sources that its were requested by the Laguna Verde Central (CFE), one with area of 20 cm{sup 2} and the other one of 100 cm{sup 2}. The homogeneity, measure as the dispersion of the activities of the aliquot ones distributed in the active surfaces was inside 2%. The percentage of attenuation of the beta particles was also measured by the film (window) with the one that the sources were sealed. (Author)

  16. TeV Gamma Rays from Geminga and the Origin of the GeV Positron Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Yuksel, Hasan; Stanev, Todor

    2008-01-01

    The Geminga pulsar has long been one of the most intriguing MeV-GeV gamma-ray point sources. We examine the implications of the recent Milagro detection of extended, multi-TeV gamma-ray emission from Geminga, finding that this reveals the existence of an ancient, powerful cosmic-ray accelerator that also can plausibly account for the multi-GeV positron excess that has evaded explanation. We explore a number of testable predictions for gamma-ray, electron/positron, and neutrino experiments that can confirm the first direct detection of a cosmic-ray source.

  17. Is The Gamma-Ray Source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 A Dark Matter Subhalo?

    CERN Document Server

    Bertoni, Bridget; Linden, Tim

    2016-01-01

    In a previous paper, we pointed out that the gamma-ray source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 shows evidence of being spatially extended. If a gamma-ray source without detectable emission at other wavelengths were unambiguously determined to be spatially extended, it could not be explained by known astrophysics, and would constitute a smoking gun for dark matter particles annihilating in a nearby subhalo. With this prospect in mind, we scrutinize the gamma-ray emission from this source, finding that it prefers a spatially extended profile over that of a single point-like source with 5.1 sigma statistical significance. We also use a large sample of active galactic nuclei and other known gamma-rays sources as a control group, confirming, as expected, that statistically significant extension is rare among such objects. We argue that the most likely (non-dark matter) explanation for this apparent extension is a pair of bright gamma-ray sources that serendipitously lie very close to each other, and estimate that there is a chan...

  18. Optimisation of spectrometric gamma-gamma probe configuration using very low radioactivity sources for lead and zinc grade determination in borehole logging

    CERN Document Server

    Asfahani, J

    1999-01-01

    The suitability of spectrometric backscattered gamma-gamma well logging measurements to predict lead and zinc metal equivalent content is demonstrated. A centralised tool employing a gamma-ray source of very low radioactivity (1.8 MBq) is used. The logging tool is tested using sup 1 sup 3 sup 3 Ba and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs sources with a 37 mm (diameter)x75 mm NaI (TI) scintillation detector. Five source-to-detector configurations were analysed for 18 geophysical models, 13 of which had a borehole diameter of 130 mm and the other 5 had a borehole diameter of 160 mm. Regression analysis on the laboratory logging data for each configuration in order to establish the calibration equation for a lead (Pb) and zinc metal equivalent (ZME) prediction is carried out. The optimum configuration for the logging probe using a sup 1 sup 3 sup 3 Ba source was determined to be 52 mm source-to-detector spacing. This configuration gives the best results for both Pb and ZME grade. The rms deviations for Pb and ZME were 0.33 and ...

  19. Automatic Quenching of High Energy gamma-ray Sources by Synchrotron Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, Lukasz; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Kirk, John; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

    2007-02-02

    Here we investigate evolution of a magnetized system, in which continuously produced high energy emission undergoes annihilation on a soft photon field, such that the synchrotron radiation of the created electron-positron pairs increases number density of the soft photons. This situation is important in high energy astrophysics, because, for an extremely wide range of magnetic field strengths (nano to mega Gauss), it involves {gamma}-ray photons with energies between 0.3GeV and 30TeV. We derive and analyze the conditions for which the system is unstable to runaway production of soft photons and ultrarelativistic electrons, and for which it can reach a steady state with an optical depth to photon-photon annihilation larger than unity, as well those for which efficient pair loading of the emitting volume takes place. We also discuss the application of our analysis to a realistic situation involving astrophysical sources of a broad-band {gamma}-ray emission and briefly consider the particular case of sources close to active supermassive black holes.

