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Sample records for corticotropin-releasing factor increases

  1. Restraint stress increases serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala via activation of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Bing; Feng, Na; Renner, Kenneth; Forster, Gina

    2008-07-30

    Decreases in serotonergic activity in the central nucleus of the amygdala reduce responses to stressors, suggesting an important role for serotonin in this region of the amygdala in stress reactivity. However, it is not known whether exposure to stressors actually increases serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala. The current experiment tested the hypothesis that restraint stress increases extracellular serotonin within the central nucleus of the amygdala and adjacent medial amygdala using in vivo microdialysis in awake male rats during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle. Serotonin release in the central nucleus increased immediately in response to restraint stress. In contrast, there was no change in serotonin release within the adjacent medial amygdala during or following restraint. Since corticotropin-releasing factor is an important mediator of both responses to stressors and serotonergic activity, subsequent experiments tested the hypothesis that central nucleus serotonergic response to restraint stress is mediated by central corticotropin-releasing factor receptors. Administration of the corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 and 2 receptor antagonist d-Phe-CRF (icv, 10 microg/5 microl) prior to restraint stress suppressed restraint-induced serotonin release in the central nucleus. The results suggest that restraint stress rapidly and selectively increases serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala by the activation of central corticotropin-releasing factor receptors. Furthermore, the results imply that corticotropin-releasing factor mediated serotonergic activity in central nucleus of the amygdala may be an important component of a stress response.

  2. Central corticotropin releasing factor and social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backström, Tobias; Winberg, Svante

    2013-01-01

    Social interactions are a main source of stress in vertebrates. Social stressors, as well as other stressors, activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis resulting in glucocorticoid release. One of the main components of the HPA axis is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). The neuropeptide CRF is part of a peptide family including CRF, urocortin 1-3, urotensin 1-3, and sauvagine. The actions of the CRF family are mediated by at least two different receptors with different anatomical distribution and affinities for the peptides. The CRF peptides affect several behavioral and physiological responses to stress including aggression, feeding, and locomotor activity. This review will summarize recent research in vertebrates concerning how social stress interacts with components of the CRF system. Consideration will be taken to the different models used for social stress ranging from social isolation, dyadic interactions, to group dominance hierarchies. Further, the temporal effect of social stressor from acute, intermittent, to chronic will be considered. Finally, strains selected for specific behavior or physiology linked to social stress will also be discussed.

  3. Central corticotropin releasing factor and social stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eBackström

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Social interactions are a main source of stress in vertebrates. Social stressors, as well as other stressors, activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis resulting in glucocorticoid release. One of the main components of the HPA axis is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF. The neuropeptide CRF is part of a peptide family including CRF, urocortin 1-3, urotensin 1-3 and sauvagine. The actions of the CRF family are mediated by at least two different receptors with different anatomical distribution and affinities for the peptides. The CRF peptides affect several behavioral and physiological responses to stress including aggression, feeding and locomotor activity. This review will summarize recent research in vertebrates concerning how social stress interacts with components of the CRF system. Consideration will be taken to the different models used for social stress ranging from social isolation, dyadic interactions, to group dominance hierarchies. Further, the temporal effect of social stressor from acute, intermittent, to chronic will be considered. Finally, strains selected for specific behavior or physiology linked to social stress will also be discussed.

  4. Nucleus accumbens corticotropin-releasing factor increases cue-triggered motivation for sucrose reward: paradoxical positive incentive effects in stress?

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    Schulkin Jay

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is typically considered to mediate aversive aspects of stress, fear and anxiety. However, CRF release in the brain is also elicited by natural rewards and incentive cues, raising the possibility that some CRF systems in the brain mediate an independent function of positive incentive motivation, such as amplifying incentive salience. Here we asked whether activation of a limbic CRF subsystem magnifies the increase in positive motivation for reward elicited by incentive cues previously associated with that reward, in a way that might exacerbate cue-triggered binge pursuit of food or other incentives? We assessed the impact of CRF microinjections into the medial shell of nucleus accumbens using a pure incentive version of Pavlovian-Instrumental transfer, a measure specifically sensitive to the incentive salience of reward cues (which it separates from influences of aversive stress, stress reduction, frustration and other traditional explanations for stress-increased behavior. Rats were first trained to press one of two levers to obtain sucrose pellets, and then separately conditioned to associate a Pavlovian cue with free sucrose pellets. On test days, rats received microinjections of vehicle, CRF (250 or 500 ng/0.2 μl or amphetamine (20 μg/0.2 μl. Lever pressing was assessed in the presence or absence of the Pavlovian cues during a half-hour test. Results Microinjections of the highest dose of CRF (500 ng or amphetamine (20 μg selectively enhanced the ability of Pavlovian reward cues to trigger phasic peaks of increased instrumental performance for a sucrose reward, each peak lasting a minute or so before decaying after the cue. Lever pressing was not enhanced by CRF microinjections in the baseline absence of the Pavlovian cue or during the presentation without a cue, showing that the CRF enhancement could not be explained as a result of generalized motor arousal, frustration or stress

  5. Regulation of gonadotropins by corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin

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    Kazunori eKageyama

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, it suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is a major regulatory peptide in the HPA axis during stress. Urocortin1 (Ucn1, a member of the CRF family of peptides, has a variety of physiological functions and both CRF and Ucn1 contribute to the stress response via G protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptors. Ucn2 and Ucn3, which belong to a separate paralogous lineage from CRF, are highly selective for the CRF type 2 receptor (CRF2 receptor. The HPA and HPG axes interact with each other, and gonadal function and reproduction are suppressed in response to various stressors. In this review, we focus on the regulation of gonadotropins by CRF and Ucn2 in pituitary gonadotrophs and of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH via CRF receptors in the hypothalamus. In corticotrophs, stress-induced increases in CRF stimulate Ucn2 production, which leads to the inhibition of gonadotropin secretion via the CRF2 receptor in the pituitary. GnRH in the hypothalamus is regulated by a variety of stress conditions. CRF is also involved in the suppression of the HPG axis, especially the GnRH pulse generator, via CRF receptors in the hypothalamus. Thus, complicated regulation of GnRH in the hypothalamus and gonadotropins in the pituitary via CRF receptors contributes to stress responses and adaptation of gonadal functions.

  6. Regulation of gonadotropins by corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    While stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, it suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a major regulatory peptide in the HPA axis during stress. Urocortin 1 (Ucn1), a member of the CRF family of peptides, has a variety of physiological functions and both CRF and Ucn1 contribute to the stress response via G protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptors. Ucn2 and Ucn3, which belong to a separate paralogous lineage from CRF, are highly selective for the CRF type 2 receptor (CRF(2) receptor). The HPA and HPG axes interact with each other, and gonadal function and reproduction are suppressed in response to various stressors. In this review, we focus on the regulation of gonadotropins by CRF and Ucn2 in pituitary gonadotrophs and of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) via CRF receptors in the hypothalamus. In corticotrophs, stress-induced increases in CRF stimulate Ucn2 production, which leads to the inhibition of gonadotropin secretion via the CRF(2) receptor in the pituitary. GnRH in the hypothalamus is regulated by a variety of stress conditions. CRF is also involved in the suppression of the HPG axis, especially the GnRH pulse generator, via CRF receptors in the hypothalamus. Thus, complicated regulation of GnRH in the hypothalamus and gonadotropins in the pituitary via CRF receptors contributes to stress responses and adaptation of gonadal functions.

  7. Impact of sex and gender on corticotropin releasing factor and noradrenergic sensitivity in cocaine use disorder

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    McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Cason, Angie M.; Kohtz, Amy S.; Maria, Megan Moran-Santa; Aston-Jones, Gary; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2016-01-01

    Responses to stress may be important in understanding sex and gender differences in substance use disorders and may also be a target for development of treatment interventions. A growing body of both preclinical and clinical research supports important underlying sex and gender differences in the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and noradrenergic systems, which may contribute to drug use. Preclinical models have demonstrated increased sensitivity of females as compared to males to CRF and noradrenergic-induced drug reinstatement, and, consistent with these findings, human laboratory studies have demonstrated greater sensitivity to corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and noradrenergic stimulation in cocaine-dependent women as compared to men. Further, neuroimaging studies have demonstrated increased neural response to stressful stimuli in cocaine-dependent women as compared to men, as well as shown significant sex differences in the sensitivity of brain regions responsible for regulating response to CRH. Development of interventions targeting the noradrenergic system and stress response in drug-dependent individuals could have important clinical implications for both women and men. PMID:27870396

  8. Impact of gender on corticotropin-releasing factor and noradrenergic sensitivity in cocaine use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Cason, Angie M; Kohtz, Amy S; Moran Santa-Maria, Megan; Aston-Jones, Gary; Brady, Kathleen T

    2017-01-02

    Responses to stress may be important in understanding gender differences in substance use disorders and may also be a target for development of treatment interventions. A growing body of both preclinical and clinical research supports important underlying gender differences in the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and noradrenergic systems, which may contribute to drug use. Preclinical models have demonstrated increased sensitivity of females to CRF and noradrenergic-induced drug reinstatement compared with males, and, consistent with these findings, human laboratory studies have demonstrated greater sensitivity to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and noradrenergic stimulation in cocaine-dependent women compared with men. Furthermore, neuroimaging studies have demonstrated increased neural response to stressful stimuli in cocaine-dependent women compared with men as well as showing significant sex differences in the sensitivity of brain regions responsible for regulating the response to CRH. Development of interventions targeting the noradrenergic system and stress response in drug-dependent individuals could have important clinical implications for both women and men. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Direct projection from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to hypophysiotrophic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus demonstrated...

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry......Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry...

  10. Cloning and characterization of corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin in Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus).

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    Robinson, B M; Tellam, D J; Smart, D; Mohammad, Y N; Brennand, J; Rivier, J E; Lovejoy, D A

    1999-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin belong to a superfamily of neuropeptides that includes the urotensins-I in fishes and the insect diuretic peptides. Sequence analysis suggests that urocortin is the mammalian ortholog of urotensin-I, although the physiological role for this peptide in mammals is not known. Within the Rodentia, hamsters belong to a phylogenetically older lineage than that of mice and rats and possess significant differences in hypothalamic organization. We have, therefore, cloned the coding region of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin mature peptide by polymerase chain reaction. Hamster urocortin was prepared by solid-phase synthesis, and its pharmacological actions on human corticotropin-releasing factor R1 and R2 receptors were investigated. The deduced hamster corticotropin-releasing factor amino acid sequence and cleavage site is identical to that in rat, whereas the urocortin sequence is unique among the urocortin/urotensin-I/sauvagine family in possessing asparagine and alanine in positions 38 and 39, respectively. The hamster urocortin carboxy terminus sequence bears greater structural similarity to the insect diuretic peptide family, suggesting either retrogressive mutational changes within the mature peptide or convergent sequence evolution. Despite these changes, human and hamster urocortin are generally equipotent at cAMP activation, neuronal acidification rate, and R1/R2 receptor affinities.

  11. Localization and functional roles of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 in the cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gounko, Natalia V.; Gramsbergen, Albert; van der Want, Johannes J. L.

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 2 receptor has three splice variants alpha, beta, and gamma. In the rodent brain only CRF-R2 alpha is present. In the cerebellum, CRF-R2 alpha has two different isoforms: a full-length form (fl) and truncated (tr). Both forms CRF-R2 have a unique

  12. Region-specific alterations in the corticotropin-releasing factor and glucocorticoid receptors in the postmortem brain of suicide victims

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanshyam N. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Rationale : Abnormalities of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis in depression and suicide are among the most consistent findings in biological psychiatry. However, the specific molecular mechanism associated with HPA axis abnormality in the brain of depressed or suicidal subjects is not clear. It is believed that abnormal HPA axis is caused by increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and decreased levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the brain of depr...

  13. Prereproductive stress to female rats alters corticotropin releasing factor type 1 expression in ova and behavior and brain corticotropin releasing factor type 1 expression in offspring.

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    Zaidan, Hiba; Leshem, Micah; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna

    2013-11-01

    Human and animal studies indicate that vulnerability to stress may be heritable and that changes in germline may mediate some transgenerational effects. Corticotropin releasing factor type 1 (CRF1) is a key component in the stress response. We investigated changes in CRF1 expression in brain and ova of stressed female rats and in the brain of their neonate and adult offspring. Behavioral changes in adulthood were also assessed. Adult female rats underwent chronic unpredictable stress. We extracted mature oocytes and brain regions from a subset of rats and mated the rest 2 weeks following the stress procedure. CRF1 expression was assessed using quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Tests of anxiety and aversive learning were used to examine behavior of offspring in adulthood. We show that chronic unpredictable stress leads to an increase in CRF1 messenger RNA expression in frontal cortex and mature oocytes. Neonatal offspring of stressed female rats show an increase in brain CRF1 expression. In adulthood, offspring of stressed female rats show sex differences in both CRF1 messenger RNA expression and behavior. Moreover, CRF1 expression patterns in frontal cortex of female offspring depend upon both maternal and individual adverse experience. Our findings demonstrate that stress affects CRF1 expression in brain but also in ova, pointing to a possible mechanism of transgenerational transmission. In offspring, stress-induced changes are evident at birth and are thus unlikely to result from altered maternal nurturance. Finally, brain CRF1 expression in offspring depends upon gender and upon maternal and individual exposure to adverse environment. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  14. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

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    Michelle H Le

    Full Text Available Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1. Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr and chronic (2hr CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  15. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

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    Le, Michelle H; Weissmiller, April M; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  16. The dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing factor test in men with major depression: role of childhood trauma.

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    Heim, Christine; Mletzko, Tanja; Purselle, David; Musselman, Dominique L; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2008-02-15

    The dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) test is considered to be the most sensitive measure of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and has been demonstrated to be altered in patients with major depression (MDD). Although childhood trauma is a demonstrated risk factor for MDD and patients with a history of childhood abuse and MDD demonstrate HPA axis hyperactivity, the dexamethasone/CRF test remains unstudied in this population. We determined the impact of childhood trauma on dexamethasone/CRF test results in patients with MDD. Forty-nine healthy men, ages 18-60 years, without mania or psychosis, active substance abuse, or eating disorder and medication-free were recruited into four study groups, including: 1) normal subjects with no childhood abuse history or psychiatric disorder (n = 14); 2) men with childhood abuse histories without current MDD (n = 14); 3) men with childhood abuse histories with current MDD (n = 15); and 4) men with current MDD and no childhood abuse history (n = 6). Plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cortisol concentrations were measured in response to dexamethasone/CRF administration. Men with childhood trauma histories exhibited increases in ACTH and cortisol responses to dexamethasone/CRF compared with non-abused men. In particular, abused men with current MDD showed increased responsiveness compared with control subjects and depressed men without childhood abuse experience. Increased response was associated with the severity, duration, and earlier onset of the abuse. The effects were not explained by concurrent posttraumatic stress disorder. Childhood trauma increases HPA axis activity as measured with the dexamethasone/CRF test in adult men with MDD, potentially reflecting environmental risk for developing depression.

  17. DIFFERENTIAL ACTIVATION OF NEURONAL CELL TYPES IN THE BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA BY CORTICOTROPIN RELEASING FACTOR

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    Rostkowski, Amanda B.; Leitermann, Randy J.; Urban, Janice H.

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced CRF release in the BLA is strongly associated with the generation of behavioral stress responses through activation of the CRF-R1 receptor subtype. Stress and anxiety-like behavior are modulated in part by the balance of peptide actions such as excitatory corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor activation in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA). While the actions of CRF are clear, little is known about the cell type influenced by CRF receptor stimulation. These studies were designed to identify the cell types within the BLA activated by intra-BLA administration of CRF using multi-label immunohistochemistry for cFos and markers for pyramidal (CaMKII-immunopositive) and interneuronal [glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65)] cell populations. Administration of CRF into the BLA produced a dose-dependent increase in the expression of cFos-ir. Intra-BLA injection of CRF induced significant increases in cFos-ir in the CaMKII-ir population. Although increases in cFos-ir in GAD65-ir cells were observed, this did not reach statistical significance perhaps in part due to the decreased numbers of GAD65-ir cells within the BLA after CRF treatment. These findings demonstrate that CRF, when released into the BLA, activates projection neurons and that the activity of GABAergic interneurons is also altered by CRF treatment. Decreases in the number of GAD65-ir neurons could reflect either increased or decreased activity of these cells and future studies will more directly address these possibilities. The expression of increased of cFos is associated with longer term regulation of gene expression which may be involved in the profound long term effects of neuropeptides, such as CRF, on the activity and plasticity of BLA pyramidal neurons. PMID:23688647

  18. Serotonin modifies corticotropin-releasing factor-induced behaviors of chicks.

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    Zhang, Rong; Tachibana, Tetsuya; Takagi, Tomo; Koutoku, Tomoyuki; Denbow, D Michael; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2004-05-05

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) decreased corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-induced behaviors in neonatal chicks, and serotonin is one of the possible mechanisms through which GLP-1 affects CRF-induced behaviors. The present experiments were conducted to confirm the effect of serotonin on CRF-induced behaviors. In Experiment 1, chicks were intracerebroventricularly injected with either saline, 0.1 microg of CRF, 5.0 microg of serotonin, or 0.1 microg of CRF plus 5.0 microg of serotonin. Injection of CRF caused excitation as evidenced by increased spontaneous activities and distress vocalizations (DVs) compared to the control group. The effect of CRF was attenuated by serotonin since chicks became quiet after given CRF with serotonin. Sleep-like behaviors were observed in the serotonin group. The number of defecations was increased by CRF and decreased by serotonin. Both CRF and serotonin increased plasma corticosterone, and the effect was synergistic. Serotonin dose-dependently decreased locomotor activities of chicks after central administration of 0.1 microg of CRF, 0.1 microg of CRF plus 2.5, 5.0, or 10.0 microg of serotonin in Experiment 2. CRF-induced DVs were modified by serotonin. Instead of DVs, tender and low-pitched vocalizations were observed in chicks treated with CRF plus serotonin, the voice frequencies of which were less than 10 kHz. In conclusion, serotonin attenuated the CRF-induced behaviors while stimulating corticosterone release. These results indicate that the role of serotonin is dependent on the behaviors being measured. Copyright 2003 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Expression and Regulation of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Type 2 beta in Developing and Mature Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuperman, Yael; Issler, Orna; Vaughan, Joan; Bilezikjian, Louise; Vale, Wylie; Chen, Alon

    Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 (CRFR2) is highly expressed in skeletal muscle (SM) tissue where it is suggested to inhibit interactions between insulin signaling pathway components affecting whole-body glucose homeostasis. However, little is known about factors regulating SM CRFR2

  20. Role of corticotropin-releasing factor in the median raphe nucleus in yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lê, A.D.; Funk, Douglas; Coen, Kathleen; Li, Zhaoxia; Shaham, Yavin

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacological stressor yohimbine increases ongoing alcohol self-administration and reinstates alcohol seeking in rats. This effect is attenuated by systemic injections of a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) antagonist. The brain sites involved in CRF's role in yohimbine-induced alcohol taking and seeking are unknown. We report that injections of the CRF receptor antagonist d-Phe CRF into the median raphe nucleus (MRN) attenuated yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking but ...

  1. Corticotropin-releasing factor within the central nucleus of the amygdala and the nucleus accumbens shell mediates the negative affective state of nicotine withdrawal in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A.; Prado, Melissa M.; Isaac, Shani K.; Marshall, Alex.; Rylkova, Daria; Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco addiction is a chronic disorder that is characterized by a negative affective state upon smoking cessation and relapse after periods of abstinence. Previous research has shown that an increased central release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) at least partly mediates the deficit in brain reward function associated with nicotine withdrawal in rats. The aim of these studies was to investigate the role of CRF in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the lateral bed nucleus of...

  2. Increased corticotropin-releasing hormone immunoreactivity in monoamine-containing pontine nuclei of depressed suicide men.

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    Austin, M C; Janosky, J E; Murphy, H A

    2003-03-01

    A number of clinical investigations and postmortem brain studies have provided evidence that excessive corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) secretion and neurotransmission is involved in the pathophysiology of depressive illness, and several studies have suggested that the hyperactivity in CRH neurotransmission extends beyond the hypothalamus involving several extra-hypothalamic brain regions. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that CRH levels are increased in specific brainstem regions of suicide victims with a diagnosis of major depression. Frozen tissue sections of the pons containing the locus coeruleus and caudal raphe nuclei from 11 matched pairs of depressed suicide and control male subjects were processed for radioimmunocytochemistry using a primary antiserum to CRH and a ([125])I-IgG secondary antibody. The optical density corresponding to the level of CRH-immunoreactivity (IR) was quantified in specific pontine regions from the film autoradiographic images. The level of CRH-IR was increased by 30% in the locus coeruleus, 39% in the median raphe and 45% in the caudal dorsal raphe in the depressed suicide subjects compared to controls. No difference in CRH-IR was found in the dorsal tegmentum or medial parabrachial nucleus between the subject groups. These findings reveal that CRH-IR levels are specifically increased in norepinephrine- and serotonin-containing pontine nuclei of depressed suicide men, and thus they are consistent with the hypothesis that CRH neurotransmission is elevated in extra-hypothalamic brain regions of depressed subjects.

  3. Corticotropin-releasing factor in the dorsal raphe nucleus: Linking stress coping and addiction.

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    Valentino, Rita J; Lucki, Irwin; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth

    2010-02-16

    Addiction and stress are linked at multiple levels. Drug abuse is often initiated as a maladaptive mechanism for coping with stress. It is maintained in part by negative reinforcement to prevent the aversive consequences of stress associated with abstinence. Finally, stress is a major factor leading to relapse in subjects in which drug seeking behavior has extinguished. These associations imply overlapping or converging neural circuits and substrates that underlie the processes of addiction and the expression of the stress response. Here we discuss the major brain serotonin (5-HT) system, the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN)-5-HT system as a point of convergence that links these processes and how the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) directs this by a bimodal regulation of DRN neuronal activity. The review begins by describing a structural basis for CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system. This is followed by a review of the effects of CRF and stress on DRN function based on electrophysiological and microdialysis studies. The concept that multiple CRF receptor subtypes in the DRN facilitate distinct coping behaviors is reviewed with recent evidence for a unique cellular mechanism by which stress history can determine the type of coping behavior. Finally, work on CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system is integrated with literature on the role of 5-HT-dopamine interactions in addiction. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

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    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel)

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  5. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor is centrally involved in learning under moderate stress.

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    Lucas, Morgan; Chen, Alon; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2013-08-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide is found to have a pivotal role in the regulation of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges. Here, we studied the involvement of the hypothalamic CRF in learning under stressful conditions. We have used a site-specific viral approach to knockdown (KD) CRF expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The two-way shuttle avoidance (TWSA) task was chosen to assess learning and memory under stressful conditions. Control animals learned to shuttle from one side to the other to avoid electrical foot shock by responding to a tone. Novel object and social recognition tasks were used to assess memory under less stressful conditions. KD of PVN-CRF expression decreased the number of avoidance responses in a TWSA session under moderate (0.8 mA), but not strong (1.5 mA), stimulus intensity compared to control rats. On the other hand, KD of PVN-CRF had no effect on memory performance in the less stressful novel object or social recognition tasks. Interestingly, basal or stress-induced corticosterone levels in CRF KD rats were not significantly different from controls. Taken together, the data suggest that the observed impairment was not a result of alteration in HPA axis activity, but rather due to reduced PVN-CRF activity on other brain areas. We propose that hypothalamic CRF is centrally involved in learning under moderate stressful challenge. Under 'basal' (less stressful) conditions or when the intensity of the stress is more demanding, central CRF ceases to be the determinant factor, as was indicated by performances in the TWSA with higher stimulus intensity or in the less stressful tasks of object and social recognition.

  6. Altered Responses to Cold Environment in Urocortin 1 and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Deficient Mice

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    Bayan Chaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined core body temperature (CBT of urocortin 1 (UCN1 and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF knockout (KO mice exposed to 4°C for 2 h. UCN1KO mice showed higher average CBT during cold exposure as compared to WT. The CBT of male and female WT mice dropped significantly to 34.1 ± 2.4 and 34.9 ± 3.1 C at 4°C, respectively. In contrast, the CBT of male and female UCN1KO mice dropped only slightly after 2 h at 4°C to 36.8 ± 0.7 and 38.1 ± 0.5 C, respectively. WT female and male UCN1KO mice showed significant acclimatization to cold; however, female UCN1KO mice did not show such a significant acclimatization. CRFKO mice showed a dramatic decline in CBT from 38.2 ±  0.4 at 22°C to 26.1 ± 9.8 at 4°C for 2 h. The CRF/UCN1 double KO (dKO mice dropped their CBT to 32.5 ± 4.0 after 2 h exposure to 4°C. Dexamethasone treatment prevented the decline in CBT of the CRFKO and the dKO mice. Taken together, the data suggest a novel role for UCN1 in thermoregulation. The role of CRF is likely secondary to adrenal glucocorticoids, which have an important regulatory role on carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism.

  7. Assessment of serum level of corticotropin-releasing factor in primary nocturnal enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motawie, Ayat A; Abd Al-Aziz, Amany M; Hamed, Hanan M; Fatouh, Amany A A; Awad, Mona A M; El-Ghany, Amany Abd

    2017-02-01

    Primary nocturnal enuresis is one of the sleep related phenomena characterized by disruption in the relationship between arousal and urination. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a neurohormone released from the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus into the median eminence to elicit release of adrenocorticotrophin from the anterior pituitary. It may act to modulate autonomic function and behavior in concert with the endocrine effects. Conflicting animal studies about the role of CRF in micturition, either facilitating or inhibiting, have been raised. It was suggested to be a novel target for treatment of urinary disorders based on the finding that manipulation of CRF in the pontine micturition circuit could affect urodynamic function. The aim was to throw light on the possible role of CRF in primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis by assessing its serum level. Twenty-nine children aged 8-14 years complaining of primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy children with good toilet control day and night were recruited to the study. History taking, clinical examination, and assessment of serum CRF levels in the morning and evening (9 a.m. and 9 p.m.) were carried out for all patients and controls. A positive family history of enuresis was detected in 82.8% of enuretic patients. Serum levels of CRF (both morning and evening) were significantly lower in patients than in controls. Several animal studies suggested that CRF in descending projections from Barrington's nucleus to the lumbosacral parasympathetic neurons is inhibitory to micturition, which supports our results and the assumption that reduction of the evening serum CRF level could have a role in the occurrence of primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis. No significant difference was found between morning and evening CRF serum levels in either cases or controls, which negates our assumption of having a rhythmic pattern of release (figure). No correlations with

  8. Role of Corticotropin Releasing Factor 1 Signaling in Cocaine Seeking during Early Extinction in Female and Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Angie M; Kohtz, Amy; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE) and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) neurons are involved in stress responses, including stress's ability to drive drug relapse. Previous animal studies indicate that female rats exhibit greater drug seeking than male rats during initial drug abstinence. Moreover, females are more sensitive to the effect of stress to drive drug seeking than males. Finally, LC-NE neurons are more sensitive to CRF in females compared to males. We hypothesized that increased drug seeking in females on extinction day one (ED1) is due to increased response to the stress of early withdrawal and is dependent upon the increased response of LC in females to CRF. We predicted that LC-NE neurons would exhibit Fos activation on ED1, and that blocking CRF1 signaling would decrease drug seeking on ED1 measured by responding on an active lever previously associated with cocaine self- administration. After chronic cocaine self-administration, female and male rats underwent a test for initial extinction responding by measuring lever pressing in the absence of cocaine. Prior to this Extinction Day 1 (ED1) session, rats were injected with vehicle or the selective CRF1 antagonist (CP) to measure effects of CRF antagonism on drug seeking during early abstinence. ED1 increased corticosterone in female rats, in proportion to lever responding in male and female, indicating that ED1 was stressful. Pretreatment with CP decreased cocaine seeking on ED1 more effectively in female compared to male rats. This increase in responding was associated with an increase in activation of LC NE neurons. Together, these findings indicate that stress, and signaling at CRF receptors in LC, may be involved in the increased drug seeking during initial abstinence.

  9. Role of Corticotropin Releasing Factor 1 Signaling in Cocaine Seeking during Early Extinction in Female and Male Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie M Cason

    Full Text Available Locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF neurons are involved in stress responses, including stress's ability to drive drug relapse. Previous animal studies indicate that female rats exhibit greater drug seeking than male rats during initial drug abstinence. Moreover, females are more sensitive to the effect of stress to drive drug seeking than males. Finally, LC-NE neurons are more sensitive to CRF in females compared to males. We hypothesized that increased drug seeking in females on extinction day one (ED1 is due to increased response to the stress of early withdrawal and is dependent upon the increased response of LC in females to CRF. We predicted that LC-NE neurons would exhibit Fos activation on ED1, and that blocking CRF1 signaling would decrease drug seeking on ED1 measured by responding on an active lever previously associated with cocaine self- administration. After chronic cocaine self-administration, female and male rats underwent a test for initial extinction responding by measuring lever pressing in the absence of cocaine. Prior to this Extinction Day 1 (ED1 session, rats were injected with vehicle or the selective CRF1 antagonist (CP to measure effects of CRF antagonism on drug seeking during early abstinence. ED1 increased corticosterone in female rats, in proportion to lever responding in male and female, indicating that ED1 was stressful. Pretreatment with CP decreased cocaine seeking on ED1 more effectively in female compared to male rats. This increase in responding was associated with an increase in activation of LC NE neurons. Together, these findings indicate that stress, and signaling at CRF receptors in LC, may be involved in the increased drug seeking during initial abstinence.

  10. Stress differentially regulates brain expression of corticotropin-releasing factor in binge-like eating prone and resistant female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvez, Juliane; de Ávila, Camila; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-12-01

    The expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide that regulates endocrine and behavioral responses to stress, was assessed in the brain in rats prone or resistant to stress-induced binge-like eating of sucrose. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to unpredictable intermittent 1-h access to sucrose in non-stressful conditions or after exposure to three foot shock stress sessions. Experimental sessions were performed at metestrus, diestrus, and proestrus. The rats were assigned to the binge-like eating prone (BEP) or the binge-like eating resistant (BER) phenotypes according to the rats' persistently high or low sucrose intake following three stress sessions. The BEP rats displayed elevated consumption of sucrose in non-stressful conditions and an additional significant increase in sucrose intake in response to stress. Conversely, the BER rats showed lower sucrose intake in non-stressful conditions, and stress did not increase sucrose intake in this phenotype. The brain expression of CRF mRNA and plasma corticosterone levels were assessed 30 min after the last stress session at the diestrous phase of the estrous cycle. Stress triggered a significant increase in plasma corticosterone levels and strongly increased CRF mRNA expression in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus in the BER but not in the BEP rats. However, the BEP but not the BER rats demonstrated a significant increase in CRF mRNA expression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) after stress. Hyporeactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the higher CRF expression in the BNST in BEP rats may contribute to stress-induced binge-like sucrose eating in the BEP phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Exposure Alters Corticotropin Releasing Factor Expression and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Female Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costine, Beth A; Oberlander, Joseph G; Davis, Matthew C; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Leaton, Robert N; Henderson, Leslie P

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the past several decades, the therapeutic use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been overshadowed by illicit use of these drugs by elite athletes and a growing number of adolescents to enhance performance and body image. As with adults, AAS use by adolescents is associated with a range of behavioral effects, including increased anxiety and altered responses to stress. It has been suggested that adolescents, especially adolescent females, may be particularly susceptible to the effects of these steroids, but few experiments in animal models have been performed to test this assertion. Here we show that chronic exposure of adolescent female mice to a mixture of three commonly abused AAS (testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate and methandrostenolone; 7.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) significantly enhanced anxiety-like behavior as assessed by the acoustic startle response (ASR), but did not augment the fear-potentiated startle response (FPS) or alter sensorimotor gating as assessed by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). AAS treatment also significantly increased the levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and somal-associated CRF immunoreactivity in the central amygdala (CeA), as well as neuropil-associated immunoreactivity in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBnST). AAS treatment did not alter CRF receptor 1 or 2 mRNA in either the CeA or the dBnST; CRF immunoreactivity in the ventral BNST, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or the median eminence (ME); or peripheral levels of corticosterone. These results suggest that chronic AAS treatment of adolescent female mice may enhance generalized anxiety, but not sensorimotor gating or learned fear, via a mechanism that involves increased CRF-mediated signaling from CeA neurons projecting to the dBnST. PMID:20537804

  12. Amygdaloid corticotropin-releasing factor is involved in the anxiolytic effect of acupuncture during ethanol withdrawal in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, ZhengLin; Jin, XiuDong; Wu, YiYan; Yang, XudXuDongong; Xu, YanJi; Jiang, James ZhongJian; Kim, Sang Chan; Lee, Bong Hyo; Yang, Chae Ha; Zhao, RongJie

    2013-10-01

    In a previous study, acupuncture at acupoint HT7 attenuated ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats by normalizing amygdaloid catecholamines. In the present study, the involvement of amygdaloid corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the anxiolytic effect of acupuncture was investigated during ethanol withdrawal. Rats were intraperitoneally treated with 3 g /kg/day of ethanol for 28 days, and the CRF mRNA levels in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) were measured by using a RT-PCR analysis 72 hours after the last dose of ethanol. During ethanol withdrawal, the rats were bilaterally treated with acupuncture at acupoints HT7, PC6 or at a non-acupoint (Tail) for one min/day for three days. Also, rats were bilaterally injected with CRF into the CEA five minutes after the third acupuncture treatment, after which followed by the elevated-plus maze (EPM) test and the plasma corticosterone radioimmunoassay (RIA) were administered. The RT-PCR analysis showed a significant increase in the amygdaloid CRF mRNA levels in the ethanol-withdrawn rats compared with both the saline-treated rats and the rats treated with acupuncture at HT7, but neither acupuncture at PC6 nor acupuncture at a non-acupoint significantly inhibited the increased mRNA expression. The EPM test and the RIA also showed that the post-acupuncture infusion of CRF greatly reduced the anxiolytic effect of acupuncture at HT7. These results suggest that during ethanol withdrawal, the anxiolytic effect of acupuncture may be mediated through the modulation of amydaloid CRF during ethanol withdrawal. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Acute central effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on energy balance: Effects of age and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenk, Judit; Rostás, Ildikó; Füredi, Nóra; Mikó, Alexandra; Soós, Szilvia; Solymár, Margit; Gaszner, Balázs; Székely, Miklós; Pétervári, Erika; Balaskó, Márta

    2016-11-01

    Previously demonstrated age-related changes in the catabolic melanocortin system that may contribute to middle-aged obesity and aging anorexia, raise the question of the potential involvement of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in these phenomena, as this catabolic hypothalamic mediator acts downstream to melanocortins. Catabolic effects of CRF were shown to be mediated by both CRF1 (hypermetabolism) and CRF2 (anorexia) receptors. To test the potential role of CRF in age-related obesity and aging anorexia, we investigated acute central effects of the peptide on energy balance in male and female rats during the course of aging. Effects of an intracerebroventricular CRF injection on food intake (FI), oxygen-consumption (VO2), core- and tail skin temperatures (Tc and Ts) were studied in male and female Wistar rats of five different age-groups (from 3- to 24-month). Anorexigenic responsiveness was tested during 180-min re-feeding (FeedScale) following 24-h fasting. Thermoregulatory analysis was performed by indirect calorimetry (Oxymax) complemented by thermocouples recording Tc and Ts (indicating heat loss). CRF suppressed FI in 3-month male and female animals. In males, CRF-induced anorexia declined with aging, whereas in females it was maintained in all groups. The peptide increased VO2 and Tc in all male age-groups, while the weaker hypermetabolic response characterizing 3-month females declined rapidly with aging. Thus, age-related alterations in acute central anorexigenic and hypermetabolic effects of CRF show different non-parallel patterns in males and females. Our findings underline the importance of gender differences. They also call the attention to the differential age-related changes in the CRF1 and CRF2 receptor systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chronic social stress alters levels of corticotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin mRNA in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albeck, D S; McKittrick, C R; Blanchard, D C; Blanchard, R J; Nikulina, J; McEwen, B S; Sakai, R R

    1997-06-15

    In the visible burrow system model of chronic social stress, male rats housed in mixed-sex groups quickly form a dominance hierarchy in which the subordinates appear to be severely stressed. A subgroup of subordinates have an impaired corticosterone response after presentation of a novel restraint stressor, leading to their designation as nonresponsive subordinates. To examine the mechanism underlying the blunted corticosterone response in these animals, in situ hybridization histochemistry was used to quantify corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNA expression in the brain. In two separate visible burrow system experiments, the nonresponsive subordinates expressed a significantly lower average number of CRF mRNA grains per cell in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus compared with stress-responsive subordinates, dominants (DOM), or cage-housed control (CON) rats. The number of CRF mRNA labeled cells was also significantly lower in nonresponders than in responsive subordinates or DOM. In the central amygdala, CRF mRNA levels were increased in both groups of subordinates compared with CON rats, whereas responsive subordinates exhibited higher levels than the DOM rats as well. AVP mRNA levels did not vary with behavioral rank in any subdivision of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. In the medial amygdala, the number of cells expressing AVP mRNA was significantly greater in CON rats compared with both groups of subordinates, although the average number of AVP mRNA grains per cell did not vary with rank. In addition, the number of AVP-positive cells significantly correlated with plasma testosterone level.

  15. Inhibitory effect of ramosetron on corticotropin releasing factor- and soybean oil-induced delays in gastric emptying in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Takuya; Keto, Yoshihiro; Yamano, Mayumi; Yokoyama, Toshihide; Sengoku, Takanori; Seki, Nobuo

    2012-09-01

    Symptoms of functional dyspepsia (FD) are highly prevalent in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, the effects of therapeutic agents for IBS on the pathophysiology of FD are unclear. In this study, therefore, we examined the effects of ramosetron, a serotonin 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, on corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)- and soybean oil-induced delays in gastric emptying of rats, in comparison with anti-diarrheal agent and spasmolytics. The involvement of 5-HT and the 5-HT(3) receptor in delayed gastric emptying was also evaluated. Corticotropin releasing factor was administered intravenously to rats 10min before oral administration of 0.05% phenol red solution, and the amount remaining in the stomach was measured after 30min. Soybean oil was administered orally with glass beads, and the number of residual beads in the stomach was counted 1h later. Both CRF and soybean oil inhibited gastric emptying dose-dependently. Ramosetron and itopride, a gastro-prokinetic agent, significantly reduced both CRF- and soybean oil-induced delays in gastric emptying, while an anti-diarrheal agent and spasmolytics aggravated them. Pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine for 2days to reduced the synthesis of endogenous 5-HT diminished the effects of both CRF and soybean oil on gastric emptying. A 5-HT(3) receptor agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide suppressed gastric emptying of both phenol red and glass beads, and those effects were reversed by ramosetron. These results suggest that CRF and soybean oil suppress gastric emptying in rats by activating 5-HT(3) receptors, and that by antagonizing these receptors, ramosetron may ameliorate symptoms of FD in clinical settings. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Role of corticotropin-releasing factor in the median raphe nucleus in yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê, A D; Funk, Douglas; Coen, Kathleen; Li, Zhaoxia; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-05-01

    The pharmacological stressor yohimbine increases ongoing alcohol self-administration and reinstates alcohol seeking in rats. This effect is attenuated by systemic injections of a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) antagonist. The brain sites involved in CRF's role in yohimbine-induced alcohol taking and seeking are unknown. We report that injections of the CRF receptor antagonist d-Phe CRF into the median raphe nucleus (MRN) attenuated yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking but had no effect on yohimbine-induced increases in alcohol intake during ongoing self-administration. Results indicate an important role of MRN CRF receptors in yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking but not yohimbine-induced increases in alcohol intake. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Effects of Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF on Sleep and Temperature Following Predictable Controllable and Uncontrollable Stress in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie eWellman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF is a major mediator of central nervous system responses to stressors, including alterations in wakefulness and sleep. However, its role in mediating stress-induced alterations in sleep has not been fully delineated. In this study, we assessed the role of CRF and the non-specific CRF antagonist, astressin (AST, in regulating changes in sleep produced by signaled, escapable shock (SES and signaled inescapable shock (SIS, two stressors that can increase or decrease sleep, respectively. Male BALB/cJ mice were surgically implanted with transmitters (DataSciences ETA10-F20 for recording EEG, activity and core body temperature by telemetry and a cannula for intracerebroventricular microinjections. After baseline (Base sleep recording, mice were presented tones (90 dB, 2 kHz that started 5.0 sec prior to and co-terminated with footshock (0.5 mA; 5.0 sec maximum duration. SES mice (n=9 always received shock but could terminate it by moving to the non-occupied chamber in a shuttlebox. Yoked SIS mice (n=9 were treated identically, but could not alter shock duration. Training with SES or SIS was conducted over two days to stabilize responses. Afterwards, the mice received saline, CRF (0.4 µg (0.42 mM or AST (1.0 µg (1.4 mM prior to SES or SIS. Sleep was analyzed over 20 h post-stress recordings. After administration of saline, REM was significantly greater in SES mice than in SIS mice whereas after CRF or AST, REM was similar in both groups. Total 20 h NREM did not vary across condition or group. However, after administration of saline and CRF, NREM episode duration was significantly decreased, and NREM episode number significantly increased, in SIS mice compared to SES animals. SES and SIS mice showed similar stress induced hyperthermia (SIH across all conditions. These data demonstrate that CRF can mediate stress-induced changes in sleep independently of SIH, an index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation.

  18. Residues remote from the binding pocket control the antagonist selectivity towards the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xianqiang; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Xu; Tang, Yun; Ågren, Hans; Tu, Yaoquan

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factors receptor-1 and receptor-2 (CRF1R and CRF2R) are therapeutic targets for treating neurological diseases. Antagonists targeting CRF1R have been developed for the potential treatment of anxiety disorders and alcohol addiction. It has been found that antagonists targeting CRF1R always show high selectivity, although CRF1R and CRF2R share a very high rate of sequence identity. This has inspired us to study the origin of the selectivity of the antagonists. We have therefore built a homology model for CRF2R and carried out unbiased molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics simulations for systems with the antagonist CP-376395 in CRF1R or CRF2R to address this issue. We found that the side chain of Tyr6.63 forms a hydrogen bond with the residue remote from the binding pocket, which allows Tyr6.63 to adopt different conformations in the two receptors and results in the presence or absence of a bottleneck controlling the antagonist binding to or dissociation from the receptors. The rotameric switch of the side chain of Tyr3566.63 allows the breaking down of the bottleneck and is a perquisite for the dissociation of CP-376395 from CRF1R.

  19. Pharmacophore Modelling and 3D-QSAR Studies on N(3)-Phenylpyrazinones as Corticotropin-Releasing Factor 1 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjit; Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Vipin

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacophore modelling-based virtual screening of compound is a ligand-based approach and is useful when the 3D structure of target is not available but a few known active compounds are known. Pharmacophore mapping studies were undertaken for a set of 50 N(3)-phenylpyrazinones possessing Corticotropin-releasing Factor 1 (CRF 1) antagonistic activity. Six point pharmacophores with two hydrogen bond acceptors, one hydrogen bond donor, two hydrophobic regions, and one aromatic ring as pharmacophoric features were developed. Amongst them the pharmacophore hypothesis AADHHR.47 yielded a statistically significant 3D-QSAR model with 0.803 as R (2) value and was considered to be the best pharmacophore hypothesis. The developed pharmacophore model was externally validated by predicting the activity of test set molecules. The squared predictive correlation coefficient of 0.91 was observed between experimental and predicted activity values of test set molecules. The geometry and features of pharmacophore were expected to be useful for the design of selective CRF 1 receptor antagonists.

  20. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone attenuates behavioral effects of corticotropin-releasing factor in isolated guinea pig pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiml-Webb, Patricia A; Miller, Emily; Deak, Terrence; Hennessy, Michael B

    2009-07-01

    During a 3-hr period of social isolation in a novel environment, guinea pig pups exhibit an initial active phase of behavioral responsiveness, characterized primarily by vocalizing, which is then followed by a stage of passive responsiveness in which pups display a distinctive crouch, eye-closing, and extensive piloerection. Prior treatment of pups with alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) reduces each of the passive behaviors. The onset of passive responding during separation can be accelerated with peripheral injection of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). To examine whether CRF produces its effects through a mechanism similar to that of prolonged separation, we examined the effect of administering alpha-MSH to pups injected with CRF. As expected, CRF markedly enhanced passive responding during a 60-min period of separation. alpha-MSH delivered by either intracerebroventricular infusion or intraperitoneal injection significantly reduced each of the passive behavioral responses without significantly affecting active behavior. These findings, together with previous results indicating that it is the anti-inflammatory property of alpha-MSH that is responsible for its behavioral effects during prolonged separation, suggest that peripheral CRF speeds the induction of passive responding through a mechanism involving enhanced proinflammatory activity.

  1. Identification and characterization of a pituitary corticotropin-releasing factor binding protein by chemical cross-linking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishimura, E; Billestrup, Nils; Perrin, M

    1987-01-01

    A corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein has been identified based on the chemical cross-linking of ovine [Nle21,m-125I-Tyr32]CRF (125I-oCRF) to bovine anterior pituitary membranes using disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). The apparent molecular weight of the cross-linked complex...... appeared to have a molecular weight of approximately 70,000. The cross-linking was specific since an excess (1 microM) of an unrelated peptide (insulin) did not affect the appearance of the Mr 75,000 band. The concentration of CRF required to inhibit cross-linking by 50% was found to be similar...... to that determined for bovine pituitary CRF receptors by radioreceptor assay. The nonhydrolyzable GTP analogue 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate dose dependently inhibited the cross-linking of 125I-oCRF to the Mr 70,000 protein. 50 nM of the inactive CRF analogue, [Ala14]oCRF, had no effect on the cross-linking...

  2. Episodic Social Stress-Escalated Cocaine Self-Administration: Role of Phasic and Tonic Corticotropin Releasing Factor in the Anterior and Posterior Ventral Tegmental Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyson, Christopher O.; Montagud-Romero, Sandra; Stein, Dirson J.; Gobrogge, Kyle L.; DeBold, Joseph F.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent social defeat stress escalates later cocaine self-administration. Reward and stress both activate ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons, increasing downstream extracellular dopamine concentration in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. The stress neuropeptide corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and its receptors (CRF-R1, CRF-R2) are located in the VTA and influence dopaminergic activity. These experiments explore how CRF release and the activation of its receptors within the VTA both during and after stress influence later cocaine self-administration in rats. In vivo microdialysis of CRF in the VTA demonstrated that CRF is phasically released in the posterior VTA (pVTA) during acute defeat, but, with repeated defeat, CRF is recruited into the anterior VTA (aVTA) and CRF tone is increased in both subregions. Intra-VTA antagonism of CRF-R1 in the pVTA and CRF-R2 in the aVTA during each social defeat prevented escalated cocaine self-administration in a 24 h “binge.” VTA CRF continues to influence cocaine seeking in stressed animals long after social defeat exposure. Unlike nonstressed controls, previously stressed rats show significant cocaine seeking after 15 d of forced abstinence. Previously stressed rats continue to express elevated CRF tone within the VTA and antagonism of pVTA CRF-R1 or aVTA CRF-R2 reverses cocaine seeking. In conclusion, these experiments demonstrate neuroadaptive changes in tonic and phasic CRF with repeated stress, that CRF release during stress may contribute to later escalated cocaine taking, and that persistently elevated CRF tone in the VTA may drive later cocaine seeking through increased activation of pVTA CRF-R1 and aVTA CRF-R2. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) has emerged as a likely candidate molecule underlying the fundamental link between stress history and escalated drug self-administration. However, the nature of CRF

  3. Interleukin 1 beta and corticotropin-releasing factor inhibit pain by releasing opioids from immune cells in inflamed tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M; Carter, L; Stein, C

    1994-01-01

    Local analgesic effects of exogenous opioid agonists are particularly prominent in painful inflammatory conditions and are mediated by opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerves. The endogenous ligands of these receptors, opioid peptides, have been demonstrated in resident immune cells within inflamed tissue of animals and humans. Here we examine in vivo and in vitro whether interleukin 1 beta (IL-1) or corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is capable of releasing these endogenous opioids and inhibiting pain. When injected into inflamed rat paws (but not intravenously), IL-1 and CRF produce antinociception, which is reversible by IL-1 receptor antagonist and alpha-helical CRF, respectively, and by the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A. In vivo administration of antibodies against opioid peptides indicates that the effects of IL-1 and CRF are mediated by beta-endorphin and, in addition, by dynorphin A and [Met]enkephalin, respectively. Correspondingly, IL-1 effects are inhibited by mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid antagonists, whereas CRF effects are attenuated by all except a kappa-antagonist. Finally, IL-1 and CRF produce acute release of immunoreactive beta-endorphin in cell suspensions freshly prepared from inflamed lymph nodes. This effect is reversible by IL-1 receptor antagonist and alpha-helical CRF, respectively. These findings suggest that IL-1 and CRF activate their receptors on immune cells to release opioids that subsequently occupy multiple opioid receptors on sensory nerves and result in antinociception. beta-Endorphin, mu- and delta-opioid receptors play a major role, but IL-1 and CRF appear to differentially release additional opioid peptides. PMID:7910403

  4. Repeated water avoidance stress induces visceral hypersensitivity: Role of interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Tsukasa; Miyagishi, Saori; Nozu, Rintaro; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2017-12-01

    Repeated water avoidance stress (WAS) induces visceral hypersensitivity. Additionally, it is also known to activate corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), mast cells, and pro-inflammatory cytokines systems, but their precise roles on visceral sensation have not been determined definitely. The aim of the study was to explore this issue. Abdominal muscle contractions induced by colonic balloon distention, that is, visceromotor response (VMR) was detected electrophysiologically in conscious rats. WAS or sham stress as control for 1 h daily was loaded, and the threshold of VMR was determined before and at 24 h after the stress. Repeated WAS for three consecutive days reduced the threshold of VMR, but sham stress did not induce any change. Astressin, a CRF receptor antagonist (50 μg/kg) intraperitoneally (ip) at 10 min before each WAS session, prevented the visceral allodynia, but the antagonist (200 μg/kg) ip at 30 min and 15 h before measurement of the threshold after completing 3-day stress session did not modify the response. Ketotifen, a mast cell stabilizer (3 mg/kg), anakinra, an interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist (20 mg/kg) or IL-6 antibody (16.6 μg/kg) ip for two times before the measurement abolished the response. Repeated WAS for three consecutive days induced visceral allodynia, which was mediated through mast cells, IL-1, and IL-6 pathways. Inhibition of peripheral CRF signaling prevented but did not reverse this response, suggesting that peripheral CRF may be an essential trigger but may not contribute to the maintenance of repeated WAS-induced visceral allodynia. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Traumatic Stress Promotes Hyperalgesia via Corticotropin-Releasing Factor-1 Receptor (CRFR1) Signaling in Central Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoga, Christy A; Roltsch Hellard, Emily A; Whitaker, Annie M; Lu, Yi-Ling; Schreiber, Allyson L; Baynes, Brittni B; Baiamonte, Brandon A; Richardson, Heather N; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2016-09-01

    Hyperalgesia is an exaggerated response to noxious stimuli produced by peripheral or central plasticity. Stress modifies nociception, and humans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit co-morbid chronic pain and amygdala dysregulation. Predator odor stress produces hyperalgesia in rodents. Systemic blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 1 receptors (CRFR1s) reduces stress-induced thermal hyperalgesia. We hypothesized that CRF-CRFR1 signaling in central amygdala (CeA) mediates stress-induced hyperalgesia in rats with high stress reactivity. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to predator odor stress in a conditioned place avoidance paradigm and indexed for high (Avoiders) and low (Non-Avoiders) avoidance of predator odor-paired context, or were unstressed Controls. Rats were tested for the latency to withdraw hindpaws from thermal stimuli (Hargreaves test). We used pharmacological, molecular, and immunohistochemical techniques to assess the role of CRF-CRFR1 signaling in CeA in stress-induced hyperalgesia. Avoiders exhibited higher CRF peptide levels in CeA that did not appear to be locally synthesized. Intra-CeA CRF infusion mimicked stress-induced hyperalgesia. Avoiders exhibited thermal hyperalgesia that was reversed by systemic or intra-CeA injection of a CRFR1 antagonist. Finally, intra-CeA infusion of tetrodotoxin produced thermal hyperalgesia in unstressed rats and blocked the anti-hyperalgesic effect of systemic CRFR1 antagonist in stressed rats. These data suggest that rats with high stress reactivity exhibit hyperalgesia that is mediated by CRF-CRFR1 signaling in CeA.

  6. Interactions Between Anandamide and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Signaling Modulate Human Amygdala Function and Risk for Anxiety Disorders: An Imaging Genetics Strategy for Modeling Molecular Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Catherine H; Drabant Conley, Emily; Bogdan, Ryan; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical models reveal that stress-induced amygdala activity and impairment in fear extinction reflect reductions in anandamide driven by corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRF1) potentiation of the anandamide catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase. Here, we provide clinical translation for the importance of these molecular interactions using an imaging genetics strategy to examine whether interactions between genetic polymorphisms associated with differential anandamide (FAAH rs324420) and CRF1 (CRHR1 rs110402) signaling modulate amygdala function and anxiety disorder diagnosis. Analyses revealed that individuals with a genetic background predicting relatively high anandamide and CRF1 signaling exhibited blunted basolateral amygdala habituation, which further mediated increased risk for anxiety disorders among these same individuals. The convergence of preclinical and clinical data suggests that interactions between anandamide and CRF1 represent a fundamental molecular mechanism regulating amygdala function and anxiety. Our results further highlight the potential of imaging genetics to powerfully translate complex preclinical findings to clinically meaningful human phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Corticotropin-releasing factor in ventromedial prefrontal cortex mediates avoidance of a traumatic stress-paired context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Allyson L; Lu, Yi-Ling; Baynes, Brittni B; Richardson, Heather N; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2017-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects 7.7 million Americans. One diagnostic criterion for PTSD is avoidance of stimuli that are related to the traumatic stress. Using a predator odor stress conditioned place aversion (CPA) model, rats can be divided into groups based on stress reactivity, as measured by avoidance of the odor-paired context. Avoider rats, which show high stress reactivity, exhibit persistent avoidance of stress-paired context and escalated alcohol drinking. Here, we examined the potential role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide that promotes anxiety-like behavior in mediating avoidance and escalated alcohol drinking after stress. CRF is expressed in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The dorsal and ventral sub-regions of the mPFC (dmPFC and vmPFC) have opposing roles in stress reactivity and alcohol drinking. We hypothesized that vmPFC CRF-CRFR1 signaling contributes functionally to stress-induced avoidance and escalated alcohol self-administration. In Experiment 1, adult male Wistar rats were exposed to predator odor stress in a CPA paradigm, indexed for avoidance of odor-paired context, and brains processed for CRF-immunoreactive cell density in vmPFC and dmPFC. Post-stress, Avoiders exhibited higher CRF cell density in vmPFC, but not the dmPFC. In Experiment 2, rats were tested for avoidance of a context repeatedly paired with intra-vmPFC CRF infusions. In Experiment 3, rats were stressed and indexed, then tested for the effects of intra-vmPFC CRFR1 antagonism on avoidance and alcohol self-administration. Intra-vmPFC CRF infusion produced avoidance of a paired context, and intra-vmPFC CRFR1 antagonism reversed avoidance of a stress-paired context, but did not alter post-stress alcohol self-administration. These findings suggest that vmPFC CRF-CRFR1 signaling mediates avoidance of stimuli paired with traumatic stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rosetta Broker for membrane protein structure prediction: concentrative nucleoside transporter 3 and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 test cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latek, Dorota

    2017-08-03

    Membrane proteins are difficult targets for structure prediction due to the limited structural data deposited in Protein Data Bank. Most computational methods for membrane protein structure prediction are based on the comparative modeling. There are only few de novo methods targeting that distinct protein family. In this work an example of such de novo method was used to structurally and functionally characterize two representatives of distinct membrane proteins families of solute carrier transporters and G protein-coupled receptors. The well-known Rosetta program and one of its protocols named Broker was used in two test cases. The first case was de novo structure prediction of three N-terminal transmembrane helices of the human concentrative nucleoside transporter 3 (hCNT3) homotrimer belonging to the solute carrier 28 family of transporters (SLC28). The second case concerned the large scale refinement of transmembrane helices of a homology model of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) belonging to the G protein-coupled receptors family. The inward-facing model of the hCNT3 homotrimer was used to propose the functional impact of its single nucleotide polymorphisms. Additionally, the 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation of the unliganded hCNT3 model confirmed its validity and revealed mobility of the selected binding site and homotrimer interface residues. The large scale refinement of transmembrane helices of the CRFR1 homology model resulted in the significant improvement of its accuracy with respect to the crystal structure of CRFR1, especially in the binding site area. Consequently, the antagonist CP-376395 could be docked with Autodock VINA to the CRFR1 model without any steric clashes. The presented work demonstrated that Rosetta Broker can be a versatile tool for solving various issues referring to protein biology. Two distinct examples of de novo membrane protein structure prediction presented here provided important insights into three

  9. Plasma adiponectin levels are increased despite insulin resistance in corticotropin-releasing hormone transgenic mice, an animal model of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinahara, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Mitsuru; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Nakayama, Shuichi; Noguchi, Toru; Kambayashi, Machiko; Okada, Yasushi; Tsuda, Masayuki; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Hashimoto, Kozo; Terada, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Adiponectin (AdN), an adipokine derived from the adipose tissue, has an insulin-sensitizing effect, and plasma AdN is shown to be decreased in obesity and/or insulin resistant state. To clarify whether changes in AdN are also responsible for the development of glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance, we examined AdN concentration in plasma and AdN expression in the adipose tissue, using corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) transgenic mouse (CRH-Tg), an animal model of Cushing syndrome. We found, unexpectedly, that plasma AdN levels in CRHTg were significantly higher than those in wild-type littermates (wild-type: 19.7+/-2.5, CRH-Tg: 32.4+/-3.1 microg/mL, pAdN mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in the adipose tissue of CRH-Tg. Bilateral adrenalectomy in CRH-Tg eliminated both their Cushing's phenotype and their increase in plasma AdN levels (wild-type/sham: 9.4+/-0.5, CRH-Tg/sham: 15.7+/-2.0, CRH-Tg/ADX: 8.5+/-0.4 microg/mL). These results strongly suggest that AdN is not a major factor responsible for the development of insulin resistance in Cushing syndrome. Our data also suggest that glucocorticoid increases plasma AdN levels but decreases AdN expression in adipocytes, the latter being explained possibly by the decrease in AdN metabolism in the Cushing state.

  10. Adolescent binge drinking leads to changes in alcohol drinking, anxiety, and amygdalar corticotropin releasing factor cells in adulthood in male rats.

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    Nicholas W Gilpin

    Full Text Available Heavy episodic drinking early in adolescence is associated with increased risk of addiction and other stress-related disorders later in life. This suggests that adolescent alcohol abuse is an early marker of innate vulnerability and/or binge exposure impacts the developing brain to increase vulnerability to these disorders in adulthood. Animal models are ideal for clarifying the relationship between adolescent and adult alcohol abuse, but we show that methods of involuntary alcohol exposure are not effective. We describe an operant model that uses multiple bouts of intermittent access to sweetened alcohol to elicit voluntary binge alcohol drinking early in adolescence (~postnatal days 28-42 in genetically heterogeneous male Wistar rats. We next examined the effects of adolescent binge drinking on alcohol drinking and anxiety-like behavior in dependent and non-dependent adult rats, and counted corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF cell in the lateral portion of the central amygdala (CeA, a region that contributes to regulation of anxiety- and alcohol-related behaviors. Adolescent binge drinking did not alter alcohol drinking under baseline drinking conditions in adulthood. However, alcohol-dependent and non-dependent adult rats with a history of adolescent alcohol binge drinking did exhibit increased alcohol drinking when access to alcohol was intermittent. Adult rats that binged alcohol during adolescence exhibited increased exploration on the open arms of the elevated plus maze (possibly indicating either decreased anxiety or increased impulsivity, an effect that was reversed by a history of alcohol dependence during adulthood. Finally, CRF cell counts were reduced in the lateral CeA of rats with adolescent alcohol binge history, suggesting semi-permanent changes in the limbic stress peptide system with this treatment. These data suggest that voluntary binge drinking during early adolescence produces long-lasting neural and behavioral effects

  11. Adolescent Binge Drinking Leads to Changes in Alcohol Drinking, Anxiety, and Amygdalar Corticotropin Releasing Factor Cells in Adulthood in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Karanikas, Chrisanthi A.; Richardson, Heather N.

    2012-01-01

    Heavy episodic drinking early in adolescence is associated with increased risk of addiction and other stress-related disorders later in life. This suggests that adolescent alcohol abuse is an early marker of innate vulnerability and/or binge exposure impacts the developing brain to increase vulnerability to these disorders in adulthood. Animal models are ideal for clarifying the relationship between adolescent and adult alcohol abuse, but we show that methods of involuntary alcohol exposure are not effective. We describe an operant model that uses multiple bouts of intermittent access to sweetened alcohol to elicit voluntary binge alcohol drinking early in adolescence (∼postnatal days 28–42) in genetically heterogeneous male Wistar rats. We next examined the effects of adolescent binge drinking on alcohol drinking and anxiety-like behavior in dependent and non-dependent adult rats, and counted corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) cell in the lateral portion of the central amygdala (CeA), a region that contributes to regulation of anxiety- and alcohol-related behaviors. Adolescent binge drinking did not alter alcohol drinking under baseline drinking conditions in adulthood. However, alcohol-dependent and non-dependent adult rats with a history of adolescent alcohol binge drinking did exhibit increased alcohol drinking when access to alcohol was intermittent. Adult rats that binged alcohol during adolescence exhibited increased exploration on the open arms of the elevated plus maze (possibly indicating either decreased anxiety or increased impulsivity), an effect that was reversed by a history of alcohol dependence during adulthood. Finally, CRF cell counts were reduced in the lateral CeA of rats with adolescent alcohol binge history, suggesting semi-permanent changes in the limbic stress peptide system with this treatment. These data suggest that voluntary binge drinking during early adolescence produces long-lasting neural and behavioral effects with

  12. Adolescent binge drinking leads to changes in alcohol drinking, anxiety, and amygdalar corticotropin releasing factor cells in adulthood in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Karanikas, Chrisanthi A; Richardson, Heather N

    2012-01-01

    Heavy episodic drinking early in adolescence is associated with increased risk of addiction and other stress-related disorders later in life. This suggests that adolescent alcohol abuse is an early marker of innate vulnerability and/or binge exposure impacts the developing brain to increase vulnerability to these disorders in adulthood. Animal models are ideal for clarifying the relationship between adolescent and adult alcohol abuse, but we show that methods of involuntary alcohol exposure are not effective. We describe an operant model that uses multiple bouts of intermittent access to sweetened alcohol to elicit voluntary binge alcohol drinking early in adolescence (~postnatal days 28-42) in genetically heterogeneous male Wistar rats. We next examined the effects of adolescent binge drinking on alcohol drinking and anxiety-like behavior in dependent and non-dependent adult rats, and counted corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) cell in the lateral portion of the central amygdala (CeA), a region that contributes to regulation of anxiety- and alcohol-related behaviors. Adolescent binge drinking did not alter alcohol drinking under baseline drinking conditions in adulthood. However, alcohol-dependent and non-dependent adult rats with a history of adolescent alcohol binge drinking did exhibit increased alcohol drinking when access to alcohol was intermittent. Adult rats that binged alcohol during adolescence exhibited increased exploration on the open arms of the elevated plus maze (possibly indicating either decreased anxiety or increased impulsivity), an effect that was reversed by a history of alcohol dependence during adulthood. Finally, CRF cell counts were reduced in the lateral CeA of rats with adolescent alcohol binge history, suggesting semi-permanent changes in the limbic stress peptide system with this treatment. These data suggest that voluntary binge drinking during early adolescence produces long-lasting neural and behavioral effects with implications

  13. Long-term effects of early adolescent stress: dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and central corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 expression in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuting; Liu, Yuan; Yin, Shiping; Lu, Cuiyan; Liu, Dexiang; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Fang

    2015-07-15

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a stress-related mental disorder caused by traumatic experiences. Studies have found that exposure to early stressful events is a risk factor for developing PTSD. However, a limited number of studies have explored the effects of traumatic stress in early adolescence on behavior, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, central corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) expression and the relative vulnerability of PTSD in adulthood. The current study aims to explore these issues using inescapable electric foot shock to induce a PTSD model in early adolescent rats. Meanwhile, running on a treadmill for six weeks and administration of the antagonist with 3.2mg/kg/day of CP-154, 526 for 14 consecutive days were used as therapeutic measures. Presently, the stress (S) group showed more anxiety and depression in the open field (OF) test and elevated plus maze (EPM) test, memory damage in the Y maze test, decreased basal CORT level, increased DEX negative feedback inhibition and exacerbated and longer-lasting reaction to CRH challenge in the DEX/CRH test compared with the control group. Central CRFR1 expression was also changed in the S group, as evidenced by the increased CRFR1 expression in the hypothalamus, amygdala and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, treadmill exercise alleviated early adolescent stress-induced behavior abnormalities and improved the functional state of the HPA axis, performing a more powerful effect than the CRFR1 antagonist CP-154, 526. Additionally, this study revealed that the alteration of central CRFR1 expression might play an important role in etiology of PTSD in adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Corticotropin-releasing factor-overexpressing mice exhibit reduced neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus and food intake in response to fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Million, Mulugeta; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Kobelt, Peter; Mönnikes, Hubert; Taché, Yvette; Wang, Lixin

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model that exhibits features of chronic stress. We investigated whether the adaptive feeding response to a hypocaloric challenge induced by food deprivation is impaired under conditions of chronic CRF overproduction. Food intake response to a 16-h overnight fast and ip injection of gut hormones regulating food intake were compared in CRF-OE and wild type (WT) littermate mice along with brain Fos expression, circulating ghrelin levels, and gastric emptying of a nonnutrient meal. CRF-OE mice injected ip with saline showed a 47 and 44% reduction of 30-min and 4-h cumulative food intake response to an overnight fast, respectively, compared with WT. However, the 30-min food intake decrease induced by ip cholecystokinin (3 microg/kg) and increase by ghrelin (300 microg/kg) were similar in CRF-OE and WT mice. Overnight fasting increased the plasma total ghrelin to similar levels in CRF-OE and WT mice, although CRF-OE mice had a 2-fold reduction of nonfasting ghrelin levels. The number of Fos-immunoreactive cells induced by fasting in the arcuate nucleus was reduced by 5.9-fold in CRF-OE compared with WT mice whereas no significant changes were observed in other hypothalamic nuclei. In contrast, fasted CRF-OE mice displayed a 5.6-fold increase in Fos-immunoreactive cell number in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and a 34% increase in 20-min gastric emptying. These findings indicate that sustained overproduction of hypothalamic CRF in mice interferes with fasting-induced activation of arcuate nucleus neurons and the related hyperphagic response.

