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Sample records for corticotropin releasing factor

  1. Regulation of gonadotropins by corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin

    OpenAIRE

    Kageyama, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    While stress activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, it suppresses the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a major regulatory peptide in the HPA axis during stress. Urocortin 1 (Ucn1), a member of the CRF family of peptides, has a variety of physiological functions and both CRF and Ucn1 contribute to the stress response via G protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptors. Ucn2 and Ucn3, which belong to a separate paralogous linea...

  2. Regulation of gonadotropins by corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori eKageyama

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available While stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, it suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is a major regulatory peptide in the HPA axis during stress. Urocortin1 (Ucn1, a member of the CRF family of peptides, has a variety of physiological functions and both CRF and Ucn1 contribute to the stress response via G protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptors. Ucn2 and Ucn3, which belong to a separate paralogous lineage from CRF, are highly selective for the CRF type 2 receptor (CRF2 receptor. The HPA and HPG axes interact with each other, and gonadal function and reproduction are suppressed in response to various stressors. In this review, we focus on the regulation of gonadotropins by CRF and Ucn2 in pituitary gonadotrophs and of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH via CRF receptors in the hypothalamus. In corticotrophs, stress-induced increases in CRF stimulate Ucn2 production, which leads to the inhibition of gonadotropin secretion via the CRF2 receptor in the pituitary. GnRH in the hypothalamus is regulated by a variety of stress conditions. CRF is also involved in the suppression of the HPG axis, especially the GnRH pulse generator, via CRF receptors in the hypothalamus. Thus, complicated regulation of GnRH in the hypothalamus and gonadotropins in the pituitary via CRF receptors contributes to stress responses and adaptation of gonadal functions.

  3. Intrahypothalamic neuroendocrine actions of corticotropin-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, O F; Hassan, A H; Holsboer, F

    1993-01-01

    Most studies of the neuroendocrine effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) have focused on its role in the regulation of the pituitary-adrenal axis; activation of this axis follows release of the peptide from CRF-containing terminals in the median eminence. However, a sizeable proportion of CRF fibres terminate within the hypothalamus itself, where synaptic contacts with other hypothalamic neuropeptidergic neurons (e.g. gonadotropin-releasing hormone-containing and opioidergic neurons) have been identified. Here, we summarize physiological and pharmacological data which provide insights into the nature and significance of these intrahypothalamic connections. It is now clear that CRF is a potent secretagogue of the three major endogenous opioid peptides (beta-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin) and that it stimulates opioidergic neurons tonically. In the case of beta-endorphin, another hypothalamic peptide, arginine vasopressin, appears to be an essential mediator of CRF's effect, suggesting the occurrence of CRF synapses on, or in the vicinity of, vasopressin neurons; morphological support for this assumption is still wanting. Evidence for direct and indirect inhibitory effects of CRF on sexual behaviour and secretion of reproductive hormones is also presented; the indirect pathways include opioidergic neurons. An important conclusion from all these studies is that, in addition to its better known functions in producing adaptive responses during stressful situations, CRF might also contribute to the coordinated functioning of various components of the neuroendocrine system under basal conditions. Although feedback regulation of hypothalamic neuronal activity by peripheral steroids is a well-established tenet of endocrinology, data on modulation of the intrahypothalamic actions of CRF by adrenal and sex steroids are just emerging. Some of these newer findings may be useful in framing questions related to the mechanisms underlying disease states (such as

  4. Physiological and behavioral effects of chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of corticotropin-releasing factor in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, B; deBoer, SF; VanKalkeren, AA; Koolhaas, JM; Kalkeren, A.A. van

    1997-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the Long-term effects of chronic elevation of centrally circulating levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on behavior and physiology. For this purpose ovine CRF was infused continuously far a period of 10 days into the lateral ventricle of rats

  5. Physiological and behavioral effects of chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of corticotropin-releasing factor in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, B; deBoer, SF; VanKalkeren, AA; Koolhaas, JM; Kalkeren, A.A. van

    1997-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the Long-term effects of chronic elevation of centrally circulating levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on behavior and physiology. For this purpose ovine CRF was infused continuously far a period of 10 days into the lateral ventricle of rats

  6. Ethanol and corticotropin releasing factor receptor modulation of central amygdala neurocircuitry: An update and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2015-05-01

    The central amygdala is a critical brain region for many aspects of alcohol dependence. Much of the work examining the mechanisms by which the central amygdala mediates the development of alcohol dependence has focused on the interaction of acute and chronic ethanol with central amygdala corticotropin releasing factor signaling. This work has led to a great deal of success in furthering the general understanding of central amygdala neurocircuitry and its role in alcohol dependence. Much of this work has primarily focused on the hypothesis that ethanol utilizes endogenous corticotropin releasing factor signaling to upregulate inhibitory GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala. Work that is more recent suggests that corticotropin releasing factor also plays an important role in mediating anxiety-like behaviors via the enhancement of central amygdala glutamatergic transmission, implying that ethanol/corticotropin releasing factor interactions may modulate excitatory neurotransmission in this brain region. In addition, a number of studies utilizing optogenetic strategies or transgenic mouse lines have begun to examine specific central amygdala neurocircuit dynamics and neuronal subpopulations to better understand overall central amygdala neurocircuitry and the role of neuronal subtypes in mediating anxiety-like behaviors. This review will provide a brief update on this literature and describe some potential future directions that may be important for the development of better treatments for alcohol addiction.

  7. Localization and functional roles of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 in the cerebellum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gounko, Natalia V.; Gramsbergen, Albert; van der Want, Johannes J. L.

    2008-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 2 receptor has three splice variants alpha, beta, and gamma. In the rodent brain only CRF-R2 alpha is present. In the cerebellum, CRF-R2 alpha has two different isoforms: a full-length form (fl) and truncated (tr). Both forms CRF-R2 have a unique cellula

  8. Sequences, expression patterns and regulation of the corticotropin releasing factor system in a teleost

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chun-Chun; Fernald, Russell D.

    2008-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is well known for its role in regulating the stress response in vertebrate species by controlling release of glucocorticoids. CRF also influences other physiological processes via two distinct CRF receptors (CRF-Rs) and is co-regulated by a CRF binding protein (CRFBP). Although CRF was first discovered in mammals, it is important for the regulation of the stress response, motor behavior, and appetite in all vertebrates. However, it is unclear how the actio...

  9. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors and stress-related alterations of gut motor function.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Over the past few decades, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways have been shown to be the main coordinators of the endocrine, behavioral, and immune responses to stress. Emerging evidence also links the activation of CRF receptors type 1 and type 2 with stress-related alterations of gut motor function. Here, we review the role of CRF receptors in both the brain and the gut as part of key mechanisms through which various stressors impact propulsive ac...

  10. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and the Brain-Gut Motor Response to Stress

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The characterization of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and CRF receptors, and the development of specific CRF receptor antagonists selective for the receptor subtypes have paved the way to the understanding of the biochemical coding of stress-related alterations of gut motor function. Reports have consistently established that central administration of CRF acts in the brain to inhibit gastric emptying while stimulating colonic motor function through modulation of the vagal and sacral pa...

  11. Neuroendocrine Control of the Gut During Stress: Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Signaling Pathways in the Spotlight

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Stress affects the gastrointestinal tract as part of the visceral response. Various stressors induce similar profiles of gut motor function alterations, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of colonic propulsive motility, and hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of stress’s impact on gut function. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways med...

  12. The corticotropin-releasing factor system in inflammatory bowel disease: prospects for new therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Konstantinos A; Kolios, George; Chatzaki, Ekaterini

    2009-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that stress is implicated in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), via initial nervous disturbance and subsequent immune dysfunction through brain-gut interactions. The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system, being the principal neuroendocrine coordinator of stress responses, is involved in the inflammatory process within the gastrointestinal tract, via vagal and peripheral pathways, as implied by multiple reports reviewed here. Blocking of CRF receptors could theoretically exert beneficial anti-inflammatory effects in colonic tissues. The recently synthesised small-molecule CRF(1) antagonists or alternatively non-peptide CRF(2) antagonists when available, may become new reliable options in the treatment of IBD.

  13. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors and stress-related alterations of gut motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Yvette; Bonaz, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few decades, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways have been shown to be the main coordinators of the endocrine, behavioral, and immune responses to stress. Emerging evidence also links the activation of CRF receptors type 1 and type 2 with stress-related alterations of gut motor function. Here, we review the role of CRF receptors in both the brain and the gut as part of key mechanisms through which various stressors impact propulsive activity of the gastrointestinal system. We also examine how these mechanisms translate into the development of new approaches for irritable bowel syndrome, a multifactorial disorder for which stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology.

  14. Neuroendocrine control of the gut during stress: corticotropin-releasing factor signaling pathways in the spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Stress affects the gastrointestinal tract as part of the visceral response. Various stressors induce similar profiles of gut motor function alterations, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of colonic propulsive motility, and hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of stress's impact on gut function. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways mediates both the inhibition of upper gastrointestinal (GI) and the stimulation of lower GI motor function through interaction with different CRF receptor subtypes. Here, we review how various stressors affect the gut, with special emphasis on the central and peripheral CRF signaling systems.

  15. Deletion of Corticotropin-releasing Factor Binding Protein Selectively Impairs Maternal, but not Intermale Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Gammie, Stephen C.; Seasholtz, Audrey F.; Stevenson, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) is a secreted protein that acts to bind and limit the activity of the neuropeptides, CRF and urocortin (Ucn) 1. We previously selected for high maternal defense (protection of offspring) in mice and found CRF-BP to be elevated in the CNS of selected mice. We also previously determined that both CRF and Ucn 1 are potent inhibitors of offspring protection when administered centrally. Thus, elevated CRF-BP could promote defense by lim...

  16. Expression and Regulation of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Type 2 beta in Developing and Mature Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuperman, Yael; Issler, Orna; Vaughan, Joan; Bilezikjian, Louise; Vale, Wylie; Chen, Alon

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 (CRFR2) is highly expressed in skeletal muscle (SM) tissue where it is suggested to inhibit interactions between insulin signaling pathway components affecting whole-body glucose homeostasis. However, little is known about factors regulating SM CRFR2 ex

  17. EFFECT OF CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR ANTAGONIST ON BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROENDOCRINE RESPONSES DURING EXPOSURE TO DEFENSIVE BURYING PARADIGM IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KORTE, SM; KORTEBOUWS, GAH; BOHUS, B; KOOB, GF

    1994-01-01

    Defensive burying behavior is a coping strategy in rodents in response to an aversive stimulus where fear will facilitate burying and treatment with anxiolytics will result in less burying. To test the hypothesis that endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is involved in the defensive buryi

  18. Common Mechanisms Underlying the Proconflict Effects of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor, A Benzodiazepine Inverse Agonist and Electric Foot-Shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Sietse F. de; Katz, Jonathan L.; Valentino, Rita J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a benzodiazepine inverse agonist (methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline-3-carboxylate; DMCM) and electric foot-shock on rat conflict behavior were characterized and compared. Rats were trained to lever press under a multiple fixed-ratio schedul

  19. Corticotropin-releasing factor has an anxiogenic action in the social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A J; File, S E

    1987-06-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, 100 and 300 ng) were investigated in the social interaction test of anxiety in rats. Both doses of CRF significantly decreased active social interaction without a concomitant decrease in locomotor activity. CRF also significantly increased self-grooming, an effect that was independent of the decrease in social interaction. These results indicate an anxiogenic action for CRF. Chlordiazepoxide (CDP, 5 mg/kg ip) pretreatment reversed the anxiogenic effects of icv CRF (100 ng), but CRF did not prevent the sedative effects of CDP. There were no statistically significant changes due to CRF in locomotor activity or rears or head dipping in the holeboard test. Both doses of CRF significantly increased plasma concentrations of corticosterone. The possible mechanisms of the behavioral effects of CRF are discussed.

  20. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor neurons in the mouse brain: a study using corticotropin-releasing factor-modified yellow fluorescent protein knock-in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junko; Konno, Kohtarou; Talukder, Ashraf Hossain; Fuse, Toshimitsu; Abe, Manabu; Uchida, Katsuya; Horio, Shuhei; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Itoi, Keiichi

    2017-05-01

    We examined the morphological features of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in a mouse line in which modified yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) was expressed under the CRF promoter. We previously generated the CRF-Venus knock-in mouse, in which Venus is inserted into the CRF gene locus by homologous recombination. In the present study, the neomycin phosphotransferase gene (Neo), driven by the pgk-1 promoter, was deleted from the CRF-Venus mouse genome, and a CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse was generated. Venus expression is much more prominent in the CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse when compared to the CRF-Venus mouse. In addition, most Venus-expressing neurons co-express CRF mRNA. Venus-expressing neurons constitute a discrete population of neuroendocrine neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) that project to the median eminence. Venus-expressing neurons were also found in brain regions outside the neuroendocrine PVH, including the olfactory bulb, the piriform cortex (Pir), the extended amygdala, the hippocampus, the neocortices, Barrington's nucleus, the midbrain/pontine dorsal tegmentum, the periaqueductal gray, and the inferior olivary nucleus (IO). Venus-expressing perikarya co-expressing CRF mRNA could be observed clearly even in regions where CRF-immunoreactive perikarya could hardly be identified. We demonstrated that the CRF neurons contain glutamate in the Pir and IO, while they contain gamma-aminobutyric acid in the neocortex, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the hippocampus, and the amygdala. A population of CRF neurons was demonstrated to be cholinergic in the midbrain tegmentum. The CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse may be useful for studying the structural and functional properties of CRF neurons in the mouse brain.

  1. Corticotropin releasing factor and catecholamines enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission in the lateral subdivision of the central amygdala.

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    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2013-07-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) plays an important role in many behaviors including anxiety, memory consolidation and cardiovascular responses. While these behaviors can be modulated by corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and catecholamine signaling, the mechanism(s) by which these signals modify CeA glutamatergic neurotransmission remains unclear. Utilizing whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology recordings from neurons in the lateral subdivision of the CeA (CeAL), we show that CRF, dopamine (DA) and the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO) all enhance the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC) without altering sEPSC kinetics, suggesting they increase presynaptic glutamate release. The effect of CRF on sEPSCs was mediated by a combination of CRFR1 and CRFR2 receptors. While previous work from our lab suggests that CRFRs mediate the effect of catecholamines on excitatory transmission in other subregions of the extended amygdala, blockade of CRFRs in the CeAL failed to significantly alter effects of DA and ISO on glutamatergic transmission. These findings suggest that catecholamine and CRF enhancement of glutamatergic transmission onto CeAL neurons occurs via distinct mechanisms. While CRF increased spontaneous glutamate release in the CeAL, CRF caused no significant changes to optogenetically evoked glutamate release in this region. The dissociable effects of CRF on different types of glutamatergic neurotransmission suggest that CRF may specifically regulate spontaneous excitatory transmission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion during stress by corticotropin-releasing factor and beta-endorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, H J

    1989-02-01

    Proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion is an important factor in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer disease. To examine the central nervous system regulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion, an animal model was developed that allowed cerebroventricular and intravenous injections as well as collection of duodenal perfusates in awake, freely moving rats. The hypothalamic peptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and stress (physical restraint) significantly stimulated duodenal bicarbonate secretion. These responses were abolished by pretreatment of the animals with the CRF receptor antagonist alpha-helical CRF-(9-41), hypophysectomy, and naloxone. In contrast, blockade of autonomic efferents by surgical and pharmacological means did not prevent the stimulatory effects of stress and CRF. Intravenous, but not cerebroventricular, administration of beta-endorphin that produced plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin that were similar to those produced by exogenous CRF and stress significantly stimulated duodenal bicarbonate secretion. These results indicate that endogenous CRF released during stress and exogenously administered CRF stimulate duodenal bicarbonate secretion by release of beta-endorphin from the pituitary, thus, demonstrating a functional hypothalamus-pituitary-gut axis.

  3. Orexin-corticotropin-releasing factor receptor heteromers in the ventral tegmental area as targets for cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; Ferré, Sergi; McCormick, Peter J

    2015-04-29

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R-OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R-OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R-CRF1R-OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A-CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking.

  4. Corticotropin-releasing factor and the brain-gut motor response to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Y; Martinez, V; Million, M; Rivier, J

    1999-03-01

    The characterization of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and CRF receptors, and the development of specific CRF receptor antagonists selective for the receptor subtypes have paved the way to the understanding of the biochemical coding of stress-related alterations of gut motor function. Reports have consistently established that central administration of CRF acts in the brain to inhibit gastric emptying while stimulating colonic motor function through modulation of the vagal and sacral parasympathetic outflow in rodents. Endogenous CRF in the brain plays a role in mediating various forms of stressor-induced gastric stasis, including postoperative gastric ileus, and activates colonic transit and fecal excretion elicited by psychologically aversive or fearful stimuli. It is known that brain CRF is involved in the cross-talk between the immune and gastrointestinal systems because systemic or central administration of interleukin-1-beta delays gastric emptying while stimulating colonic motor activity through activation of CRF release in the brain. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the dorsal vagal complex are important sites of action for CRF to inhibit gastric motor function, while the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the locus coeruleus complex are sites of action for CRF to stimulate colonic motor function. The inhibition of gastric emptying by CRF may be mediated by the interaction with the CRF2 receptors, while the anxiogenic and colonic motor responses may involve CRF1 receptors. Hypersecretion of CRF in the brain may contribute to the pathophysiology of stress-related exacerbation of irritable bowel syndrome.

  5. Stress, sex, and addiction: potential roles of corticotropin-releasing factor, oxytocin, and arginine-vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisagno, Verónica; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2014-09-01

    Stress sensitivity and sex are predictive factors for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. Life stresses are not only risk factors for the development of addiction but also are triggers for relapse to drug use. Therefore, it is imperative to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between stress and drug abuse, as an understanding of this may help in the development of novel and more effective therapeutic approaches to block the clinical manifestations of drug addiction. The development and clinical course of addiction-related disorders do appear to involve neuroadaptations within neurocircuitries that modulate stress responses and are influenced by several neuropeptides. These include corticotropin-releasing factor, the prototypic member of this class, as well as oxytocin and arginine-vasopressin that play important roles in affiliative behaviors. Interestingly, these peptides function to balance emotional behavior, with sexual dimorphism in the oxytocin/arginine-vasopressin systems, a fact that might play an important role in the differential responses of women and men to stressful stimuli and the specific sex-based prevalence of certain addictive disorders. Thus, this review aims to summarize (i) the contribution of sex differences to the function of dopamine systems, and (ii) the behavioral, neurochemical, and anatomical changes in brain stress systems.

  6. Corticotropin releasing factor impairs sustained attention in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Robert D; Kawasumi, Yushi; Parikh, Vinay; Bangasser, Debra A

    2016-01-01

    Stressful life events and stress-related psychiatric disorders impair sustained attention, the ability to monitor rare and unpredictable stimulus events over prolonged periods of time. Despite the link between stress and attentional disruptions, the neurobiological basis for stress regulation of attention systems remains underexplored. Here we examined whether corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), which orchestrates stress responses and is hypersecreted in patients with stress-related psychiatric disorders, impairs sustained attention. To this end, male and female rats received central infusions of CRF prior to testing on an operant sustained attention task (SAT), where rats were trained to discriminate signaled from non-signaled events. CRF caused a dose-dependent decrease in SAT performance in both male and female rats. Females were more impaired than males following a moderate dose of CRF, particularly during the middle part of the session. This sex difference was moderated by ovarian hormones. Females in the estrous cycle stage characterized by lower ovarian hormones had a greater CRF-induced attentional impairment than males and females in other cycle stages. Collectively, these studies highlight CRF as a critical stress-related factor that can regulate attentional performance. As sustained attention subserves other cognitive processes, these studies suggest that mitigating high levels of CRF in patients with stress-related psychiatric disorders may ameliorate their cognitive deficits.

  7. Corticotropin releasing factor dose-dependently modulates excitatory synaptic transmission in the noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Eric W; Waterhouse, Barry D; Chandler, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    The noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) is critically involved in the stress response and receives afferent input from a number of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) containing structures. Several in vivo and in vitro studies in rat have shown that CRF robustly increases the firing rate of LC neurons in a dose-dependent manner. While it is known that these increases are dependent on CRF receptor subtype 1 and mediated by effects of cAMP intracellular signaling cascades on potassium conductance, the impact of CRF on synaptic transmission within LC has not been clarified. In the present study, we used whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology to assess how varying concentrations of bath-applied CRF affect AMPA-receptor dependent spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents (sEPSCs). Compared to vehicle, 10, 25, and 100 nm CRF had no significant effects on any sEPSC parameters. Fifty nanomolar CRF, however, significantly increased sEPSC amplitude, half-width, and charge transfer, while these measures were significantly decreased by 200 nm CRF. These observations suggest that stress may differentially affect ongoing excitatory synaptic transmission in LC depending on how much CRF is released from presynaptic terminals. Combined with the well-documented effects of CRF on membrane properties and spontaneous LC discharge, these observations may help explain how stress and CRF release are able to modulate the signal to noise ratio of LC neurons. These findings have implications for how stress affects the fidelity of signal transmission and information flow through LC and how it might impact norepinephrine release in the CNS.

  8. Tyrosine Pretreatment Alleviates Suppression of Schedule-Controlled Responding Produced by Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF) in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    specific interaction with tyrosine hydroxylase . Thus, (3,13,14). alleviation of CRF with tyrosine may result from an affect of The 200 mg/kg dose of tyrosine...G., Dana, R.; Risch, S. C.; Koob, G. F. Activating aspartame, phenylalanine , and tyrosine. Fund. Appl. Toxicol. 16: and anxiogenic effects of...Onali, P. Corticotropin-releasing factor activates ty- Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav. 32:967-970: 1989. rosine hydroxylase in rat and mouse striatal

  9. Stress and addiction: contribution of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF system in neuroplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina L Haass-Koffler

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF has been shown to induce various behavioral changes related to adaptation to stress. Dysregulation of the CRF system at any point can lead to a variety of psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders (SUDs. CRF has been associated with stress-induced drug reinforcement. Extensive literature has identified CRF to play an important role in the molecular mechanisms that lead to an increase in susceptibility that precipitates relapse to SUDs. The CRF system has a heterogeneous role in SUDs. It enhances the acute effects of drugs of abuse and is also responsible for the potentiation of drug-induced neuroplasticity evoked during the withdrawal period. We present in this review the brain regions and circuitries where CRF is expressed and may participate in stress-induced drug abuse. Finally, we attempt to evaluate the role of modulating the CRF system as a possible therapeutic strategy for treating the dysregulation of emotional behaviors that result from the acute positive reinforcement of substances of abuse as well as the negative reinforcement produced by withdrawal.

  10. Structural evolution of urotensin-I: reflections of life before corticotropin releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, David A

    2009-10-01

    Peptides have a long evolutionary history that predates the appearance of metazoans. The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) family of peptides is among the most ancient peptide lineages. The identification and characterization of urotensin-I and related orthologues led the way for the elucidation of the entire CRF peptide family. A comparative analysis of the CRF paralogue sequences suggest that CRF is the most derived of these peptides and has lost many of its ancestral characteristics after it became associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/interrenal (HPA/I axis). In vertebrates, the urotensin-I group of orthologues, which includes sauvagine and urocortin, possess a number of shared characteristics that may be indicative of the ancestral peptide. Given the early origin of the CRF family peptides, it is likely that other peptide lineages are distantly related to the CRF family. In silico or cDNA library screening using probes based on urotensin-I/urocortin characteristics have been used to identify novel CRF family and related sequences that provide clues the evolutionary origin of the CRF family.

  11. Corticotropin-releasing factor secretion from dendritic cells stimulated by commensal bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariko Hojo; Toshifumi Ohkusa; Harumi Tomeoku; Shigeo Koido; Daisuke Asaoka; Akihito Nagahara; Sumio Watanabe

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the production and secretion of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) by dendritic cells and the influence of commensal bacteria.METHODS: JAWSⅡ cells (ATCC CRL-11904), a mouse dendritic cell line, were seeded into 24-well culture plates and grown for 3 d. Commensal bacterial strains of Clostridium clostrodiiforme (JCM1291), Bacteroides vulgatus (B. vulgatus) (JCM5856), Escherichia coli (JCM1649), or Fusobacterium varium (F. varium) (ATCC8501) were added to the cells except for the control well, and incubated for 2 h. After incubation, we performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the cultured medium and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the dendritic cells, and compared these values with controls.RESULTS: The level of CRF secretion by control dendritic cells was 40.4 ± 6.2 pg/mL. The CRF levels for cells incubated with F. varium and B. vulgatus were significantly higher than that of the control (P < 0.0001). CRF mRNA was present in the control sample without bacteria, and CRF mRNA levels in all samples treated with bacteria were above that of the control sample.F. varium caused the greatest increase in CRF mRNA expression. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that dendritic cells produce CRF, a process augmented by commensal bacteria.

  12. Intrahypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor elevates gastric bicarbonate and inhibits stress ulcers in rats.

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    Gunion, M W; Kauffman, G L; Taché, Y

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrahyopthalamic microinfusions of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on gastric bicarbonate, acid, and pepsin content and on cold restraint-induced gastric lesion formation were tested in three experiments. Bilateral microinfusions of CRF into the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (0.86 nmol/rat) significantly increased both gastric bicarbonate concentration and total bicarbonate output. These effects were observed irrespective of whether rats were pretreated with the acid antisecretory drug omeprazole. In nonomeprazole-pretreated rats, CRF microinfusions also significantly reduced acid secretion and raised pH. The increase in bicarbonate content accounted for half of the observed decrease in acid output, suggesting that CRF microinfusions activated separable bicarbonate-stimulating and acid-inhibiting hypothalamic systems. In non-omeprazole-pretreated rats, CRF microinfusions significantly increased serum gastrin, whereas pepsin output was unchanged. Gastric mucosal damage produced by 4 h of cold restraint was significantly diminished by CRF microinfusion into the ventromedial hypothalamus. These data demonstrate that ventromedial hypothalamic microinfusions of CRF increase bicarbonate content, decrease gastric acid content, and confer protection against cold restraint-induced gastric mucosal damage. Hypothalamic CRF neuronal terminals and receptors may be involved in the central regulation of gastric bicarbonate secretion as well as acid secretion.

  13. Stress and addiction: contribution of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) system in neuroplasticity.

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    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Bartlett, Selena E

    2012-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) has been shown to induce various behavioral changes related to adaptation to stress. Dysregulation of the CRF system at any point can lead to a variety of psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders (SUDs). CRF has been associated with stress-induced drug reinforcement. Extensive literature has identified CRF to play an important role in the molecular mechanisms that lead to an increase in susceptibility that precipitates relapse to SUDs. The CRF system has a heterogeneous role in SUDs. It enhances the acute effects of drugs of abuse and is also responsible for the potentiation of drug-induced neuroplasticity evoked during the withdrawal period. We present in this review the brain regions and circuitries where CRF is expressed and may participate in stress-induced drug abuse. Finally, we attempt to evaluate the role of modulating the CRF system as a possible therapeutic strategy for treating the dysregulation of emotional behaviors that result from the acute positive reinforcement of substances of abuse as well as the negative reinforcement produced by withdrawal.

  14. Corticotropin-releasing factor: a possible key to gut dysfunction in the critically ill.

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    Hill, Lauren T; Kidson, Susan H; Michell, William L

    2013-01-01

    Critically ill patients frequently display unexplained or incompletely explained features of gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction, including gastric stasis, ileus, and diarrhea. This makes nutrition delivery challenging, and may contribute to poor outcomes. The typical bowel dysfunction seen in severely ill patients includes retarded gastric emptying, unsynchronized intestinal motility, and intestinal hyperpermeability. These functional changes appear similar to the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated bowel dysfunctions associated with stress of various types and some GI disorders and diseases. CRF has been shown to be present within the GI tract and its action on CRF receptors within the gut have been shown to reduce gastric emptying, alter intestinal motility, and increase intestinal permeability. However, the precise role of CRF in the GI dysfunction in critical illness remains unclear. In this short review, we provide an update on GI dysfunction during stress and review the possible role of CRF in the aetiology of gut dysfunction. We suggest that activation of CRF signaling pathways in critical illness might be key to understanding the mechanisms underlying the gut dysfunction that impairs enteral feeding in the intensive care unit.

  15. Stimulation of rat B-lymphocyte proliferation by corticotropin-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillis, J P; Park, A; Rubin-Fletter, P; Turck, C; Dallman, M F; Payan, D G

    1989-07-01

    The mitogenic effect of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on rat lymphocytes was investigated. When rat splenocytes were cultured for 48 hr with CFR, a dose-dependent increase in incorporation of 3H-thymidine (3H-Tdr) was observed, with a maximal response at 10 nM CRF. Comparison of the proliferative effect of CRF on enriched populations of B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or macrophages revealed that only B lymphocytes responded following treatment with CRF. When lymphocytes derived from different lymphoid tissues were compared, CRF had a greater proliferative effect on lymphocytes derived from gut-associated lymphoid tissue (mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches) than on lymphocytes from spleen or inguinal lymph nodes; CRF had no effect on thymocytes. Synthetic fragments of CRF were used to determine which portions of the peptide are recognized by lymphocytes. The C-terminal fragments alpha-helical CRF9-41 and CRF21-41 were as potent as native CRF in stimulating B-lymphocyte proliferation, whereas CRF1-20 did not stimulate proliferation. The activity of these peptides suggests that CRF stimulates lymphocyte proliferation by cellular recognition of structural determinants in the C-terminal one-half of the peptide.

  16. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

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    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel)

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  17. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H Le

    Full Text Available Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1. Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr and chronic (2hr CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  18. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Michelle H; Weissmiller, April M; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  19. Expression of type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor in the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Xiang; Gao, Na; Wang, Xiyu; Fang, Xiucai; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Guo-Du; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D

    2005-01-17

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, electrophysiological recording, and intraneuronal injection of the neuronal tracer biocytin were integrated in a study of the functional expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors in the guinea pig enteric nervous system. RT-PCR revealed expression of CRF1 receptor mRNA, but not CRF2, in both myenteric and submucosal plexuses. Immunoreactivity for the CRF1 receptor was distributed widely in the myenteric plexus of the stomach and small and large intestine and in the submucosal plexus of the small and large intestine. CRF1 receptor immunoreactivity was coexpressed with calbindin, choline acetyltransferase, and substance P in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, CRF1 receptor immunoreactivity was found in neurons that expressed calbindin, substance P, choline acetyltransferase, or neuropeptide Y. Application of CRF evoked slowly activating depolarizing responses associated with elevated excitability in both myenteric and submucosal neurons. Histological analysis of biocytin-filled neurons revealed that both uniaxonal neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology responded to CRF. The CRF-evoked depolarizing responses were suppressed by the CRF1/CRF2 receptor antagonist astressin and the selective CRF1 receptor antagonist NBI27914 and were unaffected by the selective CRF2 receptor antagonist antisauvagine-30. The findings support the hypothesis that the CRF1 receptor mediates the excitatory actions of CRF on neurons in the enteric nervous system. Actions on enteric neurons might underlie the neural mechanisms by which stress-related release of CRF in the periphery alters intestinal propulsive motor function, mucosal secretion, and barrier functions.

  20. Delta opioid receptors colocalize with corticotropin releasing factor in hippocampal interneurons.

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    Williams, T J; Milner, T A

    2011-04-14

    The hippocampal formation (HF) is an important site at which stress circuits and endogenous opioid systems intersect, likely playing a critical role in the interaction between stress and drug addiction. Prior study findings suggest that the stress-related neuropeptide corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and the delta opioid receptor (DOR) may localize to similar neuronal populations within HF lamina. Here, hippocampal sections of male and cycling female adult Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for immunolabeling using antisera directed against the DOR and CRF peptide, as well as interneuron subtype markers somatostatin or parvalbumin, and analyzed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Both DOR- and CRF-labeling was observed in interneurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate hilus. Males and normal cycling females displayed a similar number of CRF immunoreactive neurons co-labeled with DOR and a similar average number of CRF-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus and stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3. In addition, 70% of DOR/CRF dual-labeled neurons in the hilar region co-labeled with somatostatin, suggesting a role for these interneurons in regulating perforant path input to dentate granule cells. Ultrastructural analysis of CRF-labeled axon terminals within the hilar region revealed that proestrus females have a similar number of CRF-labeled axon terminals that contain DORs compared to males but an increased number of CRF-labeled axon terminals without DORs. Taken together, these findings suggest that while DORs are anatomically positioned to modulate CRF immunoreactive interneuron activity and CRF peptide release, their ability to exert such regulatory activity may be compromised in females when estrogen levels are high.

  1. Corticotropin-releasing factor overexpression gives rise to sex differences in Alzheimer's disease-related signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangasser, D A; Dong, H; Carroll, J; Plona, Z; Ding, H; Rodriguez, L; McKennan, C; Csernansky, J G; Seeholzer, S H; Valentino, R J

    2016-10-18

    Several neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders share stress as a risk factor and are more prevalent in women than in men. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) orchestrates the stress response, and excessive CRF is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of these diseases. We previously found that the CRF1 receptor (CRF1) is sex biased whereby coupling to its GTP-binding protein, Gs, is greater in females, whereas β-arrestin-2 coupling is greater in males. This study used a phosphoproteomic approach in CRF-overexpressing (CRF-OE) mice to test the proof of principle that when CRF is in excess, sex-biased CRF1 coupling translates into divergent cell signaling that is expressed as different brain phosphoprotein profiles. Cortical phosphopeptides that distinguished female and male CRF-OE mice were overrepresented in unique pathways that were consistent with Gs-dependent signaling in females and β-arrestin-2 signaling in males. Notably, phosphopeptides that were more abundant in female CRF-OE mice were overrepresented in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathway. Phosphoproteomic results were validated by demonstrating that CRF overexpression in females was associated with increased tau phosphorylation and, in a mouse model of AD pathology, phosphorylation of β-secretase, the enzyme involved in the formation of amyloid β. These females exhibited increased formation of amyloid β plaques and cognitive impairments relative to males. Collectively, the findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby the excess CRF that characterizes stress-related diseases initiates distinct cellular processes in male and female brains, as a result of sex-biased CRF1 signaling. Promotion of AD-related signaling pathways through this mechanism may contribute to female vulnerability to AD.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 18 October 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.185.

  2. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor is centrally involved in learning under moderate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Morgan; Chen, Alon; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2013-08-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide is found to have a pivotal role in the regulation of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges. Here, we studied the involvement of the hypothalamic CRF in learning under stressful conditions. We have used a site-specific viral approach to knockdown (KD) CRF expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The two-way shuttle avoidance (TWSA) task was chosen to assess learning and memory under stressful conditions. Control animals learned to shuttle from one side to the other to avoid electrical foot shock by responding to a tone. Novel object and social recognition tasks were used to assess memory under less stressful conditions. KD of PVN-CRF expression decreased the number of avoidance responses in a TWSA session under moderate (0.8 mA), but not strong (1.5 mA), stimulus intensity compared to control rats. On the other hand, KD of PVN-CRF had no effect on memory performance in the less stressful novel object or social recognition tasks. Interestingly, basal or stress-induced corticosterone levels in CRF KD rats were not significantly different from controls. Taken together, the data suggest that the observed impairment was not a result of alteration in HPA axis activity, but rather due to reduced PVN-CRF activity on other brain areas. We propose that hypothalamic CRF is centrally involved in learning under moderate stressful challenge. Under 'basal' (less stressful) conditions or when the intensity of the stress is more demanding, central CRF ceases to be the determinant factor, as was indicated by performances in the TWSA with higher stimulus intensity or in the less stressful tasks of object and social recognition.

  3. Corticotropin-releasing factor enhances locomotion and medullary neuronal firing in an amphibian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, C A; Rose, J D; Moore, F L

    1996-03-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) administration has been shown to act centrally to enhance locomotion in rats and amphibians. In the present study we used an amphibian, the roughskin newt (Taricha granulosa), to characterize changes in medullary neuronal activity associated with CRF-induced walking and swimming in animals chronically implanted with fine-wire microelectrodes. Neuronal activity was recorded from the raphe and adjacent reticular region of the rostral medulla. Under baseline conditions most of the recorded neurons showed low to moderate amounts of neuronal activity during periods of immobility and pronounced increases in firing that were time-locked with episodes of walking. These neurons sometimes showed further increases in discharge during swimming. Injections of CRF but not saline into the lateral ventricle produced a rapidly appearing increase in walking and pronounced changes (mostly increases) in firing rates of the medullary neurons. CRF produced diverse changes in patterns of firing in different neurons, but for these neurons as a group, the effects of CRF showed a close temporal association with the onset and expression of the peptide's effect on locomotion. In neurons that were active exclusively during movement prior to CRF treatment, the post-CRF increase in firing was evident during episodes of walking; in other neurons that also were spontaneously active during immobility prior to CRF infusion, post-CRF activity changes were evident during immobility as well as during episodes of locomotion. Thus, a principal effect of CRF was to potentiate the level of neuronal firing in a population of medullary neurons with locomotor-related properties. Due to the route of administration CRF may have acted on multiple central nervous system sites to enhance locomotion, but the results are consistent with neurophysiological effects involving medullary locomotion-regulating neurons.

  4. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) modulates fear-induced alterations in sleep in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linghui; Tang, Xiangdong; Wellman, Laurie L; Liu, Xianling; Sanford, Larry D

    2009-06-18

    Contextual fear significantly reduces rapid eye movement sleep (REM) during post-exposure sleep in mice and rats. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) plays a major role in CNS responses to stressors. We examined the influence of CRF and astressin (AST), a non-specific CRF antagonist, on sleep after contextual fear in BALB/c mice. Male mice were implanted with transmitters for recording sleep via telemetry and with a guide cannula aimed into the lateral ventricle. Recordings for vehicle and handling control were obtained after ICV microinjection of saline (SAL) followed by exposure to a novel chamber. Afterwards, the mice were subjected to shock training (20 trials, 0.5 mA, 0.5 s duration) for 2 sessions. After training, separate groups of mice received ICV microinjections of SAL (0.2 microl, n=9), CRF (0.4 microg, n=8), or AST (1.0 microg, n=8) prior to exposure to the shock context alone. Sleep was then recorded for 20 h (8-hour light and 12-hour dark period). Compared to handling control, contextual fear significantly decreased REM during the 8-h light period in mice receiving SAL and in mice receiving CRF, but not in the mice receiving AST. Mice receiving CRF exhibited reductions in REM during the 12-h dark period after contextual fear, whereas mice receiving SAL or AST did not. CRF also reduced non-REM (NREM) delta (slow wave) amplitude in the EEG. Only mice receiving SAL prior to contextual fear exhibited significant reductions in NREM and total sleep. These findings demonstrate a role for the central CRF system in regulating alterations in sleep induced by contextual fear.

  5. Altered Responses to Cold Environment in Urocortin 1 and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Deficient Mice

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    Bayan Chaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined core body temperature (CBT of urocortin 1 (UCN1 and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF knockout (KO mice exposed to 4°C for 2 h. UCN1KO mice showed higher average CBT during cold exposure as compared to WT. The CBT of male and female WT mice dropped significantly to 34.1 ± 2.4 and 34.9 ± 3.1 C at 4°C, respectively. In contrast, the CBT of male and female UCN1KO mice dropped only slightly after 2 h at 4°C to 36.8 ± 0.7 and 38.1 ± 0.5 C, respectively. WT female and male UCN1KO mice showed significant acclimatization to cold; however, female UCN1KO mice did not show such a significant acclimatization. CRFKO mice showed a dramatic decline in CBT from 38.2 ±  0.4 at 22°C to 26.1 ± 9.8 at 4°C for 2 h. The CRF/UCN1 double KO (dKO mice dropped their CBT to 32.5 ± 4.0 after 2 h exposure to 4°C. Dexamethasone treatment prevented the decline in CBT of the CRFKO and the dKO mice. Taken together, the data suggest a novel role for UCN1 in thermoregulation. The role of CRF is likely secondary to adrenal glucocorticoids, which have an important regulatory role on carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism.

  6. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 and type 2 interaction in irritable bowel syndrome.

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    Nozu, Tsukasa; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2015-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) displays chronic abdominal pain or discomfort with altered defecation, and stress-induced altered gut motility and visceral sensation play an important role in the pathophysiology. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a main mediator of stress responses and mediates these gastrointestinal functional changes. CRF in brain and periphery acts through two subtype receptors such as CRF receptor type 1 (CRF1) and type 2 (CRF2), and activating CRF1 exclusively stimulates colonic motor function and induces visceral hypersensitivity. Meanwhile, several recent studies have demonstrated that CRF2 has a counter regulatory action against CRF1, which may imply that CRF2 inhibits stress response induced by CRF1 in order to prevent it from going into an overdrive state. Colonic contractility and sensation may be explained by the state of the intensity of CRF1 signaling. CRF2 signaling may play a role in CRF1-triggered enhanced colonic functions through modulation of CRF1 activity. Blocking CRF2 further enhances CRF-induced stimulation of colonic contractility and activating CRF2 inhibits stress-induced visceral sensitization. Therefore, we proposed the hypothesis, i.e., balance theory of CRF1 and CRF2 signaling as follows. Both CRF receptors may be activated simultaneously and the signaling balance of CRF1 and CRF2 may determine the functional changes of gastrointestinal tract induced by stress. CRF signaling balance might be abnormally shifted toward CRF1, leading to enhanced colonic motility and visceral sensitization in IBS. This theory may lead to understanding the pathophysiology and provide the novel therapeutic options targeting altered signaling balance of CRF1 and CRF2 in IBS.

  7. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein: a novel regulator of CRF and related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, D P; De Souza, E B; Lowry, P J; Potter, E; Sawchenko, P; Vale, W W

    1995-10-01

    A 37-kDa corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) was purified from human plasma by repeated affinity purification and subsequently sequenced and cloned. The human and rat CRF-BP cDNAs encode proteins of 322 amino acids with one putative signal sequence, one N-glycosylation site, and 10 conserved cysteines. Human CRF-BP binds human CRF with high affinity but has low affinity for the ovine peptide. In contrast, sheep CRF-BP binds human and ovine CRF with high affinity. The CRF-BP gene consists of seven exons and six introns and is located on chromosome 13 and loci 5q of the mouse and human genomes, respectively. CRF-BP inhibits the adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) releasing properties of CRF in vitro. CRF-BP dimerizes after binding CRF and clears the peptide from blood. This clearance mechanism protects the maternal pituitary gland from elevated plasma CRF levels found during the third trimester of human pregnancy. CRF-BP is expressed in the brains of all species so far tested but is uniquely expressed in human liver and placenta. In brain, CRF-BP is membrane associated and is predominantly expressed in the cerebral cortex and subcortical limbic structures. In some brain areas CRF-BP colocalizes with CRF and CRF receptors. The protein is also present in pituitary corticotropes, where it is under positive glucocorticoid control, and is likely to locally modulate CRF-induced ACTH secretion. The ligand requirements of the CRF receptor and the CRF-BP can be distinguished in that central human CRF fragments, such as CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), have high affinity for CRF-BP but low affinity for the CRF receptor. The binding protein's ability to inhibit CRF-induced ACTH secretion can be reversed by CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), suggesting that ligand inhibitors may have utility in elevating free CRF levels in disease states associated with decreased CRF. Thus, by controlling the amount of free CRF which activates CRF receptors, it is likely that the CRF

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of carbamate and aryl ether substituted pyrazinones as corticotropin releasing factor-1 (CRF₁) receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Vijay T; Hartz, Richard A; Molski, Thaddeus F; Mattson, Gail K; Lentz, Kimberley A; Grace, James E; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Macor, John E

    2016-05-01

    A series of pyrazinone-based compounds incorporating either carbamate or aryl ether groups was synthesized and evaluated as corticotropin-releasing factor-1 (CRF1) receptor antagonists. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the identification of highly potent CRF1 receptor antagonists 14a (IC50=0.74 nM) and 14b (IC50=1.9 nM). The synthesis, structure-activity relationships and in vitro metabolic stability properties of compounds in this series will be described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of morphine on hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, norepinephrine and dopamine in non-stressed and stressed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suemaru,Shuso

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of morphine on the hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, norepinephrine (NE and dopamine (DA concentrations were investigated in non-stressed and stressed rats. Acutely administered morphine stimulated both the synthesis and release of CRF in the hypothalamus, thereby activating the pituitary-adrenocortical system in non-stressed rats, but inhibited the stress-induced CRF synthesis and ACTH-corticosterone secretion. Either a morphine or ether-laparotomy stress reduced NE and DA concentrations in the hypothalamus. A pretreatment with morphine inhibited the stress-induced reduction in the hypothalamic NE and DA concentrations, and induced a significant increase in the DA concentration. These observations suggest that hypothalamic NE and DA are involved in morphine-induced changes in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA activity and that endogenous opiates have a role in regulating CRF secretion by interacting with hypothalamic biogenic amines.

  10. Effect of central corticotropin releasing factor on hepatic circulation in rats: the role of the CRF2 receptor in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Backgrounds: Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is distributed in the central nervous system and acts as a neurotransmitter to regulate gastric functions through vagal-muscarinic pathways. We have recently demonstrated that central CRF aggravates experimental acute liver injury in rats. In the present study, the central effect of CRF on hepatic circulation was investigated.

  11. Over-expression of corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA in inferior olivary neurons of rolling mouse Nagoya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kazuhiko; Kawano, Michihiro; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Hisano, Setsuji; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2003-10-01

    Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA was examined in the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) of an ataxic mutant, rolling mouse Nagoya (RMN) by semi-quantitative in situ hybridization. The most marked difference in the level of CRF mRNA signals between RMN and non-ataxic littermates (control mice) was observed in the beta-subnucleus and ventrolateral protrusion of the ION. The level of signals in these subnuclei was about twofold higher in RMN than in the controls. Signal levels in the dorsal nucleus, principal nucleus and subnucleus A were slightly but significantly higher in RMN than in the controls. In the other subnuclei, there were no differences in signal level between RMN and controls. These results suggest a region-related over-expression of CRF mRNA in the ION of RMN. This may be responsible for the increased sensitivity of some Purkinje cells to glutamate, resulting in ataxic symptoms of RMN.

  12. Pavlovian conditioning of corticotropin-releasing factor-induced increase of blood pressure and corticosterone secretion in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, M; Hellhammer, D; Murison, R; Vetter, H; Krause, U; Lehnert, H

    1992-05-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is clearly involved in the central regulation of the pituitary-adrenal axis and, moreover, of autonomic nervous system functions. Enhanced sympathetic activity with subsequent increases in blood pressure and heart rate and attenuation of the baroreceptor reflex results from the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of CRF. Additionally, the peptide has a variety of potent effects on behavioural responses in animals similar to those observed after an experimentally evoked stress. It was therefore of obvious interest to examine whether CRF is a possible mediator of the learning processes associated with physiological stress reaction patterns. This report clearly demonstrates a classical conditioning of the endocrine (i.e. corticosterone secretion) and haemodynamic (i.e. blood pressure) sequelae following central CRF application and thus indicates that this mechanism is of physiological significance for learned stress responses.