  20. Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L. as a Marine Functional Source of Gamma-Tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Menoyo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gamma tocopherol (gT exhibits beneficial cardiovascular effects partly due to its anti-inflammatory activity. Important sources of gT are vegetable oils. However, little is known to what extent gT can be transferred into marine animal species such as Atlantic salmon by feeding. Therefore, in this study we have investigated the transfer of dietary gT into salmon. To this end, fish were fed a diet supplemented with 170 ppm gT for 16 weeks whereby alpha tocopherol levels were adjusted to 190 ppm in this and the control diet. Feeding gT-rich diets resulted in a three-fold increase in gT concentrations in the liver and fillet compared to non-gT-supplemented controls. Tissue alpha tocopherol levels were not decreased indicating no antagonistic interaction between gamma- and alpha tocopherol in salmon. The concentration of total omega 3 fatty acids slightly increased in response to dietary gT. Furthermore, dietary gT significantly decreased malondialdehyde in the fillet, determined as a biomarker of lipid peroxidation. In the liver of gT fed salmon we observed an overall down-regulation of genes involved in lipid homeostasis. Additionally, gT improved the antioxidant capacity by up-regulating Gpx4a gene expression in the pyloric caeca. We suggest that Atlantic salmon may provide a marine functional source capable of enriching gT for human consumption.

  1. X-band RF Photoinjector for Laser Compton X-ray and Gamma-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anderson, G. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anderson, S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gibson, D. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barty, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-06

    Extremely bright narrow bandwidth gamma-ray sources are expanding the application of accelerator technology and light sources in new directions. An X-band test station has been commissioned at LLNL to develop multi-bunch electron beams. This multi-bunch mode will have stringent requirements for the electron bunch properties including low emittance and energy spread, but across multiple bunches. The test station is a unique facility featuring a 200 MV/m 5.59 cell X-band photogun powered by a SLAC XL4 klystron driven by a Scandinova solid-state modulator. This paper focuses on its current status including the generation and initial characterization of first electron beam. Design and installation of the inverse-Compton scattering interaction region and upgrade paths will be discussed along with future applications.

  2. Electron Linac design to drive bright Compton back-scattering gamma-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacci, A.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L. [INFN-MI, Milano (Italy); Alesini, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boni, R.; Chiadroni, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Spataro, B.; Vaccarezza, C. [INFN-LNF, Frascati, Roma (Italy); Antici, P.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [University La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Cianchi, A. [University of Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); and others

    2013-05-21

    The technological development in the field of high brightness linear accelerators and high energy/high quality lasers enables today designing high brilliance Compton-X and Gamma-photon beams suitable for a wide range of applications in the innovative field of nuclear photonics. The challenging requirements of this kind of source comprise: tunable energy (1-20 MeV), very narrow bandwidth (0.3%), and high spectral density (10{sup 4} photons/s/eV). We present here a study focused on the design and the optimization of an electron Linac aimed to meet the source specifications of the European Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics project, currently funded and seeking for an innovative machine design in order to outperform state-of-the-art facilities. We show that the phase space density of the electron beam, at the collision point against the laser pulse, is the main quality factor characterizing the Linac.

  3. Contribution of Point Sources to the Soft Gamma-Ray Galactic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, R.; Lebrun, F.; Bélanger, G.; Goldwurm, A.; Strong, A. W.; Schoenfelder, V.; Bouchet, L.; Roques, J. P.; Parmar, A.

    2004-10-01

    The nature of the soft gamma-ray (20-200 keV) Galactic emission has been a matter of debate for a long time. Previous experiments have tried to sep- arate the point source contribution from the real in- terstellar emission, but with a rather poor spatial res- olution, they concluded that the interstellar emission could be a large fraction of the total Galactic emis- sion. INTEGRAL, having both high resolution and high sensitivity, is well suited to reassess more pre- cisely this problem. Using the INTEGRAL core pro- gram Galactic Center Deep Exposure (GCDE), we estimate the contribution of detected point sources to the total Galactic flux. Key words: Interstellar emission; INTEGRAL; IBIS/ISGRI.

  4. Prospects for Detecting Galactic Sources of Cosmic Neutrinos with IceCube: An Update

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, Francis; Niro, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Air-Cherenkov telescopes have mapped the Galactic plane at TeV energies. Here we evaluate the prospects for detecting the neutrino emission from sources in the Galactic plane assuming that the highest energy photons originate from the decay of pions, which yields a straightforward prediction for the neutrino flux from the decay of the associated production of charged pions. Four promising sources are identified based on having a large flux and a flat spectrum. We subsequently evaluate the probability of their identification above the atmospheric neutrino background in IceCube data as a function of time. We show that observing them over the twenty-year lifetime of the instrumentation is likely, and that some should be observable at the $3\\,\\sigma$ level with six years of data. In the absence of positive results, we derive constraints on the spectral index and cut-off energy of the sources, assuming a hadronic acceleration mechanism.