  15. Cardiac adverse effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal on right ventricle: Role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor

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    Navarro-Zaragoza, J.; Martínez-Laorden, E.; Mora, L.; Hidalgo, J.; Milanés, M.V.; Laorden, M.L., E-mail: laorden@um.es

    2014-02-15

    Opioid addiction is associated with cardiovascular disease. However, mechanisms linking opioid addiction and cardiovascular disease remain unclear. This study investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor in mediating somatic signs and the behavioural states produced during withdrawal from morphine dependence. Furthermore, it studied the efficacy of CRF1 receptor antagonist, CP-154,526 to prevent the cardiac sympathetic activity induced by morphine withdrawal. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation pathways were evaluated. Like stress, morphine withdrawal induced an increase in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity and an enhancement of noradrenaline (NA) turnover. Pre-treatment with CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced morphine withdrawal-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, NA turnover and TH phosphorylation at Ser31 in the right ventricle. In addition, CP-154,526 reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. In addition, CP-154,526 attenuated the increases in body weight loss during morphine treatment and suppressed some of morphine withdrawal signs. Altogether, these results support the idea that cardiac sympathetic pathways are activated in response to naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal suggesting that treatment with a CRF1 receptor antagonist before morphine withdrawal would prevent the development of stress-induced behavioural and autonomic dysfunction in opioid addicts. - Highlights: • Morphine withdrawal caused an increase in myocardial sympathetic activity. • ERK regulates TH phosphorylation after naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal. • CRF1R is involved in cardiac adaptive changes during morphine dependence.

  16. Escitalopram alters gene expression and HPA axis reactivity in rats following chronic overexpression of corticotropin-releasing factor from the central amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandreau, Elizabeth I.; Bourke, Chase H.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Vale, Wylie W.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Owens, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We have previously demonstrated that viral-mediated overexpression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) within the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) reproduces many of the behavioral and endocrine consequences of chronic stress. The present experiment sought to determine whether administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram reverses the adverse effects of CeA CRF overexpression. In a 2 × 2 design, adult male rats received bilateral infusions of a control lentivirus or a lentivirus in which a portion of the CRF promoter is used to drive increased expression of CRF peptide. Four weeks later, rats were then implanted with an Alzet minipump to deliver vehicle or 10 mg/kg/day escitalopram for a 4-week period of time. The defensive withdrawal (DW) test of anxiety and the sucrose-preference test (SPT) of anhedonia were performed both before and after pump implantation. Additional post-implant behavioral tests included the elevated plus maze (EPM) and social interaction (SI) test. Following completion of behavioral testing, the dexamethasone/CRF test was performed to assess HPA axis reactivity. Brains were collected and expression of HPA axis-relevant transcripts were measured using in situ hybridization. Amygdalar CRF overexpression increased anxiety-like behavior in the DW test at week eight, which was only partially prevented by escitalopram. In both CRF-overexpressing and control groups, escitalopram decreased hippocampal CRF expression while increasing hypothalamic and hippocampal expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These gene expression changes were associated with a significant decrease in HPA axis reactivity in rats treated with escitalopram. Interestingly, escitalopram increased the rate of weight gain only in rats overexpressing CRF. Overall these data support our hypothesis that amygdalar CRF is critical in anxiety-like behavior; because the antidepressant was unable to reverse behavioral

  17. Posttraumatic stress disorder-like induction elevates β-amyloid levels, which directly activates corticotropin-releasing factor neurons to exacerbate stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Nicholas J; Huang, Longwen; Tian, Jin-Bin; Cole, Allysa; Pruski, Melissa; Hunt, Albert J; Flores, Rene; Zhu, Michael X; Arenkiel, Benjamin R; Zheng, Hui

    2015-02-11

    Recent studies have found that those who suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more likely to experience dementia as they age, most often Alzheimer's disease (AD). These findings suggest that the symptoms of PTSD might have an exacerbating effect on AD progression. AD and PTSD might also share common susceptibility factors such that those who experience trauma-induced disease were already more likely to succumb to dementia with age. Here, we explored these two hypotheses using a mouse model of PTSD in wild-type and AD model animals. We found that expression of human familial AD mutations in amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 leads to sensitivity to trauma-induced PTSD-like changes in behavioral and endocrine stress responses. PTSD-like induction, in turn, chronically elevates levels of CSF β-amyloid (Aβ), exacerbating ongoing AD pathogenesis. We show that PTSD-like induction and Aβ elevation are dependent on corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor 1 signaling and an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Furthermore, we show that Aβ species can hyperexcite CRF neurons, providing a mechanism by which Aβ influences stress-related symptoms and PTSD-like phenotypes. Consistent with Aβ causing excitability of the stress circuitry, we attenuate PTSD-like phenotypes in vivo by lowering Aβ levels during PTSD-like trauma exposure. Together, these data demonstrate that exposure to PTSD-like trauma can drive AD pathogenesis, which directly perturbs CRF signaling, thereby enhancing chronic PTSD symptoms while increasing risk for AD-related dementia. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/352612-12$15.00/0.

  18. Nicotine self-administration differentially regulates hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin mRNAs and facilitates stress-induced neuronal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoliang; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Wenyuan; Matta, Shannon G; Sharp, Burt M

    2008-03-12

    Acute nicotine is a potent stimulus for activation of the stress-responsive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, while chronic nicotine self-administration (SA) desensitizes the ACTH response to self-administered nicotine but cross-sensitizes to mild footshock stress (mFSS). To identify underlying mechanisms, we investigated (1) the effects of chronic nicotine SA on the coexpression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNAs, the primary hypothalamic neuropeptides regulating ACTH release, in the parvocellular division of paraventricular nucleus (pcPVN), and (2) mFSS-induced activation of these neurons during nicotine SA. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were given 23 h/d unlimited access to self-administer nicotine (0.03 mg/kg per injection, i.v.) for 19 d. Brains were double labeled with fluorescence in situ hybridization of CRF and AVP mRNAs and triple labeled after mFSS exposure for CRF and AVP mRNAs and c-Fos protein. Chronic nicotine SA significantly increased AVP mRNA signal and the number of pcPVN AVP-positive (AVP(+)) neurons (twofold to threefold), reduced the number of CRF-positive (CRF(+)) neurons by approximately 60%, but increased pcPVN CRF(+)/AVP(+) neuronal number fivefold. Significantly, although chronic nicotine SA did not affect total c-Fos expression induced by mFSS in pcPVN CRF(+) neurons, the majority of the new CRF(+)/AVP(+) population was activated by this heterotypic stressor. These phenotypic neuronal alterations may provide the pivotal mechanism underlying the capacity of chronically self-administered nicotine to cross-sensitize the HPA response to specific stressors, suggesting that nicotine may augment HPA responsiveness to specific stressors in human smokers.

  19. Chronic psychosocial stress induces reversible mitochondrial damage and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type-1 upregulation in the rat intestine and IBS-like gut dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, María; Alonso, Carmen; Guilarte, Mar; Serra, Jordi; Martínez, Cristina; González-Castro, Ana M; Lobo, Beatriz; Antolín, María; Andreu, Antoni L; García-Arumí, Elena; Casellas, Montserrat; Saperas, Esteban; Malagelada, Juan Ramón; Azpiroz, Fernando; Santos, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The association between psychological and environmental stress with functional gastrointestinal disorders, especially irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is well established. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. We aimed to probe chronic psychosocial stress as a primary inducer of intestinal dysfunction and investigate corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling and mitochondrial damage as key contributors to the stress-mediated effects. Wistar-Kyoto rats were submitted to crowding stress (CS; 8 rats/cage) or sham-crowding stress (SC; 2 rats/cage) for up to 15 consecutive days. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity was evaluated. Intestinal tissues were obtained 1h, 1, 7, or 30 days after stress exposure, to assess neutrophil infiltration, epithelial ion transport, mitochondrial function, and CRF receptors expression. Colonic response to CRF (10 μg/kg i.p.) and hyperalgesia were evaluated after ending stress exposure. Chronic psychosocial stress activated HPA axis and induced reversible intestinal mucosal inflammation. Epithelial permeability and conductance were increased in CS rats, effect that lasted for up to 7 days after stress cessation. Visceral hypersensitivity persisted for up to 30 days post stress. Abnormal colonic response to exogenous CRF lasted for up to 7 days after stress. Mitochondrial activity was disturbed throughout the intestine, although mitochondrial response to CRF was preserved. Colonic expression of CRF receptor type-1 was increased in CS rats, and negatively correlated with body weight gain. In conclusion, chronic psychosocial stress triggers reversible inflammation, persistent epithelial dysfunction, and colonic hyperalgesia. These findings support crowding stress as a suitable animal model to unravel the complex pathophysiology underlying to common human intestinal stress-related disorders, such as IBS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of acute treadmill running at different intensities on activities of serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor neurons, and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomomi; Nishii, Ayu; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kubota, Natsuko; Nishijima, Takeshi; Kita, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that physical exercise can reduce and prevent the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. Activation of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is implicated in antidepressant/anxiolytic properties. In addition, the incidence and symptoms of these disorders may involve dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is initiated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Thus, it is possible that physical exercise produces its antidepressant/anxiolytic effects by affecting these neuronal activities. However, the effects of acute physical exercise at different intensities on these neuronal activation and behavioral changes are still unclear. Here, we examined the activities of 5-HT neurons in the DRN and CRF neurons in the PVN during 30 min of treadmill running at different speeds (high speed, 25 m/min; low speed, 15m/min; control, only sitting on the treadmill) in male Wistar rats, using c-Fos/5-HT or CRF immunohistochemistry. We also performed the elevated plus maze test and the forced swim test to assess anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. Acute treadmill running at low speed, but not high speed, significantly increased c-Fos expression in 5-HT neurons in the DRN compared to the control, whereas high-speed running significantly enhanced c-Fos expression in CRF neurons in the PVN compared with the control and low-speed running. Furthermore, low-speed running resulted in decreased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors compared with high-speed running. These results suggest that acute physical exercise with mild and low stress can efficiently induce optimal neuronal activation that is involved in the antidepressant/anxiolytic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. ACTH response to desmopressin in a patient with acromegaly; expression of corticotropin-releasing factor, urocortins and vasopressin V1b receptor in GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arihara, Zenei; Sakurai, Kanako; Osaki, Yoshinori; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shozo; Inoshita, Naoko; Murakami, Osamu; Ohba, Koji; Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    GH-producing pituitary adenomas frequently co-produce other certain anterior pituitary hormones, such as prolactin (PRL). In contrast, GH-producing adenomas which express all of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), urocorin1 (Ucn1) and urocortin3 (Ucn3) have not been reported. A 39-year-old woman was admitted for evaluation of the pituitary tumor. The diagnosis of acromegaly was confirmed by elevated serum GH and IGF-I levels, and the absence of GH suppression by oral glucose tolerance test. ACTH response to desmopressin (DDAVP) was observed (plasma ACTH levels increased from 13.9 to 50.4 pg/ml at 90 min). Although it is known that ACTH response to DDAVP is considerably useful for the diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, the diagnosis of Cushing's disease was not supported by the criteria. The patient underwent transsphenoidal resection of the pituitary tumor. Immunohistological examination confirmed a GH- and PRL-producing adenoma, whereas ACTH was negative. ACTH response to DDAVP disappeared after tumor removal. To determine the cause of preoperative ACTH response to DDAVP, we examined expression of CRF family peptides and vasopressin V1b receptor in the pituitary adenoma by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry revealed positive immunostaining for CRF, Ucn1, Ucn3 and vasopressin V1b receptor in the adenoma. These observations raised the possibility that DDAVP caused an ACTH response, perhaps via the paracrine effects of tumor-derived CRF and Ucn1. When ACTH response to DDAVP is observed in patients with pituitary tumor, not only the direct effect of DDAVP on ACTH secretion, but also a possible involvement of CRF and/or urocortins expressed in the pituitary adenoma, should be considered.

  2. Increased number of corticotropin-releasing hormone expressing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of patients with multiple sclerosis.

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    Purba, J S; Raadsheer, F C; Hofman, M A; Ravid, R; Polman, C H; Kamphorst, W; Swaab, D F

    1995-07-01

    Observations in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for multiple sclerosis (MS), have indicated that a low activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system is accompanied by a high susceptibility for EAE in rat strains and that elevated corticosteroid levels are necessary for spontaneous recovery from EAE. The HPA axis activity is regulated by both corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP). Both types of neurons are localized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. We determined the number of immunocytochemically identified CRH-immunoreactive (CRH-IR) and AVP-immunoreactive (AVP-IR) neurons in the PVN of the human hypothalamus of 8 MS patients, aged 34-63 years, and 8 age-matched control subjects without any primary neurological or psychiatric disorders, aged 30-59 years. In addition, the number of oxytocin (OXT) immunoreactive (OXT-IR) neurons was determined, since these neurons innervate brain stem nuclei and might thus be related to autonomic disturbances in MS. In MS the staining intensity for AVP was clearly lower and for OXT slightly lower. For CRH, the staining intensity was similar in both groups, and, moreover, in MS patients the number of CRH-IR cells in the PVN was found to be about 2.4 times higher than that in the control group. The number of OXT-IR or AVP-IR cells in the PVN of MS patients was not significantly different from that of the control group. Our results point to an activation of the neuroendocrine HPA axis which may be compatible with the idea that the HPA axis is involved in recovery from MS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and Toll-Like Receptor Gene Expression Is Associated with Low-Grade Inflammation in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients with Depression

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    Song Jizhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of low-grade inflammation in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is unclear; our research concentrates on the involvement of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF and Toll-like receptor (TLR gene expression in the process of low-grade inflammation in IBS patients with depression. This study suggests more IBS patients are presenting with the states of depression and anxiety. IBS patients with depression have shown a lower grade inflammatory response and an imbalance of the inflammatory response. CRF1, CRF2, TLR2, and TLR4 in IBS patients with depression are significantly higher than those without depression and controls. Thus, activation of the CRF-TLR associated pathways produces an inflammatory reaction, which can concurrently affect the digestive tract and the CNS and induce the corresponding digestive and psychiatric symptoms.

  4. Corticotropin Releasing Factor in the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis in Socially Defeated and Non-stressed Mice with a History of Chronic Alcohol Intake

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    Lucas Albrechet-Souza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress exposure has been identified as one risk factor for alcohol abuse that may facilitate the transition from social or regulated use to the development of alcohol dependence. Preclinical studies have shown that dysregulation of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF neurotransmission has been implicated in stress-related psychopathologies such as depression and anxiety, and may affect alcohol consumption. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST contains CRF-producing neurons which seem to be sensitive to stress. In this study, adult male C57BL/6 mice previously defeated in resident-intruder confrontations were evaluated in the elevated plus-maze and tail suspension test. Mice were also tested for sweet solution intake before and after social stress. After having had continuous access to ethanol (20% weight/volume for 4 weeks, control and stressed mice had CRF type 1 (CRFR1 or type 2 (CRFR2 receptor antagonists infused into the BNST and then had access to ethanol for 24 h. In separate cohorts of control and stressed mice, we assessed mRNA levels of BNST CRF, CRFR1 and CRFR2. Stressed mice increased their intake of sweet solution after ten sessions of social defeat and showed reduced activity in the open arms of the elevated plus-maze. When tested for ethanol consumption, stressed mice persistently drank significantly more than controls during the 4 weeks of access. Also, social stress induced higher BNST CRF mRNA levels. The selective blockade of BNST CRFR1 with CP376,395 effectively reduced alcohol drinking in non-stressed mice, whereas the selective CRFR2 antagonist astressin2B produced a dose-dependent increase in ethanol consumption in both non-stressed controls and stressed mice. The 10-day episodic defeat stress used here elicited anxiety- but not depressive-like behaviors, and promoted an increase in ethanol drinking. CRF-CRFR1 signaling in the BNST seems to underlie ethanol intake in non-stressed mice, whereas CRFR2 modulates

  5. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor in the Basolateral Amygdala Enhances Memory Consolidation via an Interaction with the β-Adrenoceptor-cAMP Pathway: Dependence on Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation

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    Roozendaal, Benno; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that stress hormone effects on the consolidation of emotionally influenced memory involve noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA). The present experiments examined whether corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) modulates memory consolidation via an interaction with the β-adrenoceptor-adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) system in the BLA. In a first experiment, male Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral infusions of the CRF-binding protein ligand inhibitor CRF6-33 into the BLA either alone or together with the CRF receptor antagonist α-helical CRF9-41 immediately after inhibitory avoidance training. CRF6-33 induced dose-dependent enhancement of 48-h retention latencies, which was blocked by co-administration of α-helical CRF9-41, suggesting that CRF6-33 enhances memory consolidation by displacing CRF from its binding protein, thereby increasing ‘free’ endogenous CRF concentrations. In a second experiment, intra-BLA infusions of atenolol (β-adrenoceptor antagonist) and Rp-cAMPS (cAMP inhibitor), but not prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), blocked CRF6-33-induced retention enhancement. In a third experiment, the CRF receptor antagonist α-helical CRF9-41 administered into the BLA immediately after training attenuated the dose-response effects of concurrent intra-BLA infusions of clenbuterol (β-adrenoceptor agonist). In contrast, α-helical CRF9-41 did not alter retention enhancement induced by posttraining intra-BLA infusions of either cirazoline (α1-adrenoceptor agonist) or 8-br-cAMP (cAMP analog). These findings suggest that CRF facilitates the memory-modulatory effects of noradrenergic stimulation in the BLA via an interaction with the β-adrenoceptor-cAMP cascade, at a locus between the membrane-bound β-adrenoceptor and the intracellular cAMP formation site. Moreover, consistent with evidence that glucocorticoids enhance memory consolidation via a similar interaction with the

  6. Appetite-suppressing effects and interactions of centrally administered corticotropin-releasing factor, urotensin I and serotonin in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

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    Van A. Ortega

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, urotensin I (UI and serotonin (5-HT are generally recognized as key regulators of the anorexigenic stress response in vertebrates, yet the proximal effects and potential interactions of these central messengers on food intake in salmonids are not known. Moreover, no study to date in fishes has compared the appetite-suppressing effects of CRF and UI using species-specific peptides. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to 1 assess the individual effects of synthesized rainbow trout CRF (rtCRF, rtUI as well as 5-HT on food intake in rainbow trout, and 2 determine whether the CRF and serotonergic systems interact in the regulation of food intake in this species. Intracerebroventricular (icv injections of rtCRF and rtUI both suppressed food intake in a dose-related manner but rtUI (ED50 = 17.4 ng/g body weight [BW] was significantly more potent than rtCRF (ED50 = 105.9 ng/g BW. Co-injection of either rtCRF or rtUI with the CRF receptor antagonist a-hCRF(9-41 blocked the reduction in food intake induced by CRF-related peptides. Icv injections of 5-HT also inhibited feeding in a dose-related manner (ED50 = 14.7 ng/g BW and these effects were blocked by the serotonergic receptor antagonist methysergide. While the anorexigenic effects of 5-HT were reversed by a-hCRF(9-41 co-injection, the appetite-suppressing effects of either rtCRF or rtUI were not affected by methysergide co-injection. These results identify CRF, UI and 5-HT as anorexigenic agents in rainbow trout, and suggest that 5-HT-induced anorexia may be at least partially mediated by CRF- and/or UI-secreting neurons.

  7. Inhibition of corticotropin releasing factor expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates stress-induced behavioral and endocrine responses

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    Leah B. Callahan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF is a primary mediator of endocrine, autonomic and behavioral stress responses. Studies in both humans and animal models have implicated CRF in a wide-variety of psychiatric conditions including anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, depression, sleep disorders and addiction among others. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA, a key limbic structure with one of the highest concentrations of CRF-producing cells outside of the hypothalamus, has been implicated in anxiety-like behavior and a number of stress-induced disorders. This study investigated the specific role of CRF in the CeA on both endocrine and behavioral responses to stress. We used RNA Interference (RNAi techniques to locally and specifically knockdown CRF expression in CeA. Behavior was assessed using the elevated plus maze (EPM and open field test (OF. Knocking down CRF expression in the CeA had no significant effect on measures of anxiety-like behavior in these tests. However, it did have an effect on grooming behavior, a CRF-induced behavior. Prior exposure to a stressor sensitized an amygdalar CRF effect on stress-induced HPA activation. In these stress-challenged animals silencing CRF in the CeA significantly attenuated corticosterone responses to a subsequent behavioral stressor. Thus, it appears that while CRF projecting from the CeA does not play a significant role in the expression stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors on the EPM and OF it does play a critical role in stress-induced HPA activation.

  8. Effects of naltrexone, duloxetine, and a corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor antagonist on binge-like alcohol drinking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Dong; Gilpin, Nicholas W; Richardson, Heather N; Rivier, Catherine L; Koob, George F

    2008-02-01

    A 'binge' is defined by National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism as an excessive pattern of alcohol drinking that produces blood-alcohol levels (BALs) greater than 0.08 g% within a 2-h period and may or may not be associated with dependence. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the effects of several neuropharmacological agents in an animal model in which outbred rats voluntarily and orally self-administer pharmacologically meaningful alcohol doses that produce BALs >or=0.08 g% in daily limited access two-bottle choice and operant drinking sessions. Rats were trained to self-administer either 10% (w/v) alcohol solution sweetened with 'supersac' (3% glucose+0.125% saccharin) or supersac alone versus water in a two-bottle choice or operant situation during 30-min daily sessions. Rats were then injected systemically with multiple doses of duloxetine, naltrexone, and the corticotropin-releasing factor antagonist, MPZP, in Latin-square designs. Alcohol binge drinkers reliably consumed amounts of alcohol sufficient to produce BALs >or=0.08 g%. Duloxetine dose-dependently suppressed two-bottle choice alcohol binge drinking and operant alcohol responding as well as operant supersac responding, but did not affect two-bottle choice supersac drinking. Naltrexone-suppressed alcohol binge drinking at very low doses and suppressed supersac drinking at moderate-to-high doses. MPZP did not affect alcohol or supersac consumption. Different profiles for drugs that suppress binge-like alcohol drinking compared with dependence-induced drinking provide a heuristic foundation for future medications development.

  9. Expression patterns of corticotropin-releasing factor, arginine vasopressin, histidine decarboxylase, melanin-concentrating hormone, and orexin genes in the human hypothalamus.

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    Krolewski, David M; Medina, Adriana; Kerman, Ilan A; Bernard, Rene; Burke, Sharon; Thompson, Robert C; Bunney, William E; Schatzberg, Alan F; Myers, Richard M; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Watson, Stanley J

    2010-11-15

    The hypothalamus regulates numerous autonomic responses and behaviors. The neuroactive substances corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), arginine-vasopressin (AVP), histidine decarboxylase (HDC), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), and orexin/hypocretins (ORX) produced in the hypothalamus mediate a subset of these processes. Although the expression patterns of these genes have been well studied in rodents, less is known about them in humans. We combined classical histological techniques with in situ hybridization histochemistry to produce both 2D and 3D images and to visually align and quantify expression of the genes for these substances in nuclei of the human hypothalamus. The hypothalamus was arbitrarily divided into rostral, intermediate, and caudal regions. The rostral region, containing the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), was defined by discrete localization of CRF- and AVP-expressing neurons, whereas distinct relationships between HDC, MCH, and ORX mRNA-expressing neurons delineated specific levels within the intermediate and caudal regions. Quantitative mRNA signal intensity measurements revealed no significant differences in overall CRF or AVP expression at any rostrocaudal level of the PVN. HDC mRNA expression was highest at the level of the premammillary area, which included the dorsomedial and tuberomammillary nuclei as well as the dorsolateral hypothalamic area. In addition, the overall intensity of hybridization signal exhibited by both MCH and ORX mRNA-expressing neurons peaked in distinct intermediate and caudal hypothalamic regions. These results suggest that human hypothalamic neurons involved in the regulation of the HPA axis display distinct neurochemical patterns that may encompass multiple local nuclei. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Targeting corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) projections from the oval nucleus of the BNST using cell-type specific neuronal tracing studies in mouse and rat brain

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    Dabrowska, Joanna; Martinon, Daisy; Moaddab, Mahsa; Rainnie, Donald G.

    2016-01-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is known to play a critical role in mediating the behavioral and autonomic responses to stressors. The oval nucleus of the BNST (BNSTov) contains cell bodies that synthesize the stress hormone, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). Although afferent fibers originating from the BNSTov have been shown to innervate several key structures of the neuroendocrine and central autonomic system, the question remains as to whether, some of these fibers are CRF-positive. To directly address this question, we injected a “floxed” anterograde tracer (rAAV5/EF1a-DIO-mCherry) into the BNSTov of CRFp3.0CreGFP transgenic mice, which express a green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the CRF promoter. Serial sections were then analyzed for the presence of double-labeled fibers in potential projection sites. To determine whether CRF neurons in the rat BNSTov send comparable projections, we infused rat BNSTov with an AAV in which the human synapsin promoter drives enhanced GFP expression. We then used CRF immunoreactivity to examine double-labeled fluorescent fibers and axon terminals in projection sites from brain sections of the AAV-infused rats. We have observed several terminal fields in the mouse and rat brain with double-labeled fibers in the Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRD), the Paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and to a lesser extent in the Ventral tegmental area. We found double-labeled terminal boutons in the nucleus accumbens shell, prelimbic cortex, and posterior basolateral nucleus of the amygdala. The most intense double-labeling was found in midbrain, including substantia nigra pars compacta, red nucleus, periaqueductal gray, pontine nuclei, as well as DRD. The results of our study indicate that CRF neurons are the output neurons of the BNSTov and they send projections to the centers of neuroendocrine and autonomic regulation, but also regions modulating reward and motivation, vigilance, motor function

  11. Contrasting effects of nitric oxide and corticotropin-releasing factor within the dorsal periaqueductal gray on defensive behavior and nociception in mice

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    Miguel, T.T. [Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos and Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Gomes, K.S. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Nunes-de-Souza, R.L. [Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos and Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-30

    The anxiogenic and antinociceptive effects produced by glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation within the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) matter have been related to nitric oxide (NO) production, since injection of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors reverses these effects. dPAG corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRFr) activation also induces anxiety-like behavior and antinociception, which, in turn, are selectively blocked by local infusion of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRFr1) antagonist, NBI 27914 [5-chloro-4-(N-(cyclopropyl)methyl-N-propylamino)-2-methyl-6- (2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)aminopyridine]. Here, we determined whether i) the blockade of the dPAG by CRFr1 attenuates the anxiogenic/antinociceptive effects induced by local infusion of the NO donor, NOC-9 [6-(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-nitrosohydrazino)-N-methyl-1-hexanamine], and ii) the anxiogenic/antinociceptive effects induced by intra-dPAG CRF are prevented by local infusion of N{sup ω}-propyl-L-arginine (NPLA), a neuronal NOS inhibitor, in mice. Male Swiss mice (12 weeks old, 25-35 g, N = 8-14/group) were stereotaxically implanted with a 7-mm cannula aimed at the dPAG. Intra-dPAG NOC-9 (75 nmol) produced defensive-like behavior (jumping and running) and antinociception (assessed by the formalin test). Both effects were reversed by prior local infusion of NBI 27914 (2 nmol). Conversely, intra-dPAG NPLA (0.4 nmol) did not modify the anxiogenic/antinociceptive effects of CRF (150 pmol). These results suggest that CRFr1 plays an important role in the defensive behavior and antinociception produced by NO within the dPAG. In contrast, the anxiogenic and antinociceptive effects produced by intra-dPAG CRF are not related to NO synthesis in this limbic midbrain structure.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of nociceptin/orphanin FQ and corticotropin-releasing factor system genes in frustration stress-induced binge-like palatable food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Mariangela; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Giusepponi, Maria Elena; Romano, Adele; Filaferro, Monica; Maccarrone, Mauro; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cifani, Carlo; D'Addario, Claudio

    2016-11-01

    Evidence suggests that binge eating may be caused by a unique interaction between dieting and stress. We developed a binge-eating model in which female rats with a history of intermittent food restriction show binge-like palatable food consumption after a 15-minute exposure to the sight of the palatable food (frustration stress). The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system and of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) system genes in selective rat brain regions, using our animal model. Food restriction by itself seems to be responsible in the hypothalamus for the downregulation on messenger RNA levels of CRF-1 receptor, N/OFQ and its receptor (NOP). For the latter, this alteration might be due to selective histone modification changes. Instead, CRF gene appears to be upregulated in the hypothalamus as well as in the ventral tegmental area only when rats are food restricted and exposed to frustration stress, and, of relevance, these changes appear to be due to a reduction in DNA methylation at gene promoters. Moreover, also CRF-1 receptor gene resulted to be differentially regulated in these two brain regions. Epigenetic changes may be viewed as adaptive mechanisms to environmental perturbations concurring to facilitate food consumption in adverse conditions, that is, in this study, under food restriction and stressful conditions. Our data on N/OFQ and CRF signaling provide insight on the use of this binge-eating model for the study of epigenetic modifications in controlled genetic and environmental backgrounds. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. Is it really a matter of simple dualism? Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in body and mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.; Kozicz, T.L.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological responses to stress coordinated by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis are concerned with maintaining homeostasis in the presence of real or perceived challenges. Regulators of this axis are corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) and CRF related neuropeptides, including urocortins 1,

  14. Analysis of the stress response in rats trained in the water-maze: differential expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone, CRH-R1, glucocorticoid receptors and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in limbic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Valles, Argel; Sánchez, Edith; de Gortari, Patricia; Balderas, Israela; Ramírez-Amaya, Víctor; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico; Joseph-Bravo, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoids and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) are key regulators of stress responses. Different types of stress activate the CRH system; in hypothalamus, CRH expression and release are increased by physical or psychological stressors while in amygdala, preferentially by psychological stress. Learning and memory processes are modulated by glucocorticoids and stress at different levels. To characterize the kind of stress provoked by a hippocampal-dependent task such as spatial learning, we compared the expression profile of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), pro-CRH and CRH-R1 mRNAs (analyzed by RT-PCR), in amygdala, hippocampus and hypothalamus and quantified serum corticosterone levels by radioimmunoassay at different stages of training. mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were also quantified due to its prominent role in learning and memory processes. Male Wistar rats trained for 1, 3 or 5 days in the Morris water-maze (10 trials/day) were sacrificed 5-60 min the after last trial. A strong stress response occurred at day one in both yoked and trained animals (increased corticosterone and hypothalamic pro-CRH and CRH-R1 mRNA levels); changes gradually diminished as the test progressed. In amygdala, pro-CRH mRNA levels decreased while those of BDNF augmented when stress was highest, in yoked and trained animals. Hippocampi, of both yoked and trained groups, had decreased levels of GR mRNA on days 1 and 3, normalizing by day 5, while those of pro-CRH and CRH-R1 increased after the 3rd day. Increased gene expression, specifically due to spatial learning, occurred only for hippocampal BDNF since day 3. These results show that the Morris water-maze paradigm induces a strong stress response that is gradually attenuated. Inhibition of CRH expression in amygdala suggests that the stress inflicted is of physical but not of psychological nature and could lead to reduced fear or anxiety.

  15. Corticotropin-releasing factor overexpression in mice abrogates sex differences in body weight, visceral fat, and food intake response to a fast and alters levels of feeding regulatory hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Yuan, Pu-Qing; Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2017-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor overexpressing (CRF-OE) male mice showed an inhibited feeding response to a fast, and lower plasma acyl ghrelin and Fos expression in the arcuate nucleus compared to wild-type (WT) mice. We investigated whether hormones and hypothalamic feeding signals are impaired in CRF-OE mice and the influence of sex. Male and female CRF-OE mice and WT littermates (4-6 months old) fed ad libitum or overnight fasted were assessed for body, adrenal glands and perigonadal fat weights, food intake, plasma hormones, blood glucose, and mRNA hypothalamic signals. Under fed conditions, compared to WT, CRF-OE mice have increased adrenal glands and perigonadal fat weight, plasma corticosterone, leptin and insulin, and hypothalamic leptin receptor and decreased plasma acyl ghrelin. Compared to male, female WT mice have lower body and perigonadal fat and plasma leptin but higher adrenal glands weights. CRF-OE mice lost these sex differences except for the adrenals. Male CRF-OE and WT mice did not differ in hypothalamic expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC), while female CRF-OE compared to female WT and male CRF-OE had higher NPY mRNA levels. After fasting, female WT mice lost more body weight and ate more food than male WT, while CRF-OE mice had reduced body weight loss and inhibited food intake without sex difference. In male WT mice, fasting reduced plasma insulin and leptin and increased acyl ghrelin and corticosterone while female WT showed only a rise in corticosterone. In CRF-OE mice, fasting reduced insulin while leptin, acyl ghrelin and corticosterone were unchanged with no sex difference. Fasting blood glucose was higher in CRF-OE with female > male. In WT mice, fasting increased hypothalamic NPY expression in both sexes and decreased POMC only in males, while in CRF-OE mice, NPY did not change, and POMC decreased in males and increased in females. These data indicate that CRF-OE mice have abnormal basal and fasting

  16. Expression and actions of corticotropin-releasing factor/diuretic hormone-like peptide (CDLP) and teneurin C-terminal associated peptide (TCAP) in the vase tunicate, Ciona intestinalis: Antagonism of the feeding response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aquila, Andrea L; Hsieh, Alan Hwa-Ruey; Hsieh, Adam Hwa-Ming; De Almeida, Reuben; Lovejoy, Sabine R; Lovejoy, David A

    2017-05-15

    Teneurin C-terminal associated peptide (TCAP) is a neuropeptide that bears some structural similarity to the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family of peptides. TCAP and CRF are both implicated in the regulation of stress-related behaviors, as established in rodent models. However, in vertebrates, both TCAP and CRF possess three additional paralogous forms making vertebrate models difficult to assess with respect to TCAP-CRF interaction. As a urochordate, this species possesses single homologs of TCAP and of a CRF/Diuretic-like peptide (CDLP) in the genome, thereby establishing Ciona intestinalis as an excellent model organism to examine the interaction of these peptide systems. However, the lack of C. intestinalis synthetic peptides and specific antisera has complicated experimentation. We, therefore, prepared synthetic versions of CDLP and TCAP to prepare specific antisera and to investigate their bioactivity in this species. To analyze stress-related behaviors, a novel behavioral assay was used to characterize different types of contraction-based behaviors, using buccal opening contractions, cloacal opening contractions, lateral contractions, longitudinal contractions and expulsions. Protein and mRNA expression data indicate that the mature versions of both peptides are present in a number of tissues. With respect to behavioral activity, both TCAP- and CDLP-treated animals had distinct contraction profiles under ambient conditions. Moreover, food stimulation tests revealed that whereas CDLP-treated animals displayed a strong expulsion behavior in response to feeding, TCAP-treated animals did not show this effect. These actions are consistent with previous studies done in vertebrates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. The three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors: sushi domains and the B1 family of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Marilyn H; Grace, Christy R R; Riek, Roland; Vale, Wylie W

    2006-07-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors, CRF-R1 and CRF-R2, belong to the B1 subfamily of G protein-coupled Receptors (GPCRs), including receptors for secretin, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), calcitonin, parathyroid hormone (PTH), glucagon, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). The peptide ligand family comprises CRF, Ucn 1, 2, and 3. CRF plays the major role in integrating the response to stress. Additionally, the ligands exhibit many effects on muscle, pancreas, heart, and the GI, reproductive, and immune systems. CRF-R1 has higher affinity for CRF than does CRF-R2 while both receptors bind Ucn 1 equally. CRF-R2 shows specificity for Ucns 2 and 3. A major binding domain of the CRFRs is the N terminus/first extracellular domain (ECD1). Soluble proteins corresponding to the ECD1s of each receptor bind CRF ligands with nanomolar affinities. Our three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of a soluble protein corresponding to the ECD1 of CRF-R2beta (1) identified its structural fold as a Sushi domain/short consensus repeat (SCR), stabilized by three disulfide bridges, two tryptophan residues, and an internal salt bridge (Asp65-Arg101). Disruption of the bridge by D65A mutation abrogates ligand recognition and results in loss of the well-defined disulfide pattern and Sushi domain structure. NMR analysis of the ECD1 in complex with astressin identified key amino acids involved in ligand recognition. Mutation of some of these residues in the full-length receptor reduces its affinity for CRF ligands. A structure-based sequence comparison shows conservation of key amino acids in all the B1 subfamily receptors, suggesting a corresponding conservation of a Sushi domain structural fold of their ECD1s.

  18. Early life adversity and serotonin transporter gene variation interact to affect DNA methylation of the corticotropin-releasing factor gene promoter region in the adult rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelen, R.H. van der; Arnoldussen, I.A.C.; Ghareh, H.; Och, L. van; Homberg, J.R.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between childhood maltreatment and the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene linked polymorphic region has been associated with increased risk to develop major depression. This Gene x Environment interaction has furthermore been linked with increased levels of anxiety and glucocorticoid

  19. Corticotropin-releasing factor-like peptide modifies the AMPA-, NMDA-dependent and GABAB-ergic properties of synaptic transmissions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrushin, Anatoly A

    2014-01-10

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurotrophic effects of the mystixin-7 mini-peptide (MTX, a synthetic corticotrophin-releasing-factor-like peptide-like peptide) using a slice-based system. The technique on-line monitoring of electrophysiological parameters (excitatory glutamatergic AMPAR-, NMDAR-dependent and inhibitory GABAB-ergic postsynaptic mechanisms) in the olfactory cortex slices of the rat brain exposed to varied amounts of MTX was used. MTX in a dose-dependent manner inhibited both the AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated postsynaptic processes. The peptide caused depression of inhibitory GABAB-ergic processes only at low doses of MTX (10, 25, 50 mg/mL) while at higher doses (100, 250 mg/mL) it enhanced them. These effects of MTX were reversible. AMPA-dependent (but not NMDA-mediated mechanisms) and inhibitory processes were restored after washing. Triple reperfusion of slices with MTX (100 mg/mL) accelerated the inhibitory processes and induced NMDAR desensitization. MTX evoked the long-term depression on θ burst stimulation of the slices. This study did not only lead to the conclusion that the functions of the MTX mini-peptide is not limited to anti-inflammatory effects, but also is included modifications of excitatory glutamatergic AMPAR-, NMDAR-dependent and inhibitory GABAB-ergic postsynaptic mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [High-altitude hypoxia induces disorders of the brain-endocrine-immune network through activation of corticotropin-releasing factor and its type-1 receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue-Qun; Kong, Fan-Ping; Zhao, Yang; Du, Ji-Zeng

    2012-11-01

    High-altitude hypoxia can induce physiological dysfunction and mountain sickness, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and CRF type-i receptors (CRFR1) are members of the CRF family and the essential controllers of the physiological activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and modulators of endocrine and behavioral activity in response to various stressors. We have previously found that high-altitude hypoxia induces disorders of the brain-endocrine-immune network through activation of CRF and CRFR1 in the brain and periphery that include activation of the HPA axis in a time- and dose-dependent manner, impaired or improved learning and memory, and anxiety-like behavioral change. Meanwhile, hypoxia induces dysfunctions of the hypothalamo-pituitary-endocrine and immune systems, including suppression of growth and development, as well as inhibition of reproductive, metabolic and immune functions. In contrast, the small mammals that live on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau alpine meadow display low responsiveness to extreme high-altitude-hypoxia challenge, suggesting well-acclimatized genes and a physiological strategy that developed during evolution through interactions between the genes and environment. All the findings provide evidence for understanding the neuroendocrine mechanisms of hypoxia-induced physiological dysfunction. This review extends these findings.

  1. The corticotropin-releasing factor-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and kinin neuropeptides modulate desiccation and starvation tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, Elizabeth; Dornan, Anthony J; Halberg, Kenneth A; Terhzaz, Selim; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-A

    2016-06-01

    Malpighian tubules are critical organs for epithelial fluid transport and stress tolerance in insects, and are under neuroendocrine control by multiple neuropeptides secreted by identified neurons. Here, we demonstrate roles for CRF-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and Drosophila melanogaster kinin (Drome-kinin, DK) in desiccation and starvation tolerance. Gene expression and labelled DH44 ligand binding data, as well as highly selective knockdowns and/or neuronal ablations of DH44 in neurons of the pars intercerebralis and DH44 receptor (DH44-R2) in Malpighian tubule principal cells, indicate that suppression of DH44 signalling improves desiccation tolerance of the intact fly. Drome-kinin receptor, encoded by the leucokinin receptor gene, LKR, is expressed in DH44 neurons as well as in stellate cells of the Malpighian tubules. LKR knockdown in DH44-expressing neurons reduces Malpighian tubule-specific LKR, suggesting interactions between DH44 and LK signalling pathways. Finally, although a role for DK in desiccation tolerance was not defined, we demonstrate a novel role for Malpighian tubule cell-specific LKR in starvation tolerance. Starvation increases gene expression of epithelial LKR. Also, Malpighian tubule stellate cell-specific knockdown of LKR significantly reduced starvation tolerance, demonstrating a role for neuropeptide signalling during starvation stress. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Targeting Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Projections from the Oval Nucleus of the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Using Cell-Type Specific Neuronal Tracing Studies in Mouse and Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska, J; Martinon, D; Moaddab, M; Rainnie, D G

    2016-12-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is known to play a critical role in mediating the behavioural and autonomic responses to stressors. The oval nucleus of the BNST (BNSTov) contains cell bodies that synthesise the stress hormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). Although afferent fibres originating from the BNSTov have been shown to innervate several key structures of the neuroendocrine and central autonomic system, the question remains as to whether some of these fibres are CRF-positive. To directly address this question, we injected a 'floxed' anterograde tracer (rAAV5/EF1a-DIO-mCherry) into the BNSTov of CRFp3.0CreGFP transgenic mice, which express a green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the CRF promoter. Serial sections were then analysed for the presence of double-labelled fibres in potential projection sites. To determine whether CRF neurons in the rat BNSTov send comparable projections, we infused rat BNSTov with an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) in which the human synapsin promoter drives enhanced GFP expression. We then used CRF immunoreactivity to examine double-labelled fluorescent fibres and axon terminals in projection sites from brain sections of the AAV-infused rats. We have observed several terminal fields in the mouse and rat brain with double-labelled fibres in the Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRD), the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and, to a lesser extent, in the ventral tegmental area. We found double-labelled terminal boutons in the nucleus accumbens shell, prelimbic cortex and posterior basolateral nucleus of the amygdala. The most intense double-labelling was found in midbrain, including substantia nigra pars compacta, red nucleus, periaqueductal grey and pontine nuclei, as well as DRD. The results of the present study indicate that CRF neurons are the output neurons of the BNSTov and they send projections not only to the centres of neuroendocrine and autonomic regulation, but also regions modulating

  3. Up-regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone is associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in psoriasis and normal skin biopsy samples, and to correlate the expression of CRH with the expression of CRHBP and inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-33. Methods: Psoriasis and normal skin biopsy samples were obtained from three ...

  4. Up-regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone is associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sent for review: 28 July 2017. Revised accepted: 27 October 2017. Abstract. Purpose: To determine the expression of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) in psoriasis and normal skin biopsy samples, and to correlate the expression of CRH with the expression of CRHBP and inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-33.

  5. Up-regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone is associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the expression of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) in psoriasis and normal skin biopsy samples, and to correlate the expression of CRH with the expression of CRHBP and inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-33. Methods: Psoriasis and normal skin biopsy samples were obtained from three ...

  6. Plasma corticotropin releasing hormone during the feeling of induced emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Martins, Joao; Vale, Sónia do; Ferreira, Florbela; Fagundes, Maria Joao; Carmo, Isabel do; Saldanha, Carlota; Martins E Silva, J

    2010-01-01

    Central neuropeptides modulate behaviour. Plasma levels of neuropeptides may reflect central levels due to specific brain-to-blood transport systems. We purposed to show the modulation of plasma corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) levels in relation to induced emotions. Three groups were defined. For experimental groups A and B, an emotionally significant movie fragment was projected for 20 min, while no film projection occurred in group C. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected before, 10 and 60 min after the film or at 0 and 30 min for group C. Total CRH was measured in plasma. Personality was evaluated by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). Plasma CRH levels did not change in the condition with no movie projection - group C - 346 + or - 198 vs. 327 + or - 143 pg/mL. Plasma CRH levels dramatically increased with the projection of a dramatic movie - group A - 394 + or - 147 vs. 791 + or - 636 vs. 803 + or - 771 pg/mL, p<0.05. Plasma CRH increased less markedly in the condition with the projection of a comic movie - group B - 364 + or - 138 vs. 486 + or - 260 vs. 483 + or - 228 pg/mL, p<0.05 for differences between samples 1 and 3. Baseline plasma CRH was significantly and independently related to the neurotic triad and psychotic dyad - partial r=0.328 and 0.267, respectively, p<0.05. We conclude that plasma CRH levels increase with experimental emotion induction and that baseline levels are significantly related to behavioural traits. Plasma levels of neuropeptides may reflect central levels and may be useful in clinical medicine and in the study of behavioural disorders.

  7. Genetic moderation of child maltreatment effects on depression and internalizing symptoms by serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter (NET), and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) genes in African American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A

    2014-11-01

    Genetic moderation of the effects of child maltreatment on depression and internalizing symptoms was investigated in a sample of low-income maltreated and nonmaltreated African American children (N = 1,096). Lifetime child maltreatment experiences were independently coded from Child Protective Services records and maternal report. Child depression and internalizing problems were assessed in the context of a summer research camp by self-report on the Children's Depression Inventory and adult counselor report on the Teacher Report Form. DNA was obtained from buccal cell or saliva samples and genotyped for polymorphisms of the following genes: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter, and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1. Analyses of covariance with age and gender as covariates were conducted, with maltreatment status and respective polymorphism as main effects and their Gene × Environment (G × E) interactions. Maltreatment consistently was associated with higher Children's Depression Inventory and Teacher Report Form symptoms. The results for child self-report symptoms indicated a G × E interaction for BDNF and maltreatment. In addition, BDNF and triallelic 5-HTTLPR interacted with child maltreatment in a G × G × E interaction. Analyses for counselor report of child anxiety/depression symptoms on the Teacher Report Form indicated moderation of child maltreatment effects by triallelic 5-HTTLPR. These effects were elaborated based on variation in developmental timing of maltreatment experiences. Norepinephrine transporter was found to further moderate the G × E interaction of 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment status, revealing a G × G × E interaction. This G × G × E was extended by consideration of variation in maltreatment subtype experiences. Finally, G × G × E effects were observed for the co-action of BDNF and the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1

  8. Corticotropin-releasing hormone and dopamine release in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Doris; Williams, Belinda; Mansouri, Esmaeil; Stevanovski, Suzanna; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Le Foll, Bernard; Kish, Stephen; Houle, Sylvain; Mizrahi, Romina; George, Susan R; George, Tony P; Boileau, Isabelle

    2017-02-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a key component of the neuroendocrine response to stress. In animal models, CRH has been shown to modulate dopamine release, and this interaction is believed to contribute to stress-induced relapse in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we investigated whether CRH administration induces dopamine release in humans, using positron emission tomography (PET). Eight healthy volunteers (5 female, 22-48 years old) completed two PET scans with the dopamine D2/3 receptor radioligand [11C]-(+)-PHNO: once after saline injection, and once after injection of corticorelin (synthetic human CRH). We also assessed subjective reports and measured plasma levels of endocrine hormones (adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol). Relative to saline, corticorelin administration decreased binding of the D2/3 PET probe [11C]-(+)-PHNO, suggesting dopamine release. Endocrine stress markers were also elevated, in line with activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, but we detected no changes in subjective ratings. Preliminary results from this proof-of-concept study suggests that CRH challenge in combination with [11C]-(+)-PHNO PET may serve as an assay of dopamine release, presenting a potential platform for evaluating CRH/dopamine interactions in neuropsychiatric disorders and CRH antagonists as potential treatment avenues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1) genetic variation and stress interact to influence reward learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Ryan; Santesso, Diane L; Fagerness, Jesen; Perlis, Roy H; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2011-09-14

    Stress is a general risk factor for psychopathology, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain largely unknown. Animal studies and limited human research suggest that stress can induce anhedonic behavior. Moreover, emerging data indicate that genetic variation within the corticotropin-releasing hormone type 1 receptor gene (CRHR1) at rs12938031 may promote psychopathology, particularly in the context of stress. Using an intermediate phenotypic neurogenetics approach, we assessed how stress and CRHR1 genetic variation (rs12938031) influence reward learning, an important component of anhedonia. Psychiatrically healthy female participants (n = 75) completed a probabilistic reward learning task during stress and no-stress conditions while 128-channel event-related potentials were recorded. Fifty-six participants were also genotyped across CRHR1. Response bias, an individual's ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward, was the primary behavioral variable of interest. The feedback-related positivity (FRP) in response to reward feedback was used as a neural index of reward learning. Relative to the no-stress condition, acute stress was associated with blunted response bias as well as a smaller and delayed FRP (indicative of disrupted reward learning) and reduced anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex activation to reward. Critically, rs12938031 interacted with stress to influence reward learning: both behaviorally and neurally, A homozygotes showed stress-induced reward learning abnormalities. These findings indicate that acute, uncontrollable stressors reduce participants' ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward, and that such effects are modulated by CRHR1 genotype. Homozygosity for the A allele at rs12938031 may increase risk for psychopathology via stress-induced reward learning deficits.

  10. Modulation of Sleep Homeostasis by Corticotropin Releasing Hormone in REM Sleep-Deprived Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Borges Machado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that sleep recovery following different protocols of forced waking varies according to the level of stress inherent to each method. Sleep deprivation activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and increased corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH impairs sleep. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate how manipulations of the CRH system during the sleep deprivation period interferes with subsequent sleep rebound. Throughout 96 hours of sleep deprivation, separate groups of rats were treated i.c.v. with vehicle, CRH or with alphahelical CRH9−41, a CRH receptor blocker, twice/day, at 07:00 h and 19:00 h. Both treatments impaired sleep homeostasis, especially in regards to length of rapid eye movement sleep (REM and theta/delta ratio and induced a later decrease in NREM and REM sleep and increased waking bouts. These changes suggest that activation of the CRH system impact negatively on the homeostatic sleep response to prolonged forced waking. These results indicate that indeed, activation of the HPA axis—at least at the hypothalamic level—is capable to reduce the sleep rebound induced by sleep deprivation.

  11. The interaction of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene and early life stress on emotional empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Simone; Wirth, Katharina; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Gärtner, Matti; Feeser, Melanie; Dziobek, Isabel; Bajbouj, Malek; Aust, Sabine

    2017-06-30

    Early life stress (ELS) is associated with increased vulnerability for depression, changes to the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system and structural and functional changes in hippocampus. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) gene interact with ELS to predict depression, cognitive functions and hippocampal activity. Social cognition has been related to hippocampal function and might be crucial for maintaining mental health. However, the interaction of CRHR1 gene variation and ELS on social cognition has not been investigated yet. We assessed social cognition in 502 healthy subjects to test effects of ELS and the CRHR1 gene. Participants were genotyped for rs110402 and rs242924. ELS was assessed by Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, social cognition was measured via Multifaceted Empathy Test and Empathy Quotient. Severity of ELS was associated with decreased emotional, but not cognitive empathy. Subjects with the common homozygous GG GG genotype showed decreased implicit emotional empathy after ELS exposure regardless of its severity. The results reveal that specific CRHR1 polymorphisms moderate the effect of ELS on emotional empathy. Exposure to ELS in combination with a vulnerable genotype results in impaired emotional empathy in adulthood, which might represent an early marker of increased vulnerability after ELS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Interaction of early life stress and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene: effects on working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuge, Philipp; Aust, Sabine; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Gärtner, Matti; Feeser, Melanie; Bajbouj, Malek; Grimm, Simone

    2014-12-01

    Early life stress (ELS) experience is associated with persisting working memory (WM) deficits; changes to the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system; and structural, functional, and epigenetic changes in the hippocampus. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) gene interact with ELS experience to predict depression as well as neuroendocrine and neuronal reactivity. Although these findings indicate that vulnerable genotypes might also show impaired WM performance after ELS experience, no previous study investigated whether there is an interaction effect of CRHR1 polymorphisms and ELS experience on WM performance. Subjects (N = 451) were genotyped for rs110402 and rs242924 within the CRHR1 gene. We used an n-back task to investigate the hypothesis that WM performance in healthy subjects may be subtly influenced by functional differences in CRHR1 and represents an early marker of increased vulnerability after exposure to ELS. Exposure to ELS had a particularly strong impact on WM performance in subjects with the common homozygous GG GG genotype, whereas only severe exposure to ELS interfered with WM accuracy in AT carriers. Our data indicate that specific CRHR1 polymorphisms moderate the effect of ELS experience on WM performance. Exposure to ELS in combination with a vulnerable genotype results in subtle memory deficits in adulthood, which might develop before psychopathological symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 and histidine decarboxylase expression in chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Nikoletta; Kalogeromitros, Demetrios; Staurianeas, Nikolaos G; Tiblalexi, Despina; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2005-11-01

    Certain skin disorders, such as contact dermatitis and chronic urticaria, are characterized by inflammation involving mast cells and worsen by stress. The underlying mechanism of this effect, however, is not known. The skin appears to have the equivalent of a hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, including local expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and its receptors (CRH-R). We have reported that acute stress and intradermal administration of CRH stimulate skin mast cells and increase vascular permeability through CRH-R1 activation. In this study, we investigated the expression of CRH-R1, the main CRH-R subtype in human skin, and the mast cell related gene histidine decarboxylase (HDC), which regulates the production of histamine, in normal and pathological skin biopsies. Quantitative real time PCR revealed that chronic urticaria expresses high levels of CRH-R1 and HDC as compared to normal foreskin, breast skin and cultured human keratinocytes. The lichen simplex samples had high expression of CRH-R1, but low HDC. These results implicate CRH-R in chronic urticaria, which is often exacerbated by stress.

  14. Corticotropin-releasing hormone improves survival in pneumococcal pneumonia by reducing pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnley, Brittney; P Jones, Harlan

    2017-01-01

    The use of glucocorticoids to reduce inflammatory responses is largely based on the knowledge of the physiological action of the endogenous glucocorticoid, cortisol. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a neuropeptide released from the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of the central nervous system. This hormone serves as an important mediator of adaptive physiological responses to stress. In addition to its role in inducing downstream cortisol release that in turn regulates immune suppression, CRH has also been found to mediate inflammatory responses in peripheral tissues. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a microorganism commonly present among the commensal microflora along the upper respiratory tract. Transmission of disease stems from the resident asymptomatic pneumococcus along the nasal passages. Glucocorticoids are central mediators of immune suppression and are the primary adjuvant pharmacological treatment used to reduce inflammatory responses in patients with severe bacterial pneumonia. However, controversy exists in the effectiveness of glucocorticoid treatment in reducing mortality rates during S. pneumoniae infection. In this study, we compared the effect of the currently utilized pharmacologic glucocorticoid dexamethasone with CRH. Our results demonstrated that intranasal administration of CRH increases survival associated with a decrease in inflammatory cellular immune responses compared to dexamethasone independent of neutrophils. Thus, providing evidence of its use in the management of immune and inflammatory responses brought on by severe pneumococcal infection that could reduce mortality risks. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  15. Mid-pregnancy corticotropin-releasing hormone levels in association with postpartum depressive symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iliadis, Stavros I; Sylvén, Sara; Hellgren, Charlotte; Olivier, Jocelien D.; Schijven, Dick; Comasco, Erika; Chrousos, George P; Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Skalkidou, Alkistis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripartum depression is a common cause of pregnancy- and postpartum-related morbidity. The production of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) from the placenta alters the profile of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis hormones and may be associated with postpartum depression. The

  16. Corticotropin releasing hormone can selectively stimulate glucose uptake in corticotropinoma via glucose transporter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie; Montgomery, Blake K; Chatain, Grégoire P; Bugarini, Alejandro; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Xiang; Edwards, Nancy A; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Merrill, Marsha J; Lonser, Russell R; Chittiboina, Prashant

    2017-10-03

    Pre-operative detection of corticotropin (ACTH) secreting microadenomas causing Cushing's disease (CD) improves surgical outcomes. Current best magnetic resonance imaging fails to detect up to 40% of these microadenomas. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is specific, but not sensitive in detecting corticotropinomas. Theoretically, secretagogue stimulation with corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) could improve detection of adenomas with 18 F-FDG PET. Previous attempts with simultaneous CRH stimulation have failed to demonstrate increased 18 F-FDG uptake in corticotropinomas. We hypothesized that CRH stimulation leads to a delayed elevation in glucose uptake in corticotropinomas. Clinical data was analyzed for efficacy of CRH in improving 18 FDG-PET detection of corticotropinomas in CD. Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) immunoreactivity was performed on surgical specimens. Ex-vivo, viable cells from these tumors were tested for secretagogue effects (colorimetric glucose uptake), and for fate of intracellular glucose (glycolysis stress analysis). Validation of ex-vivo findings was performed with AtT-20 cells. CRH increased glucose uptake in human-derived corticotroph tumor cells and AtT-20, but not in normal murine or human corticotrophs (p fasentin suppressed baseline (p < 0.0001) and CRH-mediated glucose uptake. Expectedly, intra-operatively collected corticotropinomas demonstrated GLUT1 overexpression. Lastly, human derived corticotroph tumor cells demonstrated increased glycolysis and low glucose oxidation. Increased and delayed CRH-mediated glucose uptake differentially occurs in adenomatous corticotrophs. Delayed secretagogue-stimulated 18 F-FDG PET could improve microadenoma detection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Corticotropin?releasing hormone improves survival in pneumococcal pneumonia by reducing pulmonary inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Burnley, Brittney; P. Jones, Harlan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The use of glucocorticoids to reduce inflammatory responses is largely based on the knowledge of the physiological action of the endogenous glucocorticoid, cortisol. Corticotropin?releasing hormone (CRH) is a neuropeptide released from the hypothalamic?pituitary?adrenal axis of the central nervous system. This hormone serves as an important mediator of adaptive physiological responses to stress. In addition to its role in inducing downstream cortisol release that in turn regulates im...

  18. Effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone on proopiomelanocortin derivatives and monocytic HLA-DR expression in patients with septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejec, Reginald; Kayser, Friederike; Schmal, Frauke; Uhle, Florian; Bödeker, Rolf-Hasso; Maxeiner, Hagen; Kolbe, Julia Anna

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about interactions between immune and neuro-endocrine systems in patients with septic shock. We therefore evaluated whether the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and/or proopiomelanocortin (POMC) derivatives [ACTH, β-endorphin (β-END), β-lipotropin (β-LPH), α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) or N-acetyl-β-END (Nac-β-END)] have any influences on monocyte deactivation as a major factor of immunosuppression under septic shock conditions. Sixteen patients with septic shock were enrolled in a double-blind, cross-over and placebo controlled clinical study; 0.5μg/(kgbodyweighth) CRH (or placebo) were intravenously administered for 24h. Using flow cytometry we investigated the immunosuppression in patients as far as related to the loss of leukocyte surface antigen-DR expression on circulating monocytes (mHLA-DR). ACTH, β-END immunoreacive material (IRM), β-LPH IRM, α-MSH and Nac-β-END IRM as well as TNF-α and mHLA-DR expression were determined before, during and after treatment with CRH (or placebo). A significant correlation between plasma concentration of α-MSH and mHLA-DR expression and an inverse correlation between mHLA-DR expression and TNF-α plasma level were found. Additionally, a significant increase of mHLA-DR expression was observed 16h after starting the CRH infusion; 8h later, the mHLA-DR expression had decreased again. Our results indicate that the up-regulation of mHLA-DR expression after CRH infusion is not dependent on the release of POMC derivatives. From the correlation between plasma concentration of α-MSH and mHLA-DR expression, we conclude that in patients with septic shock the down-regulation of mHAL-DR expression is accompanied by the loss of monocytic release of α-MSH into the cardiovascular compartment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Corticotropin-releasing hormone expression in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy after ursodeoxycholic acid treatment: an initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fan; Zhang, Li; He, Mao Mao; Liu, Zheng Fei; Gao, Bing Xin; Wang, Xiao Dong

    2014-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is one of the most potent vasodilatory factors in the human feto-placental circulation. The expression of CRH was significantly down-regulated in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). One hundred pregnant women diagnosed with ICP at 34-34(+6) weeks of gestation agreed to participate in this prospective nested case-control study. Thirty ICP patients were finally recruited in this study, with 16 cases in the ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) group (UDCA 750 mg/d) and 14 cases in the control group (Transmetil 1000 mg/d or Essentiale 1368 mg/d). Maternal serum samples were obtained in diagnosis and at 37-37(+6) weeks of gestation. Placental tissues were obtained from participants after delivery. ELISA, enzymatic colorimetric and Western blotting were used to evaluate the concentrations of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bile acid (TBA) and CRH in maternal serum and expression of CRH in placenta tissues. The UDCA group had greater reduction in maternal serum ALT, AST and TBA levels in ICP patients (all p cholestasis (TBA ≥ 40 µmol/L). Further studies are warranted in different gestational weeks and TBA levels to provide more evidence for the correlation between UDCA treatment and CRH expression in ICP patients.

  20. Injection of corticotropin-releasing hormone into the amygdala aggravates visceral nociception and induces noradrenaline release in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, J; Tanaka, Y; Muratsubaki, T; Kano, M; Kanazawa, M; Fukudo, S

    2015-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and its receptor 1 (CRH-R1) play an important role in the colonic response to stress. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a major extrahypothalamic site that contains a large number of neurons expressing both CRH and CRH-R1. Here, we verified the hypothesis that CRH in the CeA sensitizes visceral nociception via CRH-R1 with release of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin (5-HT) in the CeA. In male Wistar rats, visceral sensitivity was quantified by recording the visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD) with administration of vehicle, CRH, or the CRH-R1 antagonist CP-154526+ CRH or CRH-R1 antagonist CP-154526 alone into the CeA. Simultaneously, extracellular levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and 5-HT were measured in the CeA using microdialysis. All data were obtained under restraint conditions. Administration of CRH into the CeA significantly increased the number of abdominal muscle contractions in response to CRD. CP-154526 significantly blocked the number of abdominal muscle contractions in response to CRD with the administration of CRH into the CeA. Noradrenaline in the CeA was increased by CRD, further increased by CRH, and inhibited by CRH-R1 antagonist. Dopamine in the CeA was also exaggerated by CRH but was not inhibited by CRH-R1 antagonist. 5-HT in the CeA was unchanged. These results suggest that CRH in the CeA sensitizes visceral nociception via CRH-R1 with release of noradrenaline. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Diversity of Reporter Expression Patterns in Transgenic Mouse Lines Targeting Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Expressing Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuncai; Molet, Jenny; Gunn, Benjamin G; Ressler, Kerry; Baram, Tallie Z

    2015-12-01

    Transgenic mice, including lines targeting corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF or CRH), have been extensively employed to study stress neurobiology. These powerful tools are poised to revolutionize our understanding of the localization and connectivity of CRH-expressing neurons, and the crucial roles of CRH in normal and pathological conditions. Accurate interpretation of studies using cell type-specific transgenic mice vitally depends on congruence between expression of the endogenous peptide and reporter. If reporter expression does not faithfully reproduce native gene expression, then effects of manipulating unintentionally targeted cells may be misattributed. Here, we studied CRH and reporter expression patterns in 3 adult transgenic mice: Crh-IRES-Cre;Ai14 (tdTomato mouse), Crfp3.0CreGFP, and Crh-GFP BAC. We employed the CRH antiserum generated by Vale after validating its specificity using CRH-null mice. We focused the analyses on stress-salient regions, including hypothalamus, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and hippocampus. Expression patterns of endogenous CRH were consistent among wild-type and transgenic mice. In tdTomato mice, most CRH-expressing neurons coexpressed the reporter, yet the reporter identified a few non-CRH-expressing pyramidal-like cells in hippocampal CA1 and CA3. In Crfp3.0CreGFP mice, coexpression of CRH and the reporter was found in central amygdala and, less commonly, in other evaluated regions. In Crh-GFP BAC mice, the large majority of neurons expressed either CRH or reporter, with little overlap. These data highlight significant diversity in concordant expression of reporter and endogenous CRH among 3 available transgenic mice. These findings should be instrumental in interpreting important scientific findings emerging from the use of these potent neurobiological tools.

  2. Regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 messenger RNA level in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells: potential implications for human stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction

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    N. C. Vamvakopoulos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the regulation of type 1 receptor mRNA in Y-79 human retinoblastoma cells, grown in the absence or presence of pharmacological levels of phorbol esters, forskolin, glucocorticoids and their combinations. To control for inducibility and for assessing the sensitivity of the Y-79 system to glucocorticoids, corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA levels were measured in parallel. All treatments stimulated corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene expression relative to baseline. A weak suppression of corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA level was observed during dexamethasone treatment. The cell line expressed ten-fold excess of receptor to ligand mRNA under basal conditions. The findings predict the presence of functional phorbol ester, cyclic AMP and glucocorticoid response elements in the promoter region of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene and support a potential role for its product during chronic stress and immune/inflammatory reaction.

  3. Expression of urocortin and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors in the horse thyroid gland.

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    Squillacioti, Caterina; De Luca, Adriana; Alì, Sabrina; Paino, Salvatore; Liguori, Giovanna; Mirabella, Nicola

    2012-10-01

    Urocortin (UCN) is a 40-amino-acid peptide and a member of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) family, which includes CRH, urotensin I, sauvagine, UCN2 and UCN3. The biological actions of CRH family peptides are mediated via two types of G-protein-coupled receptors, namely CRH type 1 receptor (CRHR1) and CRH type 2 receptor (CRHR2). The biological effects of these peptides are mediated and modulated not only by CRH receptors but also via a highly conserved CRH-binding protein (CRHBP). Our aim was to investigate the expression of UCN, CRHR1, CRHR2 and CRHBP by immunohistochemistry, Western blot and reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the horse thyroid gland. The results showed that UCN, CRHR1 and CRHR2 were expressed in the thyroid gland, whereas CRHBP was not expressed. Specifically, UCN immunoreactivity (-IR) was found in the thyroid follicular cells, CRHR2-IR in the C-cells and CRHR1-IR in blood vessels. Western blot analysis and RT-PCR experiments confirmed the immunohistochemical data. These results suggest that a regulatory system exists in the mammalian thyroid gland based on UCN, CRHR1 and CRHR2 and that UCN plays a role in the regulation of thyroid physiological functions through a paracrine mechanism.