  13. Expression and functional characterization of membrane-integrated mammalian corticotropin releasing factor receptors 1 and 2 in Escherichia coli.

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    Roberto Jappelli

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptors (CRFRs are class B1 G-protein-coupled receptors, which bind peptides of the corticotropin releasing factor family and are key mediators in the stress response. In order to dissect the receptors' binding specificity and enable structural studies, full-length human CRFR1α and mouse CRFR2β as well as fragments lacking the N-terminal extracellular domain, were overproduced in E. coli. The characteristics of different CRFR2β-PhoA gene fusion products expressed in bacteria were found to be in agreement with the predicted ones in the hepta-helical membrane topology model. Recombinant histidine-tagged CRFR1α and CRFR2β expression levels and bacterial subcellular localization were evaluated by cell fractionation and Western blot analysis. Protein expression parameters were assessed, including the influence of E. coli bacterial hosts, culture media and the impact of either PelB or DsbA signal peptide. In general, the large majority of receptor proteins became inserted in the bacterial membrane. Across all experimental conditions significantly more CRFR2β product was obtained in comparison to CRFR1α. Following a detergent screen analysis, bacterial membranes containing CRFR1α and CRFR2β were best solubilized with the zwitterionic detergent FC-14. Binding of different peptide ligands to CRFR1α and CRFR2β membrane fractions were similar, in part, to the complex pharmacology observed in eukaryotic cells. We suggest that our E. coli expression system producing functional CRFRs will be useful for large-scale expression of these receptors for structural studies.

  14. Colorectal distention induces acute and delayed visceral hypersensitivity: role of peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor and interleukin-1 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Miyagishi, Saori; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2015-12-01

    Most studies evaluating visceral sensation measure visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distention (CRD). However, CRD itself induces visceral sensitization, and little is known about the detailed characteristics of this response. The present study tried to clarify this question. VMR was determined by measuring abdominal muscle contractions as a response to CRD in rats. The CRD set consisted of two isobaric distentions (60 mmHg for 10 min twice, with a 30-min rest), and the CRD set was performed on two separate days, i.e., days 1 and 3, 8. On day 1, VMR to the second CRD was increased as compared with that to the first CRD, which is the acute sensitization. VMR to the first CRD on day 3 returned to the same level as that to the first CRD on day 1, and total VMR, i.e., the whole response to the CRD set, was not different between day 1 and day 3. However, total VMR was significantly increased on day 8 as compared with that on day 1, suggesting CRD induced the delayed sensitization. Intraperitoneally administered astressin (200 µg/kg), a corticotropin-releasing factor receptor antagonist, at the end of the first CRD blocked the acute sensitization, but anakinra (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, did not modify it. Astressin (200 µg/kg, twice before CRD on day 8) did not alter the delayed sensitization, but anakinra (20 mg/kg, twice) abolished it. CRD induced both acute sensitization and delayed sensitization, which were mediated through peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor and interleukin-1 pathways, respectively.

  15. Noradrenergic inhibition of canine gallbladder contraction and murine pancreatic secretion during stress by corticotropin-releasing factor.

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    Lenz, H J; Messmer, B; Zimmerman, F G

    1992-02-01

    Gastrointestinal secretory and motor responses are profoundly altered during stress; but the effects of stress and its mediator(s) on the two major gut functions, exocrine pancreatic secretion and gallbladder motility, are unknown. We therefore developed two animal models that allowed us to examine the effects of acoustic stress on canine gallbladder contraction and restraint stress on rat exocrine pancreatic secretion. Acoustic stress inhibited cholecystokinin-8 (CCK)- and meal-induced gallbladder contraction, and restraint stress inhibited basal and CCK/secretin-stimulated pancreatic secretion. These inhibitory responses were mimicked by cerebral injection of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and abolished by the CRF antagonist, alpha-helical CRF-(9-41). The effects of stress and exogenous CRF were simulated by intravenous infusion of norepinephrine but prevented by ganglionic, noradrenergic, and alpha-adrenergic but not beta-adrenergic receptor blockade. Vagotomy, adrenalectomy, and--in rats--hypophysectomy did not alter the effects produced by stress and CRF. These results indicate that endogenous CRF released in response to different stressors in distinct species inhibits canine gallbladder contraction and murine exocrine pancreatic secretion via activation of sympathetic efferents. Release of norepinephrine appears to be the final common pathway producing inhibition of biliary and pancreatic digestive function during stress mediated by cerebral CRF.

  16. HANS SELYE AND THE STRESS RESPONSE: FROM "THE FIRST MEDIATOR" TO THE IDENTIFICATION OF THE HYPOTHALAMIC CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachè, Yvette

    2014-03-30

    Selye pioneered the stress concept that is ingrained in the vocabulary of daily life. This was originally build on experimental observations that divers noxious agents can trigger a similar triad of endocrine (adrenal enlargement), immune (involution of thymus) and gut (gastric erosion formation) responses as reported in a letter to Nature in 1936. Subsequently, he articulated the underlying mechanisms and hypothesized the existence of a "first mediator" in the hypothalamus able to orchestrate this bodily changes. However he took two generations to identify this mediator. The Nobel Laureate, Roger Guillemin, a former Selye's PhD student, demonstrated in 1955 the existence of a hypothalamic factor that elicited adrenocorticotropic hormone release from the rat pituitary and named it corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). In 1981, Wylie Vale, a former Guillemin's Ph Student, characterized CRF as 41 amino acid and cloned the CRF1 and CRF2 receptors. This paves the way to experimental studies establishing that the activation of the CRF signaling pathways in the brain plays a key role in mediating the stress-related endocrine, behavioral, autonomic and visceral responses. The unraveling of the biochemical coding of stress is rooted in Selye legacy continues to have increasing impact on the scientific community.

  17. Angiotensin type 1a receptors on corticotropin-releasing factor neurons contribute to the expression of conditioned fear.

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    Hurt, R C; Garrett, J C; Keifer, O P; Linares, A; Couling, L; Speth, R C; Ressler, K J; Marvar, P J

    2015-09-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1a (AT1a R) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1a R signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1a R gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) ). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) mice exhibit less freezing than wild-type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression-an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1a R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1 R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  18. Chronic traumatic stress impairs memory in mice: Potential roles of acetylcholine, neuroinflammation and corticotropin releasing factor expression in the hippocampus.

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    Bhakta, Ami; Gavini, Kartheek; Yang, Euitaek; Lyman-Henley, Lani; Parameshwaran, Kodeeswaran

    2017-09-29

    Chronic stress in humans can result in multiple adverse psychiatric and neurobiological outcomes, including memory deficits. These adverse outcomes can be more severe if each episode of stress is very traumatic. When compared to acute or short term stress relatively little is known about the effects of chronic traumatic stress on memory and molecular changes in hippocampus, a brain area involved in memory processing. Here we studied the effects of chronic traumatic stress in mice by exposing them to adult Long Evan rats for 28 consecutive days and subsequently analyzing behavioral outcomes and the changes in the hippocampus. Results show that stressed mice developed memory deficits when assayed with radial arm maze tasks. However, chronic traumatic stress did not induce anxiety, locomotor hyperactivity or anhedonia. In the hippocampus of stressed mice interleukin-1β protein expression was increased along with decreased corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) gene expression. Furthermore, there was a reduction in acetylcholine levels in the hippocampus of stressed mice. There were no changes in brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in the hippocampus of stressed mice. Gene expression of immediate early genes (Zif268, Arc, C-Fos) as well as glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors were also not affected by chronic stress. These data demonstrate that chronic traumatic stress followed by a recovery period might lead to development of resilience resulting in the development of selected, most vulnerable behavioral alterations and molecular changes in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor-Overexpressing Mice Exhibit Reduced Neuronal Activation in the Arcuate Nucleus and Food Intake in Response to Fasting

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model that exhibits features of chronic stress. We investigated whether the adaptive feeding response to a hypocaloric challenge induced by food deprivation is impaired under conditions of chronic CRF overproduction. Food intake response to a 16-h overnight fast and ip injection of gut hormones regulating food intake were compared in CRF-OE and wild type (WT) littermate mice along with brain Fos expression, circulatin...

  20. Stress-related modulation of inflammation in experimental models of bowel disease and post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome: role of corticotropin releasing factor receptors

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between gut inflammatory processes and stress is gaining increasing recognition. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)-receptor activation in the brain is well established as a key signaling pathway initiating the various components of the stress response including in the viscera. In addition, a local CRF signaling system has been recently established in the gut. This review summarize the present knowledge on mechanisms through which both brain and gut CRF receptors modulate in...

  1. Tissue plasminogen activator promotes the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor on the amygdala and anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, Tomasz; Pawlak, Robert; Matys, Elzbieta; Pavlides, Constantine; McEwen, Bruce S; Strickland, Sidney

    2004-11-16

    Stress-induced plasticity in the brain requires a precisely orchestrated sequence of cellular events involving novel as well as well known mediators. We have previously demonstrated that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the amygdala promotes stress-induced synaptic plasticity and anxiety-like behavior. Here, we show that tPA activity in the amygdala is up-regulated by a major stress neuromodulator, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), acting on CRF type-1 receptors. Compared with WT, tPA-deficient mice responded to CRF treatment with attenuated expression of c-fos (an indicator of neuronal activation) in the central and medial amygdala but had normal c-fos responses in paraventricular nuclei. They exhibited reduced anxiety-like behavior to CRF but had a sustained corticosterone response after CRF administration. This effect of tPA deficiency was not mediated by plasminogen, because plasminogen-deficient mice demonstrated normal behavioral and hormonal changes to CRF. These studies establish tPA as an important mediator of cellular, behavioral, and hormonal responses to CRF.

  2. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity is reduced during induction of pituitary tumors by chronic estrogen treatment

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    Haas, D.A.; Borgundvaag, B.; Sturtridge, W.C.; George, S.R.

    1987-11-02

    The role that estrogen plays in the regulation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is not known. A radioimmunoassay specific for rat CRF was utilized to measure the CRF-like immunoreactivity (CRF-ir) in the hypothalamus of ovariectomized rats treated with estradiol for periods up to 12 weeks. Compared to ovariectomized controls, estradiol treatment resulted in significantly reduced CRF-ir after 3 and 12 weeks, although no significant change was seen after 8 weeks. Anterior pituitary (AP) weight was greatly increased by estradiol treatment at all time points studied. Bromocriptine treatment for the last 3 weeks of the 12-week period, or removal of estradiol for 3 weeks after 9 weeks of treatment did not reverse the changes in CRF-ir even though significant regressions of tumor size was achieved. There was no correlation between AP weight and CRF-ir in individual animals. These data show that chronic treatment with estrogen reduced hypothalamic CRF-ir content. Neither a direct estrogenic effect or an indirect effect mediated through alterations in the adenohypophysis could be ruled out. 21 references, 3 figures.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor and perceived early-life stress in depressed patients and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Linda L; Tyrka, Audrey R; McDougle, Christopher J; Malison, Robert T; Owens, Michael J; Nemeroff, Charles B; Price, Lawrence H

    2004-04-01

    Previous studies have reported elevated concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in patients with major depression. Elevations of CSF CRF have also been reported in adult laboratory animals exposed to the stress of brief maternal deprivation or maternal neglect in the neonatal or preweaning period. The present study was designed to determine whether major depression and a history of perceived early adversity in childhood are independently associated with elevated CSF CRF concentrations in adults. In this case-control study, 27 medication-free adults with major depression and 25 matched controls underwent standardized lumbar puncture for collection of a single CSF sample at 1200. Subjects provided data about significant adverse early-life experiences and rated their global perceived level of stress during pre-school and preteen years on a six-point Likert scale. The mean difference in CSF CRF between depressed patients and controls did not reach statistical significance. In a regression model, perceived early-life stress was a significant predictor of CSF CRF, but depression was not. Perinatal adversity and perceived adversity in the preteen adversity years (ages 6-13 years) were both independently associated with decreasing CSF CRF concentrations. The relationship observed between perceived early-life stress and adult CSF CRF concentrations in this study closely parallels recent preclinical findings. More work is needed to elucidate the critical nature and timing of early events that may be associated with enduring neuroendocrine changes in humans.

  4. Isolation and characterisation of the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) gene in a teleost fish, Fugu rubripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C; Power, Deborah M; Elgar, Greg; Clark, Melody S

    2003-06-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor receptor (CRF) is a member of the secretin family of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. These are characterised by the presence of seven transmembrane domains and six conserved cysteines that are important for receptor conformation and ligand binding. IN vertebrates two CRF receptors (CRF1 and CRF2) have been isolated and characterised. In this study the complete structure of the CRF1 receptor was isolated and partially characterised for the first time in a vertebrate using the compact genome of the Japanese pufferfish, Fugu rubripes as a model. The Fugu CRF1 receptor gene is composed of 14 exons is approximately 27 kb in length. A tissue distribution of this receptor in Fugu reveals that it is expressed mainly in liver, gonads, heart and brain, however, expression in the kidney, gut and gills was also detected. In vertebrates this receptor appears to have a different tissue distribution and its presence in the gills may indicate a new role in osmoregulatory processes.

  5. Differential stress-induced alterations of colonic corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in the Wistar Kyoto rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    o'malley, D; Julio-Pieper, M; Gibney, S M; Gosselin, R D; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2010-03-01

    BACKGROUND A growing body of data implicates increased life stresses with the initiation, persistence and severity of symptoms associated with functional gut disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Activation of central and peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors is key to stress-induced changes in gastrointestinal (GI) function. METHODS This study utilised immunofluorescent and Western blotting techniques to investigate colonic expression of CRF receptors in stress-sensitive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and control Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. KEY RESULTS No intra-strain differences were observed in the numbers of colonic CRFR1 and CRFR2 positive cells. Protein expression of functional CRFR1 was found to be comparable in control proximal and distal colon samples. Sham levels of CRFR1 were also similar in the proximal colon but significantly higher in WKY distal colons (SD: 0.38 +/- 0.14, WKY: 2.06 +/- 0.52, P CRF receptor expression and further support a role for local colonic CRF signalling in stress-induced changes in GI function.

  6. The hypothalamo-hypophyseal system of the white seabream Diplodus sargus: immunocytochemical identification of arginine-vasotocin, isotocin, melanin-concentrating hormone and corticotropin-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, G; Segura-Noguera, M M; Martín del Río, M P; Mancera, J M

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of the neurosecretory hormones vasotocin, isotocin and melanin-concentrating hormone and the hypophysiotropic hormone corticotropin-releasing factor was studied in the hypothalamo-hypophyseal system of the white seabream (Diplodus sargus) using immunocytochemical techniques. Magnocellular and parvocellular perikarya immunoreactive for arginine-vasotocin and isotocin were present in the nucleus preopticus. Perikarya immunoreactive for arginine-vasotocin extended more caudally with respect to isotocin-immunoreactive perikarya. Parvocellular perikarya were located at rostroventral levels and magnocellular perikarya in the dorsocaudal portion of the nucleus. Arginine-vasotocin and isotocin did not coexist in the same neuron. Fibres immunoreactive for arginine-vasotocin and isotocin innervated all areas of neurohypophysis and terminate close to corticotropic and melanotropic cells. Perikarya immunoreactive for melanin-concentrating hormone and corticotropin-releasing factor were observed in the nucleus lateralis tuberis, with a few neurons in the nucleus periventricularis posterior. In addition, melanin-concentrating hormone immunoreactive perikarya were detected in the nucleus recessus lateralis. The preoptic nucleus did not show immunoreactivity for these antisera. Fibres showing melanin-concentrating hormone and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity ended close to the melanotropic and somatolactotrophic cells of the pars intermedia, and close to the corticotrophic cells of the rostral pars distalis.

  7. Somatosensory regulation of serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala is mediated via corticotropin releasing factor and gamma-aminobutyric acid in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Ryota; Shimoju, Rie; Shibata, Hideshi; Kurosawa, Mieko

    2016-10-15

    Noxious cutaneous stimulation increases, whereas innocuous cutaneous stimulation decreases serotonin (5-HT) release in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in anesthetized rats. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptors and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) to those responses. Release of 5-HT in the CeA was monitored by microdialysis before and after 10-min stimulation by pinching or stroking. Increased 5-HT release in the CeA in response to pinching was abolished by CRF2 receptor antagonism in the DRN. Decreased 5-HT release in the CeA in response to stroking was abolished by either CRF1 receptor antagonism or GABAA receptor antagonism in the DRN. These results suggest that opposite responses of 5-HT release in the CeA to noxious versus innocuous stimulation of the skin are due to separate contributions of CRF2, CRF1 and GABAA receptors in the DRN.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide induces visceral hypersensitivity: role of interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Tsukasa; Miyagishi, Saori; Nozu, Rintaro; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces visceral hypersensitivity, and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) also modulates visceral sensation. Besides, LPS increases CRF immunoreactivity in rat colon, which raises the possibility of the existence of a link between LPS and the CRF system in modulating visceral sensation. The present study tried to clarify this possibility. Visceral sensation was assessed by abdominal muscle contractions induced by colonic balloon distention, i.e., visceromotor response, electrophysiologically in conscious rats. The threshold of visceromotor response was measured before and after administration of drugs. LPS at a dose of 1 mg/kg subcutaneously (sc) decreased the threshold at 3 h after the administration. Intraperitoneal (ip) administration of anakinra (20 mg/kg), an interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist, or interleukin-6 (IL-6) antibody (16.6 µg/kg) blocked this effect. Additionally, IL-1β (10 µg/kg, sc) or IL-6 (10 µg/kg, sc) induced visceral allodynia. Astressin (200 µg/kg, ip), a non-selective CRF receptor antagonist, abolished the effect of LPS, but astressin2-B (200 µg/kg, ip), a CRF receptor type 2 (CRF2) antagonist, did not alter it. Peripheral CRF receptor type 1 (CRF1) stimulation by cortagine (60 µg/kg, ip) exaggerated the effect of LPS, but activation of CRF2 by urocortin 2 (60 µg/kg, ip) abolished it. LPS induced visceral allodynia possibly through stimulating IL-1 and IL-6 release. In addition, this effect was mediated through peripheral CRF signaling. Since the LPS-cytokine system is thought to contribute to altered visceral sensation in the patients with irritable bowel syndrome, these results may further suggest that CRF plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of this disease.

  9. Effects of corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor antagonism on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Donald R; Cramer, Jeffrey; Morin, S Michelle

    2012-06-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the major hypothalamic neuropeptide responsible for stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA), resulting in the synthesis and release of glucocorticoids from the adrenal cortex. In a recent study, we reported the discovery of the CRF1 receptor antagonist, 3-(4-chloro-2-morpholin-4-yl-thiazol-5-yl)-8-(1-ethylpropyl)-2,6-dimethyl-imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine (MTIP), which has efficacy in preclinical models of stress-induced alcohol consumption. Because CRF1 is important in HPAA activation, we evaluated the effects of MTIP administration on rodent HPAA function. Initial studies established the MTIP doses required for brain and pituitary CRF1 occupancy and those associated with the inhibition of intracerebroventricular CRF on the HPAA in mice. Then, rat basal plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations were measured hourly by radioimmunoassay for 24 h after three daily doses of MTIP or vehicle. In these studies, the early phase of the nocturnal CORT surge was reduced; however, the area under the CORT curve was identical for the 24-h period. In subsequent studies, increases in plasma CORT due to direct pharmacological manipulation of the HPAA axis or by stressors were evaluated after MTIP treatment in mice. MTIP attenuated CORT responses generated by immediate bolus administration of insulin or ethanol; however, MTIP did not affect activation of the HPAA by other stressors and pharmacological agents. Therefore, MTIP can modulate basal HPAA activity during the CORT surge and reduced activation after a select number of stressors but does not produce a lasting suppression of basal CORT. The ability of MTIP to modulate plasma CORT after hyperinsulinemia may provide a surrogate strategy for a target occupancy biomarker.

  10. Corticotropin-releasing factor increases GABA synaptic activity and induces inward current in 5-hydroxytryptamine dorsal raphe neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Lynn G; Freeman-Daniels, Emily; Lemos, Julia C; Nunan, John D; Lamy, Christophe; Akanwa, Adaure; Beck, Sheryl G

    2008-11-26

    Stress-related psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression involve dysfunction of the serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] system. Previous studies have found that the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) inhibits 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in vivo. The goals of the present study were to characterize the CRF receptor subtypes (CRF-R1 and -R2) and cellular mechanisms underlying CRF-5-HT interactions. Visualized whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques in brain slices were used to measure spontaneous or evoked GABA synaptic activity in DRN neurons of rats and CRF effects on these measures. CRF-R1 and -R2-selective agonists were bath applied alone or in combination with receptor-selective antagonists. CRF increased presynaptic GABA release selectively onto 5-HT neurons, an effect mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. CRF increased postsynaptic GABA receptor sensitivity selectively in 5-HT neurons, an effect to which both receptor subtypes contributed. CRF also had direct effects on DRN neurons, eliciting an inward current in 5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R2 receptor and in non-5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. These results indicate that CRF has direct membrane effects on 5-HT DRN neurons as well as indirect effects on GABAergic synaptic transmission that are mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The inhibition of 5-HT DRN neurons by CRF in vivo may therefore be primarily an indirect effect via stimulation of inhibitory GABA synaptic transmission. These results regarding the cellular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction between CRF, 5-HT, and GABA systems could contribute to the development of novel treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  11. Immunolocalization of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 (CRF-R2) in the developing gut of the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola, Lucrezia; Gambarelli, Andrea; Pederzoli, Aurora

    2011-05-01

    Our previous data indicated an important role for adrenocorticotropic (ACTH)-like molecules co-operating with macrophages to control the modifications in body homeostasis during the first period of the life of sea bass (up to 30 days post-hatching) before the lymphoid cells have reached complete maturation. The aim of the study was to determine the immunolocalization of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), which is a very important mediator of stress-related responses. Our data showed that immunostaining for CRF is localized already at 8 days after hatching in nerve fibers of the gastrointestinal tract wall from the pharynx to the anterior gut, when the larvae are still feeding on yolk. This pattern of immunolocalization appeared similar to that in 24-day-old larvae, but at this stage there were also large cells immunopositive to CRF located in the wall of the midgut and hindgut. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, which is a known stimulator of stress hormone responses, did not modify the CRF immunostaining pattern, though it did affect the immunolocalization of the peripheral CRF receptor, i.e. CRF-R2. Immunolocalization of CRF-R2 appeared in nerve fibers of the gut wall in larvae fixed 1h after the end of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. The present results suggest that CRF plays important autocrine and/or paracrine roles in the early immune responses at the gut level in the larval stages of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) as already proposed for ACTH. Moreover, our studies taken together with other research on fish, in comparison with mammals, suggest a phylogenetically old role of CRF in immune-endocrine interactions.

  12. Increased depression-like behaviors in corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2-deficient mice: sexually dichotomous responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Tracy L; Vale, Wylie W

    2003-06-15

    Depressive disorders affect nearly 19 million American adults, making depression and the susceptibility for developing depression a critical focus of mental health research today. Females are twice as likely to develop depression as males. Stress is a known risk factor for developing depression, and recent hypotheses suggest an involvement of an overactive stress axis. As mediators of the stress response, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and its receptors (CRFR1 and CRFR2) have been implicated in the propensity for developing stress-related mood disorders. Mice deficient in CRFR2 display increased anxiety-like behaviors and a hypersensitive stress response. As a possible animal model of depression, these mice were tested for depression-like behaviors in the forced swim test. Comparisons were made between wild-type and mutant animals, as well as between sexes. Male and female CRFR2-mutant mice showed increased immobility as an indicator of depression compared with wild-type mice of the same sex. In addition, mutant and wild-type female mice demonstrated increased immobile time compared with males of the same genotype. Treatment of CRFR2-deficient mice with the CRFR1 antagonist antalarmin decreased immobile time and increased swim time in both sexes. We found a significant effect of sex for both time spent immobile and swimming after antalarmin treatment. Because differences in behaviors in the forced swim test are good indicators of serotonergic and catecholaminergic involvement, our results may reveal an interaction of CRF pathways with other known antidepressant systems and may also support an involvement of CRF receptors in the development of depression such that elevated CRFR1 activity, in the absence of CRFR2, increases depression-like behaviors.

  13. Traumatic Stress Promotes Hyperalgesia via Corticotropin-Releasing Factor-1 Receptor (CRFR1) Signaling in Central Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoga, Christy A; Roltsch Hellard, Emily A; Whitaker, Annie M; Lu, Yi-Ling; Schreiber, Allyson L; Baynes, Brittni B; Baiamonte, Brandon A; Richardson, Heather N; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2016-09-01

    Hyperalgesia is an exaggerated response to noxious stimuli produced by peripheral or central plasticity. Stress modifies nociception, and humans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit co-morbid chronic pain and amygdala dysregulation. Predator odor stress produces hyperalgesia in rodents. Systemic blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 1 receptors (CRFR1s) reduces stress-induced thermal hyperalgesia. We hypothesized that CRF-CRFR1 signaling in central amygdala (CeA) mediates stress-induced hyperalgesia in rats with high stress reactivity. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to predator odor stress in a conditioned place avoidance paradigm and indexed for high (Avoiders) and low (Non-Avoiders) avoidance of predator odor-paired context, or were unstressed Controls. Rats were tested for the latency to withdraw hindpaws from thermal stimuli (Hargreaves test). We used pharmacological, molecular, and immunohistochemical techniques to assess the role of CRF-CRFR1 signaling in CeA in stress-induced hyperalgesia. Avoiders exhibited higher CRF peptide levels in CeA that did not appear to be locally synthesized. Intra-CeA CRF infusion mimicked stress-induced hyperalgesia. Avoiders exhibited thermal hyperalgesia that was reversed by systemic or intra-CeA injection of a CRFR1 antagonist. Finally, intra-CeA infusion of tetrodotoxin produced thermal hyperalgesia in unstressed rats and blocked the anti-hyperalgesic effect of systemic CRFR1 antagonist in stressed rats. These data suggest that rats with high stress reactivity exhibit hyperalgesia that is mediated by CRF-CRFR1 signaling in CeA.

  14. Distribution and chemical coding of corticotropin-releasing factor-immunoreactive neurons in the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Na; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Xiyu; Wang, Guo-Du; Fang, Xiucai; Gao, Xiang; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D

    2006-01-01

    Immunofluorescence was used to study immunoreactivity (IR) for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the guinea pig enteric nervous system. CRF-IR was expressed in both the myenteric and the submucosal plexuses of all regions of the large and small intestine and the myenteric plexus of the stomach. CRF-IR nerve fibers were present in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses, in the circular muscle coat, and surrounding submucosal arterioles. Most of the CRF-IR fibers persisted in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses after 7 days in organotypic culture. CRF-IR was not coexpressed with tyrosine hydroxylase-IR or calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR fibers. The proportions of CRF-IR cell bodies in the myenteric plexus increased progressively from the stomach (0.6%) to the distal colon (2.8%). Most of the CRF-IR myenteric neurons (95%) had uniaxonal morphology; the remainder had Dogiel type II multipolar morphology. CRF-IR cell bodies in the myenteric plexus of the ileum expressed IR for choline acetyltransferase (56.9%), substance P (55.0%), and nitric oxide synthase (37.9%). CRF-IR never colocalized with IR for calbindin, calretinin, neuropeptide Y, serotonin, or somatostatin in the myenteric plexus. CRF-IR cell bodies were more abundant in the submucosal plexus (29.9-38.0%) than in the myenteric plexus. All CRF-IR neurons in submucosal ganglia expressed vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR and were likely to be secretomotor/vasodilator neurons. CRF-IR neurons did not express IR for the CRF(1) receptor. CRF(1)-IR was expressed in neuronal neighbors of those with CRF-IR. Collective evidence suggests that VIPergic secretomotor neurons might provide synaptic input to neighboring cholinergic neurons.

  15. Role of Corticotropin Releasing Factor 1 Signaling in Cocaine Seeking during Early Extinction in Female and Male Rats.

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    Angie M Cason

    Full Text Available Locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF neurons are involved in stress responses, including stress's ability to drive drug relapse. Previous animal studies indicate that female rats exhibit greater drug seeking than male rats during initial drug abstinence. Moreover, females are more sensitive to the effect of stress to drive drug seeking than males. Finally, LC-NE neurons are more sensitive to CRF in females compared to males. We hypothesized that increased drug seeking in females on extinction day one (ED1 is due to increased response to the stress of early withdrawal and is dependent upon the increased response of LC in females to CRF. We predicted that LC-NE neurons would exhibit Fos activation on ED1, and that blocking CRF1 signaling would decrease drug seeking on ED1 measured by responding on an active lever previously associated with cocaine self- administration. After chronic cocaine self-administration, female and male rats underwent a test for initial extinction responding by measuring lever pressing in the absence of cocaine. Prior to this Extinction Day 1 (ED1 session, rats were injected with vehicle or the selective CRF1 antagonist (CP to measure effects of CRF antagonism on drug seeking during early abstinence. ED1 increased corticosterone in female rats, in proportion to lever responding in male and female, indicating that ED1 was stressful. Pretreatment with CP decreased cocaine seeking on ED1 more effectively in female compared to male rats. This increase in responding was associated with an increase in activation of LC NE neurons. Together, these findings indicate that stress, and signaling at CRF receptors in LC, may be involved in the increased drug seeking during initial abstinence.

  16. Predator stress engages corticotropin-releasing factor and opioid systems to alter the operating mode of locus coeruleus norepinephrine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Andre L; Leiser, Steven C; Snyder, Kevin; Valentino, Rita J

    2012-03-01

    The norepinephrine nucleus, locus coeruleus (LC), has been implicated in cognitive aspects of the stress response, in part through its regulation by the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). LC neurons discharge in tonic and phasic modes that differentially modulate attention and behavior. Here, the effects of exposure to an ethologically relevant stressor, predator odor, on spontaneous (tonic) and auditory-evoked (phasic) LC discharge were characterized in unanesthetized rats. Similar to the effects of CRF, stressor presentation increased tonic LC discharge and decreased phasic auditory-evoked discharge, thereby decreasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensory response. This stress-induced shift in LC discharge toward a high tonic mode was prevented by a CRF antagonist. Moreover, CRF antagonism during stress unmasked a large decrease in tonic discharge rate that was opioid mediated because it was prevented by pretreatment with the opiate antagonist, naloxone. Elimination of both CRF and opioid influences with an antagonist combination rendered LC activity unaffected by the stressor. These results demonstrate that both CRF and opioid afferents are engaged during stress to fine-tune LC activity. The predominant CRF influence shifts the operational mode of LC activity toward a high tonic state that is thought to facilitate behavioral flexibility and may be adaptive in coping with the stressor. Simultaneously, stress engages an opposing opioid influence that restrains the CRF influence and may facilitate recovery toward pre-stress levels of activity. Changes in the balance of CRF:opioid regulation of the LC could have consequences for stress vulnerability.

  17. Suppression of piriform cortex activity in rat by corticotropin-releasing factor 1 and serotonin 2A/C receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Chakravarthi; Dunn, Henry A; Ferguson, Stephen S G; Poulter, Michael O

    2015-01-01

    The piriform cortex (PC) is richly innervated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and serotonin (5-HT) containing axons arising from central amygdala and Raphe nucleus. CRFR1 and 5-HT2A/2CRs have been shown to interact in manner where CRFR activation subsequently potentiates the activity of 5-HT2A/2CRs. The purpose of this study was to determine how the activation of CRFR1 and/or 5-HT2Rs modulates PC activity at both the circuit and cellular level. Voltage sensitive dye imaging showed that CRF acting through CRFR1 dampened activation of the Layer II of PC and interneurons of endopiriform nucleus. Application of the selective 5-HT2A/CR agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) following CRFR1 activation potentiated this effect. Blocking the interaction between CRFR1 and 5-HT2R with a Tat-CRFR1-CT peptide abolished this potentiation. Application of forskolin did not mimic CRFR1 activity but instead blocked it, while a protein kinase A antagonist had no effect. However, activation and antagonism of protein kinase C (PKC) either mimicked or blocked CRF modulation, respectively. DOI had no effect when applied alone indicating that the prior activation of CRFR1 receptors was critical for DOI to show significant effects similar to CRF. Patch clamp recordings showed that both CRF and DOI reduced the synaptic responsiveness of Layer II pyramidal neurons. CRF had highly variable effects on interneurons within Layer III, both increasing and decreasing their excitability, but DOI had no effect on the excitability of this group of neurons. These data show that CRF and 5-HT, acting through both CRFR1 and 5-HT2A/CRs, reduce the activation of the PC. This modulation may be an important blunting mechanism of stressor behaviors mediated through the olfactory cortex.

  18. Role of Corticotropin-releasing Factor Signaling in Stress-related Alterations of Colonic Motility and Hyperalgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Yvette; Million, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling systems encompass CRF and the structurally related peptide urocortin (Ucn) 1, 2, and 3 along with 2 G-protein coupled receptors, CRF1 and CRF2. CRF binds with high and moderate affinity to CRF1 and CRF2 receptors, respectively while Ucn1 is a high-affinity agonist at both receptors, and Ucn2 and Ucn3 are selective CRF2 agonists. The CRF systems are expressed in both the brain and the colon at the gene and protein levels. Experimental studies established that the activation of CRF1 pathway in the brain or the colon recaptures cardinal features of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (stimulation of colonic motility, activation of mast cells and serotonin, defecation/watery diarrhea, and visceral hyperalgesia). Conversely, selective CRF1 antagonists or CRF1/CRF2 antagonists, abolished or reduced exogenous CRF and stress-induced stimulation of colonic motility, defecation, diarrhea and colonic mast cell activation and visceral hyperalgesia to colorectal distention. By contrast, the CRF2 signaling in the colon dampened the CRF1 mediated stimulation of colonic motor function and visceral hyperalgesia. These data provide a conceptual framework that sustained activation of the CRF1 system at central and/or peripheral sites may be one of the underlying basis of IBS-diarrhea symptoms. While targeting these mechanisms by CRF1 antagonists provided a relevant novel therapeutic venue, so far these promising preclinical data have not translated into therapeutic use of CRF1 antagonists. Whether the existing or newly developed CRF1 antagonists will progress to therapeutic benefits for stress-sensitive diseases including IBS for a subset of patients is still a work in progress. PMID:25611064

  19. Constitutive Increases in Amygdalar Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Drive an Anxious Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natividad, Luis A; Buczynski, Matthew W; Herman, Melissa A; Kirson, Dean; Oleata, Christopher S; Irimia, Cristina; Polis, Ilham; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Roberto, Marisa; Parsons, Loren H

    2017-10-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mediates anxiogenic responses by activating CRF type 1 (CRF1) receptors in limbic brain regions. Anxiety is further modulated by the endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system that attenuates the synaptic effects of stress. In the amygdala, acute stress activates the enzymatic clearance of the eCB N-arachidonoylethanolamine via fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), although it is unclear whether chronic dysregulation of CRF systems induces maladaptive changes in amygdalar eCB signaling. Here, we used genetically selected Marchigian Sardinian P (msP) rats carrying an innate overexpression of CRF1 receptors to study the role of constitutive upregulation in CRF systems on amygdalar eCB function and persistent anxiety-like effects. We applied behavioral, pharmacological, and biochemical methods to broadly characterize anxiety-like behaviors and amygdalar eCB clearance enzymes in msP versus nonselected Wistar rats. Subsequent studies examined the influence of dysregulated CRF and FAAH systems in altering excitatory transmission in the central amygdala (CeA). msPs display an anxious phenotype accompanied by elevations in amygdalar FAAH activity and reduced dialysate N-arachidonoylethanolamine levels in the CeA. Elevations in CRF-CRF1 signaling dysregulate FAAH activity, and this genotypic difference is normalized with pharmacological blockade of CRF1 receptors. msPs also exhibit elevated baseline glutamatergic transmission in the CeA, and dysregulated CRF-FAAH facilitates stress-induced increases in glutamatergic activity. Treatment with an FAAH inhibitor relieves sensitized glutamatergic responses in msPs and attenuates the anxiety-like phenotype. Pathological anxiety and stress hypersensitivity are driven by constitutive increases in CRF1 signaling that dysregulate N-arachidonoylethanolamine signaling mechanisms and reduce neuronal inhibitory control of CeA glutamatergic synapses. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published

  20. Urocortin 1, urocortin 3/stresscopin, and corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in human adrenal and its disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Saruta, Masayuki; Watanabe, Mika; Nakata, Taisuke; Sasano, Hironobu

    2005-08-01

    Urocortin 1 (Ucn1) and urocortin 3 (Ucn3)/stresscopin are new members of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide family. Ucn1 binds to both CRF type 1 (CRF1) and type 2 receptors (CRF2), whereas Ucn3 is a specific agonist for CRF2. Recently, direct involvement of the locally synthesized CRF family in adrenocortical function has been proposed. We examined in situ expression of Ucn and CRF receptors in nonpathological human adrenal gland and its disorders using immunohistochemistry and mRNA in situ hybridization. Ucn immunoreactivity was localized in the cortex and medulla of nonpathological adrenal glands. Ucn1 immunoreactivity was marked in the medulla, whereas Ucn3 was immunostained mostly in the cortex. Both CRF type 1 and CRF2 were expressed in the cortex, particularly in the zonae fasciculata and reticularis but very weakly or undetectably in the medulla. Immunohistochemistry in serial tissue sections with mirror images revealed that both Ucn3 and CRF2 were colocalized in more than 85% of the adrenocortical cells. mRNA in situ hybridization confirmed these findings above. In fetal adrenals, Ucn and CRF receptors were expressed in both fetal and definitive zones of the cortex. Ucn and CRF receptors were all expressed in the tumor cells of pheochromocytomas, adrenocortical adenomas, and carcinomas, but its positivity was less than that in nonpathological adrenal glands, suggesting that Ucn1, Ucn3, and CRF receptors were down-regulated in these adrenal neoplasms. Ucn1, Ucn3, and CRF receptors are all expressed in human adrenal cortex and medulla and may play important roles in physiological adrenal functions.

  1. Corticotropin-releasing factor antagonist attenuates stress-induced inhibition of seasonal ovarian recrudescence in the lizard Mabuya carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, C B; Yajurvedi, H N

    2002-04-01

    Whether administration of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) antagonist alpha-helical CRF(9-41) (hCRF) prevents stress response of the ovary, the oviduct, the adrenals, and the spleen was studied in the lizard Mabuya carinata. Stressors (handling, chasing, and noise) applied randomly, five times a day, for 1 month to lizards during the recrudescence phase of the ovarian cycle caused a significant increase in mean nuclear diameter of the adrenal cortical cells and a significant reduction in mean number of islands of white pulp in the spleen. These results, albeit indirectly, indicated an activation of the adrenal gland and immune suppression. There was a significant decrease in the mean relative weight of the ovary and the oviduct and in the mean number of oocytes and the primordial follicles compared to those of controls. Furthermore, vitellogenic follicles were absent in the ovary of lizards exposed to stressors in contrast to their presence in controls. However, administration of hCRF to the lizards exposed to stressors (stress + hCRF) resulted in vitellogenesis and follicular growth. The mean relative weight of the ovary and the oviduct and the mean number of oocytes and the primordial follicles in stress + hCRF-treated lizards were significantly higher than those in the lizards exposed to stressors, whereas they did not significantly differ from those of controls. The results indicate that hCRF attenuates stress-induced inhibition of ovarian follicular and oviductal development in M. carinata. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report revealing that CRF antagonist can prevent ovarian stress response in lower vertebrates.

  2. Suppression of piriform cortex activity in rat by corticotropin-releasing factor 1 and serotonin 2A/C receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarthi eNarla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The piriform cortex (PC is richly innervated by Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF and Serotonin (5-HT containing axons arising from central amygdala and Raphe nucleus. CRFR1 and 5-HT2A/2CRs have been shown to interact in manner where CRFR activation subsequently potentiates the activity of 5-HT2A/2CRs. The purpose of this study was to determine how the activation of CRFR1 and/or 5-HT2Rs modulates PC activity at both the circuit and cellular level. Voltage sensitive dye imaging showed that CRF acting through CRFR1 dampened activation of the layer II of PC and interneurons of endopiriform nucleus. Application of the selective 5-HT2A/CR agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI following CRFR1 activation potentiated this effect. Blocking the interaction between CRFR1 and 5-HT2R with a Tat-CRFR1-CT peptide abolished this potentiation. Application of forskolin did not mimic CRFR1 activity but instead blocked it, while a protein kinase A antagonist had no effect. However, activation and antagonism of protein kinase C (PKC either mimicked or blocked CRF modulation respectively. DOI had no effect when applied alone indicating that the prior activation of CRFR1 receptors was critical for DOI to show significant effects similar to CRF. Patch clamp recordings showed that both CRF and DOI reduced the synaptic responsiveness of layer II pyramidal neurons. CRF had highly variable effects on interneurons within layer III, both increasing and decreasing their excitability, but DOI had no effect on the excitability of this group of neurons. These data show that CRF and serotonin, acting through both CRFR1 and 5-HT2A/CRs, reduce the activation of the PC. This modulation may be an important blunting mechanism of stressor behaviours mediated through the olfactory cortex.

  3. Ontogeny of corticotropin-releasing factor effects on locomotion and foraging in the Western spadefoot toad (Spea hammondii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Erica J; Denver, Robert J

    2004-11-01

    We investigated the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and corticosterone (CORT) on foraging and locomotion in Western spadefoot toad (Spea hammondii) tadpoles and juveniles to assess the behavioral functions of these hormones throughout development. We administered intracerebroventricular injections of ovine CRF or CRF receptor antagonist alphahelical CRF((9-41)) to tadpoles and juveniles, and observed behavior within 1.5 h after injection. In both premetamorphic (Gosner stage 33) and prometamorphic (Gosner stages 35-37) tadpoles, CRF injections increased locomotion and decreased foraging. Injections of alphahelical CRF((9-41)) reduced locomotion but did not affect foraging in premetamorphic tadpoles, but dramatically increased foraging in prometamorphic tadpoles compared to both placebo and uninjected controls. Similarly, alphahelical CRF((9-41)) injections stimulated food intake and prey-catching behavior in juveniles. These results suggest that in later-staged amphibians, endogenous CRF secretion modulates feeding by exerting a suppressive effect on appetite. By contrast to the inhibitory effect of CRF, 3-h exposure to CORT (500 nM added to the aquarium water) stimulated foraging in prometamorphic tadpoles. These tadpoles also exhibited a CORT-mediated increase in foraging 6 h after CRF injection, which was associated with elevated whole-body CORT content and blocked by glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist (RU486) injections. Thus, exogenous CRF influences locomotion and foraging in both pre- and prometamorphic tadpoles, but endogenous CRF secretion in relatively unstressed animals does not affect foraging until prometamorphic stages. Furthermore, the opposing actions of CRF and CORT on foraging suggest that they are important regulators of energy balance and food intake in amphibians throughout development.

  4. Chronic stress induces sex-specific alterations in methylation and expression of corticotropin-releasing factor gene in the rat.

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    Linda Sterrenburg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the higher prevalence of depression in women than in men is well known, the neuronal basis of this sex difference is largely elusive. METHODS: Male and female rats were exposed to chronic variable mild stress (CVMS after which immediate early gene products, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF mRNA and peptide, various epigenetic-associated enzymes and DNA methylation of the Crf gene were determined in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, oval (BSTov and fusiform (BSTfu parts of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and central amygdala (CeA. RESULTS: CVMS induced site-specific changes in Crf gene methylation in all brain centers studied in female rats and in the male BST and CeA, whereas the histone acetyltransferase, CREB-binding protein was increased in the female BST and the histone-deacetylase-5 decreased in the male CeA. These changes were accompanied by an increased amount of c-Fos in the PVN, BSTfu and CeA in males, and of FosB in the PVN of both sexes and in the male BSTov and BSTfu. In the PVN, CVMS increased CRF mRNA in males and CRF peptide decreased in females. CONCLUSIONS: The data confirm our hypothesis that chronic stress affects gene expression and CRF transcriptional, translational and secretory activities in the PVN, BSTov, BSTfu and CeA, in a brain center-specific and sex-specific manner. Brain region-specific and sex-specific changes in epigenetic activity and neuronal activation may play, too, an important role in the sex specificity of the stress response and the susceptibility to depression.

  5. Nucleus accumbens corticotropin-releasing factor increases cue-triggered motivation for sucrose reward: paradoxical positive incentive effects in stress?

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    Peciña, Susana; Schulkin, Jay; Berridge, Kent C

    2006-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is typically considered to mediate aversive aspects of stress, fear and anxiety. However, CRF release in the brain is also elicited by natural rewards and incentive cues, raising the possibility that some CRF systems in the brain mediate an independent function of positive incentive motivation, such as amplifying incentive salience. Here we asked whether activation of a limbic CRF subsystem magnifies the increase in positive motivation for reward elicited by incentive cues previously associated with that reward, in a way that might exacerbate cue-triggered binge pursuit of food or other incentives? We assessed the impact of CRF microinjections into the medial shell of nucleus accumbens using a pure incentive version of Pavlovian-Instrumental transfer, a measure specifically sensitive to the incentive salience of reward cues (which it separates from influences of aversive stress, stress reduction, frustration and other traditional explanations for stress-increased behavior). Rats were first trained to press one of two levers to obtain sucrose pellets, and then separately conditioned to associate a Pavlovian cue with free sucrose pellets. On test days, rats received microinjections of vehicle, CRF (250 or 500 ng/0.2 μl) or amphetamine (20 μg/0.2 μl). Lever pressing was assessed in the presence or absence of the Pavlovian cues during a half-hour test. Results Microinjections of the highest dose of CRF (500 ng) or amphetamine (20 μg) selectively enhanced the ability of Pavlovian reward cues to trigger phasic peaks of increased instrumental performance for a sucrose reward, each peak lasting a minute or so before decaying after the cue. Lever pressing was not enhanced by CRF microinjections in the baseline absence of the Pavlovian cue or during the presentation without a cue, showing that the CRF enhancement could not be explained as a result of generalized motor arousal, frustration or stress, or by persistent

  6. Nucleus accumbens corticotropin-releasing factor increases cue-triggered motivation for sucrose reward: paradoxical positive incentive effects in stress?