  5. Prospects for detecting galactic sources of cosmic neutrinos with IceCube: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halzen, Francis; Kheirandish, Ali; Niro, Viviana

    2017-01-01

    Air-Cherenkov telescopes have mapped the Galactic plane at TeV energies. Here we evaluate the prospects for detecting the neutrino emission from sources in the Galactic plane assuming that the highest energy photons originate from the decay of pions, which yields a straightforward prediction for the neutrino flux from the decay of the associated production of charged pions. Four promising sources are identified based on having a large flux and a flat spectrum. We subsequently evaluate the probability of their identification above the atmospheric neutrino background in IceCube data as a function of time. We show that observing them over the twenty-year lifetime of the instrumentation is likely, and that some should be observable at the 3 σ level with six years of data. In the absence of positive results, we derive constraints on the spectral index and cut-off energy of the sources, assuming a hadronic acceleration mechanism.

  6. DESIGN OF A GAMMA-RAY SOURCE BASED ON INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING AT THE FAST SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, D. [NICADD, DeKalb; Jacobson, B. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Murokh, A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2016-10-10

    A watt-level average-power gamma-ray source is currently under development at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility. The source is based on the Inverse Compton Scattering of a high-brightness 300-MeV beam against a high-power laser beam circulating in an optical cavity. The back scattered gamma rays are expected to have photon energies up to 1.5 MeV. This paper discusses the optimization of the source, its performances, and the main challenges ahead.

  7. Monitoring the $\\gamma$-Ray Source 2CG 135+1 and the Radio Star LSI+61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, M; Van Dijk, R; Strickman, M S; Zhang, S N; Foster, R S; Ray, P; Mattox, J R; Ulmer, M P; Purcell, W; Coe, M J

    1996-01-01

    We report the results of a CGRO multi-instrument series of observations of the unidentified gamma-ray source 2CG 135+1 and of its possible counterpart, the peculiar radio source GT 0236+610 coincident with the Be star LSI+61 303. We monitored the time variable radio source GT 0236+610 during the CGRO observations. OSSE and COMPTEL data were obtained during the period May-June 1994, and BATSE data for the period April 1994-January 1995. We discuss the time variability of the gamma-ray emission and spectral properties of 2CG~135+1. Understanding the nature of 2CG 135+1 may be of crucial importance for the interpretation of a class of unidentified time variable gamma-ray sources in the Galaxy.

  8. A new method for the reconstruction of very-high-energy gamma-ray spectra and application to galatic cosmic-ray accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Milton Virgilio

    2014-09-15

    In this thesis, high-energy (HE; E>0.1 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E>0.1 TeV) γ-ray data were investigated to probe Galactic stellar clusters (SCs) and star-forming regions (SFRs) as sites of hadronic Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) acceleration. In principle, massive SCs and SFRs could accelerate GCRs at the shock front of the collective SC wind fed by the individual high-mass stars. The subsequently produced VHE γ rays would be measured with imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). A couple of the Galactic VHE γ-ray sources, including those potentially produced by SCs, fill a large fraction of the field-of-view (FoV) and require additional observations of source-free regions to determine the dominant background for a spectral reconstruction. A new method of reconstructing spectra for such extended sources without the need of further observations is developed: the Template Background Spectrum (TBS). This methods is based on a method to generate skymaps, which determines background in parameter space. The idea is the creation of a look-up of the background normalisation in energy, zenith angle, and angular separation and to account for possible systematics. The results obtained with TBS and state-of-the-art background-estimation methods on H.E.S.S. data are in good agreement. With TBS even those sources could be reconstructed that normally would need further observations. Therefore, TBS is the third method to reconstruct VHE γ-ray spectra, but the first one to not need additional observations in the analysis of extended sources. The discovery of the largest VHE γ-ray source HESSJ1646-458 (2.2 in size) towards the SC Westerlund 1 (Wd1) can be plausibly explained by the SC-wind scenario. But owing to its size, other alternative counterparts to the TeV emission (pulsar, binary system, magnetar) were found in the FoV. Therefore, an association of HESSJ1646-458 with the SC is favoured, but cannot be confirmed. The SC Pismis 22 is located in the centre of the