  4. Tolerability of the dexamethasone-corticotropin releasing hormone test in major depressive disorder.

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    Dunlop, Boadie W; Betancourt, Yara; Binder, Elisabeth B; Heim, Christine; Holsboer, Florian; Ising, Marcus; McKenzie, Melissa; Mletzko, Tanja; Pfister, Hildegard; Nemeroff, Charles B; Craighead, W Edward; Mayberg, Helen S

    2011-01-01

    The dexamethasone-corticotropin releasing hormone (Dex-CRH) test may differentially predict which depressed patients will respond to antidepressant medication. However, a comprehensive analysis of the safety of this test in psychiatric patients has not previously been performed. We conducted a pooled analysis of depressed patients in four clinical studies. Observed and subjectively reported side-effects in 454 patients were collected for 90 minutes following CRH administration. Pre-test electrocardiograms were available in 250 patients to assess cardiac safety. Descriptive statistics were performed to evaluate these safety data. Eight-six (18.9%) subjects experienced no side-effects from the procedure. The mean number of side-effects per subject was 1.4±1.0. The most frequent adverse events were: flushing (n=216, 47.6%), feeling of warmth (144, 31.7%), hyperpnea/tachypnea (108, 23.8%), palpitations (37, 8.1%), and tachycardia (28, 6.2%). Side-effects were consistently mild and brief in duration. There were no serious adverse events. The Dex-CRH test produces a mild, predictable side-effect profile, characterized by flushing, feelings of warmth, hyperpnea/tachypnea, palpitations, and tachycardia. These results provide reassurance that the Dex-CRH test is well tolerated in psychiatric patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of a novel subtype of hippocampal interneurons that express corticotropin-releasing hormone.

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    Hooper, Andrew; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    A subset of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons was previously identified in the hippocampus with unknown function. Here we demonstrate that hippocampal CRH neurons represent a novel subtype of interneurons in the hippocampus, exhibiting unique morphology, electrophysiological properties, molecular markers, and connectivity. This subset of hippocampal CRH neurons in the mouse reside in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer and tract tracing studies using AAV-Flex-ChR2-tdTomato reveal dense back-projections of these neurons onto principal neurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. These hippocampal CRH neurons express both GABA and GAD67 and using in vitro optogenetic techniques, we demonstrate that these neurons make functional connections and release GABA onto CA3 principal neurons. The location, morphology, and importantly the functional connectivity of these neurons demonstrate that hippocampal CRH neurons represent a unique subtype of hippocampal interneurons. The connectivity of these neurons has significant implications for hippocampal function. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Regulation of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone neurone excitability by oxytocin.

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    Jamieson, B B; Nair, B B; Iremonger, K J

    2017-11-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide that exerts multiple actions throughout the brain and periphery. Within the brain, OT regulates diverse neural populations, including neural networks controlling responses to stress. Local release of OT within the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus has been suggested to regulate stress responses by modulating the excitability of neighbouring corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurones. However, the mechanisms by which OT regulates CRH neurone excitability are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the morphological relationship between OT and CRH neurones and determined the effects of OT on CRH neurone excitability. Morphological analysis revealed that the processes of OT and CRH neurones were highly intermingled within the PVN, possibly allowing for local cell-to-cell cross-talk. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from CRH neurones were used to study the impact of OT on postsynaptic excitability and synaptic innervation. Bath-applied OT did not alter CRH neurone holding current, spiking output or any action potential parameters. Recordings of evoked excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs/IPSCs) revealed no net effect of OT on current amplitude; however, subgroups of CRH neurones appeared to respond differentially to OT. Analysis of spontaneous EPSC events uncovered a significant reduction in spontaneous EPSC frequency but no change in spontaneous EPSC amplitude in response to OT. Together, these data demonstrate that OT exerts a subtle modulation of synaptic transmission onto CRH neurones providing one potential mechanism by which OT could suppress CRH neurone excitability and stress axis activity. © 2017 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  7. Anorectic actions of prolactin-releasing peptide are mediated by corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors.

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    Lawrence, Catherine B; Liu, Yong-Ling; Stock, Michael J; Luckman, Simon M

    2004-01-01

    Prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP) reduces food intake and body weight and modifies body temperature when administered centrally in rats, suggesting a role in energy homeostasis. However, the mediators of PrRP's actions are unknown. The present study, therefore, first examined the possible involvement of the anorectic neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the melanocortins (e.g., alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) in PrRP's effects on food intake and core body temperature and, second, determined if PrRP affects energy expenditure by measuring oxygen consumption (Vo2). Intracerebroventricular injection of PrRP (4 nmol) to 24-h-fasted male Sprague-Dawley rats decreased food intake and modified body temperature. Blockade of central CRH receptors by intracerebroventricular coadministration of the CRH receptor antagonist astressin (20 microg) reversed the PrRP-induced reduction in feeding. However, astressin's effect on PrRP-induced changes in body temperature was complicated because the antagonist itself caused a slight rise in body temperature. In contrast, intracerebroventricular coadministration of the melanocortin receptor-3/4 antagonist SHU-9119 (0.1 nmol) had no effect on any of PrRP's actions. Finally, intracerebroventricular injection of PrRP (4 nmol) caused a significantly greater Vo2 over a 3-h test period compared with vehicle-treated rats. These results show that the anorectic actions of PrRP are mediated by central CRH receptors but not by melanocortin receptors-3/4 and that PrRP can modify Vo2.

  8. Divergent evolution of two corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) genes in teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grone, Brian P; Maruska, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    Genome duplication, thought to have happened twice early in vertebrate evolution and a third time in teleost fishes, gives rise to gene paralogs that can evolve subfunctions or neofunctions via sequence and regulatory changes. To explore the evolution and functions of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), we searched sequenced teleost genomes for CRH paralogs. Our phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicate that two CRH genes, crha and crhb, evolved via duplication of crh1 early in the teleost lineage. We examined the expression of crha and crhb in two teleost species from different orders: an African cichlid, Burton's mouthbrooder, (Astatotilapia burtoni; Order Perciformes) and zebrafish (Danio rerio; Order Cypriniformes). Furthermore, we compared expression of the teleost crha and crhb genes with the crh1 gene of an outgroup to the teleost clade: the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus). In situ hybridization for crha and crhb mRNA in brains and eyes revealed distinct expression patterns for crha in different teleost species. In the cichlid, crha mRNA was found in the retina but not in the brain. In zebrafish, however, crha mRNA was not found in the retina, but was detected in the brain, restricted to the ventral hypothalamus. Spotted gar crh1 was found in the retina as well as the brain, suggesting that the ancestor of teleost fishes likely had a crh1 gene expressed in both retina and brain. Thus, genome duplication may have freed crha from constraints, allowing it to evolve distinct sequences, expression patterns, and likely unique functions in different lineages.

  9. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 gene variants in irritable bowel syndrome.

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    Naoko Sato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH acts mainly via the CRH receptor 1 (CRH-R1 and plays a crucial role in the stress-induced pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. Several studies have demonstrated that variants of the CRH-R1 gene carry a potential risk for depression, but evidence for an association between CRH-R1 genotypes and IBS is lacking. We tested the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRH-R1 moderate the IBS phenotype and negative emotion in IBS patients. METHODS: A total of 103 patients with IBS and 142 healthy controls participated in the study. Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the CRH-R1 gene (rs7209436, rs242924, and rs110402 were genotyped. Subjects' emotional states were evaluated using the Perceived-Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Self-rating Depression Scale. RESULTS: The TT genotype of rs7209436 (P = 0.01 and rs242924 (P = 0.02 was significantly more common in patients with IBS than in controls. Total sample analysis showed significant association between bowel pattern (normal, diarrhea, constipation, or mixed symptoms and the T allele of rs7209436 (P = 0.008, T allele of rs242924 (P = 0.019, A allele of rs110402 (P = 0.047, and TAT haplocopies (P = 0.048. Negative emotion was not associated with the examined CRH-R1 SNPs. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that genetic polymorphisms and the CRH-R1 haplotypes moderate IBS and related bowel patterns. There was no clear association between CRH-R1 genotypes and negative emotion accompanying IBS. Further studies on the CRH system are therefore warranted.

  10. Corticotropin-releasing hormone and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in psychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Marie; Dinan, Timothy G; Scott, Lucinda V

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1960s, both corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis have been studied in detail across a range of psychiatric illnesses, leading to important contributions to our knowledge in this area. This research arose from the conceptualization of depression, in particular, as a stress-related disorder. However, stress is now regarded as an integral component of psychiatric illnesses in general, whether as an environmental trigger or in the initial pathogenesis, and there is evidence of altered HPA axis function across a range of mental disorders. The chapter will cover the extensive literature on HPA axis abnormalities in these disorders with a particular emphasis on the CRH system as it is very evident that this 41-amino acid-containing peptide is not only a major physiologic regulator of HPA axis activity but also important in the pathogenesis of mental disorders. In particular, we discuss the abundant reports pertaining to major depressive disorder, where hyperactivity of the HPA axis, of mild to moderate severity, has been demonstrated in 30-50% of cases. Also under consideration is the less extensively studied, but equally intriguing question of HPA axis integrity in bipolar affective disorder. In addition there will be a concise summary of recent findings in schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, with an emphasis on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the latter case. Interestingly, in diametric opposition to the theory of HPA hyperactivity in depression, PTSD has features consistent with hypofunctioning of this system. Advances in animal and human studies have made it possible to synthesize these findings, and while much still remains unknown, we are gradually building up a clearer picture of this very important axis in health, at times of stress, and in chronic enduring mental illness. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dissociable Role of Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor Subtype 1 on Dopaminergic and D1 Dopaminoceptive Neurons in Cocaine Seeking Behavior

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    Rick E. Bernardi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of many drugs of abuse, including cocaine, to mediate reinforcement and drug-seeking behaviors is in part mediated by the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH system, in which CRH exerts its effects partly via the CRH receptor subtype 1 (CRHR1 in extra-hypothalamic areas. In fact, CRHR1 expressed in regions of the mesolimbic dopamine (DA system have been demonstrated to modify cocaine-induced DA release and alter cocaine-mediated behaviors. Here we examined the role of neuronal selectivity of CRHR1 within the mesolimbic system on cocaine-induced behaviors. First we used a transgenic mouse line expressing GFP under the control of the Crhr1 promoter for double fluorescence immunohistochemistry to demonstrate the cellular location of CRHR1 in both dopaminergic and D1 dopaminoceptive neurons. We then studied cocaine sensitization, self-administration, and reinstatement in inducible CRHR1 knockouts using the CreERT2/loxP in either dopamine transporter (DAT-containing neurons (DAT-Crhr1 or dopamine receptor 1 (D1-containing neurons (D1-Crhr1. For sensitization testing, mice received five daily injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg IP. For self-administration, mice received eight daily 2 h cocaine (0.5 mg/kg per infusion self-administration sessions followed by extinction and reinstatement testing. There were no differences in the acute or sensitized locomotor response to cocaine in DAT-Crhr1 or D1-Crhr1 mice and their respective controls. Furthermore, both DAT-Crhr1 and D1-Crhr1 mice reliably self-administered cocaine at the level of controls. However, DAT-Crhr1 mice demonstrated a significant increase in cue-induced reinstatement relative to controls, whereas D1-Crhr1 mice demonstrated a significant decrease in cue-induced reinstatement relative to controls. These data demonstrate the involvement of CRHR1 in cue-induced reinstatement following cocaine self-administration, and implicate a bi-directional role of CRHR1 for cocaine craving.

  12. Dissociable Role of Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor Subtype 1 on Dopaminergic and D1 Dopaminoceptive Neurons in Cocaine Seeking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Rick E; Broccoli, Laura; Hirth, Natalie; Justice, Nicholas J; Deussing, Jan M; Hansson, Anita C; Spanagel, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    The ability of many drugs of abuse, including cocaine, to mediate reinforcement and drug-seeking behaviors is in part mediated by the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system, in which CRH exerts its effects partly via the CRH receptor subtype 1 (CRHR1) in extra-hypothalamic areas. In fact, CRHR1 expressed in regions of the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system have been demonstrated to modify cocaine-induced DA release and alter cocaine-mediated behaviors. Here we examined the role of neuronal selectivity of CRHR1 within the mesolimbic system on cocaine-induced behaviors. First we used a transgenic mouse line expressing GFP under the control of the Crhr1 promoter for double fluorescence immunohistochemistry to demonstrate the cellular location of CRHR1 in both dopaminergic and D1 dopaminoceptive neurons. We then studied cocaine sensitization, self-administration, and reinstatement in inducible CRHR1 knockouts using the CreERT2/loxP in either dopamine transporter (DAT)-containing neurons (DAT-Crhr1) or dopamine receptor 1 (D1)-containing neurons (D1-Crhr1). For sensitization testing, mice received five daily injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg IP). For self-administration, mice received eight daily 2 h cocaine (0.5 mg/kg per infusion) self-administration sessions followed by extinction and reinstatement testing. There were no differences in the acute or sensitized locomotor response to cocaine in DAT-Crhr1 or D1-Crhr1 mice and their respective controls. Furthermore, both DAT-Crhr1 and D1-Crhr1 mice reliably self-administered cocaine at the level of controls. However, DAT-Crhr1 mice demonstrated a significant increase in cue-induced reinstatement relative to controls, whereas D1-Crhr1 mice demonstrated a significant decrease in cue-induced reinstatement relative to controls. These data demonstrate the involvement of CRHR1 in cue-induced reinstatement following cocaine self-administration, and implicate a bi-directional role of CRHR1 for cocaine craving.

  13. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor 2 Gene Variants in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

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    Hazuki Komuro

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH plays an important role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and regulates the stress response through two CRH receptors (R1 and R2. Previously, we reported that a CRHR1 gene polymorphism (rs110402, rs242924, and rs7209436 and haplotypes were associated with IBS. However, the association between the CRHR2 gene and IBS was not investigated. We tested the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRHR2 are associated with IBS pathophysiology and negative emotion in IBS patients.A total of 142 IBS patients and 142 healthy controls participated in this study. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the CRHR2 gene (rs4722999, rs3779250, rs2240403, rs2267710, rs2190242, rs2284217, and rs2284220 were genotyped. Subjects' psychological states were evaluated using the Perceived-Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Self-Rating Depression Scale.We found that rs4722999 and rs3779250, located in intronic region, were associated with IBS in terms of genotype frequency (rs4722999: P = 0.037; rs3779250: P = 0.017 and that the distribution of the major allele was significantly different between patients and controls. There was a significant group effect (controls vs. IBS, and a CRHR2 genotype effect was observed for three psychological scores, but the interaction was not significant. We found a haplotype of four SNPs (rs4722999, rs3779250, rs2240403, and rs2267710 and two SNPs (rs2284217 and rs2284220 in strong linkage disequilibrium (D' > 0.90. We also found that haplotypes of the CRHR2 gene were significantly different between IBS patients and controls and that they were associated with negative emotion.Our findings support the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRHR2 are related to IBS. In addition, we found associations between CRHR2 genotypes and haplotypes and negative emotion in IBS patients and controls. Further studies on IBS and the CRH

  14. Transient early-life forebrain corticotropin-releasing hormone elevation causes long-lasting anxiogenic and despair-like changes in mice.

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    Kolber, Benedict J; Boyle, Maureen P; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Kelley, Crystal L; Onwuzurike, Chiamaka C; Nettles, Sabin A; Vogt, Sherri K; Muglia, Louis J

    2010-02-17

    During development, early-life stress, such as abuse or trauma, induces long-lasting changes that are linked to adult anxiety and depressive behavior. It has been postulated that altered expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) can at least partially account for the various effects of stress on behavior. In accord with this hypothesis, evidence from pharmacological and genetic studies has indicated the capacity of differing levels of CRH activity in different brain areas to produce behavioral changes. Furthermore, stress during early life or adulthood causes an increase in CRH release in a variety of neural sites. To evaluate the temporal and spatial specificity of the effect of early-life CRH exposure on adult behavior, the tetracycline-off system was used to produce mice with forebrain-restricted inducible expression of CRH. After transient elevation of CRH during development only, behavioral testing in adult mice revealed a persistent anxiogenic and despair-like phenotype. These behavioral changes were not associated with alterations in adult circadian or stress-induced corticosterone release but were associated with changes in CRH receptor type 1 expression. Furthermore, the despair-like changes were normalized with antidepressant treatment. Overall, these studies suggest that forebrain-restricted CRH signaling during development can permanently alter stress adaptation leading to increases in maladaptive behavior in adulthood.

  15. A stress-induced anxious state in male rats: corticotropin-releasing hormone induces persistent changes in associative learning and startle reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servatius, Richard J; Beck, Kevin D; Moldow, Roberta L; Salameh, Gabriel; Tumminello, Tara P; Short, Kenneth R

    2005-04-15

    Exposure to intense inescapable stressors induces a persistent anxious state in rats. The anxious state is evident as increased sensory reactivity and enhanced associative learning. We examine whether similar neurobehavioral changes are observed after intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Two behaviors were observed: acoustic startle responses (ASRs) and acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered ICV CRH either in a single dose (1.0 microg/rat) or in three doses each separated by 30 min. Exaggerated ASRs were evident 2 hours after either CRH treatment; however, only the rats given three injections exhibited a persistently exaggerated ASR apparent 24 hours after CRH treatment. Rats administered three injections of CRH also exhibited faster acquisition of the eyeblink conditioned response beginning 24 hours after treatment. Yet, we did not find evidence for a persistent activation of the HPA-axis response; three CRH injections did not lead to elevated basal plasma corticosterone levels the following morning. Repeated treatment with CRH over a 1.5-hour period models some of the behavioral changes observed after exposure to intense inescapable stressors.

  16. Endogenous GLP-1 acts on paraventricular nucleus to suppress feeding: projection from nucleus tractus solitarius and activation of corticotropin-releasing hormone, nesfatin-1 and oxytocin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsurada, Kenichi; Maejima, Yuko; Nakata, Masanori; Kodaira, Misato; Suyama, Shigetomo; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Kario, Kazuomi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2014-08-22

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients and shown to reduce food intake and body weight. The anorexigenic effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists are thought to be mediated primarily via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). GLP-1, an intestinal hormone, is also localized in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1, particularly that in the NTS neurons, in feeding regulation remains to be established. The present study examined whether the NTS GLP-1 neurons project to PVN and whether the endogenous GLP-1 acts on PVN to restrict feeding. Intra-PVN injection of GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39) increased food intake. Injection of retrograde tracer into PVN combined with immunohistochemistry for GLP-1 in NTS revealed direct projection of NTS GLP-1 neurons to PVN. Moreover, GLP-1 evoked Ca(2+) signaling in single neurons isolated from PVN. The majority of GLP-1-responsive neurons were immunoreactive predominantly to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and nesfatin-1, and less frequently to oxytocin. These results indicate that endogenous GLP-1 targets PVN to restrict feeding behavior, in which the projection from NTS GLP-1 neurons and activation of CRH and nesfatin-1 neurons might be implicated. This study reveals a neuronal basis for the anorexigenic effect of endogenous GLP-1 in the brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the human hypothalamus in subjects with normal and abnormal sex hormone status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, A.-M.; Swaab, D.F.

    2007-01-01

    In order to determine the role of peripheral sex hormone levels in the expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons, we investigated by means of immunocytochemistry the number of CRH neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in postmortem material of young and old

  18. Reduction in brain immunoreactive corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in spontaneously hypertensive rats

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    Hashimoto, K.; Hattori, T.; Murakami, K.; Suemaru, S.; Kawada, Y.; Kageyama, J.; Ota, Z.

    1985-02-18

    The brain CRF concentration of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was examined by rat CRF radioimmunoassay. Anti-CRF serum was developed by immunizing rabbits with synthetic rat CRF. Synthetic rat CRF was also used as tracer and standard. The displacement of /sup 125/I-rat CRF by serially diluted extracts of male Wistar rats hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and neurointermediate lobe was parallel to the displacement of synthetic rat CRF. In both WKY and SHR the highest levels of CRF immunoreactivity were shown by the hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe, and considerable CRF immunoreactivity was also detected in other brain regions. The CRF immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus, neurointermediate lobe, midbrain, medulla oblongata and cerebral cortex was significantly reduced in SHR and it may suggest that CRF abnormality may be implicated in the reported abnormalities in the pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic response and behavior of SHR.

  19. Effects on Chronic Stress on Anterior Pituitary and Brain Corticotropin- Releasing Factor Receptors,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    immunoreactive CRH in anorexia nervosa pa- with dexamethasone. Life Sci. 39" 1281-1286; 1986. tients. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 62:319-324; 1986. 8...exposurt. to pro- lesions abolish the stress-induced rise in pituitary cyclic adenosine longed stress: A pituitary-mediated mechanism. Endocrinology

  20. Combined dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing factor test in chronic fatigue syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eede, F. van den; Moorkens, G.; Hulstijn, W.; Houdenhove, B. van; Cosyns, P.; Claes, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis function in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) point to hypofunction, although there are negative reports. Suggested mechanisms include a reduced hypothalamic or supra-hypothalamic stimulus to the HPA axis and enhanced sensitivity to the

  1. In vitro Expression and Mutagenesis of a Gene for Corticotropin Releasing Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-31

    AS RPT 0 DTIC USERS (U) 22a NAME OF RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL 22b. TELEPHONE (Include Area Code) 22c OFFICE SYMBOL Dr. J.A. Maide (2n?) AQA -4097 nNR DD...the release of ACTH from pituitary cells. We will pursue this goal using a recently described and novel technique of molecular biology to synthesize...of Pharmacology Depts. of Biology & Psychology Univ. of Pennsylvania Georgia State University School of Medicine Atlanta, GA 30303 36th and Hamilton

  2. Evidence for the role of corticotropin-releasing factor in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, R Parrish; Rivalan, Marion; Bangasser, D A; Deussing, J M; Ising, M; Wood, S K; Holsboer, F; Summers, Cliff H

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a devastating disease affecting over 300 million people worldwide, and costing an estimated 380 billion Euros in lost productivity and health care in the European Union alone. Although a wealth of research has been directed toward understanding and treating MDD, still no therapy has proved to be consistently and reliably effective in interrupting the symptoms of this disease. Recent clinical and preclinical studies, using genetic screening and transgenic rodents, respectively, suggest a major role of the CRF1 gene, and the central expression of CRF1 receptor protein in determining an individual's risk of developing MDD. This gene is widely expressed in brain tissue, and regulates an organism's immediate and long-term responses to social and environmental stressors, which are primary contributors to MDD. This review presents the current state of knowledge on CRF physiology, and how it may influence the occurrence of symptoms associated with MDD. Additionally, this review presents findings from multiple laboratories that were presented as part of a symposium on this topic at the annual 2014 meeting of the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society (IBNS). The ideas and data presented in this review demonstrate the great progress that has been made over the past few decades in our understanding of MDD, and provide a pathway forward toward developing novel treatments and detection methods for this disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. β-Endorphin Neuronal Cell Transplant Reduces Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Hyperresponse to Lipopolysaccharide and Eliminates Natural Killer Cell Functional Deficiencies in Fetal Alcohol Exposed Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjieva, Nadka I.; Ortigüela, María; Arjona, Alvaro; Cheng, Xiaodong; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural killer (NK) cell dysfunction is associated with hyperresponse of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) to immune challenge and with a loss of β-endorphin (BEP) neurons in fetal alcohol exposed animals. Recently, we established a method to differentiate neural stem cells into BEP neurons using cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-elevating agents in cultures. Hence, we determined whether in vitro differentiated BEP neurons could be used for reversing the compromised stress response and immune function in fetal alcohol exposed rats. Methods To determine the effect of BEP neuron transplants on NK cell function, we implanted in vitro differentiated BEP neurons into the paraventricular nucleus of pubertal and adult male rats exposed to ethanol or control in utero. The functionality of transplanted BEP neurons was determined by measuring proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene expression in these cells and their effects on CRH gene expression under basal and after lipopolysaccaride (LPS) challenge. In addition, the effectiveness of BEP neurons in activating NK cell functions is determined by measuring NK cell cytolytic activity and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in the spleen and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) following cell transplantation. Results We showed here that when these in vitro differentiated BEP neurons were transplanted into the hypothalamus, they maintain biological functions by producing POMC and reducing the CRH neuronal response to the LPS challenge. BEP neuronal transplants significantly increased NK cell cytolytic activity in the spleen and in the PBMC and increased plasma levels of IFN-γ in control and fetal alcohol exposed rats. Conclusions These data further establish the BEP neuronal regulatory role in the control of CRH and NK cell cytolytic function and identify a possible novel therapy to treat stress hyper-response and immune deficiency in fetal alcohol exposed subjects. PMID:19320628

  4. Differential Activation in Amygdala and Plasma Noradrenaline during Colorectal Distention by Administration of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone between Healthy Individuals and Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yukari; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Kano, Michiko; Morishita, Joe; Hamaguchi, Toyohiro; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Ly, Huynh Giao; Dupont, Patrick; Tack, Jan; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Tashiro, Manabu; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often comorbids mood and anxiety disorders. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis, but it is not clear how CRH agonists change human brain responses to interoceptive stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that brain activation in response to colorectal distention is enhanced after CRH injection in IBS patients compared to healthy controls. Brain H215O- positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in 16 male IBS patients and 16 age-matched male controls during baseline, no distention, mild and intense distention of the colorectum using barostat bag inflation. Either CRH (2 μg/kg) or saline (1:1) was then injected intravenously and the same distention protocol was repeated. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), serum cortisol and plasma noradrenaline levels were measured at each stimulation. At baseline, CRH without colorectal distention induced more activation in the right amygdala in IBS patients than in controls. During intense distention after CRH injection, controls showed significantly greater activation than IBS patients in the right amygdala. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol secretion showed a significant interaction between drug (CRH, saline) and distention. Plasma noradrenaline at baseline significantly increased after CRH injection compared to before injection in IBS. Further, plasma noradrenaline showed a significant group (IBS, controls) by drug by distention interaction. Exogenous CRH differentially sensitizes brain regions of the emotional-arousal circuitry within the visceral pain matrix to colorectal distention and synergetic activation of noradrenergic function in IBS patients and healthy individuals.

  5. Noise stress changes mRNA expressions of corticotropin-releasing hormone, its receptors in amygdala, and anxiety-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraslan, Evren; Akyazi, Ibrahim; Erg L-Ekiz, Elif; Matur, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    Noise is a psychological, environmental stressor that activates limbic sites in the brain. Limbic sites such as the amygdala and the amygdaloid corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system play an important role in integrating stress response. We investigated the association between noise exposures, CRH-related molecules in the amygdala, and behavioral alterations. In total 54 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the following three groups: Control (CON), acute noise exposure (ANE), and chronic noise exposure (CNE). The ANE group was exposed to 100 dB white noise only once in 4 h and the CNE group was exposed to the same for 4 h per day for 30 days. Expression profiles of CRH and its receptors CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The same stress procedure was applied to the ANE and CNE groups for behavior testing. The anxiety responses of the animals after acute and chronic stress exposure were measured in the defensive withdrawal test. CNE upregulated CRH and CRH-R1 mRNA levels but downregulated CRH-R2 mRNA levels. ANE led to a decrease in both CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 expression. In the defensive withdrawal test, while the ANE increased, CNE reduced anxiety-like behaviors. The present study shows that the exposure of rats to white noise (100 dB) leads to behavioral alterations and molecule-specific changes in the CRH system. Behavioral alterations can be related to these molecular changes in the amygdala.

  6. Noise stress changes mRNA expressions of corticotropin-releasing hormone, its receptors in amygdala, and anxiety-related behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evren Eraslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is a psychological, environmental stressor that activates limbic sites in the brain. Limbic sites such as the amygdala and the amygdaloid corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH system play an important role in integrating stress response. We investigated the association between noise exposures, CRH-related molecules in the amygdala, and behavioral alterations. In total 54 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the following three groups: Control (CON, acute noise exposure (ANE, and chronic noise exposure (CNE. The ANE group was exposed to 100 dB white noise only once in 4 h and the CNE group was exposed to the same for 4 h per day for 30 days. Expression profiles of CRH and its receptors CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. The same stress procedure was applied to the ANE and CNE groups for behavior testing. The anxiety responses of the animals after acute and chronic stress exposure were measured in the defensive withdrawal test. CNE upregulated CRH and CRH-R1 mRNA levels but downregulated CRH-R2 mRNA levels. ANE led to a decrease in both CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 expression. In the defensive withdrawal test, while the ANE increased, CNE reduced anxiety-like behaviors. The present study shows that the exposure of rats to white noise (100 dB leads to behavioral alterations and molecule-specific changes in the CRH system. Behavioral alterations can be related to these molecular changes in the amygdala.

  7. Differential Activation in Amygdala and Plasma Noradrenaline during Colorectal Distention by Administration of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone between Healthy Individuals and Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Tanaka

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS often comorbids mood and anxiety disorders. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis, but it is not clear how CRH agonists change human brain responses to interoceptive stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that brain activation in response to colorectal distention is enhanced after CRH injection in IBS patients compared to healthy controls. Brain H215O- positron emission tomography (PET was performed in 16 male IBS patients and 16 age-matched male controls during baseline, no distention, mild and intense distention of the colorectum using barostat bag inflation. Either CRH (2 μg/kg or saline (1:1 was then injected intravenously and the same distention protocol was repeated. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, serum cortisol and plasma noradrenaline levels were measured at each stimulation. At baseline, CRH without colorectal distention induced more activation in the right amygdala in IBS patients than in controls. During intense distention after CRH injection, controls showed significantly greater activation than IBS patients in the right amygdala. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol secretion showed a significant interaction between drug (CRH, saline and distention. Plasma noradrenaline at baseline significantly increased after CRH injection compared to before injection in IBS. Further, plasma noradrenaline showed a significant group (IBS, controls by drug by distention interaction. Exogenous CRH differentially sensitizes brain regions of the emotional-arousal circuitry within the visceral pain matrix to colorectal distention and synergetic activation of noradrenergic function in IBS patients and healthy individuals.

  8. Noise stress changes mRNA expressions of corticotropin-releasing hormone, its receptors in amygdala, and anxiety-related behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Eraslan, Evren; Akyazi, Ibrahim; Erg?l-Ekiz, Elif; Matur, Erdal

    2015-01-01

    Noise is a psychological, environmental stressor that activates limbic sites in the brain. Limbic sites such as the amygdala and the amygdaloid corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system play an important role in integrating stress response. We investigated the association between noise exposures, CRH-related molecules in the amygdala, and behavioral alterations. In total 54 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the following three groups: Control (CON), acute noise exposure (ANE), and chro...

  9. Fetal Exposure to Placental Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone is Associated with Child Self-Reported Internalizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Mariann A.; Sandman, Curt A.; Glynn, Laura M.; Crippen, Cheryl; Davis, Elysia Poggi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fetal exposure to maternal prenatal stress hormones such as cortisol exerts influences on the developing nervous system that persist and include risk for internalizing symptoms later in life. Placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) is a feto-placental stress signal that also shapes fetal neurodevelopment and may be a more direct indicator of the fetal experience than maternal stress hormones. The programming effects of pCRH on child development are unknown. The current investigation examined associations between prenatal maternal and placental stress hormone exposures (maternal cortisol and pCRH) and child self-reported internalizing symptoms at age 5. Method Maternal plasma cortisol and pCRH levels were measured at 15, 19, 25, 31, and 36 weeks’ gestation in a sample of 83 women and their 91 children (8 sibling pairs from separate pregnancies), who were born full-term. Child self-reported internalizing symptoms at age 5 were obtained using scales of the Berkeley Puppet Interview. Results Placental CRH profiles (including elevations in mid-gestation) were associated with higher levels of internalizing symptoms at age 5. This effect was not explained by critical prenatal or postnatal influences, including obstetric risk, concurrent maternal psychological state, and family socio-economic status. Prenatal maternal cortisol was not significantly associated with child self-reported internalizing symptoms. Conclusions Findings suggest that elevated exposures to the feto-placental stress signal pCRH exert programming effects on the developing fetal central nervous system, with lasting consequences for child mental health. PMID:26855003

  10. Fetal exposure to placental corticotropin-releasing hormone is associated with child self-reported internalizing symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Mariann A; Sandman, Curt A; Glynn, Laura M; Crippen, Cheryl; Davis, Elysia Poggi

    2016-05-01

    Fetal exposure to maternal prenatal stress hormones such as cortisol exerts influences on the developing nervous system that persist and include risk for internalizing symptoms later in life. Placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) is a feto-placental stress signal that also shapes fetal neurodevelopment and may be a more direct indicator of the fetal experience than maternal stress hormones. The programming effects of pCRH on child development are unknown. The current investigation examined associations between prenatal maternal and placental stress hormone exposures (maternal cortisol and pCRH) and child self-reported internalizing symptoms at age 5. Maternal plasma cortisol and pCRH levels were measured at 15, 19, 25, 31, and 36 weeks' gestation in a sample of 83 women and their 91 children (8 sibling pairs from separate pregnancies), who were born full-term. Child self-reported internalizing symptoms at age 5 were obtained using scales of the Berkeley Puppet Interview. Placental CRH profiles (including elevations in mid-gestation) were associated with higher levels of internalizing symptoms at age 5. This effect was not explained by critical prenatal or postnatal influences, including obstetric risk, concurrent maternal psychological state, and family socio-economic status. Prenatal maternal cortisol was not significantly associated with child self-reported internalizing symptoms. Findings suggest that elevated exposures to the feto-placental stress signal pCRH exert programming effects on the developing fetal central nervous system, with lasting consequences for child mental health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The corticotropin releasing hormone-1 (CRH1) receptor antagonist pexacerfont in alcohol dependence: a randomized controlled experimental medicine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwako, Laura E; Spagnolo, Primavera A; Schwandt, Melanie L; Thorsell, Annika; George, David T; Momenan, Reza; Rio, Daniel E; Huestis, Marilyn; Anizan, Sebastien; Concheiro, Marta; Sinha, Rajita; Heilig, Markus

    2015-03-13

    Extensive preclinical data implicate corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), acting through its CRH1 receptor, in stress- and dependence-induced alcohol seeking. We evaluated pexacerfont, an orally available, brain penetrant CRH1 antagonist for its ability to suppress stress-induced alcohol craving and brain responses in treatment seeking alcohol-dependent patients in early abstinence. Fifty-four anxious alcohol-dependent participants were admitted to an inpatient unit at the NIH Clinical Center, completed withdrawal treatment, and were enrolled in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with pexacerfont (300 mg/day for 7 days, followed by 100 mg/day for 23 days). After reaching steady state, participants were assessed for alcohol craving in response to stressful or alcohol-related cues, neuroendocrine responses to these stimuli, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to alcohol-related stimuli or stimuli with positive or negative emotional valence. A separate group of 10 patients received open-label pexacerfont following the same dosing regimen and had cerebrospinal fluid sampled to estimate central nervous system exposure. Pexacerfont treatment had no effect on alcohol craving, emotional responses, or anxiety. There was no effect of pexacerfont on neural responses to alcohol-related or affective stimuli. These results were obtained despite drug levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that predict close to 90% central CRH1 receptor occupancy. CRH1 antagonists have been grouped based on their receptor dissociation kinetics, with pexacerfont falling in a category characterized by fast dissociation. Our results may indicate that antagonists with slow offset are required for therapeutic efficacy. Alternatively, the extensive preclinical data on CRH1 antagonism as a mechanism to suppress alcohol seeking may not translate to humans.

  12. Associations between Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Related Genes and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaka Sasaki

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common functional disorder with distinct features of stress-related pathophysiology. A key mediator of the stress response is corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH. Although some candidate genes have been identified in stress-related disorders, few studies have examined CRH-related gene polymorphisms. Therefore, we tested our hypothesis that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in CRH-related genes influence the features of IBS.In total, 253 individuals (123 men and 130 women participated in this study. They comprised 111 IBS individuals and 142 healthy controls. The SNP genotypes in CRH (rs28364015 and rs6472258 and CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP (rs10474485 were determined by direct sequencing and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The emotional states of the subjects were evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, and the Self-rating Depression Scale.Direct sequencing of the rs28364015 SNP of CRH revealed no genetic variation among the study subjects. There was no difference in the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of rs6472258 and rs10474485 between IBS individuals and controls. However, IBS subjects with diarrhea symptoms without the rs10474485 A allele showed a significantly higher emotional state score than carriers.These results suggest that the CRH and CRH-BP genes have no direct effect on IBS status. However, the CRH-BP SNP rs10474485 has some effect on IBS-related emotional abnormalities and resistance to psychosocial stress.

  13. Association of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) genetic variants with acute bronchodilator response in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Audrey H.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Lazarus, Ross; Xu, Jingsong; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Lima, John J.; Irvin, Charles G.; Hanrahan, John P.; Lange, Christoph; Weiss, Scott T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Corticotropin - releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) participates in smooth muscle relaxation response and may influence acute airway bronchodilator response to short – acting β2 agonist treatment of asthma. We aim to assess associations between genetic variants of CRHR2 and acute bronchodilator response in asthma. Methods We investigated 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms in CRHR2 for associations with acute bronchodilator response to albuterol in 607 Caucasian asthmatic subjects recruited as part of the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP). Replication was conducted in two Caucasian adult asthma cohorts – a cohort of 427 subjects enrolled in a completed clinical trial conducted by Sepracor Inc. (MA, USA) and a cohort of 152 subjects enrolled in the Clinical Trial of Low-Dose Theopylline and Montelukast (LODO) conducted by the American Lung Association Asthma Clinical Research Centers. Results Five variants were significantly associated with acute bronchodilator response in at least one cohort (p-value ≤ 0.05). Variant rs7793837 was associated in CAMP and LODO (p-value = 0.05 and 0.03, respectively) and haplotype blocks residing at the 5’ end of CRHR2 were associated with response in all three cohorts. Conclusion We report for the first time, at the gene level, replicated associations between CRHR2 and acute bronchodilator response. While no single variant was significantly associated in all three cohorts, the findings that variants at the 5’ end of CRHR2 are associated in each of three cohorts strongly suggest that the causative variants reside in this region and its genetic effect, although present, is likely to be weak. PMID:18408560

  14. The Nutrient and Energy Sensor Sirt1 Regulates the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis by Altering the Production of the Prohormone Convertase 2 (PC2) Essential in the Maturation of Corticotropin-releasing Hormone (CRH) from Its Prohormone in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toorie, Anika M; Cyr, Nicole E; Steger, Jennifer S; Beckman, Ross; Farah, George; Nillni, Eduardo A

    2016-03-11

    Understanding the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides and hormones in energy balance is paramount in the search for approaches to mitigate the obese state. Increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity leads to increased levels of glucocorticoids (GC) that are known to regulate body weight. The axis initiates the production and release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) from the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. Levels of active CRH peptide are dependent on the processing of its precursor pro-CRH by the action of two members of the family of prohormone convertases 1 and 2 (PC1 and PC2). Here, we propose that the nutrient sensor sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) regulates the production of CRH post-translationally by affecting PC2. Data suggest that Sirt1 may alter the preproPC2 gene directly or via deacetylation of the transcription factor Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1). Data also suggest that Sirt1 may alter PC2 via a post-translational mechanism. Our results show that Sirt1 levels in the PVN increase in rats fed a high fat diet for 12 weeks. Furthermore, elevated Sirt1 increased PC2 levels, which in turn increased the production of active CRH and GC. Collectively, this study provides the first evidence supporting the hypothesis that PVN Sirt1 activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and basal GC levels by enhancing the production of CRH through an increase in the biosynthesis of PC2, which is essential in the maturation of CRH from its prohormone, pro-CRH. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Cell Type-Specific Expression of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Binding Protein in GABAergic Interneurons in the Prefrontal Cortex

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    Kyle D. Ketchesin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone-binding protein (CRH-BP is a secreted glycoprotein that binds CRH with very high affinity to modulate CRH receptor activity. CRH-BP is widely expressed throughout the brain, with particularly high expression in regions such as the amygdala, hippocampus, ventral tegmental area and prefrontal cortex (PFC. Recent studies suggest a role for CRH-BP in stress-related psychiatric disorders and addiction, with the PFC being a potential site of interest. However, the molecular phenotype of CRH-BP-expressing cells in this region has not been well-characterized. In the current study, we sought to determine the cell type-specific expression of CRH-BP in the PFC to begin to define the neural circuits in which this key regulator is acting. To characterize the expression of CRH-BP in excitatory and/or inhibitory neurons, we utilized dual in situ hybridization to examine the cellular colocalization of CRH-BP mRNA with vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD mRNA in different subregions of the PFC. We show that CRH-BP is expressed predominantly in GABAergic interneurons of the PFC, as revealed by the high degree of colocalization (>85% between CRH-BP and GAD. To further characterize the expression of CRH-BP in this heterogenous group of inhibitory neurons, we examined the colocalization of CRH-BP with various molecular markers of GABAergic interneurons, including parvalbumin (PV, somatostatin (SST, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and cholecystokinin (CCK. We demonstrate that CRH-BP is colocalized predominantly with SST in the PFC, with lower levels of colocalization in PV- and CCK-expressing neurons. Our results provide a more comprehensive characterization of the cell type-specific expression of CRH-BP and begin to define its potential role within circuits of the PFC. These results will serve as the basis for future in vivo studies to manipulate CRH-BP in a cell type-specific manner to better

  16. Serum blood metabolite response and evaluation of select organ weight, histology and cardiac morphology of beef heifers exposed to a dual corticotropin-releasing hormone and vasopressin challenge following supplementation of

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to: 1) determine if supplementation of Zilpaterol Hydrochloride (ZH) altered select organ weights, histology and cardiac anatomical features at harvest and 2) determine if administration of a corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (VP) challenge followi...

  17. Electro-acupuncture relieves visceral sensitivity and decreases hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone levels in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huan-gan; Liu, Hui-rong; Zhang, Zeng-an; Zhou, En-hua; Wang, Xiao-mei; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Zheng; Zhou, Ci-li; Qi, Li; Ma, Xiao-peng

    2009-11-20

    Previous studies into electro-acupuncture (EA) treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have principally focused on the peripheral effects of EA in a rat model of IBS. It is not known whether EA exerts central effects in this rat model. We have examined the effects of EA on hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) levels in a rat model of IBS provoked by colorectal distension (CRD) and forelimb immobilization. EA was administered once daily to IBS model rats over a period of 7 d; untreated IBS rats and controls were also studied. The behavioral response to distension was rated according to the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) score; hypothalamic CRH levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. We report that EA treatment significantly decreased visceral sensitivity to CRD in this rat model. In treated animals, EA also decreased hypothalamic CRH to control levels. Reduced hypothalamic CRH levels may mediate the beneficial effects of EA in this rat IBS model.

  18. Mapping the human corticotropin releasing hormone binding protein gene (CRHBP) to the long arm of chromosome 5 (5q11.2-q13.3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vamvakopoulos, N.C. [Univ. of Thessaly School of Medicine, Larisa (Greece); Sioutopoulou, T.O. [Univ. of Athens Medical School (Greece); Durkin, S.A. [American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Unexpected stimulation or stress activates the heat shock protein (hsp) system at the cellular level and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis at the level of the whole organism. At the molecular level, these two systems communicate through the functional interaction between hsp90 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) system regulates the mammalian stress response by coordinating the activity of the HPA axis. It consists of the 41-amino-acid-long principal hypothalamic secretagogue for pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), CRH, its receptor (CRHR), and its binding protein (CRHBP). Because of its central role in the coordination of stress response and whole body homeostasis, the CRH system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neuroendocrine and psychiatric disease. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Is it really a matter of simple dualism? Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in body and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donny eJanssen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Physiological responses to stress coordinated by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA- axis are concerned with maintaining homeostasis in the presence of real or perceived challenges. Regulators of this axis are corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRF and CRF related neuropeptides, including urocortins (Ucn 1, 2 and 3. They mediate their actions by binding to CRF receptors (CRFR 1 and 2, which are located in several stress related brain regions. The prevailing theory has been that the initiation of and the recovery from an elicited stress response is coordinated by two elements, viz. the (mainly opposing, but well balanced actions of CRFR1 and CRFR2. Such a dualistic view suggests that CRF/CRFR1 controls the initiation of, and urocortins/CRFR2 mediate the recovery from stress to maintain body and mental health. Consequently, failed adaptation to stress can lead to neuropathology, including anxiety and depression. Recent literature, however, challenges such dualistic and complementary actions of CRFR1 and CRFR2, and suggests that stress recruits CRF system components in a brain area and neuron specific manner to promote adaptation as conditions dictate.

  20. Palatable Foods, Stress, and Energy Stores Sculpt Corticotropin-Releasing Factor, Adrenocorticotropin, and Corticosterone Concentrations after Restraint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foster, Michelle T; Warne, James P; Ginsberg, Abigail B; Horneman, Hart F; Pecoraro, Norman C; Akana, Susan F; Dallman, Mary F

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown reduced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal responses to both acute and chronic restraint stressors in rats allowed to ingest highly palatable foods (32% sucrose ± lard) prior to restraint...

  1. Immunohistochemical localization and functional characterization of somatostatin receptor subtypes in a corticotropin releasing hormonesecreting adrenal phaeochromocytoma: review of the literature and report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Trimarchi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Somastostatin receptors are frequently expressed in phaeochromocytoma but data on somatostatin receptor subtyping are scanty and the functional response to the somatostatin analogue octretide is still debated.We report an unusual case of pheochromocytoma, causing ectopic Cushing’s syndrome due to CRH production by the tumour cells, in a 50-yr-old woman. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an inhomogeneous, 9-cm mass in the right adrenal gland, and [111In-DTPA0] octreotide scintigraphy showed an abnormal uptake of the radiotracer in the right perirenal region, corresponding to the adrenal mass. The patient underwent laparoscopic surgery and formalin-fixed and paraffinembedded samples were studied. The tumour was extensively characterized by immunohistochemistry and somatostatin receptor (SSTRs subtypes expression was analyzed. Histological and immunohistochemical examination of the surgical specimens displayed a typical pheochromocytoma, which was found to be immunoreative to S-100, chromogranin A and neurofilaments. Immunostaining for SSTR subtypes showed a positive reaction for SSTR1, SSTR2A, SSTR2B, antisera on tumour cells. The intense and diffuse immunostaining for corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH antiserum indicated that Cushing’s disease was dependent on CRH overproduction by the pheochromocytoma, in which no immunostaining for adrenocorticotropic hormone was found. Our report confirms the heterogeneity of the pattern of SSTR expression in pheochromocytomas, and provide further evidence for functional SSTR subtype SSTR2a in a subgroup of pheochromocytomas, suggesting that these tumours may represent potential target for octreotide treatment.

  2. Immunohistochemical localization and functional characterization of somatostatin receptor subtypes in a corticotropin releasing hormonesecreting adrenal phaeochromocytoma: review of the literature and report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RM Ruggeri

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Somastostatin receptors are frequently expressed in phaeochromocytoma but data on somatostatin receptor subtyping are scanty and the functional response to the somatostatin analogue octretide is still debated.We report an unusual case of pheochromocytoma, causing ectopic Cushing’s syndrome due to CRH production by the tumour cells, in a 50-yr-old woman. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an inhomogeneous, 9-cm mass in the right adrenal gland, and [111In-DTPA0] octreotide scintigraphy showed an abnormal uptake of the radiotracer in the right perirenal region, corresponding to the adrenal mass. The patient underwent laparoscopic surgery and formalin-fixed and paraffinembedded samples were studied. The tumour was extensively characterized by immunohistochemistry and somatostatin receptor (SSTRs subtypes expression was analyzed. Histological and immunohistochemical examination of the surgical specimens displayed a typical pheochromocytoma, which was found to be immunoreative to S-100, chromogranin A and neurofilaments. Immunostaining for SSTR subtypes showed a positive reaction for SSTR1, SSTR2A, SSTR2B, antisera on tumour cells. The intense and diffuse immunostaining for corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH antiserum indicated that Cushing’s disease was dependent on CRH overproduction by the pheochromocytoma, in which no immunostaining for adrenocorticotropic hormone was found. Our report confirms the heterogeneity of the pattern of SSTR expression in pheochromocytomas, and provide further evidence for functional SSTR subtype SSTR2a in a subgroup of pheochromocytomas, suggesting that these tumours may represent potential target for octreotide treatment.

  3. Distribution of MT1 melatonin receptor immunoreactivity in the human hypothalamus and pituitary gland: colocalization of MT1 with vasopressin, oxytocin, and corticotropin-releasing hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Hui; Zhou, Jiang-Ning; Balesar, Rawien; Unmehopa, Unga; Bao, Aimin; Jockers, Ralf; Van Heerikhuize, Joop; Swaab, Dick F

    2006-12-20

    Melatonin is implicated in numerous physiological processes, including circadian rhythms, stress, and reproduction, many of which are mediated by the hypothalamus and pituitary. The physiological actions of melatonin are mainly mediated by melatonin receptors. We here describe the distribution of the melatonin receptor MT1 in the human hypothalamus and pituitary by immunocytochemistry. MT1 immunoreactivity showed a widespread pattern in the hypothalamus. In addition to the area of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a number of novel sites, including the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), periventricular nucleus, supraoptic nucleus (SON), sexually dimorphic nucleus, the diagonal band of Broca, the nucleus basalis of Meynert, infundibular nucleus, ventromedial and dorsomedial nucleus, tuberomamillary nucleus, mamillary body, and paraventricular thalamic nucleus were observed to have neuronal MT1 receptor expression. No staining was observed in the nucleus tuberalis lateralis and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. The MT1 receptor was colocalized with some vasopressin (AVP) neurons in the SCN, colocalized with some parvocellular and magnocellular AVP and oxytocine (OXT) neurons in the PVN and SON, and colocalized with some parvocellular corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons in the PVN. In the pituitary, strong MT1 expression was observed in the pars tuberalis, while a weak staining was found in the posterior and anterior pituitary. These findings provide a neurobiological basis for the participation of melatonin in the regulation of various hypothalamic and pituitary functions. The colocalization of MT1 and CRH suggests that melatonin might directly modulate the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the PVN, which may have implications for stress conditions such as depression.

  4. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone As the Homeostatic Rheostat of Feto-Maternal Symbiosis and Developmental Programming In Utero and Neonatal Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viridiana Alcántara-Alonso

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A balanced interaction between the homeostatic mechanisms of mother and the developing organism during pregnancy and in early neonatal life is essential in order to ensure optimal fetal development, ability to respond to various external and internal challenges, protection from adverse programming, and safeguard maternal care availability after parturition. In the majority of pregnancies, this relationship is highly effective resulting in successful outcomes. However, in a number of pathological settings, perturbations of the maternal homeostasis disrupt this symbiosis and initiate adaptive responses with unpredictable outcomes for the fetus or even the neonate. This may lead to development of pathological phenotypes arising from developmental reprogramming involving interaction of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental-driven pathways, sometimes with acute consequences (e.g., growth impairment and sometimes delayed (e.g., enhanced susceptibility to disease that last well into adulthood. Most of these adaptive mechanisms are activated and controlled by hormones of the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis under the influence of placental steroid and peptide hormones. In particular, the hypothalamic peptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH plays a key role in feto-maternal communication by orchestrating and integrating a series of neuroendocrine, immune, metabolic, and behavioral responses. CRH also regulates neural networks involved in maternal behavior and this determines efficiency of maternal care and neonate interactions. This review will summarize our current understanding of CRH actions during the perinatal period, focusing on the physiological roles for both mother and offspring and also how external challenges can alter CRH actions and potentially impact on fetus/neonate health.

  5. Modified dexamethasone suppression-corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test: A pilot study of young healthy volunteers and implications for alcoholism research in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Leo; Cooper, Thomas B; Mann, J John; Oquendo, Maria A

    2006-01-01

    The key neuroendocrine component of a response to stress is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system. Abnormalities in the HPA system have been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcoholism and suicide. The dexamethasone suppression test (DST) is the most frequently used test to assess HPA-system function in psychiatric disorders. This neuroendocrine test consists of the administration of a low dose of dexamethasone at 11 pm and the measurement of cortisol levels at one or more time points on the following day. After corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) became available for clinical studies, the DST was combined with CRH administration. In this test, patients are pretreated with a single dose of dexamethasone at 11 pm and receive human CRH intravenously at 3 pm the following day. The resulting DST-CRH test proved to be much more sensitive in detecting HPA system alterations than the DST. We have modified the DST-CRH test and used ovine CRH instead of human CRH in a pilot study of a group of young healthy volunteers. Results indicated that it produces results similar to the results obtained with human CRH. This suggests that ovine CRH can be used in psychiatric research. Alcoholism is associated with abnormalities in HPA function. Nonalcoholic subjects with a family history of alcoholism exhibit lower plasma ACTH and beta-endorphin as well as lower ACTH, cortisol, and beta-endorphin responses to psychological stress and CRH stimulation. This suggests that in children of alcoholics, alterations in the mechanisms that regulate HPA axis activity predate the development of alcohol dependence and may be considered inherited traits. Therefore, studies of the HPA system in persons at risk for alcoholism may help understand the neurobiological mechanisms of predisposition to alcoholism.

  6. The value of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH test for differential diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome

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    Penezić Zorana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome (CS remain considerable challenge in endocrinology. For more than 20 years, CRH has been widely used as differential diagnostic test. Following the CRH administration, the majority of patients with ACTH secreting pituitary adenoma show a significant rise of plasma cortisol and ACTH, whereas those with ectopic ACTH secretion characteristically do not. Objective The aim of our study was to assess the value of CRF test for differential diagnosis of CS using the ROC (receiver operating characteristic curve method. Method A total of 30 patients with CS verified by pathological examination and postoperative testing were evaluated. CRH test was performed within diagnostic procedures. ACTH secreting pituitary adenoma was found in 18, ectopic ACTH secretion in 3 and cortisol secreting adrenal adenoma in 9 of all patients with CS. Cortisol and ACTH were determined -15, 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min. after i.v. administration of 100μg of ovine CRH. Cortisol and ACTH were determined by commercial RIA. Statistical data processing was done by ROC curve analysis. Due to small number, the patients with ectopic ACTH secretion were excluded from test evaluation by ROC curve method. Results In evaluated subgroups, basal cortisol was (1147.3±464.3 vs. 1589.8±296.3 vs. 839.2±405.6 nmol/L; maximal stimulated cortisol (1680.3±735.5 vs. 1749.0±386.6 vs. 906.1±335.0 nmol/L; and maximal increase as a percent of basal cortisol (49.1±36.9 vs. 9.0±7.6 vs. 16.7±37.3 %. Consequently, basal ACTH was (100.9 ±85.0 vs. 138.0±123.7 vs. 4.8±4.3 pg/mL and maximal stimulated ACTH (203.8 ±160.1 vs. 288.0±189.5 vs. 7.4±9.2 pg/mL. For cortisol, determination area under ROC curve was 0.815±0.083 (CI 95% 0.652-0.978. For cortisol increase cut-off level of 20%, test sensitivity was 83%, with specificity of 78%. For ACTH, determination area under ROC curve was 0.637±0.142 (CI 95% 0

  7. Endocrine and hematological responses of beef heifers divergently ranked for residual feed intake following a bovine corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A K; Earley, B; McGee, M; Fahey, A G; Kenny, D A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if beef heifers divergently ranked on phenotypic residual feed intake (RFI) differed in their physiological stress response to an exogenous bovine corticotropin-releasing hormone (bCRH) challenge. Yearling Limousin × Friesian heifers ( = 86) were ranked by RFI. The 15 highest (mean 0.66 kg DM/d; high RFI) and 15 lowest (mean -0.72 kg DM/d; low RFI) ranking animals were used for this study. During the study period, heifers (mean age 485 ± 13 d; mean BW 408 ± 31.4 kg) were housed in a slatted-floor facility. To facilitate intensive blood collection, heifers were fitted aseptically with indwelling jugular catheters. All heifers received dexamethasone (DEX; 20 µg/kg BW i.m.) 12 h before the bCRH challenge (d 0). Heparinized blood samples were collected at -60 and 0 min before administration of DEX, and 12 h after DEX administration. Following DEX administration, cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) concentrations similarly decreased ( ≥ 0.22) between high and low RFI groups. The response of the HPA axis to a standardized dose of bCRH (0.3 μg/kg BW) was examined. On d 0, serial blood samples were collected at -20, 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 270, 330, and 390 min relative to the time of bCRH administration (0 min) and were analyzed for plasma cortisol and DHEA concentrations. Blood hematology variables were also determined at -20, 0, 20, 80, 150, 270, 330, and 390 min relative to bCRH administration. Neither an RFI × sampling time interaction nor a direct effect of RFI were detected ( ≥ 0.36) for plasma cortisol, DHEA concentrations, or cortisol:DHEA ratio. An effect of sample time was observed for cortisol ( change in cortisol and DHEA concentrations following bCRH administration were not different ( ≥ 0.20) between the high and low RFI phenotypes. Similarly, an effect of RFI was not evident ( ≥ 0.16) for any of the hematology variables examined including neutrophil, lymphocyte, and

  8. Deducing corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 signaling networks from gene expression data by usage of genetic algorithms and graphical Gaussian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trümbach, Dietrich; Graf, Cornelia; Pütz, Benno; Kühne, Claudia; Panhuysen, Marcus; Weber, Peter; Holsboer, Florian; Wurst, Wolfgang; Welzl, Gerhard; Deussing, Jan M

    2010-11-19

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a hallmark of complex and multifactorial psychiatric diseases such as anxiety and mood disorders. About 50-60% of patients with major depression show HPA axis dysfunction, i.e. hyperactivity and impaired negative feedback regulation. The neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and its receptor type 1 (CRHR1) are key regulators of this neuroendocrine stress axis. Therefore, we analyzed CRH/CRHR1-dependent gene expression data obtained from the pituitary corticotrope cell line AtT-20, a well-established in vitro model for CRHR1-mediated signal transduction. To extract significantly regulated genes from a genome-wide microarray data set and to deduce underlying CRHR1-dependent signaling networks, we combined supervised and unsupervised algorithms. We present an efficient variable selection strategy by consecutively applying univariate as well as multivariate methods followed by graphical models. First, feature preselection was used to exclude genes not differentially regulated over time from the dataset. For multivariate variable selection a maximum likelihood (MLHD) discriminant function within GALGO, an R package based on a genetic algorithm (GA), was chosen. The topmost genes representing major nodes in the expression network were ranked to find highly separating candidate genes. By using groups of five genes (chromosome size) in the discriminant function and repeating the genetic algorithm separately four times we found eleven genes occurring at least in three of the top ranked result lists of the four repetitions. In addition, we compared the results of GA/MLHD with the alternative optimization algorithms greedy selection and simulated annealing as well as with the state-of-the-art method random forest. In every case we obtained a clear overlap of the selected genes independently confirming the results of MLHD in combination with a genetic algorithm. With two unsupervised algorithms

  9. Deducing corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 signaling networks from gene expression data by usage of genetic algorithms and graphical Gaussian models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holsboer Florian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is a hallmark of complex and multifactorial psychiatric diseases such as anxiety and mood disorders. About 50-60% of patients with major depression show HPA axis dysfunction, i.e. hyperactivity and impaired negative feedback regulation. The neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH and its receptor type 1 (CRHR1 are key regulators of this neuroendocrine stress axis. Therefore, we analyzed CRH/CRHR1-dependent gene expression data obtained from the pituitary corticotrope cell line AtT-20, a well-established in vitro model for CRHR1-mediated signal transduction. To extract significantly regulated genes from a genome-wide microarray data set and to deduce underlying CRHR1-dependent signaling networks, we combined supervised and unsupervised algorithms. Results We present an efficient variable selection strategy by consecutively applying univariate as well as multivariate methods followed by graphical models. First, feature preselection was used to exclude genes not differentially regulated over time from the dataset. For multivariate variable selection a maximum likelihood (MLHD discriminant function within GALGO, an R package based on a genetic algorithm (GA, was chosen. The topmost genes representing major nodes in the expression network were ranked to find highly separating candidate genes. By using groups of five genes (chromosome size in the discriminant function and repeating the genetic algorithm separately four times we found eleven genes occurring at least in three of the top ranked result lists of the four repetitions. In addition, we compared the results of GA/MLHD with the alternative optimization algorithms greedy selection and simulated annealing as well as with the state-of-the-art method random forest. In every case we obtained a clear overlap of the selected genes independently confirming the results of MLHD in combination with a genetic

  10. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in stress and disease: A review of literature and treatment perspectives with special emphasis on psychiatric disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohg, K.; Hageman, I.; Jorgensen, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    The CRF family of neuropeptides and receptors is involved in a variety of stress responses, in the regulation of appetite, metabolic and inflammatory processes as well as intestinal movements. From a primarily psychiatric perspective, the present paper reviews the literature on its anatomy......, physiology and its involvement in psychiatric, neurological and inflammatory diseases. Finally, recent developments in the pharmacological aspects of CRF in these diseases are reviewed Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  11. Enduring Effects Of Traumatic Stress On Brain Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) Systems: Molecular and Neuropharmacologic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    is (Flanagan-Cato, 2003), defensive aggression (Can- eras et al., 1994; Canteras, 2002), and innate affective eactions to pain (Borszcz, 2006). The...to generation of the affective dimension of pain . Pain 123:155–168. rown ER, Sawchenko PE (1997) Hypophysiotropic CRF neurons display a sustained...stimulates secretion of corticotropin and beta- endorphin . Science 213:1394–1397. an Pett K, Viau V, Bittencourt JC, Chan RK, Li HY, Arias C, Prins GS, Perrin

  12. The corticotropin-releasing factor-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and kinin neuropeptides modulate desiccation and starvation tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannell, Elizabeth; Dornan, Anthony J.; Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin

    2016-01-01

    Malpighian tubules are critical organs for epithelial fluid transport and stress tolerance in insects, and are under neuroendocrine control by multiple neuropeptides secreted by identified neurons. Here, we demonstrate roles for CRF-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and Drosophila melanogaster kinin...... (Drome-kinin, DK) in desiccation and starvation tolerance. Gene expression and labelled DH44 ligand binding data, as well as highly selective knockdowns and/or neuronal ablations of DH44 in neurons of the pars intercerebralis and DH44 receptor (DH44-R2) in Malpighian tubule principal cells, indicate...... that suppression of DH44 signalling improves desiccation tolerance of the intact fly. Drome-kinin receptor, encoded by the leucokinin receptor gene, LKR, is expressed in DH44 neurons as well as in stellate cells of the Malpighian tubules. LKR knockdown in DH44-expressing neurons reduces Malpighian tubule...

  13. Solubilization of high affinity corticotropin-releasing factor receptors from rat brain: Characterization of an active digitonin-solubilized receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; Zaczek, R.; Pearsall, D.M.; De Souza, E.B. (National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The binding characteristics of CRF receptors in rat frontal cerebral cortex membranes solubilized in 1% digitonin were determined. The binding of (125I)Tyro-ovine CRF ((125I)oCRF) to solubilized membrane proteins was dependent on incubation time, temperature, and protein concentration, was saturable and of high affinity, and was absent in boiled tissue. The solubilized receptors retained their high affinity for (125I) oCRF in the solubilized state, exhibiting a dissociation constant (KD) of approximately 200 pM, as determined by direct binding saturation isotherms. Solubilized CRF receptors maintained the rank order of potencies for various related and unrelated CRF peptides characteristic of the membrane CRF receptor: rat/human CRF congruent to ovine CRF congruent to Nle21,38-rat CRF greater than alpha-helical oCRF-(9-41) greater than oCRF-(7-41) much greater than vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, or the substance-P antagonist. Furthermore, the absolute potencies (Ki values) for the various CRF-related peptides in solubilized receptors were almost identical to those observed in the membrane preparations, indicating that the CRF receptor retained its high affinity binding capacity in the digitonin-solubilized state. Chemical affinity cross-linking of digitonin-solubilized rat cortical membrane proteins revealed a specifically labeled protein with an apparent mol wt of 58,000 which was similar to the labeled protein in native membrane homogenates. Although solubilized CRF receptors retained their high affinity for agonists, their sensitivity for guanine nucleotide was lost. Size exclusion chromatography substantiated these results, demonstrating that in the presence or absence of guanine nucleotides, (125I)oCRF labeled the same size receptor complex.

  14. Effects of naltrexone, duloxetine, and a corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor antagonist on binge-like alcohol drinking in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Dong; Gilpin, Nicholas W.; Heather N Richardson; Rivier, Catherine L; Koob, George F.

    2008-01-01

    A ‘binge’ is defined by National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism as an excessive pattern of alcohol drinking that produces blood–alcohol levels (BALs) greater than 0.08 g% within a 2-h period and may or may not be associated with dependence. The purpose of this investigation was to explore the effects of several neuropharmacological agents in an animal model in which outbred rats voluntarily and orally self-administer pharmacologically meaningful alcohol doses that produce BALs ≥ 0....

  15. Identification of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) target cells and effects of dexamethasone on binding in anterior pituitary using a fluorescent analog of CRF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, J; Billestrup, Nils; Perrin, M

    1986-01-01

    . Fluorescence was eliminated by coincubation with a 200-fold excess of unlabeled CRF. Treatment with dexamethasone (10(-9)-10(-7) M) decreased visible fluorescence in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrate the utility of a fluorescent CRF analog for identification of cells with specific CRF...