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    Schulkin Jay

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is typically considered to mediate aversive aspects of stress, fear and anxiety. However, CRF release in the brain is also elicited by natural rewards and incentive cues, raising the possibility that some CRF systems in the brain mediate an independent function of positive incentive motivation, such as amplifying incentive salience. Here we asked whether activation of a limbic CRF subsystem magnifies the increase in positive motivation for reward elicited by incentive cues previously associated with that reward, in a way that might exacerbate cue-triggered binge pursuit of food or other incentives? We assessed the impact of CRF microinjections into the medial shell of nucleus accumbens using a pure incentive version of Pavlovian-Instrumental transfer, a measure specifically sensitive to the incentive salience of reward cues (which it separates from influences of aversive stress, stress reduction, frustration and other traditional explanations for stress-increased behavior. Rats were first trained to press one of two levers to obtain sucrose pellets, and then separately conditioned to associate a Pavlovian cue with free sucrose pellets. On test days, rats received microinjections of vehicle, CRF (250 or 500 ng/0.2 μl or amphetamine (20 μg/0.2 μl. Lever pressing was assessed in the presence or absence of the Pavlovian cues during a half-hour test. Results Microinjections of the highest dose of CRF (500 ng or amphetamine (20 μg selectively enhanced the ability of Pavlovian reward cues to trigger phasic peaks of increased instrumental performance for a sucrose reward, each peak lasting a minute or so before decaying after the cue. Lever pressing was not enhanced by CRF microinjections in the baseline absence of the Pavlovian cue or during the presentation without a cue, showing that the CRF enhancement could not be explained as a result of generalized motor arousal, frustration or stress

  7. Cell-type specific deletion of GABA(A)α1 in corticotropin-releasing factor-containing neurons enhances anxiety and disrupts fear extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Gafford, Georgette M.; Guo, Ji-Dong; Flandreau, Elizabeth I.; Hazra, Rimi; Rainnie, Donald G.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is critical for the endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stressors, and it has been shown to modulate fear and anxiety. The CRF receptor is widely expressed across a variety of cell types, impeding progress toward understanding the contribution of specific CRF-containing neurons to fear dysregulation. We used a unique CRF-Cre driver transgenic mouse line to remove floxed GABA(A)α1 subunits specifically from CRF neurons [CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO]. This...

  8. From Hans Selye’s Discovery of Biological Stress to the Identification of Corticotropin Releasing Factor signaling pathways: Implication in Stress-Related Functional Bowel Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Selye’s pioneer the concept of biological stress in 1936 culminating to the identification of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways by Vale’s group in the last two decades. The characterization of the 41 amino-acid CRF and other peptide members of the mammalian CRF family, urocortin 1, urocortin 2 and urocortin 3, the cloning of CRF1 and CRF2 receptors, which display distinct affinity for CRF ligands, combined with the development of selective CRF receptor antagonists en...

  9. Stress and the gastrointestinal tract III. Stress-related alterations of gut motor function: role of brain corticotropin-releasing factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Y; Martinez, V; Million, M; Wang, L

    2001-02-01

    Alterations of gastrointestinal (GI) motor function are part of the visceral responses to stress. Inhibition of gastric emptying and stimulation of colonic motor function are the commonly encountered patterns induced by various stressors. Activation of brain corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors mediates stress-related inhibition of upper GI and stimulation of lower GI motor function through interaction with different CRF receptor subtypes. CRF subtype 1 receptors are involved in the colonic and anxiogenic responses to stress and may have clinical relevance in the comorbidity of anxiety/depression and irritable bowel syndrome.

  10. Stress-related modulation of inflammation in experimental models of bowel disease and post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome: role of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiank, Cornelia; Taché, Yvette; Larauche, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between gut inflammatory processes and stress is gaining increasing recognition. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-receptor activation in the brain is well established as a key signaling pathway initiating the various components of the stress response including in the viscera. In addition, a local CRF signaling system has been recently established in the gut. This review summarize the present knowledge on mechanisms through which both brain and gut CRF receptors modulate intestinal inflammatory processes and its relevance towards increased inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) activity and post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) susceptibility induced by stress.

  11. Corticotropin-releasing factor in ventromedial prefrontal cortex mediates avoidance of a traumatic stress-paired context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Allyson L; Lu, Yi-Ling; Baynes, Brittni B; Richardson, Heather N; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2017-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects 7.7 million Americans. One diagnostic criterion for PTSD is avoidance of stimuli that are related to the traumatic stress. Using a predator odor stress conditioned place aversion (CPA) model, rats can be divided into groups based on stress reactivity, as measured by avoidance of the odor-paired context. Avoider rats, which show high stress reactivity, exhibit persistent avoidance of stress-paired context and escalated alcohol drinking. Here, we examined the potential role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide that promotes anxiety-like behavior in mediating avoidance and escalated alcohol drinking after stress. CRF is expressed in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The dorsal and ventral sub-regions of the mPFC (dmPFC and vmPFC) have opposing roles in stress reactivity and alcohol drinking. We hypothesized that vmPFC CRF-CRFR1 signaling contributes functionally to stress-induced avoidance and escalated alcohol self-administration. In Experiment 1, adult male Wistar rats were exposed to predator odor stress in a CPA paradigm, indexed for avoidance of odor-paired context, and brains processed for CRF-immunoreactive cell density in vmPFC and dmPFC. Post-stress, Avoiders exhibited higher CRF cell density in vmPFC, but not the dmPFC. In Experiment 2, rats were tested for avoidance of a context repeatedly paired with intra-vmPFC CRF infusions. In Experiment 3, rats were stressed and indexed, then tested for the effects of intra-vmPFC CRFR1 antagonism on avoidance and alcohol self-administration. Intra-vmPFC CRF infusion produced avoidance of a paired context, and intra-vmPFC CRFR1 antagonism reversed avoidance of a stress-paired context, but did not alter post-stress alcohol self-administration. These findings suggest that vmPFC CRF-CRFR1 signaling mediates avoidance of stimuli paired with traumatic stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ethanol produces corticotropin releasing factor receptor-dependent enhancement of spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the mouse central amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Yuval; Fetterly, Tracy L.; Awad, Elias K.; Milano, Elana J.; Usdin, Ted B.; Winder, Danny G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol modulation of Central Amygdala (CeA) neurocircuitry plays a key role in the development of alcoholism via activation of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor system. Previous work has predominantly focused on ethanol/CRF interactions on the CeA GABA circuitry; however our lab recently showed that CRF enhances CeA glutamatergic transmission. Therefore, this study sought to determine if ethanol modulates CeA glutamate transmission via activation of CRF signaling. Methods The effects of ethanol on spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and basal resting membrane potentials were examined via standard electrophysiology methods in adult male C57BL/6J mice. Local ablation of CeA CRF neurons (CRFCeAhDTR) was achieved by targeting the human diphtheria toxin receptor (hDTR) to CeA CRF neurons with an adeno-associated virus. Ablation was quantified post-hoc with confocal microscopy. Genetic targeting of the diphtheria toxin active subunit to CRF neurons (CRFDTA mice) ablated CRF neurons throughout the CNS, as assessed by qRT-PCR quantification of CRF mRNA. Results Acute bath application of ethanol significantly increased sEPSC frequency in a concentration dependent manner in CeA neurons, and this effect was blocked by pretreatment of co-applied CRF receptor 1 and CRF receptor 2 antagonists. In experiments utilizing a CRF-tomato reporter mouse, ethanol did not significantly alter the basal membrane potential of CeA CRF neurons. The ability of ethanol to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was not altered in CRFCeAhDTR mice despite a ~78% reduction in CeA CRF cell counts. The ability of ethanol to enhance CeA sEPSC frequency was also not altered in the CRFDTA mice despite a three-fold reduction in CRF mRNA levels. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that ethanol enhances spontaneous glutamatergic transmission in the CeA via a CRF receptor dependent mechanism. Surprisingly, our data suggest that this action may not require endogenous CRF

  13. Effects of Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF on Sleep and Temperature Following Predictable Controllable and Uncontrollable Stress in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie eWellman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF is a major mediator of central nervous system responses to stressors, including alterations in wakefulness and sleep. However, its role in mediating stress-induced alterations in sleep has not been fully delineated. In this study, we assessed the role of CRF and the non-specific CRF antagonist, astressin (AST, in regulating changes in sleep produced by signaled, escapable shock (SES and signaled inescapable shock (SIS, two stressors that can increase or decrease sleep, respectively. Male BALB/cJ mice were surgically implanted with transmitters (DataSciences ETA10-F20 for recording EEG, activity and core body temperature by telemetry and a cannula for intracerebroventricular microinjections. After baseline (Base sleep recording, mice were presented tones (90 dB, 2 kHz that started 5.0 sec prior to and co-terminated with footshock (0.5 mA; 5.0 sec maximum duration. SES mice (n=9 always received shock but could terminate it by moving to the non-occupied chamber in a shuttlebox. Yoked SIS mice (n=9 were treated identically, but could not alter shock duration. Training with SES or SIS was conducted over two days to stabilize responses. Afterwards, the mice received saline, CRF (0.4 µg (0.42 mM or AST (1.0 µg (1.4 mM prior to SES or SIS. Sleep was analyzed over 20 h post-stress recordings. After administration of saline, REM was significantly greater in SES mice than in SIS mice whereas after CRF or AST, REM was similar in both groups. Total 20 h NREM did not vary across condition or group. However, after administration of saline and CRF, NREM episode duration was significantly decreased, and NREM episode number significantly increased, in SIS mice compared to SES animals. SES and SIS mice showed similar stress induced hyperthermia (SIH across all conditions. These data demonstrate that CRF can mediate stress-induced changes in sleep independently of SIH, an index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation.

  14. Effect of angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid on corticotropin releasing factor (CRF-induced ACTH release in pituitary cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami,Kazuharu

    1984-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid on CRF-induced ACTH release were examined using rat anterior pituitary cells in monolayer culture. Synthetic ovine CRF induced a significant ACTH release in this system. Angiotensin II produced an additive effect on CRF-induced ACTH release. The ACTH releasing activity of CRF was potentiated by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Dopamine itself at 0.03-30 ng/ml did not show any significant effect on ACTH release, but it inhibited CRF-induced ACTH release. Corticosterone at 10(-7 and 10(-6M inhibited CRF-induced ACTH release. These results indicate that angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid modulate ACTH release at the pituitary level.

  15. Dopamine D2 receptor desensitization by dopamine or corticotropin releasing factor in ventral tegmental area neurons is associated with increased glutamate release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Herman, Melissa; You, Chang; Arora, Devinder S; McElvain, Maureen A; Roberto, Marisa; Brodie, Mark S

    2014-07-01

    Neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are the source of dopaminergic (DAergic) input to important brain regions related to addiction. Prolonged exposure of these VTA neurons to moderate concentrations of dopamine (DA) causes a time-dependent decrease in DA-induced inhibition, a complex desensitization called DA inhibition reversal (DIR). DIR is mediated by conventional protein kinase C (cPKC) through concurrent stimulation of D2 and D1-like DA receptors, or by D2 stimulation concurrent with activation of some Gq-linked receptors. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) acts via Gq, and can modulate glutamater neurotransmission in the VTA. In the present study, we used brain slice electrophysiology to characterize the interaction of DA, glutamate antagonists, and CRF agonists in the induction and maintenance of DIR in the VTA. Glutamate receptor antagonists blocked induction but not maintenance of DIR. Putative blockers of neurotransmitter release and store-operated calcium channels blocked and reversed DIR. CRF and the CRF agonist urocortin reversed inhibition produced by the D2 agonist quinpirole, consistent with our earlier work indicating that Gq activation reverses quinpirole-mediated inhibition. In whole cell recordings, the combination of urocortin and quinpirole, but not either agent alone, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in VTA neurons. Likewise, the combination of a D1-like receptor agonist and quinpirole, but not either agent alone, increased sEPSCs in VTA neurons. In summary, desensitization of D2 receptors induced by dopamine or CRF on DAergic VTA neurons is associated with increased glutamatergic signaling in the VTA.

  16. Acute stress modulates the histamine content of mast cells in the gastrointestinal tract through interleukin-1 and corticotropin-releasing factor release in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eutamene, Helene; Theodorou, Vassilia; Fioramonti, Jean; Bueno, Lionel

    2003-12-15

    Stress results in activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and affects illnesses such as neuroinflammatory syndrome. In vivo acute stress (restraint stress) induces gastrointestinal function disturbances through colonic mast cell activation. This study investigated the effect of acute stress in histamine content of colonic mast cells, and the central role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in this effect. After a restraint stress session colonic segments were isolated and submitted to three protocols: (i) determination of histamine levels by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after incubation with 48/80 compound, (ii) evaluation by histology of mucosal mast cell (MMC) number and (iii) determination of histamine immunoreactivity of MMC. These procedures were conducted (1) in sham or stressed rats, (2) in stressed rats previously treated with intracerebroventricular (I.C.V.) IL-1ra or alpha-helical CRF9-41, (3) in naive rats pretreated with I.C.V. rhIL-1beta or CRF and (4) in rats treated with central IL-1beta and CRF plus alpha-helical CRF and IL-1ra, respectively (cross-antagonism reaction). Acute stress increases histamine content in colonic mast cells, without degranulation. I.C.V. pretreatment with IL-1ra or alpha-helical CRF9-41 blocked stress-induced mast cell histamine content increase. Both I.C.V. rhIL-1beta and CRF injections reproduced the stress-linked changes. I.C.V. treatment with CRF antagonist blocked I.C.V. rhIL-1beta-induced mast cell histamine content increase, whereas central IL-1ra did not affect stress events induced by I.C.V. CRF administration. These results suggest that in rats acute stress increases colonic mast cell histamine content. This effect is mediated by the release in cascade in the brain first of IL-1 and secondly of CRF.

  17. [Role of the Periaqueductal Gray Matter of the Midbrain in Regulation of Somatic Pain Sensitivity During Stress: Participation of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor and Glucocorticoid Hormones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarushkina, N I; Filaretova, L P

    2015-01-01

    Periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain (PAGM) plays a crucial role in the regulation of pain sensitivity under stress, involving in the stress-induced analgesia. A key hormonal system of adaptation under stress is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. HPA axis's hormones, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and glucocorticoids, are involved in stress-induced analgesia. Exogenous hormones of the HPA axis, similarly to the hormones produced under stress, may cause an analgesic effect. CRF-induced analgesia may be provided by glucocorticoid hormones. CRF and glucocorticoids-induced effects on somatic pain sensitivity may be mediated by PAGM. The aim of the review was to analyze the data of literature on the role of PAGM in the regulation of somatic pain sensitivity under stress and in providing of CRF and glucocorticoid-induced analgesia.

  18. Contents of corticotropin-releasing hormone and arginine vasopressin immunoreativity in the spleen and thymus during a chronic inflammatory stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chowdrey, H.S.; Lightman, S.L.; Harbuz, M.S.;

    1994-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone, spleen, thymus, immune system, stress, arthritis, arginine vasopressin......Corticotropin-releasing hormone, spleen, thymus, immune system, stress, arthritis, arginine vasopressin...

  19. 促肾上腺皮质激素释放因子与肠易激综合征%Corticotropin-releasing factor and irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常敏; 方秀才

    2011-01-01

    肠易激综合征( IBS)是一种个体特异性、多病因的异质性疾病,其发病和患者的精神状态、社会环境、生活应激等多种心理社会因素密切相关.促肾上腺皮质激素释放因子(CRF)是一种介导下丘脑-垂体-肾上腺(HPA)轴对应激反应的关键调节肽,参与脑-肠轴互动,通过影响胃肠道动力、内脏高敏感和肠道感染等参与IBS的发病.%Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a heterogeneous disease. The occurrence of IBS is related to patient's mental status, social environment, life stress events and the other psychosocial factors. Corticotropin-releasing factor (GRF) is a key regulatory peptide in mediating the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis' response to stress and involves in the brain-gut axis interactions. CRF might be involved in IBS pathogenesis by altering gastrointestinal motility, visceral sensitivity, and the inflammation in the bowel.

  20. CRF及其受体在胃肠疾病中的研究进展%Corticotropin-releasing factor and its receptor in gastrointestinal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宝庆; 白光

    2008-01-01

    促肾上腺皮质激素释放因子(crticotropin releasing factor,CRF)是一种重要的神经内分泌肽.CRF在体内分布广泛,主要作用为促进腺垂体合成与释放促肾上腺皮质激素,与内分泌、神经化学、行为等多种生理反应有关,广泛参与消化管生理和病理活动的调控.CRF引起胃肠动力功能改变最常见的类型是胃排空延迟、延缓小肠蠕动及结肠运转加快.CRF通过CRFR2作用抑制胃排空,而刺激结肠动力是通过CRFRI调节的.CRF受体拮抗剂的研发为治疗应激相关胃肠疾病可能开辟新方向.%Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)is a neuroendoerine peptide that stimulates the synthesis and release of adrenecortieotropic hormone from the pituitary. CRF widely distributed in the body has been implicated in the regulation of endocrine, neural, behavioral responses and has relevance in the the physio- logical effects and pathophysiology of gut. The delayed gastric emptying, inhibited small intestinal transit and stimulated colonic transit are the most common responses evoked by CRF. CRF delay gastric emptying by ac- tivating CRF2 receptor while the stimulation of colonic motility is mediated by the activation of CRF1 recep- tor. Development of antagonists of CRF receptor may treat a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of stress- related gastrointestinal disease.

  1. HPA axis dysregulation in mice overexpressing corticotropin releasing hormone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenink, L.; Dirks, A.; Verdouw, P.M.; Schipholt, M.; Veening, J.G.; Gugten, J. van der; Olivier, B.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the brain has been implicated in stress-related human pathologies. We developed a transgenic mouse line overexpressing CRH (CRH-OE) exclusively in neural tissues to assess the effect of long-term CRH overproduction on regulation

  2. Regional difference in corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity in mossy fiber terminals innervating calretinin-immunoreactive unipolar brush cells in vestibulocerebellum of rolling mouse Nagoya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masahiro; Sawada, Kazuhiko; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Jeong, Young-Gil; Takeda, Noriaki; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2005-11-23

    Unipolar brush cells (UBCs), a class of interneurons in the vestibulocerebellum, play roles in amplifying excitatory inputs from vestibulocerebellar mossy fibers. This study aimed to clarify whether corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-positive mossy fiber innervation of calretinin (CR)-positive UBCs was altered in rolling mouse Nagoya (RMN). The distribution and the number of CR-positive UBCs in the vestibulocerebellum were not different between RMN and control mice. Double immunofluorescence revealed that some CRF-positive mossy fiber terminals were in close apposition to CR-positive UBCs. In the lobule X of vermis, such mossy fiber terminals were about 5-fold greater in number in RMN than in controls. In contrast, the number of CRF-positive mossy fiber terminals adjoining CR-positive UBCs in the flocculus was not significantly different between RMN and controls. The results suggest increased number of CRF-positive mossy fiber terminals innervating CR-positive UBCs in the lobule X but not in the flocculus of RMN. CRF may alter CR-positive UBC-mediated excitatory pathways in the lobule X of RMN and may disturb functions of the lobule X such as cerebellar adaptation for linear motion of the head.

  3. Emerging role for corticotropin releasing factor signaling in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis at the intersection of stress and reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2013-01-01

    Stress and anxiety play an important role in the development and maintenance of drug and alcohol addiction. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a brain region involved in the production of long-term stress-related behaviors, plays an important role in animal models of relapse, such as reinstatement to previously extinguished drug-seeking behaviors. While a number of neurotransmitter systems have been suggested to play a role in these behaviors, recent evidence points to the neuropeptide corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) as being critically important in BNST-mediated reinstatement behaviors. Although numerous studies indicate that the BNST is a complex brain region with multiple afferent and efferent systems and a variety of cell types, there has only been limited work to determine how CRF modulates this complex neuronal system at the circuit level. Recent work from our lab and others have begun to unravel these BNST neurocircuits and explore their roles in CRF-related reinstatement behaviors. This review will examine the role of CRF signaling in drug addiction and reinstatement with an emphasis on critical neurocircuitry within the BNST that may offer new insights into treatments for addiction.

  4. Effects of corticotropin releasing factor on spontaneous burst activity in the piriform-amygdala complex of in vitro brain preparations from newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Tomoko; Onimaru, Hiroshi; Homma, Ikuo

    2011-10-01

    The amygdala is an important higher regulatory center of the autonomic nervous system, involved in respiratory and cardiovascular control, and it also plays a role in the formation of emotions. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a neuropeptide involved in stress responses. We have examined the effects of CRF on the spontaneous burst activity in the piriform-amygdala complex of rat brain preparations in vitro. Limbic-brainstem-spinal cord preparations of 0- to 1-day-old Wistar rats were isolated under deep ether anesthesia, and were superperfused in a modified Krebs solution. Bath application of 50nM CRF substantially increased the frequency of burst activity in the piriform-amygdala complex, whereas this polypeptide exerted only minor effects on C4 inspiratory activity. The excitatory effect of CRF on the amygdala burst was effectively blocked by the CRF1 antagonist, antalarmin, but not the CRF2 antagonist, astressin-2B, suggesting that CRF1 mediated the excitatory effect. The spatio-temporal pattern of the burst activity according to optical recordings was basically identical to the controls; the burst activity initially appeared in the piriform cortex and then propagated to the amygdala. The present experimental model could be useful for the study of role of the limbic system, including the amygdala, in stress responses.

  5. Comparative Immunohistochemistry of Placental Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone and the Transcription Factor RelB-NFκB2 Between Humans and Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Todd; Schulkin, Jay; Power, Michael; Tadesse, Serkalem; Norwitz, Errol R; Wen, Zhaoqin; Wang, Bingbing

    2015-04-01

    The transcription factor RelB-NFκB2, activated by the noncanonical NFκB pathway, positively regulates corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and prostaglandin production in the term human placenta and may play an important role in the timing of human parturition. Here we explored whether RelB-NFκB2 signaling plays a role in parturition in nonhuman anthropoid primates. We performed immunohistochemical staining to assess the correlation between CRH and nuclear activity of RelB-NFκB2 heterodimers in term placentas from humans, 3 catarrhine primate species, and a single platyrrhine primate species. Consistent with our previous studies, the human placenta showed cytoplasmic staining for CRH and nuclear staining for RelB-NFκB2. Similar staining patterns were noted in the 3 catarrhine primates (chimpanzee, baboon, and rhesus macaque). The platyrrhine (marmoset) placentas stained positively for CRH and RelB but not for NFκB2. Catarrhine (but not platyrrhine) nonhuman primate term placentas demonstrate the same CRH staining and nuclear localization patterns of RelB and NFκB2 as does human placenta. These results suggest that catarrhine primates, particularly rhesus macaques, may serve as useful animal models to study the biologic significance of the noncanonical NFκB pathway in human pregnancy.

  6. Repeated intravenous administrations of teneurin-C terminal associated peptide (TCAP)-1 attenuates reinstatement of cocaine seeking by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Suzanne; McPhee, Matthew; Brown, Zenya J; Kupferschmidt, David A; Song, Lifang; Lovejoy, David A

    2014-08-01

    The teneurin c-terminal associated peptides (TCAP) have been implicated in the regulation of the stress response, possibly via a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-related mechanism. We have previously shown that repeated intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of TCAP-1 attenuate the reinstatement of cocaine seeking by CRF in rats. Here, we determined whether intravenous (IV) administrations of TCAP-1 would likewise attenuate CRF-induced reinstatement, and whether this effect would vary depending on the rat's history of cocaine self administration. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine for 10 days, during once daily sessions that were either 3h ("short access"; ShA) or 6h ("long access"; LgA). Rats were then given five daily injections of TCAP-1 (0, 300, or 3,000 pmol, IV) in their home cage. Subsequently, they were returned to the self-administration chambers where extinction of cocaine seeking and testing for CRF-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking was carried out. Repeated IV administrations of TCAP-1 were efficacious in attenuating CRF-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, but at different doses in ShA and LgA rats. Taken together, the findings extend previous work showing a consistent effect of repeated ICV TCAP-1 on CRF-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, and point to a potential therapeutic benefit of TCAP-1 in attenuating cocaine seeking behaviors.

  7. Galanin is Co-Expressed with Substance P, Calbindin and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) in The Enteric Nervous System of the Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czujkowska, A; Arciszewski, M B

    2016-04-01

    Galanin is a neuropeptide widely present in the enteric nervous system of numerous animal species and exhibiting neurotransmittery/neuromodulatory roles. Colocalization patterns of galanin with substance P (SP), corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and calbindin were studied in the small intestine of the wild boar using immunofluorescence technique. We demonstrated the presence of SP in substantial populations of galanin-immunoreactive (IR) submucous neurons. Additionally, different amounts of nerve fibres exhibiting simultaneous presence of galanin and SP were noted in the small intestinal smooth musculature, submucous ganglia, lamina muscularis mucosae and mucosa. In the wild boar duodenum, jejunum and ileum, the co-expression of galanin and calbindin was limited to minor populations of submucous neurons only. Single galanin-/CRF-IR nerve fibres were exclusively present in the duodenal and jejunal (but not ileal) mucosa. These results strongly suggest that galanin participates in neuronal control of the wild boar small intestine also by functional co-operation with other biologically active neuropeptides.

  8. Interactions Between Anandamide and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Signaling Modulate Human Amygdala Function and Risk for Anxiety Disorders: An Imaging Genetics Strategy for Modeling Molecular Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Catherine H; Drabant Conley, Emily; Bogdan, Ryan; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical models reveal that stress-induced amygdala activity and impairment in fear extinction reflect reductions in anandamide driven by corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRF1) potentiation of the anandamide catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase. Here, we provide clinical translation for the importance of these molecular interactions using an imaging genetics strategy to examine whether interactions between genetic polymorphisms associated with differential anandamide (FAAH rs324420) and CRF1 (CRHR1 rs110402) signaling modulate amygdala function and anxiety disorder diagnosis. Analyses revealed that individuals with a genetic background predicting relatively high anandamide and CRF1 signaling exhibited blunted basolateral amygdala habituation, which further mediated increased risk for anxiety disorders among these same individuals. The convergence of preclinical and clinical data suggests that interactions between anandamide and CRF1 represent a fundamental molecular mechanism regulating amygdala function and anxiety. Our results further highlight the potential of imaging genetics to powerfully translate complex preclinical findings to clinically meaningful human phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. From Hans Selye's discovery of biological stress to the identification of corticotropin-releasing factor signaling pathways: implication in stress-related functional bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Yvette; Brunnhuber, Stefan

    2008-12-01

    Selye pioneered the concept of biological stress in 1936, culminating in the identification of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways by Vale's group in the last two decades. The characterization of the 41 amino-acid CRF and other peptide members of the mammalian CRF family, urocortin 1, urocortin 2, and urocortin 3, and the cloning of CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors, which display distinct affinity for CRF ligands, combined with the development of selective CRF receptor antagonists enable us to unravel the importance of CRF(1) receptor in the stress-related endocrine (activation of pituitary-adrenal axis), behavioral (anxiety/depression, altered feeding), autonomic (activation of sympathetic nervous system), and immune responses. The activation of CRF(1) receptors is also one of the key mechanisms through which various stressors impact the gut to stimulate colonic propulsive motor function and to induce hypersensitivity to colorectal distension as shown by the efficacy of the CRF(1) receptor antagonists in blunting these stress-related components. The importance of CRF(1) signaling pathway in the visceral response to stress in experimental animals provided new therapeutic approaches for treatment of functional bowel disorder such as irritable bowel syndrome, a multifactor functional disorder characterized by altered bowel habits and visceral pain, for which stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology and is associated with anxiety-depression in a subset of patients.

  10. [Effect of corticotropin releasing factor(CRF) on somatic pain sensitivity in conscious rats: involvement of CRF1 and CRF2 receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarushkina, N I; Bagaeva, T R; Filaretova, L P

    2014-11-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is involved in the regulation of pain sensitivity and can cause an analgesic effect in animals and humans. The aim of the study was to investigate the involvement of CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in CRF-induced analgesic effect (after intraperitoneal injection) on somatic pain sensitivity in conscious rats. Somatic pain sensitivity was tested by tail flick latency (tail flick test). The involvement of CRF1 and CRF2 receptors was studied by their selective antagonists NBI 27914 and astressin 2B, respectively. Systemic administration of CRF caused an increase in tail flick latency (analgesic effect). Pretreatment with NBI 27914 or astressin 2B eliminated CRF-induced analgesic effect. Besides, NBI 27914, but not astressin 2B, increased basal tail flick latency. The data obtained indicate that the analgesic effect can be mediated by both CRF1 and CRF2 receptors. CRF-1 receptor, in contrast to the CRF2 receptors, may be involved in the regulation of the basal level of pain sensitivity.

  11. Enduring, Handling-Evoked Enhancement of Hippocampal Memory Function and Glucocorticoid Receptor Expression Involves Activation of the Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Type 1 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoglio, Kristina A.; Brunson, Kristen L.; Avishai-Eliner, Sarit; Stone, Blake A.; Kapadia, Bhumika J.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2011-01-01

    Early-life experience, including maternal care, influences hippocampus-dependent learning and memory throughout life. Handling of pups during postnatal d 2–9 (P2–9) stimulates maternal care and leads to improved memory function and stress-coping. The underlying molecular mechanisms may involve early (by P9) and enduring reduction of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) expression and subsequent (by P45) increase in hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. However, whether hypothalamic CRF levels influence changes in hippocampal GR expression (and memory function), via reduced CRF receptor activation and consequent lower plasma glucocorticoid levels, is unclear. In this study we administered selective antagonist for the type 1 CRF receptor, NBI 30775, to nonhandled rats post hoc from P10–17 and examined hippocampus-dependent learning and memory later (on P50–70), using two independent paradigms, compared with naive and vehicle-treated nonhandled, and naive and antagonist-treated handled rats. Hippocampal GR and hypothalamic CRF mRNA levels and stress-induced plasma corticosterone levels were also examined. Transient, partial selective blockade of CRF1 in nonhandled rats improved memory functions on both the Morris watermaze and object recognition tests to levels significantly better than in naive and vehicle-treated controls and were indistinguishable from those in handled (naive, vehicle-treated, and antagonist-treated) rats. GR mRNA expression was increased in hippocampal CA1 and the dentate gyrus of CRF1-antagonist treated nonhandled rats to levels commensurate with those in handled cohorts. Thus, the extent of CRF1 activation, probably involving changes in hypothalamic CRF levels and release, contributes to the changes in hippocampal GR expression and learning and memory functions. PMID:15932935

  12. A corticotropin releasing factor pathway for ethanol regulation of the ventral tegmental area in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Yuval; Matthews, Robert T; Winder, Danny G

    2013-01-16

    A growing literature suggests that catecholamines and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) interact in a serial manner to activate the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) to drive stress- or cue-induced drug- and alcohol-seeking behaviors. Data suggest that these behaviors are driven in part by BNST projections to the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Together, these findings suggest the existence of a CRF-signaling pathway within the BNST that is engaged by catecholamines and regulates the activity of BNST neurons projecting to the VTA. Here we test three aspects of this model to determine: (1) whether catecholamines modify CRF neuron activity in the BNST; (2) whether CRF regulates excitatory drive onto VTA-projecting BNST neurons; and (3) whether this system is altered by ethanol exposure and withdrawal. A CRF neuron fluorescent reporter strategy was used to identify BNST CRF neurons for whole-cell patch-clamp analysis in acutely prepared slices. Using this approach, we found that both dopamine and isoproterenol significantly depolarized BNST CRF neurons. Furthermore, using a fluorescent microsphere-based identification strategy we found that CRF enhances the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs onto VTA-projecting BNST neurons in naive mice. This action of CRF was occluded during acute withdrawal from chronic intermittent ethanol exposure. These findings suggest that dopamine and isoproterenol may enhance CRF release from local BNST sources, leading to enhancement of excitatory neurotransmission on VTA-projecting neurons, and that this pathway is engaged by patterns of alcohol exposure and withdrawal known to drive excessive alcohol intake.

  13. Opposing roles of corticotropin-releasing factor and neuropeptide Y within the dorsolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in the negative affective component of pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Soichiro; Hara, Taiki; Ohno, Atsushi; Tamano, Ryuta; Koseki, Kana; Naka, Tomonori; Maruyama, Chikashi; Kaneda, Katsuyuki; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro; Minami, Masabumi

    2013-04-01

    Pain is a complex experience composed of sensory and affective components. Although the neural systems of the sensory component of pain have been studied extensively, those of its affective component remain to be determined. In the present study, we examined the effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) injected into the dorsolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dlBNST) on pain-induced aversion and nociceptive behaviors in rats to examine the roles of these peptides in affective and sensory components of pain, respectively. In vivo microdialysis showed that formalin-evoked pain enhanced the release of CRF in this brain region. Using a conditioned place aversion (CPA) test, we found that intra-dlBNST injection of a CRF1 or CRF2 receptor antagonist suppressed pain-induced aversion. Intra-dlBNST CRF injection induced CPA even in the absence of pain stimulation. On the other hand, intra-dlBNST NPY injection suppressed pain-induced aversion. Coadministration of NPY inhibited CRF-induced CPA. This inhibitory effect of NPY was blocked by coadministration of a Y1 or Y5 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in dlBNST slices revealed that CRF increased neuronal excitability specifically in type II dlBNST neurons, whereas NPY decreased it in these neurons. Excitatory effects of CRF on type II dlBNST neurons were suppressed by NPY. These results have uncovered some of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the affective component of pain by showing opposing roles of intra-dlBNST CRF and NPY in pain-induced aversion and opposing actions of these peptides on neuronal excitability converging on the same target, type II neurons, within the dlBNST.

  14. Corticotropin-releasing factor-overexpressing mice exhibit reduced neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus and food intake in response to fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Million, Mulugeta; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Kobelt, Peter; Mönnikes, Hubert; Taché, Yvette; Wang, Lixin

    2009-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model that exhibits features of chronic stress. We investigated whether the adaptive feeding response to a hypocaloric challenge induced by food deprivation is impaired under conditions of chronic CRF overproduction. Food intake response to a 16-h overnight fast and ip injection of gut hormones regulating food intake were compared in CRF-OE and wild type (WT) littermate mice along with brain Fos expression, circulating ghrelin levels, and gastric emptying of a nonnutrient meal. CRF-OE mice injected ip with saline showed a 47 and 44% reduction of 30-min and 4-h cumulative food intake response to an overnight fast, respectively, compared with WT. However, the 30-min food intake decrease induced by ip cholecystokinin (3 microg/kg) and increase by ghrelin (300 microg/kg) were similar in CRF-OE and WT mice. Overnight fasting increased the plasma total ghrelin to similar levels in CRF-OE and WT mice, although CRF-OE mice had a 2-fold reduction of nonfasting ghrelin levels. The number of Fos-immunoreactive cells induced by fasting in the arcuate nucleus was reduced by 5.9-fold in CRF-OE compared with WT mice whereas no significant changes were observed in other hypothalamic nuclei. In contrast, fasted CRF-OE mice displayed a 5.6-fold increase in Fos-immunoreactive cell number in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve and a 34% increase in 20-min gastric emptying. These findings indicate that sustained overproduction of hypothalamic CRF in mice interferes with fasting-induced activation of arcuate nucleus neurons and the related hyperphagic response.

  15. Cell-type specific deletion of GABA(A)α1 in corticotropin-releasing factor-containing neurons enhances anxiety and disrupts fear extinction.

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    Gafford, Georgette M; Guo, Ji-Dong; Flandreau, Elizabeth I; Hazra, Rimi; Rainnie, Donald G; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-10-02

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is critical for the endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stressors, and it has been shown to modulate fear and anxiety. The CRF receptor is widely expressed across a variety of cell types, impeding progress toward understanding the contribution of specific CRF-containing neurons to fear dysregulation. We used a unique CRF-Cre driver transgenic mouse line to remove floxed GABA(A)α1 subunits specifically from CRF neurons [CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO]. This process resulted in mice with decreased GABA(A)α1 expression only in CRF neurons and increased CRF mRNA within the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These mice show normal locomotor and pain responses and no difference in depressive-like behavior or Pavlovian fear conditioning. However, CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO increased anxiety-like behavior and impaired extinction of conditioned fear, coincident with an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. These behavioral impairments were rescued with systemic or BNST infusion of the CRF antagonist R121919. Infusion of Zolpidem, a GABA(A)α1-preferring benzodiazepine-site agonist, into the BNST of the CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO was ineffective at decreasing anxiety. Electrophysiological findings suggest a disruption in inhibitory current may play a role in these changes. These data indicate that disturbance of CRF containing GABA(A)α1 neurons causes increased anxiety and impaired fear extinction, both of which are symptoms diagnostic for anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder.

  16. Cardiac adverse effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal on right ventricle: Role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor

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    Navarro-Zaragoza, J.; Martínez-Laorden, E.; Mora, L.; Hidalgo, J.; Milanés, M.V.; Laorden, M.L., E-mail: laorden@um.es

    2014-02-15

    Opioid addiction is associated with cardiovascular disease. However, mechanisms linking opioid addiction and cardiovascular disease remain unclear. This study investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor in mediating somatic signs and the behavioural states produced during withdrawal from morphine dependence. Furthermore, it studied the efficacy of CRF1 receptor antagonist, CP-154,526 to prevent the cardiac sympathetic activity induced by morphine withdrawal. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation pathways were evaluated. Like stress, morphine withdrawal induced an increase in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity and an enhancement of noradrenaline (NA) turnover. Pre-treatment with CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced morphine withdrawal-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, NA turnover and TH phosphorylation at Ser31 in the right ventricle. In addition, CP-154,526 reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. In addition, CP-154,526 attenuated the increases in body weight loss during morphine treatment and suppressed some of morphine withdrawal signs. Altogether, these results support the idea that cardiac sympathetic pathways are activated in response to naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal suggesting that treatment with a CRF1 receptor antagonist before morphine withdrawal would prevent the development of stress-induced behavioural and autonomic dysfunction in opioid addicts. - Highlights: • Morphine withdrawal caused an increase in myocardial sympathetic activity. • ERK regulates TH phosphorylation after naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal. • CRF1R is involved in cardiac adaptive changes during morphine dependence.

  17. Inhibition of corticotropin releasing factor expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates stress-induced behavioral and endocrine responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah B. Callahan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF is a primary mediator of endocrine, autonomic and behavioral stress responses. Studies in both humans and animal models have implicated CRF in a wide-variety of psychiatric conditions including anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, depression, sleep disorders and addiction among others. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA, a key limbic structure with one of the highest concentrations of CRF-producing cells outside of the hypothalamus, has been implicated in anxiety-like behavior and a number of stress-induced disorders. This study investigated the specific role of CRF in the CeA on both endocrine and behavioral responses to stress. We used RNA Interference (RNAi techniques to locally and specifically knockdown CRF expression in CeA. Behavior was assessed using the elevated plus maze (EPM and open field test (OF. Knocking down CRF expression in the CeA had no significant effect on measures of anxiety-like behavior in these tests. However, it did have an effect on grooming behavior, a CRF-induced behavior. Prior exposure to a stressor sensitized an amygdalar CRF effect on stress-induced HPA activation. In these stress-challenged animals silencing CRF in the CeA significantly attenuated corticosterone responses to a subsequent behavioral stressor. Thus, it appears that while CRF projecting from the CeA does not play a significant role in the expression stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors on the EPM and OF it does play a critical role in stress-induced HPA activation.

  18. Contrasting effects of nitric oxide and corticotropin-releasing factor within the dorsal periaqueductal gray on defensive behavior and nociception in mice

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    Miguel, T.T. [Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos and Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Gomes, K.S. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Nunes-de-Souza, R.L. [Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos and Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-30

    The anxiogenic and antinociceptive effects produced by glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation within the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) matter have been related to nitric oxide (NO) production, since injection of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors reverses these effects. dPAG corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRFr) activation also induces anxiety-like behavior and antinociception, which, in turn, are selectively blocked by local infusion of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRFr1) antagonist, NBI 27914 [5-chloro-4-(N-(cyclopropyl)methyl-N-propylamino)-2-methyl-6- (2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)aminopyridine]. Here, we determined whether i) the blockade of the dPAG by CRFr1 attenuates the anxiogenic/antinociceptive effects induced by local infusion of the NO donor, NOC-9 [6-(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-nitrosohydrazino)-N-methyl-1-hexanamine], and ii) the anxiogenic/antinociceptive effects induced by intra-dPAG CRF are prevented by local infusion of N{sup ω}-propyl-L-arginine (NPLA), a neuronal NOS inhibitor, in mice. Male Swiss mice (12 weeks old, 25-35 g, N = 8-14/group) were stereotaxically implanted with a 7-mm cannula aimed at the dPAG. Intra-dPAG NOC-9 (75 nmol) produced defensive-like behavior (jumping and running) and antinociception (assessed by the formalin test). Both effects were reversed by prior local infusion of NBI 27914 (2 nmol). Conversely, intra-dPAG NPLA (0.4 nmol) did not modify the anxiogenic/antinociceptive effects of CRF (150 pmol). These results suggest that CRFr1 plays an important role in the defensive behavior and antinociception produced by NO within the dPAG. In contrast, the anxiogenic and antinociceptive effects produced by intra-dPAG CRF are not related to NO synthesis in this limbic midbrain structure.

  19. A balance theory of peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 and type 2 signaling to induce colonic contractions and visceral hyperalgesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Tsukasa; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2014-12-01

    Several recent studies suggest that peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor type 1 (CRF1) and CRF2 have a counter regulatory action on gastrointestinal functions. We hypothesized that the activity balance of each CRF subtype signaling may determine the changes in colonic motility and visceral sensation. Colonic contractions were assessed by the perfused manometry, and contractions of colonic muscle strips were measured in vitro in rats. Visceromotor response was determined by measuring contractions of abdominal muscle in response to colorectal distensions (CRDs) (60 mm Hg for 10 min twice with a 30-min rest). All drugs were administered through ip route in in vivo studies. CRF increased colonic contractions. Pretreatment with astressin, a nonselective CRF antagonist, blocked the CRF-induced response, but astressin2-B, a selective CRF2 antagonist, enhanced the response by CRF. Cortagine, a selective CRF1 agonist, increased colonic contractions. In in vitro study, CRF increased contractions of muscle strips. Urocortin 2, a selective CRF2 agonist, itself did not alter the contractions but blocked this increased response by CRF. Visceromotor response to the second CRD was significantly higher than that of the first. Astressin blocked this CRD-induced sensitization, but astressin2-B or CRF did not affect it. Meanwhile, astressin2-B together with CRF significantly enhanced the sensitization. Urocortin 2 blocked, but cortagine significantly enhanced, the sensitization. These results indicated that peripheral CRF1 signaling enhanced colonic contractility and induced visceral sensitization, and these responses were modulated by peripheral CRF2 signaling. The activity balance of each subtype signaling may determine the colonic functions in response to stress.

  20. Adolescent binge drinking leads to changes in alcohol drinking, anxiety, and amygdalar corticotropin releasing factor cells in adulthood in male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas W Gilpin

    Full Text Available Heavy episodic drinking early in adolescence is associated with increased risk of addiction and other stress-related disorders later in life. This suggests that adolescent alcohol abuse is an early marker of innate vulnerability and/or binge exposure impacts the developing brain to increase vulnerability to these disorders in adulthood. Animal models are ideal for clarifying the relationship between adolescent and adult alcohol abuse, but we show that methods of involuntary alcohol exposure are not effective. We describe an operant model that uses multiple bouts of intermittent access to sweetened alcohol to elicit voluntary binge alcohol drinking early in adolescence (~postnatal days 28-42 in genetically heterogeneous male Wistar rats. We next examined the effects of adolescent binge drinking on alcohol drinking and anxiety-like behavior in dependent and non-dependent adult rats, and counted corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF cell in the lateral portion of the central amygdala (CeA, a region that contributes to regulation of anxiety- and alcohol-related behaviors. Adolescent binge drinking did not alter alcohol drinking under baseline drinking conditions in adulthood. However, alcohol-dependent and non-dependent adult rats with a history of adolescent alcohol binge drinking did exhibit increased alcohol drinking when access to alcohol was intermittent. Adult rats that binged alcohol during adolescence exhibited increased exploration on the open arms of the elevated plus maze (possibly indicating either decreased anxiety or increased impulsivity, an effect that was reversed by a history of alcohol dependence during adulthood. Finally, CRF cell counts were reduced in the lateral CeA of rats with adolescent alcohol binge history, suggesting semi-permanent changes in the limbic stress peptide system with this treatment. These data suggest that voluntary binge drinking during early adolescence produces long-lasting neural and behavioral effects

  1. Effects of prolonged ethanol vapor exposure on forced swim behavior, and neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing factor levels in rat brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brendan M; Drimmer, David A; Walker, Jennifer L; Liu, Tianmin; Mathé, Aleksander A; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2010-09-01

    Depressive symptoms in alcohol-dependent individuals are well-recognized and clinically relevant phenomena. The etiology has not been elucidated although it is clear that the depressive symptoms may be alcohol independent or alcohol induced. To contribute to the understanding of the neurobiology of chronic ethanol use, we investigated the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure on behaviors in the forced swim test (FST) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) levels in specific brain regions. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to intermittent ethanol vapor (14 h on/10 h off) or air exposure for 2 weeks and were then tested at three time points corresponding to acute withdrawal (8-12 h into withdrawal) and protracted withdrawal (30 and 60 days of withdrawal) in the FST. The behaviors that were measured in the five-min FST consisted of latency to immobility, swim time, immobility time, and climbing time. The FST results showed that the vapor-exposed animals displayed depressive-like behaviors; for instance, decreased latency to immobility in acute withdrawal and decreased latency to immobility, decreased swim time and increased immobility time in protracted withdrawal, with differences between air- and vapor-exposed animals becoming more pronounced over the 60-day withdrawal period. NPY levels in the frontal cortex of the vapor-exposed animals were decreased compared with the control animals, and CRF levels in the amygdala were correlated with increased immobility time. Thus, extended ethanol vapor exposure produced long-lasting changes in FST behavior and NPY levels in the brain.

  2. Effects of Prolonged Ethanol Vapor Exposure on Forced Swim Behavior, and Neuropeptide Y and Corticotropin Releasing Factor Levels in Rat Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brendan M.; Drimmer, David A.; Walker, Jennifer L.; Liu, Tianmin; Mathé, Aleksander A.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2010-01-01

    Depressive symptoms in alcohol-dependent individuals are well recognized and clinically relevant phenomena. The etiology has not been elucidated although it is clear that the depressive symptoms may be alcohol independent or alcohol-induced. In order to contribute to the understanding of the neurobiology of chronic ethanol use, we investigated the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure on behaviors in the forced swim test (FST) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) levels in specific brain regions. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to intermittent ethanol vapor (14 hours on / 10 hours off) or air exposure for two weeks and were then tested at three time points corresponding to acute withdrawal (8–12 hours into withdrawal) and protracted withdrawal (30 and 60 days of withdrawal) in the FST. The behaviors that were measured in the five minute FST consisted of latency to immobility, swim time, immobility time and climbing time. The FST results showed that the vapor-exposed animals displayed depressive-like behaviors, for instance decreased latency to immobility in acute withdrawal and decreased latency to immobility, decreased swim time and increased immobility time in protracted withdrawal, with differences between air- and vapor-exposed animals becoming more pronounced over the 60 day withdrawal period. NPY levels in the frontal cortex of the vapor-exposed animals were decreased compared to the control animals and CRF levels in the amygdala were correlated with increased immobility time. Thus, extended ethanol vapor exposure produced long-lasting changes in FST behavior and NPY levels in the brain. PMID:20705420

  3. Central nesfatin-1 reduces dark-phase food intake and gastric emptying in rats: differential role of corticotropin-releasing factor2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Rivier, Jean; Kobelt, Peter; Mönnikes, Hubert; Lambrecht, Nils W G; Taché, Yvette

    2009-11-01

    Nesfatin-1, derived from nucleobindin2, is expressed in the hypothalamus and reported in one study to reduce food intake (FI) in rats. To characterize the central anorexigenic action of nesfatin-1 and whether gastric emptying (GE) is altered, we injected nesfatin-1 into the lateral brain ventricle (intracerebroventricular, icv) or fourth ventricle (4v) in chronically cannulated rats or into the cisterna magna (intracisternal, ic) under short anesthesia and compared with ip injection. Nesfatin-1 (0.05 microg/rat, icv) decreased 2-3 h and 3-6 h dark-phase FI by 87 and 45%, respectively, whereas ip administration (2 microg/rat) had no effect. The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)(1)/CRF(2) antagonist astressin-B or the CRF(2) antagonist astressin(2)-B abolished icv nesfatin-1's anorexigenic action, whereas an astressin(2)-B analog, devoid of CRF-receptor binding affinity, did not. Nesfatin-1 icv induced a dose-dependent reduction of GE by 26 and 43% that was not modified by icv astressin(2)-B. Nesfatin-1 into the 4v (0.05 microg/rat) or ic (0.5 microg/rat) decreased cumulative dark-phase FI by 29 and 60% at 1 h and by 41 and 37% between 3 and 5 h, respectively. This effect was neither altered by ic astressin(2)-B nor associated with changes in GE. Cholecystokinin (ip) induced Fos expression in 43% of nesfatin-1 neurons in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus and 24% of those in the nucleus tractus solitarius. These data indicate that nesfatin-1 acts centrally to reduce dark phase FI through CRF(2)-receptor-dependent pathways after forebrain injection and CRF(2)-receptor-independent pathways after hindbrain injection. Activation of nesfatin-1 neurons by cholecystokinin at sites regulating food intake may suggest a role in gut peptide satiation effect.