  9. Analysis of North Sky Cosmic Ray Anisotropy with Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Elizabeth; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cosmic Ray anisotropy, no experiment has definitively discovered the source of this unexpected phenomenon. Studying the cosmic rays' neutral daughter particles with pointing capabilities, like neutrinos, could shed new light. This can be done at two levels; a source which produces cosmic rays must also produce high energy astrophysical neutrinos, and low energy atmospheric neutrinos are made when the cosmic rays interact with the atmosphere. This analysis focuses on atmospheric neutrinos detected by IceCube, a Cherenkov detector instrumenting a kilometer cubed of glacial ice at the South Pole. The anisotropy and its energy dependence have been studied in the Southern sky using atmospheric muons by IceCube. In the North, gamma ray detectors, such as HAWC, and Argo-YBJ, have observed this anisotropy in cosmic ray showers. Thus far, no single- detector full-sky map exists of the anisotropy. Using IceCube's neutrino data, we can complement these studies with an exploration of the northern sky anisotropy at higher energies of cosmic rays. This could bring us much closer to understanding the complete picture of this anisotropy across energy levels and the whole sky.

  10. CANGAROO-III observation of TeV gamma rays from the unidentified gamma-ray source HESS J1614-518

    CERN Document Server

    Mizukami, T; Yoshida, T; Nakamori, T; Enomoto, R; Tanimori, T; Akimoto, M; Bicknell, G V; Clay, R W; Edwards, P G; Gunji, S; Hara, S; Hara, T; Hayashi, S; Ishioka, H; Kabuki, S; Kajino, F; Katagiri, H; Kawachi, A; Kifune, T; Kiuchi, R; Kunisawa, T; Kushida, J; Matoba, T; Matsubara, Y; Matsuzawa, I; Mizumura, Y; Mizumoto, Y; Mori, M; Muraishi, H; Naito, T; Nakayama, K; Nishijima, K; Ohishi, M; Otake, Y; Ryoki, S; Saito, K; Sakamoto, Y; Stamatescu, V; Suzuki, T; Swaby, D L; Thornton, G; Tokanai, F; Toyota, Y; Tsuchiya, K; Yanagita, S; Yokoe, Y; Yoshikoshi, T; Yukawa, Y

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection, with the CANGAROO-III imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, of a very high energy gamma-ray signal from the unidentified gamma-ray source HESS J1614-518, which was discovered in the H.E.S.S. Galactic plane survey. Diffuse gamma-ray emission was detected above 760 GeV at the 8.9 sigma level during an effective exposure of 54 hr from 2008 May to August. The spectrum can be represented by a power-law: 8.2+-2.2_{stat}+-2.5_{sys}x10^{-12}x (E/1TeV)^{-Gamma} cm^{-2} s^{-1} TeV^{-1} with a photon index Gamma of 2.4+-0.3_{stat}+-0.2_{sys}, which is compatible with that of the H.E.S.S. observations. By combining our result with multi-wavelength data, we discuss the possible counterparts for HESS J1614-518 and consider radiation mechanisms based on hadronic and leptonic processes for a supernova remnant, stellar winds from massive stars, and a pulsar wind nebula. Although a leptonic origin from a pulsar wind nebula driven by an unknown pulsar remains possible, hadronic-origin emission ...

  11. A 350-MHz GBT Survey of 50 Faint Fermi Gamma-ray Sources for Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, Jason W T; McLaughlin, Maura A; Ray, Paul S; Bangale, Priyadarshini; Ransom, Scott M; Kerr, Matthew; Camilo, Fernando; DeCesar, Megan E

    2015-01-01

    We have used the Green Bank Telescope at 350MHz to search 50 faint, unidentified Fermi Gamma-ray sources for radio pulsations. So far, these searches have resulted in the discovery of 10 millisecond pulsars, which are plausible counterparts to these unidentified Fermi sources. Here we briefly describe this survey and the characteristics of the newly discovered MSPs.

  12. Three-dimensional localization of low activity gamma-ray sources in real-time scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Manish K., E-mail: mksrkf@mst.edu; Alajo, Ayodeji B.; Lee, Hyoung K.