  16. Hyperresponsiveness of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to combined dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge in female borderline personality disorder subjects with a history of sustained childhood abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinne, Thomas; de Kloet, E. Ronald; Wouters, Luuk; Goekoop, Jaap G.; DeRijk, Roel H.; van den Brink, Wim

    2002-01-01

    Background: High coincidence of childhood abuse, major depressive disorder (MDD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been reported in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Animals exposed to early trauma show increased stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis

  17. MyD88 and TRIF mediate the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP induced corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH expression in JEG3 choriocarcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocak Hande

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classically protein kinase A (PKA and transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1 mediate the cyclic AMP (cAMP induced-corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH expression in the placenta. However enteric Gram (- bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS may also induce-CRH expression via Toll like receptor (TLR4 and its adaptor molecule Myd88. Here we investigated the role of MyD88, TRIF and IRAK2 on cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells in the absence of LPS/TLR4 stimulation. Methods JEG3 cells were transfected with CRH-luciferase and Beta-galactosidase expression vectors and either empty or dominant-negative (DN-MyD88, DN-TRIF or DN-IRAK2 vectors using Fugene6 (Roche. cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation was examined by using a luminometer and luciferase assay. Calorimetric Beta-galactosidase assays were performed to correct for transfection efficiency. Luciferase expression vectors of cAMP-downstream molecules, CRE and AP-1, were used to further examine the signaling cascades. Results cAMP stimulation induced AP-1 and CRE promoter expression and led to dose-dependent CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells. Inhibition of MyD88 signaling blocked cAMP-induced CRE and CRH promoter activation. Inhibition of TRIF signaling blocked cAMP-induced CRH but not CRE expression, while inhibition of IRAK2 did not have an effect on cAMP-induced CRH expression. Conclusion MyD88 and TRIF exert direct regulatory effect on cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells in the absence of infection. MyD88 most likely interacts with molecules upstream of IRAK2 to regulate cAMP-induced CRH expression.

  18. Antidepressants blunt the effects of inescapable stress on male mating behaviour and decrease corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordner, A P; Herwood, M B; Helmreich, D L; Parfitt, D B

    2004-07-01

    Stress decreases sexual activity. However, emerging research suggests that the psychological aspect of control prevents the detrimental effects of stress on male mating behaviour. The present study examined the effects of chronic escapable/inescapable stress on mating behaviour in the male Syrian hamster. Additionally, the ability of the antidepressant clomipramine to prevent the adverse effects of stress on mating behaviour was explored. In this paradigm, two groups received the same electric footshock stress, but differed in the psychological aspect of control. Cohorts were divided into two groups. One group received clomipramine via a sugar water solution while the other received plain sugar water. Mating behaviour was quantified before and after 12 consecutive days of stress. The morning following the final stress and behaviour session, trunk blood and brains were collected to assess: (i) plasma concentrations of testosterone and glucocorticoids and (ii) corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA expression within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). In the drug-free groups, several aspects of mating behaviour were disrupted by inescapable but not escapable stress, including anogenital investigation before the first ejaculation and time of first ejaculation. Additionally, both escapable and inescapable stress caused a decrease in total hit rate compared to the no-stress control group. Unlike the sugar-water treated animals, hamsters in either stress condition receiving clomipramine showed no differences in anogenital investigation, time of first ejaculation, hit rate, or any other aspect of mating behaviour measured, compared to the clomipramine no-stress control males. The stress-induced inhibition of mating behaviour could not be explained by changes in baseline plasma concentrations of testosterone or total glucocorticoids; these values did not vary between any of the six treatment groups. It was found that clomipramine lowers CRH m

  19. Diminished Expression of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor 2 in Human Colon Cancer Promotes Tumor Growth and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition via Persistent Interleukin-6/Stat3 SignalingSummary

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    Jorge A. Rodriguez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Chronic inflammation promotes development and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC. We explored the distribution of the corticotropin-releasing-hormone (CRH family of receptors and ligands in CRC and their contribution in tumor growth and oncogenic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Methods: The mRNA expression of CRH-family members was analyzed in CRC (n = 56 and control (n = 46 samples, seven CRC cell lines, and normal NCM460 cells. Immunohistochemical detection of CRHR2 was performed in 20 CRC and five normal tissues. Cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were compared between urocortin-2 (Ucn2-stimulated parental and CRHR2-overexpressing (CRHR2+ cells in the absence or presence of interleukin-6 (IL-6. CRHR2/Ucn2-targeted effects on tumor growth and EMT were validated in SW620-xenograft mouse models. Results: CRC tissues and cell lines showed decreased mRNA and protein CRHR2 expression compared with controls and NCM460 cells, respectively. The opposite trend was shown for Ucn2. CRHR2/Ucn2 signaling inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and colony formation in CRC-CRHR2+ cells. In vivo, SW620-CRHR2+ xenografts showed decreased growth, reduced expression of EMT-inducers, and elevated levels of EMT-suppressors. IL-1b, IL-6, and IL-6R mRNAs were diminished in CRC-CRHR2+ cells, while CRHR2/Ucn2 signaling inhibited IL-6-mediated Stat3 activation, invasion, migration, and expression of downstream targets acting as cell cycle– and EMT-inducers. Expression of cell cycle– and EMT-suppressors was augmented in IL-6/Ucn2-stimulated CRHR2+ cells. In patients, CRHR2 mRNA expression was inversely correlated with IL-6R and vimentin levels and metastasis occurrence, while positively associated with E-cadherin expression and overall survival. Conclusions: CRHR2 down-regulation in CRC supports tumor expansion and spread through maintaining persistent inflammation and constitutive Stat3 activation

  20. A mechanistic hypothesis of the factors that enhance vulnerability to nicotine use in females

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dell, Laura E.; Torres, Oscar V.

    2013-01-01

    Women are particularly more vulnerable to tobacco use than men. This review proposes a unifying hypothesis that females experience greater rewarding effects of nicotine and more intense stress produced by withdrawal than males. We also provide a neural framework whereby estrogen promotes greater rewarding effects of nicotine in females via enhanced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). During withdrawal, we suggest that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) stress systems are sensi...

  1. Hepatic vagotomy alters limbic and hypothalamic neuropeptide responses to insulin-dependent diabetes and voluntary lard ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    la Fleur, Susanne E.; Manalo, Sotara L.; Roy, Monica; Houshyar, Hani; Dallman, Mary F.

    2005-01-01

    Hypothalamic anorexigenic [corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and proopiomelanocortin] peptides decrease and the orexigen, neuropeptide Y, increases with diabetic hyperphagia. However, when diabetic rats are allowed to eat lard (saturated fat) as well as chow, both caloric intake and hypothalamic

  2. Increased rheumatoid factor and deep venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Olesen, Christine L; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of deep venous thrombosis is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that increased concentrations of rheumatoid factor are associated with increased risk of deep venous thrombosis in individuals without autoimmune rheumatic disease in the ge......BACKGROUND: The risk of deep venous thrombosis is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that increased concentrations of rheumatoid factor are associated with increased risk of deep venous thrombosis in individuals without autoimmune rheumatic disease...... in the general population. METHODS: We included 54628 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1981-83) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (2004-12), all with a measured concentration of IgM rheumatoid factor and without autoimmune rheumatic disease or venous thromboembolism. The main outcome...... was incident deep venous thrombosis. There were no losses to follow-up. RESULTS: During 368381 person-years, 670 individuals developed deep venous thrombosis. A rheumatoid factor concentration ≥ vs

  3. The corticotropin-releasing factor-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and kinin neuropeptides modulate desiccation and starvation tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannell, Elizabeth; Dornan, Anthony J.; Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin

    2016-01-01

    Malpighian tubules are critical organs for epithelial fluid transport and stress tolerance in insects, and are under neuroendocrine control by multiple neuropeptides secreted by identified neurons. Here, we demonstrate roles for CRF-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and Drosophila melanogaster kini...

  4. Increased CRF signaling in a ventral tegmental area-interpeduncular nucleus-medial habenula circuit induces anxiety during nicotine withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao-Shea, Rubing; DeGroot, Steven R.; Liu, Liwang; Vallaster, Markus; Pang, Xueyan; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Rando, Oliver J.; Martin, Gilles E.; George, Olivier; Gardner, Paul D.; Tapper, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Increased anxiety is a predominant withdrawal symptom in abstinent smokers, yet the neuroanatomical and molecular bases underlying it are unclear. Here, we show that withdrawal-induced anxiety increases activity of neurons in the interpeduncular intermediate (IPI), a subregion of the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). IPI activation during nicotine withdrawal was mediated by increased corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor-1 expression and signaling, which modulated glutamatergic input from the medial habenula (MHb). Pharmacological blockade of IPN CRF1 receptors or optogenetic silencing of MHb input reduced IPI activation and alleviated withdrawal-induced anxiety; whereas IPN CRF infusion in mice increased anxiety. We identified a meso-interpeduncular circuit, consisting of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons projecting to the IPN, as a potential source of CRF. Knock-down of CRF synthesis in the VTA prevented IPI activation and anxiety during nicotine withdrawal. These data indicate that increased CRF receptor signaling within a VTA-IPN-MHb circuit triggers anxiety during nicotine withdrawal. PMID:25898242

  5. Adolescent Activity-Based Anorexia Increases Anxiety-Like Behavior in Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzig, Kimberly P.; Hargrave, Sara L.

    2010-01-01

    Activity-based anorexia is a paradigm that induces increased physical activity, reduced food intake, and heightened activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in adult rats. To investigate whether experience with activity-based anorexia produced enduring effects on brain and behavior, female adolescent rats experienced activity-based anorexia during adolescence and were tested in adulthood for anxiety-like behavior on an elevated plus maze and in an open field. Analysis of elevated plus maze and open field behavior in adulthood revealed that rats that experienced activity-based anorexia during adolescence, but not rats that were simply food restricted, displayed increased anxiety-like behavior in adulthood. Plasma corticosterone and expression levels of corticotropin- releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and in the central nucleus of the amygdala were significantly elevated in adult rats that had undergone activity-based anorexia in adolescence in response to the open field exposure, as compared to control rats. These data demonstrate enduring effects of adolescent activity-based anorexia on anxiety-like behavior and neuroendocrine factors critical in stress responsivity in adulthood. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activity-based anorexia during adolescence serves as a model whereby prolonged anxiety is induced, allowing for evaluation of the behavioral and neural correlates of mediating anxiety-like behaviors in adulthood. PMID:20566408

  6. Adolescent activity-based anorexia increases anxiety-like behavior in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzig, Kimberly P; Hargrave, Sara L

    2010-09-01

    Activity-based anorexia is a paradigm that induces increased physical activity, reduced food intake, and heightened activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in adult rats. To investigate whether experience with activity-based anorexia produced enduring effects on brain and behavior, female adolescent rats experienced activity-based anorexia during adolescence and were tested in adulthood for anxiety-like behavior on an elevated plus maze and in an open field. Analysis of elevated plus maze and open field behavior in adulthood revealed that rats that experienced activity-based anorexia during adolescence, but not rats that were simply food restricted, displayed increased anxiety-like behavior in adulthood. Plasma corticosterone and expression levels of corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and in the central nucleus of the amygdala were significantly elevated in adult rats that had undergone activity-based anorexia in adolescence in response to the open field exposure, as compared to control rats. These data demonstrate enduring effects of adolescent activity-based anorexia on anxiety-like behavior and neuroendocrine factors critical in stress responsivity in adulthood. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activity-based anorexia during adolescence serves as a model whereby prolonged anxiety is induced, allowing for evaluation of the behavioral and neural correlates of mediating anxiety-like behaviors in adulthood. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CRF1 receptor activation increases the response of neurons in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala to afferent stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The basolateral nucleus (BLA of the amygdala contributes to the consolidation of memories for emotional or stressful events. The nucleus contains a high density of CRF1 receptors that are activated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF. Modulation of the excitability of neurons in the BLA by CRF may regulate the immediate response to stressful events and the formation of associated memories. In the present study, CRF was found to increase the amplitude of field potentials recorded in the BLA following excitatory afferent stimulation, in vitro. The increase was mediated by CRF1 receptors, since it could be blocked by the selective, non-peptide antagonists, NBI30775 and NBI35583, but not by the CRF2-selective antagonist, astressin 2B. Furthermore, the CRF2-selective agonist, urocortin II had no effect on field potential amplitude. The increase induced by CRF was long-lasting, could not be reversed by subsequent administration of NBI35583, and required the activation of protein kinase C. This effect of CRF in the BLA may be important for increasing the salience of aversive stimuli under stressful conditions, and for enhancing the consolidation of associated memories. The results provide further justification for studying the efficacy of selective antagonists of the CRF1 receptor to reduce memory formation linked to emotional or traumatic events, and suggest that these compounds might be useful as prophylactic treatment for stress-related illness such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

  8. CRH Affects the Phenotypic Expression of Sepsis-Associated Virulence Factors by Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 1 In vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette G. Ngo Ndjom

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a life-threatening health condition caused by infectious pathogens of the respiratory tract, and accounts for 28–50% of annual deaths in the US alone. Current treatment regimen advocates the use of corticosteroids as adjunct treatment with antibiotics, for their broad inhibitory effect on the activity and production of pro-inflammatory mediators. However, despite their use, corticosteroids have not proven to be able to reverse the death incidence among septic patients. We have previously demonstrated the potential for neuroendocrine factors to directly influence Streptococcus pneumoniae virulence, which may in turn mediate disease outcome leading to sepsis and septic shock. The current study investigated the role of Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH in mediating key markers of pneumococcal virulence as important phenotypic determinants of sepsis and septic shock risks. In vitro cultures of serotype 1 pneumococcal strain with CRH promoted growth rate, increased capsule thickness and penicillin resistance, as well as induced pneumolysin gene expression. These results thus provide significant insights of CRH–pathogen interactions useful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of neuroendocrine factor's role in the onset of community acquired pneumonias (CAP, sepsis and septic shock.

  9. Role of stress, corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) and amygdala plasticity in chronic anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Anantha; Truitt, William; Rainnie, Donald; Sajdyk, Tammy

    2005-12-01

    Stress initiates a series of neuronal responses that prepare an organism to adapt to new environmental challenges. However, chronic stress may lead to maladaptive responses that can result in psychiatric syndromes such as anxiety and depressive disorders. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) has been identified as a key neuropeptide responsible for initiating many of the endocrine, autonomic and behavioral responses to stress. The amygdala expresses high concentrations of CRF receptors and is itself a major extrahypothalamic source of CRF containing neurons. Within the amygdala, the basolateral nucleus (BLA) has an important role in regulating anxiety and affective responses. During periods of stress, CRF is released into the amygdala and local CRF receptor activation has been postulated as a substrate for stress-induced alterations in affective behavior. Previous studies have suggested that synaptic plasticity in the BLA contributes to mechanisms underlying long-term changes in the regulation of affective behaviors. Several studies have shown that acute glutamate receptor-mediated activation, by either GABA-mediated disinhibition or CRF-mediated excitation, induces long-term synaptic plasticity and increases the excitability of BLA neurons. This review summarizes some of the data supporting the hypotheses that stress induced plasticity within the amygdala may be a critical step in the pathophysiology of the development of chronic anxiety states. It is further proposed that such a change in the limbic neural circuitry is involved in the transition from normal vigilance responses to pathological anxiety, leading to syndromes such as panic and post-traumatic stress disorders.

  10. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Kate K; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of 24 h Fasting on Gene Expression of AMPK, Appetite Regulation Peptides and Lipometabolism Related Factors in the Hypothalamus of Broiler Chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The 5’-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK is a key part of a kinase-signaling cascade that acts to maintain energy homeostasis. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the possible effects of fasting and refeeding on the gene expression of hypothalamic AMPK, some appetitive regulating peptides and lipid metabolism related enzymes. Seven-day-old male broiler (Arbor Acres chicks were allocated into three equal treatments: fed ad libitum (control; fasted for 24 h; fasted for 24 h and then refed for 24 h. Compared with the control, the hypothalamic gene expression of AMPKα2, AMPKβ1, AMPKβ2, AMPKγ1, Ste20-related adaptor protein β (STRADβ, mouse protein 25α (MO25α and agouti-related peptide (AgRP were increased after fasting for 24 h. No significant difference among treatments was observed in mRNA levels of AMPKα1, AMPKγ2, LKB1 and neuropeptide Y (NPY. However, the expression of MO25β, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, ghrelin, fatty acid synthase (FAS, acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACCα, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1 and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1 were significantly decreased. The present results indicated that 24 h fasting altered gene expression of AMPK subunits, appetite regulation peptides and lipometabolism related factors in chick’s hypothalamus; the hypothalamic FAS signaling pathway might be involved in the AMPK regulated energy homeostasis and/or appetite regulation in poultry.

  12. Alcohol consumption increases locomotion in an open field and induces Fos-immunoreactivity in reward and approach/withdrawal-related neurocircuitries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wscieklica, Tatiana; de Barros Viana, Milena; Le Sueur Maluf, Luciana; Pouza, Kathlein Cristiny Peres; Spadari, Regina Célia; Céspedes, Isabel Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Drug addiction is a chronically relapsing disorder characterized by compulsion to seek and take the drug, loss of control in limiting intake and, eventually, the emergence of a negative emotional state when access to the drug is prevented. Both dopamine and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated systems seem to play important roles in the modulation of alcohol abuse and dependence. The present study investigated the effects of alcohol consumption on anxiety and locomotor parameters and on the activation of dopamine and CRF-innervated brain regions. Male Wistar rats were given a choice of two bottles for 31 days, one containing water and the other a solution of saccharin + alcohol. Control animals only received water and a solution of 0.2% saccharin. On the 31st day, animals were tested in the elevated plus-maze and open field, and euthanized immediately after the behavioral tests. An independent group of animals was treated with ethanol and used to measure blood ethanol concentration. Results showed that alcohol intake did not alter behavioral measurements in the plus-maze, but increased the number of crossings in the open field, an index of locomotor activity. Additionally, alcohol intake increased Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) in the prefrontal cortex, in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens, in the medial and central amygdala, in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, in the septal region, and in the paraventricular and dorsomedial hypothalamus, structures that have been linked to reward and to approach/withdrawal behavior. These observations might be relevant to a better understanding of the behavioral and physiological alterations that follow alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Full Open Access Journals Have Increased Impact Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We are pleased to report the increase of the impact factors of MDPI journals during 2007 and 2008. In 2005 and part of 2006, the use of a two tier publication system, whereby we offered full Open Access publication to those authors willing to contribute financially to support this option, while providing the alternative choice of free publication without Open Access for those authors who preferred not to pay, resulted in the obviously decreased impact factors seen in 2006 [...

  14. What factors are driving increasing demand for community nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Daniel; Legg, Alison

    2017-01-02

    Demand for district nursing services is increasing significantly. With increasing economic pressures, services are struggling to meet increases in demand, and are looking to become more proactive in planning for future demand. Traditional quantitative forecasting methods have limited use, because of the complexity of inter-linking factors that potentially drive demand for community services. Qualitative system dynamics approaches can be useful to model the complex interplay of causal factors leading to an effect, such as increased demand for services, and identify particular areas of concern for future focus. We ran a facilitated qualitative system dynamics workshop with representatives working across community nursing services in Cornwall. The generated models identified 7 key areas of concern that could be significantly contributing to demand for district nursing services. We outline the identified problem areas in this paper, and discuss potential recommendations to reduce their effects based on causal links identified in the models.

  15. Factor V Leiden is associated with increased sperm count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Mens, T E; Joensen, U N; Bochdanovits, Z

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is the thrombophilia mutation factor V Leiden (FVL) associated with an increased total sperm count? SUMMARY ANSWER: Carriers of FVL have a higher total sperm count than non-FVL-carriers, which could not be explained by genetic linkage or by observations in a FVL-mouse model. WHAT...

  16. A Summability Factor Theorem for Quasi-Power-Increasing Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaş E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish a summability factor theorem for summability , where is lower triangular matrix with nonnegative entries satisfying certain conditions. This paper is an extension of the main result of the work by Rhoades and Savaş (2006 by using quasi -increasing sequences.

  17. Factors associated with increased milk production for automatic milking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marlène; Hess, Justin P; Christenson, Brock M; McIntyre, Kolby K; Smink, Ben; van der Kamp, Arjen J; de Jong, Lisanne G; Döpfer, Dörte

    2016-05-01

    Automatic milking systems (AMS) are increasingly popular throughout the world. Our objective was to analyze 635 North American dairy farms with AMS for (risk) factors associated with increased milk production per cow per day and milk production per robot per day. We used multivariable generalized mixed linear regressions, which identified several significant risk factors and interactions of risk factors associated with milk production. Free traffic was associated with increased production per cow and per robot per day compared with forced systems, and the presence of a single robot per pen was associated with decreased production per robot per day compared with pens using 2 robots. Retrofitted farms had significantly less production in the first 4 yr since installation compared with production after 4 yr of installation. In contrast, newly built farms did not see a significant change in production over time since installation. Overall, retrofitted farms did not produce significantly more or less milk than newly constructed farms. Detailed knowledge of factors associated with increased production of AMS will help guide future recommendations to producers looking to transition to an AMS and maximize their production. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased nerve growth factor serum levels in top athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Matteo; Fioretti, Daniela; Sargentini, Vittorio; Del Giacco, Stefano; Rinaldi, Monica; Tranquilli, Carlo; Bonini, Sergio

    2013-05-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) is the main neurotrophin, which, besides being an important growth factor for nerves, plays an important role as a mediator of inflammation. Nerve growth factor has been shown to increase in relation to stress stimuli and in allergic diseases in humans as well as after physical exercise in animal models. This study aims at evaluating NGF serum levels in top athletes, a population sample in which allergic and neuro-immune diseases are reported with a significantly increased prevalence. Observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study. Institutional, tertiary care. Ninety-six Italian pre-Olympic athletes (44 allergic and 52 nonallergic) and 49 matched controls selected within the Italian National Olympic delegation (n = 435). Nerve growth factor serum levels determined through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Parametric or nonparametric tests were used for comparing NGF serum levels among different study groups depending on value distributions. Nerve growth factor serum levels were significantly higher in athletes than in controls independently from the presence of allergy. Nerve growth factor mean values were 368.3 ± 776.3 pg/mL in the sample of athletes and 174.1 ± 483.7 pg/mL in the control group (P < 0.001). This is the first study showing that intense and prolonged physical exercise is associated with an increase of NGF serum levels in athletes. Whether the increased NGF production might be linked to the prevalent Th2 response observed in allergic diseases and after physical exercise and whether it might be related to the patophysiology of neuro-immune disorders as such amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, reported with a higher prevalence in athletes, should deserve further investigations.

  19. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2016-03-08

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classic risk factors. One of the key features of shift workers is that their behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in humans. Here we show-by using two 8-d laboratory protocols-that short-term circadian misalignment (12-h inverted behavioral and environmental cycles for three days) adversely affects cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 3.0 mmHg and 1.5 mmHg, respectively. These results were primarily explained by an increase in blood pressure during sleep opportunities (SBP, +5.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.9 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, by raised blood pressure during wake periods (SBP, +1.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.4 mmHg). Circadian misalignment decreased wake cardiac vagal modulation by 8-15%, as determined by heart rate variability analysis, and decreased 24-h urinary epinephrine excretion rate by 7%, without a significant effect on 24-h urinary norepinephrine excretion rate. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels by 3-29%. We demonstrate that circadian misalignment per se increases blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Our findings may help explain why shift work increases hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease risk.

  20. Leukemia inhibitory factor increases glucose uptake in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; O'Neill, Hayley M; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Members of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) family, IL-6 and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) have been shown to increase glucose uptake and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. However, the metabolic effects of another family member, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), are not well...... indicated that Mammalian Target of Rapamycin complex (mTORC) 2, but not mTORC1, also is required for LIF-stimulated glucose uptake. In contrast to CNTF, LIF-stimulation did not alter palmitate oxidation. LIF-stimulated glucose uptake was maintained in EDL from obese insulin resistant mice, whereas soleus...

  1. Clastogenic Factors as Potential Biomarkers of Increased Superoxide Production

    OpenAIRE

    Ingrid Emerit

    2007-01-01

    The formation of clastogenic factors (CF) and their damaging effects are mediated by superoxide, since superoxide dismutase is regularly protective. CF are produced via superoxide and stimulate the production of superoxide by monocytes and neutrophils. This results in a selfsustaining and longlasting process of clastogenesis, which may exceed the DNA repair system and ultimately lead to cancer (Emerit, 1994). An increased cancer risk is indeed observed in conditions accompanied by CF formatio...

  2. Modifiable risk factors for increased arterial stiffness in outpatient nephrology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Elewa

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5% patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population. Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients.

  3. Metasystem approach to increase the load factor FMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishchukhin Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to increasing the efficiency of using flexible manufacture systems (FMS by increasing the load factor. Unlike the well-known multi-agent approach to production management, we are investigating the addition of a metasystem level allowing flexible combination of the decentralized control method with centralization. The metasystem approach allows to reduce management to flexible switching of functioning technologies on the basis of the replacement rule, while describing FMS as a metasystem consisting of classification of the system analyst J. Klir from structured data systems. Production events are simulated in virtual space with the help of a multi-agent approach. At the same time, the number of requests from the waiting queue is chosen such that it becomes possible to optimize the loading of the FMS in the simplest case by the full-scan method, if the queue is not available, then the initiative of choice is provided to communications of agents-technologies and agents-equipments. Experimental studies were carried out on the FMS model including six pieces of equipment divided into three groups with a stream of six applications, each of which has a technological route of six operations each‥ The experimental results showed the consistency of the developed approach by increasing the load factor of the FMS.

  4. Chronic stress and comfort foods: self-medication and abdominal obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallman, Mary F.; Pecoraro, Norman C.; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Central corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) networks are recruited by chronic stressors and elevated glucocorticoids (GCs) that initiate recruitment of central CRF activity in the amygdala. Increased central activity of the CRF network stimulates all monoaminergic cell groups, as well as premotor

  5. Some Factors Trigger Increasing Foodborne Diseases Cases of Livestock Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anni Kusumaningsih

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Food is an essential need for various human body activities. Consequently, food must be guaranteed to be free from biological, chemical, and physical contaminants and other hazardous substances that can obstruct health. The presence of various hazardous contaminants in food may result in the appearance of foodborne diseases, i.e. human diseases spread through contaminated food and drinks. Biological contaminants in food can be bacteria, viruses, parasites, moulds, or fungi. The most dangerous biological contaminants that may cause an epidemic disease in human are pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter spp., Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter sakazakii, Shigella, etc. Researchers believe that there are several factors that can be the trigger that increase of foodborne diseases cases such as community demography by increasing the individual groups that are more susceptible to pathogenic foodborne infections, human behaviour related to the changes in the community life style and consumption, the advances in industrial and technological sectors through the increase of large scale food industries concentrated in one location, the global trade or travel, and increasing bacterial resistances against antimicrobials as the result of the increasing the uses of antimicrobials for disease prevention and cure in animals and humans.

  6. Factor V Leiden is associated with increased sperm count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Mens, T E; Joensen, U N; Bochdanovits, Z

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is the thrombophilia mutation factor V Leiden (FVL) associated with an increased total sperm count? SUMMARY ANSWER: Carriers of FVL have a higher total sperm count than non-FVL-carriers, which could not be explained by genetic linkage or by observations in a FVL-mouse model. WHAT......, by use of a FVL-mouse model and investigations of genetic linkage. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Participants were male partners of subfertile couples (two Dutch cohorts) and young men from the general population (Danish cohort): FVL carrier rate was 4.0%, 4.6% and 7.3%, respectively...... FVL carriers have a higher total sperm count than non-carriers, with an adjusted mean difference of 31 × 106 (95%CI 0.2-61.7; P = 0.048). Mice with the FVL mutation do not have increased spermatogenesis as compared to wildtype mice. None of the studied polymorphisms was in linkage disequilibrium...

  7. Resistance exercise increases endothelial progenitor cells and angiogenic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mark D; Wekesa, Antony L; Phelan, John P; Harrison, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are involved in vascular growth and repair. They increase in the circulation after a single bout of aerobic exercise, potentially related to muscle ischemia. Muscular endurance resistance exercise (MERE) bouts also have the potential to induce muscle ischemia if appropriately structured. The objective of this study is to determine the influence of a single bout of MERE on circulating EPC and related angiogenic factors. Thirteen trained men age 22.4 ± 0.5 yr (mean ± SEM) performed a bout of MERE consisting of three sets of six exercises at participants' 15-repetition maximum without resting between repetitions or exercises. The MERE bout duration was 12.1 ± 0.6 min. Blood lactate and HR were 11.9 ± 0.9 mmol·L and 142 ± 5 bpm, respectively, at the end of MERE. Blood was sampled preexercise and at 10 min, 2 h, and 24 h postexercise. Circulating EPC and serum concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D), granulocyte colony stimulating factor, soluble Tie-2, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-9) were higher (P < 0.05) in the postexercise period. Circulating EPC levels were unchanged at 10 min postexercise but higher at 2 h postexercise (P < 0.05). The concentration of most angiogenic factors and metalloproteinases were higher at 10 min postexercise (VEGF-A, +38%; VEGF-C, +40%; VEGF-D, +9%; soluble Tie-2, +15%; soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, +24%; MMP-1, +62%; MMP-2, +3%; MMP-3, +54%; and MMP-9, +45%; all P < 0.05). Soluble E-selectin was lower (P < 0.05) at 2 and 24 h postexercise, with endothelial microparticles and thrombomodulin unchanged. Short intense bouts of MERE can trigger increases in circulating EPC and related angiogenic factors, potentially contributing to vascular adaptation and vasculoprotection.

  8. Several factors increased job dissatisfaction among medical doctors in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastaman Basuki

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Beberapa faktor stresor kerja dapat meningkatkkan ketidakpusasan kerja. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengidentifikasi beberapa faktor dominan terkait dengan ketidakpusasan kerja.Metode: Studi potong lintgang dengan sampling purposif yang dilakukan pada bulan April-Juli 2011. Subyek terdiri dari mahasiswa pascasarjana dan dosen Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Indonesia. Regresi linier digunakan untuk menganalisis data. Hasil: Peserta terdiri dari 306 subyek, berusia 23-47 tahun, mayoritas perempuan (61,4%, menikah, dan tidak pernah mengikuti pelatihan manajemen stres. Sedangkan pekerjaan saat ini/sebelumnya adalah dalam pelayanan kesehatan, atau pejabat pemerintah. Tingkat ketidakpuasan kerja berkaitan dengan tujuh faktor: yang tertinggi ialah kurangnya dukungan dari atasan, dan yang terendah ialah melakukan layanan di luar jam kerja. Satu poin kurang dukungan atasan akan meningkatkan ketidakpuasan kerja sebesar 1,26 [koefisien regresi (β = 1,26, P = 0,000; satu poin untuk menyediakan layanan di luar jam kerja akan meningkatkan 0,61 poin ketidakpuasan kerja (β= 0,6, P = 0,001. Kesimpulan: Kurangnya dukungan atasan dan interaksi dengan rekan kerja, peran organisasi ambiguitas, prosedur birokrasi, memberikan pelayanan di luar jam kerja, dan umpan balik yang tidak memadai dari pasien akan meningkatkan ketidakpuasan kerja. (Health Science Indones 2013;1:11-6Kata kunci:ketidakpuasan kerja, stresor kerja, dokterAbstractBackground:Several factors of work stressors may increase a person’s job dissatisfaction level. This study aimed to identify several dominant factors related to job dissatisfaction among medical doctors. Methods: A cross-sectional study with purposive sampling was conducted in April-July 2011. Subjects consisted of postgraduate students and faculty members of the Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia. Linear regression was used to analyze the data. Results: The participants consisted of 306 subjects, aged

  9. Adolescent caffeine consumption increases adulthood anxiety-related behavior and modifies neuroendocrine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Casey E; Newsom, Ryan J; Stafford, Jacob; Scott, Talia; Archuleta, Solana; Levis, Sophia C; Spencer, Robert L; Campeau, Serge; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2016-05-01

    Caffeine is a commonly used psychoactive substance and consumption by children and adolescents continues to rise. Here, we examine the lasting effects of adolescent caffeine consumption on anxiety-related behaviors and several neuroendocrine measures in adulthood. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed caffeine (0.3g/L) for 28 consecutive days from postnatal day 28 (P28) to P55. Age-matched control rats consumed water. Behavioral testing for anxiety-related behavior began in adulthood (P62) 7 days after removal of caffeine. Adolescent caffeine consumption enhanced anxiety-related behavior in an open field, social interaction test, and elevated plus maze. Similar caffeine consumption in adult rats did not alter anxiety-related behavior after caffeine removal. Characterization of neuroendocrine measures was next assessed to determine whether the changes in anxiety were associated with modifications in the HPA axis. Blood plasma levels of corticosterone (CORT) were assessed throughout the caffeine consumption procedure in adolescent rats. Adolescent caffeine consumption elevated plasma CORT 24h after initiation of caffeine consumption that normalized over the course of the 28-day consumption procedure. CORT levels were also elevated 24h after caffeine removal and remained elevated for 7 days. Despite elevated basal CORT in adult rats that consumed caffeine during adolescence, the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and CORT response to placement on an elevated pedestal (a mild stressor) was significantly blunted. Lastly, we assessed changes in basal and stress-induced c-fos and corticotropin-releasing factor (Crf) mRNA expression in brain tissue collected at 7 days withdrawal from adolescent caffeine. Adolescent caffeine consumption increased basal c-fos mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Adolescent caffeine consumption had no other effects on the basal or stress-induced c-fos mRNA changes. Caffeine consumption during adolescence increased

  10. Role of bed nucleus of the stria terminalis corticotrophin-releasing factor receptors in frustration stress-induced binge-like palatable food consumption in female rats with a history of food restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Romano, Adele; Bossert, Jennifer M; Rice, Kenner C; Ubaldi, Massimo; St Laurent, Robyn; Gaetani, Silvana; Massi, Maurizio; Shaham, Yavin; Cifani, Carlo

    2014-08-20

    We developed recently a binge-eating model in which female rats with a history of intermittent food restriction show binge-like palatable food consumption after 15 min exposure to the sight of the palatable food. This "frustration stress" manipulation also activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis. Here, we determined the role of the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in stress-induced binge eating in our model. We also assessed the role of CRF receptors in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a brain region implicated in stress responses and stress-induced drug seeking, in stress-induced binge eating. We used four groups that were first exposed or not exposed to repeated intermittent cycles of regular chow food restriction during which they were also given intermittent access to high-caloric palatable food. On the test day, we either exposed or did not expose the rats to the sight of the palatable food for 15 min (frustration stress) before assessing food consumption for 2 h. We found that systemic injections of the CRF1 receptor antagonist R121919 (2,5-dimethyl-3-(6-dimethyl-4-methylpyridin-3-yl)-7 dipropylamino pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine) (10-20 mg/kg) and BNST (25-50 ng/side) or ventricular (1000 ng) injections of the nonselective CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41) decreased frustration stress-induced binge eating in rats with a history of food restriction. Frustration stress also increased Fos (a neuronal activity marker) expression in ventral and dorsal BNST. Results demonstrate a critical role of CRF receptors in BNST in stress-induced binge eating in our rat model. CRF1 receptor antagonists may represent a novel pharmacological treatment for bingeing-related eating disorders. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3411316-09$15.00/0.

  11. Risk Factors Associated with Increased Morbidity in Living Liver Donation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helry L. Candido

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Living donor liver donation (LDLD is an alternative to cadaveric liver donation. We aimed at identifying risk factors and developing a score for prediction of postoperative complications (POCs after LDLD in donors. This is a retrospective cohort study in 688 donors between June 1995 and February 2014 at Hospital Sírio-Libanês and A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, in São Paulo, Brazil. Primary outcome was POC graded ≥III according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Left lateral segment (LLS, left lobe (LL, and right lobe resections (RL were conducted in 492 (71.4%, 109 (15.8%, and 87 (12.6% donors, respectively. In total, 43 (6.2% developed POCs, which were more common after RL than LLS and LL (14/87 (16.1% versus 23/492 (4.5% and 6/109 (5.5%, resp., p<0.001. Multivariate analysis showed that RL resection (OR: 2.81, 95% CI: 1.32 to 3.01; p=0.008, smoking status (OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.35 to 7.56; p=0.012, and blood transfusion (OR: 3.15, 95% CI: 1.45 to 6.84; p=0.004 were independently associated with POCs. RL resection, intraoperative blood transfusion, and smoking were associated with increased risk for POCs in donors.

  12. Nuclear suppression factor for PT increasing towards the kinematic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renk, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The suppression of high-transverse-momentum (PT) hadron production in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion (A-A) collisions as compared to the scaled expectation from proton-proton (p-p) collisions expressed as the nuclear modification factor RAA is experimentally well established and can be traced back to interactions between the hard parton shower and the soft bulk matter. Intuition suggests that the medium modification should cease to be important when the hard scale of parton production is much larger than the typical momentum scale in the medium (e.g., the temperature T) and that consequently RAA(PT)→1 for PT≫T. However, RAA is not a “simple” observable but rather results from many different mechanisms that influence what happens when PT increases. In particular, RAA does not necessarily approach unity even if the hadron momentum is probed at the kinematic limit of the reaction. The aim of this work is to identify and discuss such mechanisms, to present different model expectations of what one would find if one could measure suppression to the kinematic limit for hard hadron production, and to predict the PT dependence at both Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  13. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher J. Morris; Purvis, Taylor E.; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease, even after controlling for traditional risk factors. Shift workers frequently undergo circadian misalignment (i.e., misalignment between the endogenous circadian system and 24-h environmental/behavioral cycles). This misalignment has been proposed to explain, in part, why shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. However, the impact of circadian misalignment pe...

  14. Increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a well known angiogenic factor, has been shown to have direct and/or indirect influence on spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of this study is to observe VEGF expression changes in rats with SCI by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) treatment. The mRNA expression of VEGF ...

  15. Midlife Cardiovascular Risk Factors May Increase Chances of Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This study supports the importance of controlling vascular risk factors like high blood pressure early in life in an effort to prevent ... agreement with previous studies, an analysis of vascular risk factors showed ... or high blood pressure, also called hypertension, had a higher chance of ...

  16. Chronically increased ciliary neurotrophic factor and fibroblast growth factor-2 expression after spinal contusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Richa B; McTigue, Dana M

    2008-09-10

    Demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss following spinal cord injury (SCI) are well documented. Recently, we showed oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) accumulation and robust oligodendrocyte genesis occurring along SCI lesion borders. We have since begun investigating potential mechanisms for this endogenous repair response. Here, we examined ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) expression, because both factors alter progenitor proliferation and differentiation and are increased in several CNS disorders. We hypothesized that CNTF and FGF-2 would increase after SCI, especially in regions of enhanced oligogenesis. First, CNTF protein was quantified using Western blots, which revealed that CNTF protein continually rose through 28 days post injury (dpi). Next, by using immunohistochemistry, we examined the spatiotemporal expression of CNTF in cross-sections spanning the injury site. CNTF immunoreactivity was observed on astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in naïve and contused spinal cords. Significantly increased CNTF was detected in spared white and gray matter between 5 and 28 dpi compared with uninjured controls. By 28 dpi, CNTF expression was significantly higher along lesion borders compared with outlying spared tissue; a similar distribution of phosphorylated STAT3, a transcription factor up-regulated by CNTF and to a lesser extent FGF-2, was also detected. Because CNTF can potentiate FGF-2 expression, we examined the distribution of FGF-2+ cells. Significantly more FGF-2+ cells were noted along lesion borders at 7 and 28 dpi. Thus, both CNTF and FGF-2 are present in regions of elevated OPC proliferation and oligodendrocyte generation after SCI and therefore may play a role in injury-induced gliogenesis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Factors influencing increase in tuberculosis patients in Mpumalanga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The factors considered most important in this study were lack of knowledge of TB among participants despite their various levels of education, poverty, overcrowding, ... religious and ritual beliefs, and the influence of traditional healers' herbal medicines with the dictum that participants have been possessed by evil spirits.

  18. Circulating serum trefoil factors increase dramatically during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Mie Hessellund; Vestergaard, E M; Milman, N

    2008-01-01

    Trefoil factors (TFF1-3) are 7-12 kDa peptides secreted by mucosal surfaces, with changing levels of expression reflected in serum concentrations. The genes for the peptides are located on chromosome 21, the chromosome duplicated in trisomy 21. We studied the levels of circulating TFFs in pregnant...... women carrying trisomy 21 foetuses and in women with normal pregnancies, throughout pregnancy and postpartum....

  19. Technology advancement: a factor in increasing resource use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, David R.; Goonan, Thomas G.; Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2001-01-01

    The specter of mineral resource scarcity has been repeatedly raised as a concern because ever-growing populations with seemingly insatiable appetites for minerals place claims against a finite resource endowment. This report analyzes how technology has helped to ease resource constraints, and uses case studies of aluminum, copper, potash, and sulfur minerals to identify the effects of technology on resource supply. In spite of heightened demand for and increased loss of resources to environmental policy and urbanization, mineral producers historically have been able to continually expand production and lower costs. Specific production increases for the years 1900-98 were: aluminum (3,250 percent), copper (2,465 percent), potash (3,770 percent), and sulfur (6,000 percent). For the same period, constant-dollar (1998) prices decreased: aluminum (90 percent), copper (75 percent), potash (94 percent), and sulfur (89 percent). The application of technology has made available mineral deposits that were previously overlooked or considered non-viable. Using technology, producers can meet the demand for stronger, energy-efficient, more environmentally safe products with less physical material. Technologies have been developed to increase the amount of materials recycled and remanufactured. Technology development can occur in breakthroughs, but most often advances incrementally. Technological development is driven by the profit motive.

  20. Factors associated with increased healthcare utilization among adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Monideepa Bhattacharya

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate determinants of increased emergency room (ER) visit and hospitalization among adults with asthma, with emphasis on the role of psychological distress, self-efficacy, and obesity. For analysis 2009, 2011/2012 California Health Interview Survey was used. Adults who reported lifetime asthma were selected. Association between ER and overnight hospital stay with population characteristics were conducted using chi-square analysis. Multivariable binary logistic regression models, taking into account control variables, were utilized to assess the relationship between ER visit or overnight hospital stay with that of psychological distress, self-efficacy, and obesity. Odds of ER visits were higher among those with mild-to-moderate psychological distress (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.28, 2.94), and among those with serious psychological distress (aOR = 2.62, 95% CI: 1.65, 4.16). Mild-to-moderate distress was associated with two-fold increase in hospital overnight stay (aOR = 2.05, 95% CI: 1.29, 3.25). Adults with asthma who reported low self-efficacy had increased ER visits (aOR = 6.21, 95% CI: 3.63, 10.65) and hospitalization (aOR = 4.13, 95% CI: 2.63, 6.49). Finally, adults who had asthma and were obese had higher odds of ER visits (aOR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.20, 2.13). Healthcare utilization is higher among asthma patients with psychological distress, low self-efficacy, and obesity. Interventions, such as incorporation of integrated care models, are critical to ensure early screening of mental health status among such patients. In addition, there is a need for patient education and improved weight management among adults with asthma.

  1. Factors associated with increased felt stigma among individuals with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Ramon Edmundo D; Shapovalov, Denys; Shoraka, Ali Reza

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study is to determine whether certain demographic, clinical, and psychosocial traits are associated with higher levels of felt stigma among persons with epilepsy (PWE) patients followed at a level 4 epilepsy center. We performed a direct survey of 182 consenting patients that included the Epilepsy Stigma Scale. On univariate analysis, higher levels of perceived stigma were associated with age, marital status, race, driving, work status, seizure etiology, Quality of Life in Epilepsy-10 (QOLIE-10) scores, and health literacy. Among coping reactions, the use of denial, behavioral disengagement and venting were also associated with higher degrees of felt stigma. Using multiple linear regression, being single, poorer QOLIE-10 scores, difficulties understanding written information, and the use of behavioral disengagement were independently associated with poorer scores on the Epilepsy Stigma Scale. Our study paints a compelling profile of a PWE who has greater perceived stigma. Programs that increase the level of social support, improve health literacy, and enhance quality of life may also help decrease the amount of felt stigma among PWE. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Steroid-induced polycystic ovaries in rats: effect of electro-acupuncture on concentrations of endothelin-1 and nerve growth factor (NGF, and expression of NGF mRNA in the ovaries, the adrenal glands, and the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloe Luigi

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies on the effect of repeated electro-acupuncture (EA treatments in rats with steriod-induced polycystic ovaries (PCO, EA has been shown to modulate nerve growth factor (NGF concentration in the ovaries as well as corticotropin releasing factor (CRF in the median eminence (ME. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that repeated EA treatments modulates sympathetic nerve activity in rats with PCO. This was done by analysing endothelin-1 (ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor involved in ovarian functions, as well as NGF and NGF mRNA expression involved in the pathophysiological process underlying steroid-induced PCO. The main result in the present study was that concentrations of ET-1 in the ovaries were significantly lower in the PCO group receiving EA compared with the healthy control group (p p p p

  3. CRF1 receptor-deficiency increases cocaine reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contarino, Angelo; Kitchener, Pierre; Vallée, Monique; Papaleo, Francesco; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    Stimulant drugs produce reward but also activate stress-responsive systems. The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the related hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress-responsive systems are activated by stimulant drugs. However, their role in stimulant drug-induced reward remains poorly understood. Herein, we report that CRF1 receptor-deficient (CRF1-/-), but not wild-type, mice show conditioned place preference (CPP) responses to a relatively low cocaine dose (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Conversely, wild-type, but not CRF1-/-, mice display CPP responses to a relatively high cocaine dose (20 mg/kg, i.p.), indicating that CRF1 receptor-deficiency alters the rewarding effects of cocaine. Acute pharmacological antagonism of the CRF1 receptor by antalarmin also eliminates cocaine reward. Nevertheless, CRF1-/- mice display higher stereotypy responses to cocaine than wild-type mice. Despite the very low plasma corticosterone concentration, CRF1-/- mice show higher nuclear glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels in the brain region of the hippocampus than wild-type mice. Full rescue of wild-type-like corticosterone and GR circadian rhythm and level in CRF1-/- mice by exogenous corticosterone does not affect CRF1 receptor-dependent cocaine reward but induces stereotypy responses to cocaine. These results indicate a critical role for the CRF1 receptor in cocaine reward, independently of the closely related HPA axis activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Glucocorticoids suppress corticotropin-releasing hormone and vasopressin expression in human hypothalamic neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkut, Z. A.; Pool, C.; Swaab, D. F.

    1998-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are widely used in clinical practice in a variety of immune-mediated and neoplastic diseases, mostly for their immunosuppressive, leukopenic, antiedematous, or malignancy-suppressive actions. However, their usage is limited because of serious and sometimes life-threatening

  5. Corticotropin-releasing activity of gastrin-releasing peptide in normal men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U; Holst, J J; Knuhtsen, S

    1987-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP; mammalian bombesin) exerts several functions within the hypothalamus and is a putative regulator of pituitary hormone secretion. We investigated the effect of GRP on the secretion of pituitary hormones and cortisol in normal men. GRP was infused iv as primed...

  6. Factors related to increasing trends in cigarette smoking of adolescent males in rural areas of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Nam Soo; Kam, Sin; Kim, Keon Yeop

    2013-05-01

    Cigarette smoking prevalence among adolescent males in rural areas of Korea has increased in recent years. The aim of this study was to explore the factors related to increasing trends in cigarette smoking among adolescent males living in rural areas. The raw data from the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey from 2006 to 2009 were used. Data were analyzed by using the method of complex survey data analysis considering complex sampling design. Multiple logistic regression models were used to explore the factors affecting cigarette smoking. We evaluated the linear time trends in the prevalence of factors that were related to current smoking status and the linear time trends in cigarette smoking in groups stratified by the exposure to each factor using logistic regression models. Finally, we examined the contributions of the factors to the time trends in cigarette smoking by adjusting for each of those factors in the baseline regression models and changes in the adjusted odds ratio by survey year. A statistically significant increasing trend in smoking was observed after adjusting for the factors affecting cigarette smoking. Significant factors related to cigarette use were perceived stress, experience with depression, current alcohol drinking, exposure to secondhand smoke, and academic performance. The factor related to increasing trends in cigarette smoking was academic performance. Stress about academic performance is an important factor affecting the increase in cigarette smoking among adolescent males in a rural area of Korea.

  7. Nicotine self-administration differentially modulates glutamate and GABA transmission in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to enhance the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Guoliang; Chen, Hao; Wu, Xingjun; Matta, Shannon G.; Sharp, Burt M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mechanisms by which chronic nicotine self-administration augments hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responses to stress are only partially understood. Nicotine self-administration alters neuropeptide expression in corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons within paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and increases PVN responsiveness to norepinephrine during mild footshock stress. Glutamate and GABA also modulate CRF neurons, but their roles in enhanced HPA responsiveness to footshock during c...

  8. Chronic stress and obesity: A new view of “comfort food”

    OpenAIRE

    Dallman, Mary F.; Pecoraro, Norman; Akana, Susan F.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Gomez, Francisca; Houshyar, Hani; Bell, M. E.; Bhatnagar, Seema; Laugero, Kevin D.; Manalo, Sotara

    2003-01-01

    The effects of adrenal corticosteroids on subsequent adrenocorticotropin secretion are complex. Acutely (within hours), glucocorticoids (GCs) directly inhibit further activity in the hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenal axis, but the chronic actions (across days) of these steroids on brain are directly excitatory. Chronically high concentrations of GCs act in three ways that are functionally congruent. (i) GCs increase the expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA in the central nucleu...

  9. A very-low-fat vegan diet increases intake of protective dietary factors and decreases intake of pathogenic dietary factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewell, Antonella; Weidner, Gerdi; Sumner, Michael D; Chi, Christine S; Ornish, Dean

    2008-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that dietary factors in plant-based diets are important in the prevention of chronic disease. This study examined protective (eg, antioxidant vitamins, carotenoids, and fiber) and pathogenic (eg, saturated fatty acids and cholesterol) dietary factors in a very-low-fat vegan diet. Ninety-three early-stage prostate cancer patients participated in a randomized controlled trial and were assigned to a very-low-fat (10% fat) vegan diet supplemented with soy protein and lifestyle changes or to usual care. Three-day food records were collected at baseline (n=42 intervention, n=43 control) and after 1 year (n=37 in each group). Analyses of changes in dietary intake of macronutrients, vitamins, minerals, carotenoids, and isoflavones from baseline to 1 year showed significantly increased intake of most protective dietary factors (eg, fiber increased from a mean of 31 to 59 g/day, lycopene increased from 8,693 to 34,464 mug/day) and significantly decreased intake of most pathogenic dietary factors (eg, saturated fatty acids decreased from 20 to 5 g/day, cholesterol decreased from 200 to 10 mg/day) in the intervention group compared to controls. These results suggest that a very-low-fat vegan diet can be useful in increasing intake of protective nutrients and phytochemicals and minimizing intake of dietary factors implicated in several chronic diseases.

  10. Conditions That Shape the Learning Curve: Factors That Increase the Ability and Opportunity to Learn

    OpenAIRE

    Eelke Wiersma

    2007-01-01

    Prior studies examining factors that influence the learning curve mainly focus on settings in which firms adopt new products or technologies or open new plants or assembly lines. Less is known, however, about how more mature firms learn, when they are further down the learning curve. To gain insight into factors that enhance learning in this situation, I examine factors that increase both the ability and the opportunity to learn. I hypothesize that the ability to learn is enhanced by the pres...

  11. Increased sexually transmitted infection incidence in a low risk population: identifying the risk factors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shiely, Frances

    2010-04-01

    Between 1994 and 2006, the incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Ireland has increased by over 300%. Recent literature would suggest that this figure is an underestimation of the true scale of infection. Our objective was to determine the risk factors associated with STI diagnosis in a population with a rapidly increasing STI incidence.

  12. Endogenous glucocorticoid increases the basal level of Treg-Th17 balance under early phase of stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Hai-yan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To explore the changes of Treg-Th17 balance influenced by corticosterone, major ef-fect hormone of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis under running stress. Methods: A total of 25 corticotropin-releasing hor-mone (CRH wildtype (CRH+/+ and knockout (CRH-/- mice were adopt and divided into 4 groups as follows: CRH+/+ ctrl, CRH+/+ stress, CRH-/- ctrl and CRH-/- stress. All mice in stress groups were under 2 h running. After 1 h, blood plasma in all groups was collected and the ex-pression of corticosterone and IL-17A was detected by ELISA. Meanwhile, unicell suspensions of peripheral lymph node and spleen in each group were prepared too and stained by PE-CD4 and FITC-CD25, then the changes of Treg (CD4+CD25+ in different groups were checked by flow cytometry; all data were statistically analyzed by the software of WinMDI 2.9, SPSS 11.5, Origin 7.5 and Matlab 2-D and 3-D plot function. Results: The levels of corticosterone were signifi-cantly higher in stress groups than that in correspond-ing control groups (P<0.05, especially in CRH+/+ stress group (P<0.01. However, the changes of Tregs were not obvious between stress groups and control groups with respective genotypes (P<0.05. Compared with that in CRH+/+ control group, the ratio of Treg and the expres-sion of IL-17A in CRH-/- stress group were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.05. Combined with the expression levels of corticosterone, Treg and Th17, our study suggests that endogenous glucocorti-coid with basal level may cause the changes in Treg-Th17 balance. Moreover, as the corticosterone level increases, the expression of Treg and Th17 appears to manifest antagonistic fluctuant status with a rising ten-dency in general. Conclusion: Endogenous glucocorticoid under early stage of stress may increase the function of T lymphocyte immunity to some extent. Key words: Stress disorders, post-traumatic; Glucocorticoids; Corticotropin-releasing hormone

  13. Concentrated growth factor increases Schwann cell proliferation and neurotrophic factor secretion and promotes functional nerve recovery in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jie; Wang, Lin; Sun, Yue; Sun, Xiaolin; Wen, Chaoju; Shahmoradi, Mahdi; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-02-01

    Concentrated growth factor (CGF) is a newly generated complex that comprises a fibrin matrix incorporating growth factors and plasmatic and leukocyte cytokines. It has been widely used in bone regenerative medicine. However, the effect of CGF on peripheral nerve regeneration had not been previously investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of using CGF for nerve regeneration by i) investigating the effect of CGF on the proliferation of Schwann cells (SCs) and secretion of neurotrophic factors nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line‑derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in vitro; and ii) analyzing the effect of CGF on functional nerve recovery after nerve injury in vivo. CGF was prepared from venous blood taken from rats, and using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we noted that it featured a fiber‑like appearance with pore size ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 µm. The soluble component of CGF was used to produce conditioned media with which to treat the Schwann cell line. A cell counting kit-8 assay and cell cycle analysis were both used to study the proliferative effect of CGF on SCs. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that there was an increase in the mRNA and protein expression of NGF and GDNF, both of which are markers of SC neurotrophic secretion. A model of sciatic nerve crush injury was established for the in vivo experiment, and CGF was found to increase the sciatic functional index (indicative of nerve function). We noted that CGF increased SC proliferation and secretion of neurotrophic factors in vitro, and promoted functional recovery after peripheral nerve injuries in vivo. These results suggest that CGF is a promising candidate biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration, and may potentially be utilized to repair nerve injuries.

  14. Increasing coverage of transcription factor position weight matrices through domain-level homology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady Bernard

    Full Text Available Transcription factor-DNA interactions, central to cellular regulation and control, are commonly described by position weight matrices (PWMs. These matrices are frequently used to predict transcription factor binding sites in regulatory regions of DNA to complement and guide further experimental investigation. The DNA sequence preferences of transcription factors, encoded in PWMs, are dictated primarily by select residues within the DNA binding domain(s that interact directly with DNA. Therefore, the DNA binding properties of homologous transcription factors with identical DNA binding domains may be characterized by PWMs derived from different species. Accordingly, we have implemented a fully automated domain-level homology searching method for identical DNA binding sequences.By applying the domain-level homology search to transcription factors with existing PWMs in the JASPAR and TRANSFAC databases, we were able to significantly increase coverage in terms of the total number of PWMs associated with a given species, assign PWMs to transcription factors that did not previously have any associations, and increase the number of represented species with PWMs over an order of magnitude. Additionally, using protein binding microarray (PBM data, we have validated the domain-level method by demonstrating that transcription factor pairs with matching DNA binding domains exhibit comparable DNA binding specificity predictions to transcription factor pairs with completely identical sequences.The increased coverage achieved herein demonstrates the potential for more thorough species-associated investigation of protein-DNA interactions using existing resources. The PWM scanning results highlight the challenging nature of transcription factors that contain multiple DNA binding domains, as well as the impact of motif discovery on the ability to predict DNA binding properties. The method is additionally suitable for identifying domain-level homology mappings to

  15. Reducing risk, increasing protective factors: findings from the Caribbean Youth Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Robert W; Ireland, Marjorie

    2004-12-01

    To identify the prevalence of health-compromising behaviors, and the risk and protective factors associated with them among youth in the Caribbean, and to predict the likelihood of these outcomes given the presence or absence of the risk and protective factors. Analyses were done on the results of a 1997-98 survey of over 15,500 young people in nine countries of the Caribbean Community. The four health-compromising behaviors studied included violence involvement, sexual intercourse, tobacco use, and alcohol use. Logistic regression was used to identify the strongest risk and protective factors, and also to create models for predicting the outcomes given combinations of the risk and protective factors. Rage was the strongest risk factor for every health-compromising behavior for both genders, and across all age groups, and school connectedness was the strongest protective factor. For many of the outcomes studied, increased protective factors were associated with as much or more reduction of involvement in health-compromising behaviors than a decrease in risk factors. This research suggests the importance of strengthening the protective factors in the lives of vulnerable youth not just reducing risk.

  16. Psychosocial factors associated with increased physical activity in insufficiently active adults with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, G M E E Geeske; Brown, Wendy J; Burton, Nicola W

    2015-09-01

    Although physical activity can potentially reduce symptoms of arthritis, 50% of people with arthritis are insufficiently active. The aim was to identify psychosocial factors associated with increased physical activity in mid-age adults with arthritis who did not meet recommended physical activity levels. Longitudinal cohort study. Data were from 692 insufficiently active men and women (mean age 55 ± 6.6 years) with arthritis, who answered mailed surveys in 2007 and 2009 in the HABITAT study. Increased physical activity was defined as a change of ≥ 200 MET min/week in walking, moderate and vigorous activities from 2007 to 2009. Scale scores were used to measure psychosocial factors including intention, experiences, attitudes, efficacy, barriers, motivation, social support, and health professional advice. Associations between (1) 2007 psychosocial factors and (2) 2007-2009 improvement (≥ +1 standard deviation) in psychosocial factors and increased physical activity were examined with logistic regression models. Results were adjusted for education, body mass index, and self-rated health. Between 2007 and 2009, 296 participants (42.8%) increased their physical activity. Engagement, mastery and physical activity intention in 2007 were associated with this increase in physical activity (engagement OR = 1.11, 99% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-1.17; mastery OR = 1.12, 99%CI = 1.02-1.22; physical activity intention OR = 1.29, 99%CI = 1.06-1.56). Improved scores for encouragement (OR = 2.07, CI = 1.07-4.01) and self-efficacy (OR =2 .27, CI = 1.30-3.97) were also significantly associated with increased physical activity. Positive physical activity experiences and intentions were predictors of increased physical activity among people with arthritis. Improved physical activity confidence and social support were associated with increased physical activity. It is important to consider these psychosocial factors when planning physical activity interventions for people with

  17. Qualitative analysis of factors that increase and reduce involvement in gambling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidijus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the rapid development of gambling business, the number of pathological gamblers is increasing as well. The problem of pathological gambling is just as important as alcoholism or drug addiction. However, there is a lack of information and research of this topicin Lithuania. The aim of work: to investigate and analyse the factors that increase or reduce involvement in gambling. Research questions: 1 What factors increase involvement in gambling? 2 What factors reduce involvement in gambling? Critical case sampling was used for selection of the participants. Subjects were required to a have experience of involvement in gambling for at least one year; b have experience of negative impact of gambling on quality of life; c have at least 6 months of gambling abstinence. Five individuals participated in the research; all of them were males who live in Vilnius. Age of the participants varied from 19 to 45. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The matic analysis of the data led to the identification of four major the matic categories: psychological factors; social relations; material well being; quality of life. There search results show that negatyve childhood experience, gambling friends, escaping from various troubles, disputes in family and high financial needs can increase involvement in gambling. Factors that reduce involvement in gambling are: feeling support of social environment, proper evaluation of financial position, awareness of one‘s own addiction to gambling and desire to change life.

  18. Factors behind increasing ocean use: the IPAT equation and the marine environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegland, Troels Jacob

    2017-01-01

    on the marine environment—can be seen as rooted in a combination of increasing population and human development. In doing so, the chapter departs from the IPAT equation, which is a classic way to explain changes in the environmental impacts of human activities as a product of three factors: population......This chapter provides an introduction to the main factors behind increasing ocean use, which—more often than not—tend to lead to increasing pressure on the marine environment. In this way, it aims on a very general level to account for the root causes of the different developments that have led...... to the need for specific management and governance intended to protect the marine environment. With reference to a few, selected examples related to fishing, which is one of the main anthropogenic stressors of the marine environment, it is illustrated how increasing ocean use—and associated pressure...

  19. The F309S mutation increases factor VIII secretion in human cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daianne Maciely Carvalho Fantacini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: The capacity of a human cell line to secrete recombinant factor VIII with a F309S point mutation was investigated, as was the effect of the addition of chemical chaperones (betaine and sodium-4-phenylbutyrate on the secretion of factor VIII. METHODS: This work used a vector with a F309S mutation in the A1 domain to investigate FVIII production in the HEK 293 human cell line. Factor VIII activity was measured by chromogenic assay. Furthermore, the effects of chemical drugs on the culture were evaluated. RESULTS: The addition of the F309S mutation to a previously described FVIII variant increased FVIII secretion by 4.5 fold. Moreover, the addition of betaine or sodium-4-phenylbutyrate increased the secretion rate of FVIIIΔB proteins in HEK 293 cells, but the same effect was not seen for FVIIIΔB-F309S indicating that all the recombinant protein produced had been efficiently secreted. CONCLUSION: Bioengineering factor VIII expressed in human cells may lead to an efficient production of recombinant factor VIII and contribute toward low-cost coagulation factor replacement therapy for hemophilia A. FVIII-F309S produced in human cells can be effective in vivo.

  20. Epidermal growth factor increases LRF/Pokemon expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-10-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (LRF/Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of proteins that promotes oncogenesis in several forms of cancer. Recently, we found higher LRF expression in human breast and prostate carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the regulation of LRF expression in human prostate cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival of prostate cancer cells. There was significantly higher level of LRF expression in the nucleus of LNCaP and PC-3 cells than RWPE-1 cells. A significant increase in LRF expression was observed with increasing doses of EGF in more aggressive and androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells suggesting that EGF signaling pathway is critical in upregulating the expression of LRF/Pokemon to promote oncogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Retrograde axonal transport of ciliary neurotrophic factor is increased by peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, R; Adryan, K M; Zhu, Y; Harkness, P J; Lindsay, R M; DiStefano, P S

    1993-09-16

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes the survival of several populations of neurons, including sensory and motor neurons. Although CNTF is abundant in adult sciatic nerve, the mature protein lacks a signal sequence and is not secreted; therefore, it has been proposed to act as a lesion factor. The identification of a functional CNTF receptor revealed ligand-specific phosphorylation cascades and gene induction. However, it is not clear how these signal-transducing events are elicited in neuronal cell bodies that may be distant from the source of CNTF. We report here that CNTF can be retrogradely transported by adult sensory neurons. More importantly, sensory and motor neurons both show greatly increased transport of CNTF following peripheral nerve lesion. Axotomy-induced increases in retrograde transport of neurotrophic factors may be an important response of neuronal cell bodies during regeneration.

  2. Increased risk for fetal loss in carriers of the factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinardi, [No Value; Middeldorp, S; de Kam, PJ; Koopman, MMW; van Pampus, ECM; Hamulyak, K; Prins, MH; Buller, HR; van der Meer, J

    1999-01-01

    Background: An increased risk for fetal loss caused by placental thrombosis is probable in carriers of the factor V Leiden mutation but has not been demonstrated consistently in previous studies. Objective: To determine the overall risk for fetal loss and the separate risks for miscarriage and

  3. FACTORS AND REASONS THAT CAN MAKE USERS TO INCREASE THE USAGE OF SMARTPHONE SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Cristina Teodora

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the conclusions related to the reasons and direction that can make users to increase the usage of smartphone services are coming both, from multiple factor regression analysis, as well as from the analysis of the sample research profile.

  4. Interleukin-1 contributes to increased concentrations of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type I in sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poll, T.; Fischer, E.; Coyle, S. M.; van Zee, K. J.; Pribble, J. P.; Stiles, D. M.; Barie, P. S.; Buurman, W. A.; Moldawer, L. L.; Lowry, S. F.

    1995-01-01

    Studies were done in baboons and humans to assess the role of interleukin (IL)-1 on the release of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors (sTNFRs) during sepsis. In baboons, IL-1 alpha induced increased levels of sTNFR types I and II. Infusion of Escherichia coli into baboons also led to higher

  5. Dynamic Increase Factors for High Performance Concrete in Compression using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Benjamin; Ngo, Tuan; Mendis, Priyan

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides dynamic increase factors (DIF) in compression for two different High Performance Concretes (HPC), 100 MPa and 160 MPa, respectively. In the experimental investigation 2 different Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars are used in order to test over a wide range of strain rates, 100 sec1...

  6. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S.; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L.; Stupp, Samuel I. (NWU); (USC)

    2016-04-12

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets.