  4. Chronic psychosocial stress induces reversible mitochondrial damage and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type-1 upregulation in the rat intestine and IBS-like gut dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, María; Alonso, Carmen; Guilarte, Mar; Serra, Jordi; Martínez, Cristina; González-Castro, Ana M; Lobo, Beatriz; Antolín, María; Andreu, Antoni L; García-Arumí, Elena; Casellas, Montserrat; Saperas, Esteban; Malagelada, Juan Ramón; Azpiroz, Fernando; Santos, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The association between psychological and environmental stress with functional gastrointestinal disorders, especially irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is well established. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. We aimed to probe chronic psychosocial stress as a primary inducer of intestinal dysfunction and investigate corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling and mitochondrial damage as key contributors to the stress-mediated effects. Wistar-Kyoto rats were submitted to crowding stress (CS; 8 rats/cage) or sham-crowding stress (SC; 2 rats/cage) for up to 15 consecutive days. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity was evaluated. Intestinal tissues were obtained 1h, 1, 7, or 30 days after stress exposure, to assess neutrophil infiltration, epithelial ion transport, mitochondrial function, and CRF receptors expression. Colonic response to CRF (10 μg/kg i.p.) and hyperalgesia were evaluated after ending stress exposure. Chronic psychosocial stress activated HPA axis and induced reversible intestinal mucosal inflammation. Epithelial permeability and conductance were increased in CS rats, effect that lasted for up to 7 days after stress cessation. Visceral hypersensitivity persisted for up to 30 days post stress. Abnormal colonic response to exogenous CRF lasted for up to 7 days after stress. Mitochondrial activity was disturbed throughout the intestine, although mitochondrial response to CRF was preserved. Colonic expression of CRF receptor type-1 was increased in CS rats, and negatively correlated with body weight gain. In conclusion, chronic psychosocial stress triggers reversible inflammation, persistent epithelial dysfunction, and colonic hyperalgesia. These findings support crowding stress as a suitable animal model to unravel the complex pathophysiology underlying to common human intestinal stress-related disorders, such as IBS.

  5. Appetite-suppressing effects and interactions of centrally administered corticotropin-releasing factor, urotensin I and serotonin in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van A. Ortega

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, urotensin I (UI and serotonin (5-HT are generally recognized as key regulators of the anorexigenic stress response in vertebrates, yet the proximal effects and potential interactions of these central messengers on food intake in salmonids are not known. Moreover, no study to date in fishes has compared the appetite-suppressing effects of CRF and UI using species-specific peptides. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to 1 assess the individual effects of synthesized rainbow trout CRF (rtCRF, rtUI as well as 5-HT on food intake in rainbow trout, and 2 determine whether the CRF and serotonergic systems interact in the regulation of food intake in this species. Intracerebroventricular (icv injections of rtCRF and rtUI both suppressed food intake in a dose-related manner but rtUI (ED50 = 17.4 ng/g body weight [BW] was significantly more potent than rtCRF (ED50 = 105.9 ng/g BW. Co-injection of either rtCRF or rtUI with the CRF receptor antagonist a-hCRF(9-41 blocked the reduction in food intake induced by CRF-related peptides. Icv injections of 5-HT also inhibited feeding in a dose-related manner (ED50 = 14.7 ng/g BW and these effects were blocked by the serotonergic receptor antagonist methysergide. While the anorexigenic effects of 5-HT were reversed by a-hCRF(9-41 co-injection, the appetite-suppressing effects of either rtCRF or rtUI were not affected by methysergide co-injection. These results identify CRF, UI and 5-HT as anorexigenic agents in rainbow trout, and suggest that 5-HT-induced anorexia may be at least partially mediated by CRF- and/or UI-secreting neurons.

  6. Is it really a matter of simple dualism? Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in body and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donny eJanssen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Physiological responses to stress coordinated by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA- axis are concerned with maintaining homeostasis in the presence of real or perceived challenges. Regulators of this axis are corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRF and CRF related neuropeptides, including urocortins (Ucn 1, 2 and 3. They mediate their actions by binding to CRF receptors (CRFR 1 and 2, which are located in several stress related brain regions. The prevailing theory has been that the initiation of and the recovery from an elicited stress response is coordinated by two elements, viz. the (mainly opposing, but well balanced actions of CRFR1 and CRFR2. Such a dualistic view suggests that CRF/CRFR1 controls the initiation of, and urocortins/CRFR2 mediate the recovery from stress to maintain body and mental health. Consequently, failed adaptation to stress can lead to neuropathology, including anxiety and depression. Recent literature, however, challenges such dualistic and complementary actions of CRFR1 and CRFR2, and suggests that stress recruits CRF system components in a brain area and neuron specific manner to promote adaptation as conditions dictate.

  7. A central theory of preterm and term labor: putative role for corticotropin-releasing hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzoub, J A; McGregor, J A; Lockwood, C J; Smith, R; Taggart, M S; Schulkin, J

    1999-01-01

    Near the end of human pregnancy the concentration of placental corticotropin-releasing hormone in maternal blood rises exponentially. The rate of elevation of corticotropin-releasing hormone and its duration through time have been linked to the time of onset of labor. Paradoxically, although glucocorticoids are known to inhibit corticotropin-releasing hormone production within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, cortisol actually increases corticotropin-releasing hormone levels in several areas outside the hypothalamus, including the placenta. Placental corticotropin-releasing hormone may be an important component of a system that controls the normal maturation of the fetus and signals the initiation of labor. Abnormal elevations in corticotropin-releasing hormone, which may be a hormonal response to stressors arising in either the mother, placenta, or fetus, may prove to participate in the premature onset of parturition.

  8. Overexpression of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis improves posttraumatic stress disorder-like symptoms in a model of incubation of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elharrar, Einat; Warhaftig, Gal; Issler, Orna; Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Dikshtein, Yahav; Zahut, Roy; Redlus, Lior; Chen, Alon; Yadid, Gal

    2013-12-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severe, persistent psychiatric disorder in response to a traumatic event, causing intense anxiety and fear. These responses may increase over time upon conditioning with fear-associated cues, a phenomenon termed fear incubation. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRFR1) is involved in activation of the central stress response, while corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 (CRFR2) has been suggested to mediate termination of this response. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors are found in stress-related regions, including the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST), which is implicated in sustained fear. Fear-related behaviors were analyzed in rats exposed to predator-associated cues, a model of psychological trauma, over 10 weeks. Rats were classified as susceptible (PTSD-like) or resilient. Expression levels of CRF receptors were measured in the amygdala nuclei and BNST of the two groups. In addition, lentiviruses overexpressing CRFR2 were injected into the medial division, posterointermediate part of the BNST (BSTMPI) of susceptible and resilient rats and response to stress cues was measured. We found that exposure to stress and stress-associated cues induced a progressive increase in fear response of susceptible rats. The behavioral manifestations of these rats were correlated both with sustained elevation in CRFR1 expression and long-term downregulation in CRFR2 expression in the BSTMPI. Intra-BSTMPI injection of CRFR2 overexpressing lentiviruses attenuated behavioral impairments of susceptible rats. These results implicate the BNST CRF receptors in the mechanism of coping with stress. Our findings suggest increase of CRFR2 levels as a new approach for understanding stress-related atypical psychiatric syndromes such as PTSD. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

  9. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of the mouse urocortin II gene: a putative connection between the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alon; Vaughan, Joan; Vale, Wylie W

    2003-08-01

    Peptides encoded by the urocortin II (Ucn II) gene were recently identified as new members of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family. Ucn II is a specific ligand for the type 2 CRF receptor. Using RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, and immunofluorescence staining, we report the expression of Ucn II mRNA in several human and mouse (m) neuronal cell lines. Using these neuronal cell lines, we provide evidence that exposure to glucocorticoid hormones increases mUcn II mRNA expression and promoter activation. The effect of glucocorticoids on mUcn II mRNA expression was tested in the Ucn II/glucocorticoid receptor-positive cell line NG108-15. The results demonstrate that mUcn II mRNA expression is up-regulated by dexamethasone in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Computer analysis revealed the presence of 14 putative half-palindrome glucocorticoid response element sequences within 1.2 kb of the mUcn II 5' flanking region. Transfections with different fragments of the 5'-flanking region of the mUcn II gene fused to a luciferase reporter gene showed a promoter-dependent expression of the reporter gene and regulation by dexamethasone. Promoter deletion studies clarify the sufficient putative glucocorticoid response element site mediating this effect. The steroid hormone antagonist RU486 blocked the effect of dexamethasone on mUcn II mRNA expression and promoter activation, suggesting a direct glucocorticoid receptor-mediated effect of dexamethasone on mUcn II mRNA expression. Ucn II is expressed in vivo in the hypothalamus, brainstem, olfactory bulb, and pituitary. Low levels were also detected in the mouse cortex, hippocampus, and spinal cord. We demonstrated that mUcn II gene transcription was stimulated by glucocorticoid administration in vivo and inhibited by removal of glucocorticoids by adrenalectomy. Administration of dexamethasone to mice resulted in an increase of mUcn II levels in the hypothalamus and brainstem but not in the olfactory bulb region 12 h following

  10. Estrogen inhibits corticotropin-releasing hormone production in primary human placental cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐晓露; 倪鑫; 由振东; 何平; 惠宁; 顾清; 孙刚

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the inhibition effects of estrogen on the production of corticotropin-releasing hormone in human placental cells. Methods: Primary cultured placental cells were treated by ICI182, 780, a complete ER antagonist, and Tamoxifen, an ERα-mixed agonist/antagonist and ERβ antagonist for 24 h. The supernatant was havested for the radioimmunoassay of CRH. Results: 17β-estradiol inhibited the secretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone in human placental (P<0.05). ICI182, 780 stimulated the secretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone in human placental (P<0.05). Conclusion: Estrogen represses the synthesis and secretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone in human placental, which is possibly mediated by ERα.

  11. Corticotropin-releasing hormone: Mediator of vertebrate life stage transitions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yugo; Grommen, Sylvia V H; De Groef, Bert

    2016-03-01

    Hormones, particularly thyroid hormones and corticosteroids, play critical roles in vertebrate life stage transitions such as amphibian metamorphosis, hatching in precocial birds, and smoltification in salmonids. Since they synergistically regulate several metabolic and developmental processes that accompany vertebrate life stage transitions, the existence of extensive cross-communication between the adrenal/interrenal and thyroidal axes is not surprising. Synergies of corticosteroids and thyroid hormones are based on effects at the level of tissue hormone sensitivity and gene regulation. In addition, in representative nonmammalian vertebrates, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulates hypophyseal thyrotropin secretion, and thus functions as a common regulator of both the adrenal/interrenal and thyroidal axes to release corticosteroids and thyroid hormones. The dual function of CRH has been speculated to control or affect the timing of vertebrate life history transitions across taxa. After a brief overview of recent insights in the molecular mechanisms behind the synergic actions of thyroid hormones and corticosteroids during life stage transitions, this review examines the evidence for a possible role of CRH in controlling vertebrate life stage transitions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of corticotropin-releasing hormone in onset of labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatopoulos, D K; Hillhouse, E W

    1999-10-30

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) derived from the placenta is secreted into the maternal circulation in large amounts during the third trimester of human pregnancy and may have an important role in the onset of labour. Although the biological role of CRH remains enigmatic, the presence of functional CRH receptors in the myometrium suggests that CRH may modulate myometrial contractility and hence parturition. CRH action is mediated via multiple receptor subtypes and pregnancy results in differential receptor expression. These receptors are primarily linked to the adenylate cyclase second messenger system, which would help the intracellular microenvironment to maintain the required myometrial quiescence. CRH can exert further actions such as inhibition of prostaglandin production to prevent contractions. At term under the influence of oxytocin there is a modification in the coupling mechanisms that leads to a decrease in the biological activity of the CRH receptor and in the generation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate which favours myometrial contractions. CRH, via distinct receptor subtypes, is then able to enhance the contractile response of the myometrium. This hypothesis places CRH in a central role in coordinating the smooth transition from a state of relaxation to one of contraction.

  13. Cutaneous induction of corticotropin releasing hormone by Propionibacterium acnes extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isard, Olivia; Knol, Anne-Chantal; Castex-Rizzi, Nathalie; Khammari, Amir; Charveron, Marie; Dréno, Brigitte

    2009-03-01

    The skin commensal bacillus Propionibacterium acnes is known to play a major role in the development of acne vulgaris and it is established that this bacteria is involved both in the induction and maintenance of the inflammatory phase of acne. The corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), a neuropeptide originally isolated from the hypothalamus, is also produced by the skin. CRH has been reported to play a role in the inflammation, the production of sebum and finally the differentiation of keratinocytes. At the therapeutic level, zinc is known to act specifically on inflammatory lesions with still partially known mechanisms and thus could play an important role in the development of inflammatory acne lesions. Our objective was to study the modulation of CRH expression by keratinocytes induced by P. acnes extracts. CRH expression was examined using immunohistochemistry technique on deep-frozen sections of normal human skin explants incubated with two different extracts of P. acnes and with or without zinc salts. We observed that the membrane fraction (FM) of P. acnes increased the CRH expression in the epidermis. This result indicates that P. acnes, by stimulating the production of CRH, can both modulate the differentiation of keratinocytes and increase the local inflammation, arguing that this bacterium plays a role not only in the development of inflammatory acne lesions but also in the formation of the microcomedo in the early stages of acne.

  14. Involvement of Nurr-1/Nur77 in corticotropin-releasing factor/urocortin1-induced tyrosinase-related protein 1 gene transcription in human melanoma HMV-II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Yutaka; Takayasu, Shinobu; Kageyama, Kazunori; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Sakihara, Satoru; Terui, Ken; Nigawara, Takeshi; Suda, Toshihiro

    2013-05-06

    Recent molecular and biochemical analyses have revealed the presence of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and urocortin (Ucn), together with their corresponding receptors in mammalian skin. The melanosomal enzyme tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1) is involved in modulation of pigment production in response to stressors. Although CRF and Ucn are thought to have potent effects on the skin system, their possible roles and regulation have yet to be fully determined. This study aimed to explore the effects of CRF and Ucn on TRP1 gene expression using human melanoma HMV-II cells. The mRNA of CRF, Ucn1, Ucn2, and CRF receptor type 1 (CRF1 receptor) was detected in HMV-II cells. CRF and Ucn1 stimulated TRP1 gene transcription via the CRF1 receptor, and increased both Nurr-1 and Nur77 mRNA expression levels. Both CRF- and Ucn1-induced Nurr-1/Nur77 acted via a NGFI-B response element on the TRP1 promoter. The combination of Nurr-1/Nur77 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, a melanocyte-specific transcription factor gene induced by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, had additive effects on activation of TRP1 gene transcription. The findings suggest that in human melanoma HMV-II cells both CRF and Ucn1 regulate TRP1 gene expression via Nurr-1/Nur77 production, independent of pro-opiomelanocortin or α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone stimulation.

  15. Sex differences in NMDA GluN1 plasticity in rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons containing corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor following slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kempen, T A; Dodos, M; Woods, C; Marques-Lopes, J; Justice, N J; Iadecola, C; Pickel, V M; Glass, M J; Milner, T A

    2015-10-29

    There are profound, yet incompletely understood, sex differences in the neurogenic regulation of blood pressure. Both corticotropin signaling and glutamate receptor plasticity, which differ between males and females, are known to play important roles in the neural regulation of blood pressure. However, the relationship between hypertension and glutamate plasticity in corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-receptive neurons in brain cardiovascular regulatory areas, including the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), is not understood. In the present study, we used dual-label immuno-electron microscopy to analyze sex differences in slow-pressor angiotensin II (AngII) hypertension with respect to the subcellular distribution of the obligatory NMDA glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in the RVLM and PVN. Studies were conducted in mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) under the control of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF1) promoter (i.e., CRF1-EGFP reporter mice). By light microscopy, GluN1-immunoreactivity (ir) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons of the RVLM and PVN. Moreover, in both regions tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons. In response to AngII, male mice showed an elevation in blood pressure that was associated with an increase in the proportion of GluN1 on presumably functional areas of the plasma membrane (PM) in CRF1-EGFP dendritic profiles in the RVLM. In female mice, AngII was neither associated with an increase in blood pressure nor an increase in PM GluN1 in the RVLM. Unlike the RVLM, AngII-mediated hypertension had no effect on GluN1 localization in CRF1-EGFP dendrites in the PVN of either male or female mice. These studies provide an anatomical mechanism for sex-differences in the convergent modulation of RVLM catecholaminergic neurons by CRF and glutamate. Moreover, these results suggest that sexual dimorphism in

  16. Regulation of feeding behavior and psychomotor activity by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH in fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouhei eMatsuda

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH is a hypothalamic neuropeptide belonging to a family of neuropeptides that includes urocortins, urotensin I and sauvagine in vertebrates. CRH and urocortin act as anorexigenic factors for satiety regulation in fish. In a goldfish model, intracerebroventricular (ICV administration of CRH has been shown to affect not only food intake, but also locomotor and psychomotor activities. In particular, CRH elicits anxiety-like behavior as an anxiogenic neuropeptide in goldfish, as is the case in rodents. This paper reviews current knowledge of CRH and its related peptides derived from studies of teleost fish, as representative non-mammals, focusing particularly on the role of the CRH system, and examines its significance from a comparative viewpoint.

  17. High-altitude hypoxia induces disorders of the brain-endocrine-immune network through activation of corticotropin-releasing factor and its type-1 receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-qun CHEN; Fan-ping KONG; Yang ZHAO; Ji-zeng DU

    2012-01-01

    High-altitude hypoxia can induce physiological dysfunction and mountain sickness,but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood.Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and CRF type-1 receptors (CRFR1) are members of the CRF family and the essential controllers of the physiological activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and modulators of endocrine and behavioral activity in response to various stressors.We have previously found that high-altitude hypoxia induces disorders of the brain-endocrine-immune network through activation of CRF and CRFR1 in the brain and periphery that include activation of the HPA axis in a time-and dose-dependent manner,impaired or improved learning and memory,and anxiety-like behavioral change.Meanwhile,hypoxia induces dysfunctions of the hypothalamo-pituitary-endocrine and immune systems,including suppression of growth and development,as well as inhibition of reproductive,metabolic and immune functions.In contrast,the small mammals that live on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau alpine meadow display low responsiveness to extreme high-altitudehypoxia challenge,suggesting well-acclimatized genes and a physiological strategy that developed during evolution through interact-ions between the genes and environment.All the findings provide evidence for understanding the neuroendocrine mechanisms of hypoxia-induced physiological dysfunction.This review extends these findings.

  18. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol in calves after corticotropin-releasing hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veissier, I.; Reenen, van C.G.; Andanson, S.; Leushuis, I.E.

    1999-01-01

    The aim for this study was to analyze responsiveness of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis to exogenous bovine corticotropin-releasing hormone (bCRH) in calves. Two dose-response studies were carried out, using either bCRH alone (dose rates of 0, .01, .03, and .1 μg bCRH/kg live weight) o

  19. Mid-pregnancy corticotropin-releasing hormone levels in association with postpartum depressive symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iliadis, Stavros I; Sylvén, Sara; Hellgren, Charlotte; Olivier, Jocelien D.; Schijven, Dick; Comasco, Erika; Chrousos, George P; Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Skalkidou, Alkistis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripartum depression is a common cause of pregnancy- and postpartum-related morbidity. The production of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) from the placenta alters the profile of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis hormones and may be associated with postpartum depression. The purpo

  20. Advances in Study on Corticotropin-releasing Factor in Inflammatory Bowel Disease%促肾上腺皮质激素释放因子在炎症性肠病中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马俊方; 张予蜀; 孔超美

    2013-01-01

    近年来,越来越多的证据表明应激可干扰神经系统,进而通过脑-肠轴的交互作用引起免疫紊乱,在炎症性肠病(IBD)的发病中起重要作用.促肾上腺皮质激素释放因子(CRF)是一种与应激反应密切相关的神经内分泌肽,其家族成员通过与受体结合,调节机体在应激状态下的下丘脑-垂体-肾上腺(HPA)轴功能,在协调应激相关内分泌、自主神经、免疫、行为等反应中起重要作用.在慢性肠道炎症中,脑和肠黏膜中的CRF系统成员被激活以调节肠道局部和中枢免疫反应.本文对CRF在IBD中作用的研究进展作一综述.%It has become increasingly evident that stress is implicated in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) via initial nervous disturbance and subsequent immune dysfunction through brain-gut interaction. Being a principal neuroendocrine coordinator of stress responses, corticotropin-releasing factor ( CRF) and its related peptides regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and coordinate the endocrine, autonomic, immune and behavioral responses to stress through its receptors. In chronic intestinal inflammation, the members of CRF system in brain and colonic mucosa are activated, regulating both the local and central immune response. This article reviewed the advances in study on the role of CRF in IBD.

  1. NEURONAL ACTIVITY AND STRESS DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATE HIPPOCAMPAL AND HYPOTHALAMIC CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE EXPRESSION IN THE IMMATURE RAT

    OpenAIRE

    Hatalski, C G; Brunson, K. L.; TANTAYANUBUTR, B.; Chen, Y.(California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA); Baram, T. Z.

    2000-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone, a major neuromodulator of the neuroendocrine stress response, is expressed in the immature hippocampus, where it enhances glutamate receptor-mediated excitation of principal cells. Since the peptide influences hippocampal synaptic efficacy, its secretion from peptidergic interneuronal terminals may augment hippocampal-mediated functions such as learning and memory. However, whereas information regarding the regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone’s abund...

  2. Effects of injection of anti-corticotropin release hormone serum in the lateral ventricles and electroacupuncture analgesia on pain threshold in rats with adjuvant arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunying Qiao; Fudong Wu; Jian Wang; Xiaolu Cui; Congcong Liu; Xinlong Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Rat models of adjuvant arthritis were established, and anti-corticotropin release hormone serum injection in the lateral ventricles and electroacupuncture at right Jiaji (EX-B2) were performed. The pain threshold was decreased at 45 and 60 minutes after injection of the anti-corticotropin release hormone serum. Electroacupuncture at Jiaji can resist this effect. Immunohistochemical staining results showed that the expression of corticotropin release hormone in the hypothalamic paraven-tricular nucleus was greater in the electroacupuncture + anti-corticotropin release hormone serum group compared with the anti-corticotropin release hormone serum group. The expression of corti-cotropin release hormone was correlated with the pain threshold. The effect of endogenous corti-cotropin release hormone in pain modulation can be obstructed by anti-corticotropin release hor-mone serum. The analgesia of electroacupuncture can partially resist the depressed pain threshold caused by injection of anti-corticotropin release hormone serum. The analgesic effect of elec-troacupuncture is associated with the corticotropin release hormone content in the hypothalamus.

  3. Role of a genetic polymorphism in the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 gene in alcohol drinking and seeking behaviors of Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring (msP rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Ojonemile Ayanwuyi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring (msP rats exhibit innate preference for alcohol, are highly sensitive to stress and stress-induced alcohol seeking. Genetic analysis showed that over-expression of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF system of msP rats is correlated with the presence of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs occurring in the promoter region (position -1836 and -2097 of the CRF1 receptor (CRF1-R gene. Here we examined whether these point mutations were associated to the innate alcohol preference, stress-induced drinking and seeking.We have recently re-derived the msP rats to obtain two distinct lines carrying the wild type (GG and the point mutations (AA, respectively. The phenotypic characteristics of these two lines were compared with those of unselected Wistar rats. Both AA and GG rats showed similar patterns of voluntary alcohol intake and preference. Similarly, the pharmacological stressor yohimbine (0.0, 0.625, 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg elicited increased operant alcohol self-administration under fixed and progressive ratio reinforcement schedules in all three lines. Following extinction, yohimbine (0.0, 0.625, 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg significantly reinstated alcohol seeking in the three groups. However, at the highest dose this effect was no longer evident in AA rats. Treatment with the CRF1-R antagonist antalarmin (0, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg significantly reduced alcohol-reinforced lever pressing in the AA line (10 and 20 mg/kg while a weaker or no effect was observed in the Wistar and the GG group, respectively. Finally, antalarmin significantly reduced yohimbine-induced increase in alcohol drinking in all three groups.In conclusion, these specific SNPs in the CRF1-R gene do not seem to play a primary role in the expression of the msP excessive-drinking phenotype or stress-induced drinking but may be associated with a decreased threshold for stress-induced alcohol seeking and an increased sensitivity to the effects of

  4. Corticotropin releasing hormone- and adreno-corticotropin-like immunoreactivity in human placenta, peripheral and uterine vein plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, H M; Healy, D L

    1987-01-01

    The presence of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-like immunoreactivity (IR) in human placenta and maternal peripheral blood has been reported by many investigators. However, its physiological role has not yet been defined. We investigated plasma and placental tissue from women at different times of pregnancy and performed peripheral and uterine vein sampling during caesarean section before and after removal of the placenta. Beside IR-CRH, IR-GRF and -GnRH as well as -ACTH and cortisol were measured. The highest content of CRH was found in placental extracts from end term (40 weeks) pregnancies and lower levels at an earlier stage (10 weeks). Plasma CRH from peripheral blood could be detected in some samples and was higher as pregnancy advanced. Thirty minutes after removal of the placenta CRH levels dropped in peripheral plasma and could not be detected in uterine vein samples. IR-ACTH plasma levels were within the range of normals, cortisol was elevated. Gel- and HPLC-chromatographie revealed that placental extracts coeluted with synthetic human CRH. The material from endterm placenta showed full bioactivity in the rat pituitary bio-assay. IR-GRF could only be detected in 10 weeks placental tissue and no IR-GnRH was measured. We conclude that CRH from the placenta is biologically active, however, cannot stimulate the maternal pituitary-adrenal-axis.

  5. Human fear acquisition deficits in relation to genetic variants of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 and the serotonin transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Heitland

    Full Text Available The ability to identify predictors of aversive events allows organisms to appropriately respond to these events, and failure to acquire these fear contingencies can lead to maladaptive contextual anxiety. Recently, preclinical studies demonstrated that the corticotropin-releasing factor and serotonin systems are interactively involved in adaptive fear acquisition. Here, 150 healthy medication-free human subjects completed a cue and context fear conditioning procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex (FPS was measured to assess both uninstructed fear acquisition and instructed fear expression. All participants were genotyped for polymorphisms located within regulatory regions of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1 - rs878886 and the serotonin transporter (5HTTLPR. These polymorphisms have previously been linked to panic disorder and anxious symptomology and personality, respectively. G-allele carriers of CRHR1 (rs878886 showed no acquisition of fear conditioned responses (FPS to the threat cue in the uninstructed phase, whereas fear acquisition was present in C/C homozygotes. Moreover, carrying the risk alleles of both rs878886 (G-allele and 5HTTLPR (short allele was associated with increased FPS to the threat context during this phase. After explicit instructions regarding the threat contingency were given, the cue FPS and context FPS normalized in all genotype groups. The present results indicate that genetic variability in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, especially in interaction with the 5HTTLPR, is involved in the acquisition of fear in humans. This translates prior animal findings to the human realm.

  6. A novel role of peripheral corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH on dermal fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Rassouli

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone, or factor, (CRH or CRF exerts important biological effects in multiple peripheral tissues via paracrine/autocrine actions. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of endogenous CRH in the biology of mouse and human skin fibroblasts, the primary cell type involved in wound healing. We show expression of CRH and its receptors in primary fibroblasts, and we demonstrate the functionality of fibroblast CRH receptors by induction of cAMP. Fibroblasts genetically deficient in Crh (Crh-/- had higher proliferation and migration rates and compromised production of IL-6 and TGF-β1 compared to the wildtype (Crh+/+ cells. Human primary cultures of foreskin fibroblasts exposed to the CRF(1 antagonist antalarmin recapitulated the findings in the Crh-/- cells, exhibiting altered proliferative and migratory behavior and suppressed production of IL-6. In conclusion, our findings show an important role of fibroblast-expressed CRH in the proliferation, migration, and cytokine production of these cells, processes associated with the skin response to injury. Our data suggest that the immunomodulatory effects of CRH may include an important, albeit not explored yet, role in epidermal tissue remodeling and regeneration and maintenance of tissue homeostasis.

  7. Characterization of a novel subtype of hippocampal interneurons that express corticotropin-releasing hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Andrew; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    A subset of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons was previously identified in the hippocampus with unknown function. Here we demonstrate that hippocampal CRH neurons represent a novel subtype of interneurons in the hippocampus, exhibiting unique morphology, electrophysiological properties, molecular markers, and connectivity. This subset of hippocampal CRH neurons in the mouse reside in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer and tract tracing studies using AAV-Flex-ChR2-tdTomato reveal dense back-projections of these neurons onto principal neurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. These hippocampal CRH neurons express both GABA and GAD67 and using in vitro optogenetic techniques, we demonstrate that these neurons make functional connections and release GABA onto CA3 principal neurons. The location, morphology, and importantly the functional connectivity of these neurons demonstrate that hippocampal CRH neurons represent a unique subtype of hippocampal interneurons. The connectivity of these neurons has significant implications for hippocampal function.

  8. Corticotropin-releasing hormone in the teleost stress response: rapid appearance of the peptide in plasma of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepels, P.P.L.M.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Balm, P.H.

    2004-01-01

    High concentrations (up to 600 pg/ml) of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) were detected in plasma of the teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia) when screening peripheral tissues of tilapia exposed to stress. Notably, the plasma CRH response to stressors in tilapia is much more pronounce

  9. Corticotropin-releasing hormone in the teleost stress response: rapid appearance of the peptide in plasma of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepels, P.P.L.M.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Balm, P.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    High concentrations (tip to 600 pg/ml) of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) were detected in plasma of the teleost fish Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia) when screening peripheral tissues of tilapia exposed to stress. Notably, the plasma CRH response to stressors in tilapia is much more pronounc

  10. CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE MICROINFUSION IN THE CENTRAL AMYGDALA DIMINISHES A CARDIAC PARASYMPATHETIC OUTFLOW UNDER STRESS-FREE CONDITIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERSMA, A; BOHUS, B; KOOLHAAS, JM

    1993-01-01

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is known to be involved in the regulation of autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioural responses in stress situations. The CeA contains large numbers of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) cell bodies. Neuroanatomical studies revealed that the majority of

  11. Overproduction of corticotropin-releasing hormone blocks germinal center formation: role of corticosterone and impaired follicular dendritic cell networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murray, S.E.; Rosenzweig, H.L.; Johnson, M.; Huising, M.O.; Sawicki, K.; Stenzel-Poore, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    xCorticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a central mediator in the response to stress, coordinating behavioral, autonomic and neuroendocrine activation. CRH overproduction is implicated in several affective disorders, including major depression, panic-anxiety disorder and anorexia-diseases also ass

  12. In vivo effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone on femoral adipose tissue metabolism in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellhöner, P; Welzel, M; Rolle, D; Dodt, C

    2007-04-01

    To investigate whether i.v. injected corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) (1 microg/kg) has a direct effect on adipose tissue metabolism in humans. Double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Twelve healthy normal weight female volunteers (age 20-37 years, body mass index: 22.75+/-1.33 kg/m(2)) Assessment of local generation of glycerol, and glucose in adipose tissue by microdialysis. Measurement of adipose tissue and skin blood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry. Injection of CRH acutely increases interstitial concentrations of glycerol (19.0+/-5.4%, Ptissue blood flow do not explain interstitial metabolite alterations. Initial CRH effects on adipose tissue metabolism are short lasting and disappear after 15 min. The importance of CRH on human energy metabolism is underlined by the present in vivo study demonstrating peptidergic effects on lipolysis and glucose homeostasis in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

  13. Corticotropin-releasing hormone and progesterone plasma levels association with the onset and progression of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatelou, F; Deligeoroglou, E; Vrachnis, N; Iliodromiti, S; Iliodromiti, Z; Sifakis, S; Farmakides, G; Creatsas, G

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF LNVESTIGATION: To examine the relationship between maternal plasma progesterone along with corticotropin- releasing hormone (CRH) plasma levels and the progression of labor. Maternal serum CRH and progesterone were measured during the latent phase of labor, active labor, and 24 hours postpartum in women who went into spontaneous labor and delivered vaginally at term. Progesterone (P) levels in women delivered by an elective cesarean section at term were also measured as baseline. Mean maternal plasma P was 18% higher in the active phase than in the latent phase of labor (p labor (p labor progresses, P and CRH increase and subsequently decrease precipitously in the immediate postpartal period. P levels tend to drop in women who are in early labor compared with non-laboring full-term women.

  14. Regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 messenger RNA level in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells: potential implications for human stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Vamvakopoulos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the regulation of type 1 receptor mRNA in Y-79 human retinoblastoma cells, grown in the absence or presence of pharmacological levels of phorbol esters, forskolin, glucocorticoids and their combinations. To control for inducibility and for assessing the sensitivity of the Y-79 system to glucocorticoids, corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA levels were measured in parallel. All treatments stimulated corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene expression relative to baseline. A weak suppression of corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA level was observed during dexamethasone treatment. The cell line expressed ten-fold excess of receptor to ligand mRNA under basal conditions. The findings predict the presence of functional phorbol ester, cyclic AMP and glucocorticoid response elements in the promoter region of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene and support a potential role for its product during chronic stress and immune/inflammatory reaction.

  15. Molecular diversity of corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNA-containing neurons in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Roman A; Alpár, Alán; Hökfelt, Tomas; Harkany, Tibor

    2017-03-01

    Hormonal responses to acute stress rely on the rapid induction of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) production in the mammalian hypothalamus, with subsequent instructive steps culminating in corticosterone release at the periphery. Hypothalamic CRH neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus are therefore considered as 'stress neurons'. However, significant morphological and functional diversity among neurons that can transiently produce CRH in other hypothalamic nuclei has been proposed, particularly as histochemical and molecular biology evidence associates CRH to both GABA and glutamate neurotransmission. Here, we review recent advances through single-cell RNA sequencing and circuit mapping to suggest that CRH production reflects a state switch in hypothalamic neurons and thus confers functional competence rather than being an identity mark of phenotypically segregated neurons. We show that CRH mRNA transcripts can therefore be seen in GABAergic, glutamatergic and dopaminergic neuronal contingents in the hypothalamus. We then distinguish 'stress neurons' of the paraventricular nucleus that constitutively express secretagogin, a Ca(2+) sensor critical for the stimulus-driven assembly of the molecular machinery underpinning the fast regulated exocytosis of CRH at the median eminence. Cumulatively, we infer that CRH neurons are functionally and molecularly more diverse than previously thought. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 messenger RNA level in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells: potential implications for human stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Vamvakopoulos, N C; Sioutopoulou, T. O.; Mamuris, Z.; Marcoulatos, P.; Avgerinos, P. C.

    1996-01-01

    We report the regulation of type 1 receptor mRNA in Y-79 human retinoblastoma cells, grown in the absence or presence of pharmacological levels of phorbol esters, forskolin, glucocorticoids and their combinations. To control for inducibility and for assessing the sensitivity of the Y-79 system to glucocorticoids, corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA levels were measured in parallel. All treatments stimulated corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene expression relative to baseline....

  17. Levels of maternal serum corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) at midpregnancy in relation to maternal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yumin; Holzman, Claudia; Chung, Hwan; Senagore, Patricia; Talge, Nicole M; Siler-Khodr, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in maternal blood originates primarily from gestational tissues and elevated levels in midpregnancy have been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Investigators have hypothesized that high levels of maternal stress might lead to elevated CRH levels in pregnancy. Yet a few studies have measured maternal CRH levels among subgroups of women who experience disproportionate socioeconomic disadvantage, such as African-American and Hispanic women, and found that these groups have lower CRH levels in pregnancy. Our goal was to identify maternal characteristics related to CRH levels in midpregnancy and examine which if any of these factors help to explain race differences in CRH levels. METHODS The Pregnancy Outcomes and Community Health (POUCH) Study prospectively enrolled women at 15–27 weeks’ gestation from 52 clinics in five Michigan communities (1998–2004). Data from the POUCH Study were used to examine maternal demographics, anthropometrics, health behaviors, and psychosocial factors (independent variables) in relation to midpregnancy blood CRH levels modeled as log CRH pg/ml (dependent variable). Analyses were conducted within a subcohort from the POUCH Study (671 non-Hispanic Whites, 545 African Americans) and repeated in the subcohort subset with uncomplicated pregnancies (n=746). Blood levels of CRH and independent variables were ascertained at the time of enrollment. All regression models included week of enrollment as a covariate. In addition, final multivariable regression models alternately incorporated different psychosocial measures along with maternal demographics and weight. Psychosocial variables included measures of current depressive symptoms, perceived stress, coping style, hostility, mastery, anomie, and a chronic stressor (history of abuse as a child and adult). RESULTS In subcohort models, the adjusted mean CRH level was significantly lower in African Americans vs. non-Hispanic whites

  18. Effect of a corticotropin releasing hormone receptor antagonist on colonic sensory and motor function in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is presumed to be a disorder of the brain-gut link associated with an exaggerated response to stress. We hypothesised that peripheral administration of α-helical CRH (αhCRH), a non-selective CRH receptor antagonist, would improve gastrointestinal motility, visceral perception, and negative mood in response to gut stimulation in IBS patient...

  19. Genetic moderation of child maltreatment effects on depression and internalizing symptoms by serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter (NET), and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) genes in African American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A

    2014-11-01

    Genetic moderation of the effects of child maltreatment on depression and internalizing symptoms was investigated in a sample of low-income maltreated and nonmaltreated African American children (N = 1,096). Lifetime child maltreatment experiences were independently coded from Child Protective Services records and maternal report. Child depression and internalizing problems were assessed in the context of a summer research camp by self-report on the Children's Depression Inventory and adult counselor report on the Teacher Report Form. DNA was obtained from buccal cell or saliva samples and genotyped for polymorphisms of the following genes: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter, and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1. Analyses of covariance with age and gender as covariates were conducted, with maltreatment status and respective polymorphism as main effects and their Gene × Environment (G × E) interactions. Maltreatment consistently was associated with higher Children's Depression Inventory and Teacher Report Form symptoms. The results for child self-report symptoms indicated a G × E interaction for BDNF and maltreatment. In addition, BDNF and triallelic 5-HTTLPR interacted with child maltreatment in a G × G × E interaction. Analyses for counselor report of child anxiety/depression symptoms on the Teacher Report Form indicated moderation of child maltreatment effects by triallelic 5-HTTLPR. These effects were elaborated based on variation in developmental timing of maltreatment experiences. Norepinephrine transporter was found to further moderate the G × E interaction of 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment status, revealing a G × G × E interaction. This G × G × E was extended by consideration of variation in maltreatment subtype experiences. Finally, G × G × E effects were observed for the co-action of BDNF and the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1

  20. Modulation of Sleep Homeostasis by Corticotropin Releasing Hormone in REM Sleep-Deprived Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Borges Machado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that sleep recovery following different protocols of forced waking varies according to the level of stress inherent to each method. Sleep deprivation activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and increased corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH impairs sleep. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate how manipulations of the CRH system during the sleep deprivation period interferes with subsequent sleep rebound. Throughout 96 hours of sleep deprivation, separate groups of rats were treated i.c.v. with vehicle, CRH or with alphahelical CRH9−41, a CRH receptor blocker, twice/day, at 07:00 h and 19:00 h. Both treatments impaired sleep homeostasis, especially in regards to length of rapid eye movement sleep (REM and theta/delta ratio and induced a later decrease in NREM and REM sleep and increased waking bouts. These changes suggest that activation of the CRH system impact negatively on the homeostatic sleep response to prolonged forced waking. These results indicate that indeed, activation of the HPA axis—at least at the hypothalamic level—is capable to reduce the sleep rebound induced by sleep deprivation.

  1. Cloning and tissue distribution of the chicken type 2 corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groef, Bert; Grommen, Sylvia V H; Mertens, Inge; Schoofs, Liliane; Kühn, Eduard R; Darras, Veerle M

    2004-08-01

    We report the cloning of the complete coding sequence of the putative chicken type 2 corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor (CRH-R2) by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The chicken CRH-R2 is a 412-amino acid 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor, showing 87% identity to the Xenopus laevis and Oncorhynchus keta CRH-R2s, and 78-80% to mammalian CRH-R2s. The distribution of CRH-R2 mRNA was studied by RT-PCR analysis and compared to CRH-R1 distribution. Both CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 mRNA are expressed in the main chicken brain parts. In peripheral organs, CRH-R1 mRNA shows a more restricted distribution, whereas CRH-R2 mRNA is expressed in every tissue investigated, indicating that a number of actions of CRH and/or CRH-like peptides remain to be discovered in the chicken as well as in other vertebrates.

  2. Corticotropin releasing hormone in colonic mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, Y; Sano, H; Mukai, S; Asai, K; Kimura, S; Yamamura, Y; Kato, H; Chrousos, G P; Wilder, R L; Kondo, M

    1995-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is a key hormone in integrated response to stress, acting as the major regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Recently, local production of CRH has been detected in normal human colonic enterochromaffin cells. CRH is locally secreted in granulomatous and arthritic tissues in rats and humans, where it seems to act as a local proinflammatory agent. To find out if CRH is present in colonic tissues of patients with ulcerative colitis, this study examined the expression of this peptide in the large bowel of patients with ulcerative colitis. Colonic tissues of patients with ulcerative colitis obtained by endoscopic biopsy were immunostained with anti-CRH antibody. CRH messenger (m) RNA was also examined in biopsy specimens of ulcerative colitis by the reverse transcribed polymerase chain reaction method and by in situ hybridisation. Considerably enhanced expression of immunoreactive CRH was found in mucosal inflammatory cells. Intense staining with anti-CRH antibody was also shown in mucosal macrophages. CRH mRNA was expressed in mucosal epithelial cells. The expression of immunoreactive CRH in colonic mucosal epithelial cells of ulcerative colitis slightly increased, but not significantly, compared with normal colonic mucosal epithelial cells. These results suggest that CRH may play a part in the modulation of intestinal immune and inflammatory system, and as a modulator in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4A Figure 4B-4C Figure 5 PMID:7489943

  3. Combined Dexamethasone Suppression-Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Stimulation Test in Studies of Depression, Alcoholism, and Suicidal Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Sher

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis controls the secretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, corticotropin (adrenocorticotropic hormone, ACTH, and cortisol. The dexamethasone suppression test (DST is the most frequently used test to assess HPA system function in psychiatric disorders. Patients who have failed to suppress plasma cortisol secretion, i.e., who escape from the suppressive effect of dexamethasone, have a blunted glucocorticoid receptor response. After CRH became available for clinical studies, the DST was combined with CRH administration. The resulting combined dexamethasone suppression-corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation (DST–CRH test proved to be more sensitive in detecting HPA system changes than the DST. There is a growing interest in the use of the DEX-CRH test for psychiatric research. The DEX-CRH test has been used to study different psychiatric conditions. Major depression, alcoholism, and suicidal behavior are public health problems around the world. Considerable evidence suggests that HPA dysregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of depressive disorders, alcoholism, and suicidal behavior. Over the past 2 decades, there has been a shift from viewing excessive HPA activity in depression as an epiphenomenon to its having specific effects on symptom formation and cognition. The study of HPA function in depression, alcoholism, and suicidal behavior may yield new understanding of the pathophysiolgy of these conditions, and suggest new approaches for therapeutic interventions. The combined DEX-CRH test may become a useful neuroendocrinological tool for evaluating psychiatric patients.

  4. Corticotropin-releasing hormone expression in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy after ursodeoxycholic acid treatment: an initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fan; Zhang, Li; He, Mao Mao; Liu, Zheng Fei; Gao, Bing Xin; Wang, Xiao Dong

    2014-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is one of the most potent vasodilatory factors in the human feto-placental circulation. The expression of CRH was significantly down-regulated in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). One hundred pregnant women diagnosed with ICP at 34-34(+6) weeks of gestation agreed to participate in this prospective nested case-control study. Thirty ICP patients were finally recruited in this study, with 16 cases in the ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) group (UDCA 750 mg/d) and 14 cases in the control group (Transmetil 1000 mg/d or Essentiale 1368 mg/d). Maternal serum samples were obtained in diagnosis and at 37-37(+6) weeks of gestation. Placental tissues were obtained from participants after delivery. ELISA, enzymatic colorimetric and Western blotting were used to evaluate the concentrations of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bile acid (TBA) and CRH in maternal serum and expression of CRH in placenta tissues. The UDCA group had greater reduction in maternal serum ALT, AST and TBA levels in ICP patients (all p cholestasis (TBA ≥ 40 µmol/L). Further studies are warranted in different gestational weeks and TBA levels to provide more evidence for the correlation between UDCA treatment and CRH expression in ICP patients.