    2016-03-21

    Radioactive source localization plays an important role in tracking radiation threats in homeland security tasks. Its real-time application requires computationally efficient and reasonably accurate algorithms even with limited data to support detection with minimum uncertainty. This paper describes a statistic-based grid-refinement method for backtracing the position of a gamma-ray source in a three-dimensional domain in real-time. The developed algorithm used measurements from various known detector positions to localize the source. This algorithm is based on an inverse-square relationship between source intensity at a detector and the distance from the source to the detector. The domain discretization was developed and implemented in MATLAB. The algorithm was tested and verified from simulation results of an ideal case of a point source in non-attenuating medium. Subsequently, an experimental validation of the algorithm was performed to determine the suitability of deploying this scheme in real-time scenarios. Using the measurements from five known detector positions and for a measurement time of 3 min, the source position was estimated with an accuracy of approximately 53 cm. The accuracy improved and stabilized to approximately 25 cm for higher measurement times. It was concluded that the error in source localization was primarily due to detection uncertainties. In verification and experimental validation of the algorithm, the distance between {sup 137}Cs source and any detector position was between 0.84 m and 1.77 m. The results were also compared with the least squares method. Since the discretization algorithm was validated with a weak source, it is expected that it can localize the source of higher activity in real-time. It is believed that for the same physical placement of source and detectors, a source of approximate activity 0.61–0.92 mCi can be localized in real-time with 1 s of measurement time and same accuracy. The accuracy and computational

  13. Interstellar medium around supernova remnants associated with gamma-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvidovich, L.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Dubner, G.

    2017-07-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are potential sources of gamma-rays, either through inverse Compton scattering of electrons off ambient photons or through the decay of neutral pions created by the collision of energetic protons with dense ambient gas. The SNRs G298.6-0.0 and G298.5-0.3 are proposed to be associated to the gamma-ray sources 3FGL J1214.0-6236 and 3FGL J1212.2-6251, respectively. They are located in a complex portion of the Galactic plane, also containing sources of powerful stellar winds such as the star Wolf Rayet HD104994 and the HII regions G298.559-00.114, G298.868-00.432 and G298.228-00.331 with ongoing star formation. We present a study of the neutral hydrogen distribution towards the mentioned SNRs. We found a structure with ellipsoidal morphology that encloses a region containing G298.5-0.3, G298.6-0.0, HD104994, G298.559-00.114 and G298.228-00.331. This HI feature is detected in the velocity range 89-100 km s-1. We propose that the neutral gas would be the accelerated portion (which would explain its high radial velocity) of a gas shell swept up by a series of expansive and explosive events. The rest of this shell (at radial velocities compatible with the systemic velocity of the objects) is not visible because of confusion with galactic emission. We also inspected the distribution of the 12CO gas and found a dense molecular cloud at the systemic velocity of ˜ 22 km s-1 corresponding to the kinematical distance of ˜ 10.4 kpc, compatible with the distance to the SNR G298.6-0.0. This molecular cloud is in spatial coincidence, projected in the sky plane, with the very high energy source associated with the remnant. This fact, suggesting a possible hadronic origin for the gamma-rays emission. Regarding to the SNR G298.5-0.3, smaller and fainter than the previous one, the angular resolution of the molecular data is insufficient to draw meaningful conclusions.

  14. Extended clustering analyses to constrain the deflection angular scale and source density of the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Decerprit, Guillaume; Parizot, Etienne

    2011-01-01

    The search of a clustering signal in the arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is a standard method to assess the level of anisotropy of the data sets under investigation. Here, we first show how to quantify the sensitivity of a UHECR detector to the detection of anisotropy, and then propose a new method that pushes forward the study of the two-point auto-correlation function, enabling one to put astrophysically meaningful constraints on both the effective UHECR source density and the angular deflections that these charged particles suffer while they propagate through the galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields. We apply the method to simulated data sets obtained under various astrophysical conditions, and show how the input model parameters can be estimated through our analysis, introducing the notion of "clustering similarity" (between data sets), to which we give a precise statistical meaning. We also study how the constraining power of the method is influenced by the size of the ...