  7. Angiogenic factors are increased in circulating granulocytes and CD34+ cells of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotički, Tijana; Mitrović Ajtić, Olivera; Beleslin-Čokić, Bojana B; Nienhold, Ronny; Diklić, Miloš; Djikić, Dragoslava; Leković, Danijela; Bulat, Tanja; Marković, Dragana; Gotić, Mirjana; Noguchi, Constance T; Schechter, Alan N; Skoda, Radek C; Čokić, Vladan P

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown that angiogenesis and inflammation play an important role in development of most hematological malignancies including the myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). The aim of this study was to investigate and correlate the levels of key angiogenic molecules such as hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells of MPN patients, along with JAK2V617F mutation allele burden and effects of therapy. HIF-1α and VEGF gene expression were decreased, while eNOS mRNA levels were increased in granulocytes of MPN patients. Furthermore, positively correlated and increased VEGF and eNOS protein levels were in negative correlation with HIF-1α levels in granulocytes of MPN patients. According to immunoblotting, the generally augmented angiogenic factors demonstrated JAK2V617F allele burden dependence only in granulocytes of PMF. The angiogenic factors were largely reduced after hydroxyurea therapy in granulocytes of MPN patients. Levels of eNOS protein expression were stimulated by Calreticulin mutations in granulocytes of essential thrombocythemia. Immunocytochemical analyses of CD34+ cells showed a more pronounced enhancement of angiogenic factors than in granulocytes. Increased gene expression linked to the proinflammatory TGFβ and MAPK signaling pathways were detected in CD34+ cells of MPN patients. In conclusion, the angiogenesis is increased in several cell types of MPN patients supported by the transcriptional activation of inflammation-related target genes, and is not limited to bone marrow stroma cells. It also appears that some of the benefit of hydroxyurea therapy of the MPN is mediated by effects on angiogenic factors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Social defeat in adolescent mice increases vulnerability to alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Arias, Marta; Navarrete, Francisco; Blanco-Gandia, Maria Carmen; Arenas, Maria Carmen; Bartoll-Andrés, Adrián; Aguilar, Maria A; Rubio, Gabriel; Miñarro, José; Manzanares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This study employs an oral operant conditioning paradigm to evaluate the effects of repeated social defeat during adolescence on the reinforcing and motivational actions of ethanol in adult OF1 mice. Social interaction, emotional and cognitive behavioral aspects were also analyzed, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments were performed to study gene expression changes in the mesocorticolimbic and hypothalamus-hypophysis-adrenal (HHA) axis. Social defeat did not alter anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze or cognitive performance in the passive avoidance and Hebb-Williams tests. A social interaction test revealed depression-like symptoms and social subordination behavior in defeated OF1 mice. Interestingly, social defeat in adolescence significantly increased the number of effective responses, ethanol consumption values and motivation to drink. Finally, real-time PCR analyses revealed that social defeat significantly increased tyrosine hydroxylase and corticotropin-releasing hormone in the ventral tegmental area and paraventricular nucleus, respectively. In contrast, mu-opioid receptor gene expression was decreased in the nucleus accumbens of socially defeated mice. In summary, these findings suggest that exposure to social defeat during adolescence increases vulnerability to the rewarding effects of ethanol without affecting emotional or cognitive performance. The gene expression alterations we have observed in the mesocorticolimbic and HHA axis systems of defeated mice could be related with their increased ethanol consumption. These results endorse future research into pharmacological strategies that modulate these systems for the treatment of social stress-related alcohol consumption problems. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Increased tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Hallahan, D E; Spriggs, D R; Beckett, M A; Kufe, D W; Weichselbaum, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    We report that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA is increased after treatment with x-rays in certain human sarcoma cells. An increase in TNF-alpha mRNA is accompanied by the increased production of TNF-alpha protein. TNF-alpha enhances radiation lethality in both TNF-alpha-producing and -nonproducing tumor cells. These data suggest that, in addition to the direct cytotoxic effects of x-rays, production of TNF-alpha may add to radiation lethality through autocrine and paracrine mech...

  10. Atherosclerotic risk factors are increased in clinically healthy subjects with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Borch-Johnsen, K; Jensen, G

    1995-01-01

    in clinically healthy subjects. All healthy 40-65 year-old participants with microalbuminuria, examined within the first 21 months of The Copenhagen City Heart Study, were invited, and 28 were studied. An age- and sex-matched group of 60 randomly chosen subjects with normoalbuminuria served as control......Increased morbidity and mortality from atherosclerotic vascular disease were observed in subjects with slightly elevated urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER), known as microalbuminuria. Therefore, the association between microalbuminuria and established atherogenic risk factors was studied...... and fasting serum insulin concentration were slightly elevated in the microalbuminuric group but not statistically significant. It is concluded that microalbuminuria in clinically healthy subjects is associated with increased levels of atherogenic risk factors. This may contribute to the increased vascular...

  11. Factors associated with increased risk for pain catastrophizing in patients with chronic neck pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Jun; Lee, Rippy; Yoon, Duck Mi; Yoon, Kyung Bong; Kim, Kiwook; Kim, Shin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pain catastrophizing is becoming increasingly recognized as a clinically important psychological factor in chronic musculoskeletal pain. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, we have identified factors associated with an increased risk for pain catastrophizing in chronic neck pain (CNP) patients. We obtained data from our medical database on 331 patients who were treated for neck pain as their chief complaint at our clinic. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) was used to define a high pain catastrophizing state (PCS score ≥21) in this study. Patient demographics, pain-related factors, and psychological factors were evaluated with logistic regression analysis to identify risk factors of high pain catastrophizing among patients with CNP. A total of 256 patients with CNP satisfied the study inclusion criteria and were included in the analyses. The median PCS score was 16 (range, 0–45), and 86 of 256 patients (33.5%) reported a PCS score ≥21. In multivariate analysis, high pain intensity, clinical insomnia, and a high level of depression/anxiety were strongly associated with high pain catastrophizing in patients with CNP. Depression was the strongest predictor of high pain catastrophizing, with an odds ratio of 7.35 (95% confidence interval 2.23–24.22). High pain catastrophizing was not significantly related to age, gender, comorbidities, or neck pain-related physical symptoms. In conclusion, poor psychological states should be addressed as an important part of pain management in CNP patients who are susceptible to high pain catastrophizing. PMID:27631217

  12. Factors increasing vulnerability to health effects before, during and after floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Dianne; Ebi, Kristie L; Forsberg, Bertil

    2013-12-11

    Identifying the risk factors for morbidity and mortality effects pre-, during and post-flood may aid the appropriate targeting of flood-related adverse health prevention strategies. We conducted a systematic PubMed search to identify studies examining risk factors for health effects of precipitation-related floods, among Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) member countries. Research identifying flood-related morbidity and mortality risk factors is limited and primarily examines demographic characteristics such as age and gender. During floods, females, elderly and children appear to be at greater risk of psychological and physical health effects, while males between 10 to 29 years may be at greater risk of mortality. Post-flood, those over 65 years and males are at increased risk of physical health effects, while females appear at greater risk of psychological health effects. Other risk factors include previous flood experiences, greater flood depth or flood trauma, existing illnesses, medication interruption, and low education or socio-economic status. Tailoring messages to high-risk groups may increase their effectiveness. Target populations differ for morbidity and mortality effects, and differ pre-, during, and post-flood. Additional research is required to identify the risk factors associated with pre- and post-flood mortality and post-flood morbidity, preferably using prospective cohort studies.

  13. Factors Increasing Vulnerability to Health Effects before, during and after Floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Lowe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the risk factors for morbidity and mortality effects pre-, during and post-flood may aid the appropriate targeting of flood-related adverse health prevention strategies. We conducted a systematic PubMed search to identify studies examining risk factors for health effects of precipitation-related floods, among Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD member countries. Research identifying flood-related morbidity and mortality risk factors is limited and primarily examines demographic characteristics such as age and gender. During floods, females, elderly and children appear to be at greater risk of psychological and physical health effects, while males between 10 to 29 years may be at greater risk of mortality. Post-flood, those over 65 years and males are at increased risk of physical health effects, while females appear at greater risk of psychological health effects. Other risk factors include previous flood experiences, greater flood depth or flood trauma, existing illnesses, medication interruption, and low education or socio-economic status. Tailoring messages to high-risk groups may increase their effectiveness. Target populations differ for morbidity and mortality effects, and differ pre-, during, and post-flood. Additional research is required to identify the risk factors associated with pre- and post-flood mortality and post-flood morbidity, preferably using prospective cohort studies.

  14. Factors Increasing Vulnerability to Health Effects before, during and after Floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Dianne; Ebi, Kristie L.; Forsberg, Bertil

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the risk factors for morbidity and mortality effects pre-, during and post-flood may aid the appropriate targeting of flood-related adverse health prevention strategies. We conducted a systematic PubMed search to identify studies examining risk factors for health effects of precipitation-related floods, among Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) member countries. Research identifying flood-related morbidity and mortality risk factors is limited and primarily examines demographic characteristics such as age and gender. During floods, females, elderly and children appear to be at greater risk of psychological and physical health effects, while males between 10 to 29 years may be at greater risk of mortality. Post-flood, those over 65 years and males are at increased risk of physical health effects, while females appear at greater risk of psychological health effects. Other risk factors include previous flood experiences, greater flood depth or flood trauma, existing illnesses, medication interruption, and low education or socio-economic status. Tailoring messages to high-risk groups may increase their effectiveness. Target populations differ for morbidity and mortality effects, and differ pre-, during, and post-flood. Additional research is required to identify the risk factors associated with pre- and post-flood mortality and post-flood morbidity, preferably using prospective cohort studies. PMID:24336027

  15. From therapeutic to elective cesarean deliveries: factors associated with the increase in cesarean deliveries in Chiapas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyermuth, María Graciela; Muños, José Alberto; Ochoa, María Del Pilar

    2017-05-25

    Cesarean deliveries have increased over the past decade in Mexico, including those states with high percentages of indigenous language speakers, e.g., Chiapas. However, the factors contributing to this trend and whether they affect indigenous languages populations remain unknown. Thus, this work aims to identify some of the factors controlling the prevalence of cesarean sections (C-sections) in Chiapas between the 2011-2014 period. We analyzed certified birth data, compiled by the Subsystem of Information on Births of the Secretary of Health and the National Institute of Statistics and Geography, and information regarding the Human Development Index (HDI), assembled by the United Nations Development Program. A descriptive analysis of the variables and a multilevel logistics regression model were employed to assess the role of the different factors in the observed trends. The results show that the factors contributing to the increased risk of C-sections are (i) women residing in municipalities with indigenous population and municipalities with high HDIs, (ii) advanced schooling, (iii) frequent prenatal checkups, and (iv) deliveries occurring in private health clinics. Furthermore, C-sections might also be associated with prolonged hospital stays. The increasing frequency of C-sections among indigenous populations in Chiapas seems to be related to public policies aimed at reducing maternal mortality in Mexico. Therefore, public health policy needs to be revisited to ensure that reproductive rights are being respected.

  16. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy Increases Growth Factor Release from Equine Platelet-Rich Plasma In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A. Seabaugh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionExtracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT and platelet-rich plasma (PRP are common treatments for soft tissue injuries in horses. Shockwave triggers cell specific responses to promote healing. Growth factors released from PRP also promote healing. It has been hypothesized that greater growth factor release would amplify the healing process. The combination of ESWT and PRP could promote healing in injured tendons and ligaments in the horse. The objective of this study was to determine if application of shockwaves to PRP samples increases the concentration of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and platelet-derived growth factor ββ (PDGF-ββ released from the platelets in vitro.Materials and methodsPRP was produced from blood drawn from six horses. The PRP from each horse was exposed to the following treatments: (1 positive control (freeze-thaw cycle, (2 untreated negative control, or shockwaves with either (3 a “standard probe” (ESWT-S with a 2 cm focal width and medium energy density or (4 a “power probe” (ESWT-P with a 1 cm focal width and high energy density. After each treatment, the samples were centrifuged, and the supernatant was harvested. The supernatant was then used for growth factor quantification via commercially available ELISA kits for TGF-β1 and PDGF-ββ.ResultsConcentrations of TGF-β1 and PDGF-ββ in PRP that underwent a freeze-thaw cycle were significantly increased compared with all other treatments. Both ESWT-S and ESWT-P resulted in significantly increased TGF-β1 concentrations, 46 and 33%, respectively, when compared with the negative control. Both ESWT-S and ESWT-P resulted in significantly increased PDGF-ββ concentrations, 219 and 190%, respectively, when compared with the negative control.DiscussionThese data indicate that the application of ESWT to PRP increases the expression of growth factors in vitro. This suggests that the combination therapy of local PRP injection followed by ESWT

  17. FACTORS INFLUENCING FARMERS’ DECISION TO INCREASE BEEF CATTLE BUSINESS SCALE IN CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Roessali

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to analyze factors influencing farmers decision to increase beef cattle business scale through improved technology. The research was conducted by using a survey method. Five districts were purposively selected in three base areas and two non-base areas of beef cattle in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Twenty beef cattle groups were selected based on the largest cattle population managed and their performance, while 196 respondents were randomly selected. Farmers decision to increase beef cattle business scale was determined using a probit model. Result of the research indicated that the number of family labor and expectation to increase income had a significantly positive influence on the farmers’ decision to increase beef cattle business scale. It meant that if the total number of family labor increased, so did the farmers’ decision to increase the beef cattle business scale. Also, if the expectation to revenue increased, so did the farmers’ decision to increase the beef cattle business scale. On the contrary, education level and business risk had negative significant influence on the farmers decision to increase the beef cattle business scale with the significance levels of 1.1 and 0.84, respectively.

  18. Human factors dimensions in the evolution of increasingly automated control rooms for near-earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the control and ground support for all of NASA's unmanned near-earth satellites. Traditionally, each satellite had its own dedicated mission operations room. In the mid-seventies, an integration of some of these dedicated facilities was begun with the primary objective to reduce costs. In this connection, the Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) was designed. MSOCC represents currently a labor intensive operation. Recently, Goddard has become increasingly aware of human factors and human-machine interface issues. A summary is provided of some of the attempts to apply human factors considerations in the design of command and control environments. Current and future activities with respect to human factors and systems design are discussed, giving attention to the allocation of tasks between human and computer, and the interface for the human-computer dialogue.

  19. Immune modulation and increased neurotrophic factor production in multiple sclerosis patients treated with testosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giesser Barbara S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system with a pronounced neurodegenerative component. It has been suggested that novel treatment options are needed that target both aspects of the disease. Evidence from basic and clinical studies suggests that testosterone has an immunomodulatory as well as a potential neuroprotective effect that could be beneficial in MS. Methods Ten male MS patients were treated with 10 g of gel containing 100 mg of testosterone in a cross-over design (6 month observation period followed by 12 months of treatment. Blood samples were obtained at three-month intervals during the observation and the treatment period. Isolated blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs were used to examine lymphocyte subpopulation composition by flow cytometry and ex vivo protein production of cytokines (IL-2, IFNγ, TNFα, IL-17, IL-10, IL-12p40, TGFβ1 and growth factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor BDNF, platelet-derived growth factor PDGF-BB, nerve growth factor NGF, and ciliary neurotrophic factor CNTF. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH skin recall tests were obtained before and during treatment as an in vivo functional immune measure. Results Testosterone treatment significantly reduced DTH recall responses and induced a shift in peripheral lymphocyte composition by decreasing CD4+ T cell percentage and increasing NK cells. In addition, PBMC production of IL-2 was significantly decreased while TGFβ1 production was increased. Furthermore, PBMCs obtained during the treatment period produced significantly more BDNF and PDGF-BB. Conclusion These results are consistent with an immunomodulatory effect of testosterone treatment in MS. In addition, increased production of BDNF and PDGF-BB suggests a potential neuroprotective effect. Trial Registration NCT00405353 http://www.clinicaltrials.gov

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Will heightened awareness of risk factors slow its increase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, S M; Flowers, F P

    1993-06-01

    Although squamous cell carcinoma of the skin is still less common than basal cell carcinoma, its incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Cumulative sun exposure is a major risk factor, and deterioration of the ozone layer combined with life-style choices that promote time in the sun may account for part of the increased incidence. Other risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma include exposure to ionizing radiation, arsenic, or industrial chemicals; viral infection; preexisting burns and scars; and immunosuppression. Actinic keratosis is considered a precancerous lesion that should be watched closely. Treatment methods for squamous cell carcinoma vary depending on the size and location of the lesion. Knowledge of high-risk locations and appropriate treatment choices ensures proper care and decreases the likelihood of metastasis.

  1. Epidermal transformation leads to increased perlecan synthesis with heparin-binding-growth-factor affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapanadechopone, P; Tumova, S; Jiang, X

    2001-01-01

    cells was significantly increased in both mRNA and protein levels. JB6 perlecan was exclusively substituted with heparan sulphate, whereas that of RT101 contained some additional chondroitin sulphate. Detailed structural analysis of the heparan sulphate (HS) chains from perlecan of both cell types...... revealed that their overall sulphation and chain length were similar (approximately 60 kDa), but the HS chains of tumour-cell-derived perlecan were less sulphated. This resulted from reduced 2-O- and 6-O-sulphation, but not N-sulphation, and an increase in the proportion of unsulphated disaccharides....... Despite this, the heparan sulphate of RT101- and JB6-derived perlecan bound fibroblast growth factor-1, -2, -4 and -7 and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor with similar affinity. Therefore abundant tumour-derived perlecan may support the angiogenic responses seen in vivo and be a key player...

  2. Growth Factors Released from Gelatin Hydrogel Microspheres Increase New Neurons in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaguchi, Kanako; Jinnou, Hideo; Kaneko, Naoko; Sawada, Masato; Hikita, Takao; Saitoh, Shinji; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that new neurons are continuously generated by endogenous neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult mammalian brain. Some of these new neurons migrate to injured brain tissues and differentiate into mature neurons, suggesting that such new neurons may be able to replace neurons lost to degenerative disease or injury and improve or repair neurological deficits. Here, we tested whether delivering growth factors via gelatin hydrogel microspheres would support neurogenesis in the SVZ. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons in the SVZ. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons migrating from the SVZ towards the injured striatum in a stroke model in mouse. These results suggest that the strategy of using gelatin hydrogel microspheres to achieve the sustained release of growth factors holds promise for the clinical regeneration of damaged brain tissues from endogenous neural stem cells in the adult SVZ. PMID:23093979

  3. Growth Factors Released from Gelatin Hydrogel Microspheres Increase New Neurons in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Nakaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that new neurons are continuously generated by endogenous neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult mammalian brain. Some of these new neurons migrate to injured brain tissues and differentiate into mature neurons, suggesting that such new neurons may be able to replace neurons lost to degenerative disease or injury and improve or repair neurological deficits. Here, we tested whether delivering growth factors via gelatin hydrogel microspheres would support neurogenesis in the SVZ. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons in the SVZ. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons migrating from the SVZ towards the injured striatum in a stroke model in mouse. These results suggest that the strategy of using gelatin hydrogel microspheres to achieve the sustained release of growth factors holds promise for the clinical regeneration of damaged brain tissues from endogenous neural stem cells in the adult SVZ.

  4. Development of investment infrastructure as the factor of the increase in investment attractiveness of the region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheltenkov, Alexander; Syuzeva, Olga; Vasilyeva, Elena; Sapozhnikova, Ekaterina

    2017-10-01

    The research of influence of investment infrastructure on the investment attractiveness of the territory is investigated in the article. The conditions and factors of the increase in investment attractiveness of the territory on the basis of development of infrastructure are given. The authors pay special attention to development of transport infrastructure in the region, to features of this sphere. The authors prove that transport possesses the important role in increase in investment activity in the territory of the region. The authors prove, that the development of transport infrastructure will allow to solve a number of economic problems and promote the investment activity in the region.

  5. Exercise induced hypercoagulability, increased von Willebrand factor and decreased thyroid hormone concentrations in sled dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anne Kirstine Havnsøe; Legind, Pernille; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Sled dogs performing endurance races have been reported to have a high incidence of gastric erosions or ulcerations and an increased risk of gastro intestinal bleeding leading to death in some cases. In addition, these dogs also become hypothyroid during training and exercise. Canine hypothyroidi......, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor (vWf), D-dimer, platelet number, thyroid hormones, hematocrit and C-reactive protein (CRP)....

  6. Social and economic factors of the natural risk increasing: estimation of the Russian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Petrova

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to assess quantitatively social and economic factors that determine vulnerability of Russian regions to natural risk, to trace the space differences of the considered factors, and to group the regions by their similarity. In order to indicate the regional differences in social and economic development, equipment condition, dangerous substances accumulation, and social trouble four the most suitable parameters were estimated, including the per capita production of Gross Regional Product (GRP, capital consumption, volume of total toxic waste, and crime rate. Increase of the first parameter causes vulnerability reducing, the increase of the last three causes its increasing. Using multidimensional cluster analysis five types of regions were found for Russia according to similarity of the considered parameters. These types are characterized with higher value of a single (rarely two chosen parameter, which seems to be sufficient enough to affect natural risks increasing in these regions in near future. Only few regions belonging to the fifth type proved to have rather high value of GRP and relatively low values of the other parameters. The negative correlation was found between a number of natural disasters (ND and the per capita GRP in case when some parameters reached anomalously high value. The distinctions between regions by prevailing different parameters, which result in natural risk increasing, help risk management to find directions where to focus on.

  7. FACTORS INFLUENCING FARMERS’ DECISION TO INCREASE BEEF CATTLE BUSINESS SCALE IN CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Roessali

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to analyze factors influencing farmers' decision to increasebeef cattle business scale through improved technology. The research was conducted by using a surveymethod. Five districts were purposively selected in three base areas and two non-base areas of beefcattle in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Twenty beef cattle groups were selected based on the largestcattle population managed and their performance, while 196 respondents were randomly selected.Farmers’ decision to increase beef cattle business scale was determined using a probit model. Result ofthe research indicated that the number of family labor and expectation to increase income had asignificantly positive influence on the farmers’ decision to increase beef cattle business scale. It meantthat if the total number of family labor increased, so did the farmers’ decision to increase the beef cattlebusiness scale. Also, if the expectation to revenue increased, so did the farmers’ decision to increase thebeef cattle business scale. On the contrary, education level and business risk had negative significantinfluence on the farmers’ decision to increase the beef cattle business scale with the significance levelsof 1.1 and 0.84, respectively.

  8. Metabolic acidosis increases fibroblast growth factor 23 in neonatal mouse bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy S; Culbertson, Christopher D; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Bushinsky, David A

    2012-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) significantly increases with declining renal function, leading to reduced renal tubular phosphate reabsorption, decreased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and increased left ventricular hypertrophy. Elevated FGF23 is associated with increased mortality. FGF23 is synthesized in osteoblasts and osteocytes; however, the mechanisms by which it is regulated are not clear. Patients with chronic kidney disease have decreased renal acid excretion leading to metabolic acidosis, which has a direct effect on bone cell activity. We hypothesized that metabolic acidosis would directly increase bone cell FGF23 production. Using cultured neonatal mouse calvariae, we found that metabolic acidosis increased medium FGF23 protein levels as well as FGF23 RNA expression at 24 h and 48 h compared with incubation in neutral pH medium. To exclude that the increased FGF23 was secondary to metabolic acidosis-induced release of bone mineral phosphate, we cultured primary calvarial osteoblasts. In these cells, metabolic acidosis increased FGF23 RNA expression at 6 h compared with incubation in neutral pH medium. Thus metabolic acidosis directly increases FGF23 mRNA and protein in mouse bone. If these results are confirmed in humans with chronic kidney disease, therapeutic interventions to mitigate acidosis, such as bicarbonate administration, may also lower levels of FGF23, decrease left ventricular hypertrophy, and perhaps even decrease mortality.

  9. What Factors Control the Trend of Increasing AAOD Over the United States in the Last Decade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Henze, Daven K.; Grell, Georg A.; Torres, Omar; Jethva, Hiren; Lamsal, Lok N.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the spatial and temporal trends of absorbing aerosol optical depth (AAOD) in the last decade over the United States (U.S.) observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Monthly average OMI AAOD has increased over broad areas of the central U.S. from 2005 to 2015, by up to a factor of 4 in some grid cells (60 km resolution). The AAOD increases in all seasons, although the percentage increases are larger in summer (June-July-August) than in winter (December-January-February) by a factor of 3. Despite enhancements in AAOD, OMI AOD exhibits insignificant trend over most of the U.S. except parts of the central and western U.S., the latter which may partly be due to decreases in precipitation. Trends in AAOD contrast with declining trends in surface concentrations of black carbon (BC) aerosol. Interannual variability of local biomass burning emissions of BC may contribute to the positive trend in AAOD over the western U.S. Changes in both dust aerosol measured at the surface (in terms of concentration and size) and dust AAOD indicate distinct enhancements, especially over the central U.S. by 50-100%, which appears to be one of the major factors that impacts positive trends in AAOD.

  10. Factors Affecting Canagliflozin-Induced Transient Urine Volume Increase in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Takano, Kazuhiko; Iijima, Hiroaki; Kubo, Hajime; Maruyama, Nobuko; Hashimoto, Toshio; Arakawa, Kenji; Togo, Masanori; Inagaki, Nobuya; Kaku, Kohei

    2017-02-01

    Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors exhibit diuretic activity, which is a possible mechanism underlying the cardiovascular benefit of these inhibitors. However, the osmotic diuresis-induced increase in urine volume, and the risk of dehydration have been of concern with SGLT2 inhibitor treatment. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism underlying SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin-induced diuresis in Japanese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Thirteen T2DM patients received a daily oral dose of 100 mg canagliflozin before breakfast for 6 days. Blood and urine samples were collected at predetermined time points. The primary endpoint was evaluation of correlations between changes from baseline in urine volume and factors that are known to affect urine volume and between actual urine volume and these factors. Canagliflozin transiently increased urine volume and urinary sodium excretion on Day 1 with a return to baseline levels thereafter. Canagliflozin administration increased urinary glucose excretion, which was sustained during repeated-dose administration. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and N-terminal pro-b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels decreased, while plasma renin activity increased. On Day 1 of treatment, changes in sodium and potassium excretion were closely correlated with changes in urine output. A post hoc multiple regression analysis showed changes in sodium excretion and water intake as factors that affected urine volume change at Day 1. Furthermore, relative to that at baseline, canagliflozin decreased blood glucose throughout the day and increased plasma total GLP-1 after breakfast. Canagliflozin induced transient sodium excretion and did not induce water intake at Day 1; hence, natriuresis rather than glucose-induced osmotic diuresis may be a major factor involved in the canagliflozin-induced transient increase in urine output. In addition, canagliflozin decreased plasma ANP and NT-proBNP levels and

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases vascular endothelial growth factor expression and enhances angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Shih-Ya; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-10-15

    Chondrosarcomas are a type of primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity for local invasion and distant metastasis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is commonly upregulated during neurogenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanism involved in BDNF-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells. Here, we knocked down BDNF expression in chondrosarcoma cells and assessed their capacity to control VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We found knockdown of BDNF decreased VEGF expression and abolished chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis effects in vivo in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel plug nude mouse models. In addition, in the xenograft tumor angiogenesis model, the knockdown of BDNF significantly reduced tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. BDNF increased VEGF expression and angiogenesis through the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α signaling pathway. Finally, we analyzed samples from chondrosarcoma patients by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of BDNF and VEGF protein in 56 chondrosarcoma patients was significantly higher than in normal cartilage. In addition, the high level of BDNF expression correlated strongly with VEGF expression and tumor stage. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF increases VEGF expression and enhances angiogenesis through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α. Therefore, BDNF may represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy for human chondrosarcoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Advances in pubertal growth and factors influencing it: Can we increase pubertal growth?

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    Ashraf Soliman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Puberty is a period of development characterized by partially concurrent changes which includes growth acceleration, alteration in body composition and appearance of secondary sex characteristics. Puberty is characterized by an acceleration and then deceleration in skeletal growth. The initiation, duration and amount of growth vary considerably during the growth spurt. Pubertal growth and biological maturation are dynamic processes regulated by a variety of genetic and environmental factors. Changes in skeletal maturation and bone mineral accretion concomitant with the stage of pubertal development constitute essential components in the evaluation of growth during this pubertal period. Genetic, endocrine and nutritional factors and ethnicity contribute variably to the amount of growth gained during this important period of rapid changes. Many studies investigated the possibility of increasing pubertal growth to gain taller final adult height in adolescents with idiopathic short stature (ISS. The pattern of pubertal growth, its relation to sex maturity rating and factors affecting them has been addressed in this review. The results of different trials to increase final adult height of adolescents using different hormones have been summarized. These data enables Endocrinologists to give in-depth explanations to patients and families about the efficacy and clinical significance as well as the safety of using these therapies in the treatment of adolescents with ISS.

  13. Understanding the Process and Success Factors to Increase Synergies between Research and Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Ballou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While the synergies between research for knowledge discovery and teaching are widely accepted, the evidence is mostly implicit, verbal and poorly documented, and many times contradictive. In an effort to better understand the interaction between these important activities, the main objective of this study is to collect knowledge illustrating their synergies through specific cases. A complementary objective is to identify the important factors, which professionals should implement or avoid for increasing the likelihood that these synergies will be derived. To collect the necessary information personal interviews have been used to address the research question. The same set of questions was sent to several professionals known to have extensive experience in the areas of academic research and teaching. The respondents were asked to: 1. briefly describe the knowledge area in which the synergies occurred; 2. For the specified knowledge area, to please describe in summary form but specifically how they derived the synergy between research and teaching; and 3. Based on their personal experience, to please identify the important factors to increase the likelihood that academic research will produce benefits for teaching, and vice versa. The results strongly corroborate the importance of academic research for effective teaching. Based on the results, a set of recommendations are made to faculty members and school administrators to further promote academic research as an important factor for more effective teaching.

  14. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF. After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC, MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC, MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001; however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008 and microvessel density (P<0.001. Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  15. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.C. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zheng, G.F. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Ganzhou, Ganzhou (China); Wu, L.; Ou Yang, L.Y.; Li, W.X. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-08-08

    Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF). After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC), MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC), MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001); however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008) and microvessel density (P<0.001). Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  16. Excess LIGHT contributes to placental impairment, increased secretion of vasoactive factors, hypertension, and proteinuria in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Parchim, Nicholas F; Iriyama, Takayuki; Luo, Renna; Zhao, Cheng; Liu, Chen; Irani, Roxanna A; Zhang, Weiru; Ning, Chen; Zhang, Yujin; Blackwell, Sean C; Chen, Lieping; Tao, Lijian; Hicks, M John; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2014-03-01

    Preeclampsia, a prevalent hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, is believed to be secondary to uteroplacental ischemia. Accumulating evidence indicates that hypoxia-independent mediators, including inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, are associated with preeclampsia, but it is unclear whether these signals directly contribute to placental damage and disease development in vivo. We report that LIGHT, a novel tumor necrosis factor superfamily member, is significantly elevated in the circulation and placentas of preeclamptic women compared with normotensive pregnant women. Injection of LIGHT into pregnant mice induced placental apoptosis, small fetuses, and key features of preeclampsia, hypertension and proteinuria. Mechanistically, using neutralizing antibodies specific for LIGHT receptors, we found that LIGHT receptors herpes virus entry mediator and lymphotoxin β receptor are required for LIGHT-induced placental impairment, small fetuses, and preeclampsia features in pregnant mice. Accordingly, we further revealed that LIGHT functions through these 2 receptors to induce secretion of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and endothelin-1, 2 well-accepted pathogenic factors in preeclampsia, and thereby plays an important role in hypertension and proteinuria in pregnant mice. Lastly, we extended our animal findings to human studies and demonstrated that activation of LIGHT receptors resulted in increased apoptosis and elevation of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 secretion in human placental villous explants. Overall, our human and mouse studies show that LIGHT signaling is a previously unrecognized pathway responsible for placental apoptosis, elevated secretion of vasoactive factors, and subsequent maternal features of preeclampsia, and reveal new therapeutic opportunities for the management of the disease.

  17. Macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy: increased risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan

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    Kobayashi Noritoshi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to estimate whether the macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy is associated with a risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma using a case-control study in Japanese subjects, a population known to have a high prevalence of CagA-positive H. pylori infection. Methods Two hundred and fifty-three patients who were diagnosed as having esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 253 sex- and age-matched controls were enrolled in the present study. The macroscopic extent of gastric mucosal atrophy was evaluated based on the Kimura and Takemoto Classification. A conditional logistic regression model with adjustment for potential confounding factors was used to assess the associations. Results Body gastritis, defined endoscopically, was independently associated with an increased risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion Our findings suggest that macroscopic body gastritis may be a risk factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Japan. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  18. Stimulation of body weight increase and epiphyseal cartilage growth by insulin like growth factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) to induce growth in hypophysectomized immature rats was tested by continuous infusion of the partially purified factor at daily doses of 6, 21, and 46 mU for an 8-day period. A dose-dependent growth of the proximal epiphyseal cartilage of the tibia and an associated stimulation of the primary spongiosa were produced by these amounts of IGF. The two highest doses of IGF also resulted in dose-dependent increases of body weight. Gel permeation of the sera at neutrality showed that the large-molecular-weight IGF binding protein was not induced by the infusion of IGF, whereas it ws generated in the sera of hypophysectomized rats that were infused with daily doses of 86 mU of human growth hormone.

  19. Decreasing Risk Factors for Later Alcohol Use and Antisocial Behaviors in Children in Foster Care by Increasing Early Promotive Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pears, Katherine C; Kim, Hyoun K; Fisher, Philip A

    2016-05-01

    Children in foster care are at high risk for poor psychosocial outcomes, including school failure, alcohol and other substance abuse, and criminal behaviors. Promoting healthy development by increasing broad-impact positive skills may help reduce some of the risk factors for longer-term negative outcomes. School readiness has been linked to a number of positive outcomes across childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, and may also boost intermediary positive skills such as self-competence. This paper presents findings from a longitudinal study involving 192 children in foster care who were 5 years old at the start of the study. They participated in a randomized controlled trial of a school readiness program to prepare them for kindergarten. Outcomes were assessed at third grade (9 years old) on variables associated with risk for later involvement in substance use and delinquency. These included positive attitudes towards alcohol use, positive attitudes towards antisocial behaviors, and involvement with deviant peers. Results showed that the intervention decreased positive attitudes towards alcohol use and antisocial behaviors. Further, the mediating role of children's self-competence was tested. The intervention positively influenced children's third-grade self-competence, which in turn, decreased their involvement with deviant peers. Findings suggest that promoting school readiness in children in foster care can have far-reaching, positive effects and that increased self-competence may be a mechanism for reducing risk.

  20. Modifiable Factors Leading to Increased Length of Stay after Carotid Endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaffey, James H; LaPar, Damien J; Tracci, Margret C; Cherry, Kenneth J; Kern, John A; Kron, Irving; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2017-02-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a commonly performed vascular operation. Yet, postoperative length of stay (LOS) varies greatly even within institutions. In this study, the morbidity and mortality, as well as financial impact of increased LOS were reviewed to establish modifiable factors associated with prolonged hospital stay. The Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative database was used to identify all patients undergoing primary CEA at a single institution between June 1, 2011 and November 28, 2014. Preoperative patient characteristics, intraoperative details, postoperative factors, long-term outcomes, and cost data were reviewed using an Institutional Review Board-approved prospectively collected database. Multivariate analysis was used to determine statistical difference between patients with LOS ≤1 day and >1 day. Complete 30-day variable and cost data were available for 219 patients with an average follow-up of 12 months. Seventy-nine (36%) patients had an LOS > 1 day. Variables determined to be statistically significant predictors of prolonged LOS included preoperative creatinine (P = 0.02) and severe congestive heart failure (P = 0.05) with self-pay status (P = 0.02) and preoperative beta-blocker therapy (P = 0.04) being protective. Shunt placement (P = 0.04), arterial re-exploration, and postoperative cardiac (P = 0.001) or neurological (P = 0.03) complications also resulted in prolonged hospitalization. Specific modifiable risk factors that contributed to increased LOS included operative start time after noon (P = 0.04), drain placement (P = 0.05), prolonged operative time (101 vs. 125 min, P = 0.01), return to the operating room (P = 0.01), and postoperative hypertension (P = 0.02) or hypotension (P = 0.04). Of note, there was no difference in LOS associated with technique (conventional versus eversion), patch use (P = 0.49), protamine administration (P = 0.60), electroencephalogram monitoring (P

  1. Isolated increase in serum alkaline phosphatase after liver transplantation: risk factors and outcomes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng-Maw; Ho, Ming-Chih; Shau, Wen-Yi; Hu, Rey-Heng; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Wu, Yao-Ming; Lee, Po-Huang

    2013-01-01

    Isolated increase in serum alkaline phosphatase (IISAlp) is frequently observed in liver transplant recipients visiting outpatient clinics. However, whether the increase is associated with risk factors or poor survival is unknown. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of liver transplant recipients who were followed up during 1999-2009 and had IISAlp 1 month after liver transplantation, which was sustained for at least 6 months. Clinical parameters, survival, and risk factors were analyzed and compared between recipients who survived longer than 6 months after transplantation. Among 307 liver transplant recipients, 44 had IISAlp. Compared with the control group, the patients with IISAlp were more frequently of the pediatric population, recipients of female donor or living-related partial liver grafts, and found to have biliary-related pretransplant disorders, lower body weight, and shorter warm ischemic time (P liver transplantation was 6.3 ± 0.8 months. The mean follow-up duration was 5.5 ± 0.2 years. Stepwise multivariate analysis showed that being a pediatric or living-related liver transplant recipient was an independent risk factor for IISAlp, with adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of 5.41 (2.59-11.28) and 3.0 (0.98-9.27), respectively. Therefore, being a pediatric or living-related liver transplant recipient was an independent risk factor for IISAlp. However, IISAlp was not associated with poor survival after liver transplantation. Hence, patients who have undergone liver transplantation do not require frequent routine examination of serum alkaline phosphatase levels. Copyright © 2012 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lifestyle Risk Factors Increase the Risk of Hospitalization for Sciatica: Findings of Four Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Rahman; Euro, Ulla; Heliövaara, Markku; Hirvensalo, Mirja; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Karppinen, Jaro; Lahti, Jouni; Rahkonen, Ossi; Raitakari, Olli T; Solovieva, Svetlana; Yang, Xiaolin; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Lallukka, Tea

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of lifestyle risk factors on the risk of hospitalization for sciatica and to determine whether overweight or obesity modifies the effect of leisure-time physical activity on hospitalization for sciatica. We included 4 Finnish prospective cohort studies (Health 2000 Survey, Mobile Clinic Survey, Helsinki Health Study, and Young Finns Study) consisting of 34,589 participants and 1259 hospitalizations for sciatica during 12 to 30 years of follow-up. Sciatica was based on hospital discharge register data. We conducted a random-effects individual participant data meta-analysis. After adjustment for confounding factors, current smoking at baseline increased the risk of subsequent hospitalization for sciatica by 33% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13%-56%), whereas past smokers were no longer at increased risk. Obesity defined by body mass index increased the risk of hospitalization for sciatica by 36% (95% CI 7%-74%), and abdominal obesity defined by waist circumference increased the risk by 41% (95% CI 3%-93%). Walking or cycling to work reduced the risk of hospitalization for sciatica by 33% (95% CI 4%-53%), and the effect was independent of body weight and other leisure activities, while other types of leisure activities did not have a statistically significant effect. Smoking and obesity increase the risk of hospitalization for sciatica, whereas walking or cycling to work protects against hospitalization for sciatica. Walking and cycling can be recommended for the prevention of sciatica in the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Current lifestyle factors that increase risk of T2DM in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N; Du, S M; Ma, G S

    2017-07-01

    The Report on the Status of Nutrition and Chronic Diseases of Chinese residents (2015) indicated that the prevalence of diabetes was 9.7% among adults aged ⩾18 years, which markedly increased from 2.6% in 2002 within 10 years. In addition to the social economic factors, transitions in food consumption, behavioral and lifestyle playing the important roles in the fast increase of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In 2010-2012, the cereal food consumption of Chinese residents was 337 g/d, vegetables consumption 269 g/d, fruit consumption 41 g/d, legume and legume products 11 g/d, dairy and dairy products consumption 25 g/d, meat consumption 90 g/d, edible oil consumption 42 g/d and dietary fiber 10.8 g/d. The traditional Chinese dietary pattern (high consumption of rice, pork and vegetables) is shifting towards a dietary pattern with high consumption of meats and edible oil but low consumption of cereals and vegetables. Smoking, breakfast omitting and high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages became popular. Insufficient physical activity rate was 31.7%. Less sleep duration and poorer sleep quality was also common for Chinese residents. Concerning early life factors, residents exposed to the Chinese famine (1959-1961) during fetal life and childhood had an increased risk of hyperglycemia. As a conclusion, current unhealthy lifestyle has inversely effect on the incidence and development of T2DM, especially for the increased intake of fat and carbohydrate, the transition of dietary pattern, the extension of sedentary time and the increasing rate of obesity. Lifestyle management should be taken seriously as a part of diabetes prevention.

  4. An empirical study to detect effective factors to increase number of moviegoers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Giyahi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an empirical study to detect important factors, which could increase the number of moviegoers. The study distributes a questionnaire among different people at four age groups including 35.2% (men, and 64.8% (women, most of them are single (between 21 to 30 years living at 3- to 4-member families, holding BA degree with 4 to 7 million Rials monthly salary. Inferential statistics tests, including Kolmogorov–Smirnov, binominal or ratio, Chi Square and Friedman, show that type of story, genre and artists, casts are considered as the most important factors in selection of film while quality of sound, seat comfort, ventilation of cinema hall are regarded as the most important factors in selection of cinema. In addition, cinema is not predominant pastime or hobby of individuals during holidays and existence of more attractive pastimes than cinema is the most important factor, which hinders individuals from going to cinema. Individuals go to cinema fewer than three times a year, primarily during the afternoon of holidays at the weekend. TV teasers and word of mouth advertisements are the most significant publicity tools for those individuals who intend to go to cinema halls. These two factors, i.e. TV teasers and word of mouth advertisements, are the most significant sources of studying individuals for the selection of film. Individuals almost select their favorite movies before going to cinema and if ticket is finished at the box office of cinema, they suspend watching film in another time and finally, they re-plan watching film. It should be noted that satisfaction of individuals from cinema is much more effective than their satisfaction from film.

  5. Association Between the Duration of Periodontitis and Increased Cardiometabolic Risk Factors: A 9-Year Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Toyoko; Yamazaki, Yoji; Fujiharu, Chika; Ishii, Takanori; Seto, Misae; Nishinoue, Norihide; Sasaki, Yoshiyuki; Nakai, Kumiko; Tanaka, Hideki; Kawato, Takayuki; Maeno, Masao

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that periodontitis and cardiometabolic disease such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes are associated; however, there have been very few prospective cohort studies on this topic. Therefore, we conducted a 9-year follow-up study to examine the relationship between the duration of periodontitis and cardiometabolic risk factors, including hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and obesity. The study participants comprised 572 adult industrial workers (417 men and 155 women; mean age, 37.4 years) who had undergone annual medical and dental health examinations from 2003 to 2012; the evaluation of the four cardiometabolic risk factors in 2003 revealed normal values in all the participants. We investigated the relationship between the cumulative duration of the presence of periodontal pockets, which is a major symptom of periodontitis, and the presence of cardiometabolic risk factors after 9 years using multiple logistic regression analysis. The odds ratio (OR) for the presence of ≥1 cardiometabolic risk factor in participants with a cumulative duration of periodontal pockets for ≥6 years was significantly higher than that in participants without pockets. The ORs for the onset of obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia were higher in participants with a cumulative duration of periodontal pockets for ≥6 years than those in participants without pockets or in participants with a cumulative duration of periodontal pockets for ≤5 years, and all the differences, except dyslipidemia, were significant. Chronic periodontitis was significantly associated with having cardiometabolic risk factors during the 9-year observation period, suggesting that the risk of cardiometabolic disease might increase in people who have untreated periodontitis.

  6. Empirical testing of Kotler's high-performance factors to increase sales growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Dayan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and/or objectives: The primary objective of this study is to empirically test Kotler's (2003 high-performance model which ensures an increase in sales growth. More specifically, the study explores the influence of process variables (as measured by marketing strategies, resources management (as measured by the management of labour, materials, machines, information technology and energy and organisational variables (as measured by TQM and organisational culture on sales growth in the food, motorcar and high-technology manufacturing industries. Problem investigated Various research studies suggest that the managers of firms are continuously challenged in their attempts to increase their sales (Morre, 2007; Pauwels, Silva Risso, Srinivasan & Hanssens, 2004: 142-143; Gray & Hayes, 2007: 1. Kotler (2003 suggests a model that leads to a high performing business. The question is posed as to whether this model can be used to increase sales growth in all businesses. This study seeks to develop a generic model to increase sales growth across industries by using an adapted version of Kotler's (2003 high-performance model. The study investigates the application of this adapted model on the food, motorcar and high-technology manufacturing industries. Design and/or methodology and/or approach: An empirical causal research design that includes 770 marketing and product development practitioners from multinational food, motorcar and high-technology manufacturing firms, was used in this study. A response rate of 76.1% was achieved as only 571 useable questionnaires were returned. The internal reliability and discriminant validity of the measuring instrument were assessed by the calculation of Cronbach alpha coefficients and the conducting an exploratory factor analysis respectively. Structural Equation Modelling SEM was used to statistically test the relationships between the independent variables (marketing strategies, resource management, TQM and

  7. Examining factors that increase and decrease stress in adolescent community college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Nancy R; Norris, Anne E

    2011-12-01

    In contrast to adolescents attending traditional universities, adolescents attending community colleges represent a large but relatively unstudied population with respect to stress and mental health issues. The purpose of this study was to determine what factors increase and decrease stress in a sample of adolescent community college students (N = 166). Findings from a self-administered questionnaire indicated that students had moderate levels of stress and resilience. Contrary to predictions, males demonstrated statistically significant higher levels of stress than females, but as expected, resilience had a significant negative effect on stress (p < .05). Practice and research implications are discussed for nurses in pediatric settings. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Increased insulin/insulin growth factor signaling advances the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkiewicz, Magdalena A; Stern, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms by which attainment of specific body sizes trigger developmental transitions to adulthood (e.g. puberty or metamorphosis) are incompletely understood. In Drosophila, metamorphosis is triggered by ecdysone synthesis from the prothoracic gland (PG), whereas growth rate is increased by insulin/insulin growth factor signalling (IIS). Transgene-induced activation of PI3K, the major effector of IIS, within the PG advances the onset of metamorphosis via precocious ecdysone synthesis, raising the possibility that IIS triggers metamorphosis via PI3K activation in the PG. Here we show that blocking the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway in the insulin producing cells (IPCs) increases IIS. This increased IIS increases larval growth rate and also advances the onset of metamorphosis, which is accompanied by precocious ecdysone synthesis and increased transcription of at least one ecdysone biosynthetic gene. Our observations suggest that IIS is regulated by PKA pathway activity in the IPCs. In addition, taken together with previous findings, our observations are consistent with the possibility that, in Drosophila, attainment of a specific body size triggers metamorphosis via the IIS-mediated activation of PI3K and hence ecdysone synthesis in the PG.

  9. Increased insulin/insulin growth factor signaling advances the onset of metamorphosis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena A Walkiewicz

    Full Text Available Mechanisms by which attainment of specific body sizes trigger developmental transitions to adulthood (e.g. puberty or metamorphosis are incompletely understood. In Drosophila, metamorphosis is triggered by ecdysone synthesis from the prothoracic gland (PG, whereas growth rate is increased by insulin/insulin growth factor signalling (IIS. Transgene-induced activation of PI3K, the major effector of IIS, within the PG advances the onset of metamorphosis via precocious ecdysone synthesis, raising the possibility that IIS triggers metamorphosis via PI3K activation in the PG. Here we show that blocking the protein kinase A (PKA pathway in the insulin producing cells (IPCs increases IIS. This increased IIS increases larval growth rate and also advances the onset of metamorphosis, which is accompanied by precocious ecdysone synthesis and increased transcription of at least one ecdysone biosynthetic gene. Our observations suggest that IIS is regulated by PKA pathway activity in the IPCs. In addition, taken together with previous findings, our observations are consistent with the possibility that, in Drosophila, attainment of a specific body size triggers metamorphosis via the IIS-mediated activation of PI3K and hence ecdysone synthesis in the PG.

  10. Priming Dental Pulp Stem Cells With Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Increases Angiogenesis of Implanted Tissue-Engineered Constructs Through Hepatocyte Growth Factor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Caroline; Rochefort, Gael Y.; Bascetin, Rumeyza; Ying, Hanru; Lesieur, Julie; Sadoine, Jérémy; Beckouche, Nathan; Berndt, Sarah; Novais, Anita; Lesage, Matthieu; Hosten, Benoit; Vercellino, Laetitia; Merlet, Pascal; Le-Denmat, Dominique; Marchiol, Carmen; Letourneur, Didier; Nicoletti, Antonino; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Poliard, Anne; Salmon, Benjamin; Germain, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies based on implanting cellularized biomaterials are promising therapeutic approaches for the reconstruction of large tissue defects. A major hurdle for the reliable establishment of such therapeutic approaches is the lack of rapid blood perfusion of the tissue construct to provide oxygen and nutrients. Numerous sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) displaying angiogenic potential have been characterized in the past years, including the adult dental pulp. Establishment of efficient strategies for improving angiogenesis in tissue constructs is nevertheless still an important challenge. Hypoxia was proposed as a priming treatment owing to its capacity to enhance the angiogenic potential of stem cells through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. The present study aimed to characterize additional key factors regulating the angiogenic capacity of such MSCs, namely, dental pulp stem cells derived from deciduous teeth (SHED). We identified fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) as a potent inducer of the release of VEGF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by SHED. We found that FGF-2 limited hypoxia-induced downregulation of HGF release. Using three-dimensional culture models of angiogenesis, we demonstrated that VEGF and HGF were both responsible for the high angiogenic potential of SHED through direct targeting of endothelial cells. In addition, FGF-2 treatment increased the fraction of Stro-1+/CD146+ progenitor cells. We then applied in vitro FGF-2 priming to SHED before encapsulation in hydrogels and in vivo subcutaneous implantation. Our results showed that FGF-2 priming is more efficient than hypoxia at increasing SHED-induced vascularization compared with nonprimed controls. Altogether, these data demonstrate that FGF-2 priming enhances the angiogenic potential of SHED through the secretion of both HGF and VEGF. Significance The results from the present study show that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) priming is more

  11. MILK WITH INCREASED CONCENTRATION OF MELATONIN PACKAGING FACTORS ON CONSUMER PURCHASE INTENTION

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    Maria Patricia Milagres

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The conjoint analysis of factors was used employed to develop a label for the packaging of milk with increased concentration of melatonin. Three factors were selected with three or two levels for the assembly of packaging: packaging design (“blue design with stars and pouring milk”, “white without drawing” and “blue stars with and without drawing”, name (“milk night “and” melatonin “ and informative text about getting natural melatonin by night milking, and the benefits of this compound (“with” and “without”. Twelve packaging designs were created based on a complete factorial arrangement. The designs were presented to 144 consumers who were asked to assess purchase intent of each package. For the joint analysis of factors, the ideal product or more likely to purchase for the most consumers would be blue with stars and packaging design of milk pouring, named milk night and in the presence of informational text, demonstrating that consumers like a package that brings the product and that contains information described. Therefore, the packaging has a major influence on consumer choice and can contribute positively or negatively to the acceptance of food.

  12. Factors responsible for increased percent recirculation in arterio-venous fistula among the haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, T; Chowdhury, M N U; Jahan, F; Islam, M N; Khan, F M; Sikder, N H; Rahman, M

    2013-04-01

    Recirculation is an important issue in haemodialysis (HD) patients as increased percent recirculation causes decreased dialysis delivery of the patients. The purpose of the study was to determine the amount and factors of recirculation in those patients. The study was a cross sectional one carried in the Department of Nephrology, Dhaka Medical College and Hospital during October 2010 to September 2011. A total of 118 end stage renal disease patients with arterio-venous fistula who were on HD for more than 3 months were purposively selected. The degree of recirculation was measured with urea based two needle technique method. For each patient distances between arterial and venous and distances of needles from fistula and its directions were recorded. Echocardiography and A-V fistula Colour Doppler Ultrasound were also performed. The mean A-V fistula recirculation was 8.1 +/- 5.5% with a range 0-66%. The most common factors were close proximity and improper arterial and venous needles placement. No difference was observed between diabetic and non diabetic also between hypertensive and normotensive. A-V fistula recirculation is common occurrence in HD patients and the most common factors of recirculation are misplacement and close proximity of needles therefore emphasis should be given on education and training of HD staffs.

  13. Risk factors associated with increased mortality of farmed Pacific oysters in Ireland during 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Tracy A; Morrissey, Teresa; Geoghegan, Fiona; Martin, S Wayne; Lyons, Kieran; Ashe, Seán; More, Simon J

    2014-02-01

    The Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, plays a significant role in the aquaculture industry in Ireland. Episodes of increased mortality in C. gigas have been described in many countries, and in Ireland since 2008. The cause of mortality events in C. gigas spat and larvae is suspected to be multifactorial, with ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1, in particular OsHV-1μvar) considered a necessary, but not sufficient, cause. The objectives of the current study were to describe mortality events that occurred in C. gigas in Ireland during the summer of 2011 and to identify any associated environmental, husbandry and oyster endogenous factors. A prospective cohort study was conducted during 2010-2012, involving 80 study batches, located at 24 sites within 17 bays. All 17 bays had previously tested positive for OsHV-1μvar. All study farmers were initially surveyed to gather relevant data on each study batch, which was then tracked from placement in the bay to first grading. The outcome of interest was cumulative batch-level mortality (%). Environmental data at high and low mortality sites were compared, and a risk factor analysis, using a multiple linear regression mixed effects model, was conducted. Cumulative batch mortality ranged from 2% to 100% (median=16%, interquartile range: 10-34%). The final multivariable risk factor model indicated that batches imported from French hatcheries had significantly lower mortalities than non-French hatcheries; sites which tested negative for OsHV-1μvar during the study had significantly lower mortalities than sites which tested positive and mortalities increased with temperature until a peak was reached. There were several differences between the seed stocks from French and non-French hatcheries, including prior OsHV-1μvar exposure and ploidy. A range of risk factors relating to farm management were also considered, but were not found significant. The relative importance of prior OsHV-1μvar infection and ploidy will become clearer

  14. Mortality risk factor analysis in colonic perforation: would retroperitoneal contamination increase mortality in colonic perforation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ri Na; Kye, Bong-Hyeon; Kim, Gun; Kim, Hyung Jin; Cho, Hyeon-Min

    2017-10-01

    Colonic perforation is a lethal condition presenting high morbidity and mortality in spite of urgent surgical treatment. This study investigated the surgical outcome of patients with colonic perforation associated with retroperitoneal contamination. Retrospective analysis was performed for 30 patients diagnosed with colonic perforation caused by either inflammation or ischemia who underwent urgent surgical treatment in our facility from January 2005 to December 2014. Patient characteristics were analyzed to find risk factors correlated with increased postoperative mortality. Using the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the Enumeration of Mortality and Morbidity (POSSUM) audit system, the mortality and morbidity rates were estimated to verify the surgical outcomes. Patients with retroperitoneal contamination, defined by the presence of retroperitoneal air in the preoperative abdominopelvic CT, were compared to those without retroperitoneal contamination. Eight out of 30 patients (26.7%) with colonic perforation had died after urgent surgical treatment. Factors associated with mortality included age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, and the ischemic cause of colonic perforation. Three out of 6 patients (50%) who presented retroperitoneal contamination were deceased. Although the patients with retroperitoneal contamination did not show significant increase in the mortality rate, they showed significantly higher ASA physical status classification than those without retroperitoneal contamination. The mortality rate predicted from Portsmouth POSSUM was higher in the patients with retroperitoneal contamination. Patients presenting colonic perforation along with retroperitoneal contamination demonstrated severe comorbidity. However, retroperitoneal contamination was not found to be correlated with the mortality rate.

  15. Increased Nerve Growth Factor Signaling in Sensory Neurons of Early Diabetic Rats Is Corrected by Electroacupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Lucia Nori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN, characterized by early hyperalgesia and increased nerve growth factor (NGF, evolves in late irreversible neuropathic symptoms with reduced NGF support to sensory neurons. Electroacupuncture (EA modulates NGF in the peripheral nervous system, being effective for the treatment of DPN symptoms. We hypothesize that NGF plays an important pathogenic role in DPN development, while EA could be useful in the therapy of DPN by modulating NGF expression/activity. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ injection. One week after STZ, EA was started and continued for three weeks. NGF system and hyperalgesia-related mediators were analyzed in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG and in their spinal cord and skin innervation territories. Our results show that four weeks long diabetes increased NGF and NGF receptors and deregulated intracellular signaling mediators of DRG neurons hypersensitization; EA in diabetic rats decreased NGF and NGF receptors, normalized c-Jun N-terminal and p38 kinases activation, decreased transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 ion channel, and possibly activated the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (Nf-κB. In conclusion, NGF signaling deregulation might play an important role in the development of DPN. EA represents a supportive tool to control DPN development by modulating NGF signaling in diabetes-targeted neurons.

  16. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zolfagharian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bee venom (BV is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Methods: Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50, and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD values of BV were determined. Results: Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa, respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. Conclusion: BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro.

  17. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera) Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfagharian, Hossein; Mohajeri, Mohammad; Babaie, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Bee venom (BV) is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera) on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50), and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT) and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT) tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD) values of BV were determined. Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs) = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa), respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro.

  18. Chinese herb cinobufagin-reduced cancer pain is associated with increased peripheral opioids by invaded CD3/4/8 lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Yuan, Shenjun; Wan, Xin-Nian; Zhan, Ling; Yu, Xue-Qin; Zeng, Jian-Hong; Li, Hong; Zhang, Wen; Hu, Xiang-Yang; Ye, Yi-Fei; Hu, Wei

    2017-02-14

    To investigate the mechanism of cinobufagin-reduced cancer pain in mouse cancer pain model and in vitro cell co-culture system. Female Kunming mice were randomly divided into 4 groups. One group of animals was set as normal control without any treatment. Other three groups of animals received H22 hepatoma cell inoculation in right hind paw. At day 9 after inoculation, mice in other three groups were injected intraperitoneally once a day for 8 days with the solvent, morphine or cinobufagin, respectively. The pain behavior was recorded daily. On the last day, all mice were sacrificed and xenograft tissues homogenate and plasma levels of β-endorphin (β-END), corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA assay. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β-END, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and the μ-opioid receptor (μ-OR) in the xenograft tissues. Immunofluorescence was used to localize lymphocytes with expression of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ in xenograft tumors and adjacent tissues. Mice splenic lymphocytes and H22 hepatoma carcinoma ascites cells were prepared for co-culture. β-END and CRF were detected in co-culture supernatants. The MTT assay and cytometry were used to assess cell proliferation. RT-PCR was conducted to determine the gene expression of POMC and Cathepsin L (CTSL). Chemotaxis was examined using a transwell-based migration assay. Compared to the model group, the thermal and mechanical pain thresholds were increased in mice after cinobufagin treatment. The expression of β-END and CRF in the plasma and tumor tissues of cinobufagin group were much higher than that of the model group mice, but the expression of IL-1β in the plasma and tumor tissues was much lower than that in the model group mice. Meanwhile, the expression of β-END, POMC and μ-OR proteins was significantly increased in the xenograft tissues from cinobufagin group. Lymphocyte population of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ were also

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus increases energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanfeng; Bomberg, Eric; Billington, Charles J; Levine, Allen S; Kotz, Catherine M

    2010-06-08

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) decreases food intake and body weight, but few central sites of action have been identified for its effect on energy expenditure. The hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMH) is important in regulating energy metabolism. Our previous work indicated that BDNF in the VMH reduced food intake. The purposes of the study were to determine: 1) if BDNF in the VMH increases energy expenditure (EE); 2) if BDNF-enhanced thermogenesis results from increased spontaneous physical activity (SPA) and resting metabolic rate (RMR); and 3) if VMH BDNF thermogenic effects are mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue (BAT). BDNF (0.5 microg) was injected into the VMH of male Sprague-Dawley rats and oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, food intake and SPA were measured for 24h in an indirect calorimeter. Animals were sacrificed 4h after BDNF injection, and BAT UCP1 gene expression was measured with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. BDNF significantly decreased food and water intake, and body weight gain. Heat production and RMR were significantly elevated for 9h immediately after BDNF injection. BDNF increased SPA and EE during SPA (aEE) within 9h after injection although BDNF had no effect on 0-24h SPA and aEE. BDNF did not induce a significant increase in BAT UCP1 expression. In conclusion, VMH BDNF reduces body weight by decreasing food intake and increasing EE consequent to increased SPA and RMR, suggesting that the VMH is an important site of BDNF action to influence energy balance. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Increased expression of protease-activated receptor 4 and Trefoil factor 2 in human colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyu Yu

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4, a member of G-protein coupled receptors family, was recently reported to exhibit decreased expression in gastric cancer and esophageal squamous cancer, yet increased expression during the progression of prostate cancer. Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2, a small peptide constitutively expressed in the gastric mucosa, plays a protective role in restitution of gastric mucosa. Altered TFF2 expression was also related to the development of gastrointestinal cancer. TFF2 has been verified to promote cell migration via PAR4, but the roles of PAR4 and TFF2 in the progress of colorectal cancer are still unknown. In this study, the expression level of PAR4 and TFF2 in colorectal cancer tissues was measured using real-time PCR (n = 38, western blotting (n=38 and tissue microarrays (n = 66. The mRNA and protein expression levels of PAR4 and TFF2 were remarkably increased in colorectal cancer compared with matched noncancerous tissues, especially in positive lymph node and poorly differentiated cancers. The colorectal carcinoma cell LoVo showed an increased response to TFF2 as assessed by cell invasion upon PAR4 expression. However, after intervention of PAR4 expression, PAR4 positive colorectal carcinoma cell HT-29 was less responsive to TFF2 in cell invasion. Genomic bisulfite sequencing showed the hypomethylation of PAR4 promoter in colorectal cancer tissues and the hypermethylation in the normal mucosa that suggested the low methylation of promoter was correlated to the increased PAR4 expression. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the up-regulated expression of PAR4 and TFF2 frequently occurs in colorectal cancer tissues, and that overexpression of PAR4 may be resulted from promoter hypomethylation. While TFF2 promotes invasion activity of LoVo cells overexpressing PAR4, and this effect was significantly decreased when PAR4 was knockdowned in HT-29 cells. Our findings will be helpful in further investigations into the

  1. Factors Predicting Adherence to Risk Management Behaviors of Women at Increased Risk for Developing Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Kerry A.; Miller, Suzanne M.; Roussi, Pagona; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Lymphedema affects 20-30% of women following breast cancer treatment. However, even when women are informed, they do not necessarily adhere to recommended lymphedema self-management regimens. Utilizing the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing framework, we assessed cognitive and emotional factors influencing adherence to lymphedema risk management. Methods Women with breast cancer who had undergone breast and lymph node surgery were recruited through the Fox Chase Cancer Centre breast clinic. Participants (N=103) completed measures of lymphedema-related perceived risk, beliefs and expectancies, distress, self-regulatory ability to manage distress, knowledge, and adherence to risk management behaviors. They then received the American Cancer Society publication “Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know”. Cognitive and affective variables were reassessed at 6- and 12-months post-baseline. Results Maximum likelihood multilevel model analyses indicated that overall adherence increased over time, with significant differences between baseline and 6- and 12- month assessments. Adherence to wearing gloves was significantly lower than that for all other behaviors except electric razor use. Distress significantly decreased, and knowledge significantly increased, over time. Greater knowledge, higher self-efficacy to enact behaviors, lower distress, and higher self-regulatory ability to manage distress were associated with increased adherence. Conclusions Women who understand lymphedema risk management and feel confident in managing this risk are more likely to adhere to recommended strategies. These factors should be rigorously assessed as part of routine care to ensure that women have the self-efficacy to seek treatment and the self-regulatory skills to manage distress, which may undermine attempts to seek medical assistance. PMID:24970542

  2. Factors predicting adherence to risk management behaviors of women at increased risk for developing lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Kerry A; Miller, Suzanne M; Roussi, Pagona; Taylor, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema affects 20-30% of women following breast cancer treatment. However, even when women are informed, they do not necessarily adhere to recommended lymphedema self-management regimens. Utilizing the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing framework, we assessed the cognitive and emotional factors influencing adherence to lymphedema risk management. Women with breast cancer who had undergone breast and lymph node surgery were recruited through the Fox Chase Cancer Center breast clinic. Participants (N = 103) completed measures of lymphedema-related perceived risk, beliefs and expectancies, distress, self-regulatory ability to manage distress, knowledge, and adherence to risk management behaviors. They then received the American Cancer Society publication "Lymphedema: What Every Woman with Breast Cancer Should Know." Cognitive and affective variables were reassessed at 6 and 12 months post-baseline. Maximum likelihood multilevel model analyses indicated that overall adherence increased over time, with significant differences between baseline and 6- and 12-month assessments. Adherence to wearing gloves was significantly lower than that for all other behaviors except electric razor use. Distress significantly decreased, and knowledge significantly increased, over time. Greater knowledge, higher self-efficacy to enact behaviors, lower distress, and higher self-regulatory ability to manage distress were associated with increased adherence. Women who understand lymphedema risk management and feel confident in managing this risk are more likely to adhere to recommended strategies. These factors should be rigorously assessed as part of routine care to ensure that women have the self-efficacy to seek treatment and the self-regulatory skills to manage distress, which may undermine attempts to seek medical assistance.

  3. Increased deposition of von Willebrand factor in the rat heart after local ionizing irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerma, M.; Loenen, M.M. van; Klein, H.R.; Bart, C.I.; Wondergem, J. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology (K1-P), Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands); Kruse, J.J.C.M. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology (K1-P), Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands); Dept. of Experimental Therapy (H6), Netherlands Cancer Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zurcher, C. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology (K1-P), Leiden Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands); Dept. of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-02-01

    Background and purpose: von willebrand factor (vWf), a glycoprotein involved in blood coagulation, is synthesized by endothelial cells. Increased amounts of vWf in blood plasma or tissue samples are indicative of damaged endothelium. In the present study, mRNA expression and localization of vWf were determined in irradiated rat heart tissue. Material and methods: sprague-dawley rats received local heart irradiation with a single dose of 0, 15, or 20 Gy. Hearts were dissected at different time points (up to 16 months) after irradiation. In a second experiment, rats were injected with the radioprotector amifostine (160 mg/kg, i.p.) 15-20 min before irradiation and sacrificed after 6 months. Immunohistochemistry was performed using a polyclonal anti-vWf antibody. Serial sections were subjected to a general rat endothelial cell immunostaining (RECA-1) or a collagen staining (picrosirius red). mRNA expression was determined by using PCR. Results: in control tissue, all endothelial cells lining the lumen of the endocardium and coronary arteries, but not capillary endothelial cells, were stained for vWf. 1 month after irradiation with both 15 and 20 Gy, myocardial capillaries became immunoreactive. From 3 months onward, staining was observed also within the extracellular matrix (ECM) of fibrotic areas. At mRNA level, no changes in vWf could be observed at all time points after irradiation, suggesting that vWf deposition was not due to increased biosynthesis of the protein. In sections of amifostine-treated rat hearts, vWf staining was increased to a lesser extent. Conclusion: these dose- and time-dependent increases in deposition of vWf indicate the presence of damaged endothelium in the irradiated rat heart. These increases in vWf accumulation precede development of fibrosis in the subendocardial layer and myocardium of the left ventricles, right ventricles, and atria. (orig.)