  5. Loss of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone markedly reduces anxiety behaviors in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Asai, Masato; Mahoney, Carrie E; Joachim, Maria; Shen, Yuan; Gunner, Georgia; Majzoub, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing paradigm posits that hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) regulates neuroendocrine functions such as adrenal glucocorticoid release, while extra-hypothalamic CRH plays a key role in stressor-triggered behaviors. Here we report that hypothalamus-specific Crh knockout mice (Sim1CrhKO mice, created by crossing Crhflox with Sim1Cre mice) have absent Crh mRNA and peptide mainly in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) but preserved Crh expression in other brain regions including amygdala and cerebral cortex. As expected, Sim1CrhKO mice exhibit adrenal atrophy as well as decreased basal, diurnal and stressor-stimulated plasma corticosterone secretion and basal plasma ACTH, but surprisingly, have a profound anxiolytic phenotype when evaluated using multiple stressors including open field, elevated plus maze, holeboard, light-dark box, and novel object recognition task. Restoring plasma corticosterone did not reverse the anxiolytic phenotype of Sim1CrhKO mice. Crh-Cre driver mice revealed that PVHCrh fibers project abundantly to cingulate cortex and the nucleus accumbens shell, and moderately to medial amygdala, locus coeruleus, and solitary tract, consistent with the existence of PVHCrh-dependent behavioral pathways. Although previous, nonselective attenuation of CRH production or action, genetically in mice and pharmacologically in humans, respectively, has not produced the anticipated anxiolytic effects, our data show that targeted interference specifically with hypothalamic Crh expression results in anxiolysis. Our data identify neurons that express both Sim1 and Crh as a cellular entry point into the study of CRH-mediated, anxiety-like behaviors and their therapeutic attenuation. PMID:27595593

  6. Elevated Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Human Pregnancy Increases the Risk of Postpartum Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Ilona S.; Glynn, Laura M.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Hobel, Calvin J.; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Postpartum depression (PPD) is common and has serious implications for the mother and her newborn. A possible link between placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) and PPD incidence has been discussed, but there is a lack of empirical evidence. Objective To determine whether accelerated pCRH increases throughout pregnancy are associated with PPD symptoms. Design Pregnant women were recruited into this longitudinal cohort study. Blood samples were obtained at 15, 19, 25, 31 and 37 weeks gestational age (GA) for assessment of pCRH, cortisol and ACTH. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a standardized questionnaire at the last four pregnancy visits and postpartum. Setting Subjects were recruited from two Southern California Medical Centers, and visits were conducted in university research laboratories. Participants 100 adult women with a singleton pregnancy. Main Outcome Measure PPD symptoms were assessed 8.7 weeks (SD = 2.94 wks) after delivery with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Results Sixteen women developed PPD symptoms. At 25 weeks GA, pCRH was a strong predictor of PPD symptoms (R2 = .21, β = .46, p < .001), an effect that remained significant after controlling for prenatal depressive symptoms. No significant associations were found for cortisol and ACTH. Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analyses revealed that pCRH at 25 weeks GA is a useful diagnostic test (area under the curve = .78, p = .001). Sensitivity (.75) and specificity (.74) at the ideal cut-off point (56.86 pg/ml pCRH) were high. Growth curve analyses indicated that pCRH trajectories in women with PPD symptoms are significantly accelerated between 23 and 26 weeks GA. Conclusion There is a critical period in mid-pregnancy during which pCRH is a sensitive and specific early diagnostic test for PPD symptoms. If replicated, these results have implications for identification and treatment of pregnant women at risk of PPD. PMID:19188538

  7. Risk of postpartum depressive symptoms with elevated corticotropin-releasing hormone in human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Ilona S; Glynn, Laura M; Dunkel-Schetter, Christine; Hobel, Calvin J; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A

    2009-02-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is common and has serious implications for the mother and her newborn infant. A possible link between placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) and PPD incidence has been hypothesized, but empirical evidence is lacking. To determine whether accelerated increases in pCRH throughout pregnancy are associated with PPD symptoms. Pregnant women were recruited into this longitudinal cohort study. Blood samples were obtained at 15, 19, 25, 31, and 37 weeks' gestational age (GA) for assessment of pCRH, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Depressive symptoms were assessed with a standardized questionnaire at the last 4 pregnancy visits and post partum. Subjects were recruited from 2 southern California medical centers, and visits were conducted in research laboratories. One hundred adult women with a singleton pregnancy. Main Outcome Measure Symptoms of PPD were assessed at a mean (SD) of 8.7 (2.94) weeks after delivery with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Sixteen women developed PPD symptoms. At 25 weeks' GA, pCRH was a strong predictor of PPD symptoms (R(2) = 0.21; beta = 0.46 [P < .001]), an effect that remained significant after controlling for prenatal depressive symptoms. No significant associations were found for cortisol and ACTH. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses revealed that pCRH at 25 weeks' GA is a possible diagnostic tool (area under the curve, 0.78 [P = .001]). Sensitivity (0.75) and specificity (0.74) at the ideal cutoff point (pCRH, 56.86 pg/mL) were moderate. Growth curve analyses indicated that the trajectories of pCRH in women with PPD symptoms are significantly accelerated from 23 to 26 weeks' GA. At a critical period in midpregnancy, pCRH is a sensitive and specific early diagnostic test for PPD symptoms. If replicated, these results have implications for the identification and treatment of pregnant women at risk for PPD.

  8. Corticotropin-releasing hormone family evolution: five ancestral genes remain in some lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C R; Bergqvist, Christina A; Félix, Rute C; Larhammar, Dan

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of the peptide family consisting of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the three urocortins (UCN1-3) has been puzzling due to uneven evolutionary rates. Distinct gene duplication scenarios have been proposed in relation to the two basal rounds of vertebrate genome doubling (2R) and the teleost fish-specific genome doubling (3R). By analyses of sequences and chromosomal regions, including many neighboring gene families, we show here that the vertebrate progenitor had two peptide genes that served as the founders of separate subfamilies. Then, 2R resulted in a total of five members: one subfamily consists of CRH1, CRH2, and UCN1. The other subfamily contains UCN2 and UCN3. All five peptide genes are present in the slowly evolving genomes of the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae (a lobe-finned fish), the spotted gar Lepisosteus oculatus (a basal ray-finned fish), and the elephant shark Callorhinchus milii (a cartilaginous fish). The CRH2 gene has been lost independently in placental mammals and in teleost fish, but is present in birds (except chicken), anole lizard, and the nonplacental mammals platypus and opossum. Teleost 3R resulted in an additional surviving duplicate only for crh1 in some teleosts including zebrafish (crh1a and crh1b). We have previously reported that the two vertebrate CRH/UCN receptors arose in 2R and that CRHR1 was duplicated in 3R. Thus, we can now conclude that this peptide-receptor system was quite complex in the ancestor of the jawed vertebrates with five CRH/UCN peptides and two receptors, and that crh and crhr1 were duplicated in the teleost fish tetraploidization. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  9. Corticotropin-releasing hormone: an autocrine hormone that promotes lipogenesis in human sebocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouboulis, Christos C; Seltmann, Holger; Hiroi, Naoki; Chen, WenChieh; Young, Maggie; Oeff, Marina; Scherbaum, Werner A; Orfanos, Constantin E; McCann, Samuel M; Bornstein, Stefan R

    2002-05-14

    Sebaceous glands may be involved in a pathway conceptually similar to that of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Such a pathway has been described and may occur in human skin and lately in the sebaceous glands because they express neuropeptide receptors. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is the most proximal element of the HPA axis, and it acts as central coordinator for neuroendocrine and behavioral responses to stress. To further examine the probability of an HPA equivalent pathway, we investigated the expression of CRH, CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP), and CRH receptors (CRH-R) in SZ95 sebocytes in vitro and their regulation by CRH and several other hormones. CRH, CRH-BP, CRH-R1, and CRH-R2 were detectable in SZ95 sebocytes at the mRNA and protein levels: CRH-R1 was the predominant type (CRH-R1/CRH-R2 = 2). CRH was biologically active on human sebocytes: it induced biphasic increase in synthesis of sebaceous lipids with a maximum stimulation at 10(-7) M and up-regulated mRNA levels of 3 beta- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta(5-4) isomerase, although it did not affect cell viability, cell proliferation, or IL-1 beta-induced IL-8 release. CRH, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 17 beta-estradiol did not modulate CRH-R expression, whereas testosterone at 10(-7) M down-regulated CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 mRNA expression at 6 to 24 h, and growth hormone (GH) switched CRH-R1 mRNA expression to CRH-R2 at 24 h. Based on these findings, CRH may be an autocrine hormone for human sebocytes that exerts homeostatic lipogenic activity, whereas testosterone and growth hormone induce CRH negative feedback. The findings implicate CRH in the clinical development of acne, seborrhea, androgenetic alopecia, skin aging, xerosis, and other skin disorders associated with alterations in lipid formation of sebaceous origin.

  10. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1) genetic variation and stress interact to influence reward learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Ryan; Santesso, Diane L; Fagerness, Jesen; Perlis, Roy H; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2011-09-14

    Stress is a general risk factor for psychopathology, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain largely unknown. Animal studies and limited human research suggest that stress can induce anhedonic behavior. Moreover, emerging data indicate that genetic variation within the corticotropin-releasing hormone type 1 receptor gene (CRHR1) at rs12938031 may promote psychopathology, particularly in the context of stress. Using an intermediate phenotypic neurogenetics approach, we assessed how stress and CRHR1 genetic variation (rs12938031) influence reward learning, an important component of anhedonia. Psychiatrically healthy female participants (n = 75) completed a probabilistic reward learning task during stress and no-stress conditions while 128-channel event-related potentials were recorded. Fifty-six participants were also genotyped across CRHR1. Response bias, an individual's ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward, was the primary behavioral variable of interest. The feedback-related positivity (FRP) in response to reward feedback was used as a neural index of reward learning. Relative to the no-stress condition, acute stress was associated with blunted response bias as well as a smaller and delayed FRP (indicative of disrupted reward learning) and reduced anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex activation to reward. Critically, rs12938031 interacted with stress to influence reward learning: both behaviorally and neurally, A homozygotes showed stress-induced reward learning abnormalities. These findings indicate that acute, uncontrollable stressors reduce participants' ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward, and that such effects are modulated by CRHR1 genotype. Homozygosity for the A allele at rs12938031 may increase risk for psychopathology via stress-induced reward learning deficits.

  11. Role of corticotropin-releasing hormone in irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukudo, Shin

    2007-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a major mediator of stress response in the brain-gut axis. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is presumed to be a disorder of the brain-gut link associated with exaggerated response to stress. We first showed that peripheral administration of CRH aggravated visceral sensorimotor function as well as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) response in IBS patients. We then administered alpha-helical CRH (alphahCRH), a non-selective CRH receptor antagonist among IBS patients. Electrical stimulation of the rectum induced significantly higher motility indices of the colon in IBS patients than in the controls. This response was significantly suppressed in IBS patients but not in the controls after administration of alphahCRH. Administration of alphahCRH induced a significant increase in the barostat bag volume of the controls but not in that of IBS patients. alphahCRH significantly reduced the ordinate scale of abdominal pain and anxiety evoked by electrical stimulation in IBS patients. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol were generally not suppressed by alphahCRH. Last, administration of CRH1-receptor (CRH-R1) specific antagonist blocked colorectal distention-induced sensitization of the visceral perception in rats. Moreover, pretreatment with CRH-R1 antagonist blocked colorectal distention-induced anxiety, which was measured with elevated plus-maze, in rats. Evidence supporting the concept that peripheral CRH and CRH-R1 play important roles in brain-gut sensitization is increasing. Several studies have identified immunoreactive CRH and urocortin as well as CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 mRNAs in human colonic mucosa. In addition, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction has revealed the expression of CRH-R1 mRNA in both the myenteric and submucosal plexus in the guinea pig. Application of CRH has been shown to evoke depolarizing responses associated with elevated excitability in both myenteric and submucosal neurons. On the other hand, peripheral

  12. Human fear acquisition deficits in relation to genetic variants of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 and the serotonin transporter - revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heitland, I; Groenink, L; van Gool, J M; Domschke, K; Reif, A; Baas, J M P

    We recently showed that a genetic polymorphism (rs878886) in the human corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) is associated with reduced fear conditioned responses to a threat cue. This is a potentially important finding considering that the failure to acquire fear contingencies can

  13. Gender difference in age-related number of corticotropin-releasing hormone-expressing neurons in the human hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and the role of sex hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, A.-M.; Swaab, D.F.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the total number of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-stained neurons in the human hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) increases with age. To determine whether this age-related change depends on gender and whether circulating sex hormones play a role, we

  14. Association between corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 and 2 (CRHR1 and CRHR2) gene polymorphisms and personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitobi, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Shinya; Kanehisa, Masayuki; Higuma, Haruka; Maruyama, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Shizuko; Inoue, Ayako; Imanaga, Junko; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Tsuru, Jusen; Hanada, Hiroaki; Akiyoshi, Jotaro

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is involved with personality traits. We examined the association between corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor (CRHR) genes and personality traits. We investigated the 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms of intron CRHR (six in CRHR1 and six in CRHR2, respectively) in 218 healthy volunteers using TaqMan PCR assays. Personality traits were assessed using the Revised NEO-Personality Inventory, the Temperament and Character Inventory, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. No significant associations were observed between CRHR1 and CRHR2 expression and personality traits. These results fail to provide support for an association of CRHR1 and CRHR2 with personality traits in a Japanese adult population.

  15. Role of Corticotropin-releasing Factor in Gastrointestinal Permeability

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The interface between the intestinal lumen and the mucosa is the location where the majority of ingested immunogenic particles face the scrutiny of the vast gastrointestinal immune system. Upon regular physiological conditions, the intestinal micro-flora and the epithelial barrier are well prepared to process daily a huge amount of food-derived antigens and non-immunogenic particles. Similarly, they are ready to prevent environmental toxins and microbial antigens to penetrate further and inte...

  16. Coordinate control of corticotropin, β-lipotropin, and β-endorphin release in mouse pituitary cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard G.; Herbert, Edward; Hinman, Michael; Shibuya, Haruo; Pert, Candace B.

    1978-01-01

    Hypothalamic extract stimulates the release of corticotropin (ACTH) and endorphins 2.5- to 30-fold in mouse pituitary tumor cell cultures (AtT-20/D16v line) and primary cell cultures from mouse anterior pituitary. ACTH and endorphin activities were measured by radioimmunoassay and immunoprecipitation. Pretreatment of tumor cell cultures with 1 μM dexamethasone reduced the stimulatory effect of the extract on release of ACTH and endorphins. Pretreatment of primary cell cultures with 10-6 M dexamethasone reduced the stimulatory effect of both vasopressin and the extract on the release of ACTH and endorphins. Release of ACTH and endorphin was coupled in both kinds of cultures in the basal, stimulated, and inhibited states. The molecular weight forms of ACTH and endorphin in tumor cell culture medium were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Radioimmunoassay and immunoprecipitation show that the 13,000-dalton and 4500-dalton forms of ACTH were present in about equal amounts in medium from cultures incubated with or without hypothalamic extract for 15 min, 30 min, or 2 hr. Smaller amounts of the high molecular weight forms of ACTH (20,000- to 23,000-dalton and 31,000-dalton ACTH) were observed in the culture medium at these times. The predominant forms of endorphin released after 20 min or 3 hr of incubation had molecular weights of 31,000, 11,700 (β-lipotropic hormone-size material) and 3500 (β-endorphin-size material). No degradation of the forms of endorphin released into the culture medium was observed after incubating the culture medium for 1.5 hr in the absence of cells. The proportions of the different forms of endorphin and ACTH present in the culture medium resembles that seen in cell extracts. PMID:217008

  17. Correlated memory defects and hippocampal dendritic spine loss after acute stress involve corticotropin-releasing hormone signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuncai; Rex, Christopher S; Rice, Courtney J; Dubé, Céline M; Gall, Christine M; Lynch, Gary; Baram, Tallie Z

    2010-07-20

    Stress affects the hippocampus, a brain region crucial for memory. In rodents, acute stress may reduce density of dendritic spines, the location of postsynaptic elements of excitatory synapses, and impair long-term potentiation and memory. Steroid stress hormones and neurotransmitters have been implicated in the underlying mechanisms, but the role of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), a hypothalamic hormone also released during stress within hippocampus, has not been elucidated. In addition, the causal relationship of spine loss and memory defects after acute stress is unclear. We used transgenic mice that expressed YFP in hippocampal neurons and found that a 5-h stress resulted in profound loss of learning and memory. This deficit was associated with selective disruption of long-term potentiation and of dendritic spine integrity in commissural/associational pathways of hippocampal area CA3. The degree of memory deficit in individual mice correlated significantly with the reduced density of area CA3 apical dendritic spines in the same mice. Moreover, administration of the CRH receptor type 1 (CRFR(1)) blocker NBI 30775 directly into the brain prevented the stress-induced spine loss and restored the stress-impaired cognitive functions. We conclude that acute, hours-long stress impairs learning and memory via mechanisms that disrupt the integrity of hippocampal dendritic spines. In addition, establishing the contribution of hippocampal CRH-CRFR(1) signaling to these processes highlights the complexity of the orchestrated mechanisms by which stress impacts hippocampal structure and function.

  18. Peripheral lipopolysaccharide administration transiently affects expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, corticotropin and proopiomelanocortin in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnydrig, Sabine; Korner, Lukas; Landweer, Svenja; Ernst, Beat; Walker, Gaby; Otten, Uwe; Kunz, Dieter

    2007-12-11

    Peripheral inflammation induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to cause functional impairments in the brain affecting memory and learning. One of mechanisms may be the interference with neurotrophin (NT) expression and function. In the current study we administered a single, high dose of LPS (3mg/kg, i.p.) into mice and investigated changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression within 1-6 days after LPS injection. Crude synaptosomes were isolated from brain tissue and subjected to Western-blot analyses. We found transient reductions in synaptosomal proBDNF- and BDNF protein expression, with a maximal decrease at day 3 as compared to saline injected controls. The time course of reduction of BDNF mRNA in whole brain extracts parallels the decrease in protein levels in synaptosomes. LPS effects in the central nervous system (CNS) are known to crucially involve the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We analysed the time course of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)- and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA expression. As observed for BDNF-, CRH- and POMC mRNA levels are also significantly reduced on day 3 indicating a comparable time course. These results suggest that peripheral inflammation causes a reduction of trophic supply in the brain, including BDNF at synaptic sites. The mechanisms involved could be a negative feedback of the activated HPA axis.

  19. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH)-Containing Neurons in the Immature Rat Hippocampal Formation: Light and Electron Microscopic Features and Colocalization With Glutamate Decarboxylase and Parvalbumin

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiao-Xin; Toth, Zsolt; Schultz, Linda; Ribak, Charles E; Tallie Z. Baram

    1998-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) excites hippocampal neurons and induces death of selected CA3 pyramidal cells in immature rats. These actions of CRH require activation of specific receptors that are abundant in CA3 during early postnatal development. Given the dramatic effects of CRH on hippocampal neurons and the absence of CRH-containing afferents to this region, we hypothesized that a significant population of CRHergic neurons exists in developing rat hippocampus. This study defined ...

  20. Impact of corticotropin-releasing hormone on gastrointestinal motility and adrenocorticotropic hormone in normal controls and patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Background—Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays a key role in modulating intestinal motility in stressed animals. 
Aims—To evaluate the effect of CRH on intestinal motility in humans and to determine whether patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have an exaggerated response to CRH. 
Subjects—Ten IBS patients diagnosed by Rome criteria and 10 healthy controls. 
Methods—CRH (2 µg/kg) was intravenously administered during duodenal and colonic manometry and plasma ...

  1. Low levels of corticotropin-releasing hormone during early pregnancy are associated with precocious maturation of the human fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Quetzal A; Buss, Claudia; Davis, Elysia Poggi; Gierczak, Matt; Pattillo, Carol; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A

    2008-01-01

    Elevation in placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) during the last trimester of pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk for preterm delivery. Less is known about the consequences for the human fetus exposed to high levels of pCRH early in pregnancy. pCRH levels were measured in 138 pregnant women at least once at 15, 20 and 25 weeks of gestation. At 25 weeks of gestation, fetal heart rate (FHR) responses to a startling vibroacoustic stimulus (VAS) were recorded as an index of maturity. pCRH levels at 15 weeks of gestation, but at no later point, predicted FHR responses to the VAS. Fetuses exposed to the lowest concentrations of pCRH at 15 weeks of gestation exhibited a distinguishable response to the VAS, whereas fetuses exposed to higher levels of pCRH did not respond. The findings suggest that exposure to low levels of pCRH early in gestation may be optimal and associated with a response pattern indicating greater maturity. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. On the function of placental corticotropin-releasing hormone: a role in maternal-fetal conflicts over blood glucose concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangestad, Steven W; Caldwell Hooper, Ann E; Eaton, Melissa A

    2012-11-01

    Throughout the second and third trimesters, the human placenta (and the placenta in other anthropoid primates) produces substantial quantities of corticotropin-releasing hormone (placental CRH), most of which is secreted into the maternal bloodstream. During pregnancy, CRH concentrations rise over 1000-fold. The advantages that led selection to favour placental CRH production and secretion are not yet fully understood. Placental CRH stimulates the production of maternal adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) and cortisol, leading to substantial increases in maternal serum cortisol levels during the third trimester. These effects are puzzling in light of widespread theory that cortisol has harmful effects on the fetus. The maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis becomes less sensitive to cortisol during pregnancy, purportedly to protect the fetus from cortisol exposure. Researchers, then, have often looked for beneficial effects of placental CRH that involve receptors outside the HPA system, such as the uterine myometrium (e.g. the placental clock hypothesis). An alternative view is proposed here: the beneficial effect of placental CRH to the fetus lies in the fact that it does stimulate the production of cortisol, which, in turn, leads to greater concentrations of glucose in the maternal bloodstream available for fetal consumption. In this view, maternal HPA insensitivity to placental CRH likely reflects counter-adaptation, as the optimal rate of cortisol production for the fetus exceeds that for the mother. Evidence pertaining to this proposal is reviewed. © 2012 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2012 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  3. Low Levels of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone during Early Pregnancy Are Associated with Precocious Maturation of the Human Fetus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Quetzal A.; Buss, Claudia; Davis, Elysia Poggi; Gierczak, Matt; Pattillo, Carol; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A.

    2010-01-01

    Elevation in placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) during the last trimester of pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk for preterm delivery. Less is known about the consequences for the human fetus exposed to high levels of pCRH early in pregnancy. pCRH levels were measured in 138 pregnant women at least once at 15, 20 and 25 weeks of gestation. At 25 weeks of gestation, fetal heart rate (FHR) responses to a startling vibroacoustic stimulus (VAS) were recorded as an index of maturity. pCRH levels at 15 weeks of gestation, but at no later point, predicted FHR responses to the VAS. Fetuses exposed to the lowest concentrations of pCRH at 15 weeks of gestation exhibited a distinguishable response to the VAS, whereas fetuses exposed to higher levels of pCRH did not respond. The findings suggest that exposure to low levels of pCRH early in gestation may be optimal and associated with a response pattern indicating greater maturity. PMID:19127063

  4. Linkage of congenital isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency to the corticotropin releasing hormone locus using simple sequence repeat polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyllo, J.H.; Collins, M.M.; Vetter, K.L. [Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-29

    Genetic screening techniques using simple sequence repeat polymorphisms were applied to investigate the molecular nature of congenital isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency. We hypothesize that this rare cause of hypocortisolism shared by a brother and sister with two unaffected sibs and unaffected parents is inherited as an autosomal recessive single gene mutation. Genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis controlling cortisol sufficiency were investigated for a causal role in this disorder. Southern blotting showed no detectable mutations of the gene encoding pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), the ACTH precursor. Other candidate genes subsequently considered were those encoding neuroendocrine convertase-1, and neuroendocrine convertase-2 (NEC-1, NEC-2), and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Tests for linkage were performed using polymorphic di- and tetranucleotide simple sequence repeat markers flanking the reported map locations for POMC, NEC-1, NEC-2, and CRH. The chromosomal haplotypes determined by the markers flanking the loci for POMC, NEC-1, and NEC-2 were not compatible with linkage. However, 22 individual markers defining the chromosomal haplotypes flanking CRH were compatible with linkage of the disorder to the immediate area of this gene of chromosome 8. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the ACTH deficiency in this family is due to an abnormality of CRH gene structure or expression. These results illustrate the useful application of high density genetic maps constructed with simple sequence repeat markers for inclusion/exclusion studies of candidate genes in even very small nuclear families segregating for unusual phenotypes. 25 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Periconceptional undernutrition suppresses cortisol response to arginine vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge in adult sheep offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, M H; Bloomfield, F H; Jaquiery, A L; Todd, S E; Thorstensen, E B; Harding, J E

    2012-02-01

    Poor maternal nutrition during pregnancy can result in increased disease risk in adult offspring. Many of these effects are proposed to be mediated via altered hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) function, and are sex and age specific. Maternal undernutrition around the time of conception alters HPAA function in foetal and early postnatal life, but there are limited conflicting data about later effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of moderate periconceptional undernutrition on HPAA function of offspring of both sexes longitudinally, from juvenile to adult life. Ewes were undernourished from 61 days before until 30 days after conception or fed ad libitum. HPAA function in offspring was assessed by arginine vasopressin plus corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge at 4, 10 and 18 months. Plasma cortisol response was lower in males than in females, and was not different between singles and twins. Periconceptional undernutrition suppressed offspring plasma cortisol but not adrenocorticotropic hormone responses. In males, this suppression was apparent by 4 months, and was more profound by 10 months, with no further change by 18 months. In females, suppression was first observed at 10 months and became more profound by 18 months. Maternal undernutrition limited to the periconceptional period has a prolonged, sex-dependent effect on adrenal function in the offspring.

  6. Associations between Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Related Genes and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaka Sasaki

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common functional disorder with distinct features of stress-related pathophysiology. A key mediator of the stress response is corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH. Although some candidate genes have been identified in stress-related disorders, few studies have examined CRH-related gene polymorphisms. Therefore, we tested our hypothesis that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in CRH-related genes influence the features of IBS.In total, 253 individuals (123 men and 130 women participated in this study. They comprised 111 IBS individuals and 142 healthy controls. The SNP genotypes in CRH (rs28364015 and rs6472258 and CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP (rs10474485 were determined by direct sequencing and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The emotional states of the subjects were evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, and the Self-rating Depression Scale.Direct sequencing of the rs28364015 SNP of CRH revealed no genetic variation among the study subjects. There was no difference in the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of rs6472258 and rs10474485 between IBS individuals and controls. However, IBS subjects with diarrhea symptoms without the rs10474485 A allele showed a significantly higher emotional state score than carriers.These results suggest that the CRH and CRH-BP genes have no direct effect on IBS status. However, the CRH-BP SNP rs10474485 has some effect on IBS-related emotional abnormalities and resistance to psychosocial stress.

  7. Association of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) genetic variants with acute bronchodilator response in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Audrey H.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Lazarus, Ross; Xu, Jingsong; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Lima, John J.; Irvin, Charles G.; Hanrahan, John P.; Lange, Christoph; Weiss, Scott T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Corticotropin - releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) participates in smooth muscle relaxation response and may influence acute airway bronchodilator response to short – acting β2 agonist treatment of asthma. We aim to assess associations between genetic variants of CRHR2 and acute bronchodilator response in asthma. Methods We investigated 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms in CRHR2 for associations with acute bronchodilator response to albuterol in 607 Caucasian asthmatic subjects recruited as part of the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP). Replication was conducted in two Caucasian adult asthma cohorts – a cohort of 427 subjects enrolled in a completed clinical trial conducted by Sepracor Inc. (MA, USA) and a cohort of 152 subjects enrolled in the Clinical Trial of Low-Dose Theopylline and Montelukast (LODO) conducted by the American Lung Association Asthma Clinical Research Centers. Results Five variants were significantly associated with acute bronchodilator response in at least one cohort (p-value ≤ 0.05). Variant rs7793837 was associated in CAMP and LODO (p-value = 0.05 and 0.03, respectively) and haplotype blocks residing at the 5’ end of CRHR2 were associated with response in all three cohorts. Conclusion We report for the first time, at the gene level, replicated associations between CRHR2 and acute bronchodilator response. While no single variant was significantly associated in all three cohorts, the findings that variants at the 5’ end of CRHR2 are associated in each of three cohorts strongly suggest that the causative variants reside in this region and its genetic effect, although present, is likely to be weak. PMID:18408560

  8. Effect of a corticotropin releasing hormone receptor antagonist on colonic sensory and motor function in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagami, Y; Shimada, Y; Tayama, J; Nomura, T; Satake, M; Endo, Y; Shoji, T; Karahashi, K; Hongo, M; Fukudo, S

    2004-07-01

    Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is presumed to be a disorder of the brain-gut link associated with an exaggerated response to stress. We hypothesised that peripheral administration of alpha-helical CRH (alphahCRH), a non-selective CRH receptor antagonist, would improve gastrointestinal motility, visceral perception, and negative mood in response to gut stimulation in IBS patients. Ten normal healthy subjects and 10 IBS patients, diagnosed according to the Rome II criteria, were studied. The tone of the descending colon and intraluminal pressure of the sigmoid colon were measured at baseline, during rectal electrical stimulation (ES), and at recovery after administration of saline. Visceral perception after colonic distension or rectal ES was evaluated as threshold values on an ordinate scale. The same measurements were repeated after administration of alphahCRH (10 micro g/kg). ES induced significantly higher motility indices of the colon in IBS patients compared with controls. This response was significantly suppressed in IBS patients but not in controls after administration of alphahCRH. Administration of alphahCRH induced a significant increase in the barostat bag volume of controls but not in that of IBS patients. alphahCRH significantly reduced the ordinate scale of abdominal pain and anxiety evoked by ES in IBS patients. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone and serum cortisol levels were generally not suppressed by alphahCRH. Peripheral administration of alphahCRH improves gastrointestinal motility, visceral perception, and negative mood in response to gut stimulation, without affecting the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in IBS patients.

  9. Neural circuitry underlying the central hypertensive action of nesfatin-1: melanocortins, corticotropin-releasing hormone, and oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosten, Gina L C; Samson, Willis K

    2014-05-15

    Nesfatin-1 is produced in the periphery and in the brain where it has been demonstrated to regulate appetite, stress hormone secretion, and cardiovascular function. The anorexigenic action of central nesfatin-1 requires recruitment of neurons producing the melanocortins and centrally projecting oxytocin (OT) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons. We previously have shown that two components of this pathway, the central melanocortin and oxytocin systems, contribute to the hypertensive action of nesfatin-1 as well. We hypothesized that the cardiovascular effect of nesfatin-1 also was dependent on activation of neurons expressing CRH receptors, and that the order of activation of the melanocortin-CRH-oxytocin circuit was preserved for both the anorexigenic and hypertensive actions of the peptide. Pretreatment of male rats with the CRH-2 receptor antagonist astressin2B abrogated nesfatin-1-induced increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP). Furthermore, the hypertensive action of CRH was blocked by pretreatment with an oxytocin receptor antagonist ornithine vasotocin (OVT), indicating that the hypertensive effect of nesfatin-1 may require activation of oxytocinergic (OTergic) neurons in addition to recruitment of CRH neurons. Interestingly, we found that the hypertensive effect of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) itself was not blocked by either astressin2B or OVT. These data suggest that while α-MSH-producing neurons are part of a core melanocortin-CRH-oxytocin circuit regulating food intake, and a subpopulation of melanocortin neurons activated by nesfatin-1 do mediate the hypertensive action of the peptide, α-MSH can signal independently from this circuit to increase MAP.

  10. Gene × Environment interaction and resilience: effects of child maltreatment and serotonin, corticotropin releasing hormone, dopamine, and oxytocin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A

    2012-05-01

    In this investigation, gene-environment interaction effects in predicting resilience in adaptive functioning among maltreated and nonmaltreated low-income children (N = 595) were examined. A multicomponent index of resilient functioning was derived and levels of resilient functioning were identified. Variants in four genes (serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region, corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1, dopamine receptor D4-521C/T, and oxytocin receptor) were investigated. In a series of analyses of covariance, child maltreatment demonstrated a strong negative main effect on children's resilient functioning, whereas no main effects for any of the genotypes of the respective genes were found. However, gene-environment interactions involving genotypes of each of the respective genes and maltreatment status were obtained. For each respective gene, among children with a specific genotype, the relative advantage in resilient functioning of nonmaltreated compared to maltreated children was stronger than was the case for nonmaltreated and maltreated children with other genotypes of the respective gene. Across the four genes, a composite of the genotypes that more strongly differentiated resilient functioning between nonmaltreated and maltreated children provided further evidence of genetic variations influencing resilient functioning in nonmaltreated children, whereas genetic variation had a negligible effect on promoting resilience among maltreated children. Additional effects were observed for children based on the number of subtypes of maltreatment children experienced, as well as for abuse and neglect subgroups. Finally, maltreated and nonmaltreated children with high levels of resilience differed in their average number of differentiating genotypes. These results suggest that differential resilient outcomes are based on the interaction between genes and developmental experiences.

  11. Corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulates expression of leptin, 11beta-HSD2 and syncytin-1 in primary human trophoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahlbusch Fabian B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The placental syncytiotrophoblast is the major source of maternal plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH in the second half of pregnancy. Placental CRH exerts multiple functions in the maternal organism: It induces the adrenal secretion of cortisol via the stimulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone, regulates the timing of birth via its actions in the myometrium and inhibits the invasion of extravillous trophoblast cells in vitro. However, the auto- and paracrine actions of CRH on the syncytiotrophoblast itself are unknown. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR is accompanied by an increase in placental CRH, which could be of pathophysiological relevance for the dysregulation in syncytialisation seen in IUGR placentas. Methods We aimed to determine the effect of CRH on isolated primary trophoblastic cells in vitro. After CRH stimulation the trophoblast syncytialisation rate was monitored via syncytin-1 gene expression and beta-hCG (beta-human chorionic gonadotropine ELISA in culture supernatant. The expression of the IUGR marker genes leptin and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11beta-HSD2 was measured continuously over a period of 72 h. We hypothesized that CRH might attenuate syncytialisation, induce leptin, and reduce 11beta-HSD2 expression in primary villous trophoblasts, which are known features of IUGR. Results CRH did not influence the differentiation of isolated trophoblasts into functional syncytium as determined by beta-hCG secretion, albeit inducing syncytin-1 expression. Following syncytialisation, CRH treatment significantly increased leptin and 11beta-HSD2 expression, as well as leptin secretion into culture supernatant after 48 h. Conclusion The relevance of CRH for placental physiology is underlined by the present in vitro study. The induction of leptin and 11beta-HSD2 in the syncytiotrophoblast by CRH might promote fetal nutrient supply and placental corticosteroid metabolism in the phase

  12. Dehydration-induced drinking decreases Fos expression in hypothalamic paraventricular neurons expressing vasopressin but not corticotropin-releasing hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotus, Cheryl; Arnhold, Michelle M; Engeland, William C

    2007-03-01

    Water-restricted (WR) rats exhibit a rapid suppression of plasma corticosterone following drinking. The present study monitored Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos) to assess the effect of WR-induced drinking on the activity of vasopressin (VP)-positive magnocellular and parvocellular neurons and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-positive parvocellular neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Adult male rats received water for 30 min (WR) in the post meridiem (PM) each day for 6 days and were killed without receiving water or at 1 h after receiving water for 15 min. In WR rats, Fos increased in VP magnocellular and parvocellular neurons but not CRH neurons. After drinking, Fos was reduced in VP magnocellular and parvocellular neurons but did not change in CRH neurons. To assess the severity of osmotic stress, rats were sampled throughout the final day of WR. Plasma osmolality, hematocrit and plasma VP were increased throughout the day before PM rehydration, and plasma ACTH and corticosterone were elevated at 1230 and 1430, respectively, showing that WR activates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity during the early PM before the time of rehydration. To determine the effects of WR-induced drinking on CRH neurons activated by acute stress, WR rats underwent restraint. Restraint increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone and Fos in CRH neurons; although rehydration reduced plasma ACTH and Fos expression in VP neurons, Fos in CRH neurons was not affected. These results suggest that inhibition of VP magnocellular and parvocellular neurons, but not CRH parvocellular neurons, contributes to the suppression of corticosterone after WR-induced drinking.

  13. Fetal exposure to placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) programs developmental trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Curt A

    2015-10-01

    The maternal endocrine stress system is profoundly altered during the course of human pregnancy. The human placenta expresses the genes for CRH as early as the seventh week of gestation and it is the expotential increase in placental CRH (pCRH) over the course of human gestation that is responsible for the greatest modification in the maternal stress system. The bi-directional placental release of hormones into the maternal and fetal compartments has profound influences for both. The influential Fetal Programming model predicted that early or fetal exposures to maternal signals of threat or adverse conditions have lifelong consequences for health outcomes. A basic assumption of this model was that developing organisms play a dynamic role in their own construction. Data are reviewed and new data are presented that elevated pCRH over the course of human gestation plays a fundamental role in the organization of the fetal nervous system, modifies birth phenotype (the timing of the onset of spontaneous labor and delivery), and influences developmental, temperamental and metabolic trajectories. Evidence for sex differences and conserved function across species is presented. Finally, a model is presented that proposes several pathways that pCRH can program risk for health and disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulates cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene (CART1) expression through CRH type 1 receptor (CRHR1) in chicken anterior pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Chunheng; Cai, Guoqing; Huang, Long; Deng, Qiuyang; Lin, Dongliang; Cui, Lin; Wang, Yajun; Li, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide(s) is generally viewed as neuropeptide(s) and can control food intake in vertebrates, however, our recent study revealed that CART1 peptide is predominantly expressed in chicken anterior pituitary, suggesting that cCART1 peptide is a novel pituitary hormone in chickens and its expression is likely controlled by hypothalamic factor(s). To test this hypothesis, in this study, we examined the spatial expression of CART1 in chicken anterior pituitary and investigated the effect of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on pituitary cCART1 expression. The results showed that: 1) CART1 is expressed in both caudal and cephalic lobes of chicken anterior pituitary, revealed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), western blot and immuno-histochemical staining; 2) CRH potently stimulates cCART1 mRNA expression in cultured chick pituitary cells, as examined by qPCR, and this effect is blocked by CP154526 (and not K41498), an antagonist specific for chicken CRH type I receptor (cCRHR1), suggesting that cCRHR1 expressed on corticotrophs mediates this action; 3) the stimulatory effect of CRH on pituitary cCART1 expression is inhibited by pharmacological drugs targeting the intracellular AC/cAMP/PKA, PLC/IP3/Ca(2+), and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. This finding, together with the functional coupling of these signaling pathways to cCRHR1 expressed in CHO cells demonstrated by luciferase reporter assay systems, indicates that these intracellular signaling pathways coupled to cCRHR1 can mediate CRH action. Collectively, our present study offers the first substantial evidence that hypothalamic CRH can stimulate pituitary CART1 expression via activation of CRHR1 in a vertebrate species.

  15. Plasma adiponectin levels are increased despite insulin resistance in corticotropin-releasing hormone transgenic mice, an animal model of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinahara, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Mitsuru; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Nakayama, Shuichi; Noguchi, Toru; Kambayashi, Machiko; Okada, Yasushi; Tsuda, Masayuki; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Hashimoto, Kozo; Terada, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Adiponectin (AdN), an adipokine derived from the adipose tissue, has an insulin-sensitizing effect, and plasma AdN is shown to be decreased in obesity and/or insulin resistant state. To clarify whether changes in AdN are also responsible for the development of glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance, we examined AdN concentration in plasma and AdN expression in the adipose tissue, using corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) transgenic mouse (CRH-Tg), an animal model of Cushing syndrome. We found, unexpectedly, that plasma AdN levels in CRHTg were significantly higher than those in wild-type littermates (wild-type: 19.7+/-2.5, CRH-Tg: 32.4+/-3.1 microg/mL, pAdN mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in the adipose tissue of CRH-Tg. Bilateral adrenalectomy in CRH-Tg eliminated both their Cushing's phenotype and their increase in plasma AdN levels (wild-type/sham: 9.4+/-0.5, CRH-Tg/sham: 15.7+/-2.0, CRH-Tg/ADX: 8.5+/-0.4 microg/mL). These results strongly suggest that AdN is not a major factor responsible for the development of insulin resistance in Cushing syndrome. Our data also suggest that glucocorticoid increases plasma AdN levels but decreases AdN expression in adipocytes, the latter being explained possibly by the decrease in AdN metabolism in the Cushing state.

  16. Serum blood metabolite response and evaluation of select organ weight, histology and cardiac morphology of beef heifers exposed to a dual corticotropin-releasing hormone and vasopressin challenge following supplementation of

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to: 1) determine if supplementation of Zilpaterol Hydrochloride (ZH) altered select organ weights, histology and cardiac anatomical features at harvest and 2) determine if administration of a corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (VP) challenge followi...

  17. Spectrum of Adrenal Dysfunction in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Evaluation of Adrenal and Pituitary Reserve with ACTH and Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, P U; Papadopoulos, A D; Wardlaw, S L; Goland, R S

    1997-07-01

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been reported to develop abnormalities of the endocrine system and in particular of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. To define the abnormalities of HPA function in AIDS patients better, we performed ACTH and ovine corticotropin-releasing hormone (oCRH) testing in a group of AIDS patients and oCRH testing in a group of healthy subjects. Our study found that in AIDS patients with normal ACTH testing, oCRH testing revealed a variety of subclinical abnormalities of ACTH and cortisol responses. Although we did not find frank adrenal insufficiency in any of these AIDS patients, it remains to be determined if any of the subclinical abnormalities we identified are predictive of clinically significant adrenal insufficiency; it may be that as AIDS patients live longer, the subclinical abnormalities will progress to adrenal insufficiency. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:173-180). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  18. Combined quantification of corticotropin-releasing hormone, cortisol-to-cortisone ratio and progesterone by liquid chromatography-Tandem mass spectrometry in placental tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlbusch, Fabian B; Ruebner, Matthias; Rascher, Wolfgang; Rauh, Manfred

    2013-09-01

    With mid-gestation the production of placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) starts to steadily increase. The fetal peptide CRH excerts direct functions at the feto-maternal interface (vasodilatation, timing of birth) via its interaction with progesterone and indirectly ensures maturation and growth of fetal organ systems for delivery by driving fetal cortisol production via its induction of adrenocorticotropic hormone release. This feedback loop is tightly controlled by the amount of enzymatic cortisol/cortisone turnover in the placental syncytiotrophoblast by 11β-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2). Traditionally, placental tissue hormones have been quantified by immunological methods (e.g. RIA or ELISA), which have the drawback of possible cross-reactivity and tissue perturbations. Most importantly, it is not possible to quantify CRH and steroid hormones, such as cortisol, cortisone and progesterone together in the same sample with these methods. Hence, we aimed to develop and validate a quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) method for multi-modal quantification of these placental hormones: While CRH was readily detectable throughout the placenta, the placental levels of progesterone and especially cortisol and cortisone were higher at the placental base facing the maternal side. The HPLC-MS/MS procedure showed excellent selectivity and sufficient limit of quantification in placental tissue homogenates to allow for simultaneous detection of CRH, cortisol and cortisone, and progesterone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Association of glucocorticoid and type 1 corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors gene variants and risk for depression during pregnancy and post-partum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Neelam; Darwin, Lucy; Nishigandh, Deole; Ngianga-Bakwin, Kandala; Smith, Steve C; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K

    2013-09-01

    Women with postnatal depression (PND) appear to have abnormal hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis responses to stress, which might involve a genetic variability component. We investigated association of genetic variants in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, NR3C1) and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) genes with increased risk for PND. Two hundred pregnant women were recruited prospectively and PND risk was assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) during pregnancy and again 2-8 weeks post-natally (CW-GAPND study). The BclI and ER22/23EK single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the GR and the haplotype-tagged rs1876828, rs242939 and rs242941 SNPs of the CRHR1 associated with genetic risk to depressive disorders were genotyped. A cut-off score of 10 was used to detect increased risk of PND. Association analysis was carried out in 140 patients that completed the study protocol. The BclI and rs242939 SNPs were over-represented in women with postnatal EPDS score ≥10 with significant allele association (p = 0.011 and genetics of high-risk for depression during pregnancy and postpartum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulates mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 expression via a PLC/PKC-dependent signaling pathway in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Hui; Xu, Yongjun; Chen, Yanming; Zhang, Yanmin; Ni, Xin

    2012-10-15

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) has been shown to modulate dendritic development in hippocampus. Mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 (MKLP1) plays key roles in dendritic differentiation. In the present study, we examined the effects of CRH on MKLP1 expression in cultured hippocampal neurons and determine subsequent signaling pathways involved. CRH dose-dependently increased MKLP1 mRNA and protein expression. This effect can be reversed by CRHR1 antagonist but not by CRHR2 antagonist. CRHR1 knockdown impaired this effect of CRH. CRH stimulated GTP-bound Gαs protein and phosphorylated phospholipase C (PLC)-β3 expression, which were blocked by CRHR1 antagonist. Transfection of GP antagonist-2A, an inhibitory peptide of Gαq protein, blocked CRH-induced phosphorylated PLC-β3 expression. PLC and PKC inhibitors completely blocked whereas adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA inhibitors did not affect CRH-induced MKLP1 expression. Our results indicate that CRH act on CRHR1 to induce MKLP1 expression via PLC/PKC signaling pathway. CRH may regulate MKLP1 expression, thereby modulating dendritic development.

  1. Corticotropin-releasing hormone-mediated metamorphosis in the neotenic axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum: synergistic involvement of thyroxine and corticoids on brain type II deiodinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Eduard R; De Groef, Bert; Van der Geyten, Serge; Darras, Veerle M

    2005-08-01

    In the present study, morphological changes leading to complete metamorphosis have been induced in the neotenic axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum using a submetamorphic dose of T(4) together with an injection of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). An injection of CRH alone is ineffective in this regard presumably due to a lack of thyrotropic stimulation. Using this low hormone profile for induction of metamorphosis, the deiodinating enzymes D2 and D3 known to be present in amphibians were measured in liver and brain 24h following an intraperitoneal injection. An injection of T(4) alone did not influence liver nor brain D2 and D3, but dexamethasone (DEX) or CRH alone or in combination with T(4) decreased liver D2 and D3. Brain D2 activity was slightly increased with a higher dose of DEX, though CRH did not have this effect. A profound synergistic effect occurred when T(4) and DEX or CRH were injected together, in the dose range leading to metamorphosis, increasing brain D2 activity more than fivefold. This synergistic effect was not found in the liver. It is concluded that brain T(3) availability may play an important role for the onset of metamorphosis in the neotenic axolotl.

  2. Blunted ACTH and cortisol responses to systemic injection of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in fibromyalgia: role of somatostatin and CRH-binding protein.

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    Riedel, Walter; Schlapp, Ulrike; Leck, Stefanie; Netter, Petra; Neeck, Gunther

    2002-06-01

    Thirteen female patients suffering from fibromyalgia (FM) and thirteen female age-matched controls were intravenously injected with a bolus dose of 100 microg corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), and the evoked secretion pattern of ACTH, cortisol, somatostatin, and growth hormone (GH) was followed up for two hours, together with the plasma levels of CRH. The increases of ACTH and cortisol following CRH were not significantly different between controls and FM patients. The increase of plasma CRH following its injection was significantly higher in FM patients and lasted about 45 min, paralleled by an increase of somatostatin with a similar time course. Basal GH levels were significantly lower in FM patients. GH increased in FM patients 90 min after injection of CRH, coincident with decreasing CRH and somatostatin levels, while GH levels in controls rather decreased with the lowest values occurring 90 min after CRH. The results support the concept that the hormonal secretion pattern frequently observed in FM patients is primarily caused by CRH, possibly as a response to chronic pain and stress. The elevated levels of CRH in the circulation of FM patients suggest elevated levels of CRH-binding protein, which could explain why the levels of ACTH and cortisol between controls and FM following CRH do not differ.