  15. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources: A Cosmological View - AGN Number Counts, the Cosmic X-Ray Background and SMBH Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Zinn, Peter-Christian; Ibar, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Context. Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5 sigma sensitivities as low as 1 uJy. Aims. Recent SED-modelling and analysis of their radio properties shows that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3Cosmic X-ray Background. By estimating the black hole mass contained in IFRS, we present conclusions for the SMBH mass density in the early universe and compare it to relevant simula...

  16. Tracking Down the Source Population Responsible for the Unresolved Cosmic 6-8 keV Background

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Y Q; Brandt, W N; Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Bauer, F E; Comastri, A; Fabian, A C; Gilli, R; Lehmer, B D; Schneider, D P; Vignali, C; Young, M

    2012-01-01

    Using the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey, we have identified a sample of 6845 X-ray undetected galaxies that dominates the unresolved ~ 20-25% of the 6-8 keV cosmic X-ray background (XRB). This sample was constructed by applying mass and color cuts to sources from a parent catalog based on GOODS-South HST z-band imaging of the central 6'-radius area of the 4 Ms CDF-S. The stacked 6-8 keV detection is significant at the 3.9 sigma level, but the stacked emission was not detected in the 4-6 keV band which indicates the existence of an underlying population of highly obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Further examinations of these 6845 galaxies indicate that the galaxies on the top of the blue cloud and with redshifts of 1 ~1E10 M_sun) galaxies. We discuss constraints upon this underlying AGN population, supporting evidence for relatively low-mass galaxies hosting highly obscured AGNs, and prospects for further boosting the stacked signal.

  17. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahakyan N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent results from ground based γ-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS provide a population of TeV galactic γ-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE neutrinos. Since the γ-rays and ν-s are produced from decays of neutral and charged pions, the flux of TeV γ-rays can be used to estimate the upper limit of ν flux and vice versa; the detectability of ν flux implies a minimum flux of the accompanying γ-rays (assuming the internal and the external absorption of γ-rays is negligible. Using this minimum flux, it is possible to find the sources which can be detected with cubic-kilometer telescopes. I will discuss the possibility to detect HE neutrinos from powerful galactic accelerators, such as Supernova Remnants (SNRs and Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe and show that likely only RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622 and Vela X can be detected by current generation of instruments (IceCube and Km3Net. It will be shown also, that galactic binary systems could be promising sources of HE ν-s. In particular, ν-s and γ-rays from Cygnus X-3 will be discussed during recent gamma-ray activity, showing that in the future such kind of activities could produce detectable flux of HE ν-s.

  18. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakyan, N.

    2016-07-01

    The recent results from ground based γ-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) provide a population of TeV galactic γ-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE) neutrinos. Since the γ-rays and ν-s are produced from decays of neutral and charged pions, the flux of TeV γ-rays can be used to estimate the upper limit of ν flux and vice versa; the detectability of ν flux implies a minimum flux of the accompanying γ-rays (assuming the internal and the external absorption of γ-rays is negligible). Using this minimum flux, it is possible to find the sources which can be detected with cubic-kilometer telescopes. I will discuss the possibility to detect HE neutrinos from powerful galactic accelerators, such as Supernova Remnants (SNRs) and Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) and show that likely only RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622 and Vela X can be detected by current generation of instruments (IceCube and Km3Net). It will be shown also, that galactic binary systems could be promising sources of HE ν-s. In particular, ν-s and γ-rays from Cygnus X-3 will be discussed during recent gamma-ray activity, showing that in the future such kind of activities could produce detectable flux of HE ν-s.

  19. Comparative dosimetry of GammaMed Plus high-dose rate 192 Ir brachytherapy source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparative dosimetry of GammaMed (GM Plus high-dose rate brachytherapy source was performed by an experiment using 0.1-cc thimble ionization chamber and simulation-based study using EGSnrc code. In-water dose measurements were performed with 0.1-cc chamber to derive the radial dose function (r = 0.8 to 20.0 cm and anisotropy function (r = 5.0 cm with polar angle from 10° to 170°. The nonuniformity correction factor for 0.1-cc chamber was applied for in-water measurements at shorter distances from the source. The EGSnrc code was used to derive the dose rate constant (L, radial dose function g L (r and anisotropy function F(r, q of GM Plus source. The dosimetric data derived using EGSnrc code in our study were in very good agreement relative to published data for GM Plus source. The radial dose function up to 12 cm derived from measured dose using 0.1-cc chamber was in agreement within ±3% of data derived by the simulation study.

  20. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.