  4. Resveratrol Reactivates Latent HIV through Increasing Histone Acetylation and Activating Heat Shock Factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaoyun; Pan, Xiaoyan; Xu, Xinfeng; Lin, Jian; Que, Fuchang; Tian, Yuanxin; Li, Lin; Liu, Shuwen

    2017-06-07

    The persistence of latent HIV reservoirs presents a significant challenge to viral eradication. Effective latency reversing agents (LRAs) based on "shock and kill" strategy are urgently needed. The natural phytoalexin resveratrol has been demonstrated to enhance HIV gene expression, although its mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that resveratrol was able to reactivate latent HIV without global T cell activation in vitro. Mode of action studies showed resveratrol-mediated reactivation from latency did not involve the activation of silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1), which belonged to class-3 histone deacetylase (HDAC). However, latent HIV was reactivated by resveratrol mediated through increasing histone acetylation and activation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). Additionally, synergistic activation of the latent HIV reservoirs was observed under cotreatment with resveratrol and conventional LRAs. Collectively, this research reveals that resveratrol is a natural LRA and shows promise for HIV therapy.

  5. Apple, Cherry, and Blackcurrant Increases Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation in Liver of Transgenic Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balstad, Trude; Paur, Ingvild; Poulsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    slightly higher whole-body NF-B activation at 4 h, and all 3 experimental groups had higher NF-B activation at 6 h. LPS-induced NF-B activation in liver was increased with all 3 experimental diets, but no effects were observed in other organs. Our findings indicate that high intakes of lyophilized fruits......Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-B) is essential in normal physiology, and several human disorders involve inappropriate regulation of NF-B. Diets dominated by plant-based foods protect against chronic diseases, and several food derived compounds have been identified as promising NF-B modulators. We...... investigated the effects of diets supplemented with apple, blackcurrant, or cherries on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-B activation in transgenic NF-B-luciferase mice. Whole body and organ specific NF-B activities were determined. The mice had ad libitum access to the respective experimental diets for 7...

  6. [Psychological violence against women: What factors increase the risk of this kind of intimate partner abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safranoff, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Using data from Argentina's National Study on Violence Against Women [Estudio nacional sobre violencias contra las mujeres] carried out in 2015, the article identifies the risk factors that increase women's vulnerability to psychological abuse. Findings show that women who are more prone to be victims of this kind of partner violence are those who are less educated, older, do not earn a wage for their work, live with children at home, are involved in less "formal" long-term relationships, as well as those whose male partners have a lower educational level than their own and/or have alcohol problems and/or were victims or witnesses of violence during their childhood. The article suggests possible intervention strategies to eradicate abuse, which should be primarily targeted at empowering women and strengthening their independence from their partners.

  7. Psychological violence against women: What factors increase the risk of this kind of intimate partner abuse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Safranoff

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Using data from Argentina’s National Study on Violence Against Women [Estudio nacional sobre violencias contra las mujeres] carried out in 2015, the article identifies the risk factors that increase women’s vulnerability to psychological abuse. Findings show that women who are more prone to be victims of this kind of partner violence are those who are less educated, older, do not earn a wage for their work, live with children at home, are involved in less “formal” long-term relationships, as well as those whose male partners have a lower educational level than their own and/or have alcohol problems and/or were victims or witnesses of violence during their childhood. The article suggests possible intervention strategies to eradicate abuse, which should be primarily targeted at empowering women and strengthening their independence from their partners.

  8. Depletion of mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 causes increased apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue-Yamauchi, Akane, E-mail: ainoyama@research.twmu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan); Oda, Hideaki [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, 8-1 Kawada-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8666 (Japan)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 is required for mitochondrial fission in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 participates in inhibition of colon cancer cell apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DRP1 can inhibit apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release. -- Abstract: Mitochondria play a critical role in regulation of apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, by releasing apoptogenic factors including cytochrome c. Growing evidence suggests that dynamic changes in mitochondrial morphology are involved in cellular apoptotic response. However, whether DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission is required for induction of apoptosis remains speculative. Here, we show that siRNA-mediated DRP1 knockdown promoted accumulation of elongated mitochondria in HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells. Surprisingly, DRP1 down-regulation led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of these cells. A higher rate of cytochrome c release and reductions in mitochondrial membrane potential were also revealed in DRP1-depleted cells. Taken together, our present findings suggest that mitochondrial fission factor DRP1 inhibits colon cancer cell apoptosis through the regulation of cytochrome c release and mitochondrial membrane integrity.

  9. Serum preadipocyte factor-1 is increased in fetuses of pregnancy complicated with severe preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qunyan; Li, Jie; Wang, Hanzhi; Han, Cong; Tian, Ting; Zhu, Qiuyuan; Huang, Hefeng; Dong, Minyue

    2013-09-23

    Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1), an inhibitor of adipocyte differentiation, is increased in fetal blood of small for gestational age (SGA) and is considered a factor involved in determining adiposity and associated with high risk of metabolic diseases in adulthood. Preeclampsia is a condition closely associated with SGA, however, the alteration of Pref-1 of in fetuses of preeclampsia remains unknown. The aims of the current investigation were to clarify the alteration of serum Pref-1 in fetuses of preeclamptic pregnancy and to explore possible role of Pref-1 in metabolic diseases in late life. Cord blood samples were taken at birth from 45 fetuses of normal pregnancy, 16 of gestational hypertension, 29 of mild preeclampsia and 29 of severe preeclampsia. Serum Pref-1 concentrations were measured with ELISA. There were significant differences in cord blood Pref-1 and neonatal birth weight among normal pregnancy, gestational hypertension, mild and severe preeclampsia (F=8.557, Ppregnancy, gestational hypertension and mild preeclampsia respectively (Ppregnancy, gestational hypertension and mild preeclampsia (P>0.05 for all). Fetal Pref-1 concentration was significantly negatively correlated with birth weight (R(2)=0.175, P=0.027 for severe preeclampsia; R(2)=0.209, Pcomplicated pregnancy, and it may be proposed that Pref-1 is among the possible mediators leading to high risk of metabolic diseases in adulthood. © 2013.

  10. Bothrops jararaca venom metalloproteinases are essential for coagulopathy and increase plasma tissue factor levels during envenomation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine M Yamashita

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Bleeding tendency, coagulopathy and platelet disorders are recurrent manifestations in snakebites occurring worldwide. We reasoned that by damaging tissues and/or activating cells at the site of the bite and systemically, snake venom toxins might release or decrypt tissue factor (TF, resulting in activation of blood coagulation and aggravation of the bleeding tendency. Thus, we addressed (a whether TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, an oxireductase involved in TF encryption/decryption, were altered in experimental snake envenomation; (b the involvement and significance of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP and serine proteinases (SVSP to hemostatic disturbances. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Crude Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV was preincubated with Na2-EDTA or AEBSF, which are inhibitors of SVMP and SVSP, respectively, and injected subcutaneously or intravenously into rats to analyze the contribution of local lesion to the development of hemostatic disturbances. Samples of blood, lung and skin were collected and analyzed at 3 and 6 h. Platelet counts were markedly diminished in rats, and neither Na2-EDTA nor AEBSF could effectively abrogate this fall. However, Na2-EDTA markedly reduced plasma fibrinogen consumption and hemorrhage at the site of BjV inoculation. Na2-EDTA also abolished the marked elevation in TF levels in plasma at 3 and 6 h, by both administration routes. Moreover, increased TF activity was also noticed in lung and skin tissue samples at 6 h. However, factor VII levels did not decrease over time. PDI expression in skin was normal at 3 h, and downregulated at 6 h in all groups treated with BjV. CONCLUSIONS: SVMP induce coagulopathy, hemorrhage and increased TF levels in plasma, but neither SVMP nor SVSP are directly involved in thrombocytopenia. High levels of TF in plasma and TF decryption occur during snake envenomation, like true disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome, and might be implicated in

  11. Bothrops jararaca venom metalloproteinases are essential for coagulopathy and increase plasma tissue factor levels during envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Karine M; Alves, André F; Barbaro, Katia C; Santoro, Marcelo L

    2014-05-01

    Bleeding tendency, coagulopathy and platelet disorders are recurrent manifestations in snakebites occurring worldwide. We reasoned that by damaging tissues and/or activating cells at the site of the bite and systemically, snake venom toxins might release or decrypt tissue factor (TF), resulting in activation of blood coagulation and aggravation of the bleeding tendency. Thus, we addressed (a) whether TF and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an oxireductase involved in TF encryption/decryption, were altered in experimental snake envenomation; (b) the involvement and significance of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP) and serine proteinases (SVSP) to hemostatic disturbances. Crude Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) was preincubated with Na2-EDTA or AEBSF, which are inhibitors of SVMP and SVSP, respectively, and injected subcutaneously or intravenously into rats to analyze the contribution of local lesion to the development of hemostatic disturbances. Samples of blood, lung and skin were collected and analyzed at 3 and 6 h. Platelet counts were markedly diminished in rats, and neither Na2-EDTA nor AEBSF could effectively abrogate this fall. However, Na2-EDTA markedly reduced plasma fibrinogen consumption and hemorrhage at the site of BjV inoculation. Na2-EDTA also abolished the marked elevation in TF levels in plasma at 3 and 6 h, by both administration routes. Moreover, increased TF activity was also noticed in lung and skin tissue samples at 6 h. However, factor VII levels did not decrease over time. PDI expression in skin was normal at 3 h, and downregulated at 6 h in all groups treated with BjV. SVMP induce coagulopathy, hemorrhage and increased TF levels in plasma, but neither SVMP nor SVSP are directly involved in thrombocytopenia. High levels of TF in plasma and TF decryption occur during snake envenomation, like true disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome, and might be implicated in engendering bleeding manifestations in severely-envenomed patients.

  12. MicroRNA gene polymorphisms and environmental factors increase patient susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Yin-Hung Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Micro RNAs (miRNAs are small RNA fragments that naturally exist in the human body. Through various physiological mechanisms, miRNAs can generate different functions for regulating RNA protein levels and balancing abnormalities. Abnormal miRNA expression has been reported to be highly related to several diseases and cancers. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in miRNAs have been reported to increase patient susceptibility and affect patient prognosis and survival. We adopted a case-control research design to verify the relationship between miRNAs and hepatocellular carcinoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 525 subjects, including 377 controls and 188 hepatocellular carcinoma patients, were selected. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP and real-time PCR were used to analyze miRNA146a (rs2910164, miRNA149 (rs2292832, miRNA196 (rs11614913, and miRNA499 (rs3746444 genetic polymorphisms between the control group and the case group. The results indicate that people who carry the rs3746444 CT or CC genotypes may have a significantly increased susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.88-4.30. In addition, when combined with environmental risk factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption, interaction effects were observed between gene polymorphisms and environmental factors (odds ratio [OR] = 4.69, 95% CI = 2.52-8.70; AOR = 3.38, 95% CI = 1.68-6.80. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that a significant association exists between miRNA499 SNPs and hepatocellular carcinoma. Gene-environment interactions of miRNA499 polymorphisms, smoking, and alcohol consumption might alter hepatocellular carcinoma susceptibility.

  13. Plasma factor VII-activating protease is increased by oral contraceptives and induces factor VII activation in-vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, Johannes J; Skouby, Sven O; Kluft, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) use influences the hemostatic system significantly and is a risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) has potential effects on hemostasis. The 1601GA genotype of the 1601G/A polymorphism in the FSAP gene expresses a FSAP...

  14. Risk Factors That Increase Risk of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlikowske, Karla; Gard, Charlotte C; Tice, Jeffrey A; Ziv, Elad; Cummings, Steven R; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2017-05-01

    Risk factors may differentially influence development of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive vs -negative breast cancer. We examined associations with strong, prevalent risk factors by ER subtype. Of 1 279 443 women age 35 to 74 years participating in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, 14 969 developed ER-positive and 3617 developed ER-negative invasive breast cancer. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) using Cox regression and compared ER subtype hazard ratios at representative ages or by menopausal status using Wald tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. For women age 40 years, compared with no prior biopsy, ER-positive vs ER-negative HRs were 1.53 (95% CI = 1.30 to 1.81) vs 1.26 (95% CI = 0.90 to 1.76) for nonproliferative disease, 1.63 (95% CI = 1.23 to 2.17) vs 1.41 (95% CI = 0.78 to 2.57) for proliferative disease without atypia, and 4.47 (95% CI = 2.88 to 6.96) vs 0.20 (95% CI = 0.02 to 2.51) for proliferative disease with atypia. Benign disease proliferation risk was stronger for ER-positive than ER-negative cancer for women age 35 years (Wald P = .04), age 40 years (Wald P = .04), and age 50 years (Wald P = .06). Among pre/perimenopausal women, body mass index (BMI) had a stronger association with ER-negative than ER-positive cancer (obese II/III vs. normal weight: HR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.19 to 1.94; vs 1.21, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.36). Increasing BMI similarly increased ER-positive and ER-negative cancer risk among postmenopausal hormone users (Wald P = .15) and nonusers (Wald P = .08). Associations with ER subtype varied by race/ethnicity across all ages (P breast cancer and breast density for specific ages. Strength of risk factor associations differed by ER subtype. Separate risk models for ER subtypes may improve identification of women for targeted prevention strategies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Factors influencing increased expertise for a sustainable workforce at a research centre in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, S; Draper, H R; Enarson, D A; Beyers, N; Claassens, M

    2014-12-21

    The Desmond Tutu Tuberculosis (TB) Centre (DTTC), Stellenbosch University, South Africa. 1) To determine whether access to designated funding is associated with the development of expertise in employees, and 2) which other factors are associated with the development of expertise in employees. This was a retrospective study. The target population consisted of all employees at the DTTC during the period 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2011. Improvement in expertise during employment was the primary outcome; the secondary outcome was an increase in educational level linked to the National Qualifications Framework. There was no association between access to funding and expertise development, but an association between the number of months employed and improvement of expertise during employment was observed (OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.02-1.04, P < 0.001), controlling for age at appointment, sex, access to designated funding and education level. The study shows that almost a third of employees increased their expertise, more than 90% had access to designated funding and personnel employed for a longer duration were more likely to experience improvements in expertise. We encourage research organisations in low- and middle-income countries to implement strategies to retain employees in order to build their expertise.

  16. Increased urinary excretion of platelet activating factor in mice with lupus nephritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macconi, D.; Noris, M.; Benfenati, E.; Quaglia, R.; Pagliarino, G. (Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Bergamo (Italy)); Remuzzi, G. (Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Bergamo (Italy) Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is present in urine from humans and experimental animals in normal conditions. Very little is known about changes in PAF urinary excretion under pathologic conditions and no data are available about the origin of PAF in the urine. In the present study we explored the possibility that immunologic renal disease is associated with an increase in PAF urinary excretion using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. To clarify the renal or extrarenal origin of urinary PAF we evaluated whether exogenously administered PAF (1-(1{prime},2{prime}-{sup 3}H)alkyl) is filtered through the glomerulus and excreted in the urine. The results show that: (1) urine from mice with lupus nephritis in the early phase of the disease contained amounts of PAF comparable to those excreted in normal mouse urine, (2) PAF levels increased when animals started to develop high grade proteinuria, (3) after intravenous injection of ({sup 3}H) PAF In nephritic mice, a negligible amount of ({sup 3}H) ether lipid, corresponding to ({sup 3}H)1-alkyl -2-acyl-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-2-acyl-GPC), was recovered from the 24 h urine extract.

  17. Solar radiation increases suicide rate after adjusting for other climate factors in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Hee-Jung; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Yu Jin; Choi, Nari; An, Hyonggin; Lee, Heon-Jeong

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that suicide rates have significant seasonal variations. There is seasonal discordance between temperature and solar radiation due to the monsoon season in South Korea. We investigated the seasonality of suicide and assessed its association with climate variables in South Korea. Suicide rates were obtained from the National Statistical Office of South Korea, and climatic data were obtained from the Korea Meteorological Administration for the period of 1992-2010. We conducted analyses using a generalized additive model (GAM). First, we explored the seasonality of suicide and climate variables such as mean temperature, daily temperature range, solar radiation, and relative humidity. Next, we identified confounding climate variables associated with suicide rate. To estimate the adjusted effect of solar radiation on the suicide rate, we investigated the confounding variables using a multivariable GAM. Suicide rate showed seasonality with a pattern similar to that of solar radiation. We found that the suicide rate increased 1.008 times when solar radiation increased by 1 MJ/m 2 after adjusting for other confounding climate factors (P Solar radiation has a significant linear relationship with suicide after adjusting for region, other climate variables, and time trends. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Increased Functional Half-life of Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 by Recovering a Vestigial Disulfide Bond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihun Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The fibroblast growth factor (FGF family of proteins contains an absolutely conserved Cys residue at position 83 that is present as a buried free cysteine. We have previously shown that mutation of the structurally adjacent residue, Ala66, to cysteine results in the formation of a stabilizing disulfide bond in FGF-1. This result suggests that the conserved free cysteine residue at position 83 in the FGF family of proteins represents a vestigial half-cystine. Here, we characterize the functional half-life and mitogenic activity of the oxidized form of the Ala66Cys mutation to identify the effect of the recovered vestigial disulfide bond between Cys83 and Cys66 upon the cellular function of FGF-1. The results show that the mitogenic activity of this mutant is significantly increased and that its functional half-life is greatly extended. These favorable effects are conferred by the formation of a disulfide bond that simultaneously increases thermodynamic stability of the protein and removes a reactive buried thiol at position 83. Recovering this vestigial disulfide by introducing a cysteine at position 66 is a potentially useful protein engineering strategy to improve the functional half-life of other FGF family members.

  19. Incremental increases in economic burden parallels cardiometabolic risk factors in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McQueen RB

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available R Brett McQueen,1 Vahram Ghushchyan,1,2 Temitope Olufade,3 John J Sheehan,4 Kavita V Nair,1 Joseph J Saseen1,5 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA; 2College of Business and Economics, American University of Armenia, Yerevan, Armenia; 3AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE, 4AstraZeneca, Fort Washington, PA, 5Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA Objective: Estimate the economic burden associated with incremental increases in the number of cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRFs in the US. Methods: We used the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey from 2010 to 2012 to create a retrospective cohort of people based on the number of CMRFs (one, two, and three or four, and a comparison cohort of people with zero CMRFs. CMRFs included abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, and elevated glucose and were defined using diagnostic codes, prescribed medications, and survey responses. Adjusted regression analysis was developed to compare health expenditures, utilization, and lost-productivity differences between the cohorts. Generalized linear regression was used for health care expenditures, and negative binomial regression was used for utilization and productivity, controlling for individual characteristics. Results: The number of CMRFs was associated with significantly more annual utilization, health care expenditures, and reduced productivity. As compared with people with zero CMRFs, people with one, two, and three or four CMRFs had 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06, 1.24, 1.37 (95% CI: 1.25, 1.51, and 1.39 (95% CI: 1.22, 1.57 times higher expected rate of emergency room visits, respectively. Compared with people with zero CMRFs, people with one, two, and three or four CMRFs had increased incremental health care expenditures of US$417 (95

  20. Factors Associated with Diffusely Increased Splenic F-18 FDG Uptake in Patients with Cholangiocarcinoma

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    Kim, Keunyoung; Kim, Seongjang; Kim, Injoo; Kim, Dong Uk; Kim, Heeyoung; Kim, Sojung; Ahn, Sang Hyun [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Although diffuse splenic {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) uptake exceeding hepatic activity, is considered abnormal, its clinical significance is rarely discussed in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine the contributing factors causing diffusely increased splenic FDG uptake in patients with cholangiocarcinoma. From January 2010 to March 2013, 140 patients (84 men, 56 women) were enrolled in this study. All patients had been diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma and underwent F-18 FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for the pretreatment staging work up. Clinical records were reviewed retrospectively. Various hematological parameters, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, CEA, CA19-9, pancreatic enzymes and liver function tests were conducted within 2 days after the F-18 FDG PET/CT study. Diffuse splenic uptake was observed in 23 patients (16.4%). Of those, 19 patients (82.6%) underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreastography (ERCP) 7 days before F-18 FDG PET/CT. The CRP level (p <0.001) and white blood cell count (p =0.023) were significantly higher in the group of patients with diffuse splenic FDG uptake. The hemoglobin (p <0.001) and the hematocrit (p <0.001) were significantly lower in patients with diffuse splenic FDG uptake. Pancreatic enzymes, liver function test results, and tumor markers were not significantly different between the patients who did or did not have diffusely increased splenic FDG uptake. The significant factors for diffuse splenic F-18 FDG uptake exceeding hepatic F-18 FDG uptake on multivariate analysis included: performing ERCP before F-18 FDG PET-CT (odds ratio [OR], 77.510; 95% CI, 7.624-132.105), and the presence of leukocytosis (OR, 12.436; 95% CI, 2.438-63.445) or anemia (OR, 1.211; 95% CI, 1.051-1.871). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that concurrent inflammation could be associated with diffusely increased splenic FDG uptake. We suggest that performing ERCP before F-18 FDG PET

  1. Systemic and cerebral vascular endothelial growth factor levels increase in murine cerebral malaria along with increased Calpain and caspase activity and can be reduced by erythropoietin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hoyer, Nils; Kildemoes, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria (CM) includes compromised microvascular perfusion, increased inflammation, cytoadhesion, and endothelial activation. These events cause blood-brain barrier disruption and neuropathology and associations with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF...... increased levels of VEGF in brain and plasma and decreased plasma levels of soluble VEGF receptor 2. EPO treatment normalized VEGF receptor 2 levels and reduced brain VEGF levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was significantly upregulated whereas cerebral HIF-2α and EPO levels remained unchanged...

  2. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) activation of astrocytes decreases spreading depolarization susceptibility and increases potassium clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Jessica L; Faideau, Mathilde; Aiba, Isamu; Pannasch, Ulrike; Escartin, Carole; Rouach, Nathalie; Bonvento, Gilles; Shuttleworth, C William

    2015-01-01

    Waves of spreading depolarization (SD) have been implicated in the progressive expansion of acute brain injuries. SD can persist over several days, coincident with the time course of astrocyte activation, but little is known about how astrocyte activation may influence SD susceptibility. We examined whether activation of astrocytes modified SD threshold in hippocampal slices. Injection of a lentiviral vector encoding Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) into the hippocampus in vivo, led to sustained astrocyte activation, verified by up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) at the mRNA and protein levels, as compared to controls injected with vector encoding LacZ. In acute brain slices from LacZ controls, localized 1M KCl microinjections invariably generated SD in CA1 hippocampus, but SD was never induced with this stimulus in CNTF tissues. No significant change in intrinsic excitability was observed in CA1 neurons, but excitatory synaptic transmission was significantly reduced in CNTF samples. mRNA levels of the predominantly astrocytic Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase pump α2 subunit were higher in CNTF samples, and the kinetics of extracellular K(+) transients during matched synaptic activation were consistent with increased K(+) uptake in CNTF tissues. Supporting a role for the Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase pump in increased SD threshold, ouabain, an inhibitor of the pump, was able to generate SD in CNTF tissues. These data support the hypothesis that activated astrocytes can limit SD onset via increased K(+) clearance and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting these glial cells could improve the outcome following acute brain injuries associated with SD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Sexual selection can both increase and decrease extinction probability: reconciling demographic and evolutionary factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ruiz, Carlos; Knell, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Previous theoretical models of the effect of sexual selection on average individual fitness in a population have mostly predicted that sexually selected populations should adapt faster and clear deleterious mutations more quickly than populations where sexual selection is not operating. While some laboratory studies have supported these predictions, others have not and studies of field systems have tended to find negative effects of sexual selection, or no effect. The negative effects of sexual selection found in field and other studies are usually ascribed to the costs associated with strong sexual selection acting on the population. Here, using an individual-based model that allows feedback between demographic and evolutionary processes, we find that sexual selection can lead to both increases and decreases in population-level fitness measures such as extinction probability and adaptation rate. Whether fitness increases or decreases depends on a variety of environmental and demographic factors including the nature of environmental change, the carrying capacity of the environment, the average fecundity of the population in question and the strength of condition dependence. In many cases, our model predicts that sexual selection leads to higher extinction probability in small populations because of an increased risk of demographic stochasticity, but lower extinction probability in larger populations because of faster adaptation rates. This is consistent with field studies that have mostly focussed on very small populations such as recently introduced birds, and tend to find negative effects, and also with laboratory studies that tend to use larger populations and have tended to find positive effects. These findings go at least some way towards an understanding of the apparent contradictions between theoretical predictions, laboratory studies and field data. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2016 British Ecological Society.

  4. Exercise increases serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerling, A; Kück, M; Tegtbur, U; Grams, L; Weber-Spickschen, S; Hanke, A; Stubbs, B; Kahl, K G

    2017-06-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Existing data on exercise treatment in people with MDD are inconsistent concerning the effect of exercise on BDNF pointing either to increased or unaltered BDNF concentrations. However, studies in non-depressed persons demonstrated a significant effect on resting peripheral BDNF concentrations in aerobic training interventions. Given the lack of clarity mentioned above, the current study aimed at examining the effect of adjunctive exercise on serum BDNF levels in guideline based treated patients with MDD. 42 depressed inpatients were included, and randomized either to a 6 week structured and supervised exercise intervention plus treatment as usual (EXERCISE, n=22), or to treatment as usual (TAU, n=20). BDNF serum concentrations were assessed before and after the intervention in both study groups with established immunoassays. Serum BDNF slightly decreased in the TAU group, whilst there was an increase in BDNF levels in the exercise group. There was a significant time x group effect concerning sBDNF (p=0.030) with repeated ANOVA measures with age and BMI as covariates, suggesting an increase in BDNF concentrations in the EXERCISE group compared to TAU. Though there was no statistic difference in the antidepressant medication between EXERCISE and TAU potential interactions between exercise and medication on the effects of exercise in BDNF cannot be excluded. Gender was not considered as a covariate in ANOVA due to the small number of objects. Exercise training given as adjunct to standard guideline based treatment appears to have additional effects on BDNF serum concentrations in people with MDD. Our results add further evidence to the beneficial effects of exercise in the treatment of MDD. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Strong negative self regulation of Prokaryotic transcription factors increases the intrinsic noise of protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Dafyd J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many prokaryotic transcription factors repress their own transcription. It is often asserted that such regulation enables a cell to homeostatically maintain protein abundance. We explore the role of negative self regulation of transcription in regulating the variability of protein abundance using a variety of stochastic modeling techniques. Results We undertake a novel analysis of a classic model for negative self regulation. We demonstrate that, with standard approximations, protein variance relative to its mean should be independent of repressor strength in a physiological range. Consequently, in that range, the coefficient of variation would increase with repressor strength. However, stochastic computer simulations demonstrate that there is a greater increase in noise associated with strong repressors than predicted by theory. The discrepancies between the mathematical analysis and computer simulations arise because with strong repressors the approximation that leads to Michaelis-Menten-like hyperbolic repression terms ceases to be valid. Because we observe that strong negative feedback increases variability and so is unlikely to be a mechanism for noise control, we suggest instead that negative feedback is evolutionarily favoured because it allows the cell to minimize mRNA usage. To test this, we used in silico evolution to demonstrate that while negative feedback can achieve only a modest improvement in protein noise reduction compared with the unregulated system, it can achieve good improvement in protein response times and very substantial improvement in reducing mRNA levels. Conclusion Strong negative self regulation of transcription may not always be a mechanism for homeostatic control of protein abundance, but instead might be evolutionarily favoured as a mechanism to limit the use of mRNA. The use of hyperbolic terms derived from quasi-steady-state approximation should also be avoided in the analysis of stochastic

  6. Further evidence for increased macrophage migration inhibitory factor expression in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iczkowski Kenneth A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a cytokine associated with prostate cancer, based on histologic evidence and circulating (serum levels. Recent studies from another laboratory failed to document these results. This study's aims were to extend and confirm our previous data, as well as to define possible mechanisms for the discrepant results. Additional aims were to examine MIF expression, as well as the location of MIF's receptor, CD74, in human prostatic adenocarcinoma compared to matched benign prostate. Methods MIF amounts were determined in random serum samples remaining following routine PSA screening by ELISA. Native, denaturing and reducing polyacrylamide gels and Western blot analyses determined the MIF form in serum. Prostate tissue arrays were processed for MIF in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for MIF and CD74. MIF released into culture medium from normal epithelial, LNCaP and PC-3 cells was detected by Western blot analysis. Results Median serum MIF amounts were significantly elevated in prostate cancer patients (5.87 ± 3.91 ng/ml; ± interquartile range; n = 115 compared with patients with no documented diagnosis of prostate cancer (2.19 ± 2.65 ng/ml; n = 158. ELISA diluent reagents that included bovine serum albumin (BSA significantly reduced MIF serum detection (p Conclusion Increased serum MIF was associated with prostate cancer. Diluent reagents that included BSA resulted in MIF serum immunoassay interference. In addition, significant amounts of complexed MIF (180 kDa under denaturing conditions by Western blot found in the serum do not bind to the MIF capture antibody. Increased MIF mRNA expression was observed in prostatic adenocarcinoma compared to benign tissue from matched samples, supporting our earlier finding of increased MIF gene expression in prostate cancer.

  7. Factors affecting acceptability of an email-based intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, Emily J; Mullan, Barbara A

    2014-09-30

    Fresh Facts is a 30-day email-delivered intervention designed to increase the fruit and vegetable consumption of Australian young adults. This study investigated the extent to which the program was acceptable to members of the target audience and examined the relationships between participant and intervention characteristics, attrition, effectiveness, and acceptability ratings. Young adults were randomised to two levels of message frequency: high-frequency (n = 102), low-frequency (n = 173). Individuals in the high-frequency group received daily emails while individuals in the low-frequency group received an email every 3 days. Individuals in the high-frequency group were more likely to indicate that they received too many emails than individuals in the low-frequency group. No other differences in acceptability were observed. Baseline beliefs about fruit and vegetables were an important predictor of intervention acceptability. In turn, acceptability was associated with a number of indicators of intervention success, including change in fruit and vegetable consumption. The findings highlight the importance of considering the relationship between these intervention and participant factors and acceptability in intervention design and evaluation. Results support the ongoing use of email-based interventions to target fruit and vegetable consumption within young adults. However, the relationships between beliefs about fruit and vegetable consumption and acceptability suggest that this intervention may be differentially effective depending on individual's existing beliefs about fruit and vegetable consumption. As such, there is a pressing need to consider these factors in future research in order to minimize attrition and maximize intervention effectiveness when interventions are implemented outside of a research context.

  8. Dendritic cell nuclear protein-1, a novel depression-related protein, upregulates corticotropin-releasing hormone expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Shanshan; Ren, Haigang; Qi, Xin-Rui; Luchetti, Sabina; Kamphuis, Willem; Zhou, Jiang-Ning; Wang, Guanghui; Swaab, Dick F.

    2010-01-01

    The recently discovered dendritic cell nuclear protein-1 is the product of a novel candidate gene for major depression. The A allele encodes full-length dendritic cell nuclear protein-1, while the T allele encodes a premature termination of translation at codon number 117 on chromosome 5. In the

  9. Stress and Female Reproductive System: Disruption of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone/Opiate Balance by Sympathetic Nerve Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays stress is an integral part of everyday living and the physiological and behavioral consequences of exposure to stressful situations have been extensively studied for decades. The stress response is a necessary mechanism but disrupts homeostatic process and it is sub served by a complex system located in both the central nervous system (CNS and the periphery. Stressor-induced activation of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS results in a series of neural and endocrine adaptations known as the "stress response" or "stress cascade." The stress cascade is responsible for allowing the body to make the necessary physiological and metabolic changes required to cope with the demands of a homeostatic challenge. Normal activation of the HPA axis is essential for reproduction, growth, metabolic homeostasis, and responses to stress and they are critical for adapting to changes in the external environment. The regulation of gonadal function in men and women is under the control of the HPA. This regulation is complex and sex steroids are important regulators of GnRH and gonadotropin release through classical feedback mechanisms in the hypothalamus and the pituitary. The present overview focuses on the neuroendocrine infrastructure of the adaptive response to stress and its effects on the female reproductive system. 

  10. The role of glucocorticoids and corticotropin-releasing hormone regulation on anxiety symptoms and response to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta B Raglan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The stress response has been linked to the expression of anxiety and depression, but the mechanisms for these connections are under continued consideration. The activation and expression of glucocorticoids and CRH are variable and may hold important clues to individual experiences of mood disorders. This paper explores the interactions of glucocorticoids and CRH in the presentation of anxiety and depressive disorders in an effort to better describe their differing roles in each of these clinical presentations. In addition, it focuses on ways in which extra-hypothalamic glucocorticoids and CRH, often overlooked, may play important roles in the presentation of clinical disorders.

  11. Glucocorticoids and relapse of major depression (dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing hormone test in relation to relapse of major depression)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelhof, Bente C.; Huyser, Jochanan; Verweij, Mijke; Brouwer, Jantien P.; van Dyck, Richard; Fliers, Eric; Hoogendijk, Witte J. G.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Schene, Aart H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms and predictors of relapse in major depressive disorder is still limited. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis dysregulation is thought to be related to the development and course of depression. METHODS: We investigated whether

  12. Factors associated with increased academic productivity among US academic radiation oncology faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Catherine; Murata, Stephen; Murata, Mark; Fuller, Clifton David; Thomas, Charles R; Choi, Mehee; Holliday, Emma B

    Publication productivity metrics can help evaluate academic faculty for hiring, promotion, grants, and awards; however, limited benchmarking data exist, which makes intra- and interdepartmental comparisons difficult. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the scholarly activity of physician faculty at academic radiation oncology (RO) departments and establish factors associated with increased academic productivity. Citation database searches were performed for all physician-faculty in US residency-affiliated academic RO departments. Demographics, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, and bibliometrics (number of publications, Hirsch-[h]-index, and m-index [Hirsch index divided by the number of years since first publication]) were collected and stratified by academic rank. Senior academic rank was defined as full professor, professor, and/or chair. Junior academic rank was defined as all others. Logistic regression was performed to determine the association of academic rank and other factors with h- and m-indices. A total of 1191 academic RO physician faculty from 75 institutions were included in the analysis. The mean (standard deviation) number of publications and h- and m-indices were 48.2 (71.2), 14.5 (15), and 0.86 (0.83), respectively. The median (interquartile range) number of publications and h- and m-indices were 20 (6-61), 9 (4-20), and 0.69 (0.38-1.10), respectively. Recursive partitioning analysis revealed a statistically significant numeric h-index threshold of 21 between junior and senior faculty (LogWorth 114; receiver operating characteristic, 0.828). Senior faculty status, receipt of NIH funding, and a larger department size were associated with increased h- and m-indices. Current academic RO departments have relatively high objective metrics of scholastic productivity compared with prior benchmarking analyses of RO departments and compared with published metrics from other academic medicine subspecialties. An h-index of 21 or greater was

  13. Factors That Increase Risk of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity After a Gastrointestinal Infection in Early Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Lynch, Kristian F; Liu, Edwin; Lönnrot, Maria; Simell, Ville; Briese, Thomas; Koletzko, Sibylle; Hagopian, William; Rewers, Marian; She, Jin-Xiong; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Ziegler, Anette-G; Akolkar, Beena; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Lernmark, Åke; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W; Agardh, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of gluten immunogenicity in patients with celiac disease. We studied temporal associations between infections and the development of celiac disease autoimmunity, and examined effects of HLA alleles, rotavirus vaccination status, and infant feeding. We monitored 6327 children in the United States and Europe carrying HLA risk genotypes for celiac disease from 1 to 4 years of age for presence of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (the definition of celiac disease autoimmunity), until March 31, 2015. Parental reports of gastrointestinal and respiratory infections were collected every third month from birth. We analyzed time-varying relationships among reported infections, rotavirus vaccination status, time to first introduction of gluten, breastfeeding, and risk of celiac disease autoimmunity using proportional hazard models. We identified 13,881 gastrointestinal infectious episodes (GIE) and 79,816 respiratory infectious episodes. During the follow-up period, 732 of 6327 (11.6%) children developed celiac disease autoimmunity. A GIE increased the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity within the following 3 months by 33% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-1.59). This risk increased 2-fold among children born in winter and introduced to gluten before age 6 months (HR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.46-2.98), and increased 10-fold among children without HLA-DQ2 alleles and breastfed for fewer than 4 months (HR, 9.76; 95% CI, 3.87-24.8). Risk of celiac disease autoimmunity was reduced in children vaccinated against rotavirus and introduced to gluten before age 6 months (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.36-0.88). Gastrointestinal infections increase the risk of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with genetic susceptibility to this autoimmune disorder. The risk is modified by HLA genotype, infant gluten consumption, breastfeeding, and rotavirus vaccination, indicating complex interactions among infections, genetic factors

  14. Increased Serum Levels of Epidermal Growth Factor in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseri, Elvan; Guney, Esra; Ceylan, Mehmet F.; Yucel, Aysegul; Aral, Arzu; Bodur, Sahin; Sener, Sahnur

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of autism is unclear, however autism is considered as a multifactorial disorder that is influenced by neurological, environmental, immunological and genetic factors. Growth factors, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), play an important role in the celluler proliferation and the differentiation of the central and peripheral…

  15. Increasing Risk Factors for Imported and Domestic Gnathostomiasis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2015-01-01

    Gnathostomiasis is a foodborne zoonotic helminthic infection, commonly described in Asia and Latin America, which may follow the consumption of raw fish, eels, amphibians, and reptiles infected with muscle-encysted larvae of Gnathostoma species nematodes. After an inoculum of as little as one infective larva and an incubation period of months to years, most infections are characterized by intermittent migratory swellings due to subdermal larval migration. Less commonly, larval migration to the central nervous system may result in radiculomyelopathy or eosinophilic meningoencephalitis with high fatality rates; or larval migration to the eye with resulting blindness in untreated cases. Since the US now supports a zoonosis of Gnathostoma species with infective larvae encysted in imported and domestic fish and eels that may be consumed raw as exotic ethnic dishes, the objectives of this review were to describe the biology and life cycle of Gnathostoma nematodes and the behavioral risk factors for gnathostomiasis; and to describe the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, management, and prevention of human gnathostomiasis. Since the eradication of gnathostomiasis is very unlikely given the global distribution of Gnathostoma nematodes and the increasingly exotic culinary tastes of US residents and travelers to endemic regions, the only effective strategies for gnathostomiasis include: (1) educating citizens in the US and travelers abroad in endemic areas that fish, eels, frogs, snakes, and chicken must be cooked thoroughly first and not eaten raw or marinated; and (2) seeking medical care immediately for evaluation of migratory subcutaneous swellings. The combination of international travel and increased immigration from Asia and Latin America to the US has resulted in greater popularity of exotic ethnic cuisine, especially raw seafood dishes. The ethnic cuisine industry is supported by domestic aquaculture that produces fish-farmed tilapia and trout, and by increased

  16. Low Levels of Physical Activity Are Associated with Increased Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors in Korean Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hoon Lee

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLow levels of physical activity (PA are strongly associated with the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS and chronic diseases. However, few studies have examined this association in Koreans. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the associations between PA and MetS risks in Korean adults.MethodsA total of 1,016 Korean adults (494 males and 522 females participated in this study. PA levels were assessed using the International PA Questionnaire. MetS risk factors were determined using clinically established diagnostic criteria.ResultsCompared with the highest PA group, the group with the lowest level of PA was at greater risk of high triglyceride (TG in males (odds ratio [OR], 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 3.24 and of hemoglobin A1c ≥5.5% in females (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.00 to 3.04 after adjusting for age and body mass index. Compared with subjects who met the PA guidelines, those who did not meet the guidelines were more likely to have low high density lipoprotein cholesterol in both males (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.58, and females (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.20 to 2.77. Furthermore, those who did not meet the PA guidelines were at increased risk of high TG levels in males (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.86 and abnormal fasting glucose (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.17 to 3.20 and MetS (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.15 to 3.84 in females.ConclusionIncreased levels of PA are significantly associated with a decreased risk of abnormal MetS components.

  17. Increasing epidermal growth factor receptor expression in human melanocytic tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, P E; Moretti, S; Koenders, P G; Weterman, M A; van Muijen, G N; Gianotti, B; Ruiter, D J

    1992-08-01

    Different results have been reported on the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human melanocytic lesions, which may be due to different methodologic approaches. Therefore, we compared EGFR expression in six human melanoma cell lines by utilizing the monoclonal antibodies 2E9, 425, and 225, applying four immunocytochemical staining procedures. The results were compared with those obtained by a multiple point ligand binding assay. In addition, Northern blot analysis was performed. A three-step immunoperoxidase method using the monoclonal antibody 2E9 proved most sensitive. Staining intensities, estimated semiquantitatively, correlated well with the quantitative data obtained by the ligand-binding assay. Expression on the mRNA level was also in agreement with these results. Immunohistochemical staining of a large series of human cutaneous melanocytic lesions using the method selected showed differential EGFR expression in various stages of melanocytic tumor progression: 19% of common nevocellular nevi; 61% of dysplastic nevi, 89% of primary cutaneous melanomas, and 91% of melanoma metastases showed staining of the melanocytic cells. Intralesional heterogeneity of EGFR expression was present. Although the mean percentage of positive melanocytic cells in positive lesions did not increase with progression, mean staining intensity was stronger in malignant lesions compared to benign lesions. Ligand binding assays showed that EGFR expression in the highly metastasizing cell lines MV3 and BLM was at least 40 times higher than in the cell lines IF6, 530, M14, and Mel57, which do not or only sporadically metastasize after subcutaneous inoculation in nude mice. Although the differences between the various stages of progression are not absolute, we provide further evidence that EGFR expression increases in human melanocytic tumor progression.

  18. Acute aerobic exercise increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in elderly with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Flávia Gomes de Melo; Vital, Thays Martins; Stein, Angelica Miki; Arantes, Franciel José; Rueda, André Veloso; Camarini, Rosana; Teodorov, Elizabeth; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Decreased BDNF levels may constitute a lack of trophic support and contribute to cognitive impairment in AD. The benefits of acute and chronic physical exercise on BDNF levels are well-documented in humans, however, exercise effects on BDNF levels have not been analyzed in older adults with AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on BDNF levels in older adults with AD and to verify associations among BDNF levels, aerobic fitness, and level of physical activity. Using a controlled design, twenty-one patients with AD (76.3 ± 6.2 years) and eighteen healthy older adults (74.6 ± 4.7 years) completed an acute aerobic exercise. The outcomes included measures of BDNF plasma levels, aerobic fitness (treadmill grade, time to exhaustion, VO2, and maximal lactate) and level of physical activity (Baecke Questionnaire Modified for the Elderly). The independent t-test shows differences between groups with respect to the BDNF plasma levels at baseline (p = 0.04; t = 4.53; df = 37). In two-way ANOVA, a significant effect of time was found (p = 0.001; F = 13.63; df = 37), the aerobic exercise significantly increased BDNF plasma levels in AD patients and healthy controls. A significant correlation (p = 0.04; r = 0.33) was found between BDNF levels and the level of physical activity. The results of our study suggest that aerobic exercise increases BDNF plasma levels in patients with AD and healthy controls. In addition to that, BDNF levels had association with level of physical activity.

  19. Increased expression of PITX2 transcription factor contributes to ovarian cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Frederic K C; Chan, David W; Liu, Vincent W S; Leung, Thomas H Y; Cheung, Annie N Y; Ngan, Hextan Y S

    2012-01-01

    Paired-like homeodomain 2 (PITX2) is a bicoid homeodomain transcription factor which plays an essential role in maintaining embryonic left-right asymmetry during vertebrate embryogenesis. However, emerging evidence suggests that the aberrant upregulation of PITX2 may be associated with tumor progression, yet the functional role that PITX2 plays in tumorigenesis remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative RT-PCR (Q-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses, we demonstrated that PITX2 was frequently overexpressed in ovarian cancer samples and cell lines. Clinicopathological correlation showed that the upregulated PITX2 was significantly associated with high-grade (P = 0.023) and clear cell subtype (P = 0.011) using Q-PCR and high-grade (PPITX2 could promote ovarian cancer cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth ability, migration/invasion and tumor growth in xenograft model mice. Moreover, enforced expression of PITX2 elevated the cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin-D1 and C-myc. Conversely, RNAi mediated knockdown of PITX2 in PITX2-high expressing ovarian cancer cells had the opposite effect. Our findings suggest that the increased expression PITX2 is involved in ovarian cancer progression through promoting cell growth and cell migration/invasion. Thus, targeting PITX2 may serve as a potential therapeutic modality in the management of high-grade ovarian tumor.

  20. Increased expression of PITX2 transcription factor contributes to ovarian cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic K C Fung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paired-like homeodomain 2 (PITX2 is a bicoid homeodomain transcription factor which plays an essential role in maintaining embryonic left-right asymmetry during vertebrate embryogenesis. However, emerging evidence suggests that the aberrant upregulation of PITX2 may be associated with tumor progression, yet the functional role that PITX2 plays in tumorigenesis remains unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using real-time quantitative RT-PCR (Q-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical (IHC analyses, we demonstrated that PITX2 was frequently overexpressed in ovarian cancer samples and cell lines. Clinicopathological correlation showed that the upregulated PITX2 was significantly associated with high-grade (P = 0.023 and clear cell subtype (P = 0.011 using Q-PCR and high-grade (P<0.001 ovarian cancer by IHC analysis. Functionally, enforced expression of PITX2 could promote ovarian cancer cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth ability, migration/invasion and tumor growth in xenograft model mice. Moreover, enforced expression of PITX2 elevated the cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin-D1 and C-myc. Conversely, RNAi mediated knockdown of PITX2 in PITX2-high expressing ovarian cancer cells had the opposite effect. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the increased expression PITX2 is involved in ovarian cancer progression through promoting cell growth and cell migration/invasion. Thus, targeting PITX2 may serve as a potential therapeutic modality in the management of high-grade ovarian tumor.

  1. Non-fasting factor VII coagulant activity (FVII:C) increased by high-fat diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Marckmann, P; Sandström, B

    1994-01-01

    :Bt/FVII:Am (a measure of FVII activation) increased from fasting levels on both diets, but most markedly on the high-fat diet. In contrast, FVII:Am (a measure of FVII protein) tended to decrease from fasting levels on both diets. FVII:C rose from fasting levels on the high-fat diet, but not on the low-fat diet......Preliminary observations have suggested that non-fasting factor VII coagulant activity (FVII:C) may be related to the dietary fat content. To confirm this, we performed a randomised cross-over study. Seventeen young volunteers were served 2 controlled isoenergetic diets differing in fat content (20......% or 50% of energy). The 2 diets were served on 2 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected at 8.00 h, 16.30 h and 19.30 h, and analysed for triglycerides, FVII coagulant activity using human (FVII:C) or bovine thromboplastin (FVII:Bt), and FVII amidolytic activity (FVII:Am). The ratio FVII...

  2. Increase in plasma platelet-activating factor levels in enterally fed preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKendrick, W; Hill, N; Hsueh, W; Caplan, M

    1993-01-01

    Because platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), we designed a prospective study to examine plasma PAF levels during the first 14 days of feeding in a population of neonates of less than 32 weeks gestation. We found that significantly more patients had detectable plasma PAF levels on days 3 and 14 of feeding when compared to their prefeeding levels (7% on day 0 vs. 26% at day 3, p = 0.04; none on day 0 vs. 18.5% at day 14, p = 0.01). This finding could not be explained by decreased plasma activity of acetylhydrolase, the PAF breakdown enzyme, spontaneous endotoxinemia or a maturational effect. None of the infants who developed detectable PAF levels after feedings were begun went on to develop NEC. We conclude that our findings may reflect increased intestinal PAF production with the provision of feedings to some premature infants. However, this phenomenon by itself does not appear to be a sufficient condition for the subsequent development of NEC.

  3. Trefoil factor family peptides are increased in the saliva of children with mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verey, Fran; Nexo, Ebba; Greenwood, Rosemary; Berry, Monica; Corfield, Anthony P

    2011-12-01

    Mucositis is a painful ulcerative condition of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, occurring in association with chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes. Trefoil factor family peptides (TFF, trefoil peptides), present in saliva, contribute to epithelial restitution and repair and are therefore potentially important in the healing phase of mucositis. This study aimed to assess any changes in the levels of trefoil peptides in oncology patients with and without mucositis. Saliva was collected from healthy children, pretreatment oncology patients, neutropenic patients on treatment with no oral disease and mucositic patients. TFF1, 2 and 3 were quantified using ELISA. In healthy children TFF2 and 3 were positively correlated with age (r = 0.454, p = 0.01 for TFF2; r = 0.410, p = 0.05 for TFF3 Spearman rank correlation). TFF3 was higher in mucositis compared to all other groups. A linear regression prediction model indicated that TFF3, but not TFF1 and TFF2, was significantly different in mucositic and healthy controls, suggesting an altered pattern of trefoil peptide secretion (p = 0.021). This study is the first to focus on trefoil peptides in paediatric saliva. It shows the correlation between TFF2, TFF3 and age in healthy children. Paediatric mucositis disease occurs in the presence of increased concentrations and an altered pattern of trefoil peptides.

  4. THE QUALITY OF THE TOURIST DESTINATIONS A KEY FACTOR FOR INCREASING THEIR ATTRACTIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daliborka Blazeska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Taking into consideration that the tourism is extremely important for any country including Republic of Macedonia, it is necessary to pay attention to the quality of the tourist destinations and increasing of their attractiveness. So winners in the field of tourism will be those countries that have attractive tourist destination that will attract a lot of visitors. In this paper is defined the relationship between the factors of attractiveness of the destination and the achieving of competitiveness. In order to become competitive in the global market, the tourist destination has to be innovative and to continually search for new competitive advantages. Those kind of competitive advantages enable stable and long-term sustainable development of the tourist destination. In this paper special emphasis is put to the monitoring of the quality of the tourist destination with constant inquiries of the tourists (domestic and foreign regarding the most important segments of the quality of the tourist product which they are using, in order to perceive the satisfaction or the eventual dissatisfaction in order to be taken concrete strategies for the following period. The obtained results clearly confirm the dissatisfaction with the road infrastructure and signalization, the price of the services and the conditions for the stay, as well as the additional attractions that were expected to get.

  5. Is increased antidepressant exposure a contributory factor to the obesity pandemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S H; Paz-Filho, G; Mastronardi, C; Licinio, J; Wong, M-L

    2016-01-01

    of stress and antidepressants followed by long-term high-fat diet results, long after discontinuation of antidepressant treatment, in markedly increased weight, in excess of what is caused by high-fat diet alone. On the basis of existing epidemiological, clinical and preclinical data, we have generated the testable hypothesis that escalating use of antidepressants, resulting in high rates of antidepressant exposure, might be a contributory factor to the obesity epidemic. PMID:26978741

  6. Increased lipid production by heterologous expression of AtWRI1 transcription factor in Nannochloropsis salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam Kyu; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Young Uk; Lee, Bongsoo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Jeong, Byeong-Ryool; Chang, Yong Keun

    2017-01-01

    Genetic engineering of microalgae is necessary to produce economically feasible strains for biofuel production. Current efforts are focused on the manipulation of individual metabolic genes, but the outcomes are not sufficiently stable and/or efficient for large-scale production of biofuels and other materials. Transcription factors (TFs) are emerging as good alternatives for engineering of microalgae, not only to increase production of biomaterials but to enhance stress tolerance. Here, we investigated an AP2 type TF Wrinkled1 in Arabidopsis (AtWRI1) known as a key regulator of lipid biosynthesis in plants, and applied it to industrial microalgae, Nannochloropsis salina. We expressed AtWRI1 TF heterologously in N. salina, named NsAtWRI1, in an effort to re-enact its key regulatory function of lipid accumulation. Stable integration AtWRI1 was confirmed by RESDA PCR, and its expression was confirmed by Western blotting using the FLAG tag. Characterizations of transformants revealed that the neutral and total lipid contents were greater in NsAtWRI1 transformants than in WT under both normal and stress conditions from day 8. Especially, total lipid contents were 36.5 and 44.7% higher in NsAtWRI1 2-3 than in WT under normal and osmotic stress condition, respectively. FAME contents of NsAtWRI1 2-3 were also increased compared to WT. As a result, FAME yield of NsAtWRI1 2-3 was increased to 768 mg/L/day, which was 64% higher than that of WT under the normal condition. We identified candidates of AtWRI1-regulated genes by searching for the presence of the AW-box in promoter regions, among which lipid metabolic genes were further analyzed by qRT-PCR. Overall, qRT-PCR results on day 1 indicated that AtWRI1 down-regulated TAGL and DAGK, and up-regulated PPDK, LPL, LPGAT1, and PDH, resulting in enhanced lipid production in NsAtWRI1 transformants from early growth phase. AtWRI1 TF regulated several genes involved in lipid synthesis in N. salina, resulting in enhancement of

  7. Increased expression of transcription factor TFAP2α correlates with chemosensitivity in advanced bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehmann Jan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The standard treatment for patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder is platin based chemotherapy. Only approximately 50% of the patients respond to chemotherapy. Therefore, molecular predictive markers for identification of chemotherapy sensitive subgroups of patients are highly needed. We selected the transcription factor TFAP2α from a previously identified gene expression signature for chemotherapy response. Methods TFAP2α expression and localization was assessed by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray (TMA containing 282 bladder cancer tumors from patients with locally advanced (pT2-T4b and N1-3 or metastatic (M1 disease. All patients had received cisplatin containing chemotherapy. Furthermore, QPCR analysis of three TFAP2α isoforms was performed on tumor specimens of advanced muscle invasive bladder cancers (T2-4. Using the bladder cell lines T24 and SW780 the relation of TFAP2α and cisplatin and gemcitabine sensitivity as well as cell proliferation was examined using siRNA directed TFAP2α knockdown. Results TFAP2α protein expression was analyzed on a TMA with cores from 282 advanced bladder cancer tumors from patients treated with cisplatin based combinational chemotherapy. TFAP2α was identified as a strong independent predictive marker for a good response and survival after cisplatin-containing chemotherapy in patients with advanced bladder cancer. Strong TFAP2α nuclear and cytoplasmic staining predicted good response to chemotherapy in patients with lymph node metastasis, whereas weak TFAP2α nuclear staining predicted good response in patients without lymph node metastasis. In vitro studies showed that siRNA mediated knockdown of TFAP2α increased the proliferation of SW780 cells and rendered the cells less sensitive to cisplatin and gemcitabine. In contrast to that T24 bladder cells with mutated p53 showed to be more drug sensitive upon TFAP2α depletion. Conclusions High

  8. Factors Associated with Increased Risk for Lethal Violence in Intimate Partner Relationships among Ethnically Diverse Black Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Bushra; Stockman, Jamila K.; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; O’Brien, Sharon; Campbell, Doris; Callwood, Gloria B.; Bertrand, Desiree; Sutton, Lorna W.; Hart-Hyndman, Greta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with increased risk for lethal violence among ethnically diverse Black women in Baltimore, Maryland (MD) and the US Virgin Islands (USVI). Women with abuse experiences (n=456) were recruited from primary care, prenatal or family planning clinics in Baltimore, MD and St. Thomas and St. Croix, USVI. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with the risk for lethal violence among abused women. Factors independently related to increased risk of lethal violence included fear of abusive partners, PTSD symptoms, and use of legal resources. These factors must be considered in assessing safety needs of Black women in abusive relationships. PMID:25429191

  9. Factors Increasing Vulnerability to Health Effects before, during and after Floods

    OpenAIRE

    Dianne Lowe; Kristie L. Ebi; Bertil Forsberg

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the risk factors for morbidity and mortality effects pre-, during and post-flood may aid the appropriate targeting of flood-related adverse health prevention strategies. We conducted a systematic PubMed search to identify studies examining risk factors for health effects of precipitation-related floods, among Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) member countries. Research identifying flood-related morbidity and mortality risk factors is limited and primar...

  10. Increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus in a developing country and its related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animaw, Worku; Seyoum, Yeshaneh

    2017-01-01

    All countries, irrespective of their developmental stage, face an increasing burden of non-communicable diseases including diabetes mellitus. There is substantial evidence of the existence of the gap in the level of diabetes mellitus and its complications prevention and control measures in developing countries. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in urban and rural dwellers in a low-income country from both younger and older population and to identify factors related. This is a community based comparative cross-sectional study conducted in a low-income country, Ethiopia. The sample size was determined by EPI-Info for two populations; the WHO's STEP-wise approach for non-communicable diseases surveillance in developing countries was employed for sampling, study variable selection and data collection procedures. Fasting blood glucose levels were measured by finger pricking after overnight fasting. Data entry was done by EPI-data computer program version 3.1 and then processed by SPSS version 20. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression tests were used to assess the associations between diabetes status of individuals and its potential predictor variables. P-value diabetes mellitus was 3.3%; while it was 2.0% for rural and (4.6%) for urban dwellers. Both the mean blood glucose level and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus were significantly higher for urban residents than rural. More than three-fourths of diabetic cases were newly diagnosed by this study. Urban dwellers, centrally obese, overweight, and hypertensive individuals have higher odds of getting diabetes mellitus. High prevalence of diabetes mellitus involving both old and young population was documented. Most diabetic cases were suddenly diagnosed during this survey. The problem is noticeably alarming, attention should be given to the control and prevention of diabetes mellitus and related complications.

  11. Stromal-Derived Factor-1α (CXCL12) Levels Increase in Periodontal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Aaron M.; Chiu, Evonne; Taba, Mario; Wang, Jincheng; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Jung, Younghun; Taichman, L. Susan; D'Silva, Nisha J.; Gopalakrishnan, R.; Wang, CunYu; Giannobile, William V.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2008-01-01

    Background The CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1α or CXC chemokine ligand 12) are involved in the trafficking of leukocytes into and out of extravascular tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine whether SDF-1α secreted by host cells plays a role in recruiting inflammatory cells into the periodontia during local inflammation. Methods SDF-1α levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of 24 individuals with periodontitis versus healthy individuals in tissue biopsies and in a preclinical rat model of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide–induced experimental bone loss. Neutrophil chemotaxis assays were also used to evaluate whether SDF-1α plays a role in the recruitment of host cells at periodontal lesions. Results Subjects with periodontal disease had higher levels of SDF-1α in their GCF compared to healthy subjects. Subjects with periodontal disease who underwent mechanical therapy demonstrated decreased levels of SDF-1α. Immunohistologic staining showed that SDF-1α and CXCR4 levels were elevated in samples obtained from periodontally compromised individuals. Similar results were observed in the rodent model. Neutrophil migration was enhanced in the presence of SDF-1α, mimicking immune cell migration in periodontal lesions. Conclusions SDF-1α may be involved in the immune defense pathway activated during periodontal disease. Upon the development of diseased tissues, SDF-1α levels increase and may recruit host defensive cells into sites of inflammation. These studies suggest that SDF-1α may be a useful biomarker for the identification of periodontal disease progression. PMID:18454663

  12. Increased intestinal permeability in endotoxic pigs. Mesenteric hypoperfusion as an etiologic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, M.P.; Antonsson, J.B.; Wang, H.L.; Rothschild, H.R. (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Infusing pigs with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) decreases superior mesenteric artery blood flow (Qsma), suggesting that mesenteric hypoperfusion may be responsible for LPS-induced alterations in gut mucosal permeability. To test this hypothesis, we studied four groups of anesthetized swine. Group 1 animals (N = 6) were infused with LPS (250 micrograms/kg over 1 hour beginning at 60 minutes) and continuously resuscitated with Ringer's lactate (48 mL/kg per hour). In group 2 (N = 5), Qsma was decreased by 50% by means of a mechanical occluder to mimic the LPS-induced alterations in Qsma observed in group I. Group 3 (N = 5) was included to document our ability to detect ischemia/reperfusion-induced alterations in mucosal permeability; in these pigs, Qsma was decreased in steps to zero flow (at 150 to 210 minutes) and then perfusion was restored (at 210 to 270 minutes). Pigs in group 4 (N = 6) served as normal controls; these animals were resuscitated with Ringer's lactate at the same rate as in group 1 but were not infused with LPS. To assess mucosal permeability, we measured plasma-to-lumen clearances for two markers, chromium 51-labeled edetic acid monohydrate (EDTA) and urea. Loading and maintenance infusions of the markers were given intravenously, and a 20-cm isolated segment of small intestine was continuously perfused at 2 mL/min with Ringer's lactate at 37 degrees C. Results were expressed as the ratio of the clearances for the two probes (CEDTA/CUREA). In group 3, CEDTA/CUREA was 999% +/- 355% of baseline at 270 minutes. In group 1, CEDTA/CUREA was 572% +/- 235% of baseline at 270 minutes. In groups 2 and 4, however, CEDTA/CUREA did not change significantly from the baseline value over the duration of the study. These data suggest that increased mucosal permeability after LPS is due to factors other than (or in addition to) mesenteric hypoperfusion.

  13. Plasma levels of trefoil factors are increased in patients with advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, E.M.; Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2006-01-01

    Through cDNA array analyses and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays, trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) was recently shown to be overexpressed in prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of using the levels of trefoil factors as a plasma marker for prostate cancer....

  14. Factors increasing the caries risk of second primary molars in 5-year-old Dutch children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfrink, Marlies E C; Schuller, Annemarie A; Veerkamp, Jaap S J; Poorterman, Jan H G; Moll, Henriette A; ten Cate, Bob J M

    BACKGROUND: Caries is still a prevalent condition in 5-year-old children. At present, knowledge regarding some aetiological factors, like deciduous molar hypomineralization (DMH), is limited. AIM: To investigate aetiological factors both directly and indirectly associated with caries in second

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor is increased during the first 48 hours of human septic shock and correlates with vascular permeability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickkers, P.; Sprong, T.; Eijk, L.T. van; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Smits, P.; Deuren, M. van

    2005-01-01

    Meningococcal septic shock is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults worldwide and is the prototypical gram-negative septic shock. One of the key factors in the development of shock is increased microvascular permeability. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)

  16. Ten-year time course of risk factors for increased carotid intima-media thickness: the Hoorn Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, E; Biessels, G.J.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Heine, R.J.; Nijpels, G.; Dekker, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is a measure of atherosclerosis. Levels of vascular risk factors that are associated with increased IMT change over time. This study aimed to examine the time course of vascular risk factors in older persons with 'high' versus 'low' IMT over a

  17. School-Level Factors Associated with Increased Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among Students in California Middle and High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosliner, Wendi

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study assessed associations between selective school-level factors and students' consumption of fruits and vegetables at school. Better understanding of school factors associated with increased produce consumption is especially important, as students are served more produce items at school. Methods: This cross-sectional study…

  18. Ciliary neurotrophic factor and fibroblast growth factor increase the speed and number of regenerating axons after optic nerve injury in adult Rana pipiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Meléndez, Giam S; Blagburn, Jonathan M; Blanco, Rosa E

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophins such as ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and growth factors such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) play important roles in neuronal survival and in axonal outgrowth during development. However, whether they can modulate regeneration after optic nerve injury in the adult animal is less clear. The present study investigates the effects of application of these neurotrophic factors on the speed, number, and distribution of regenerating axons in the frog Rana pipiens after optic nerve crush. Optic nerves were crushed and the factors, or phosphate-buffered saline, were applied to the stump or intraocularly. The nerves were examined at different times after axotomy, using anterograde labeling with biotin dextran amine and antibody against growth-associated protein 43. We measured the length, number, and distribution of axons projecting beyond the lesion site. Untreated regenerating axons show an increase in elongation rate over 3 weeks. CNTF more than doubles this rate, FGF-2 increases it, and BDNF has little effect. In contrast, the numbers of regenerating axons that have reached 200 μm at 2 weeks were more than doubled by FGF-2, increased by CNTF, and barely affected by BDNF. The regenerating axons were preferentially distributed in the periphery of the nerve; although the numbers of axons were increased by neurotrophic factor application, this overall distribution was substantially unaffected. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Intrauterine exposure to maternal atherosclerotic risk factors increases the susceptibility to atherosclerosis in adult life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, F.E.; Gittenberger-Groot, A.C. de; Schiel, A.E.; Munsteren, J.C. van; Hogers, B.; Vliet, L.S.J. van; Poelmann, R.E.; Havekes, L.M.; Dijk, K.W. van; Ruiter, M.C. de

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Maternal hypercholesterolemia is associated with a higher incidence and faster progression of atherosclerotic lesions in neonatal offspring. We aimed to determine whether an in utero environment exposing a fetus to maternal hypercholesterolemia and associated risk factors can prime the

  20. Increasing and decreasing factors of hope in infertile women with failure in infertility treatment: A phenomenology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Parandavar, Nehle; Gholami, Morteza; Abdollahifard, Sareh

    2014-02-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) provide the hope of pregnancy for infertile women, but do not always turn this hope into reality. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of infertile women from increasing and decreasing factors of hope in infertile women with failure in infertility treatment. Using a qualitative research design (Phenomenology study), 23 subjects were selected who had experienced infertility failure visited by gynecologist (Rasekh Infertility center) in 2012. The data were collected through semi structured interviews and analyzed using interpretive research strategies of phenomenology by Collizi's seven-stage method. Totally 96 codes were identified. The data arranged in two categories. The factors decreasing and increasing hope in infertility treatments. Totally 5 themes and 20 sub themes were extracted. The increasing factors which emerged from the data contain "spiritual source", "family interaction and support" and "information through the media", and decreasing factors contain "nature of treatments" and "negatively oriented mind".

  1. Plasma from preeclamptic women increases blood-brain barrier permeability: role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amburgey, Odül A; Chapman, Abbie C; May, Victor; Bernstein, Ira M; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2010-11-01

    Circulating factors in preeclamptic women are thought to cause endothelial dysfunction and thereby contribute to the progression of this hypertensive condition. Despite the involvement of neurological complications in preeclampsia, there is a paucity of data regarding the effect of circulating factors on cerebrovascular function. Using a rat model of pregnancy, we investigated blood-brain barrier permeability, myogenic activity, and the influence of endothelial vasodilator mechanisms in cerebral vessels exposed intraluminally to plasma from normal pregnant or preeclamptic women. In addition, the role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in mediating changes in permeability in response to plasma was investigated. A 3-hour exposure to 20% normal pregnant or preeclamptic plasma increased blood-brain barrier permeability by ≈6.5- and 18.0-fold, respectively, compared with no plasma exposure (Pvascular endothelial growth factor receptor kinase activity prevented the increase in permeability in response to preeclamptic plasma but had no effect on changes in permeability of vessels exposed to normal pregnant plasma. Circulating factors in preeclamptic plasma did not affect myogenic activity or the influence of endothelium on vascular tone. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to preeclamptic plasma has little effect on reactivity of cerebral arteries but significantly increases blood-brain barrier permeability. Prevention of increased permeability by inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling suggests that activation of this pathway may be responsible for increased blood-brain barrier permeability after exposure to preeclamptic plasma.