  3. Endogenous GLP-1 acts on paraventricular nucleus to suppress feeding: projection from nucleus tractus solitarius and activation of corticotropin-releasing hormone, nesfatin-1 and oxytocin neurons.

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    Katsurada, Kenichi; Maejima, Yuko; Nakata, Masanori; Kodaira, Misato; Suyama, Shigetomo; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Kario, Kazuomi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2014-08-22

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have been used to treat type 2 diabetic patients and shown to reduce food intake and body weight. The anorexigenic effects of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor agonists are thought to be mediated primarily via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). GLP-1, an intestinal hormone, is also localized in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1, particularly that in the NTS neurons, in feeding regulation remains to be established. The present study examined whether the NTS GLP-1 neurons project to PVN and whether the endogenous GLP-1 acts on PVN to restrict feeding. Intra-PVN injection of GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin (9-39) increased food intake. Injection of retrograde tracer into PVN combined with immunohistochemistry for GLP-1 in NTS revealed direct projection of NTS GLP-1 neurons to PVN. Moreover, GLP-1 evoked Ca(2+) signaling in single neurons isolated from PVN. The majority of GLP-1-responsive neurons were immunoreactive predominantly to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and nesfatin-1, and less frequently to oxytocin. These results indicate that endogenous GLP-1 targets PVN to restrict feeding behavior, in which the projection from NTS GLP-1 neurons and activation of CRH and nesfatin-1 neurons might be implicated. This study reveals a neuronal basis for the anorexigenic effect of endogenous GLP-1 in the brain.

  4. Marked changes of arginine vasopressin, oxytocin, and corticotropin-releasing hormone in hypophysial portal plasma after pituitary stalk damage in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makara, G B; Sutton, S; Otto, S; Plotsky, P M

    1995-05-01

    Mechanical compression of the pituitary stalk with the help of a blunt stereotaxic knife results in posterior pituitary denervation (PPD) and sprouting proximal to the injury, leading to formation of an ectopic neurohypophysis in the stalk. This provides an experimental model for those cases in which traumatic damage severs the nerve fibers to the neural lobe but does not obliterate the hypophysial-portal circulation. The effect of PPD on the hypophysial-portal concentration profile of putative ACTH secretagogues as well as basal and stimulated ACTH secretion in vitro were investigated at varying times after PPD. The contents of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) in extracts of the stalk median eminence 1 week after PPD were markedly elevated, whereas corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) content was unaffected. Levels of these three neuropeptides in hypophysial-portal blood collected under anesthesia from the proximal stump of the transected stalk (or the ectopic neural lobe) were measured at weekly intervals in groups of rats after sham or PPD surgery. Hypophysial-portal AVP levels showed a monotonic increase with time after PPD from a 1.8-fold elevation at 1 week post-PPD to a maximum concentration 6-fold greater than that in sham groups at 4 weeks post-PPD. Portal plasma OT levels also exhibited extreme elevation. In contrast, portal plasma CRH levels showed an initial 72% decline 1 week post-PPD. We suggest that mechanical damage to the pituitary stalk and the subsequent sprouting redirected secretion of AVP and OT from the neural lobe to the pituitary stalk. This caused sustained elevations of portal plasma concentrations of AVP and OT. The resulting tonic exposure to AVP and/or OT may down-regulate anterior pituitary receptors to these neurohypophyseal peptides and indirectly decrease CRH release into the portal circulation.

  5. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-containing neurons in the immature rat hippocampal formation: light and electron microscopic features and colocalization with glutamate decarboxylase and parvalbumin.

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    Yan, X X; Toth, Z; Schultz, L; Ribak, C E; Baram, T Z

    1998-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) excites hippocampal neurons and induces death of selected CA3 pyramidal cells in immature rats. These actions of CRH require activation of specific receptors that are abundant in CA3 during early postnatal development. Given the dramatic effects of CRH on hippocampal neurons and the absence of CRH-containing afferents to this region, we hypothesized that a significant population of CRHergic neurons exists in developing rat hippocampus. This study defined and characterized hippocampal CRH-containing cells by using immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural examination, and colocalization with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-synthesizing enzyme and calcium-binding proteins. Numerous, large CRH-immunoreactive (ir) neurons were demonstrated in CA3 strata pyramidale and oriens, fewer were observed in the corresponding layers of CA1, and smaller CRH-ir cells were found in stratum lacunosum-moleculare of Ammon's horn. In the dentate gyrus, CRH-ir somata resided in the granule cell layer and hilus. Ultrastructurally, CRH-ir neurons had aspiny dendrites and were postsynaptic to both asymmetric and symmetric synapses. CRH-ir axon terminals formed axosomatic and axodendritic symmetric synapses with pyramidal and granule cells. Other CRH-ir terminals synapsed on axon initial segments of principal neurons. Most CRH-ir neurons were coimmunolabeled for glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)-65 and GAD-67 and the majority also contained parvalbumin, but none were labeled for calbindin. These results confirm the identity of hippocampal CRH-ir cells as GABAergic interneurons. Further, a subpopulation of neurons immunoreactive for both CRH and parvalbumin and located within and adjacent to the principal cell layers consists of basket and chandelier cells. Thus, axon terminals of CRH-ir interneurons are strategically positioned to influence the excitability of the principal hippocampal neurons via release of both CRH and GABA.

  6. Sexually dimorphic stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to an intravenous corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge of Brahman cattle following transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, Lindsey E; Carroll, Jeffery A; Ballou, Michael A; Burdick, Nicole C; Dailey, Jeffery W; Caldwell, Lisa C; Loyd, Andrea N; Vann, Rhonda C; Welsh, Thomas H; Randel, Ronald D

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to characterize potential sexually dimorphic stress and immunological responses following a corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) challenge in beef cattle. Six female (heifers) and six male (bulls) Brahman calves (264 ± 12 d of age) were administered CRH intravenously (0.5 µg of CRH/kg body mass) after which serum concentrations of cortisol increased from 0.5 h to 4 h. From 1 h to 4 h after CRH administration, serum cortisol concentrations were greater in heifers than in bulls. In all cattle, increased serum concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ were observed from 2.5 h to 3 h after CRH, with greater concentrations of IFN-γ and IL-6 in heifers than bulls. Heifer total leukocyte counts decreased 1 h after CRH administration, while bull leukocyte counts and percent neutrophils decreased 2 h after CRH administration. Heifers had greater rectal temperatures than bulls, yet rectal temperatures did not change following administration of CRH. There was no effect of CRH administration on heart rate. However, bulls tended to have increased heart rate 2 h after CRH administration than before CRH. Heifer heart rate was greater than bulls throughout the study. These data demonstrate that acute CRH administration can elicit a pro-inflammatory response, and cattle exhibit a sexually dimorphic pro-inflammatory cytokine and cortisol response to acute CRH administration.

  7. Consolidation of remote fear memories involves Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH) receptor type 1-mediated enhancement of AMPA receptor GluR1 signaling in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeringer, Christoph K; Henes, Kathrin; Eder, Matthias; Dahlhoff, Maik; Wurst, Wolfgang; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M; Moosmang, Sven; Wotjak, Carsten T

    2012-02-01

    Persistent dreadful memories and hyperarousal constitute prominent psychopathological features of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here, we used a contextual fear conditioning paradigm to demonstrate that conditional genetic deletion of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptor 1 within the limbic forebrain in mice significantly reduced remote, but not recent, associative and non-associative fear memories. Per os treatment with the selective CRHR1 antagonist DMP696 (3 mg/kg) attenuated consolidation of remote fear memories, without affecting their expression and retention. This could be achieved, if DMP696 was administered for 1 week starting as late as 24 h after foot shock. Furthermore, by combining electrophysiological recordings and western blot analyses, we demonstrate a delayed-onset and long-lasting increase in AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluR1-mediated signaling in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus 1 month after foot shock. These changes were absent from CRHR1-deficient mice and after DMP696 treatment. Inactivation of hippocampal GluR1-containing AMPARs by antisense oligonucleotides or philantotoxin 433 confirmed the behavioral relevance of AMPA-type glutamatergic neurotransmission in maintaining the high levels of remote fear in shocked mice with intact CRHR1 signaling. We conclude that limbic CRHR1 receptors enhance the consolidation of remote fear memories in the first week after foot shock by increasing the expression of Ca(2+)-permeable GluR1-containing AMPARs in the DG. These findings suggest both receptors as rational targets for the prevention and therapy, respectively, of psychopathology associated with exaggerated fear memories, such as PTSD.

  8. Neuronal histamine and expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone, vasopressin and oxytocin in the hypothalamus: relative importance of H1 and H2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, A; Larsen, P J; Knigge, U; Jørgensen, H; Warberg, J

    1998-08-01

    Centrally administered histamine (HA) stimulates the secretion of the pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides ACTH and beta-endorphin as well as prolactin. The effect of HA on secretion of these adenohypophysial hormones is indirect and may involve activation of hypothalamic neurons containing corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), arginine-vasopressin (AVP) or oxytocin (OT). We studied the effect of activating central HA receptors by central infusion of HA, HA agonists or antagonists on expression of CRH, AVP and OT mRNA in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei. Intracerebroventricular infusion of HA (270 nmol), the H1-receptor agonist 2-thiazolylethylamine or the H2-receptor agonist 4-methylhistamine increased the level of CRH mRNA in the PVN, and OT mRNA in the SON. In contrast, none of these compounds had any effect on expression of AVP mRNA in the PVN or SON. Administration of the H1-receptor antagonist mepyramine or the H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine had no effect on basal expression of CRH, AVP or OT mRNA in the PVN and/or SON except for a slight inhibitory effect of cimetidine on CRH mRNA expression in the PVN. Pretreatment with mepyramine or cimetidine before HA administration inhibited the HA-induced increase in OT mRNA levels but had no effect on the HA-induced increase in CRH mRNA levels in the PVN. We conclude that HA stimulates hypothalamic CRH and OT neurons by increasing mRNA levels, and this effect seems to be mediated via activation of both HA H1 and H2 receptors.

  9. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone As the Homeostatic Rheostat of Feto-Maternal Symbiosis and Developmental Programming In Utero and Neonatal Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Alonso, Viridiana; Panetta, Pamela; de Gortari, Patricia; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K

    2017-01-01

    A balanced interaction between the homeostatic mechanisms of mother and the developing organism during pregnancy and in early neonatal life is essential in order to ensure optimal fetal development, ability to respond to various external and internal challenges, protection from adverse programming, and safeguard maternal care availability after parturition. In the majority of pregnancies, this relationship is highly effective resulting in successful outcomes. However, in a number of pathological settings, perturbations of the maternal homeostasis disrupt this symbiosis and initiate adaptive responses with unpredictable outcomes for the fetus or even the neonate. This may lead to development of pathological phenotypes arising from developmental reprogramming involving interaction of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental-driven pathways, sometimes with acute consequences (e.g., growth impairment) and sometimes delayed (e.g., enhanced susceptibility to disease) that last well into adulthood. Most of these adaptive mechanisms are activated and controlled by hormones of the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis under the influence of placental steroid and peptide hormones. In particular, the hypothalamic peptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays a key role in feto-maternal communication by orchestrating and integrating a series of neuroendocrine, immune, metabolic, and behavioral responses. CRH also regulates neural networks involved in maternal behavior and this determines efficiency of maternal care and neonate interactions. This review will summarize our current understanding of CRH actions during the perinatal period, focusing on the physiological roles for both mother and offspring and also how external challenges can alter CRH actions and potentially impact on fetus/neonate health.

  10. Modified dexamethasone suppression-corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test: A pilot study of young healthy volunteers and implications for alcoholism research in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Leo; Cooper, Thomas B; Mann, J John; Oquendo, Maria A

    2006-01-01

    The key neuroendocrine component of a response to stress is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system. Abnormalities in the HPA system have been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcoholism and suicide. The dexamethasone suppression test (DST) is the most frequently used test to assess HPA-system function in psychiatric disorders. This neuroendocrine test consists of the administration of a low dose of dexamethasone at 11 pm and the measurement of cortisol levels at one or more time points on the following day. After corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) became available for clinical studies, the DST was combined with CRH administration. In this test, patients are pretreated with a single dose of dexamethasone at 11 pm and receive human CRH intravenously at 3 pm the following day. The resulting DST-CRH test proved to be much more sensitive in detecting HPA system alterations than the DST. We have modified the DST-CRH test and used ovine CRH instead of human CRH in a pilot study of a group of young healthy volunteers. Results indicated that it produces results similar to the results obtained with human CRH. This suggests that ovine CRH can be used in psychiatric research. Alcoholism is associated with abnormalities in HPA function. Nonalcoholic subjects with a family history of alcoholism exhibit lower plasma ACTH and beta-endorphin as well as lower ACTH, cortisol, and beta-endorphin responses to psychological stress and CRH stimulation. This suggests that in children of alcoholics, alterations in the mechanisms that regulate HPA axis activity predate the development of alcohol dependence and may be considered inherited traits. Therefore, studies of the HPA system in persons at risk for alcoholism may help understand the neurobiological mechanisms of predisposition to alcoholism.

  11. Effect of electro-acupuncture on substance P, its receptor and corticotropin-releasing hormone in rats with irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Peng Ma; Lin-Ying Tan; Yun Yang; Huan-Gan Wu; Bin Jiang; Hui-Rong Liu; Ling Yang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect and mechanism of electro-acupuncture (EA) at ST25 and ST37 on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) of rats. METHODS: A total of 21 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal group, model group and EA group. A rat model of IBS was established by constraining the limbs and distending the colorectum of rats. Rats in EA group received bilateral EA at ST25 and ST37 with a sparse and intense waveform at a frequency of 2/50 Hz for 15 min, once a day for 7 d as a course. Rats in normal and model groups were stimulated by distending colorectum (CR). An abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scoring system was used to evaluate improvements in visceral hypersensitivity. Toluidine blue-improved method, immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay were used to observe mucosal mast cells (MC), changes of substance P (SP) and substance P receptor (SPR) in colon and change of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in hypothalamus. RESULTS: The threshold of visceral sense was significantly lower in model group than in normal group, and significantly higher in EA group than in model group. The number of mucosal MC was greater in model group than in normal group and significantly smaller in EA group than in model group. The CRH level in hypothalamus of rats was significantly higher in model group than in normal group, which was remarkably decreased after electro-acupuncture treatment. The SP and SPR expression in colon of rats in model group was decreased after electro-acupuncture treatment.CONCLUSION:EA at ST25 and ST37 can decrease the number of mucosal MC and down-regulate the expression of CRH in hypothalamus,and the expression of SP and SPR in colon of rats with IBS.

  12. Differential Activation in Amygdala and Plasma Noradrenaline during Colorectal Distention by Administration of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone between Healthy Individuals and Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

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    Yukari Tanaka

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS often comorbids mood and anxiety disorders. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis, but it is not clear how CRH agonists change human brain responses to interoceptive stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that brain activation in response to colorectal distention is enhanced after CRH injection in IBS patients compared to healthy controls. Brain H215O- positron emission tomography (PET was performed in 16 male IBS patients and 16 age-matched male controls during baseline, no distention, mild and intense distention of the colorectum using barostat bag inflation. Either CRH (2 μg/kg or saline (1:1 was then injected intravenously and the same distention protocol was repeated. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, serum cortisol and plasma noradrenaline levels were measured at each stimulation. At baseline, CRH without colorectal distention induced more activation in the right amygdala in IBS patients than in controls. During intense distention after CRH injection, controls showed significantly greater activation than IBS patients in the right amygdala. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol secretion showed a significant interaction between drug (CRH, saline and distention. Plasma noradrenaline at baseline significantly increased after CRH injection compared to before injection in IBS. Further, plasma noradrenaline showed a significant group (IBS, controls by drug by distention interaction. Exogenous CRH differentially sensitizes brain regions of the emotional-arousal circuitry within the visceral pain matrix to colorectal distention and synergetic activation of noradrenergic function in IBS patients and healthy individuals.

  13. Stress and Female Reproductive System: Disruption of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone/Opiate Balance by Sympathetic Nerve Traffic

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    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays stress is an integral part of everyday living and the physiological and behavioral consequences of exposure to stressful situations have been extensively studied for decades. The stress response is a necessary mechanism but disrupts homeostatic process and it is sub served by a complex system located in both the central nervous system (CNS and the periphery. Stressor-induced activation of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS results in a series of neural and endocrine adaptations known as the "stress response" or "stress cascade." The stress cascade is responsible for allowing the body to make the necessary physiological and metabolic changes required to cope with the demands of a homeostatic challenge. Normal activation of the HPA axis is essential for reproduction, growth, metabolic homeostasis, and responses to stress and they are critical for adapting to changes in the external environment. The regulation of gonadal function in men and women is under the control of the HPA. This regulation is complex and sex steroids are important regulators of GnRH and gonadotropin release through classical feedback mechanisms in the hypothalamus and the pituitary. The present overview focuses on the neuroendocrine infrastructure of the adaptive response to stress and its effects on the female reproductive system. 

  14. Moderation of the Association between Childhood Maltreatment and Neuroticism by the Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor 1 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Colin G.; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Neuroticism is a personality trait reflecting the tendency to experience negative affect. It is a major risk for psychopathology, especially depression and anxiety disorders. Childhood maltreatment is another major risk factor for psychopathology and may influence personality. Maltreatment may interact with genotype to predict…

  15. Corticotropin-releasing hormone, its binding protein and receptors in human cervical tissue at preterm and term labor in comparison to non-pregnant state

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    Byström Birgitta

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is still the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The level of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH is known to be significantly elevated in the maternal plasma at preterm birth. Although, CRH, CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP, CRH-receptor 1 (CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 have been identified both at mRNA and protein level in human placenta, deciduas, fetal membranes, endometrium and myometrium, no corresponding information is yet available on cervix. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the levels of the mRNA species coding for CRH, CRH-BP, CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 in human cervical tissue and myometrium at preterm and term labor and not in labor as well as in the non-pregnant state, and to localize the corresponding proteins employing immunohistochemical analysis. Methods Cervical, isthmic and fundal (from non-pregnant subjects only biopsies were taken from 67 women. Subjects were divided in 5 groups: preterm labor (14, preterm not in labor (7, term labor (18, term not in labor (21 and non-pregnant (7. Real-time RT-PCR was employed for quantification of mRNA levels and the corresponding proteins were localized by immunohistochemical analysis. Results The levels of CRH-BP, CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 mRNA in the pregnant tissues were lower than those in non-pregnant subjects. No significant differences were observed between preterm and term groups. CRH-BP and CRH-R2 mRNA and the corresponding proteins were present at lower levels in the laboring cervix than in the non-laboring cervix, irrespective of gestational age. In most of the samples, with the exception of four myometrial biopsies the level of CRH mRNA was below the limit of detection. All of these proteins could be detected and localized in the cervix and the myometrium by immunohistochemical analysis. Conclusion Expression of CRH-BP, CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 in uterine tissues is down-regulated during pregnancy. The most pronounced down-regulation of CRH-BP and CRH-R2

  16. Deducing corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 signaling networks from gene expression data by usage of genetic algorithms and graphical Gaussian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trümbach, Dietrich; Graf, Cornelia; Pütz, Benno; Kühne, Claudia; Panhuysen, Marcus; Weber, Peter; Holsboer, Florian; Wurst, Wolfgang; Welzl, Gerhard; Deussing, Jan M

    2010-11-19

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a hallmark of complex and multifactorial psychiatric diseases such as anxiety and mood disorders. About 50-60% of patients with major depression show HPA axis dysfunction, i.e. hyperactivity and impaired negative feedback regulation. The neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and its receptor type 1 (CRHR1) are key regulators of this neuroendocrine stress axis. Therefore, we analyzed CRH/CRHR1-dependent gene expression data obtained from the pituitary corticotrope cell line AtT-20, a well-established in vitro model for CRHR1-mediated signal transduction. To extract significantly regulated genes from a genome-wide microarray data set and to deduce underlying CRHR1-dependent signaling networks, we combined supervised and unsupervised algorithms. We present an efficient variable selection strategy by consecutively applying univariate as well as multivariate methods followed by graphical models. First, feature preselection was used to exclude genes not differentially regulated over time from the dataset. For multivariate variable selection a maximum likelihood (MLHD) discriminant function within GALGO, an R package based on a genetic algorithm (GA), was chosen. The topmost genes representing major nodes in the expression network were ranked to find highly separating candidate genes. By using groups of five genes (chromosome size) in the discriminant function and repeating the genetic algorithm separately four times we found eleven genes occurring at least in three of the top ranked result lists of the four repetitions. In addition, we compared the results of GA/MLHD with the alternative optimization algorithms greedy selection and simulated annealing as well as with the state-of-the-art method random forest. In every case we obtained a clear overlap of the selected genes independently confirming the results of MLHD in combination with a genetic algorithm. With two unsupervised algorithms

  17. The metabolic, stress axis, and hematology response of zilpaterol hydrochloride supplemented beef heifers when exposed to a dual corticotropin-releasing hormone and vasopressin challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntyn, J O; Burdick Sanchez, N C; Schmidt, T B; Erickson, G E; Sieren, S E; Jones, S J; Carroll, J A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the metabolic, stress, and hematology response of beef heifers supplemented with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) when exposed to an endocrine stress challenge. Heifers ( = 20; 556 ± 7 kg BW) were randomized into 2 treatment groups: 1) control (CON), no ZH supplementation, and 2) zilpaterol (ZIL), supplemented with ZH at 8.33 mg/kg (DM basis). The ZIL group was supplemented ZH for 20 d, with a 3-d withdrawal period. On d 24, heifers received an intravenous bolus of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH; 0.3 µg/kg BW) and arginine vasopressin (VP; 1.0 µg/kg BW) to activate the stress axis. Blood samples were collected at 30-min intervals for serum and 60-min intervals for plasma and whole blood, from -2 to 8 h relative to the challenge at 0 h (1000 h). Samples were analyzed for glucose, insulin, NEFA, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and complete blood cell counts. Following the challenge, cattle were harvested over a 3-d period. Liver, LM, and biceps femoris (BF) samples were collected and analyzed for glucose, lactate, and glycolytic potential (GP). There was a treatment ( ≤ 0.001) effect for vaginal temperature (VT), with ZIL having a 0.1°C decrease in VT when compared with CON. A treatment × time effect ( = 0.002) was observed for NEFA. A treatment effect was observed for BUN; ZIL had decreased BUN concentrations compared with CON ( challenge; however, no treatment × time effect was observed. There was also a treatment effect for cortisol ( ≤ 0.01) and epinephrine ( = 0.003); ZIL had decreased cortisol and epinephrine during the CRH/VP challenge when compared with CON. There was a time effect for total white blood cells, lymphocytes, and monocytes; each variable increased ( ≤ 0.01) 2 h postchallenge. Additionally, neutrophil counts decreased ( ≤ 0.01) in response to CRH/VP challenge in both treatment groups. Glucose concentrations within the LM were greater ( = 0.03) in CON

  18. Deducing corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 signaling networks from gene expression data by usage of genetic algorithms and graphical Gaussian models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holsboer Florian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is a hallmark of complex and multifactorial psychiatric diseases such as anxiety and mood disorders. About 50-60% of patients with major depression show HPA axis dysfunction, i.e. hyperactivity and impaired negative feedback regulation. The neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH and its receptor type 1 (CRHR1 are key regulators of this neuroendocrine stress axis. Therefore, we analyzed CRH/CRHR1-dependent gene expression data obtained from the pituitary corticotrope cell line AtT-20, a well-established in vitro model for CRHR1-mediated signal transduction. To extract significantly regulated genes from a genome-wide microarray data set and to deduce underlying CRHR1-dependent signaling networks, we combined supervised and unsupervised algorithms. Results We present an efficient variable selection strategy by consecutively applying univariate as well as multivariate methods followed by graphical models. First, feature preselection was used to exclude genes not differentially regulated over time from the dataset. For multivariate variable selection a maximum likelihood (MLHD discriminant function within GALGO, an R package based on a genetic algorithm (GA, was chosen. The topmost genes representing major nodes in the expression network were ranked to find highly separating candidate genes. By using groups of five genes (chromosome size in the discriminant function and repeating the genetic algorithm separately four times we found eleven genes occurring at least in three of the top ranked result lists of the four repetitions. In addition, we compared the results of GA/MLHD with the alternative optimization algorithms greedy selection and simulated annealing as well as with the state-of-the-art method random forest. In every case we obtained a clear overlap of the selected genes independently confirming the results of MLHD in combination with a genetic

  19. Evidence for a functional link between the heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway and corticotropin-releasing hormone release from primary cultures of human trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarra, P; Miceli, F; Tringali, G; Minici, F; Pardo, M G; Lanzone, A; Mancuso, S; Apa, R

    2001-01-01

    The gene expression and synthesis of both constitutive and inducible heme oxygenase (HO) isoforms have been recently described in human placental cells, but the functional role(s) of this biochemical pathway in placental physiology and pathology is still unclear. In the present study, we have investigated whether HO activity is involved in the control of CRH secretion from trophoblast cells. Fluctuations in HO activity were induced in primary cultures of human trophoblast cells using well-known activators and inhibitors of HO, and the subsequent changes in CRH secretion were monitored measuring CRH immunoreactivity released into the incubation medium. It was found that the increase in HO activity induced by hemin or cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) was associated with parallel significant increases in CRH release. This effect was probably caused by the gaseous HO end-product, carbon monoxide (CO), because it was blocked by the HO inhibitor tin-mesoporphyrin-9, but it was not mimicked by stable HO end-products, biliverdin and bilirubin. We have also investigated whether stimulation of CRH release induced by HO was mediated by the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway. Indeed, hemin also caused significant increases in PGE2 release in this experimental paradigm. However, CoCl(2), which also enhances CRH release, had no stimulatory effect and actually inhibited PG secretion; moreover, a nonselective COX inhibitor, indomethacin, failed to counteract hemininduced CRH release. Taken collectively, these findings suggested that modulation of CRH secretion by the HO-CO system occurs through a mechanism independent of COX activity.

  20. The Impact of Stress on Tumor Growth; the Significance of Peripheral Corticotropin Releasing Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    visualize the architecture of actin in the cell. Cells treated with CRF showed more intense staining compared to the untreated controls, most extensively...time points. Tumor growth was monitored every 4 days using a Fluorescent Molecular Tomography approach ( FMT ) (13) as shown in Figure 12. During the... FMT analysis of the tumors revealed that in mice not exposed to stress, administration of antalarmin resulted in reduced tumor burden. Upon stress

  1. Corticotropin-releasing factor administration elicits a stress-like activation of cerebral catecholaminergic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A J; Berridge, C W

    1987-08-01

    The cerebral content of the biogenic amines, dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT) and their catabolites 30 min after CRF or saline injections was determined using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Injection of CRF (1.0 micrograms) into the lateral ventricles (ICV) of mice produced a behavioral activation in which their motor movements appeared as bursts of activity followed by periods of immobility. CRF administration (ICV or SC) did not alter the concentrations of DA, NE, tryptophan, 5-HT, or 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in any brain region measured. ICV CRF increased the concentrations of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), the major catabolite of DA, and of 3-methoxy,4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (MHPG), the major catabolite of NE, in several brain regions. DOPAC:DA ratios were consistently increased in prefrontal cortex, septum, hypothalamus, and brain stem relative to animals injected with saline. MHPG:NE ratios were also increased in the prefrontal cortex and hypothalamus, with a marginal effect (p = 0.06) in brain stem. SC CRF significantly increased DOPAC:DA in prefrontal cortex, and MHPG:NE in prefrontal cortex, hypothalamus and brain stem. Pretreatment with naloxone did not prevent any of the neurochemical responses to ICV CRF, but naloxone alone increased DOPAC:DA in medial profrontal cortex, and decreased MHPG:NE in nucleus accumbens in CRF-injected mice. These results suggest that administration of CRF either centrally or peripherally induces an activation of both dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems in several regions of mouse brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Combined dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing factor test in chronic fatigue syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eede, F. van den; Moorkens, G.; Hulstijn, W.; Houdenhove, B. van; Cosyns, P.; Claes, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis function in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) point to hypofunction, although there are negative reports. Suggested mechanisms include a reduced hypothalamic or supra-hypothalamic stimulus to the HPA axis and enhanced sensitivity to the ne

  3. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.P. Acthar Gel® ... Corticotropin repository injection comes as a long acting gel to inject under the skin or into a ... prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, or herbal products you are taking or plan to take. ...

  4. Urocortin, a novel peptide of the corticotropin releasing hormone family%Urocortin--促肾上腺皮质激素释放激素肽类家族的最新成员

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾清; 沙金燕

    2002-01-01

    @@ 促肾上腺皮质激素释放激素(corticotropin releasing hormone,CRH)家族是包括CRH、硬骨鱼紧张肽(urotensin)、蛙皮降压肽(sauvagine)以及新近发现的urocortin在内的一组肽类物质,这组肽类物质在分子结构和生物学活性方面都有很高的同源性.CRH是一个41氨基酸肽,由下丘脑分泌后刺激垂体前叶细胞释放促肾上腺皮质激素(adrenocorticotropin,ACTH)和β-内啡肽(β-endorphin,β EP)[1].

  5. Effects of sex and early maternal abuse on adrenocorticotropin hormone and cortisol responses to the corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge during the first 3 years of life in group-living rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Mar M; McCormack, Kai; Grand, Alison P; Fulks, Richelle; Graff, Anne; Maestripieri, Dario

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in 21 group-living rhesus monkeys infants that were physically abused by their mothers in the first few months of life and in 21 nonabused controls. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) responses to a corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) challenge were assessed at 6-month intervals during the subjects' first 3 years of life. Abused infants exhibited greater cortisol responses to CRH than controls across the 3 years. Abused infants also exhibited blunted ACTH secretion in response to CRH, especially at 6 months of age. Although there were no significant sex differences in abuse experienced early in life, females showed a greater cortisol response to CRH than males at all ages. There were no significant sex differences in the ACTH response to CRH, or significant interactions between sex and abuse in the ACTH or cortisol response. Our findings suggest that early parental maltreatment results in greater adrenocortical, and possibly also pituitary, responsiveness to challenges later in life. These long-term alterations in neuroendocrine function may be one the mechanisms through which infant abuse results in later psychopathologies. Our study also suggests that there are developmental sex differences in adrenal function that occur irrespective of early stressful experience. The results of this study can enhance our understanding of the long-term effects of child maltreatment as well as our knowledge of the development of the HPA axis in human and nonhuman primates.

  6. A second corticotropin-releasing hormone gene (CRH2) is conserved across vertebrate classes and expressed in the hindbrain of a basal neopterygian fish, the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grone, Brian P; Maruska, Karen P

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the origins of the vertebrate stress-response system, we searched sequenced vertebrate genomes for genes resembling corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). We found that vertebrate genomes possess, in addition to CRH, another gene that resembles CRH in sequence and syntenic environment. This paralogous gene was previously identified only in the elephant shark (a holocephalan), but we find it also in marsupials, monotremes, lizards, turtles, birds, and fishes. We examined the relationship of this second vertebrate CRH gene, which we name CRH2, to CRH1 (previously known as CRH) and urocortin1/urotensin1 (UCN1/UTS1) in primitive fishes, teleosts, and tetrapods. The paralogs CRH1 and CRH2 likely evolved via duplication of CRH during a whole-genome duplication early in the vertebrate lineage. CRH2 was subsequently lost in both teleost fishes and eutherian mammals but retained in other lineages. To determine where CRH2 is expressed relative to CRH1 and UTS1, we used in situ hybridization on brain tissue from spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus), a neopterygian fish closely related to teleosts. In situ hybridization revealed widespread distribution of both crh1 and uts1 in the brain. Expression of crh2 was restricted to the putative secondary gustatory/secondary visceral nucleus, which also expressed calcitonin-related polypeptide alpha (calca), a marker of parabrachial nucleus in mammals. Thus, the evolutionary history of CRH2 includes restricted expression in the brain, sequence changes, and gene loss, likely reflecting release of selective constraints following whole-genome duplication. The discovery of CRH2 opens many new possibilities for understanding the diverse functions of the CRH family of peptides across vertebrates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Activated human neutrophils release hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte growth factor or scatter factor (HGF\\/SF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has potent angiogenic properties. We have previously demonstrated that neutrophils (PMN) are directly angiogenic by releasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We hypothesized that the acute inflammatory response can stimulate PMN to release HGF. AIMS: To examine the effects of inflammatory mediators on PMN HGF release and the effect of recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) on PMN adhesion receptor expression and PMN VEGF release. METHODS: In the first experiment, PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Culture supernatants were assayed for HGF using ELISA. In the second experiment, PMN were lysed to measure total HGF release and HGF expression in the PMN was detected by Western immunoblotting. Finally, PMN were stimulated with rhHGF. PMN CD 11a, CD 11b, and CD 18 receptor expression and VEGF release was measured using flow cytometry and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: TNF-alpha, LPS and fMLP stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN HGF (755+\\/-216, 484+\\/-221 and 565+\\/-278 pg\\/ml, respectively) compared to controls (118+\\/-42 pg\\/ml). IL-8 had no effect. Total HGF release following cell lysis and Western blot suggests that HGF is released from intracellular stores. Recombinant human HGF did not alter PMN adhesion receptor expression and had no effect on PMN VEGF release. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that pro-inflammatory mediators can stimulate HGF release from a PMN intracellular store and that activated PMN in addition to secreting VEGF have further angiogenic potential by releasing HGF.

  8. The Nutrient and Energy Sensor Sirt1 Regulates the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis by Altering the Production of the Prohormone Convertase 2 (PC2) Essential in the Maturation of Corticotropin-releasing Hormone (CRH) from Its Prohormone in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toorie, Anika M; Cyr, Nicole E; Steger, Jennifer S; Beckman, Ross; Farah, George; Nillni, Eduardo A

    2016-03-11

    Understanding the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides and hormones in energy balance is paramount in the search for approaches to mitigate the obese state. Increased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity leads to increased levels of glucocorticoids (GC) that are known to regulate body weight. The axis initiates the production and release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) from the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. Levels of active CRH peptide are dependent on the processing of its precursor pro-CRH by the action of two members of the family of prohormone convertases 1 and 2 (PC1 and PC2). Here, we propose that the nutrient sensor sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) regulates the production of CRH post-translationally by affecting PC2. Data suggest that Sirt1 may alter the preproPC2 gene directly or via deacetylation of the transcription factor Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1). Data also suggest that Sirt1 may alter PC2 via a post-translational mechanism. Our results show that Sirt1 levels in the PVN increase in rats fed a high fat diet for 12 weeks. Furthermore, elevated Sirt1 increased PC2 levels, which in turn increased the production of active CRH and GC. Collectively, this study provides the first evidence supporting the hypothesis that PVN Sirt1 activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and basal GC levels by enhancing the production of CRH through an increase in the biosynthesis of PC2, which is essential in the maturation of CRH from its prohormone, pro-CRH.

  9. Noradrenergic inhibition of canine gallbladder contraction and murine pancreatic secretion during stress by corticotropin-releasing factor.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal secretory and motor responses are profoundly altered during stress; but the effects of stress and its mediator(s) on the two major gut functions, exocrine pancreatic secretion and gallbladder motility, are unknown. We therefore developed two animal models that allowed us to examine the effects of acoustic stress on canine gallbladder contraction and restraint stress on rat exocrine pancreatic secretion. Acoustic stress inhibited cholecystokinin-8 (CCK)- and meal-induced gallb...

  10. Corticotropin-releasing hormone interacts with interleukin-1β to regulate prostaglandin H synthase-2 expression in human myometrium during pregnancy and labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Danijela; Bari, Muhammad F; Lu, Buyu; Vatish, Manu; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K

    2013-07-01

    The onset of labor appears to involve the activation of myometrial inflammatory pathways, and transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) control expression of the contraction-associated proteins required to induce a procontractile phenotype. These responses might involve CRH, which integrates immune and neuroendocrine systems. In human myometrium we investigated cyclooxygenase 2 (PGHS2) expression and regulation by CRH and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β before and after labor. Myometrial tissues obtained from pregnant women at term before (n = 12) or during labor (n = 10) and pathological cases of choriamnionitis-associated term labor (n = 5) were used to isolate primary myocytes and investigate in vitro, CRH effects on basal and IL-1β regulated p65 activation and PGHS2 expression. In nonlaboring myometrial cells, CRH was unable to induce NF-κB nuclear translocation; however, it altered the temporal dynamics of IL-1β-driven NF-κB nuclear entry by initially delaying entry and subsequently prolonging retention. These CRH-R1-driven effects were associated with a modest inhibitory action in the early phase (within 2 hours) of IL-1β stimulated PGHS2 mRNA expression, whereas prolonged stimulation for 6-18 hours augmented the IL-1β effects. The early-phase effect required intact protein kinase A activity and was diminished after the onset of labor. The presence of chorioamnionitis led to exaggerated PGHS2 mRNA responses to IL-1β but diminished effects of CRH. CRH is involved in the inflammatory regulation of PGHS2 expression before and during labor; these actions might be important in priming and preparing the myometrium for labor and cellular adaptive responses to inflammatory mediators.

  11. Reproduction and genotype identification of corticotropin-releasing hormone gene knockout mice%促肾上腺皮质激素释放激素基因敲除小鼠的繁殖与基因型鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海燕; 刘庆; 钟河江; 杨策; 黄苏娜; 严军; 蒋建新

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨促肾上腺皮质激素释放激素(CRH)基因敲除(KO)小鼠饲养、繁殖及基因型鉴定的方法.方法 从美国Jackson实验室引进CRH KO小鼠,按照遗传学规则,对杂合子型(CRH+/-)小鼠进行配对繁殖,提取幼鼠尾部组织全基因组DNA,通过聚合酶链反应(PCR)对幼鼠基因型进行鉴定.结果 CRH KO纯合子型(CRH-/-)小鼠的繁殖和饲养均获得成功,采用PCR成功地对所获得的小鼠进行基因分析,在子代小鼠中存在野生纯合子型(CRH+/+)、杂合子型(CRH+/-)及CRH KO纯合子型(CRH-/-)小鼠.CRH-/-小鼠较另外2种基因型小鼠存活率明显下降,但3种基因型小鼠在出生后10 d及30 d体质量无明显差异.结论 正确的饲养繁殖以及鉴定方法可从杂合子型(CRH+/-)小鼠中获得CRH KO纯合子型(CRH-/-)小鼠.%Objective To explore the methods of breeding, reproductin and genotype identification of corticotropin-releasing hormone ( CRH)knockout( KO) mice.Methods CRH knockout mice were obtained from Jackson laboratory in USA.Heterozygous type (CRH+/- )mice were inbreeded according to genetic rules to yield CRH knockout mice.The genotypes of offspring were identified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR)using genomic DNA extracted from tissue of mice tails.Results Both breeding and reproductin of CRH KO heterozygous type(CRH+/- )mice were successful.PCR was used successfully for genetic analysis in mice obtained.There were wild homozygous genotype( CRH+ /+ ) , heterozygous genotype ( CRH + /- ) and CRH KO homozygous genotype( CRH-/- )in the offspring.Compared with other two genotype mice,survival rate of CRH- /- mice were significantly decreased.however, body mass of the three genotypes mice had no significant difference at 10 and 30 days after birth.Conclusion Appropriate reproductin , breeding and identification are effective methods to obtain CRH KO homozygous genotype( CRH -/- ) mice from heterozygous genotype( CRH+ / - ) mice.

  12. 中枢精氨酸加压素在大鼠促肾上腺皮质激素释放激素引起发热机制中的作用%The role of central arginine vasopressin in corticotropin releasing hormone-induced fever in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华东; 王彦平; 胡巢凤; 戚仁斌; 严玉霞; 陆大祥; 李楚杰

    2001-01-01

    实验对大鼠进行第三脑室和脑腹中隔区插管, 用数字体温计测量大鼠的结肠温度, 用放射免疫分析法测定脑中隔区精氨酸加压素(arginine vasopressin, AVP)含量, 观察脑中隔区AVP在大鼠促肾上腺皮质激素释放激素(corticotrophin releasing hormone, CRH)性发热机制中的作用.结果发现: 脑室注射CRH (5.0 μg)引起大鼠结肠温度明显升高, 同时明显增高脑中隔区 AVP的含量.脑腹中隔区注射AVP V1受体拮抗剂本身并不导致大鼠结肠温度明显改变, 但能显著增强脑室注射CRH引起的发热反应.而且, 腹中隔区注射AVP显著抑制大鼠CRH性发热.结果提示: 发热时CRH是引起脑腹中隔区AVP释放的因素之一, 脑腹中隔区内源性AVP抑制中枢注射CRH引起的体温升高.%The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of central arginine vasopressin (AVP) in corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-induced fever in the rat. Guide cannulae were inserted into the third ventricle and placed over the ventral septal area (VSA). The content of arginine vasopressin in the VSA of the brain was determined by radioimmunoassay. Colon temperature was monitored in lightly restrained rats by insertion of a catheter-mounted thermistor probe 5 cm in the rectum. The results demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of CRH increased AVP level in the VSA and the colonic temperature of the rats. Microinjection of AVP V1 antagonist into the VSA 10 min before CRH administration significantly enhanced CRH-induced febrile response, while AVP V1 antagonist itself did not have a significant effect on the colonic temperature. Furthermore, injection of AVP into the VSA 5 min before CRH administration (icv) suppressed the fever evoked by CRH. These findings suggest that CRH is an important factor that stimulates the release of AVP in the VSA during fever, and endogenous AVP in the VSA has an antipyretic action on the CRH-induced fever.

  13. Familial growth hormone releasing factor deficiency in pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Stirling, H F; Barr, D G; Kelnar, C J

    1991-01-01

    A mother with pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism and her short son showed poor spontaneous growth hormone secretion, and provocation tests suggested a deficiency of growth hormone releasing factor. This is the first report of growth hormone releasing factor deficiency in pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism. The boy has responded well to growth hormone treatment over a period of three years.

  14. Collagenous matrices as release carriers of exogenous growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Shingo; Ozeki, Makoto; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Kanatani, Isao; Ogawa, Osamu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2004-08-01

    We have investigated the use of natural and synthetic collagenous matrices as carriers of exogenous growth factors. A bladder acellular matrix (BAM) was processed from rat bladder and compared with sponge matrix of porcine type 1 collagen. The lyophilized matrices were rehydrated by the aqueous solutions of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and heparin binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), to obtain the matrix incorporating each growth factor. The rehydration method enabled the growth factor protein to distribute into the matrix homogeneously. In vivo release test in the mouse subcutis revealed that, the property of BAM for growth factor release was similar to that of collagen sponge. Among the growth factors examined, bFGF release was the most sustained, followed by HGF and PDGF-BB. bFGF released from the two matrices showed similar in vivo angiogenic activity at the mouse subcutis in a dose-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that the collagenous matrices function as release carriers of growth factors. This feature is promising to create a scaffold, which has a nature to control the tissue regeneration actively.

  15. Effect of the principle for soothing the liver and strengthening the spleen, regulating stomach and refresh spirit on corticotropin releasing hormone content of functional diarrhoea rats%疏肝健脾、安神和胃法治疗功能性腹泻模型大鼠的作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴文江; 陶双友; 韩棉梅; 梁嘉恺; 罗琦; 何丽英; 周福生

    2013-01-01

    corticotropin releasing hormone level expression was tested. Results After 2 weeks of the treatment, intestinal propulsion rate of functional diarrhoea rats was significantly reduced (P < 0. 05 ). Compared with the normal group, the corticotropin releasing hormone level of model group was significantly increased (P <0. 05). Conclusions The corticotropin releasing hormone expression levels in brain stem, hypothalamus, intestinal mucosa of functional diarrhoea rat are often associated with the pathogenesis of functional diarrhoea. The principle for soothing the liver and strengthening the spleen, regulating stomach and refresh spirit lower the expression of corticotropin releasing hormone explains the pathogenesis of functional diarrhoea.

  16. Uniformity of Peptide Release Is Maintained by Methylation of Release Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Pierson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Termination of protein synthesis on the ribosome is catalyzed by release factors (RFs, which share a conserved glycine-glycine-glutamine (GGQ motif. The glutamine residue is methylated in vivo, but a mechanistic understanding of its contribution to hydrolysis is lacking. Here, we show that the modification, apart from increasing the overall rate of termination on all dipeptides, substantially increases the rate of peptide release on a subset of amino acids. In the presence of unmethylated RFs, we measure rates of hydrolysis that are exceptionally slow on proline and glycine residues and approximately two orders of magnitude faster in the presence of the methylated factors. Structures of 70S ribosomes bound to methylated RF1 and RF2 reveal that the glutamine side-chain methylation packs against 23S rRNA nucleotide 2451, stabilizing the GGQ motif and placing the side-chain amide of the glutamine toward tRNA. These data provide a framework for understanding how release factor modifications impact termination.

  17. The corticotropin-releasing factor-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and kinin neuropeptides modulate desiccation and starvation tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, Elizabeth; Dornan, Anthony J; Halberg, Kenneth A; Terhzaz, Selim; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-A

    2016-06-01

    Malpighian tubules are critical organs for epithelial fluid transport and stress tolerance in insects, and are under neuroendocrine control by multiple neuropeptides secreted by identified neurons. Here, we demonstrate roles for CRF-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and Drosophila melanogaster kinin (Drome-kinin, DK) in desiccation and starvation tolerance. Gene expression and labelled DH44 ligand binding data, as well as highly selective knockdowns and/or neuronal ablations of DH44 in neurons of the pars intercerebralis and DH44 receptor (DH44-R2) in Malpighian tubule principal cells, indicate that suppression of DH44 signalling improves desiccation tolerance of the intact fly. Drome-kinin receptor, encoded by the leucokinin receptor gene, LKR, is expressed in DH44 neurons as well as in stellate cells of the Malpighian tubules. LKR knockdown in DH44-expressing neurons reduces Malpighian tubule-specific LKR, suggesting interactions between DH44 and LK signalling pathways. Finally, although a role for DK in desiccation tolerance was not defined, we demonstrate a novel role for Malpighian tubule cell-specific LKR in starvation tolerance. Starvation increases gene expression of epithelial LKR. Also, Malpighian tubule stellate cell-specific knockdown of LKR significantly reduced starvation tolerance, demonstrating a role for neuropeptide signalling during starvation stress. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in stress and disease: A review of literature and treatment perspectives with special emphasis on psychiatric disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohg, K.; Hageman, I.; Jorgensen, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    The CRF family of neuropeptides and receptors is involved in a variety of stress responses, in the regulation of appetite, metabolic and inflammatory processes as well as intestinal movements. From a primarily psychiatric perspective, the present paper reviews the literature on its anatomy......, physiology and its involvement in psychiatric, neurological and inflammatory diseases. Finally, recent developments in the pharmacological aspects of CRF in these diseases are reviewed Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  19. Enduring Effects Of Traumatic Stress On Brain Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) Systems: Molecular and Neuropharmacologic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    nucleus of the hypothalamus, and medial amygdala post-defeat. AcN Control Defeated 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 # Treatment VMH Control Defeated 0 10 20...ains to be determined. Defeat also increased the number of Fos-positive cells n the VMH, another androgen receptor–expressing nu- leus that is larger...Finally, the androgen - ependent sexual dimorphism of VMH volume is seen electively in the ventrolateral, but not dorsomedial, sub- ivision (Dugger et al

  20. Corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin regulate spine and synapse formation : structural basis for stress-induced neuronal remodeling and pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gounko, N. V.; Swinny, J. D.; Kalicharan, D.; Jafari, S.; Corteen, N.; Seifi, M.; Bakels, R.; van der Want, J. J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines are important sites of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain with their function determined by their structure and molecular content. Alterations in spine number, morphology and receptor content are a hallmark of many psychiatric disorders, most notably those because of stress.