  2. Isolated isoflavones do not affect the circulating insulin-like growth factor system in men at increased colorectal cancer risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Rookus, M.A.; Kampman, E.; Bonfrer, J.M.G.; Korse, C.M.; Doorn, J. van; Lampe, J.W.; Cats, A.; Witteman, B.J.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Veer, L.J. van 't; Voskuil, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that increased insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I concentrations are related to increased colorectal cancer risk. A reduced colorectal cancer risk has been associated with isoflavones, which might affect the IGF-system because of their weak estrogenic activity. We

  3. Isolated Isoflavones do not affect the circulating insulin-like growth factor system in men at increased colorectal cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Rookus, M.A.; Kampman, E.; Bonfrer, J.M.G.; Korse, C.M.; Doorn, van J.; Lampe, J.W.; Cats, A.; Witteman, B.J.M.; Leeuwen, van F.E.; van't Veer, L.J.; Voskuil, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that increased insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I concentrations are related to increased colorectal cancer risk. A reduced colorectal cancer risk has been associated with isoflavones, which might affect the IGF-system because of their weak estrogenic activity. We

  4. Increased concentrations of growth factors and activation of the EGFR system in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalund Olsen, Dorte; Bechmann, Troels; Østergaard, Birthe

    2012-01-01

    In this study the total and phosphorylated amount of epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR) and 2 (HER2) were measured together with EGFR ligands in tissue samples of breast cancer patients in order to investigate interrelations and possible prognostic values....

  5. [Regulations of sickness certification as a factor for increased health care utilization in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Wolfram J; Haarmann, Alexander; Bærheim, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In Germany, utilization of ambulatory health care is high compared to other countries. Classical models of health care utilization cannot sufficiently explain these differences. The aim of this study was to explore relevant factors which can explain the higher health care utilization in Germany. In this article, we focus on regulations regarding sickness certification as a potential factor. An explorative qualitative study design. We conducted episodic interviews with 20 patients in Germany and 20 patients in Norway and participant observation in four primary care practices each. Additionally, we conducted a context analysis of relevant health care system related factors which emerged during the study. Qualitative data analysis was done by thematic coding in the framework of grounded theory. The need for a sickness certificate was an important reason for encounter in Germany, especially regarding minor illnesses. Sickness certification is a societal topic. GPs play a double role regarding sickness certification, both as the patients' advocate and as an expert witness for social security services. In Norway, longer periods of self-administered sickness certification and more differentiated possibilities of sickness certification have been introduced successfully. Our results point to regulations regarding sickness certification as a relevant factor for higher health care utilization in Germany. In pilot studies, the effect of extended self-certification of sickness and part-time sickness certification should be further assessed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Increasing epidermal growth factor receptor expression in human melanocytic tumor progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, P. E.; Moretti, S.; Koenders, P. G.; Weterman, M. A.; van Muijen, G. N.; Gianotti, B.; Ruiter, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Different results have been reported on the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human melanocytic lesions, which may be due to different methodologic approaches. Therefore, we compared EGFR expression in six human melanoma cell lines by utilizing the monoclonal antibodies 2E9,

  7. Conditions that shape the learning curve: factors that increase the ability and opportunity to learn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, E.

    2007-01-01

    Prior studies examining factors that influence the learning curve mainly focus on settings in which firms adopt new products or technologies or open new plants or assembly lines. Less is known, however, about how more mature firms learn, when they are further down the learning curve. To gain insight

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha increases myocardial microvascular transport in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P R; Svendsen, J H; Høyer, Christian S

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a primary mediator in the pathogenesis of tissue injury, and high circulating levels of TNF-alpha are found in a variety of pathological conditions. In open-chest anesthetized dogs, the effects of intracoronary recombinant human TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha; 100...

  9. Identification and Quantification of Cumulative Factors that Increase Environmental Exposures and Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluating the combined adverse effects of multiple stressors upon human health is an imperative component of cumulative risk assessment (CRA)1. In addition to chemical stressors, other non-chemical factors are also considered. For examples, smoking will elevate the risks of havi...

  10. Increasing the Adaptive Capacity of the Organism When Exposed to Adverse Environmental Factors Through Phytoadaptogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babii, N. V.; Pomozova, V. A.; Kiseleva, T. F.; Romanenko, V. O.

    2017-07-01

    The Problem of improving the quality of life of the population in modern conditions is the most relevant. The level of human health largely depends on the quality of the environment. Of special importance are the risk factors for the spread of diseases like environmental pollution, social conditions and bad habits. To the emergence of ecologically dependent diseases leads the combined impact of technogenic, social-economic, natural-climatic factors. The introduction of the principles of biotechnology, nanotechnology and innovations in industrial processing of plant resources, especially natural adaptogens, contributes to the production of balanced, ecologically clean food products functional purpose, the use of which will significantly minimize the adverse effects of the environment on humans.

  11. Specialization of the Romanian Economy as a Factor of Increasing Competitiveness in the International Market

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela-Carmen MUNTEAN; Daniela Sarpe; Costel NISTOR

    2011-01-01

    A major importance in study performance of trade is presented by specialization profile, usually measured by comparative advantage. However, the specialization of a country in a particular sector can be measured by various indicators, their choice depending on many factors, so below, we present some of these indicators as they were by logically structured by different authors. Important to note is that if the product group that we identified to have relative comparative advantage with bigger ...

  12. Natural postmenopause is associated with an increase in combined cardiovascular risk factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lejsková, M.; Alušík, Š.; Valenta, Zdeněk; Adámková, S.; Piťha, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2012), s. 587-596 ISSN 0862-8408 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NS10511 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : menopause * metabolic syndrome * dyslipidemia * cardiovascular disease * central obesity Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23098660

  13. Advances in pubertal growth and factors influencing it: Can we increase pubertal growth?

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf Soliman; Vincenzo De Sanctis; Rania Elalaily; Said Bedair

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a period of development characterized by partially concurrent changes which includes growth acceleration, alteration in body composition and appearance of secondary sex characteristics. Puberty is characterized by an acceleration and then deceleration in skeletal growth. The initiation, duration and amount of growth vary considerably during the growth spurt. Pubertal growth and biological maturation are dynamic processes regulated by a variety of genetic and environmental factors. ...

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha increases myocardial microvascular transport in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P R; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Høyer, S

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a primary mediator in the pathogenesis of tissue injury, and high circulating levels of TNF-alpha are found in a variety of pathological conditions. In open-chest anesthetized dogs, the effects of intracoronary recombinant human TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha; 10...... hydrophilic molecules across the myocardial microvascular barrier in vivo and induce a prolonged decrease in cardiac performance. These effects may be important elements in myocardial pathophysiology....

  15. Choosing Surgery: Identifying Factors Leading to Increased General Surgery Matriculation Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, David T; Freeman, Matthew D; Korndorffer, James R; Meade, Peter C; Jaffe, Bernard M; Slakey, Douglas P

    2017-03-01

    Tulane graduates have, over the past six years, chosen general surgical residency at a rate above the national average (mean 9.6% vs 6.6%). With much of the recent career choice research focusing on disincentives and declining general surgery applicants, we sought to identify factors that positively influenced our students' decision to pursue general surgery. A 50-question survey was developed and distributed to graduates who matched into a general surgery between the years 2006 and 2014. The survey evaluated demographics, exposure to surgery, and factors affecting interest in a surgical career. We achieved a 54 per cent (61/112) response rate. Only 43 per cent considered a surgical career before medical school matriculation. Fifty-nine per cent had strongly considered a career other than surgery. Sixty-two per cent chose to pursue surgery during or immediately after their surgery clerkship. The most important factors cited for choosing general surgery were perceived career enjoyment of residents and faculty, resident/faculty relationship, and mentorship. Surgery residents and faculty were viewed as role models by 72 and 77 per cent of responders, respectively. This study demonstrated almost half of those choosing a surgical career did so as a direct result of the core rotation experience. We believe that structuring the medical student education experience to optimize the interaction of students, residents, and faculty produces a positive environment encouraging students to choose a general surgery career.

  16. Epidemiological support for genetic variability at hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and serotonergic system as risk factors for major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-López A

    2015-10-01

    intergenic variant (rs9526236 upstream of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A gene (HTR2A; chromosome 13, and five polymorphisms (rs17689966, rs173365, rs7209436, rs110402, and rs242924 located in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 gene (CRHR1; chromosome 17, all showed suggestive trends for association with MDD (P<0.05. Within CRHR1 gene, the TATGA haplotype combination was found to increase significantly the risk for MDD with an odds ratio =1.68 (95% CI: 1.16–2.42, P=0.006.Conclusion: Although limited, perhaps due to insufficient sample size power, our results seem to support the notion that the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal and serotonergic systems are likely to be involved in the genetic susceptibility for MDD. Future studies, including larger samples, should be addressed for further validation and replication of the present findings.Keywords: genetic association analysis, major depression, HPA axis, serotonergic system

  17. Edible coating as factor of preserving freshness and increasing biological value of gingerbread cakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Shulga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents experimental study on the feasibility of using edible films (in the coating as a means of preventing staling and method of increasing the biological value of gingerbread products. Grounded components of edible coating. Based on the organoleptic and physico-chemical showers properties (moisture content, water absorptivity and friability proved the feasibility and necessity of use last one edible coating, which also can increase the biological value of products, as part of the cover is linseed oil.

  18. Assessment of factors that increase and reduce the risk of aggressive unlawful behavior among juveniles (a review of foreign literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarova N.G.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to an overview of foreign researches about factors that increase the risk of aggressive unlawful behavior among juveniles and reduce the risk of such behavior. Such definitions as risk factor, protective factor (defensive, aggression and violence were examined. It is shown how the methods of assessment for both social and negative consequences of unlawful behavior, including aggressive one, have been developed, starting from discretionary approach based on unstructured clinical statement and ending with a method of structured risk assessment. The article contains the descriptions of researches about prognostic structured risk assessment of aggressive criminal behavior among adolescents. The results of contemporary foreign researches that were aimed at identifying factors that either increase or reduce the risk of aggressive unlawful behavior in childhood and adolescence, were outlined.

  19. Early expressions of hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor increase the neuronal plasticity of activated endogenous neural stem cells after focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seung; Park, Jong-Tae; Na, Joo Young; Park, Man-Seok; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Lee, Min-Cheol; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2014-05-01

    Endogenous neural stem cells become "activated" after neuronal injury, but the activation sequence and fate of endogenous neural stem cells in focal cerebral ischemia model are little known. We evaluated the relationships between neural stem cells and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in a photothromobotic rat stroke model using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. We also evaluated the chronological changes of neural stem cells by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression was initially increased from 1 hour after ischemic injury, followed by vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α immunoreactivity was detected in the ipsilateral cortical neurons of the infarct core and peri-infarct area. Vascular endothelial growth factor immunoreactivity was detected in bilateral cortex, but ipsilateral cortex staining intensity and numbers were greater than the contralateral cortex. Vascular endothelial growth factor immunoreactive cells were easily found along the peri-infarct area 12 hours after focal cerebral ischemia. The expression of nestin increased throughout the microvasculature in the ischemic core and the peri-infarct area in all experimental rats after 24 hours of ischemic injury. Nestin immunoreactivity increased in the subventricular zone during 12 hours to 3 days, and prominently increased in the ipsilateral cortex between 3-7 days. Nestin-labeled cells showed dual differentiation with microvessels near the infarct core and reactive astrocytes in the peri-infarct area. BrdU-labeled cells were increased gradually from day 1 in the ipsilateral subventricular zone and cortex, and numerous BrdU-labeled cells were observed in the peri-infarct area and non-lesioned cortex at 3 days. BrdU-labeled cells rather than neurons, were mainly co-labeled with nestin and GFAP. Early expressions of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular

  20. Factors Associated With Increased Mortality And Prolonged Length Of Stay In An Adult Intensive Care Unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz Francioso de; Dias,Olivia Meira; Mello,Marcos Moreira; Araújo, Sebastião; Dragosavac, Desanka; Nucci, Anamarli; Falcão, Antônio Luis Eiras

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit is synonymous of high severity, and its mortality rates are between 5.4 and 33%. With the development of new technologies, a patient can be maintained for long time in the unit, causing high costs, psychological and moral for all involved. This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors for mortality and prolonged length of stay in an adult intensive care unit. The study included all patients consecutively admitted to the adult medical/surgical intensive care unit of Hos...

  1. Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood to increase heavy oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-04-01

    This report covers work performed in the area related to the physicochemical factors for the improvement of the oil recovery efficiency in steamfloods. In this context, three general areas are studied: (1) The understanding of vapor-liquid flow in porous media, whether the flow is internal (boiling), external (steam injection) or countercurrent (as in vertical heat pipes). (2) The effect of reservoir heterogeneity, particularly as it regards fractured systems and long and narrow reservoirs (which are typical of oil reservoirs). (3) The flow properties of additives for the improvement of recovery efficiency, in particular the properties of foams.

  2. Modification of chemical and physical factors in steamflood to increase heavy oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2000-01-19

    This report covers the work performed in the various physicochemical factors for the improvement of oil recovery efficiency. In this context the following general areas were studied: (1) The understanding of vapor-liquid flows in porous media, including processes in steam injection; (2) The effect of reservoir heterogeneity in a variety of foams, from pore scale to macroscopic scale; (3) The flow properties of additives for improvement of recovery efficiency, particularly foams and other non-Newtonian fluids; and (4) The development of optimization methods to maximize various measures of oil recovery.

  3. Transforming growth factor-beta1 adsorbed to tricalciumphosphate coated implants increases peri-implant bone remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, M.; Overgaard, S; Glerup, H

    2001-01-01

    Increasing experimental interest has emerged for the use of growth factors to stimulate bone healing and bone formation in various clinical situations. We and others have demonstrated that recombinant human transforming growth factor-beta1 (rhTGF-beta1) adsorbed onto tricalcium phosphate (TCP...... inserted bilaterally into the femoral condyles of 10 skeletally mature mongrel dogs. The implants were initially surrounded by a 2 mm gap. Implants with 0.3 microg rhTGF-beta1 were compared with implants without growth factor. The dogs were sacrificed after six weeks. Bone remodeling was evaluated...

  4. Environmental risk factors (outdoor air pollution and climatic changes) and increased trend of respiratory allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, G; Liccardi, G; D'Amato, M

    2000-01-01

    A wealth of evidence suggests that allergic respiratory diseases such as rhinosinusitis and bronchial asthma have become more common worldwide in recent years and a great deal of etiological and pathogenic research has been carried out to evaluate the possible causes of this increasing trend. There is also some evidence that increased atmospheric concentrations of pollutants such as ozone (O3), nitric oxides (NOx), respirable particulate (PM10) and volatile organic chemicals (VOC5), which result from increased use of liquid petroleum gas or kerosene, may be linked to the increased prevalence of allergic diseases which develop more frequently in urban areas of developed countries. Since bronchial asthma is a syndrome which can be aggravated by inhaled compounds, the effects of air pollutants on health have been the focus of attention. In fact, various studies have demonstrated that inhalation of air pollutants such as O3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), either individually or in combination, can enhance the airway response to inhaled allergens in atopic subjects, thus inducing asthma exacerbations. Moreover, experimental studies have shown that diesel exhaust particulate causes respiratory symptoms and is able also to modulate the immune response by increasing IgE synthesis in predisposed animals and humans. There is also some evidence that air pollutants can interact with aeroallergens in the atmosphere and/or on human airways, potentiating their effects. In fact, by inducing airway inflammation which increases epithelial permeability, some pollutants overcome the mucosal barrier and lead to allergen-induced responses. However, air pollution and climatic changes should also have an indirect effect on allergic response by influencing quantitatively and qualitatively the pollen production by allergenic plants.

  5. Factors associated with increased mortality and prolonged length of stay in an adult intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz Francioso de; Dias, Olivia Meira; Mello, Marcos Moreira; Araújo, Sebastião; Dragosavac, Desanka; Nucci, Anamarli; Falcão, Antônio Luis Eiras

    2010-09-01

    The intensive care unit is synonymous of high severity, and its mortality rates are between 5.4 and 33%. With the development of new technologies, a patient can be maintained for long time in the unit, causing high costs, psychological and moral for all involved. This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors for mortality and prolonged length of stay in an adult intensive care unit. The study included all patients consecutively admitted to the adult medical/surgical intensive care unit of Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas, for six months. We collected data such as sex, age, diagnosis, personal history, APACHE II score, days of invasive mechanical ventilation orotracheal reintubation, tracheostomy, days of hospitalization in the intensive care unit and discharge or death in the intensive care unit. Were included in the study 401 patients; 59.6% men and 40.4% women, age 53.8±18.0. The mean intensive care unit stay was 8.2±10.8 days, with a mortality rate of 13.5%. Significant data for mortality and prolonged length of stay in intensive care unit (p 11, OT-Re and tracheostomy. The mortality and prolonged length of stay in intensive care unit intensive care unit as risk factors were: APACHE>11, orotracheal reintubation and tracheostomy.

  6. USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AS INCREASE FACTOR OF PRIVATE SECTOR COMPETITIVENESS IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kuzioma

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article shows that the international network of electronic communication helps the various economic agents to find new partners, to respond more quickly to the changing conditions, facilitate greater interaction of economic partners and establishment of the trusting and long-term relationships, reduce the transaction costs and the distance between the partners, while simultaneously increasing the economic benefits of their relationship. It justifies the fact that the widespread implementation of information and communication technologies in Ukraine might contribute to increasing the number of small businesses and private business organizations, as well as strengthening their competitive positions in the domestic and foreign markets. This article proves that the use of ICTs can enhance the effectiveness of the production and companies’ management system by increasing their access to the information, knowledge, financial services and other resources. As explained in this work, thanks to the use of ICTs, new opportunities are created for the small private enterprises to develop the existing and discover new types and directions of activity, which will contribute to the improvement of the well-being of the population. It also rationalizes that the expansion of the ICTs’ usage by the government and other public bodies may support the increase of the business environment transparency and simplification of the procedures for starting and running a business. It determines why the spread of information technology, especially in our country, requires governmental support, primarily on the development of information infrastructure and adaptation of the legislation to the conditions of the information economy.

  7. Low serum insulin-like growth factor I is associated with increased risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Scheike, Thomas Harder; Davidsen, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We hypothesize that low IGF-I and high IGFBP-3 levels might be associated with increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD).......Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We hypothesize that low IGF-I and high IGFBP-3 levels might be associated with increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD)....

  8. Specialization of the Romanian Economy as a Factor of Increasing Competitiveness in the International Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela-Carmen MUNTEAN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A major importance in study performance of trade is presented by specialization profile, usually measured by comparative advantage. However, the specialization of a country in a particular sector can be measured by various indicators, their choice depending on many factors, so below, we present some of these indicators as they were by logically structured by different authors. Important to note is that if the product group that we identified to have relative comparative advantage with bigger share to export or import to / from EU and also in the total export and import, this is a first indication that it retains the advantage comparison, almost at all groups (with some minor exceptions. Romania exports respectively imports in large enough share to / from the European Union.

  9. Increased serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients with narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders B; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden loss of muscle tone (cataplexy), fragmentation of nocturnal sleep and sleep paralysis. The symptoms of the disease strongly correlate with a reduction in hypocretin levels in CSF and a reduction in hypoc......Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden loss of muscle tone (cataplexy), fragmentation of nocturnal sleep and sleep paralysis. The symptoms of the disease strongly correlate with a reduction in hypocretin levels in CSF and a reduction...... that serum levels of these factors are altered in patients with narcolepsy compared to healthy controls without sleep disturbances. Polysomnography data was obtained and serum BDNF and NGF levels measured using ELISA, while hypocretin was measured using RIA. Serum BDNF levels were significantly higher...... in narcolepsy patients than in healthy controls (64.2±3.9ng/ml vs 47.3±2.6ng/ml, P...

  10. Study on the Key Factor Parameters to Increase Productivity in Construction and Manufacturing Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazyed, K.; Alaswad, A.; Olabi, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    Proper management of human and non-human resources in construction and manufacturing projects can give-in considerable savings in time and cost. Construction and Manufacturing industry faces issues in connection with problems related with productivity and the problems are usually connected with performance of employees. The performance of employees is affected by many factors. In this paper a survey was made on respondents who are employed various projects of Saudi Arabia. The researcher developed a theoretical framework from the existing research which was used as a Model to collect and analyze the field data to test the hypothesis. In this research activity three predictors (commitment, job satisfaction and job performance) for determining the change in productivity. The results highlight that commitment and job performance (respectively) are the two predictors which are explaining 37% of variation in the productivity of the companies. The results also show that Job Satisfaction has no role in the prediction of productivity.

  11. Increase of ozone concentrations, its temperature sensitivity and the precursor factor in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised about the possible connections between the local and regional photochemical problem and global warming. The current study assesses the trend of ozone in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta (PRD in South China and investigates the interannual changes of sensitivity of ozone to air temperature, as well as the trends in regional precursors. Results reveal, at the three monitoring sites from the mid-1990s to 2010, an increase in the mean ozone concentrations from 1.0 to 1.6 µg m−3 per year. The increase occurred in all seasons, with the highest rate in autumn. This is consistent with trends and temperature anomalies in the region. The increase in the sensitivity of ozone to temperature is clearly evident from the correlation between ozone (OMI [Ozone Monitoring Instrument] column amount and surface air temperature (from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder displayed in the correlation maps for the PRD during the prominently high ozone period of July–September. It is observed to have increased from 2005 to 2010, the latter being the hottest year on record globally. To verify this temporal change in sensitivity, the ground-level trends of correlation coefficients/regression slopes are analysed. As expected, results reveal a statistically significant upward trend over a 14-year period (1997–2010. While the correlation revealed in the correlation maps is in agreement with the corresponding OMI ozone maps when juxtaposed, temperature sensitivity of surface ozone also shows an association with ozone concentration, with R=0.5. These characteristics of ozone sensitivity are believed to have adverse implications for the region. As shown by ground measurements and/or satellite analyses, the decrease in nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx in Hong Kong is not statistically significant while NO2 of the PRD has only very slightly changed. However, carbon dioxide has remarkably declined in the whole region. While these observations concerning

  12. Production of tumor necrosis factor-á is increased in urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neni Susilaningsih

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary tract infection (UTI is a common source of bacteriemia. The most common cause of UTI is Escherichia coli (E. coli. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-á gene polymorphism has been reported to be responsible for an excessive production of TNF-á and eventual disruption of pro-inflammatory cytokine regulation. The aim of this study was to compare TNF-á serum levels and TNF-á allele polymorphisms in patients with UTI due to E.coli and in non-UTI controls. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Dr. Kariadi Central Hospital and the Center for Biomedical Research, Faculty of Medicine, Diponegoro University, Semarang. In 68 patients with UTI the TNF-á serum levels were determined by means of ELISA and compared to those of non-UTI controls (n=55. TNF-á-308G>A gene polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length using the NcoI enzyme. Fragments were visualized on polyacrylamide gel with silver staining. Results TNF-á serum level in patients with UTI had a median of 8.9 pg/mL, which was significantly higher than the median of 3.7 pg/mL in the control group (pA gene polymorphisms found in the patient group were G/G=61 (90%, G/A=7(10% and A/A=0, while in the control group were G/G=48 (87%, G/A=7 (13% and A/A =0. There was no significant differences (p=0.578 in gene polymorphisms between the two groups. Conclusions TNF-á serum levels in patients with UTI due to E. coli were significantly higher than in non-UTI controls, but for the TNF-á-380 gene polymorphisms no significant difference was found between the two groups. There are presumably more important factors than host genotype that influence UTI pathogenesis.

  13. An investigation of factors increasing the risk of aggressive behaviour among schizophrenic inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel eLejoyeux

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the studyThis study tried to identify risk factors of aggressive behavior in a population of schizophrenic inpatients. We tested the association between aggressive behavior and socio-demographic characteristics, addictive disorders, history of suicide attempt and sexual violence, impulsivity and sensation seeking.MethodsAll consecutive schizophrenic inpatients (100 were assessed during six months. Aggressive behavior was quantified with a standardized scale, the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS. We studied socio-demographic characteristics and the history of suicide attempt and sexual violence with a specific standardized questionnaire. Addictive disorders were identified with the Fagerström and CAGE questionnaires and with the DSM-IV-R diagnostic criteria for nicotine, alcohol, cannabis opiates, and cocaine abuse and dependence disorders. Lastly, we studied sensation-seeking with the Zuckerman scale and impulsivity with the Barratt scale. ResultsLinear regression identified four factors associated with aggressive behaviour: male gender (odd ratio =12.8, history of sexual violence (odd ratio = 3.6, Fagerström score (odd ratio= 1.3, number of cigarettes smoked each day (odd ratio=1.16. Patients with nicotine use or dependence had significantly higher levels of OAS scores. This difference was not observed between patients with or without alcohol dependence. OAS scores were correlated to the number of cigarettes smoked each day and to Fagerström scores. Patients with a higher level of sensation seeking and impulsivity also had higher OAS scores. ConclusionA Typical schizophrenic patient at risk of showing aggressive behavior is a man, who smokes and presents a history of sexual violence.

  14. Prospective risk factors for increased central augmentation index in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva Kumar, Prithvi; Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Morey-Vargas, Oscar; Zamani, Payman; Bolaños-Salazar, Juan F; Chirinos, Diana A; Haines, Philip; Khan, Zubair A; Coacalla-Guerra, Johanna C; Davalos-Robles, Maria E; Llerena-Dongo, Gladys R; Zapata-Ponze, Mardelangel; Chirinos, Julio A

    2015-01-01

    Arterial wave reflections are important determinants of central pressure pulsatility and left ventricular afterload. The augmentation index (AIx) is the most widely used surrogate of arterial wave reflections. Despite multiple cross-sectional studies assessing the correlates of AIx, little prospective data exist regarding changes in AIx over time. We aimed to assess the predictors of changes in AIx over time in adults from the general population. We performed radial arterial tonometry assessments a median of 3.18 ± 0.4 years apart on 143 nondiabetic adult participants in the population-based PREVENCION study. Central AIx was obtained using the generalized transfer function of the Sphygmocor device. Predictors of the change in AIx over time were investigated. Among men (n = 67), the change in AIx was predicted by abdominal obesity (standardized β for waist circumference = 0.34; P = 0.002), impaired fasting glucose (standardized β = 0.24; P = 0.009), and the change in heart rate (standardized β = -0.78; P < 0.001). Among women (n = 76), the change in AIx was predicted by non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (standardized β = 0.33; P = 0.001), C-reactive protein levels (standardized β = 0.24; P = 0.02), change in mean arterial pressure (standardized β = 0.33; P = 0.001), and change in heart rate (standardized β = -0.52; P < 0.001). Metabolic and inflammatory factors predicted changes in AIx over time, with important sex differences. Metabolic factors, such as abdominal obesity and impaired fasting glucose, predicted changes in AIx in men, whereas C-reactive protein and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels predicted changes in women. Our findings highlight the impact of sex on arterial properties and may guide the design of interventions to favorably impact changes in late systolic pressure augmentation. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Socio-Educational Partnership as a Factor in Increasing the Efficiency of Preparing the Teaching Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vasilyevna Zelenko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to actual problems of modernization of pedagogical education in view of educational priorities and demands from consumers of educational services. Based on the held experiment and generalized experience there were revealed the forms of the implementation of socio-educational partnership between the pedagogical institutions and the state and local governments, the educational establishments, the cultural and sports establishments, the public organizations. The most optimal forms of socio-educational partnership were considered the following: participation of employer’s representatives in correction of curriculum and teaching programs, direction of the course and diploma projects, final state attestation of graduates; running joint experimental researches; conducting joint scientific and entertaining activities; employment assistance. The study concludes that social-educational partnership facilitates the increase of quality of educational process and plays an important role in increasing the quality of training of the future teachers.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha increases myocardial microvascular transport in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P R; Svendsen, J H; Høyer, Christian S

    1994-01-01

    ng/kg for 60 min) on myocardial microvascular transport of a small hydrophilic indicator was examined by the single-injection, residue-detection method. Intracoronary infusion of rTNF-alpha increased myocardial microvascular transport after 120 min. This increase was preceded by a sustained decline...... in cardiac output and was associated with the appearance of areas with myocardial necrosis in the regional left ventricular wall. The myocardial plasma flow rate and maximum plasma flow rate in response to a 30-s coronary occlusion were not influenced by rTNF-alpha, although a decrease in the myocardial...... hydrophilic molecules across the myocardial microvascular barrier in vivo and induce a prolonged decrease in cardiac performance. These effects may be important elements in myocardial pathophysiology....

  17. Factors increasing snake detection and perceived threat in captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etting, Stephanie F; Isbell, Lynne A; Grote, Mark N

    2014-02-01

    The primary predators of primates are all ambush hunters, and yet felids, raptors, and snakes differ in aspects of their ecology that affect the evasive strategies of their primate prey. Felids and raptors can traverse long distances quickly, thus the urgency of threat they present increases as they come closer in proximity to primates. In contrast, snakes do not move rapidly over long distances, and so primates may be reasonably safe even at close distances provided snakes can be detected and monitored. We investigated the ability of captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to detect snakes at distances ranging from 15 to 1.5 m. We also examined variation in intensity of perceived threat by applying a Hidden Markov Model to infer changes in underlying state from observable behaviors, that is, increased attention and mobbing. We found that the macaques often failed to detect snake models but that closer proximity improved snake detection, which is necessary before threat can be perceived. We also found that having only one individual in fairly close proximity (≤ 7.5 m) was sufficient to alert the rest of the group and so the chances of detection did not increase with increasing group size. Finally, we found that when the snakes were perceived, they did not elicit greater intensity of response with closer proximity. These results provide evidence that the threat from snakes is greatest when they are in proximity to primates but are unseen. When snakes are seen, however, distance appears not to affect primates' perceived risk, in contrast to their perceived risk from raptors and felids. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Explaining the Rapid Increase in Nigeria's Sex Ratio at Birth: Factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    This paper examines the rapid increase in Nigeria's sex ratio at birth from 1.03 boys born for every 1 girl born in each year from. 1996-2008 to 1.06 in each year from 2009-2014, second only to Tunisia in Africa at 1.07. The average sex ratio at birth in the world in 2014 was 1.07. In most Black African nations or Black majority ...

  19. Empirical testing of Kotler's high-performance factors to increase sales growth

    OpenAIRE

    Oren Dayan; Cecil A. Arnolds; Miemie Struwig

    2010-01-01

    Purpose and/or objectives: The primary objective of this study is to empirically test Kotler's (2003) high-performance model which ensures an increase in sales growth. More specifically, the study explores the influence of process variables (as measured by marketing strategies), resources management (as measured by the management of labour, materials, machines, information technology and energy) and organisational variables (as measured by TQM and organisational culture) on sales growth...

  20. Factors Contributing to Increases in Prescription Drug Expenditures Borne by National Health Insurance in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Young-Man; Paek, Kyung Won; Bea, Min Hee; Chun, Kihong; Lee, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rapid growth of prescription drug expenditures is a problem in South Korea. The objective of this study was to assess the contributions of four variables (therapeutic choice, drug-mix, original use, and price changes) to increases in drug expenditures paid by the National Health Insurance (NHI) in Korea. Materials and Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted between January 1, 2008 and June 30, 2012 utilizing data from the NHI Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review a...

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor B (TNFB) Genetic Variants and Its Increased Expression Are Associated with Vitiligo Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laddha, Naresh C.; Dwivedi, Mitesh; Gani, Amina R.; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2013-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in TNFB are involved in the regulation of its expression and are found to be associated with various autoimmune diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TNFB +252A/G (rs909253) and exon 3 C/A (rs1041981) polymorphisms are associated with vitiligo susceptibility, and expression of TNFB and ICAM1 affects the disease onset and progression. We have earlier reported the role of TNFA in autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo, and we now show the involvement of TNFB in vitiligo pathogenesis. The two polymorphisms investigated in the TNFB were in strong linkage disequilibrium and significantly associated with vitiligo. TNFB and ICAM1 transcripts were significantly increased in patients compared to controls. Active vitiligo patients showed significant increase in TNFB transcripts compared to stable vitiligo. The genotype-phenotype analysis revealed that TNFB expression levels were higher in patients with GG and AA genotypes as compared to controls. Patients with the early age of onset and female patients showed higher TNFB and ICAM1 expression. Overall, our findings suggest that the increased TNFB transcript levels in vitiligo patients could result, at least in part, from variations at the genetic level which in turn leads to increased ICAM1 expression. For the first time, we show that TNFB +252A/G and exon 3 C/A polymorphisms are associated with vitiligo susceptibility and influence the TNFB and ICAM1 expression. Moreover, the study also emphasizes influence of TNFB and ICAM1 on the disease progression, onset and gender bias for developing vitiligo. PMID:24312346

  2. Increasing age is a major risk factor for susceptibility to heat stress during physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Ryan; Poirier, Martin P; Louie, Jeffrey C; Sigal, Ronald J; Boulay, Pierre; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the extent to which age, cardiorespiratory fitness, and body fat can independently determine whole-body heat loss (WBHL) in 87 otherwise healthy adults. We show that increasing age is a major predictor for decreasing WBHL in otherwise healthy adults (aged 20-70 years), accounting for 40% of the variation in the largest study to date. While greater body fat also had a minor detrimental impact on WBHL, there was no significant role for cardiorespiratory fitness.

  3. Lumbar decompression in the elderly: increased age as a risk factor for complications and nonhome discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; Gilder, Hannah; Maloney, Patrick R; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Shepherd, Daniel; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Ubl, Daniel S; Crowson, Cynthia S; Krauss, William E; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE With improving medical therapies for chronic conditions, elderly patients increasingly present as candidates for operative intervention for degenerative diseases of the spine. To date, there is a paucity of studies examining complications in lumbar decompression, without fusion, that include patients older than 80 years. Using a multicenter national database, the authors of this study evaluated lumbar decompression in the elderly, including octogenarians, to evaluate for associations between age and patient outcomes. METHODS The 2011-2013 American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data set was queried for patients 65 years and older with diagnosis and procedure codes inclusive of degenerative spine disease and lumbar decompression without fusion. Morbidity and mortality within the 30-day postoperative period were the primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes of interest included unplanned readmission within 30 days or discharge to a nonhome facility. Outcomes and operative characteristics were compared using chi-square tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS A total of 8744 patients were identified; of these patients 4573 (52.30%) were 65 years and older. Elderly patients were stratified into 3 age categories: 85 years or older (n = 314), 75-84 years (n = 1663), and 65-74 years (n = 2596). Univariate analysis showed that, compared with age younger than 65 years, increased age was associated with the number of levels (≥ 3), readmissions within 30 days, nonhome discharge, any complication, length of stay, and blood transfusion (all p lumbar decompression without fusion in the elderly, specifically including patients older than 80 years, demonstrates that increased age is associated with more extensive operations, resulting in longer hospital stays, increased rates of nonhome discharge, and minor complications.

  4. PERFECTION RUSSIAN TAX FEDERALISM AS THE FACTOR OF INCREASE COMPETITIVENESS OF INDUSTRIALLY ADVANCED REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Tatarkin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article problems of increase of competitiveness of industrially advanced regions are considered on the basis of optimization of system of differentiation of tax powers and tax incomes, stimulating authorities of different levels to develop own tax potential, to form economic sources for self-development and to carry out a responsible financial policy in interests of the population. The basic background of research became the ground of an opportunity to transfer the principles of a competition on mutual relations of authorities of a various level, thus determining economic advantages of decentralization control system of territory development.

  5. Increasing maternal percentage body fat in early second trimester: a risk factor for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanxia; Qiu, Jie; Zhou, Min; Wang, Youjie; Du, Yukai

    2015-02-01

    To determine if maternal percentage body fat (PBF) or fat free mass (FFM) in the early second trimester of pregnancy influenced the development of preeclampsia. A matched nested case-control study was conducted from a cohort study of 1668 women at Gansu provincial maternal and child care hospital from July 2007 to August 2011 in China. Maternal PBF and FFM were assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis during 12th-16th gestational week. The demographic characteristics were all chart abstracted. After childbirth, 70 cases of preeclampsia were matched by race/age with 140 uncomplicated pregnancies women. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the associated risk factors. Pre-pregnancy body mass index were higher in women who subsequently developed preeclampsia compared with controls (p preeclampsia (adjusted OR: 6.84, 95% CI: 4.15-41.60) among women with PBF ≥ 40% versus women with PBF preeclampsia (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.6-3.6). Maternal PBF but not FFM is a predictor of preeclampsia in the early second trimester. Excessive adipose tissue possibly played an important role in developing of preeclampsia.

  6. Factors that increase the electric field of the dielectric barrier ozone generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganea, I.; Morar, R.

    2017-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge cell (DBDC), also called ozone cell, is the main component of the ozone generators widely used. When the cell is powered with a high voltage value (> 5 kV) in the dielectric gas, arises a high intensity electric field that influences ozone generation processes by silent discharge also called dielectric barrier discharge. The intensity of the electric field depends by a number of factors such as the constructive form of the cell, the cell sizes, the value and the waveform of the supply voltage, the type of insulators used as dielectric barrier. The insulators which constituting the dielectric barrier, influence the intensity of the electric field through the dielectric constant of the liquid or solid shows the values of intensity electrical fields from ozone cells, with plane electrodes and ozone cells with cylindrical electrodes. The paper presents a graphic variation of the electric field from the gap and the dielectric barrier of cells with plane electrodes and cylindrical collinear electrodes. Experimental research highlights current-voltage characteristic for several types of dielectrics. Distilled water was highlighted as dielectric with the best results.

  7. Integrated Risk Management as a Factor of Competitiveness Increase of Oil and Gas Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya Nikolaevna Shabanova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to risk assessment and analysis (RAA in oil and gas industry. The article reviews current trends of risks’ assessment and management in oil and gas industry in relation to the activities of enterprises engaged in engineering design in the field of oil and gas processing considering the requirements of international standards (ISO. The classification of risks is provided with consideration of peculiar features of enterprises of Mineral Resources Sector. The authors present a review of major international and national standards, specifying the activities in risk management. It is shown that one of the modern trends of international standardization is a development of risk management and management of sustainable business based on the risk oriented approach. The authors have proposed the algorithm of risk management in oil and gas projects using the domestic software Business Studio, logically divided into following three stages: identification and assessment of project risks, development of risks mitigation measures and monitoring of project risks. The main indicators of the oil and gas complex of Russia (the volume of oil and gas, the primary oil refining, are the main risk factors for the oil and gas industry. The peculiarities of risk management are described in the form of an economic category. The article shows that risk can and should be controlled, in other words, certain measures should be applied to anticipate as many as possible the risk events and to reduce them.

  8. INCREASING AGE IS A RISK FACTOR FOR DECREASED POSTPARTUM PELVIC FLOOR STRENGTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Lieschen H.; Pickett, Stephanie D.; Peck, Jennifer D; Rostaminia, Ghazaleh; Stone, Daniel E.; Shobeiri, S. Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine factors associated with decreased pelvic floor strength (PFS) after the first vaginal delivery in a cohort of low risk women Methods This is a secondary analysis of a prospective study examining the risk of pelvic floor injury in a cohort of primiparous women. All recruited participants underwent an examination, 3D ultrasound and measurement of pelvic floor strength (PFS) in the third trimester and repeated at 4 weeks-6 months postpartum using a perineometer. Results There were 84 women recruited for the study, and 70 completed the postpartum assessment. Average age was 28.4 years (SD, 4.8). There were 46 (66%) subjects with a vaginal delivery (VD) and 24 (34%) with a cesarean delivery (CD) who labored. Decreased PFS was observed more frequently in the VD group compared to the CD group (68% vs. 42%, p=0.03). In modified Poisson regression models controlling for mode of delivery and time of postpartum assessment, women who were age 25-29 (RR=2.80, 95% CI 1.03-7.57) and >=30 (RR=2.53, 95% CI 0.93-6.86)) were over 2.5 times more likely to have decreased postpartum PFS compared to women < 25 yo. Conclusions In this population, women age 25 and older were more than twice as likely to have a decrease in postpartum PFS. PMID:28067746

  9. The transcription factor ERG increases expression of neurotransmitter receptors on prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissick, Haydn T; On, Seung T; Dunn, Laura K; Sanda, Martin G; Asara, John M; Pellegrini, Kathryn L; Noel, Jonathan K; Arredouani, Mohamed S

    2015-08-27

    The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion occurs in about half of prostate cancer (PCa) cases and results in overexpression of the transcription factor ERG. Overexpression of ERG has many effects on cellular function. However, how these changes enhance cell growth and promote tumor development is unclear. To investigate the role of ERG, LNCaP and PC3 cells were transfected with ERG and gene expression and metabolic profile were analyzed. Our data show that expression of ERG induces overexpression of many nicotinicacetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In addition, metabolic profiling by LC-MS/MS revealed elevated production of several neurotransmitters in cells expressing ERG. Consistently, treatment of ERG-expressing cells with nicotine induced elevated calcium influx, GSK3β (Ser9) phosphorylation and cell proliferation. Finally, we show that PCa patientswho are smokers have larger tumors if their tumors are TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion positive. Collectively, our data suggest that ERG sensitizes prostate tumor cells to neurotransmitter receptor agonists like nicotine.

  10. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  11. [Effects of practical training to increase motivation for learning and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takumi; Akiyama, Shinji; Sagara, Hidenori; Tanaka, Akihiro; Miyauchi, Yoshirou; Araki, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Izushi, Fumio; Namba, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Under the six-year pharmaceutical education system that was initiated in April 2006, students who had completed the course in March 2012 became the first graduates. The six-year system encourages students to develop a well-rounded personality, a deep sense of ethics, knowledge required for health care professionals, abilities to identify and solve problems, and practical skills required in clinical settings, as well as basic knowledge and skills. Under the new education system based on the "pharmaceutical education model core curriculums" and "practical training model core curriculums", general pharmaceutical education is implemented in each college, and five-month practical training is conducted in clinical settings. Clinical tasks experienced by students for the first time are expected to significantly influence their motivation to learn and future prospects. In the present survey research, students who had completed practical training evaluated the training program, and correspondence and logistic regression analyses of the results were conducted to examine the future effects and influences of the training on the students. The results suggest that the students viewed the practical training program positively. In addition, clinical experience during the training sessions not only influenced their decisions on future careers, but also significantly increased their motivation to learn. Furthermore, their motivation for learning was increased most by the enthusiasm of pharmacists who advised them in clinical settings, rather than the training program itself. To improve pharmaceutical clinical learning, it is important to develop teaching and working environments for pharmacists in charge of advising students in clinical training.

  12. Factors Contributing to Increases in Prescription Drug Expenditures Borne by National Health Insurance in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jeong Sook; Kim, Young Man; Paek, Kyung Won; Bea, Min Hee; Chun, Kihong; Lee, Soojin

    2016-07-01

    Rapid growth of prescription drug expenditures is a problem in South Korea. The objective of this study was to assess the contributions of four variables (therapeutic choice, drug-mix, original use, and price changes) to increases in drug expenditures paid by the National Health Insurance (NHI) in Korea. A retrospective cohort study was conducted between January 1, 2008 and June 30, 2012 utilizing data from the NHI Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The number of target drug types for final analysis was 13959. To analyze the growth rates of drug expenditures, this study used Fisher ideal index and the Laspeyres and Paasche indexes. With the exception of 2012, therapeutic choice contributed to about 40-60% of the increase in drug expenditures every year, while drug-mix contributed to another 30-40%. The rapid growth in prescription drug expenditure was found to be largely due to drug-mix and therapeutic choice over time. Original use had little impact on drug spending.

  13. Fluid inhibition as a factor in estrogen-induced increase of prostatic weight in castrated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, J J; Kadohama, N; Chai, L S; Hoisaeter, P A; Hampton, M T; Murphy, G P; Sandberg, A A

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism by which estrogens inhibit castration atrophy has been investigated morphologically and biochemically utilizing ventral prostate from Copenhagen rats. The suppression of weight loss and gross edematous appearance of the prostate associated with the in vivo effect of 17 beta-estradiol (E2) could not be accounted for by DNA and protein synthesis. Increase in the fluid content in the tissues was confirmed by demonstration of significant increase in the ratio of wet/dry tissue weights. Light microscopy demonstrated that the main effects were on the stroma, characterized by large interglandular areas almost totally devoid of collagen resulting in an edematous appearance. Electron microscope studies showed an abundance of fluid localized adjacent to the capillary endothelium and some red blood cells indicating disturbances in capillary permeability. The combination of a prolactin secretion inhibiting agent with E2 alone, indicating an involvement of prolactin the estrogen effect. Differences in blood prolactin concentration between the strains of rats may influence the sensitivity of the prostate to estrogens.

  14. Factor V G1691A is associated with an increased risk of retinal vein occlusion: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Jingyi; Ji, Xiangning; Liu, Yuqing

    2017-09-26

    We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between the Factor V G1691A polymorphism and the risk of retinal vein occlusion (RVO). This analysis included 37 studies involving 2,510 cases and 3,466 controls. Factor V G1691A was associated with an increased risk of RVO in the allele, heterozygote, dominant, and carrier models (PA 1), but not the homozygote or recessive models (PA > 0.05). Similar results were observed in a meta-analysis of central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and when comparing Caucasian subgroups to population-based controls. These data demonstrate that the G/A genotype of Factor V G1691A is associated with an increased risk of RVO/CRVO in a Caucasian population.

  15. Heparanase procoagulant activity, factor Xa, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 are increased in shift work female nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir, Yona; Saharov, Gleb; Hoffman, Ron; Keren-Politansky, Anat; Tzoran, Inna; Brenner, Benjamin; Shochat, Tamar

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate on an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer in shift workers, although the underlying mechanism is obscure. Heparanase directly enhances tissue factor (TF) activity leading to increased factor Xa production and subsequent activation of the coagulation system. In the present study, a comparison of coagulation markers among healthy shift working (SW) vs. healthy daytime working (DW) female nurses was performed. Thirty SW and 30 DW female nurses were enrolled. For each of the 60 participants, blood was drawn between 7:00 and 8:00 a.m. and at least 8 h after the last work shift. Plasma was studied for coagulation marker that included TF/heparanase procoagulant activity, TF activity, heparanase procoagulant activity, heparanase level, factor Xa level, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), plasminogen, α2-antiplasmin, fibrinogen, global protein C, von Willebrand factor, and D-dimer by chromogenic assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Sleep quality was assessed by self-report according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The heparanase procoagulant activity increased by 2-fold and the TF/heparanase procoagulant activity increased by 1.5-fold in SW nurses compared to DW nurses (P cardiovascular and cancer morbidity.

  16. Vitamin D3 supplementation increases fibroblast growth factor-23 in HIV-infected youth treated with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenofovir (TDF) is associated with phosphaturia and elevated 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D (1,25-OH(2)D). Fibroblast growth factor-23 causes phosphaturia and increases in response to elevated 1,25-OH(2)D. Vitamin D binding proetin (VDBP) binds to 1,25-OH(2)D, decreasing biologic activity, and is elevated...

  17. Vitamin D Supplementation increases fibroblast growth factor-23 in HIV-infected youth treated with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Tenofovir (TDF) is associated with phosphaturia and elevated 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D (1,25-OH(2)D). Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) causes phosphaturia and increases in response to elevated 1,25-OH(2)D. Vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) binds to 1,25-OH(2)D, decreasing its biologic...

  18. High circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in centenarians are not associated with increased production in T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandmand, Marie; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Kemp, Kåre

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aging is characterized by increased inflammatory activity reflected by increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines, concomitant with an altered cytokine profile of T lymphocytes. High plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha are strongly associated with morbidity...... and mortality in elderly humans. However, the cellular source and mechanisms for the increased circulating TNF-alpha levels are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate if high plasma levels of TNF-alpha are associated with increased production of TNF-alpha by T lymphocytes in elderly...... humans. METHODS: TNF-alpha production by CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometry following stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin in 28 young controls, 14, 81-year-olds and 25 centenarians. RESULTS: Plasma levels of TNF-alpha increased with increasing age...

  19. RELEVANT FACTORS TO INCREASE THE ACCURACY, FEASIBILITY AND SUCCESS OF JOB PERFORMANCE EVALUATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Díaz Cabrera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The situation of economic crisis in Spain has motivated an increasing interest in employee performance evaluation in organizations. On the other hand, it is also producing greater resistance to this evaluation on the part of appraisees, who regard these processes with suspicion and concern in these times of economic difficulties. Therefore, in economic situations like the current one, it is very important to develop assessment scales that facilitate the effectiveness, credibility and success of these systems. The general goal of this work is to provide results that can help evaluation systems to be viewed positively by organizations as well as by their members. For this it is necessary that: (a the response scales used offer precise and reliable data; and (b the procedures applied to assess performance are perceived as fair and reliable by the participants.

  20. Importance of sigma factor mutations in increased triclosan resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gantzhorn, Mette Rørbæk; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Thomsen, Line Elnif

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Salmonella enterica is the second most common foodborne pathogen. The use of biocides is crucial to prevent spread of foodborne pathogens, and it would be devastating for food safety if Salmonella would become resistant to the disinfectants used. Another concern is that exposure...... to disinfectants might lead to decreased susceptibility to antibiotics. The current study aimed to identify genetic changes causing high level triclosan resistance in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and evaluate how these affected antibiotic resistance and efflux pump activity. RESULTS: Wild type strains S....... Typhimurium 4/74 and DTU3 were adapted to increasing concentrations of the biocide triclosan by serial passage. High level triclosan resistant isolates (MIC > 1000 μg/ml) were obtained. Strains were genome sequenced, and SNPs in fabI, rpoS and rpoD were found to be associated with high level resistance...

  1. Daytime napping and increased risk of incident respiratory diseases: symptom, marker, or risk factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yue; Wainwright, Nick W J; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Surtees, Paul G; Hayat, Shabina; Luben, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2016-07-01

    We have identified a strong association between daytime napping and increased mortality risk from respiratory diseases, but little is known about the relationship between daytime napping and respiratory morbidity. Data were drawn from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk cohort. Participants reported napping habits during 1998-2000 and were followed up for respiratory disease hospital admissions until March 2009. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the association between daytime napping and respiratory disease incidence risk. The study sample included 10,978 men and women with a mean age of 61.9 years, and a total of 946 incident respiratory disease cases were recorded. After adjustment for age, sex, social class, education, marital status, employment status, nightshift work, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake, self-reported general health, hypnotic drug use, habitual sleep duration, and preexisting health conditions, daytime napping was associated with an increase in the overall respiratory disease incidence risk (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15, 1.52 for napping napping ≥1 h). This association was more pronounced for lower respiratory diseases, especially for the risk of chronic lower respiratory diseases (HR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.96 for napping napping ≥1 h, overall p = 0.003). Excessive daytime napping might be a useful marker of future respiratory disease incidence risk. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and help understand potential mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The use of less common grass varieties as a factor of increasing forage lands productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Д. Бугайов

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess introduced samples of drought-resistant species of perennial grasses, select a promising parent material and create on its base high-yielding varie­ ies with economic characters. Methods. Field experiment, laboratory testing. Results. The results of studies on introduction and breeding were given aimed to improve drought tolerance of non-traditional perennial grasses under the conditions of the Right-Bank Forest-Steppe zone of Ukraine. Based on the selected parent material, varieties were created by the use of hybridization and ecotype breeding methods and then entered into the State Register of plant varieties suitable for dissemination in Ukraine, among them: intermediate wheatgrass (Elytrigia intermedia (Host Nevski – ‘Hors’, crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum (L. Gaertn. – ‘Petrivskyi’; meadow brome (Bromus riparia Rehm. – ‘Boian’; slender wheatgrass (Roegneria trachycaulon (Link Nevski – ‘Co­umb’. As compared with conventional, relatively drought-tolerant species of smooth brome (Bromopsis inermis (Leyss. Holub – ‘Mars’, increment of dry matter content of these species in the extreme drought conditions of 2011 was increased by 1,52–3,73 t/ha. Under more sufficient moistening conditions of 2012, slender wheatgrass ‘Columb’ was at the level of the сheck variety in terms of this indicator. Other varieties exceeded it by 1.44–3.22 t/ha. The data was given including seed productivity and sowing quality indicators, after-ripening duration and economic fitness of seeds. Conclusions. The use of the recommended varieties of drought-resistant species of perennial grasses as part of grass mixtures will increase significantly the productivity of grasslands and pastures in the current context of climate change.

  3. Increase of Exports as a Potential Factor for Sustainable Economic Development of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Myrvete Badivuku - Pantina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kosovo as the newest state in the region, in the economic aspect represents an economic complex with considerable potential of human, economic and demographic resources, having an open economy and entirely Euro integrated, with the central position in Balkan Peninsula. As a new state Kosovo is going through a transition phase and is found in an unsatisfactory position, therefore a serious professional intervention by the competent mechanisms is necessary towards finding an adequate solution which enables a speedier economic, social and cultural development, thus accessing into economic and political integrations in the region and in Europe. Kosovo economy during 2012 was characterised by a positive norm of growth. The real norm of economic growth in the country reached the figure of 2.9 per cent. The slowest developments in the regional and European markets during this year appeared as a challenge for the general economic activity in the country. In 2012, a decrease was marked from several important sources of financing in the country, especially the foreign direct investments. A reduction was also characterised in export of goods, but, growth of export of the services neutralised the effect of decrease of goods export. Kosovo suffers from the negative trade balance, implying that Kosovo depends on imports, whereas its opportunities to export local products into foreign market are very low. With intention of improving the competitive position of Kosovar enterprises, and for increasing export into world market, the existing economic policies need to be amended and supplemented and the institutional functioning needs to be improved as well. The aim of this study is to provide a realistic overview of the economic situation of Kosovo through an overall analysis and to also give recommendations with intention of improving the trade balance in favour of increase of Kosovar export in the future.

  4. Bibliometric analysis of factors predicting increased citations in the vascular and endovascular literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, George A; Antoniou, Stavros A; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Sfyroeras, George S; Georgiadis, George S

    2015-02-01

    Dissemination of research findings in the scientific community is reflected by the citation count. Our objective was to investigate the relative citation impact of vascular research studies and identify potential predictors of increased citation rates. Articles published in leading journals of vascular and general surgery (Journal of Vascular Surgery, European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Journal of Endovascular Therapy, Annals of Vascular Surgery and Annals of Surgery, British Journal of Surgery, Journal of the American College of Surgeons, and JAMA Surgery) during a 4-month period were identified through electronic databases. Variables potentially associated with increased citation rates, including subject, design, title characteristics, article length, bibliographic references, authorship, geographic distribution, interdisciplinary collaboration, article access, and funding, were assessed in univariate and multiple linear regression models through December 2012. A total of 226 articles with a total number of 4,605 citations were identified. Univariate analysis revealed that endovascular-related studies, study design, studies reporting design in the title, long articles, and studies with high number of references were associated with higher citation rates. On multivariate analysis, 3 variables were found to independently predict the number of citations: study subject (endovascular-related studies; regression coefficient [95% confidence interval], 0.474 [0.240-0.708]; P < 0.001); study design (randomized controlled trial; regression coefficient [95% confidence interval], 0.575 [0.145-1.005]; P = 0.009); and article length (number of pages; regression coefficient [95% confidence interval], 0.069 [0.016-0.123]; P = 0.011). Authors involved in vascular research may enhance the impact of their work by embarking on research strategies of high methodologic quality and pursuing work related with new technologies and evolving endovascular therapies

  5. Determination of factors required to increase uptake of influenza vaccination among hospital-based healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, C E; Riphagen-Dalhuisen, J; Looijmans-van den Akker, I; Frijstein, G; Van der Geest-Blankert, A D J; Danhof-Pont, M B; De Jager, H J; Bos, A A; Smeets, E; De Vries, M J T; Gallee, P M M; Lenderink, A F; Hak, E

    2011-04-01

    A questionnaire study was performed in all eight University Medical Centers in The Netherlands to determine the predictors of influenza vaccination compliance in hospital-based healthcare workers (HCWs). Demographical, behavioural and organisational determinants were assessed based on behavioural and implementation models. Multivariable regression analysis was applied to assess the independent predictors for influenza vaccine uptake. Age >40 years, the presence of a chronic illness, awareness of personal risk and awareness of risk of infecting patients, trust in the effectiveness of the vaccine to reduce the risk of infecting patients, the HCWs' duty to do no harm and their duty to ensure continuity of care, finding vaccination useful despite the constant flow of visitors and having knowledge of the Health Council's advice, social influence and convenient time for vaccination were all independently associated with vaccine uptake. The accuracy of the prediction model was very high (area under the receiver operating curve: 0.95). Intervention programmes to increase influenza vaccine uptake among HCWs should target the relevant determinants identified in this study. Copyright © 2010 the Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Copper-2 Ingestion, Plus Increased Meat Eating Leading to Increased Copper Absorption, Are Major Factors Behind the Current Epidemic of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, George J

    2015-12-02

    It has become clear that copper toxicity is playing a major role in Alzheimer's disease; but why is the brain copper toxicity with cognition loss in Alzheimer's disease so much different clinically than brain copper toxicity in Wilson's disease, which results in a movement disorder? Furthermore, why is the inorganic copper of supplement pills and in drinking water so much more damaging to cognition than the organic copper in food? A recent paper, which shows that almost all food copper is copper-1, that is the copper-2 of foods reverts to the reduced copper-1 form at death or harvest, gives new insight into these questions. The body has an intestinal transport system for copper-1, Ctr1, which channels copper-1 through the liver and into safe channels. Ctr1 cannot absorb copper-2, and some copper-2 bypasses the liver, ends up in the blood quickly, and is toxic to cognition. Humans evolved to handle copper-1 safely, but not copper-2. Alzheimer's is at least in part, a copper-2 toxicity disease, while Wilson's is a general copper overload disease. In this review, we will show that the epidemiology of the Alzheimer's epidemic occurring in developed, but not undeveloped countries, fits with the epidemiology of exposure to copper-2 ingestion leached from copper plumbing and from copper supplement pill ingestion. Increased meat eating in developed countries is also a factor, because it increases copper absorption, and thus over all copper exposure.

  7. Life Style Related Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Its Increased Prevalence in Saudi Arabia: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fareed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Role of life style related risk factors is very important in the pathogenesis and progression of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. The aim of this article is to review the disease burden of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM among the population of Saudi Arabia due to unhealthy life style. Methods: In this review, the information was collected from published literatures related to risk factors like unhealthy dietary pattern and sedentary life style leading to T2DM. Additionally, some epidemiological information for the prevalence of T2DM in Saudi Arabia was also collected. Results: Earlier studies have depicted that unhealthy life style and dietary patterns are risk factors involved in the development of insulin resistance in the body cells. In Saudi Arabia, rapid economic growth has provided a luxurious life style to the masses eventually leading to decrease in the physical activities and adoption of unhealthy dietary patterns. The increased prevalence of T2DM in Saudi Arabia is very much implicated to the life style related risk factors which needs to be improvise for the prevention of this disease. Conclusion: Since the increased prevalence of T2DM is associated with the sedentary life style and unhealthy dietary pattern, so it is recommended that creating awareness about the life style related risk factors for T2DM among general population and patients, will effectively contribute in lowering its incidence rate.

  8. Insulin-like growth factor-1 and cardiotrophin 1 increase strength and mass of extraocular muscle in juvenile chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian; Wiggins, Larisa M; von Bartheld, Christopher S

    2010-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and cardiotrophin 1 (CT1) are known to increase the strength of extraocular muscles in adult and embryonic animals, but no information is available for the early postnatal period, when strabismus treatment in humans is most urgent. Here the authors sought to determine whether these trophic factors strengthen juvenile maturing extraocular muscles and gain insight into mechanisms of force increase. After two injections of IGF1, CT1, or both with different dosages in posthatch chickens, the authors quantified five parameters of the superior oblique extraocular muscle at 2 weeks of age: contractile force, muscle mass, total myofiber area, myofiber diameter, and number of proliferating satellite cells labeled by bromodeoxyuridine. Treatment with IGF1, CT1, and combination of IGF1 and CT1 significantly increased contractile force by 14% to 22%. CT1 and combination treatment significantly increased muscle mass by 10% to 24%. IGF1/CT1 combination treatment did not have additive effects on strengthening muscles, compared with single-drug treatments. Myofiber area increased significantly with IGF1 and CT1 treatment in proximal, but not distal, parts of the muscle and this was due to increased fiber numbers or length (IGF1) or increased diameters of global layer myofibers (CT1). Trophic factors increased the number of proliferating (bromodeoxyuridine-labeled) satellite cells in proximal and middle segments of muscles. Exogenous IGF1 and CT1 strengthen extraocular muscles during maturation. They predominantly remodel the proximal segment of juvenile extraocular muscles. This information about muscle plasticity may aid the design of pharmacologic treatment of strabismus in children during the "critical period" of oculomotor maturation.

  9. Hiring and Retention: Key Factors in Increasing Gender Diversity in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, M.; O'Connell, S.; Frey, C.

    2004-12-01

    Graduation and hiring data of geoscientists over the last ten years indicate that the largest leak in the academic pipeline for women geoscientists is at hiring into tenure-track positions. Anecdotal explanations for this leak generally cite a lack of females in the applicant pool, but women in tenure-track positions anecdotally cite a lack of family-friendly practices by academic departments. Both ideas are currently being tested via surveys of geoscience departments. Is there a way to attract more women to the field to increase the applicant pool? Results of focus groups of geoscientists indicate that both men and women are attracted into the field of geosciences by the same types of events: over one-third became a geoscientist by randomly walking into an undergraduate class and finding themselves captivated by the topic and/or a dynamic instructor. The subject matter itself attracts another one-fourth, and family members encourage another one-fifth of geoscientists to initially enter the field. Slightly more women cite the first attractor of undergraduate class, but the principal draw for our future workforce, male and female, is good instruction of freshman courses. Retention of women in academia is another key issue. The proportion that considers leaving after working towards one or more degrees is highly skewed by gender: one-half of female and only one-third of male geoscientists considered leaving the field at some time in their career. The reasons for considering leaving also differ by gender. Males cite financial issues, including an uncertain job market. Females cite two principal reasons for considering leaving: family issues and difficulties with a graduate advisor. Strategies currently exist for "family issues", including stop-the-clock (of tenure for family needs), assignment shift, on-campus daycare facilities, and unflinching administrative support for such practices. Graduate advising is a learnable skill, and more attention needs to be paid to

  10. Myofibroblast keratinocyte growth factor reduces tight junctional integrity and increases claudin-2 levels in polarized Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Il; Poulin, Emily J.; Blask, Elliot; Bukhalid, Raghida; Whitehead, Robert H.; Franklin, Jeffrey L.; Coffey, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The colonic epithelium is composed of a polarized monolayer sheathed by a layer of pericryptal myofibroblasts (PCMFs). We mimicked these cellular compartments in vitro to assess the effects of paracrine-acting PCMF-derived factors on tight junction (TJ) integrity, as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). Co-culture with 18Co PCMFs, or basolateral administration of 18Co conditioned medium (CM), significantly reduced TER of polarized Caco-2 cells. Amongst candidate paracrine factors, only keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) reduced Caco-2 TER; basolateral KGF treatment led to time- and concentration-dependent increases in claudin-2 levels. We also demonstrate amphiregulin (AREG), produced largely by Caco-2 cells, increased claudin-2 levels, leading to epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated TER reduction. We propose that colonic epithelial TJ integrity can be modulated by paracrine KGF and autocrine AREG through increased claudin-2 levels. KGF-regulated claudin-2 induction may have implications for inflammatory bowel disease, where both KGF and claudin-2 are upregulated. PMID:22946653

  11. Increased visceral adipose tissue as a potential risk factor in patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti T Muuronen

    Full Text Available The etiology of an ischemic stroke remains undetermined in 20-35% of cases and many patients do not have any of the conventional risk factors. Increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT is a suggested new risk factor for both carotid artery atherosclerosis (CAA and atrial fibrillation (AF, but its role in the remaining stroke population is unknown. We assessed the amount of VAT in patients with embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS after excluding major-risk cardioembolic sources, occlusive atherosclerosis, and lacunar stroke.Altogether 58 patients (mean age 57.7 ± 10.2 years, 44 men with ischemic stroke of unknown etiology but without CAA, known AF or small vessel disease underwent computed tomography angiography and assessment of VAT. For comparison VAT values from three different reference populations were used. Conventional risk factors (smoking, hypertension, diabetes, increased total and LDL-cholesterol, decreased HDL-cholesterol were also registered.Mean VAT area was significantly higher in stroke patients (205 ± 103 cm2 for men and 168 ± 99 cm2 for women compared to all reference populations (P < 0.01. 50% of male and 57% of female patients had an increased VAT area. In male patients, VAT was significantly higher despite similar body mass index (BMI. Increased VAT was more common than any of the conventional risk factors.Increased VAT was found in over half of our patients with ESUS suggesting it may have a role in the pathogenesis of thromboembolism in this selected group of patients.

  12. Why is tick-borne encephalitis increasing? A review of the key factors causing the increasing incidence of human TBE in Swedena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaenson Thomas GT

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The highest annual incidence of human tick-borne encephalitis (TBE in Sweden ever recorded by the Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI occurred last year, 2011. The number of TBE cases recorded during 2012 up to 6th August 2012 indicates that the incidence for 2012 could exceed that of 2011. In this review of the ecology and epidemiology of TBE in Sweden our main aim is to analyse the possible reasons behind the gradually increasing incidence of human TBE during the last 20 years. The main TBE virus (TBEV vector to humans in Sweden is the nymphal stage of the common tick Ixodes ricinus. The main mode of transmission and maintenance of TBEV in the tick population is considered to be when infective nymphs co-feed with uninfected but infectible larvae on rodents. In most locations the roe deer, Capreolus capreolus is the main host for the reproducing adult I. ricinus ticks. The high number of roe deer for more than three decades has resulted in a very large tick population. Deer numbers have, however, gradually declined from the early 1990s to the present. This decline in roe deer numbers most likely made the populations of small rodents, which are reservoir-competent for TBEV, gradually more important as hosts for the immature ticks. Consequently, the abundance of TBEV-infected ticks has increased. Two harsh winters in 2009–2011 caused a more abrupt decline in roe deer numbers. This likely forced a substantial proportion of the “host-seeking” ticks to feed on bank voles (Myodes glareolus, which at that time suddenly had become very numerous, rather than on roe deer. Thus, the bank vole population peak in 2010 most likely caused many tick larvae to feed on reservoir-competent rodents. This presumably resulted in increased transmission of TBEV among ticks and therefore increased the density of infected ticks the following year. The unusually warm, humid weather and the prolonged vegetation period in 2011 permitted

  13. Why is tick-borne encephalitis increasing? A review of the key factors causing the increasing incidence of human TBE in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenson, Thomas G T; Hjertqvist, Marika; Bergström, Tomas; Lundkvist, Ake

    2012-08-31

    The highest annual incidence of human tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in Sweden ever recorded by the Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI) occurred last year, 2011. The number of TBE cases recorded during 2012 up to 6th August 2012 indicates that the incidence for 2012 could exceed that of 2011. In this review of the ecology and epidemiology of TBE in Sweden our main aim is to analyse the possible reasons behind the gradually increasing incidence of human TBE during the last 20 years. The main TBE virus (TBEV) vector to humans in Sweden is the nymphal stage of the common tick Ixodes ricinus. The main mode of transmission and maintenance of TBEV in the tick population is considered to be when infective nymphs co-feed with uninfected but infectible larvae on rodents. In most locations the roe deer, Capreolus capreolus is the main host for the reproducing adult I. ricinus ticks. The high number of roe deer for more than three decades has resulted in a very large tick population. Deer numbers have, however, gradually declined from the early 1990s to the present. This decline in roe deer numbers most likely made the populations of small rodents, which are reservoir-competent for TBEV, gradually more important as hosts for the immature ticks. Consequently, the abundance of TBEV-infected ticks has increased. Two harsh winters in 2009-2011 caused a more abrupt decline in roe deer numbers. This likely forced a substantial proportion of the "host-seeking" ticks to feed on bank voles (Myodes glareolus), which at that time suddenly had become very numerous, rather than on roe deer. Thus, the bank vole population peak in 2010 most likely caused many tick larvae to feed on reservoir-competent rodents. This presumably resulted in increased transmission of TBEV among ticks and therefore increased the density of infected ticks the following year. The unusually warm, humid weather and the prolonged vegetation period in 2011 permitted nymphs and adult ticks to

  14. Copper-2 Ingestion, Plus Increased Meat Eating Leading to Increased Copper Absorption, Are Major Factors Behind the Current Epidemic of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, George J.

    2015-01-01

    It has become clear that copper toxicity is playing a major role in Alzheimer’s disease; but why is the brain copper toxicity with cognition loss in Alzheimer’s disease so much different clinically than brain copper toxicity in Wilson’s disease, which results in a movement disorder? Furthermore, why is the inorganic copper of supplement pills and in drinking water so much more damaging to cognition than the organic copper in food? A recent paper, which shows that almost all food copper is copper-1, that is the copper-2 of foods reverts to the reduced copper-1 form at death or harvest, gives new insight into these questions. The body has an intestinal transport system for copper-1, Ctr1, which channels copper-1 through the liver and into safe channels. Ctr1 cannot absorb copper-2, and some copper-2 bypasses the liver, ends up in the blood quickly, and is toxic to cognition. Humans evolved to handle copper-1 safely, but not copper-2. Alzheimer’s is at least in part, a copper-2 toxicity disease, while Wilson’s is a general copper overload disease. In this review, we will show that the epidemiology of the Alzheimer’s epidemic occurring in developed, but not undeveloped countries, fits with the epidemiology of exposure to copper-2 ingestion leached from copper plumbing and from copper supplement pill ingestion. Increased meat eating in developed countries is also a factor, because it increases copper absorption, and thus over all copper exposure. PMID:26633489

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates hippocampal synaptic transmission by increasing N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Eric S; Crozier, Robert A.; Black, Ira B.; Plummer, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been found to regulate synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Whole-cell and single-channel recordings from cultured hippocampal neurons revealed a mechanism responsible for enhanced synaptic strength. Specifically, brain-derived neurotrophic factor augmented glutamate-evoked, but not acetylcholine-evoked, currents 3-fold and increased N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor open probability. Activation of trkB NT receptors was critical, as glutamate curr...

  16. Increased local expression of coagulation factor X contributes to the fibrotic response in human and murine lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Scotton, Chris J.; Krupiczojc, Malvina A.; Königshoff, Melanie; Mercer, Paul F; Lee, Y C Gary; Kaminski, Naftali; Morser, John; Post, Joseph M.; Maher, Toby M.; Nicholson, Andrew G; Moffatt, James D; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Derian, Claudia K.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2009-01-01

    Uncontrolled activation of the coagulation cascade contributes to the pathophysiology of several conditions, including acute and chronic lung diseases. Coagulation zymogens are considered to be largely derived from the circulation and locally activated in response to tissue injury and microvascular leak. Here we report that expression of coagulation factor X (FX) is locally increased in human and murine fibrotic lung tissue, with marked immunostaining associated with bronchial and alveolar ep...

  17. Increased mitochondrial mass in cells with functionally compromised mitochondria after exposure to both direct gamma radiation and bystander factors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Sharon M E

    2007-07-01

    The bystander effect describes radiation-like damage in unirradiated cells either in the vicinity of irradiated cells or exposed to medium from irradiated cells. This study aimed to further characterize the poorly understood mitochondrial response to both direct irradiation and bystander factor(s) in human keratinocytes (HPV-G) and Chinese hamster ovarian cells (CHO-K1). Oxygen consumption rates were determined during periods of state 4, state 3 and uncoupled respiration. Mitochondrial mass was determined using MitoTracker FM. CHO-K1 cells showed significantly reduced oxygen consumption rates 4 h after exposure to 5 Gy direct radiation and irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and an apparent recovery 12-24 h later. The apparent recovery was likely due to the substantial increase in mitochondrial mass observed in these cells as soon as 4 h after exposure. HPV-G cells, on the other hand, showed a sustained increase in oxygen consumption rates after ICCM exposure and a transient increase 4 h after exposure to 5 Gy direct radiation. A significant increase in mitochondrial mass per HPV-G cell was observed after exposure to both direct radiation and ICCM. These findings are indicative of a stress response to mitochondrial dysfunction that increases the number of mitochondria per cell.

  18. Dietary L-glutamine supplementation increases Pasteurella multocida burden and the expression of its major virulence factors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenkai; Liu, Shuping; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Fengmei; Li, Nengzhang; Yin, Jie; Peng, Yuanyi; Wu, Li; Liu, Gang; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of graded doses of L-glutamine supplementation on the replication and distribution of Pasteurella multocida, and the expression of its major virulence factors in mouse model. Mice were randomly assigned to the basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 % glutamine. Pasteurella multocida burden was detected in the heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney after 12 h of P. multocida infection. The expression of major virulence factors, toll-like receptors (TLRs), proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha) and anti-oxidative factors (GPX1 and CuZnSOD) was analyzed in the lung and spleen. Dietary 0.5 % glutamine supplementation has little significant effect on these parameters, compared to those with basal diet. However, results showed that a high dose of glutamine supplementation increased the P. multocida burden (P multocida burden and the expression of its major virulence factors, while affecting the functions of the lung and spleen.

  19. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium increases the intracellular free calcium concentration in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Min, Shengping; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-04-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is involved in the activation of astrocytes. A previous study showed that CNTF-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) contributed to the increase of the calcium current and the elevation of corresponding ion channels in cortical neurons. On this basis, it is reasonable to assume that CNTF-ACM may increase the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) in neurons. In the present study, the effects of CNTF-ACM on [Ca 2+ ] i in rat cortical neurons were determined, and on this basis, the aim was to investigate the potential active ingredients in ACM that are responsible for this biological process. As expected, the data indicated that CNTF-ACM resulted in a clear elevation of [Ca 2+ ] i in neurons. Additionally, the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) contained in the CNTF-ACM was found to participate in the upregulation of [Ca 2+ ] i . Taken together, CNTF induces the production of active factors (at least including FGF-2) released from astrocytes, which finally potentiate the increase of [Ca 2+ ] i in cortical neurons.

  20. Fetal alcohol exposure alters proopiomelanocortin gene expression and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function via increasing MeCP2 expression in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangisetty, Omkaram; Bekdash, Rola; Maglakelidze, George; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2014-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is a precursor gene of the neuropeptide β-endorphin in the hypothalamus and is known to regulate various physiological functions including stress response. Several recent reports showed that fetal alcohol exposure programs the hypothalamus to produce lower levels of POMC gene transcripts and to elevate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stressful stimuli. We investigated the role of methyl CpG binding protein (MeCP2) in the effects of prenatal ethanol on POMC gene expression and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed between GD 7 and 21 with a liquid diet containing 6.7% alcohol, pair-fed with isocaloric liquid diet, or fed ad libitum with rat chow, and their male offsprings were used at 60 days after birth in this study. Fetal alcohol exposure reduced the level of POMC mRNA, but increased the level of DNA methylation of this gene in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus where the POMC neuronal cell bodies are located. Fetal alcohol exposed rats showed a significant increase in MeCP2 protein levels in POMC cells, MeCP2 gene transcript levels as well as increased MeCP2 protein binding on the POMC promoter in the arcuate nucleus. Lentiviral delivery of MeCP2 shRNA into the third ventricle efficiently reduced MeCP2 expression and prevented the effect of prenatal ethanol on POMC gene expression in the arcuate nucleus. MeCP2-shRNA treatment also normalized the prenatal ethanol-induced increase in corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) gene expression in the hypothalamus and elevated plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone hormone responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. These results suggest that fetal alcohol programming of POMC gene may involve recruitment of MeCP2 on to the methylated promoter of the POMC gene to suppress POMC transcript levels and contribute to HPA axis dysregulation.

  1. Tumor cell–associated tissue factor and circulating hemostatic factors cooperate to increase metastatic potential through natural killer cell–dependent and–independent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Joseph S.; Talmage, Kathryn E.; Massari, Jessica V.; La Jeunesse, Christine M.; Flick, Matthew J.; Kombrinck, Keith W.; Hu, Zhiwei; Barney, Kelley A.

    2007-01-01

    Tumor cell–associated tissue factor (TF) is a powerful determinant of metastatic potential. TF may increase metastasis by supporting thrombin-mediated proteolysis, through intracellular signaling events mediated by the TF cytoplasmic domain, through TF/fVIIa/fXa–mediated activation of protease-activated receptors, or through a combination of these processes. To better define the relationship between tumor cell-associated TF and circulating hemostatic factors in malignancy, we generated a set of C57Bl/6-derived tumor lines genetically lacking TF, expressing wild-type murine TF, or expressing a mutant TF lacking the cytoplasmic domain. Comparison of the metastatic potential of these cells in immunocompetent mice with genetic deficits in prothrombin, platelet function, or fibrinogen revealed that TF supports metastasis through mechanisms independent of the cytoplasmic domain, but dependent on each of these distal hemostatic factors. TF was neither required for primary tumor growth nor necessary for initial localization of embolized tumor cells within the lungs. Rather, tumor cell fate studies indicated TF supports metastasis by increasing the survival of micrometastases. One mechanism linking TF to metastasis is through a fibrin(ogen)-dependent and platelet-dependent restriction in natural killer cell–mediated clearance of micrometastases. However, TF also supported the early success of micrometastases through an additional mechanism independent of natural killer cells, but coupled to circulating prothrombin. PMID:17371949

  2. Tumor cell-associated tissue factor and circulating hemostatic factors cooperate to increase metastatic potential through natural killer cell-dependent and-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Joseph S; Talmage, Kathryn E; Massari, Jessica V; La Jeunesse, Christine M; Flick, Matthew J; Kombrinck, Keith W; Hu, Zhiwei; Barney, Kelley A; Degen, Jay L

    2007-07-01

    Tumor cell-associated tissue factor (TF) is a powerful determinant of metastatic potential. TF may increase metastasis by supporting thrombin-mediated proteolysis, through intracellular signaling events mediated by the TF cytoplasmic domain, through TF/fVIIa/fXa-mediated activation of protease-activated receptors, or through a combination of these processes. To better define the relationship between tumor cell-associated TF and circulating hemostatic factors in malignancy, we generated a set of C57Bl/6-derived tumor lines genetically lacking TF, expressing wild-type murine TF, or expressing a mutant TF lacking the cytoplasmic domain. Comparison of the metastatic potential of these cells in immunocompetent mice with genetic deficits in prothrombin, platelet function, or fibrinogen revealed that TF supports metastasis through mechanisms independent of the cytoplasmic domain, but dependent on each of these distal hemostatic factors. TF was neither required for primary tumor growth nor necessary for initial localization of embolized tumor cells within the lungs. Rather, tumor cell fate studies indicated TF supports metastasis by increasing the survival of micrometastases. One mechanism linking TF to metastasis is through a fibrin(ogen)-dependent and platelet-dependent restriction in natural killer cell-mediated clearance of micrometastases. However, TF also supported the early success of micrometastases through an additional mechanism independent of natural killer cells, but coupled to circulating prothrombin.

  3. A mechanistic hypothesis of the factors that enhance vulnerability to nicotine use in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Laura E; Torres, Oscar V

    2014-01-01

    Women are particularly more vulnerable to tobacco use than men. This review proposes a unifying hypothesis that females experience greater rewarding effects of nicotine and more intense stress produced by withdrawal than males. We also provide a neural framework whereby estrogen promotes greater rewarding effects of nicotine in females via enhanced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). During withdrawal, we suggest that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) stress systems are sensitized and promote a greater suppression of dopamine release in the NAcc of females versus males. Taken together, females display enhanced nicotine reward via estrogen and amplified effects of withdrawal via stress systems. Although this framework focuses on sex differences in adult rats, it is also applied to adolescent females who display enhanced rewarding effects of nicotine, but reduced effects of withdrawal from this drug. Since females experience strong rewarding effects of nicotine, a clinical implication of our hypothesis is that specific strategies to prevent smoking initiation among females are critical. Also, anxiolytic medications may be more effective in females that experience intense stress during withdrawal. Furthermore, medications that target withdrawal should not be applied in a unilateral manner across age and sex, given that nicotine withdrawal is lower during adolescence. This review highlights key factors that promote nicotine use in females, and future studies on sex-dependent interactions of stress and reward systems are needed to test our mechanistic hypotheses. Future studies in this area will have important translational value toward reducing health disparities produced by nicotine use in females. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Liraglutide Suppresses Obesity and Hyperglycemia Associated with Increases in Hepatic Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Production in KKAy Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori Nonogaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Social isolation contributes to the development of obesity and insulin-independent diabetes in KKAy mice. Here we show that systemic administration of liraglutide, a long-acting human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analog, significantly decreased food intake, body weight, and blood glucose levels at 24 h after its administration while having no significant effects on plasma insulin and glucagon levels in individually housed KKAy mice. In addition, the systemic administration of liraglutide significantly increased plasma fibroblast growth factor (Fgf 21 levels (1.8-fold increase associated with increases in the expression of hepatic Fgf21 (1.9-fold increase and Pparγ (1.8-fold increase, while having no effects on the expression of hepatic Pparα and Fgf21 in white adipose tissue. Moreover, systemic administration of liraglutide over 3 days significantly suppressed food intake, body weight gain, and hyperglycemia in KKAy mice. On the other hand, despite remarkably increased plasma active GLP-1 levels (4.2-fold increase, the ingestion of alogliptin, a selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, over 3 days had no effects on food intake, body weight, blood glucose levels, and plasma Fgf21 levels in KKAy mice. These findings suggest that systemic administration of liraglutide induces hepatic Fgf21 production and suppresses the social isolation-induced obesity and diabetes independently of insulin, glucagon, and active GLP-1 in KKAy mice.

  5. Human pancreatic tumors grown in mice release tissue factor-positive microvesicles that increase venous clot size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisada, Y; Ay, C; Auriemma, A C; Cooley, B C; Mackman, N

    2017-11-01

    Essentials Tumor-bearing mice have larger venous clots than controls. Human tissue factor is present in clots in tumor-bearing mice. Inhibition of human tissue factor reduces clot size in tumor-bearing mice. This new mouse model may be useful to study mechanisms of cancer-associated thrombosis. Background Pancreatic cancer patients have a high rate of venous thromboembolism. Human pancreatic tumors and cell lines express high levels of tissue factor (TF), and release TF-positive microvesicles (TF+ MVs). In pancreatic cancer patients, tumor-derived TF+ MVs are present in the blood, and increased levels are associated with venous thromboembolism and decreased survival. Previous studies have shown that mice with orthotopic human or murine pancreatic tumors have circulating tumor-derived TF+ MVs, an activated clotting system, and increased incidence and mean clot weight in an inferior vena cava stenosis model. These results suggest that TF+ MVs contribute to thrombosis. However, the specific role of tumor-derived TF+ MVs in venous thrombosis in mice has not been determined. Objectives To test the hypothesis that tumor-derived TF+ MVs enhance thrombosis in mice. Methods We determined the contribution of TF+ MVs derived from human pancreatic tumors grown orthotopically in nude mice to venous clot formation by using an anti-human TF mAb. We used an inferior vena cava stasis model of venous thrombosis. Results Tumor-bearing mice had significantly larger clots than control mice. Clots from tumor-bearing mice contained human TF, suggesting the incorporation of tumor-derived MVs. Importantly, administration of an anti-human TF mAb reduced clot size in tumor-bearing mice but did not affect clot size in control mice. Conclusions Our results indicate that TF+ MVs released from orthotopic pancreatic tumors increase venous thrombosis in mice. This new model may be useful for evaluating the roles of different factors in cancer-associated thrombosis. © 2017 International Society on

  6. Increased Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR Associated with Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF and Symptom Severity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Russo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background One in 88 children in the US is thought to have one of the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. ASDs are characterized by social impairments and communication problems. Growth factors and their receptors may play a role in the etiology of ASDs. Research has shown that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activation is associated with nerve cell development and repair. This study was designed to measure plasma levels of EGFR in autistic children and correlate these levels with its ligand, epidermal growth factor, other related putative biomarkers such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, the ligand for MET (MNNG HOS transforming gene receptor, as well as the symptom severity of 19 different behavioral symptoms. Subjects and Methods Plasma EGFR concentration was measured in 33 autistic children and 34 age- and gender-similar neurotypical controls, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma EGFR levels were compared to putative biomarkers known to be associated with EGFR and MET and severity levels of 19 autism-related symptoms. Results We found plasma EGFR levels significantly higher in autistic children, when compared to neurotypical controls. EGFR levels correlated with HGF and high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1 levels, but not other tested putative biomarkers, and EGFR levels correlated significantly with severity of expressive language, conversational language, focus/attention, hyperactivity, eye contact, and sound sensitivity deficiencies. Conclusions These results suggest a relationship between increased plasma EGFR levels and designated symptom severity in autistic children. A strong correlation between plasma EGFR and HGF and HMGB1 suggests that increased EGFR levels may be associated with the HGF/Met signaling pathway, as well as inflammation.

  7. Hepatocyte growth factor increases vascular endothelial growth factor-A production in human synovial fibroblasts through c-Met receptor pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Angiogenesis is essential for the progression of osteoarthritis (OA. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is an angiogenic mediator, and it shows elevated levels in regions of OA. However, the relationship between HGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A in OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs is mostly unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we found that stimulation of OASFs with HGF induced concentration- and time-dependent increases in VEGF-A expression. Pretreatment with PI3K inhibitor (Ly294002, Akt inhibitor, or mTORC1 inhibitor (rapamycin blocked the HGF-induced VEGF-A production. Treatment of cells with HGF also increased PI3K, Akt, and mTORC1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, HGF increased the stability and activity of HIF-1 protein. Moreover, the use of pharmacological inhibitors or genetic inhibition revealed that c-Met, PI3K, Akt, and mTORC1 signaling pathways were potentially required for HGF-induced HIF-1α activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results provide evidence that HGF enhances VEGF-A expression in OASFs by an HIF-1α-dependent mechanism involving the activation of c-Met/PI3K/Akt and mTORC1 pathways.

  8. Differential stress response in rats subjected to chronic mild stress is accompanied by changes in CRH-family gene expression at the pituitary level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasa, Magdalena; Faron-Górecka, Agata; Kuśmider, Maciej; Szafran-Pilch, Kinga; Solich, Joanna; Żurawek, Dariusz; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine molecular markers of the stress response at the pituitary and peripheral levels in animals that responded differently to chronic mild stress (CMS). Rats were subjected to 2-weeks CMS and symptoms of anhedonia was measured by the consumption of 1% sucrose solution. mRNA levels of CRH-family neuropeptides (Crh-corticotropin-releasing hormone, Ucn1-urocortin 1, Ucn2-urocortin 2, Ucn3-urocortin 3), CRH receptors (Crhr1-corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, Crhr2-corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 2) and Crhbp (corticotropin-releasing factor binding protein) in the pituitaries of rats were determined with real-time PCR. Plasma levels of ACTH (adrenocorticotropin), CRH and urocortins were measured with ELISA assays. CMS procedure led to the development of anhedonia manifested by the decreased sucrose consumption (stress-reactive, SR, stress-susceptible group). Additionally, the group of animals not exhibiting any signs of anhedonia (stress non-reactive, SNR, stress-resilient group) and the group characterized by the increased sucrose consumption (stress invert-reactive group SIR) were selected. The significant increases in ACTH plasma level accompanied by the decreases in the pituitary gene expression of the Crh, Ucn2 and Ucn3 in both stress non-reactive and stress invert-reactive groups were observed. The only molecular change observed in stress-reactive group was the increase in UCN2 plasma level. The differentiated behavioral stress responses were reflected by gene expression changes in the pituitary. Alterations in the mRNA levels of Crh, Ucn2 and Ucn3 in the pituitary might confirm the paracrine and/or autocrine effects of these peptides in stress response. The opposite behavioral effect between SNR vs. SIR groups and the surprising similarity at gene expression and plasma ACTH levels in these two groups may suggest the discrepancy between molecular and behavioral stress responses; however, there results might

  9. A common mitochondrial DNA variant and increased body mass index as associated factors for development of type 2 diabetes: Additive effects of genetic and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Chia-Wei; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Huei Weng, Hsu; Lee, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Tzu-Ling; Wei, Yau-Huei; Chen, Shang-Der; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Weng, Shao-Wen; Wang, Pei-Wen

    2007-01-01

    The suggested correlation between a T-to-C transition at the nucleotide 16189 in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with increasing insulin resistance and adult-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) is debatable. Our study examined mtDNA from 462 subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and 592 normoglycemic controls (non-DM). Each participant's body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin concentration, insulin resistance index, and beta-cell function were measured. Sequencing for mtDNA, focusing on exploration of the hypervariable polycytosine tract within the control region, was also conducted in all subjects. Prevalence of the mtDNA 16189 variant was significantly different between DM and non-DM subjects (39.2% vs. 30.7% respectively; P = 0.004). Increased incidence of DM was noted in those harboring the 16189 variant compared with those lacking the variant (multivariate odds ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.80). Moreover, increased BMI was identified as an aggravating factor for development of DM in subjects harboring the variant. Odds ratio determinations yielded 2.14 in overweight and 4.63 in obese subjects harboring the variant in comparison with subjects without (1.83 in overweight and 2.16 in obese subjects). This is consistent with a progressively increased prevalence of the mtDNA 16189 variant in the non-DM groups with higher fasting insulin concentration, insulin resistance index, and beta-cell function (all P(trend) 16189 variant can influence development of T2DM. The demonstrated dynamic between the 16189 variant and increased BMI exemplify an additive effect of genetic and environmental factors on the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  10. Depression-like behavior induced by nesfatin-1 in rats: involvement of increased immune activation and imbalance of synaptic vesicle proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge eJinfang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a multicausal disorder and has been associated with metabolism regulation and immuno-inflammatory reaction. The anorectic molecule nesfatin-1 has recently been characterized as a potential mood regulator, but its precise effect on depression and the possible mechanisms remain unknown, especially when given peripherally. In the present study, nesfatin-1 was intraperitoneally injected to the rats and the depression-like behavior and activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis were evaluated. The plasma concentrations of nesfatin-1, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP; and the hypothalamic expression levels of nesfatin-1, synapsinⅠ, and synaptotagminⅠmRNA were evaluated in nesfatin-1 chronically treated rats. The results showed that both acute and chronic administration of nesfatin-1 increased immobility in the forced swimming test (FST, and resulted in the hyperactivity of HPA axis, as indicated by the increase of plasma corticosterone concentration and hypothalamic expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH mRNA. Moreover, after chronic nesfatin-1 administration, the rats exhibited decreased activity and exploratory behavior in the open field test (OFT and increased mRNA expression of synapsinⅠand synaptotagminⅠin the hypothalamus. Furthermore, chronic administration of nesfatin-1 elevated plasma concentrations of IL-6 and CRP, which were positively correlated with despair behavior, plasma corticosterone level, and the hypothalamic mRNA expression of synapsinⅠ and synaptotagminⅠ. These results indicated that exogenous nesfatin-1 could induce the immune-inflammatory activation,which might be a central hug linking the depression-like behavior and the imbalanced mRNA expression of synaptic vesicle proteins in the hypothalamus.

  11. Antioxidative Diet Supplementation Reverses High-Fat Diet-Induced Increases of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Vargas-Robles

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide epidemic that is characterized not only by excessive fat deposition but also by systemic microinflammation, high oxidative stress, and increased cardiovascular risk factors. While diets enriched in natural antioxidants showed beneficial effects on oxidative stress, blood pressure, and serum lipid composition, diet supplementation with synthetic antioxidants showed contradictive results. Thus, we tested in C57Bl/6 mice whether a daily dosage of an antioxidative mixture consisting of vitamin C, vitamin E, L-arginine, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (corabion would affect cardiovascular risk factors associated with obesity. Obese mice showed increased serum triglyceride and glucose levels and hypertension after eight weeks of being fed a high-fat diet (HFD. Importantly, corabion ameliorated all of these symptoms significantly. Oxidative stress and early signs of systemic microinflammation already developed after two weeks of high-fat diet and were significantly reduced by daily doses of corabion. Of note, the beneficial effects of corabion could not be observed when applying its single antioxidative components suggesting that a combination of various nutrients is required to counteract HFD-induced cardiovascular risk factors. Thus, daily consumption of corabion may be beneficial for the management of obesity-related cardiovascular complications.

  12. Increased secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in mucosal lesions of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, M; Hiwatashi, N; Liu, Z X; Toyota, T

    2001-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-3 transmit a same signal needed for growth and activation in granulocytes and macrophages, because these receptors utilize a common beta chain. Little is known about growth factors for intestinal myeloid cells in lesions of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To find out whether GM-CSF is produced by the intestinal cells in IBD patients and controls. We measured levels of GM-CSF, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and IL-3 in the media of organ culture and lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) culture of colonic mucosa from the patients with IBD. Next, we have investigated GM-CSF production of colonic epithelial cell lines. Spontaneous secretion of GM-CSF was increased in inflamed mucosa, while secretion of IL-3 was not detected. Release of GM-CSF was enhanced in LPMCs from inflamed mucosa. Mucosal GM-CSF production was correlated to TNF-alpha production. Colonic epithelial cell line and T cell produced GM-CSF with superantigen stimulation. We revealed pivotal production of GM-CSF but not IL-3 in intestinal lesion of IBD. Increased secretion of GM-CSF might lead to chronic gut inflammation. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Atherosclerosis amelioration by moderate alcohol consumption is associated with increased circulating levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Bernabe, Paloma; Boveda-Ruiz, Daniel; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina; Toda, Masaaki; Miyake, Yasushi; Mifuji-Moroka, Rumi; Iwasa, Motoh; Morser, John; Gabazza, Esteban C; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    A moderate intake of alcohol is associated with lower cardiovascular mortality, and the role of circulating progenitor cells in the beneficial effect of alcohol on atherosclerosis is unclear. The hypothesis of this study was that alcohol ameliorates atherosclerosis by modulating the circulating levels of stromal cell-derived growth factor (SDF)-1 and vascular progenitor cells. Atherosclerosis was induced by infusion of angiotensin II in apolipoprotein-E deficient mice, which were treated with high and low doses of ethanol for 28 days by intraperitoneal injection. Mice treated with low-dose ethanol had significantly less dilatation and fewer atheromatous lesions than mice receiving the high-dose ethanol. The number of circulating fibrocytes was significantly lower in mice treated with high-dose ethanol compared with mice with atherosclerosis untreated with ethanol. The plasma CXCL12/SDF-1 level was significantly increased in mice treated with low-dose ethanol compared with mice treated with a high dose, and the plasma concentration of transforming growth factor-β1 was significantly increased in mice treated with high-dose ethanol compared with control mice. Ethanol regulated the secretion of SDF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor from fibroblasts in a dose-dependent and bimodal fashion. The circulating level of CXCL12/SDF-1 may be involved, at least in part, in the differential effects of alcohol consumption on atherosclerosis.

  14. Factors affecting increased risk for substance use disorders following traumatic brain injury: What we can learn from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Steven F; Cannella, Lee Anne; Razmpour, Roshanak; Lutton, Evan; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Rawls, Scott M; Ramirez, Servio H

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have helped identify multiple factors affecting increased risk for substance use disorders (SUDs) following traumatic brain injury (TBI). These factors include age at the time of injury, repetitive injury and TBI severity, neurocircuits, neurotransmitter systems, neuroinflammation, and sex differences. This review will address each of these factors by discussing 1) the clinical and preclinical data identifying patient populations at greatest risk for SUDs post-TBI, 2) TBI-related neuropathology in discrete brain regions heavily implicated in SUDs, and 3) the effects of TBI on molecular mechanisms that may drive substance abuse behavior, like dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission or neuroimmune signaling in mesolimbic regions of the brain. Although these studies have laid the groundwork for identifying factors that affect risk of SUDs post-TBI, additional studies are required. Notably, preclinical models have been shown to recapitulate many of the behavioral, cellular, and neurochemical features of SUDs and TBI. Therefore, these models are well suited for answering important questions that remain in future investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased Energy Expenditure, Ucp1 Expression, and Resistance to Diet-induced Obesity in Mice Lacking Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-related Transcription Factor-2 (Nrf2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kevin; Valdez, Joshua; Nguyen, Janice; Vawter, Marquis; Galke, Brandi; Kurtz, Theodore W; Chan, Jefferson Y

    2016-04-01

    The NRF2 (also known as NFE2L2) transcription factor is a critical regulator of genes involved in defense against oxidative stress. Previous studies suggest thatNrf2plays a role in adipogenesisin vitro, and deletion of theNrf2gene protects against diet-induced obesity in mice. Here, we demonstrate that resistance to diet-induced obesity inNrf2(-/-)mice is associated with a 20-30% increase in energy expenditure. Analysis of bioenergetics revealed thatNrf2(-/-)white adipose tissues exhibit greater oxygen consumption. White adipose tissue showed a >2-fold increase inUcp1gene expression. Oxygen consumption is also increased nearly 2.5-fold inNrf2-deficient fibroblasts. Oxidative stress induced by glucose oxidase resulted in increasedUcp1expression. Conversely, antioxidant chemicals (such asN-acetylcysteine and Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride) and SB203580 (a known suppressor ofUcp1expression) decreasedUcp1and oxygen consumption inNrf2-deficient fibroblasts. These findings suggest that increasing oxidative stress by limitingNrf2function in white adipocytes may be a novel means to modulate energy balance as a treatment of obesity and related clinical disorders. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Increased bioplastic production with an RNA polymerase sigma factor SigE during nitrogen starvation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Numata, Keiji; Oikawa, Akira; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Kan; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2013-12-01

    Because cyanobacteria directly harvest CO2 and light energy, their carbon metabolism is important for both basic and applied sciences. Here, we show that overexpression of the sigma factor sigE in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 widely changes sugar catabolism and increases production of the biodegradable polyester polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) during nitrogen starvation. sigE overexpression elevates the levels of proteins implicated in glycogen catabolism, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis. PHB accumulation is enhanced by sigE overexpression under nitrogen-limited conditions, yet the molecular weights of PHBs synthesized by the parental glucose-tolerant and sigE overexpression strain are similar. Although gene expression induced by nitrogen starvation is changed and other metabolites (such as GDP-mannose and citrate) accumulate under sigE overexpression, genetic engineering of this sigma factor altered the metabolic pathway from glycogen to PHB during nitrogen starvation.

  17. Increase of homogenous new bone formation using osteoinductive factor rhGDF-5 during sinus floor augmentation in Goettingen Minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Phillipp; Lange, Katharina; Hahn, Wolfram; Schliephake, Henning; Matthias Gruber, Rudolf

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that recombinant human growth and differentiation factor-5 (rhGDF-5) induces an increased and homogenous distribution of new bone formation across the entire volume of sinus floor augmentation in 12 Goettingen Minipigs. In a randomized split-mouth design, one maxillary sinus was augmented with the bone substitute β-TCP, whereas a combination of β-TCP and the osteoinductive growth factor rhGDF-5 was used on the contralateral side. To evaluate the influence of dose and time on the effectiveness of the factor, two different concentrations of rhGDF-5 (400 μg and 800 μg) and healing periods (4 and 12 weeks) were each analysed. After 4 weeks, a homogenous gradient of bone formation could be observed for all dosage groups, with decreasing bone density from the local bone towards the sinus membrane. Both test groups, however, achieved a higher total level of bone formation compared with the control group, which was only significant in the low-dose group (P = 0.0184). After 12 weeks, the influence of the growth factor significantly depends on the region (P = 0.023). In the low-dose group, the new bone formation did not differ significantly within the examined regions of the graft (P = 0.1118), suggesting a homogeneous bone formation over the entire augmentation. The gradient of the high-dose group was similar to the control group with a decrease of local bone development. rhGDF-5 delivered on a β-TCP scaffold material leads to an increase in homogeneous new bone formation across the entire volume of the sinus floor augmentation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The increased concentration of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with tick-borne encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygorczuk, Sambor; Parczewski, Miłosz; Świerzbińska, Renata; Czupryna, Piotr; Moniuszko, Anna; Dunaj, Justyna; Kondrusik, Maciej; Pancewicz, Sławomir

    2017-06-24

    Host factors determining the clinical presentation of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) are not fully elucidated. The peripheral inflammatory response to TBE virus is hypothesized to facilitate its entry into central nervous system by disrupting the blood-brain barrier with the involvement of a signaling route including Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and pro-inflammatory cytokines macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). Concentrations of MIF, TNFα, and IL-1β were measured with commercial ELISA in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 36 hospitalized TBE patients, 7 patients with non-TBE meningitis, and 6 controls. The CSF albumin quotient (AQ) was used as a marker of blood-brain barrier permeability. Single nucleotide polymorphisms rs3775291, rs5743305 (associated with TLR3 expression), and rs755622 (associated with MIF expression) were assessed in blood samples from 108 TBE patients and 72 non-TBE controls. The data were analyzed with non-parametric tests, and p low-expression rs3775291 TLR3 genotype TT associated with a prolonged increase of CSF protein concentration. The high-expression MIF rs755622 genotype CC tended to correlate with an increased risk of TBE, and within TBE group, it was associated with a mild presentation. The results point to the signaling route involving TLR3, MIF, and TNFα being active in TBE virus infection and contributing to the risk of an overt neuroinvasive disease. The same factors may play a protective role intrathecally contributing to the milder course of neuroinfection. This suggests that the individual variability of the risk and clinical presentation of TBE might be traced to the variable peripheral and intrathecal expression of the mediators of the inflammatory response, which in turn associates with the host genetic background.

  19. Does high sugar consumption exacerbate cardiometabolic risk factors and increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Laaksonen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of sugar has been relatively high in the Nordic countries; the impact of sugar intake on metabolic risk factors and related diseases has been debated. The objectives were to assess the effect of sugar intake (sugar-sweetened beverages, sucrose and fructose on association with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and related metabolic risk factors (impaired glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, blood pressure, uric acid, inflammation markers, and on all-cause mortality, through a systematic review of prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled intervention studies published between January 2000 and search dates. The methods adopted were as follows: the first search was run in PubMed in October 2010. A second search with uric acid as risk marker was run in April 2011. The total search strategy was rerun in April 2011 in SveMed+. An update was run in PubMed in January 2012. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion from the 2,743 abstracts according to predefined eligibility criteria. The outcome was that out of the 17 studies extracted, 15 were prospective cohort studies and two were randomised controlled crossover trials. All of the studies included only adults. With respect to incident type 2 diabetes (nine studies, four of six prospective cohort studies found a significant positive association for sugar-sweetened beverage intake. In general, larger cohort studies with longer follow-up more often reported positive associations, and BMI seemed to mediate part of the increased risk. For other metabolic or cardiovascular risk factors or outcomes, too few studies have been published to draw conclusions. In conclusion, data from prospective cohort studies published in the years 2000–2011 suggest that sugar-sweetened beverages probably increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. For related metabolic risk factors, cardiovascular disease or all-cause mortality and other types of sugars, too few studies

  20. Risk factors for increased need for intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations in adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarad, N A; Giles, K

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary exacerbations (P Exs) are important in cystic fibrosis (CF). They are very common, and are associated with poor quality of life. P Exs are regarded as an important end point in clinical trials. Risk factors associated with increase in P Exs have not been examined at a large scale. This study investigates factors associated with P Exs in a large cohort of adolescent and adult patients. This is a cross-sectional study on data collected in the South and West Regions in England in 2002. Patients aged 16 years and over were included. Data on age, gender, FEV(1), body mass index (BMI), infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and on CF-related diabetes were included in the analysis. P Ex was defined as an episode treated with IV antibiotics. Forward stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed with the number of P Exs being the independent variable. The rest of the variables were considered to be the dependent variables. Data from 341 patients (194 female), mean age (SD), 24.9 (8.9) years were available. In 2002, a total of 599 P Exs were reported, median 1.00 range 0-16 P Exs. Using stepwise multiple regression analysis factors associated with increased number of P Exs were: infection with Pa (t-value -5.0, P < 0.0001), FEV(1), (t-value -4.9, P < 0.0001) and diabetes mellitus, (t-value -2.1, P = 0.04). Age, gender and BMI did not influence the annual number of exacerbations. In this study, risk factors for P Exs were found to be as follows: growth of Pa in the sputum, reduced FEV1 and CF-related diabetes mellitus.

  1. Milk consumption during pregnancy increases birth weight, a risk factor for the development of diseases of civilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C; John, Swen Malte; Schmitz, Gerd

    2015-01-16

    Antenatal dietary lifestyle intervention and nutrition during pregnancy and early postnatal life are important for appropriate lifelong metabolic programming. Epidemiological evidence underlines the crucial role of increased birth weight as a risk factor for the development of chronic diseases of civilization such as obesity, diabetes and cancer. Obstetricians and general practitioners usually recommend milk consumption during pregnancy as a nutrient enriched in valuable proteins and calcium for bone growth. However, milk is not just a simple nutrient, but has been recognized to function as an endocrine signaling system promoting anabolism and postnatal growth by activating the nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1. Moreover, pasteurized cow's milk transfers biologically active exosomal microRNAs into the systemic circulation of the milk consumer apparently affecting more than 11,000 human genes including the mTORC1-signaling pathway. This review provides literature evidence and evidence derived from translational research that milk consumption during pregnancy increases gestational, placental, fetal and birth weight. Increased birth weight is a risk factor for the development of diseases of civilization thus involving key disciplines of medicine. With regard to the presented evidence we suggest that dietary recommendations promoting milk consumption during pregnancy have to be re-evaluated.

  2. An epidemiological analysis of factors influencing the increase in Taenia ovis prevalence during the New Zealand Echinococcus granulosus control program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, M J; Schwabe, C W

    1977-08-01

    There was an 8-fold increase in the national prevalence of Taenia ovis in dogs during the first decade of the New Zealand hydatid disease control program. The temporal patterns in the prevalence of T. ovis were similar in both rural working dogs and urban pet dogs, with the highest prevalence found in the sheep farming areas. The dramatic increase in the prevalence of T. ovis was a reflection of the change in source of food for many working dogs, from the traditional raw viscera to carcase meat of sheep, a change necessitated by hydatid disease control. Other factors influencing the rise in prevalence of T. ovis in rural dogs were investigated using stepwise multiple regression techniques. The results of the regression analyses suggested that the rate of increase in the prevalence of T. ovis was influenced by 4 major factors: Taenia hydatigena variables (initial prevalence and rate of progress in control), an ethnic variable (Maori proportion in local population), canine variables (numbers of dogs per farm and per owner), and animal husbandry variables (pasture type, sheep density and numbers of sheep per farm). The results were discussed in the light of present knowledge of the epidemiology and immunology of the taeniid cestodes.

  3. Rapid increase in fibroblast growth factor 21 in protein malnutrition and its impact on growth and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Yori; Saito, Kenji; Nakazawa, Kyoko; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kato, Hisanori; Takenaka, Asako

    2015-11-14

    Protein malnutrition promotes hepatic steatosis, decreases insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I production and retards growth. To identify new molecules involved in such changes, we conducted DNA microarray analysis on liver samples from rats fed an isoenergetic low-protein diet for 8 h. We identified the fibroblast growth factor 21 gene (Fgf21) as one of the most strongly up-regulated genes under conditions of acute protein malnutrition (P<0·05, false-discovery rate<0·001). In addition, amino acid deprivation increased Fgf21 mRNA levels in rat liver-derived RL-34 cells (P<0·01). These results suggested that amino acid limitation directly increases Fgf21 expression. FGF21 is a polypeptide hormone that regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. FGF21 also promotes a growth hormone-resistance state and suppresses IGF-I in transgenic mice. Therefore, to determine further whether Fgf21 up-regulation causes hepatic steatosis and growth retardation after IGF-I decrease in protein malnutrition, we fed an isoenergetic low-protein diet to Fgf21-knockout (KO) mice. Fgf21-KO did not rescue growth retardation and reduced plasma IGF-I concentration in these mice. Fgf21-KO mice showed greater epididymal white adipose tissue weight and increased hepatic TAG and cholesterol levels under protein malnutrition conditions (P<0·05). Overall, the results showed that protein deprivation directly increased Fgf21 expression. However, growth retardation and decreased IGF-I were not mediated by increased FGF21 expression in protein malnutrition. Furthermore, FGF21 up-regulation rather appears to have a protective effect against obesity and hepatic steatosis in protein-malnourished animals.

  4. Low-Level Lead Exposure Increases Systolic Arterial Pressure and Endothelium-Derived Vasodilator Factors in Rat Aortas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorim, Jonaina; Ribeiro Júnior, Rogério F.; Silveira, Edna A.; Padilha, Alessandra S.; Vescovi, Marcos Vinícius A.; de Jesus, Honério C.; Stefanon, Ivanita; Salaices, Mercedes; Vassallo, Dalton V.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic lead exposure induces hypertension and alters endothelial function. However, treatment with low lead concentrations was not yet explored. We analyzed the effects of 7 day exposure to low lead concentrations on endothelium-dependent responses. Wistar rats were treated with lead (1st dose 4 µg/100 g, subsequent dose 0.05 µg/100 g, i.m. to cover daily loss) or vehicle; blood levels attained at the end of treatment were 9.98 µg/dL. Lead treatment had the following effects: increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP); reduction of contractile response to phenylephrine (1 nM–100 µM) of aortic rings; unaffected relaxation induced by acetylcholine (0.1 nM–300 µM) or sodium nitroprusside (0.01 nM–0.3 µM). Endothelium removal, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 µM) and tetraethylammonium (2 mM) increased the response to phenylephrine in treated rats more than in untreated rats. Aminoguanidine (50 µM) increased but losartan (10 µM) and enalapril (10 µM) reduced the response to phenylephrine in treated rats. Lead treatment also increased aortic Na+/K+-ATPase functional activity, plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, protein expression of the Na+/K+-ATPase alpha-1 subunit, phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-eNOS), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Our results suggest that on initial stages of lead exposure, increased SBP is caused by the increase in plasma ACE activity. This effect is accompanied by increased p-eNOS, iNOS protein expression and Na+/K+-ATPase functional activity. These factors might be a compensatory mechanism to the increase in SBP. PMID:21364929

  5. Epothilone B impairs functional recovery after spinal cord injury by increasing secretion of macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Liang; Gao, Wei; Chen, Shurui; Song, Ying; Song, Changwei; Zhou, Zipeng; Zhao, Haosen; Zhou, Kang; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Kunming; Liu, Chang; Mei, Xifan

    2017-11-02

    The microtubule-stabilizing drug epothilone B (epoB) has shown potential value in the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI) through diverse mechanisms. However, it remains elusive why a limited overall effect was observed. We aim to investigate the limiting factors underlying functional recovery promoted by epoB. The same SCI model treated by epoB was established as discussed previously. We used a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample to assess the changes in cytokines in milieu of the SCI lesion site after epoB treatment. We then analyzed the source of cytokines, the state of microglia/macrophages/monocytes (M/Ms), and the recruitment of neutrophil in the lesion site by using the results of antibody array. Following these findings, we further evaluated the motor functional recovery caused by the reshaped microenvironment. Systemic administration of epoB significantly increased levels of several cytokines in the CSF of the rat SCI model; macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) secreted by intact central nervous system (CNS) cells was one of the cytokines with increased levels. Along with epoB and other cytokines, M-CSF reshapes the SCI milieu by activating the microglias, killing bone marrow-derived macrophages, polarizing the M/M to M1 phenotype, and activating downstream cytokines to exacerbate the SCI injury, but it also increases the expression of neurotrophic factors. Anti-inflammatory therapy using a neutralizing antibody mix shows encouraging results. Using in vivo experiments, our findings indicate that epoB inhibits the SCI functional recovery in many ways by reshaping the milieu, which counteracts the therapeutic efficacy that led to the limited overall effectiveness.

  6. Cytostatic factor proteins are present in male meiotic cells and beta-nerve growth factor increases mos levels in rat late spermatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Hélène Perrard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In co-cultures of pachytene spermatocytes with Sertoli cells, beta-NGF regulates the second meiotic division by blocking secondary spermatocytes in metaphase (metaphase II, and thereby lowers round spermatid formation. In vertebrates, mature oocytes are arrested at metaphase II until fertilization, because of the presence of cytostatic factor (CSF in their cytoplasm. By analogy, we hypothesized the presence of CSF in male germ cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show here, that Mos, Emi2, cyclin E and Cdk2, the four proteins of CSF, and their respective mRNAs, are present in male rat meiotic cells; this was assessed by using Western blotting, immunocytochemistry and reverse transcriptase PCR. We measured the relative cellular levels of Mos, Emi2, Cyclin E and Cdk2 in the meiotic cells by flow cytometry and found that the four proteins increased throughout the first meiotic prophase, reaching their highest levels in middle to late pachytene spermatocytes, then decreased following the meiotic divisions. In co-cultures of pachytene spermatocytes with Sertoli cells, beta-NGF increased the number of metaphases II, while enhancing Mos and Emi2 levels in middle to late pachytene spermatocytes, pachytene spermatocytes in division and secondary spermatocytes. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that CSF is not restricted to the oocyte. In addition, they reinforce the view that NGF, by enhancing Mos in late spermatocytes, is one of the intra-testicular factors which adjusts the number of round spermatids that can be supported by Sertoli cells.

  7. Joint bleeds increase the inhibitor response to human factor VIII in a rat model of severe haemophilia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfgren, Karin Maria; Søndergaard, H.; Skov, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The most serious complication in haemophilia A (HA) replacement therapy with coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is neutralizing antibodies, i.e. inhibitors. It has been hypothesized that danger signals generated during a bleed might have an adjuvant effect on the immune response to FVIII...... in on-demand treatment, increasing the inhibitor risk. Aim To compare the antibody response to treatment with recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII) in relation to induced knee joint bleeds and treatment without concurrent bleeds in a HA rat model. Method HA rats were divided into two groups: one group (n...

  8. No influence of noradrenaline manipulation on acute exercise-induced increase of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goekint, Maaike; Heyman, Elsa; Roelands, Bart; Njemini, Rose; Bautmans, Ivan; Mets, Tony; Meeusen, Romain

    2008-11-01

    To examine the influence of a selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) on the exercise-induced increase in circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, 11 young, healthy male subjects were treated with either placebo or reboxetine. On each occasion, they performed a 60-min cycling exercise at 55% of their maximal power output (Wmax) followed by a time trial (TT) at 75% of Wmax. HR and ratings of perceived exertion were measured. Blood samples were taken at four time points. An increase in serum BDNF was found after exercise without any influence of drug administration on BDNF levels. Serum BDNF returned to resting levels after 15 min of recovery. Time trial (TT) performance was significantly worse after reboxetine intake. Serum cortisol increased in both trials during and after exercise and was significantly higher in the reboxetine trial. Also, HR was increased with reboxetine intake, probably because of the sympathomimetic effect of SNRI. Midterm memory was significantly impaired after the exercise protocol without difference between reboxetine and placebo trial. The administration of an SNRI has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in BDNF. However, effects were seen on serum cortisol, HR, and memory. Future research should focus on the effect of regular exercise training in combination with several reuptake inhibitors in both healthy and depressed subjects on BDNF and memory.

  9. Increased placental growth factor (PlGF) concentrations in children and adolescents with obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervanidou, Panagiota; Chouliaras, Giorgos; Akalestos, Athanassios; Bastaki, Despoina; Apostolakou, Filia; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Chrousos, George P

    2014-01-01

    Childhood obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) are associated with an increased risk for early onset endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Placental growth factor (PlGF), a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor family, plays an important role in atherosclerosis by stimulating angiogenesis and atherogenic migration of monocytes/macrophages into the arterial wall. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in circulating PlGF concentrations between children with obesity/metabolic syndrome and non-obese children. We have previously shown increased high-sensitivity troponin (hs-TnT) concentrations in children with MetS from the same cohort. Fifty-seven obese (49 without and 8 with MetS) and 25 non-obese children (controls) were assessed at the Childhood Obesity Clinic of our Department. Obesity was defined using the IOTF criteria. MetS was defined based on the IDF criteria. PlGF was measured using electrochemiluminescence methodology. Mean PIGF concentrations of obese children were significantly higher (p=0.048) compared with those of the controls. Analysis of the three groups, the οbese (without MetS), the MetS and the control, demonstrated a significant difference in PlGF concentrations (p=0.035). Subgroup analysis revealed increased PlGF concentrations in children with the MetS compared to the controls (p=0.009). Troponin had a significant positive correlation with PlGF overall (p=0.003) and in the obese group (p=0.046). Increased serum concentrations of PlGF, a biomarker of angiogenesis, are found in obese children with the MetS compared to non-obese controls, whereas PlGF correlated positively with troponin. Longitudinal studies may reveal the prognostic role of this biomarker in the progression of atherosclerosis in obese children with the MetS.

  10. Increase in gamma-glutamyltransferase level and development of established cardiovascular risk factors and diabetes in Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimba, Sachiyo; Nakagami, Tomoko; Oya, Junko; Wasada, Taro; Endo, Yasuhiro; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the predictive value of changes in serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Japanese. A total of 1514 adult participants in a general health examination program were followed for 3 years until January, 2006. The subjects were divided into two groups according to whether their serum GGT level had decreased ( or =1 U/L) from the baseline level of GGT during the study period. The logistic regression model was used to analyze the relationship between increases in GGT levels and the incidence of diabetes (DM), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), dyslipidemia, and hypertension (HT). The mean value of GGT level was significantly higher at baseline than the 3-year follow-up point (47 +/- 41 versus 41 +/- 51, P < 0.0001), and the average 3-year GGT change was -5.7 +/- 32.3 U/L. The subjects with an increased GGT over the 3 years had an increased risk of developing DM, IFG, high triglyceride (TG) levels, and HT, in comparison with that of the subjects with a decreased GGT level, with an odds ratios (OR) of 6.13 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.83-13.25), 2.70 (1.68-4.34), 2.65 (1.76-3.99), and 1.54 (1.12-2.13), respectively, after adjusting for age, sex, and alcohol habits. Further adjustments for baseline GGT, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), body mass index (BMI), and 3-year changes in BMI did not alter these associations. The increased change in GGT over 3 years was a significant and an independent risk factor for the development of high TG, HT, IFG, and DM in Japanese.

  11. Metabolically protective cytokines adiponectin and fibroblast growth factor-21 are increased by acute overfeeding in healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie K Heilbronn

    Full Text Available Circulating levels of metabolically protective and adverse cytokines are altered in obese humans and rodent models. However, it is not clear whether these cytokines are altered rapidly in response to over-nutrition, or as a later consequence of the obese state.Forty sedentary healthy individuals were examined prior to and at 3 and 28 days of high fat overfeeding (+1250 kCal/day, 45% fat. Insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp, adiposity, serum levels of adiponectin and fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21, fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4, lipocalin-2 and plasminogen activator factor-1 (PAI1 were assessed. Statistics were performed by repeated measures ANOVA.Overfeeding increased weight, body fat and liver fat, fasting glucose, insulin and reduced insulin sensitivity by clamp (all P <0.05. Metabolically protective cytokines, adiponectin and FGF21 were increased at day 3 of overfeeding (P ≤0.001 and adiponectin was also elevated at day 28 (P=0.001. FABP4, lipocalin-2 and PAI-1 were not changed by overfeeding at either time point.Metabolically protective cytokines, adiponectin and FGF-21, were increased by over nutrition and weight gain in healthy humans, despite increases in insulin resistance. We speculate that this was in attempt to maintain glucose homeostasis in a state of nutritional excess. PAI-I, FABP4 and lipocalin 2 were not altered by overfeeding suggesting that changes in these cytokines may be a later consequence of the obese state.www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00562393.

  12. MSCs transfected with hepatocyte growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor improve cardiac function in the infarcted porcine heart by increasing angiogenesis and reducing fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fanglin; Zhao, Xianxian; Wu, Jun; Cui, Yong; Mao, Yanjun; Chen, Kebiao; Yuan, Yang; Gong, Dejun; Xu, Zhiyun; Huang, Shengdong

    2013-09-10

    Cell transplantation and gene therapy have been demonstrated to have beneficial effects after a myocardial infarction (MI). Here, we used a large animal model of MI to investigate the beneficial effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfected with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) genes. A porcine MI model was created by balloon occlusion of the distal left anterior descending artery for 90 min followed by reperfusion. At 1 week after MI, the pigs were infused via the coronary vein with saline (n=8), MSCs + AdNull(n=8), MSC+VEGF(n=10), or MSC+HGF(n=10). Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion were evaluated by using echocardiography and gated cardiac perfusion imaging before and 4 weeks after transplantation. Morphometric and histological analyses were performed. All cell-implanted groups had better cardiac function than the saline control group. There were further functional improvements in the MSC+HGF group, accompanied by smaller infarct sizes, increased cell survival, and less collagen deposition. Blood vessel densities in the damaged area and cardiac perfusion were significantly greater in the MSC+AdNull group than in the saline control group, and further increased in the MSC+VEGF/HGF groups. Tissue fibrosis was significantly less extensive in the MSC and MSC+VEGF groups than in the saline control group and was most reduced in the MSC+HGF group. MSCs (alone or transfected with VEGF/HGF) delivered into the infarcted porcine heart via the coronary vein improved cardiac function and perfusion, probably by increasing angiogenesis and reducing fibrosis. MSC+HGF was superior to MSC+VEGF, possibly owing to its enhanced antifibrotic effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Factors and Organizational Issues in 2015: The Increasing Complexity of the Healthcare Domain Calls for More Comprehensive Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, S; Santos, R

    2016-11-10

    To summarize significant research contributions on human factors and organizational issues in medical informatics published in 2015. An extensive search using PubMed/Medline and Web of Science® was conducted to identify the scientific contributions published in 2015 that address human factors and organizational issues in medical informatics. The selection process comprised three steps: (i) 15 candidate best papers were first selected by the two section editors, (ii) external reviewers from internationally renowned research teams reviewed each candidate best paper, and (iii) the final selection of five best papers was conducted by the editorial board of the Yearbook. Noteworthy papers in 2015 emphasize the increasing complexity of the healthcare environment. They call for more comprehensive approaches and evaluation studies. All provide a real added-value in this direction. There is no more need to promote the contribution of human factors and ergonomics (HFE) approaches to health IT-related risks and patient safety. However, there is still a need for research on HFE methods to adapt health information technology tools to the complexity of the healthcare domain.

  14. Micro-level social and structural factors act synergistically to increase HIV risk among Nepalese female sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuba, Keshab; Anderson, Sarah; Ekström, Anna Mia; Pandey, Satish Raj; Shrestha, Rachana; Karki, Deepak Kumar; Marrone, Gaetano

    2016-08-01

    Sex workers face stigma, discrimination, and violence across the globe and are almost 14 times more likely to be HIV-infected than other women in low- and middle-income countries. In Asia, condom campaigns at brothels have been effective in some settings, but for preventive interventions to be sustainable, it is important to understand micro-level social and structural factors that influence sexual behaviours of sex workers. This study assessed the syndemic effects of micro-level social and structural factors of unprotected sex and the prevalence of HIV among female sex workers (FSWs) in Nepal. This quantitative study included 610 FSWs who were recruited using two-stage cluster sampling from September to November 2012 in 22 Terai Highway districts of Nepal. Rapid HIV tests and face-to-face interviews were conducted to collect biological and behavioural information. A count of physical (sexual violence and other undesirable events), social (poor social support and condom negotiation skills), and economic (unprotected sex to make more money) factors that operate at the micro-level was calculated to test the additive relationship to unprotected sex. The HIV prevalence was 1%; this is presumably representative, with a large sample of FSWs in Nepal. The prevalence of unprotected sex with clients was high (24%). For each additional adverse physical, social, and economic condition, the probability of non-use of condoms with clients increased substantially: one problem = 12% (psex among Nepalese FSWs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. A Variationally Formulated Problem of the Stationary Heat Conduction in a Plate with Radiation Reduction Factor Increased under Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The equipment uses heat-shielding and structural materials that, when exposed, absorb radiation both on the surface and in the volume. In a variety of technical devices, absorption processes of penetrating radiation of materials and structural elements are typical for a number of process steps and operating conditions. Absorption of radiation penetrating into material volume may significantly affect the temperature state and runability of construction made of such material.The process of material-absobed penetrating radiation is associated with transition of the electromagnetic wave energy into the excitation energy of this material microparticles that, after all, leads to increasing internal energy and temperature growth. With radiation passing through the layer of material its flow density and hence energy of penetrating radiation decreases exponentially with increasing distance from the exposed layer surface. This law was experimentally established by the French physicist P. Bouguer and bears his name. In general, a certain fraction of this energy is radiated and dissipated in the material volume, and the rest is absorbed. A mathematical model describing these processes is an equation of the radiative energy transfer.In mathematical modeling of thermomechanical processes there is a need to consider the effect of penetrating radiation on the temperature state of materials and construction elements. The P. Bouguer law is used also when the volume radiation and scattering of penetrating radiation in the material can be neglected, but it is necessary to take into account its absorption. In this case, a negative indicator of the exponential function is represented by the product of the distance from the irradiated surface and integral or some average absorption factor that is constant for a given material and spectral distribution of penetrating radiation. However, with increasing power of radiation passing through the material layer there is a

  16. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases circulating CD34-postive cells in patients with AIDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Dam-Larsen, S; Nielsen, C

    1997-01-01

    .e., the circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells (CD34 cells) in patients with AIDS, using the recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Eight patients with AIDS were treated with G-CSF for neutropenia (... G-CSF for 3-5 consecutive days. Within 5 days of initiation of G-CSF therapy, an increase in the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was seen in all patients. There was a median increase in ANC from 0.4 to 3.4 x 10(9)/l. In addition, G-CSF treatment significantly increased the absolute number of CD34...... cells. The median increase in CD34 cells was from 0.8 to 2.2 x 10(6)/l. Finally, using a highly sensitive HIV-1 RNA PCR, we found that treatment of AIDS patients with G-CSF did not lead to enhanced HIV replication. These observations indicate that G-CSF may be used to mobilize CD34 cells in patients...

  17. Factors associated with increased white matter hyperintense lesion (WMHI) load in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaharir, S S; Osman, S S; Md Rani, S A; Sakthiswary, R; Said, M S M

    2018-01-01

    Introduction White matter hyperintense (WMHI) lesions are the most common finding in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Objective The objective of this article is to determine the clinical factors associated with an increase in WMHI lesion load among SLE patients. Method A total of 83 SLE patients with MRI of the brain from National University of Malaysia Medical Centre were included. The WMHI lesion load was determined using the Scheltens score and Fazekas scale, and their distribution was divided into the deep white matter (DWMHI) and periventricular (PVH) regions. The clinical correlates of WMHI lesions were initially determined using univariate analyses and subsequently multivariable regression analyses were performed to determine the independent factors of increased WMHI lesion load. Results MRI of the brain of 46 patients who had WMHI lesions were compared with 37 patients with normal MRI. We found significant association between the presence of WMHI lesions and age, presence of cerebral infarcts, positive antiphospholipid antibody (aPL), active disease, neuropsychiatric lupus (NPSLE) and disease damage. Age, SLEDAI scores, cerebral infarcts and disease damage were significantly associated with higher DWMHI and PVH Scheltens scores. Meanwhile, patients with active lupus nephritis (LN), lower serum albumin and more severe proteinuria were associated with larger Fazekas WMHI lesions. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that the independent factors associated with presence of WMHI lesions were positive aPL and SLEDAI scores ( p SLE disease. Conclusion Presence of WMHI lesions in SLE was significantly associated with cerebral infarcts, aPL and high general SLE activity, suggesting both inflammation and ischaemia as the underlying pathology of these lesions.

  18. Applying human factors principles to alert design increases efficiency and reduces prescribing errors in a scenario-based simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Alissa L; Zillich, Alan J; Melton, Brittany L; Russell, Scott A; Chen, Siying; Spina, Jeffrey R; Weiner, Michael; Johnson, Elizabette G; Daggy, Joanne K; McManus, M Sue; Hawsey, Jason M; Puleo, Anthony G; Doebbeling, Bradley N; Saleem, Jason J

    2014-10-01

    To apply human factors engineering principles to improve alert interface design. We hypothesized that incorporating human factors principles into alerts would improve usability, reduce workload for prescribers, and reduce prescribing errors. We performed a scenario-based simulation study using a counterbalanced, crossover design with 20 Veterans Affairs prescribers to compare original versus redesigned alerts. We redesigned drug-allergy, drug-drug interaction, and drug-disease alerts based upon human factors principles. We assessed usability (learnability of redesign, efficiency, satisfaction, and usability errors), perceived workload, and prescribing errors. Although prescribers received no training on the design changes, prescribers were able to resolve redesigned alerts more efficiently (median (IQR): 56 (47) s) compared to the original alerts (85 (71) s; p=0.015). In addition, prescribers rated redesigned alerts significantly higher than original alerts across several dimensions of satisfaction. Redesigned alerts led to a modest but significant reduction in workload (p=0.042) and significantly reduced the number of prescribing errors per prescriber (median (range): 2 (1-5) compared to original alerts: 4 (1-7); p=0.024). Aspects of the redesigned alerts that likely contributed to better prescribing include design modifications that reduced usability-related errors, providing clinical data closer to the point of decision, and displaying alert text in a tabular format. Displaying alert text in a tabular format may help prescribers extract information quickly and thereby increase responsiveness to alerts. This simulation study provides evidence that applying human factors design principles to medication alerts can improve usability and prescribing outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Structural factors associated with an increased risk of HIV and sexually transmitted infection transmission among street-involved youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoveller Jean A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs among street-involved youth greatly exceed that of the general adolescent population; however, little is known regarding the structural factors that influence disease transmission risk among this population. Methods Between September 2005 and October 2006, 529 street-involved youth were enroled in a prospective cohort known as the At Risk Youth Study (ARYS. We examined structural factors associated with number of sex partners using quasi-Poisson regression and consistent condom use using logistic regression. Results At baseline, 415 (78.4% were sexually active, of whom 253 (61.0% reported multiple sex partners and 288 (69.4% reported inconsistent condom use in the past six months. In multivariate analysis, self-reported barriers to health services were inversely associated with consistent condom use (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.52, 95%CI: 0.25 – 1.07. Structural factors that were associated with greater numbers of sex partners included homelessness (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] = 1.54, 95%CI: 1.11 – 2.14 and having an area restriction that affects access to services (aIRR = 2.32, 95%CI: 1.28 – 4.18. Being searched or detained by the police was significant for males (aIRR = 1.36, 95%CI: 1.02 – 1.81. Conclusion Although limited by its cross-sectional design, our study found several structural factors amenable to policy-level interventions independently associated with sexual risk behaviours. These findings imply that the criminalization and displacement of street-involved youth may increase the likelihood that youth will engage in sexual risk behaviours and exacerbate the negative impact of resultant health outcomes. Moreover, our findings indicate that environmental-structural interventions may help to reduce the burden of these diseases among street youth in urban settings.

  20. Optimal reprogramming factor stoichiometry increases colony numbers and affects molecular characteristics of murine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann, Ulf; Sgodda, Malte; Warlich, Eva; Ballmaier, Matthias; Schöler, Hans R; Schambach, Axel; Cantz, Tobias

    2011-06-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed toward pluripotency by overexpression of a set of transcription factors, yielding induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with features similar to embryonic stem cells. Little is known to date about stoichiometric requirements of the individual reprogramming factors (RFs) for efficient reprogramming and especially about whether stoichiometry also influences the quality of derived iPSCs. To address this important issue, we chose bicistronic lentiviral vectors coexpressing fluorescent reporters (eGFP, dTomato, Cerulean, or Venus) along with the canonical RFs to transduce a bulk of murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Using a flow cytometric approach, we were able to independently and proportionally quantify all fluorophores in multiple-infected MEFs and more importantly could sort these cells into all 16 stoichiometric combinations of high or moderate expression of the four factors. On average, we obtained about 600 alkaline phosphatase-expressing colonies from 20,000 seeded cells. Interestingly, only seven different stoichiometric ratios gave rise to any colonies at all. The by far most colonies were obtained from those fractions, where Oct4 was in excess over the other three factors (2,386 colonies/20,000 cells), or where both Oct4 and c-Myc were in excess over Sox2 and Klf4 (1,593 colonies/20,000 cells). Our findings suggest that increased Oct4 levels opposite to modest ones for Sox2 and Klf4 are required for satisfying reprogramming efficiencies and that these stoichiometries are also highly beneficial for achieving a stable pluripotent state independent of ectopic RF expression. Finally, the eligible Oct4(high) , Sox2(low) , and Klf4(low) subpopulation only resembles a small fraction of cells targeted by equal vector amounts, suggesting the necessity to address stoichiometry also in alternative approaches for iPSC generation or between different experimental systems. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Advancement of