  1. Early life adversity and serotonin transporter gene variation interact to affect DNA methylation of the corticotropin-releasing factor gene promoter region in the adult rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelen, R.H. van der; Arnoldussen, I.A.C.; Ghareh, H.; Och, L. van; Homberg, J.R.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between childhood maltreatment and the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene linked polymorphic region has been associated with increased risk to develop major depression. This Gene x Environment interaction has furthermore been linked with increased levels of anxiety and glucocorticoid

  2. The corticotropin-releasing factor-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and kinin neuropeptides modulate desiccation and starvation tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannell, Elizabeth; Dornan, Anthony J.; Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin

    2016-01-01

    (Drome-kinin, DK) in desiccation and starvation tolerance. Gene expression and labelled DH44 ligand binding data, as well as highly selective knockdowns and/or neuronal ablations of DH44 in neurons of the pars intercerebralis and DH44 receptor (DH44-R2) in Malpighian tubule principal cells, indicate...... that suppression of DH44 signalling improves desiccation tolerance of the intact fly. Drome-kinin receptor, encoded by the leucokinin receptor gene, LKR, is expressed in DH44 neurons as well as in stellate cells of the Malpighian tubules. LKR knockdown in DH44-expressing neurons reduces Malpighian tubule......-specific LKR, suggesting interactions between DH44 and LK signalling pathways. Finally, although a role for DK in desiccation tolerance was not defined, we demonstrate a novel role for Malpighian tubule cell-specific LKR in starvation tolerance. Starvation increases gene expression of epithelial LKR. Also...

  3. Gelatin methacrylate microspheres for controlled growth factor release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H; McKinney, Jay; Miller, Tobias; Bongiorno, Tom; McDevitt, Todd C

    2015-02-01

    Gelatin has been commonly used as a delivery vehicle for various biomolecules for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications due to its simple fabrication methods, inherent electrostatic binding properties, and proteolytic degradability. Compared to traditional chemical cross-linking methods, such as the use of glutaraldehyde (GA), methacrylate modification of gelatin offers an alternative method to better control the extent of hydrogel cross-linking. Here we examined the physical properties and growth factor delivery of gelatin methacrylate (GMA) microparticles (MPs) formulated with a wide range of different cross-linking densities (15-90%). Less methacrylated MPs had decreased elastic moduli and larger mesh sizes compared to GA MPs, with increasing methacrylation correlating to greater moduli and smaller mesh sizes. As expected, an inverse correlation between microparticle cross-linking density and degradation was observed, with the lowest cross-linked GMA MPs degrading at the fastest rate, comparable to GA MPs. Interestingly, GMA MPs at lower cross-linking densities could be loaded with up to a 10-fold higher relative amount of growth factor than conventional GA cross-linked MPs, despite the GA MPs having an order of magnitude greater gelatin content. Moreover, a reduced GMA cross-linking density resulted in more complete release of bone morphogenic protein 4 and basic fibroblast growth factor and accelerated release rate with collagenase treatment. These studies demonstrate that GMA MPs provide a more flexible platform for growth factor delivery by enhancing the relative binding capacity and permitting proteolytic degradation tunability, thereby offering a more potent controlled release system for growth factor delivery.

  4. Controlled growth factor release from synthetic extracellular matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Peters, Martin C.; Anderson, Kenneth W.; Mooney, David J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric matrices can be used to grow new tissues and organs, and the delivery of growth factors from these matrices is one method to regenerate tissues. A problem with engineering tissues that exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, such as bone, muscle and blood vessels, is that most drug delivery systems have been designed to operate under static conditions. We thought that polymeric matrices, which release growth factors in response to mechanical signals, might provide a new approach to guide tissue formation in mechanically stressed environments. Critical design features for this type of system include the ability to undergo repeated deformation, and a reversible binding of the protein growth factors to polymeric matrices to allow for responses to repeated stimuli. Here we report a model delivery system that can respond to mechanical signalling and upregulate the release of a growth factor to promote blood vessel formation. This approach may find a number of applications, including regeneration and engineering of new tissues and more general drug-delivery applications.

  5. Hypopituitarism: growth hormone and corticotropin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Wass, John A H

    2015-03-01

    This article presents an overview of adult growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) and corticotropin deficiency (central adrenal failure, CAI). Both conditions can result from various ailments affecting the hypothalamus or pituitary gland (most frequently a tumor in the area or its treatment). Clinical manifestations are subtle in AGHD but potentially life-threatening in CAI. The diagnosis needs dynamic testing in most cases. Treatment of AGHD is recommended in patients with documented severe deficiency, and treatment of CAI is mandatory in all cases. Despite significant progress in replacement hormonal therapy, more physiologic treatments and more reliable indicators of treatment adequacy are still needed.

  6. GH responses to growth hormone releasing factor in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R; Beer, R; Harris, B; John, R; Scanlon, M

    1989-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH), thyrotrophin (TSH) and prolactin response to growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) was investigated in 18 patients suffering from major depression with melancholia and in 18 age- and sex-matched normal controls. There was no significant difference in the GH response to GRF stimulation between the patients and controls and in neither subject group was there a demonstrable TSH or prolactin response to GRF. These findings indicate that the pathophysiology underlying the blunted GH response to pharmacological challenge, demonstrated in other studies, must lie at a suprapituitary level.

  7. Soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor release after anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody treatment in mice is independent of tumour necrosis factor-alpha release.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, A.C.T.M.; Tibbe, G.J.M.; Buurman, W.A.; Benner, R.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor release after anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody treatment in mice is independent of tumour necrosis factor-alpha release. Vossen AC, Tibbe GJ, Buurman WA, Benner R, Savelkoul HF. Department of Immunology, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. The involvem

  8. Platelet-Released Growth Factors Induce Differentiation of Primary Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates, for example, platelet-released growth factors, (PRGFs or their clinically related formulations (e.g., Vivostat PRF® came recently into the physicians’ focus as they revealed promising effects in regenerative and reparative medicine such as the support of healing of chronic wounds. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we analyzed the influence of PRGF and Vivostat PRF on human keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and on epidermal differentiation status of skin wounds in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the expression of early (keratin 1 and keratin 10 and late (transglutaminase-1 and involucrin differentiation markers. PRGF treatment of primary human keratinocytes decreased keratin 1 and keratin 10 gene expression but induced involucrin and transglutaminase-1 gene expression in an epidermal growth factor receptor- (EGFR- dependent manner. In concordance with these results, microscopic analyses revealed that PRGF-treated human keratinocytes displayed morphological features typical of keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In vivo treatment of artificial human wounds with Vivostat PRF revealed a significant induction of involucrin and transglutaminase-1 gene expression. Together, our results indicate that PRGF and Vivostat PRF induce terminal differentiation of primary human keratinocytes. This potential mechanism may contribute to the observed beneficial effects in the treatment of hard-to-heal wounds with autologous thrombocyte concentrate lysates in vivo.

  9. Factors controlling alkalisalt deposition in recovery boiler- release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Kylloenen, H.; Kurkela, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1996-12-01

    As part of a cooperative effort to develop a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers, an experimental investigation of the release of sulphur during black liquor pyrolysis has been undertaken. Previous to these studies, the mechanisms of sulphur release and the reasons for the observed effects of process conditions on sulphur release were very poorly understood. On the basis of the experimental results, the main reactions leading to sulphur release have been elucidated with a fair degree of certainty. Logical explanations for the variations of sulphur release with temperature and with liquor solids content have been proposed. The influence of pressure has been investigated in order to gain insights into the effects of mass transfer on the sulphur-release rate. In the near future, the research will be aimed at generating the kinetic data necessary for modelling the release of sulphur in the recovery furnace. (author)

  10. Release factor one is nonessential in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David B F; Wang, Chong; Xu, Jianfeng; Schultz, Matthew D; Schmitz, Robert J; Ecker, Joseph R; Wang, Lei

    2012-08-17

    Recoding a stop codon to an amino acid may afford orthogonal genetic systems for biosynthesizing new protein and organism properties. Although reassignment of stop codons has been found in extant organisms, a model organism is lacking to investigate the reassignment process and to direct code evolution. Complete reassignment of a stop codon is precluded by release factors (RFs), which recognize stop codons to terminate translation. Here we discovered that RF1 could be unconditionally knocked out from various Escherichia coli stains, demonstrating that the reportedly essential RF1 is generally dispensable for the E. coli species. The apparent essentiality of RF1 was found to be caused by the inefficiency of a mutant RF2 in terminating all UAA stop codons; a wild type RF2 was sufficient for RF1 knockout. The RF1-knockout strains were autonomous and unambiguously reassigned UAG to encode natural or unnatural amino acids (Uaas) at multiple sites, affording a previously unavailable model for studying code evolution and a unique host for exploiting Uaas to evolve new biological functions.

  11. Standardized ileal digestible lysine requirements of male pigs immunized against gonadotrophin releasing factor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, K L; Mullan, B P; Kim, J C; Dunshea, F R

    2016-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the standardized ileal digestible (SID) Lys requirement of entire male and male pigs immunized against gonadotrophin releasing factor (GnRF; immunocastrates...

  12. Factors controlling alkali salt deposition in recovery boilers. Release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Kurkela, M.; Kylloenen, H.; Tapola, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1997-10-01

    The research was part of an ongoing cooperative research effort aimed at developing a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers. During 1996 experimental investigations of sulphur release were continued. Experiments at elevated pressures and employing larger particle sizes were performed in order to gain information about mass transfer effects. The first experiments yielding data on the rates of the sulphur-release reactions were performed. This data will be used as the basis of a drop model for sulphur release being developed in cooperation with another research group. The other part of the work during 1996 explored the possibility of using chemical equilibrium calculations to predict the release of sodium, potassium and chlorine in the recovery furnace. The approach is essentially different from that employed in earlier studies in that the effects of fume formation are taken into account. So far, the predictions of the chemical equilibrium release model have, in no way, conflicted with field measurements. (orig.)

  13. Factors affecting surface and release properties of thin PDMS films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Junker, Michael Daniel; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2013-01-01

    of perfluoroether allylamide (PFE) lowered the surface energy which could ease the release. This is further investigated together with an evaluation of the resulting change in actuator performance. The relationship between the adhesive energy, surface energy, Young’s modulus and peel force of the films is analyzed....

  14. Enhanced motivation for food reward induced by stress and attenuation by corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor antagonism in rats: implications for overeating and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu

    2015-06-01

    Overeating beyond individuals' homeostatic needs critically contributes to obesity. The neurobehavioral mechanisms underlying the motivation to consume excessive foods with high calories are not fully understood. The present study examined whether a pharmacological stressor, yohimbine, enhances the motivation to procure food reward with an emphasis on comparisons between standard lab chow and high-fat foods. The effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor blockade by a CRF1-selective antagonist NBI on the stress-enhanced motivation for food reward were also assessed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with chow available ad libitum in their home cages were trained to press a lever under a progressive ratio schedule for deliveries of either standard or high-fat food pellets. For testing yohimbine stress effects, rats received an intraperitoneal administration of yohimbine 10 min before start of the test sessions. For testing effects of CRF1 receptor blockade on stress responses, NBI was administered 20 min prior to yohimbine challenge. The rats emitted higher levels of lever responses to procure the high-fat food pellets compared with their counterparts on standard food pellets. Yohimbine challenge facilitated lever responses for the reward in all of the rats, whereas the effect was more robust in the rats on high-fat food pellets compared with their counterparts on standard food pellets. An inhibitory effect of pretreatment with NBI was observed on the enhancing effect of yohimbine challenge but not on the responses under baseline condition without yohimbine administration. Stress challenge significantly enhanced the motivation of satiated rats to procure extra food reward, especially the high-fat food pellets. Activation of CRF1 receptors is required for the stress-enhanced motivation for food reward. These results may have implications for our better understanding of the biobehavioral mechanisms of overeating and obesity.

  15. Genetic variation in the corticotrophin-releasing factor receptors: identification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and association studies with obesity in UK Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challis, B G; Luan, J; Keogh, J; Wareham, N J; Farooqi, I S; O'Rahilly, S

    2004-03-01

    To investigate whether genetic variation at the loci encoding the corticotropin-releasing factor receptors-1 and -2 (CRF-R1 and CRF-R2) contributes to human obesity. The coding region of the CRF-R1 and CRF-R2 genes was screened in 51 severely obese children (body mass index (BMI)>4 kg/m(2) standard deviations above the age-related mean) using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct nucleotide sequencing. Common polymorphisms that were identified were typed from a UK Caucasian population-based cohort by a PCR-based forced restriction digestion. A repeated measures analysis was used to determine associations between the C861T and G1047A genotypes and anthropometric and biochemical indices relevant to obesity. In subjects with extreme early-onset obesity, four missense mutations were found, each in a single individual: CRF-R1 (Val161Met) and CRF-R2 (Glu220Asp, Val240Ile and Val411Met). However, none of these missense mutations clearly cosegregated with obesity in family studies. Two common single-nucleotide polymorphisms, C861T (Cys287Cys) in CRF-R1 and G1047A (Ser349Ser) in CRF-R2, were also detected. G1047A did not associate with any obesity-related phenotype. In contrast, carriers of the CRF-R1 polymorphism, C861T, had a significantly higher body mass index (BMI). Mutations in the coding sequence of the CRF-R1 and CRF-R2 genes are unlikely to be a common monogenic cause of early-onset obesity. In an adult UK Caucasian population, the CRF-R1 C861T polymorphism is associated with increased BMI.

  16. Juvenile criminal recidivism : relations with personality and post release environmental risk and protective factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, C. van

    2005-01-01

    The general aim of the present dissertation is to get more insight in the contribution of personality traits and post release environmental risk and protective factors on juvenile criminal recidivism. One year after their release from a juvenile detention centre, a sample of 60 adolescent male offen

  17. Controllable mineral coatings on scaffolds as carriers for growth factor release for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurez-Gonzalez, Darilis

    The work presented in this document, focused on the development and characterization of mineral coatings on scaffold materials to serve as templates for growth factor binding and release. Mineral coatings were formed using a biomimetic approach that consisted in the incubation of scaffolds in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF). To modulate the properties of the mineral coating, which we hypothesized would dictate growth factor release, we used carbonate (HCO3) concentration in mSBF of 4.2 mM, 25mM, and 100mM. Analysis of the mineral coatings formed using scanning electron microscopy indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral with different morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite. FTIR data confirmed the substitution of HCO3 in the mineral. As the extent of HCO3 substitution increased, the coating exhibited more rapid dissolution kinetics in an environment deficient in calcium and phosphate. The mineral coatings provided an effective mechanism for bioactive growth factor binding and release. Peptide versions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) were bound with efficiencies up to 90% to mineral-coated PCL scaffolds. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) also bound to mineral coated scaffolds with lower efficiency (20%) and released with faster release kinetics compared to peptides growth factor. Released rhVEGF induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation in vitro and enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in an intramuscular sheep model. In addition to the use the mineral coatings for single growth factor release, we expanded the concept and bound both an angiogenic (rhVEGF) and osteogenic (mBMP2) growth factor by a simple double dipping process. Sustained release of both growth factors was demonstrated for over 60 days. Released rhVEGF enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in sheep and its biological activity was

  18. Comparative release of growth factors from PRP, PRF, and advanced-PRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eizaburo; Flückiger, Laura; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Sawada, Kosaku; Sculean, Anton; Schaller, Benoit; Miron, Richard J

    2016-12-01

    The use of platelet concentrates has gained increasing awareness in recent years for regenerative procedures in modern dentistry. The aim of the present study was to compare growth factor release over time from platelet-rich plasma (PRP), platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), and a modernized protocol for PRF, advanced-PRF (A-PRF). Eighteen blood samples were collected from six donors (3 samples each for PRP, PRF, and A-PRF). Following preparation, samples were incubated in a plate shaker and assessed for growth factor release at 15 min, 60 min, 8 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 10 days. Thereafter, growth factor release of PDGF-AA, PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB, TGFB1, VEGF, EGF, and IGF was quantified using ELISA. The highest reported growth factor released from platelet concentrates was PDGF-AA followed by PDGF-BB, TGFB1, VEGF, and PDGF-AB. In general, following 15-60 min incubation, PRP released significantly higher growth factors when compared to PRF and A-PRF. At later time points up to 10 days, it was routinely found that A-PRF released the highest total growth factors. Furthermore, A-PRF released significantly higher total protein accumulated over a 10-day period when compared to PRP or PRF. The results from the present study indicate that the various platelet concentrates have quite different release kinetics. The advantage of PRP is the release of significantly higher proteins at earlier time points whereas PRF displayed a continual and steady release of growth factors over a 10-day period. Furthermore, in general, it was observed that the new formulation of PRF (A-PRF) released significantly higher total quantities of growth factors when compared to traditional PRF. Based on these findings, PRP can be recommended for fast delivery of growth factors whereas A-PRF is better-suited for long-term release.

  19. Corneal organ cultures in tyrosinemia release chemotactic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, K M; Hyndiuk, R A; Hatchell, D L; Kurth, C E

    1985-05-01

    Corneal inflammation with subsequent scarring and blindness occurs in the inherited human metabolic disease tyrosinemia type II, yet putative inflammatory mediators in this disorder and in the avascular cornea in general are poorly defined. In a Tyr-fed rat model of tyrosinemia type II, intracellular crystals, presumably Tyr, are hypothesized to be responsible for the increased lysosomal activity observed in corneal epithelial lesions. Because polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) are seen only at the site of these lesions, we used this model to study humoral mediators released from Tyr-fed rat corneal organ cultures. Only Tyr-fed rats developed stromal edema and linear granular opacities in gray edematous corneal epithelium, compatible with a noninfectious keratitis. Electron micrographs confirmed epithelial edema and showed focal epithelial necrosis with PMN invasion of the stroma. Only Tyr-fed rat corneal culture supernatants contained chemotactic activity that was heat labile and moderately trypsin sensitive. Four peaks with varying amounts of chemotactic activity were found on Sephadex G-75 chromatography. Although the identity of these peaks of activity has not yet been established, we suggest that they may be responsible for the PMN infiltration observed in this model of corneal inflammation.

  20. Release of Growth Factors into Root Canal by Irrigations in Regenerative Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qian; Nguyen, Sean; Zhang, Hongming; Chebrolu, Hari Priya; Alzebdeh, Dalia; Badi, Mustafa A; Kim, Jong Ryul; Ling, Junqi; Yang, Maobin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the release of growth factors into root canal space after the irrigation procedure of regenerative endodontic procedure. Sixty standardized root segments were prepared from extracted single-root teeth. Nail varnish was applied to all surfaces except the root canal surface. Root segments were irrigated with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 17% EDTA, or deionized water. The profile of growth factors that were released after irrigation was studied by growth factor array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to validate the release of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) at 4 hours, 1 day, and 3 days after irrigation. The final concentrations were calculated on the basis of the root canal volume measured by cone-beam computed tomography. Dental pulp stem cell migration on growth factors released from root segments was measured by using Transwell assay. Total of 11 of 41 growth factors were detected by growth factors array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that TGF-β1 was released in all irrigation groups. Compared with the group with 17% EDTA (6.92 ± 4.49 ng/mL), the groups with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA and 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA had significantly higher release of TGF-β1 (69.04 ± 30.41 ng/mL and 59.26 ± 3.37 ng/mL, respectively), with a peak release at day 1. The release of bFGF was detected at a low level in all groups (0 ng/mL to 0.43 ± 0.22 ng/mL). Migration assay showed the growth factors released from root segments induced dental pulp stem cell migration. The root segment model in present study simulated clinical scenario and indicated that the current irrigation protocol released a significant amount of TGF-β1 but not bFGF. The growth factors released into root canal space induced dental pulp stem cell migration. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  2. Polymethylmethacrylate-induced release of bone-resorbing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, J.H.; Sowder, W.G.; Anderson, D.; Appel, A.M.; Hopson, C.N. (Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (USA))

    1989-12-01

    A pseudomembranous structure that has the histological characteristics of a foreign-body-like reaction invariably develops at the bone-cement interface in the proximity of resorption of bone around aseptically loosened cemented prostheses. This study was an attempt to implicate polymethylmethacrylate in this resorptive process. Unfractionated peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (consisting of lymphocytes and monocytes) and surface-adherent cells (monocyte-enriched) were prepared from control subjects who did and did not have clinical evidence of osteoarthrosis and from patients who had osteoarthrosis and were having a revision for failure of a cemented hip or knee implant. Cells were cultured for varying periods in the presence and absence of nonpolymerized methacrylate (one to two-micrometer spherules), pulverized polymerized material, or culture chambers that were pre-coated with polymerized cement. Conditioned media that were derived from both methacrylate-stimulated cell populations were shown to contain specific bone-resorbing mediators (interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, or prostaglandin E2) and to directly affect bone resorption in 45Ca-labeled murine limb-bone assays.

  3. Control of angiogenesis by galectins involves the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Etulain

    Full Text Available Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases.

  4. Time-dependent release of growth factors from implant surfaces treated with plasma rich in growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ilárduya, María Belén; Trouche, Elodie; Tejero, Ricardo; Orive, Gorka; Reviakine, Ilya; Anitua, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGFs) technology is an autologous platelet-rich plasma approach that provides a pool of growth factors and cytokines that have been shown to increase tissue regeneration and accelerate dental implant osseointegration. In this framework, the spatiotemporal release of growth factors and the establishment of a provisional fibrin matrix are likely to be key aspects governing the stimulation of the early phases of tissue regeneration around implants. We investigated the kinetics of growth factor release at implant surfaces functionalized either with PRGFs or platelet-poor plasma and correlated the results obtained with the morphology of the resulting interfaces. Our main finding is that activation and clot formation favors longer residence times of the growth factors at the interfaces studied, probably due to their retention in the adsorbed fibrin matrix. The concentration of the platelet-derived growth factors above the interfaces becomes negligible after 2-4 days and is significantly higher in the case of activated interfaces than in the case of nonactivated ones, whereas that of the plasmatic hepatocyte growth factor is independent of platelet concentration and activation, and remains significant for up to 9 days. Platelet-rich plasma preparations should be activated to permit growth factor release and thereby facilitate implant surface osseointegration.

  5. Influence of storage conditions on the release of growth factors in platelet-rich blood derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Düregger Katharina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thrombocytes can be concentrated in blood derivatives and used as autologous transplants e.g. for wound treatment due to the release of growth factors such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF. Conditions for processing and storage of these platelet-rich blood derivatives influence the release of PDGF from the platelet-bound α-granules into the plasma. In this study Platelet rich plasma (PRP and Platelet concentrate (PC were produced with a fully automated centrifugation system. Storage of PRP and PC for 1 h up to 4 months at temperatures between −20°C and +37°C was applied with the aim of evaluating the influence on the amount of released PDGF. Storage at −20°C resulted in the highest release of PDGF in PRP and a time dependency was determined: prolonged storage up to 1 month in PRP and 10 days in PC increased the release of PDGF. Regardless of the storage conditions, the release of PDGF per platelet was higher in PC than in PRP.

  6. Gelatin-based hydrogel for vascular endothelial growth factor release in peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnavi, S; di Blasio, L; Tonda-Turo, C; Mancardi, A; Primo, L; Ciardelli, G; Gambarotta, G; Geuna, S; Perroteau, I

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogels are promising materials in regenerative medicine applications, due to their hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and capacity to release drugs and growth factors in a controlled manner. In this study, biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels based on blends of natural polymers were used in in vitro and ex vivo experiments as a tool for VEGF-controlled release to accelerate the nerve regeneration process. Among different candidates, the angiogenic factor VEGF was selected, since angiogenesis has been long recognized as an important and necessary step during tissue repair. Recent studies have pointed out that VEGF has a beneficial effect on motor neuron survival and Schwann cell vitality and proliferation. Moreover, VEGF administration can sustain and enhance the growth of regenerating peripheral nerve fibres. The hydrogel preparation process was optimized to allow functional incorporation of VEGF, while preventing its degradation and denaturation. VEGF release was quantified through ELISA assay, whereas released VEGF bioactivity was validated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in a Schwann cell line (RT4-D6P2T) by assessing VEGFR-2 and downstream effectors Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia explants cultured on VEGF-releasing hydrogels displayed increased neurite outgrowth, providing confirmation that released VEGF maintained its effect, as also confirmed in a tubulogenesis assay. In conclusion, a gelatin-based hydrogel system for bioactive VEGF delivery was developed and characterized for its applicability in neural tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Factors affecting release of ethanol vapour in active modified atmosphere packaging systems for horticultural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerawate Utto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The active modified atmosphere packaging (active MAP system , which provides interactive postharvest control , using ethanol vapour controlled release, is one of the current interests in the development of active packaging for horticultural products. A number of published research work have discussed the relationship between the effectiveness of ethanol vapour and its concentration in the package headspace, including its effect on postharvest decay and physiological controls. This is of importance because a controlled release system should release and maintain ethanol vapour at effective concentrations during the desired storage period. A balance among the mass transfer processes of ethanol vapour in the package results in ethanol vapour accumulation in the package headspace. Key factors affecting these processes include ethanol loading, packaging material, packaged product and storage environment (temperature and relative h umidity. This article reviews their influences and discusses future work required to better understand their influences on ethanol vapour release and accumulations in active MAP.

  8. Corticotropin-releasing activity of gastrin-releasing peptide in normal men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U; Holst, J J; Knuhtsen, S;

    1987-01-01

    than 0.0025). GRP dose-dependently stimulated beta-endorphin immunoreactivity compared with the effect of saline [delta beta-endorphin immunoreactivity before and after treatment: GRP I, 6 +/- 1 vs. -3 +/- 1 pmol/L (P less than 0.01); GRP II, 11 +/- 4 vs. -6 +/- 2 pg/mL (P less than 0.025)]. GRP had...

  9. Growth hormone-releasing factor stimulates proliferation of somatotrophs in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Swanson, L W; Vale, W

    1986-01-01

    The mitogenic effect of the hypothalamic peptides growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin on cultured growth hormone (GH)-producing cells (somatotrophs) was studied. Using autoradiographic detection of [3H]thymidine uptake and immunocytochemical identification of GH-producing cells...

  10. Adenohypophysial changes in mice transgenic for human growth hormone-releasing factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefaneanu, L; Kovacs, K; Horvath, E

    1989-01-01

    The effect of protracted GH-releasing factor (GRF) stimulation on adenohypophysial morphology was investigated in six mice transgenic for human GRF (hGRF). All animals had significantly higher plasma levels of GH and GRF and greater body weights than controls. Eight-month-old mice were killed...

  11. Growth hormone-releasing factor induces c-fos expression in cultured primary pituitary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, Nils; Mitchell, R L; Vale, W;

    1987-01-01

    GH-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin regulates the secretion and biosynthesis of GH as well as the proliferation of GH-producing cells. In order to further characterize the mitogenic effect of GRF, we studied the expression of the proto-oncogene c-fos in primary pituitary cells. Maximal...

  12. 76 FR 27888 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor-Diphtheria...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... drug regulations to reflect approval of a new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Pfizer, Inc. The NADA provides for the veterinary prescription use of gonadotropin releasing factor-diphtheria toxoid...-5755, filed NADA 141-322 that provides for the veterinary prescription use of IMPROVEST...

  13. 77 FR 4227 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor Analog...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... drug regulations to reflect approval of a supplemental new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Pfizer, Inc. The supplemental NADA extends the slaughter interval for intact male swine injected with..., filed a supplement to NADA 141-322 for IMPROVEST (gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  14. ENDOCANNABINOIDS INHIBIT RELEASE OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR BY INFLAMMATION-ACTIVATED MAST CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a pleiotropic member of the neurotrophin family. Beside its neuronal effects, NGF plays a role in various processes, including angiogenesis. Mast cells release NGF and are among elements contributing to angiogenesis, a process regulated by arrays of factors, including the inhibitory cannabinoids. The possible inhibitory role of cannabinoids on mast cell-related NGF mitogenic effect on endothelial cells was then investigated. Human mastocytic ce...

  15. The Transcription Factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 Controls Border-Like Cell Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Rucha; Suárez-Román, Frank; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S

    2016-07-01

    The root cap covers the tip of the root and functions to protect the root from environmental stress. Cells in the last layer of the root cap are known as border cells, or border-like cells (BLCs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These cells separate from the rest of the root cap and are released from its edge as a layer of living cells. BLC release is developmentally regulated, but the mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that the transcription factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 (NLP7) is required for the proper release of BLCs in Arabidopsis. Mutations in NLP7 lead to BLCs that are released as single cells instead of an entire layer. NLP7 is highly expressed in BLCs and is activated by exposure to low pH, a condition that causes BLCs to be released as single cells. Mutations in NLP7 lead to decreased levels of cellulose and pectin. Cell wall-loosening enzymes such as CELLULASE5 (CEL5) and a pectin lyase-like gene, as well as the root cap regulators SOMBRERO and BEARSKIN1/2, are activated in nlp7-1 seedlings. Double mutant analysis revealed that the nlp7-1 phenotype depends on the expression level of CEL5 Mutations in NLP7 lead to an increase in susceptibility to a root-infecting fungal pathogen. Together, these data suggest that NLP7 controls the release of BLCs by acting through the cell wall-loosening enzyme CEL5.

  16. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma.

  17. Mast Cell Proteases 6 and 7 Stimulate Angiogenesis by Inducing Endothelial Cells to Release Angiogenic Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devandir Antonio de Souza Junior

    Full Text Available Mast cell proteases are thought to be involved with tumor progression and neo-vascularization. However, their exact role is still unclear. The present study was undertaken to further elucidate the function of specific subtypes of recombinant mouse mast cell proteases (rmMCP-6 and 7 in neo-vascularization. SVEC4-10 cells were cultured on Geltrex® with either rmMCP-6 or 7 and tube formation was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the capacity of these proteases to induce the release of angiogenic factors and pro and anti-angiogenic proteins was analyzed. Both rmMCP-6 and 7 were able to stimulate tube formation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that incubation with the proteases induced SVEC4-10 cells to invade the gel matrix. However, the expression and activity of metalloproteases were not altered by incubation with the mast cell proteases. Furthermore, rmMCP-6 and rmMCP-7 were able to induce the differential release of angiogenic factors from the SVEC4-10 cells. rmMCP-7 was more efficient in stimulating tube formation and release of angiogenic factors than rmMCP-6. These results suggest that the subtypes of proteases released by mast cells may influence endothelial cells during in vivo neo-vascularization.

  18. Endocannabinoids inhibit release of nerve growth factor by inflammation-activated mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarella, Giuseppina; Scollo, Mimmo; Lempereur, Laurence; Saccani-Jotti, Gloria; Basile, Francesco; Bernardini, Renato

    2011-08-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a pleiotropic member of the neurotrophin family. Beside its neuronal effects, NGF plays a role in various processes, including angiogenesis. Mast cells release NGF and are among elements contributing to angiogenesis, a process regulated by arrays of factors, including the inhibitory cannabinoids. The possible inhibitory role of cannabinoids on mast cell-related NGF mitogenic effect on endothelial cells was then investigated. Human mastocytic cells HMC-1, challenged with PMA to yield release of NGF, were preincubated with the endocannabinoid PEA. Then, conditioned media were added to HUVEC cultures. PMA-activated HMC-1 cells released substantial amounts of NGF, whereas PEA inhibited PMA-induced NGF release. HUVEC proliferation increased after treatment with media from activated HMC-1 cells, while was reduced with media from HMC-1 cells treated with PEA. To characterize receptors mediating such effects of PEA, RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed on HMC-1 cells. None of the two cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors was expressed by HMC-1 cells, which on the other hand expressed the orphan receptor GPR55. PEA was ineffective in inhibiting NGF release from HMC-1 cells treated with PMA and transfected with positive GPR55 RNAi, whereas it induced significant reduction of NGF in cells transfected with the corresponding negative control RNAi. Results indicate that NGF released from inflammatory mast cells induces angiogenesis. Cannabinoids attenuate such pro-angiogenic effects of NGF. Finally, cannabinoids could be considered for antiangiogenic treatment in disorders characterized by prominent inflammation.

  19. Growth hormone secretion from chicken adenohypophyseal cells in primary culture: effects of human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1987-03-01

    A primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells has been developed to study the regulation of growth hormone (GH) secretion. Following collagenase dispersion, cells were exposed for 2 hr to vehicle (control) or test agents. Human pancreatic (tumor) growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) and rat hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor stimulated GH release to similar levels. GH release was increased by the presence of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) alone did not influence GH release; however, TRH plus hpGRF together exerted a synergistic (greater than additive) effect, increasing GH release by 100 to 300% over the sum of the values for each secretagogue acting alone. These relationships between TRH and hpGRF were further examined in cultured cells exposed to secretagogues for two consecutive 2-hr incubations. TRH pretreatment enhanced subsequent hpGRF-stimulated GH release by about 80% over that obtained if no secretagogue was present during the first incubation. In other experiments, somatostatin (SRIF) alone did not alter GH secretion. However, SRIF reduced hpGRF-stimulated GH release to levels found in controls. Furthermore, GH release stimulated by the presence of both TRH and hpGRF was lowered to control values by SRIF. The results of these studies demonstrate that a primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells is a useful model for the study of GH secretion. Indeed, these results suggest that TRH and hpGRF regulate GH secretion by mechanisms which are not identical.

  20. Material-mediated proangiogenic factor release pattern modulates quality of regenerated blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Baek, Kwanghyun; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Millet, Larry J; Bashir, Rashid; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-12-28

    Hydrogels designed to sustainably release bioactive molecules are extensively used to enhance tissue repair and regenerative therapies. Along this line, numerous efforts are made to control the molecular release rate and amount. In contrast, few efforts are made to control the molecular release pattern, and, subsequently, modulate the spatial organization of newly forming tissues, including blood vessels. Therefore, using a hydrogel printed to release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into a pre-defined pattern, this study demonstrates that spatial distribution of VEGF is important in guiding growth direction of new blood vessels, and also in retaining the structural integrity of pre-existing vasculature. Guided by a computational model, we fabricated a patch composed of micro-sized VEGF-releasing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel cylinders using an ink-jet printer. Interestingly, hydrogel printed with computationally optimized spacing created anisotropically aligned vasculature exclusively when the printed gel pattern was placed parallel to pre-existing blood vessels. In contrast, vascular sprouting from placing the printed gel pattern perpendicular to pre-existing vessels resulted in deformation and structural disintegration of the original vasculature. We envision that this study will be useful to better understand angiogenesis-modulated neovascularization and further improve the treatment quality for various wounds and tissue defects.

  1. Elongation factor 1-alpha is released into the culture medium during growth of Giardia intestinalis trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarin, Hanna; Ringqvist, Emma; Hellman, Ulf; Svärd, Staffan G

    2011-04-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of the intestinal parasite Giardia intestinalis is still not fully understood but excretory-secretory products have been suggested to be important during host-parasite interactions. Here we used SDS-PAGE gels and MALDI-TOF analysis to identify proteins released by Giardia trophozoites during in vitro growth. Serum proteins (mainly bovine serum albumin) in the growth medium, bind to the parasite surface and they are continuously released, which interfere with parasite secretome characterization. However, we identified two released Giardia proteins: elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) and a 58 kDa protein, identified as arginine deiminase (ADI). This is the first description of EF-1α as a released/secreted Giardia protein, whereas ADI has been identified in an earlier secretome study. Two genes encoding EF-1α were detected in the Giardia WB genome 35 kbp apart with almost identical coding sequences but with different promoter and 3' regions. Promoter luciferase-fusions showed that both genes are transcribed in trophozoites. The EF-1α protein localizes to the nuclear region in trophozoites but it relocalizes to the cytoplasm during host-cell interaction. Recombinant EF-1α is recognized by serum from giardiasis patients. Our results suggest that released EF-1α protein can be important during Giardia infections.

  2. Differential actions of peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), urocortin II, and urocortin III on gastric emptying and colonic transit in mice: role of CRF receptor subtypes 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Vicente; Wang, Lixin; Rivier, Jean E; Vale, Wylie; Taché, Yvette

    2002-05-01

    Peripheral CRF inhibits gastric emptying and stimulates colonic motor function in rats. We investigated the role of CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors in i.p. CRF-induced alterations of gut transit in conscious mice using selective CRF(1) and CRF(2) ligands injected i.p. Gastric emptying 2 h after ingestion of a solid chow meal and colonic transit (time to expel a bead inserted into the distal colon) were determined simultaneously. Rat/human (r/h)CRF, which has CRF(1) > CRF(2) binding affinity, decreased distal colonic transit time at lower doses (6-12 microg/kg) than those inhibiting gastric emptying (20-60 microg/kg). Ovine CRF, a preferential CRF(1) receptor agonist (6-60 microg/kg), reduced significantly the colonic transit time without altering gastric emptying, whereas the selective CRF(2) receptor agonists mouse urocortin II (20-60 microg/kg) and urocortin III (120 microg/kg) inhibited significantly gastric emptying without modifying colonic transit. The CRF(1)/CRF(2) receptor antagonist, astressin (30-120 microg/kg), dose dependently prevented r/hCRF (20 microg/kg)-induced inhibition of gastric emptying and reduction of colonic transit time. The selective CRF(1) receptor antagonists, NBI-27914 (C(18)H(20)Cl(4)N(4)C(7)H(8)O(3)S) and CP-154,526 (butyl-[2,5-dimethyl-7-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl]ethylamine) (5-30 mg/kg), dose dependently blocked r/hCRF action on the colon without influencing the gastric response, whereas the CRF(2) receptor antagonist, antisauvagine-30 (30-100 microg/kg), dose dependently abolished r/hCRF-induced delayed gastric emptying and had no effect on colonic response. These data show that i.p. r/hCRF-induced opposite actions on upper and lower gut transit in conscious mice are mediated by different CRF receptor subtypes: the activation of CRF(1) receptors stimulates colonic propulsive activity, whereas activation of CRF(2) receptors inhibits gastric emptying.

  3. Novel systems for tailored neurotrophic factor release based on hydrogel and resorbable glass hollow fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novajra, G; Tonda-Turo, C; Vitale-Brovarone, C; Ciardelli, G; Geuna, S; Raimondo, S

    2014-03-01

    A novel system for the release of neurotrophic factor into a nerve guidance channel (NGC) based on resorbable phosphate glass hollow fibers (50P2O5-30CaO-9Na2O-3SiO2-3MgO-2.5K2O-2.5TiO2 mol%) in combination with a genipin-crosslinked agar/gelatin hydrogel (A/G_GP) is proposed. No negative effect on the growth of neonatal olfactory bulb ensheathing cell line (NOBEC) as well as on the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins was measured in vitro in the presence of fiber dissolution products in the culture medium. For the release studies, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-20), taken as growth factor model molecule, was solubilized in different media and introduced into the fiber lumen exploiting the capillary action. The fibers were filled with i) FD-20/phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, ii) FD-20/hydrogel solution before gelation and iii) hydrogel before gelation, subsequently lyophilized and then filled with the FD-20/PBS solution. The different strategies used for the loading of the FD-20 into the fibers resulted in different release kinetics. A slower release was observed with the use of A/G_GP hydrogel. At last, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nerve guides containing the hollow fibers and the hydrogel have been fabricated.

  4. Synthesis of multilayered alginate microcapsules for the sustained release of fibroblast growth factor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Omaditya; Moya, Monica L; Opara, Emmanuel C; Brey, Eric M

    2010-01-01

    Alginate microcapsules coated with a permselective poly-L-ornithine (PLO) membrane have been investigated for the encapsulation and transplantation of islets as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. The therapeutic potential of this approach could be improved through local stimulation of microvascular networks in order to meet mass transport demands of the encapsulated cells. Fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1) is a potent angiogenic factor with optimal effect occurring when it is delivered in a sustained manner. In this paper, a technique is described for the generation of multilayered alginate microcapsules with an outer alginate layer that can be used for the delivery of FGF-1. The influence of alginate concentration and composition (high mannuronic acid (M) or guluronic acid (G) content) on outer layer size and stability, protein encapsulation efficiency, and release kinetics was investigated. The technique results in a stable outer layer of alginate with a mean thickness between 113–164 µm, increasing with alginate concentration and G-content. The outer layer was able to encapsulate and release FGF-1 for up to thirty days, with 1.25% of high G alginate displaying the most sustained release. The released FGF-1 retained its biologic activity in the presence of heparin, and the addition of the outer layer did not alter the permselectivity of the PLO coat. This technique could be used to generate encapsulation systems that deliver proteins to stimulate local neovascularization around encapsulated islets. PMID:20725969

  5. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT).

  6. Studies on the Biological Effects of Ozone: 10. Release of Factors from Ozonated Human Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Valacchi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3, promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 and interleukin-8(IL-8 are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limbischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT.

  7. Mechanisms in bradykinin stimulated arachidonate release and synthesis of prostaglandin and platelet activating factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ricupero

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory mechanisms in bradykinin (BK activated release of arachidonate (ARA and synthesis of prostaglandin (PG and platelet activating factor (PAF were studied in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAEC. A role for GTP binding protein (G-protein in the binding of BK to the cells was determined. Guanosine 5-O- (thiotriphosphate, (GTPτS, lowered the binding affinity for BK and increased the Kd for the binding from 0.45 to 1.99 nM. The Bmax remained unaltered at 2.25 × 10-11 mole. Exposure of the cells to aluminium fluoride also reduced the affinity for BK. Bradykinin-induced release of ARA proved pertussis toxin (PTX sensitive, with a maximum sensitivity at 10 ug/ml PTX. GTPτS at 100 μM increased the release of arachidonate. The effect of GTPτS and BK was additive at suboptimal doses of BK up to 0.5 nM but never exceeded the levels of maximal BK stimulation at 50 nM. PTX also inhibited the release of ARA induced by the calcium ionophore, A23187. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or more commonly known as tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA itself had little effect on release by the intact cells. However, at 100 nM it augmented the BK activated release. This was downregulated by overnight exposure to TPA and correlated with down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC activity. The down-regulation only affected the augmentation of ARA release by TPA but not the original BK activated release. TPA displayed a similar, but more potent amplification of PAF synthesis in response to both BK or the calcium ionophore A23187. These results taken together point to the participation of G-protein in the binding of BK to BPAEC and its activation of ARA release. Possibly two types of G-protein are involved, one associated with the receptor, the other activated by Ca2+ and perhaps associated with phospholipase A2 (PLA2. Our results further suggest that a separate route of activation, probably also PLA2 related, takes place through a PKC catalysed

  8. Immunochemical determination of cellular content of translation release factor RF4 in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1999-01-01

    of the stop codons, and RF3 is known to accelerate the overall termination process. Release factor RF4 is a protein involved in the release of the mRNA and tRNA from the ribosomal complex. Furthermore, RF4 is involved in the proofreading in the elongation step of protein biosynthesis. The cellular contents...... of RF1, RF2, and RF3 were determined earlier. Here we report the cellular content of RF4 in Escherichia coli to be approximately 16,500 molecules per cell. The cells were grown in a rich medium and harvested in the beginning of the exponential growth phase. The quantifications were performed by using......The biosynthesis of proteins in prokaryotes is terminated when a stop codon is present in the A-site of the 70S ribosomal complex. Four different translation termination factors are known to participate in the termination process. Release factor RF1 and RF2 are responsible for the recognition...

  9. Solvent-free fabrication of polyHIPE microspheres for controlled release of growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglia, Robert; Whitely, Michael; Brooks, Megan; Robinson, Jennifer; Pishko, Michael; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    The growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) is utilized in surgical procedures to improve bone regeneration; however, current treatments deliver BMP-2 at amounts greater than 100,000 fold of physiological levels, which increases treatment costs and risk of side effects. Drug-eluting microcarriers developed to improve these therapies have faced significant commercialization challenges including particle size distributions, solvent removal, low encapsulation efficiency, and bioactivity loss. In this study, a solvent-free method is presented for fabrication of uniform polyHIPE microspheres for controlled growth factor release. Emulsion templating principles and fluid dynamics were used to fabricate uniform particles with tunable particle size (200-800 μm) and pore size (10-30 μm). The ability to independently tune particle and pore size is expected to provide excellent control of release kinetics. Overall, this solvent-free method for making porous microspheres displays strong promise for the controlled release of BMP-2 and other growth factors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Inflammation and activity augment brain-derived neurotrophic factor peripheral release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, L Y; Shen, S; Liu, M; Xia, C; Kay, J C; Zhang, Q L

    2016-03-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release to nerve terminals in the central nervous system is crucial in synaptic transmission and neuronal plasticity. However, BDNF release peripherally from primary afferent neurons has not been investigated. In the present study, we show that BDNF is synthesized by primary afferent neurons located in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rat, and releases to spinal nerve terminals in response to depolarization or visceral inflammation. In two-compartmented culture that separates DRG neuronal cell bodies and spinal nerve terminals, application of 50mM K(+) to either the nerve terminal or the cell body evokes BDNF release to the terminal compartment. Inflammatory stimulation of the visceral organ (e.g. the urinary bladder) also facilitates an increase in spontaneous BDNF release from the primary afferent neurons to the axonal terminals. In the inflamed viscera, we show that BDNF immunoreactivity is increased in nerve fibers that are immuno-positive to the neuronal marker PGP9.5. Both BDNF and pro-BDNF levels are increased, however, pro-BDNF immunoreactivity is not expressed in PGP9.5-positive nerve-fiber-like structures. Determination of receptor profiles in the inflamed bladder demonstrates that BDNF high affinity receptor TrkB and general receptor p75 expression levels are elevated, with an increased level of TrkB tyrosine phosphorylation/activity. These results suggest a possibility of pro-proliferative effect in the inflamed bladder. Consistently we show that the proliferation marker Ki67 expression levels are enhanced in the inflamed organ. Our results imply that in vivo BDNF release to the peripheral organ is an important event in neurogenic inflammatory state.

  11. In situ formation of poly(vinyl alcohol–heparin hydrogels for mild encapsulation and prolonged release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine J Roberts

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Heparin-based hydrogels are attractive for controlled growth factor delivery, due to the native ability of heparin to bind and stabilize growth factors. Basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor are heparin-binding growth factors that synergistically enhance angiogenesis. Mild, in situ encapsulation of both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor and subsequent bioactive dual release has not been demonstrated from heparin-crosslinked hydrogels, and the combined long-term delivery of both growth factors from biomaterials is still a major challenge. Both basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor were encapsulated in poly(vinyl alcohol-heparin hydrogels and demonstrated controlled release. A model cell line, BaF32, was used to show bioactivity of heparin and basic fibroblast growth factor released from the gels over multiple days. Released basic fibroblast growth factor promoted higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth over 24 h and proliferation for 3 days than the poly(vinyl alcohol-heparin hydrogels alone. The release of vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol-heparin hydrogels promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth but not significant proliferation. Dual-growth factor release of basic fibroblast growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor from poly(vinyl alcohol-heparin hydrogels resulted in a synergistic effect with significantly higher human umbilical vein endothelial cell outgrowth compared to basic fibroblast growth factor or vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Poly(vinyl alcohol-heparin hydrogels allowed bioactive growth factor encapsulation and provided controlled release of multiple growth factors which is beneficial toward tissue regeneration applications.

  12. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD.

  13. Functional identification of central afferent projections conveying information of acute "stress" to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P.J.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    c-fos, corticotropin-releasing factor, neurosecretory neurons, paraventricular nucleus, transcription factors, neuroendocrinology, cholera toxin subunit B, retrograde tracing......c-fos, corticotropin-releasing factor, neurosecretory neurons, paraventricular nucleus, transcription factors, neuroendocrinology, cholera toxin subunit B, retrograde tracing...

  14. Role of bed nucleus of the stria terminalis corticotrophin-releasing factor receptors in frustration stress-induced binge-like palatable food consumption in female rats with a history of food restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Romano, Adele; Bossert, Jennifer M; Rice, Kenner C; Ubaldi, Massimo; St Laurent, Robyn; Gaetani, Silvana; Massi, Maurizio; Shaham, Yavin; Cifani, Carlo

    2014-08-20

    We developed recently a binge-eating model in which female rats with a history of intermittent food restriction show binge-like palatable food consumption after 15 min exposure to the sight of the palatable food. This "frustration stress" manipulation also activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis. Here, we determined the role of the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in stress-induced binge eating in our model. We also assessed the role of CRF receptors in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a brain region implicated in stress responses and stress-induced drug seeking, in stress-induced binge eating. We used four groups that were first exposed or not exposed to repeated intermittent cycles of regular chow food restriction during which they were also given intermittent access to high-caloric palatable food. On the test day, we either exposed or did not expose the rats to the sight of the palatable food for 15 min (frustration stress) before assessing food consumption for 2 h. We found that systemic injections of the CRF1 receptor antagonist R121919 (2,5-dimethyl-3-(6-dimethyl-4-methylpyridin-3-yl)-7 dipropylamino pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine) (10-20 mg/kg) and BNST (25-50 ng/side) or ventricular (1000 ng) injections of the nonselective CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41) decreased frustration stress-induced binge eating in rats with a history of food restriction. Frustration stress also increased Fos (a neuronal activity marker) expression in ventral and dorsal BNST. Results demonstrate a critical role of CRF receptors in BNST in stress-induced binge eating in our rat model. CRF1 receptor antagonists may represent a novel pharmacological treatment for bingeing-related eating disorders.

  15. Cyclic strain alters the expression and release of angiogenic factors by human tendon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavizadeh, Rouhollah; Khosravi, Shahram; Behzad, Hayedeh; McCormack, Robert G; Duronio, Vincent; Scott, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is associated with the tissue changes underlying chronic overuse tendinopathy. We hypothesized that repetitive, cyclic loading of human tendon cells would lead to increased expression and activity of angiogenic factors. We subjected isolated human tendon cells to overuse tensile loading using an in vitro model (1 Hz, 10% equibiaxial strain). We found that mechanically stimulated human tendon cells released factors that promoted in vitro proliferation and tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). In response to cyclic strain, there was a transient increase in the expression of several angiogenic genes including ANGPTL4, FGF-2, COX-2, SPHK1, TGF-alpha, VEGF-A and VEGF-C, with no change in anti-angiogenic genes (BAI1, SERPINF1, THBS1 and 2, TIMP1-3). Cyclic strain also resulted in the extracellular release of ANGPTL4 protein by tendon cells. Our study is the first report demonstrating the induction of ANGPTL4 mRNA and release of ANGPTL4 protein in response to cyclic strain. Tenocytes may contribute to the upregulation of angiogenesis during the development of overuse tendinopathy.

  16. Neuroprotection elicited by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor released from astrocytes in response to methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Takuya; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The protective roles of astrocytes in neurotoxicity induced by environmental chemicals, such as methylmercury (MeHg), are largely unknown. We found that conditioned medium of MeHg-treated astrocytes (MCM) attenuated neuronal cell death induced by MeHg, suggesting that astrocytes-released factors can protect neuronal cells. The increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was observed in MeHg-treated astrocytes. NGF and BDNF were detected in culture media as homodimers, which are able to bind specific tyrosine kinase receptors, tropomyosin related kinase (Trk) A and TrkB, respectively. The TrkA antagonist and TrkB antagonist abolished the protective effects of MCM in neuronal cell death induced by MeHg. Taken together, astrocytes synthesize and release NGF and BDNF in response to MeHg to protect neurons from MeHg toxicity. This study is considered to show a novel defense mechanism against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Evidence for a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from the brain during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Brassard, Patrice; Adser, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has an important role in regulating maintenance, growth and survival of neurons. However, the main source of circulating BDNF in response to exercise is unknown. To identify whether the brain is a source of BDNF during exercise, eight volunteers rowed for 4...... h while simultaneous blood samples were obtained from the radial artery and the internal jugular vein. To further identify putative cerebral region(s) responsible for BDNF release, mouse brains were dissected and analysed for BDNF mRNA expression following treadmill exercise. In humans, a BDNF...... release from the brain was observed at rest (P exercise (P exercise, the brain contributed 70-80% of circulating BDNF, while that contribution decreased following 1 h of recovery. In mice, exercise induced a three...

  18. A novel collagen/platelet-rich plasma (COL/PRP) scaffold: preparation and growth factor release analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiujie; Wang, Jingwei; Ren, Mingguang; Li, Lifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely used in clinical practice for more than 20 years because it causes the release of many growth factors. However, the burst release pattern and short release period of PRP have become obstacles to its application. An optimal controllable release system is an urgent need for researchers. This study investigated whether collagen/PRP (COL/PRP) scaffolds can serve as a vehicle for the controllable release of growth factors. We fabricated a novel scaffold that integrates PRP activated by thrombin or collagen into type I collagen. The mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) content were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the COL/PRP scaffolds were not cytotoxic to L-929 fibroblasts. The PDGF and FGF content in the thrombin group was at a higher level and lasted for a long period of time. Collagen and thrombin played the same role in the release of TGF-β1 and VEGF. These data suggest that the novel COL/PRP scaffolds provide a carrier for the controllable release of growth factors and may be used in tissue- regenerative therapies.

  19. A prospective study of prognostic factors for duration of sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalsgaard Jesper

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic carpal tunnel release with a single portal technique has been shown to reduce sick leave compared to open carpal tunnel release, claiming to be a less invasive procedure and reducing scar tenderness leading to a more rapid return to work, and the purpose of this study was to identify prognostic factors for prolonged sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release in a group of employed Danish patients. Methods The design was a prospective study including 75 employed patients with carpal tunnel syndrome operated with ECTR at two hospitals. The mean age was 46 years (SD 10.1, the male/female ratio was 0.42, and the mean preoperative duration of symptoms 10 months (range 6-12. Only 21 (28% were unable to work preoperatively and mean sick leave was 4 weeks (range 1-4. At base-line and at the 3-month follow-up, a self-administered questionnaire was collected concerning physical, psychological, and social circumstances in relation to the hand problem. Data from a nerve conduction examination were collected at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Significant prognostic factors were identified through multiple logistic regression analysis. Results After the operation, the mean functional score was reduced from 2.3 to 1.4 (SD 0.8 and the mean symptom score from 2.9 to 1.5 (SD 0.7. The mean sick leave from work after the operation was 19.8 days (SD 14.3. Eighteen patients (24% had more than 21 days of sick leave. Two patients (3% were still unable to work after 3 months. Significant prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis for more than 21 days of postoperative sick leave were preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem and a preoperative distal motor latency. Conclusion Preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem, and a preoperative distal nerve conduction motor latency were prognostic factors for postoperative work absence of more than 21 days. Other factors may be important

  20. Development of realistic environmental release factors based on measured data: approach and lessons from the EU metal industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonck, Frederik A M; Van Assche, Frank; Hicks, Keegan; Mertens, Jelle; Voigt, Astrid; Verougstraete, Violaine

    2014-10-01

    The assessment of environmental exposure and risks associated with the production or use of a substance on an industrial site includes the estimation of the releases to the environment. In the absence of measured release data on the specific substance, a risk assessor would rely on default release factors to the environmental compartments as developed in international, national, or regional context. Because a wide variety of substances, processes, and uses has to be covered, default release factors are as a rule conservative, usually leading to significant overprediction of releases and hence to overpredicted environmental exposure concentrations and risks. In practice, unrealistic and worst-case predictions do not support a more efficient management of releases and risk. The objective of this article is to propose a more realistic approach to characterize the environmental releases from manufacture, processing, and downstream uses of the metals and their compounds. Although developed in the European Union (EU), this approach can also be used in other regions and in other chemical management systems addressing metals. A database consisting of more than 1300 recent (1993-2010), site-specific measured release factors to air and water of 18 different metals from various EU Member States was compiled and used to calculate average and reasonable worst-case release factors for multiple metal manufacture and industrial use processes. The parameters influencing releases to water were found to depend predominantly on life cycle step (manufacture and/or use), the sector and/or the solid-water partition coefficient (K(d)). The release factors can be used as advanced tier instrument in environmental safety assessments, increasing the realism of the estimates while still keeping a sufficient level of conservatism.

  1. Injectable Biodegradable Polyurethane Scaffolds with Release of Platelet-derived Growth Factor for Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Li, Bing; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of triisocyanate composition on the biological and mechanical properties of biodegradable, injectable polyurethane scaffolds for bone and soft tissue engineering. Methods Scaffolds were synthesized using reactive liquid molding techniques, and were characterized in vivo in a rat subcutaneous model. Porosity, dynamic mechanical properties, degradation rate, and release of growth factors were also measured. Results Polyurethane scaffolds were elastomers with tunable damping properties and degradation rates, and they supported cellular infiltration and generation of new tissue. The scaffolds showed a two-stage release profile of platelet-derived growth factor, characterized by a 75% burst release within the first 24 h and slower release thereafter. Conclusions Biodegradable polyurethanes synthesized from triisocyanates exhibited tunable and superior mechanical properties compared to materials synthesized from lysine diisocyanates. Due to their injectability, biocompatibility, tunable degradation, and potential for release of growth factors, these materials are potentially promising therapies for tissue engineering. PMID:18516665

  2. Effect of trehalose coating on basic fibroblast growth factor release from tailor-made bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungjin; Lee, Jongil; Igawa, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Shigeki; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Chung, Ung-il; Sasaki, Nobuo

    2011-12-01

    Artificial bone implants are often incorporated with osteoinductive factors to facilitate early bone regeneration. Calcium phosphate, the main component in artificial bone implants, strongly binds these factors, and in a few cases, the incorporated proteins are not released from the implant under conditions of physiological pH, thereby leading to reduction in their osteoinductivity. In this study, we coated tailor-made bone implants with trehalose to facilitate the release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In an in vitro study, mouse osteoblastic cells were separately cultured for 48 hr in a medium with a untreated implant (T-), trehalose-coated implant (T+), bFGF-incorporated implant (FT-), and bFGF-incorporated implant with trehalose coating (FT+). In the FT+ group, cell viability was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P<0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that trehalose effectively covered the surface of the artificial bone implant without affecting the crystallinity or the mechanical strength of the artificial bone implant. These results suggest that coating artificial bone implants with trehalose could limit the binding of bFGF to calcium phosphate.

  3. Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 4 regulates gene expression via transcription factor release in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP...... supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation....

  4. Performance of optimized noncanonical amino acid mutagenesis systems in the absence of release factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yunan; Lajoie, Marc J; Italia, James S; Chin, Melissa A; Church, George M; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2016-05-24

    Site-specific incorporation of noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins expressed in E. coli using UAG-suppression competes with termination mediated by release factor 1 (RF1). Recently, unconditional deletion of RF1 was achieved in a genomically recoded E. coli (C321), devoid of all endogenous UAG stop codons. Here we evaluate the efficiency of ncAA incorporation in this strain using optimized suppression vectors. Even though the absence of RF1 does not benefit the suppression efficiency of a single UAG codon, multi-site incorporation of a series of chemically distinct ncAAs was significantly improved.

  5. Leukotriene B4 and tumor necrosis factor release from leukocytes: effect of peritoneal dialysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörres, A; Jörres, D; Gahl, G M; Kessel, M; Müller, C; Köttgen, E; Serke, S; Schulz, E; Mahiout, A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of peritoneal dialysate on the capacity of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear (PMNL) and mononuclear leukocytes (MNC) to release leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) was investigated in vitro. Following density gradient separation, aliquots of 5 x 10(6) PMNL or MNC were incubated in peritoneal dialysis fluid containing 1.5% glucose or Hanks' buffer (= control) for 1-2 h at 37 degrees C. TNF alpha and LTB4 production was stimulated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and calcium ionophore A23187, respectively. MNC incubated in buffer and LPS produced (mean +/- SD) 1,006 +/- 522 pg TNF alpha/5 x 10(6) cells; no significant amounts of TNF alpha were detectable in the presence of dialysate. An inhibition of TNF alpha release was also observed in MNC exposed to bicarbonate-buffered dialysates (pH 7.40) and 4.25% and 1.5% glucose solution with physiologic osmolality. Incubation of PMNL in Hanks' buffer followed by A23187 stimulation led to production of 29.1 +/- 19.2 ng LTB4/5 x 10(6) cells, whereas glucose-incubated cells were refractory to ionophore stimulation (less than 0.1 ng LTB4/5 x 10(6) cells). The failure of dialysate-exposed leukocytes to release inflammatory mediators in response to adequate stimuli may contribute to the impairment of cellular host defense in the setting of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

  6. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (Pmuscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  7. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (Pmuscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  8. Immobilization increases interleukin-6, but not tumour necrosis factor-a, release from the leg during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reihmane, Dace; Hansen, Andreas Vigelsø; Jensen, Martin Gram;

    2013-01-01

    Data on interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) release during acute exercise are not conclusive, and information is lacking about the impact of physical inactivity. Some studies have shown an increase, but others report no changes in IL-6 and TNF-a release during exercise. We...

  9. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyatake S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shouta Miyatake,1 Yuko Shimizu-Motohashi,2 Shin’ichi Takeda,1 Yoshitsugu Aoki1 1Department of Molecular Therapy, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Child Neurology, National Center Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. Keywords: calcium channels, ryanodine receptor 1, exon skipping, NF-κB, myokine, ROS

  10. Outer mitochondrial membrane localization of apoptosis-inducing factor: mechanistic implications for release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong‑Woon Yu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor, but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders.

  11. Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Localization of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor: Mechanistic Implications for Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Woon Yu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor, but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders.

  12. Wnt3a regulates tumor necrosis factor-α-stimulated interleukin-6 release in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Hideo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Adachi, Seiji; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kato, Kenji; Minamitani, Chiho; Otsuka, Takanobu; Kozawa, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    It is recognized that Wnt pathways regulate bone metabolism. We have previously shown that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulates synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a potent bone resorptive agent, via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)/Akt in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Wnt3a on TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 synthesis in these cells. Wnt3a, which alone did not affect the IL-6 levels, significantly suppressed the TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 release. Lithium Chloride (LiCl), which is an inhibitor of GSK3β, markedly reduced the TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 release, similar to the results with Wnt3a. The suppression by Wnt3a or LiCl was also observed in the intracellular protein levels of IL-6 elicited by TNF-α. Wnt3a failed to affect the TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase, Akt, IκB or NFκB. Either Wnt3a or LiCl failed to reduce, rather increased the IL-6 mRNA expression stimulated by TNF-α. Lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, and bafilomycin A1, a lysosomal protease inhibitor, significantly restored the suppressive effect of Wnt3a on TNF-α-stimulated IL-6 release. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that Wnt3a regulates IL-6 release stimulated by TNF-α at post-transcriptional level in osteoblasts.

  13. Possible participation of calcium in growth hormone release and in thyrotropin-releasing hormone and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor synergy in a primary culture of chicken pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1989-09-01

    We previously reported that thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) exert synergistic (greater than additive) effects on growth hormone (GH) release from chicken pituitary cells in primary culture. In the present studies the possible participation of calcium in GH release and in TRH and hpGRF synergy was investigated. Following dispersion with collagenase, cells were cultured for 48 hr prior to exposure (2 hr) to test agents. Cultured cells were exposed to a range of calcium concentrations (0, 0.02, 0.2, and 2.0 mM) in the presence and absence of secretagogues. These results demonstrated that basal GH release was not altered by the concentration of calcium in the medium: however, secretagogue-induced GH release required calcium. Thus, TRH, hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, or forskolin stimulated GH release in the absence of calcium. Furthermore, synergistic GH release evoked by TRH and hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, or forskolin was observed only at the highest calcium concentration (2.0 mM). In other studies, ionomycin (10(-5) M), a calcium ionophore, stimulated GH release to a value about 125% over the basal (absence of test agent) value. Ionomycin-induced GH release was not affected by TRH (5.0 ng/ml); the combined effects of ionomycin (10(-7)-10(-5) M) and hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml) on GH release were less than additive. However, ionomycin (10(-5) M) further increased GH release over that resulting from the synergistic action of TRH and hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml each). Verapamil (a calcium channel blocker) did not affect GH release induced by either TRH or hpGRF (5.0 ng/ml each). However, this agent did inhibit synergistic GH release evoked by TRH and hpGRF, 8 Br-cAMP, forskolin, or isobutylmethylxanthine. These results suggest that calcium participates in secretagogue-induced GH release from chicken somatotrophs in vitro.

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-10-0233 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-10-0233 ref|NP_112261.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Ratt...us norvegicus] sp|P35353|CRFR1_RAT Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 precursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA16441.1| corticotropin-releasing factor receptor gb|A...AC53519.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Rattus norvegicus] gb|EDM06294.1| corticotropin releas...ing hormone receptor 1 [Rattus norvegicus] NP_112261.1 0.0 99% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-11-0131 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-11-0131 ref|NP_112261.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Ratt...us norvegicus] sp|P35353|CRFR1_RAT Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 precursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA16441.1| corticotropin-releasing factor receptor gb|A...AC53519.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Rattus norvegicus] gb|EDM06294.1| corticotropin releas...ing hormone receptor 1 [Rattus norvegicus] NP_112261.1 0.0 98% ...

  16. In Situ Loading of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Within Porous Silica Nanoparticles for a Prolonged Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postovit Lynne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, a protein, plays a key role in wound healing and blood vessel regeneration. However, bFGF is easily degraded in biologic systems. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs with well-tailored porous structure have been used for hosting guest molecules for drug delivery. Here, we report an in situ route to load bFGF in MSNs for a prolonged release. The average diameter (d of bFGF-loaded MSNs is 57 ± 8 nm produced by a water-in-oil microemulsion method. The in vitro releasing profile of bFGF from MSNs in phosphate buffer saline has been monitored for 20 days through a colorimetric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The loading efficiency of bFGF in MSNs is estimated at 72.5 ± 3%. In addition, the cytotoxicity test indicates that the MSNs are not toxic, even at a concentration of 50 μg/mL. It is expected that the in situ loading method makes the MSNs a new delivery system to deliver protein drugs, e.g. growth factors, to help blood vessel regeneration and potentiate greater angiogenesis.

  17. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates gene expression through transcription factor release in the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Botanga, Christopher J; Thorgrimsen, Stephan; Palma, Kristoffer; Suarez-Rodriguez, Maria Cristina; Sandbech-Clausen, Signe; Lichota, Jacek; Brodersen, Peter; Grasser, Klaus D; Mattsson, Ole; Glazebrook, Jane; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2008-08-20

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) exists in nuclear complexes with the WRKY33 transcription factor. This complex depends on the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Challenge with Pseudomonas syringae or flagellin leads to the activation of MPK4 and phosphorylation of MKS1. Subsequently, complexes with MKS1 and WRKY33 are released from MPK4, and WRKY33 targets the promoter of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3) encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of antimicrobial camalexin. Hence, wrky33 mutants are impaired in the accumulation of PAD3 mRNA and camalexin production upon infection. That WRKY33 is an effector of MPK4 is further supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation.

  18. Substance P induces tumor necrosis factor-alpha release from human skin via mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, T; Hide, M; Koro, O; Yamamoto, S

    2000-06-16

    Substance P plays an important role in neurogenic inflammation with granulocyte infiltration. To investigate cytokines involved in the substance P-induced inflammation and the mechanism of cell activation, we studied the release of TNF (tumor necrosis factor)-alpha and histamine from human skin slices in response to substance P and antigen. Substance P induced the release of histamine and TNF-alpha in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations from 0.8 to 100 microM. PD 098059 (2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone) selectively inhibited the release of TNF-alpha, but not the release of histamine induced by either substance P or antigen. SB 203580 ([4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-++ +imida zole]) slightly inhibited TNF-alpha release induced by antigen, but not that induced by substance P, and slightly enhanced histamine release induced by either stimulation. The release of TNF-alpha in response to either stimulation was inhibited by 1 nM-1 microM dexamethasone, but histamine release was not affected. These results suggest that substance P, in addition to antigen, induced TNF-alpha release from human skin by a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, predominantly extracellular signaling-regulated protein kinase (ERK)-dependent, and dexamethasone-sensitive pathway, which is separate from that for histamine release from mast cells.

  19. Growth hormone-releasing factor regulates growth hormone mRNA in primary cultures of rat pituitary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gick, G G; Zeytin, F N; BRAZEAU, P.; Ling, N C; Esch, F S; Bancroft, C

    1984-01-01

    A peptide with high intrinsic activity for specifically stimulating the secretion of immunoreactive growth hormone (GH; somatotropin) has been characterized and reproduced by total synthesis. This peptide, human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor, 44-amino-acid form (hpGRF1-44-NH2), was isolated from a tumor localized in the pancreas of a patient with acromegaly. We report here the effect of this growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) on GH release and the GH mRNA levels in monolayer c...

  20. Growth Factors Released from Gelatin Hydrogel Microspheres Increase New Neurons in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Nakaguchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that new neurons are continuously generated by endogenous neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult mammalian brain. Some of these new neurons migrate to injured brain tissues and differentiate into mature neurons, suggesting that such new neurons may be able to replace neurons lost to degenerative disease or injury and improve or repair neurological deficits. Here, we tested whether delivering growth factors via gelatin hydrogel microspheres would support neurogenesis in the SVZ. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons in the SVZ. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF-containing microspheres increased the number of new neurons migrating from the SVZ towards the injured striatum in a stroke model in mouse. These results suggest that the strategy of using gelatin hydrogel microspheres to achieve the sustained release of growth factors holds promise for the clinical regeneration of damaged brain tissues from endogenous neural stem cells in the adult SVZ.

  1. Repository Corticotropin Injection for Treatment of Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarat Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a group of systemic autoimmune diseases that involve inflammation of skeletal muscle. The two most common forms are dermatomyositis and polymyositis, the former of which entails a skin component. There are few approved therapeutics available for treatment of this group of diseases and the first-line therapy is usually corticosteroid treatment. Considering that a large proportion of patients do not respond to or cannot tolerate corticosteroids, additional treatments are required. There are second-line therapies available, but many patients are also refractory to those options. H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection [RCI] is a melanocortin peptide that can induce steroid-dependent effects and steroid-independent effects. Herein, we present a series of cases that involved the use of RCI in the management of dermatomyositis and polymyositis. RCI treatments resulted in improvement in three of four patients, despite failure with previous therapies. The use of RCI did not exacerbate any comorbidity and no significant changes in blood pressure, weight, or glycemic control were observed. Overall, these results are encouraging and suggest that randomized, controlled clinical trials applying RCI to dermatomyositis and polymyositis are warranted.

  2. Expression and purification of growth hormone-releasing factor with the aid of dihydrofolate reductase handle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, M; Obara, K; Kokubu, T; Ohashi, S; Izutsu, H

    1992-07-01

    Expression of a fusion protein composed of dihydrofolate reductase and a derivative of growth hormone-releasing factor resulted in the formation of inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli at 37 degrees C. Among various chemicals, such as detergents, protein denaturants, and acetic acid, tested for the ability to dissolve the inclusion bodies, acetic acid, Brij-35, deoxycholic acid sodium salts, guanidine-HCl, and urea showed a strong solubilizing effect without damaging the DHFR activity. Acetic acid was useful in terms of preparing GRF derivatives, since it could be easily removed by lyophilization, and this made it easy to perform the succeeding BrCN treatment for cutting out the GRF derivative from the fusion protein. The GRF derivative was purified by reversed phase HPLC from the BrCN digest of the acetic acid extract, and its growth hormone-releasing activity was demonstrated. However, for obtaining a highly purified fusion protein itself, solubilization of inclusion bodies by urea was preferred because urea was the only agent which did not cause serious precipitation of the regenerated fusion protein after 10-fold dilution of the extracted inclusion bodies with buffer. The fusion protein was highly purified by means of a methotrexate affinity chromatography.

  3. Applications of human factors engineering to LNG release prevention and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikiar, R.; Rankin, W.L.; Rideout, T.B.

    1982-06-01

    The results of an investigation of human factors engineering and human reliability applications to LNG release prevention and control are reported. The report includes a discussion of possible human error contributions to previous LNG accidents and incidents, and a discussion of generic HF considerations for peakshaving plants. More specific recommendations for improving HF practices at peakshaving plants are offered based on visits to six facilities. The HF aspects of the recently promulgated DOT regulations are reviewed, and recommendations are made concerning how these regulations can be implemented utilizing standard HF practices. Finally, the integration of HF considerations into overall system safety is illustrated by a presentation of human error probabilities applicable to LNG operations and by an expanded fault tree analysis which explicitly recognizes man-machine interfaces.

  4. Expression of growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor gene in GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, I; Inokuchi, K; Hasegawa, O; Sugihara, H; Minami, S

    1992-02-01

    Pituitary cells synthesize various neuropeptides that influence pituitary hormone secretion. GH-releasing factor (GRF) may also be produced by normal or pituitary tumor cells. We examined GRF gene expression in pituitary tumors. Standard techniques for the analysis of GRF gene expression did not appear to be suitable. Highly sensitive reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction was used. Specimens of pituitary adenoma were obtained by transsphenoidal adenomectomy from six patients with acromegaly and three patients with no clinical evidence of pituitary hormone overproduction; non-functioning adenoma. Pituitary glands were collected at autopsy from three patients who died from nonendocrine disorders. A specific GRF gene transcript was detected in five out of six GH-producing pituitary adenomas, whereas this was not found in three separate specimens of nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma or anterior and posterior pituitary tissue. The data suggest that GRF is synthesized as an intrinsic product in human GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

  5. Sustained release of tissue factor following thrombosis of lower limb trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walenga, Jeanine M; Kaiser, Phoebe C; Prechel, M Margaret; Hoppensteadt, Debra; Jeske, Walter P; Misselwitz, Frank; Bacher, Peter; Lassen, Michael R; Fareed, Jawed

    2014-10-01

    This study was undertaken to provide evidence for the mechanism of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in healthy patients with minor lower limb injury (fracture; Achilles tendon rupture) that was medically managed with plaster cast/brace immobilization. The Plaster Cast clinical trial provided a unique opportunity to identify the natural history of VTE using placebo-controlled patients (n = 183) with validation of the mechanism using the low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH; reviparin)-treated patients (n = 182). Confirmed VTE in this population was associated with a burst of tissue factor release (and a minor fibrinolytic deficit) leading to thrombin generation that was sustained at least 5 weeks, greater with fractures than with soft-tissue injuries and greater with surgery than with conservative treatment. The root cause likely involves platelet/leukocyte activation (inflammation) rather than endothelial cell injury. Thromboprophylaxis with a low dose of LMWH reduced thrombin generation, with patients undergoing surgery benefitting the most.

  6. The portal-drained viscera release fibroblast growth factor 19 in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelfat, Kiran V K; Bloemen, Johanne G; Jansen, Peter L M; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Schaap, Frank G; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is an ileum-derived endrocrine factor that is produced in response to transepithelial bile salt flux. FGF19 represses bile salt synthesis in the liver. Despite the general assumption that FGF19 signals to the liver via portal blood, no human data are available to support this notion. The aim was to study portal FGF19 levels, and determined bile salt and FGF19 fluxes across visceral organs in humans. Bile salt and FGF19 levels were assessed in arterial, portal, and hepatic venous blood collected from fasted patients who underwent partial liver resection for colorectal liver metastases (n = 30). Fluxes across the portal-drained viscera (PDV), liver, and splanchnic area were calculated. Portal bile salt levels (7.8 [5.0-12.4] μmol/L) were higher than levels in arterial (2.7 [1.7-5.5] μmol/L, P FGF19 (161 ± 78 pg/mL) were higher than arterial levels (135 ± 65 pg/mL, P = 0.046). A net release of FGF19 by the PDV (+4.0 [+2.1 to +9.9] ng kg(-1) h(-1), P FGF19 across the liver (-0.2 [-3.7 to +7.4] ng kg(-1) h(-1), P = 0.93). In conclusion, FGF19 levels in human portal blood are higher than in arterial blood. FGF19 is released by the portal-drained viscera under fasted steady state conditions.

  7. Insulin/IGF signaling in Drosophila and other insects: factors that regulate production, release and post-release action of the insulin-like peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nässel, Dick R; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin-like peptides (ILPs) are important regulators of metabolism, growth, reproduction and lifespan, and mechanisms of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) have been well conserved over evolution. In insects, between one and 38 ILPs have been identified in each species. Relatively few insect species have been investigated in depth with respect to ILP functions, and therefore we focus mainly on the well-studied fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. In Drosophila eight ILPs (DILP1-8), but only two receptors (dInR and Lgr3) are known. DILP2, 3 and 5 are produced by a set of neurosecretory cells (IPCs) in the brain and their biosynthesis and release are controlled by a number of mechanisms differing between larvae and adults. Adult IPCs display cell-autonomous sensing of circulating glucose, coupled to evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for DILP release. The glucose-mediated DILP secretion is modulated by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, as well as by factors released from the intestine and adipocytes. Larval IPCs, however, are indirectly regulated by glucose-sensing endocrine cells producing adipokinetic hormone, or by circulating factors from the intestine and fat body. Furthermore, IIS is situated within a complex physiological regulatory network that also encompasses the lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. After release from IPCs, the ILP action can be modulated by circulating proteins that act either as protective carriers (binding proteins), or competitive inhibitors. Some of these proteins appear to have additional functions that are independent of ILPs. Taken together, the signaling with multiple ILPs is under complex control, ensuring tightly regulated IIS in the organism.

  8. Factors influencing immediate post-release survival of spectacled eiders following surgical implantation of transmitters with percutaneous antennae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexson, Matthew G.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Spriggs, Maria; Myers, Gwen E.

    2014-01-01

    Surgically implanted transmitters are a common method for tracking animal movements. Immediately following surgical implantation, animals pass through a critical recovery phase when behaviors may deviate from normal and the likelihood of individual survival may be reduced. Therefore, data collected during this period may be censored to minimize bias introduced by surgery-related behaviors or mortality. However, immediate post-release mortalities negate a sampling effort and reduce the amount of data potentially collected after the censoring period. Wildlife biologists should employ methods to support an animal’s survival through this period, but factors contributing to immediate post-release survival have not been formally assessed. We evaluated factors that potentially influenced the immediate post-release survival of 56 spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) marked with coelomically implanted satellite transmitters with percutaneous antennae in northern Alaska in 2010 and 2011. We modeled survival through the first 14 days following release and assessed the relative importance and effect of 15 covariates hypothesized to influence survival during this immediate post-release period. Estimated daily survival rate increased over the duration of the immediate post-release period; the probability of mortality was greatest within the first 5 days following release. Our top-ranking model included the effect of 2 blood analytes, pH and hematocrit, measured prior to surgical implantation of a transmitter. We found a positive response to pH; eiders exhibiting acidemia (low pH) prior to surgery were less likely to survive the immediate post-release period. We found a curvilinear response to hematocrit; eiders exhibiting extremely low or high pre-surgery hematocrit were also less likely to survive the immediate post-release period. In the interest of maximizing the survival of marked birds following release, hematological data obtained prior to surgical implantation of

  9. Gender-Based Correlation Profiles Among the Release Factors and Distance Thrown in Paralympic Seated Shot Put.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangwoo; Davis, Ronald; Judge, Lawrence W; Kwon, Young-Hoo; Han, Kihoon; Kim, Jemin; Kim, Jaewoong; Kim, Jaehwa

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among release factors (speed, height, and angle) and distance thrown in Paralympic seated shot put. Forty-eight trials performed by 11 men and 5 women during the 2012 US Paralympic trials in track and field were analyzed. With both genders combined, release speed (r = .95, p < .01) and angle (r = .51, p < .01) showed significant correlations to distance thrown. Release speed (r = .94, p < .01) in men and all release factors (r = .60-.98, p < .02) in women showed significant correlations to distance. Release speed and angle were identified as important predictors of the distance, explaining over 89-96% of the variance in distance thrown. Unlike athletes without disability, seated shot-putters exhibited significant positive speed-angle correlations (combined: r = .37, p < .01; women: r = .57, p = .03). Application of these results should address a focus in training on generating speed through the release point with a consistent release angle.

  10. Early outgrowth cells release soluble endocrine antifibrotic factors that reduce progressive organ fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Zhang, Yanling; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, Golam; Kepecs, David; Spring, Christopher; Smith, Christopher; Batruch, Ihor; Kosanam, Hari; Advani, Andrew; Diamandis, Eleftherios; Marsden, Philip A; Gilbert, Richard E

    2013-11-01

    Adult bone marrow-derived cells can improve organ function in chronic disease models, ostensibly by the release of paracrine factors. It has, however, been difficult to reconcile this prevailing paradigm with the lack of cell retention within injured organs and their rapid migration to the reticuloendothelial system. Here, we provide evidence that the salutary antifibrotic effects of bone marrow-derived early outgrowth cells (EOCs) are more consistent with an endocrine mode of action, demonstrating not only the presence of antifibrotic factors in the plasma of EOC-treated rats but also that EOC conditioned medium (EOC-CM) potently attenuates both TGF-β- and angiotensin II-induced fibroblast collagen production in vitro. To examine the therapeutic relevance of these findings in vivo, 5/6 subtotally nephrectomized rats, a model of chronic kidney and heart failure characterized by progressive fibrosis of both organs, were randomized to receive i.v. injections of EOC-CM, unconditioned medium, or 10(6) EOCs. Rats that received unconditioned medium developed severe kidney injury with cardiac diastolic dysfunction. In comparison, EOC-CM-treated rats demonstrated substantially improved renal and cardiac function and structure, mimicking the changes found in EOC-treated animals. Mass spectrometric analysis of EOC-CM identified proteins that regulate cellular functions implicated in fibrosis. These results indicate that EOCs secrete soluble factor(s) with highly potent antifibrotic activity, that when injected intravenously replicate the salutary effects of the cells themselves. Together, these findings suggest that an endocrine mode of action may underlie the effectiveness of cell therapy in certain settings and portend the possibility for systemic delivery of cell-free therapy.

  11. Rapid release of growth factors regenerates force output in volumetric muscle loss injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasman, Jonathan M; Do, Duc M; Page, Raymond L; Pins, George D

    2015-12-01

    A significant challenge in the design and development of biomaterial scaffolds is to incorporate mechanical and biochemical cues to direct organized tissue growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) loaded, crosslinked fibrin (EDCn-HGF) microthread scaffolds on skeletal muscle regeneration in a mouse model of volumetric muscle loss (VML). The rapid, sustained release of HGF significantly enhanced the force production of muscle tissue 60 days after injury, recovering more than 200% of the force output relative to measurements recorded immediately after injury. HGF delivery increased the number of differentiating myoblasts 14 days after injury, and supported an enhanced angiogenic response. The architectural morphology of microthread scaffolds supported the ingrowth of nascent myofibers into the wound site, in contrast to fibrin gel implants which did not support functional regeneration. Together, these data suggest that EDCn-HGF microthreads recapitulate several of the regenerative cues lost in VML injuries, promote remodeling of functional muscle tissue, and enhance the functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. Further, by strategically incorporating specific biochemical factors and precisely tuning the structural and mechanical properties of fibrin microthreads, we have developed a powerful platform technology that may enhance regeneration in other axially aligned tissues.

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0121 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0121 sp|P34998|CRFR1_HUMAN Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 p...recursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA35719.1| corticotropin releasing... factor receptor gb|AAC69993.1| corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor [Homo sapiens] P34998 0.0 90% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-09-0011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-09-0011 sp|P34998|CRFR1_HUMAN Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 p...recursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA35719.1| corticotropin releasing... factor receptor gb|AAC69993.1| corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor [Homo sapiens] P34998 0.0 91% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-1136 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-1136 sp|P34998|CRFR1_HUMAN Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 p...recursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA35719.1| corticotropin releasing... factor receptor gb|AAC69993.1| corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor [Homo sapiens] P34998 3e-51 45% ...

  15. Interferon regulatory factor-1 mediates the release of high mobility group box-1 in endotoxemia in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Pin-hua; Jon Cardinal; LI Mo-li; HU Cheng-ping; Allan Tsung

    2013-01-01

    Background The extracellular release of the danger signal high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis and outcomes of sepsis.Understanding the mechanisms responsible for HMGB1 release can lead to the identification of targets that may inhibit this process.The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an important mediator of innate immune responses and has been shown to participate in mortality associated with endotoxemia; however,its role in mediating the release of HMGB1 in these settings is unknown.Methods Male IRF-1 knockout (KO) and age matched C57BL/6 wild type (WT) mice were given intraperitoneal (IP)injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS).In some experiments,96 hours survival rates were observed.In other experiments,mice were sacrificed 12 hours after LPS administration and sera were harvested for future analysis.In in vitro study,RAW 264.7 murine monocyte/macrophage-like cells or primary peritoneal macrophage obtained from IRF-1 KO and WF mice were cultured for LPS mediated HMGB1 release analysis.And the mechanism for HMGB1 release was analyzed by immune-precipitation.Results IRF-1 KO mice experienced less mortality,and released less systerric HMGB1 compared to their WT counterparts.Exogenous administration of recombinant HMGB1 to IRF-1 KO mice returned the mortality rate to that seen originally in IRF-1 WT mice.Using cultures of peritoneal macrophages or RAW264.7 cells,in vitro LPS stimulation induced the release of HMGB1 in an IRF-1 dependent manner.And the janus associated kinase (JAK)-IRF-1 signal pathway appeared to participate in the signaling mechanisms of LPS-induced HMGB1 release by mediating acetylation of HMGB1.Conclusion IRF-1 plays a role in LPS induced release of HMGB1 and therefore may serve as a novel target in sepsis.

  16. Detecting transforming growth factorrelease from liver cells using an aptasensor integrated with microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matharu, Zimple; Patel, Dipali; Gao, Yandong; Haque, Amranul; Zhou, Qing; Revzin, Alexander

    2014-09-02

    We developed a cell-culture/biosensor platform consisting of aptamer-modified Au electrodes integrated with reconfigurable microfluidics for monitoring of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), an important inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokine. Aptamers were thiolated, labeled with redox reporters, and self-assembled on gold surfaces. The biosensor was determined to be specific for TGF-β1 with an experimental detection limit of 1 ng/mL and linear range extending to 250 ng/mL. Upon determining figures of merit, aptasensor was miniaturized and integrated with human hepatic stellate cells inside microfluidic devices. Reconfigurable microfluidics were developed to ensure that seeding of "sticky" stromal cells did not foul the electrode and compromise sensor performance. This microsystem with integrated aptasensors was used to monitor TGF-β1 release from activated stellate cells over the course of 20 h. The electrochemical response went down upon infusing anti-TGF-β1 antibodies into the microfluidic devices containing activated stellate cells. To further validate aptasensor responses, stellate cells were stained for markers of activation (e.g., alpha smooth muscle actin) and were also tested for presence of TGF-β1 using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Given the importance of TGF-β1 as a fibrogenic signal, a microsystem with integrated biosensors for local and continuous detection of TGF-β1 may prove to be an important tool to study fibrosis of the liver and other organs.

  17. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  18. Numerical Studies on Heat Release Rate in Room Fire on Liquid Fuel under Different Ventilation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat release rate (HRR of the design fire is the most important parameter in assessing building fire hazards. However, HRR in room fire was only studied by computational fluid dynamics (CFD in most of the projects determining fire safety provisions by performance-based design. In contrast to ten years ago, officers in the Far East are now having better knowledge of CFD. Two common questions are raised on CFD-predicted results on describing free boundaries; and on computing grid size. In this work, predicting HRR by the CFD model was justified with experimental room pool fire data reported earlier. The software fire dynamics simulator (FDS version 5 was selected as the CFD simulation tool. Prescribed input heating rate based on the experimental results was used with the liquid fuel model in FDS. Five different free boundary conditions were investigated to predict HRR. Grid sensitivity study was carried out using one stretched mesh and multiple uniform meshes with different grid sizes. As it is difficult to have the entire set of CFD predicted results agreed with experiments, macroscopic flow parameters on the mass flow rate through door opening predicted by CFD were also justified by another four conditions with different ventilation factors.

  19. Pharmacological analysis for mechanisms of GPI-80 release from tumour necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitto, Takeaki; Araki, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Yuji; Sendo, Fujiro

    2002-10-01

    1 GPI-80, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein initially identified on human neutrophils, plays a role(s) in the regulation of beta2 integrin function. Previous studies have shown that GPI-80 is sublocated in secretory vesicles. It is also found in soluble form in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients, and in the culture supernatant of formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulated neutrophils. To understand the behaviour of GPI-80 under conditions of stimulation, we investigated the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on its expression and release. We also probed the mechanism of its release with various pharmacologic tools. 2 TNF-alpha induced the release of GPI-80 from human neutrophils in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (in the range of 1-100 u ml(-1) and 30-120 min, respectively), but did not affect surface GPI-80 levels. 3 Cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 but not PD98059 inhibited TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release and neutrophil adherence at the same concentration. In addition, TNF-alpha-induced GPI-80 release was inhibited by blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to components of Mac-1 (CD11b and CD18). 4 Antioxidants (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine) inhibited GPI-80 release by TNF-alpha stimulation, but superoxide dismutase did not. Antioxidants but not superoxide dismutase reduced an intracellular oxidation state. 5 These findings indicate that TNF-alpha-stimulated GPI-80 release from human neutrophils depends upon adherence via beta2 integrins. They also suggest that cytochalasin B, genistein, and SB203580 inhibit GPI-80 release by suppressing signals for cell adherence, rather than by a direct effect on its secretion. Finally, we suggest that GPI-80 release involves an intracellular change in a redox state.

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-08-0018 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-08-0018 ref|NP_073205.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 [Ratt...us norvegicus] sp|P47866|CRFR2_RAT Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 precursor (CRF-R 2) (CRF2) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 2) (CRH-R 2) gb|AAC52159.1| corticotropin-releasing factor receptor subtype 2 NP_073205.1 0.0 93% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-03-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-03-0035 ref|NP_989652.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Gall...us gallus] sp|Q90812|CRFR1_CHICK Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 precursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA96656.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor NP_989652.1 0.0 88% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-30-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-30-0010 ref|NP_989652.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Gall...us gallus] sp|Q90812|CRFR1_CHICK Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 precursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA96656.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor NP_989652.1 0.0 97% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-06-0056 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-06-0056 ref|NP_073205.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 [Ratt...us norvegicus] sp|P47866|CRFR2_RAT Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 precursor (CRF-R 2) (CRF2) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 2) (CRH-R 2) gb|AAC52159.1| corticotropin-releasing factor receptor subtype 2 NP_073205.1 0.0 97% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-02-0001 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TNIG-02-0001 ref|NP_989652.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Gall...us gallus] sp|Q90812|CRFR1_CHICK Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 precursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA96656.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor NP_989652.1 0.0 83% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0746 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0746 ref|NP_989652.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Gall...us gallus] sp|Q90812|CRFR1_CHICK Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 precursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA96656.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor NP_989652.1 0.0 90% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-07-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-07-0016 ref|NP_073205.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 [Ratt...us norvegicus] sp|P47866|CRFR2_RAT Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 precursor (CRF-R 2) (CRF2) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 2) (CRH-R 2) gb|AAC52159.1| corticotropin-releasing factor receptor subtype 2 NP_073205.1 0.0 93% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2480 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2480 ref|NP_073205.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 [Ratt...us norvegicus] sp|P47866|CRFR2_RAT Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 precursor (CRF-R 2) (CRF2) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 2) (CRH-R 2) gb|AAC52159.1| corticotropin-releasing factor receptor subtype 2 NP_073205.1 0.0 81% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-27-0004 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-27-0004 ref|NP_989652.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Gall...us gallus] sp|Q90812|CRFR1_CHICK Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 precursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA96656.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor NP_989652.1 0.0 99% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-14-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-14-0058 ref|NP_073205.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 [Ratt...us norvegicus] sp|P47866|CRFR2_RAT Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 precursor (CRF-R 2) (CRF2) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 2) (CRH-R 2) gb|AAC52159.1| corticotropin-releasing factor receptor subtype 2 NP_073205.1 0.0 93% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0916 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0916 ref|NP_989652.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Gall...us gallus] sp|Q90812|CRFR1_CHICK Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 precursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA96656.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor NP_989652.1 0.0 84% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-03-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-03-0038 ref|NP_073205.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 [Ratt...us norvegicus] sp|P47866|CRFR2_RAT Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 precursor (CRF-R 2) (CRF2) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 2) (CRH-R 2) gb|AAC52159.1| corticotropin-releasing factor receptor subtype 2 NP_073205.1 0.0 93% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-05-0008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-05-0008 ref|NP_989652.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Gall...us gallus] sp|Q90812|CRFR1_CHICK Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 precursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA96656.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor NP_989652.1 0.0 79% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0313 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0313 ref|NP_073205.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 [Ratt...us norvegicus] sp|P47866|CRFR2_RAT Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 precursor (CRF-R 2) (CRF2) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 2) (CRH-R 2) gb|AAC52159.1| corticotropin-releasing factor receptor subtype 2 NP_073205.1 0.0 92% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-0265 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-0265 ref|NP_989652.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Gall...us gallus] sp|Q90812|CRFR1_CHICK Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 precursor (CRF-R) (CRF1) (Corticotropin-releasing... hormone receptor 1) (CRH-R 1) gb|AAA96656.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor NP_989652.1 1e-152 84% ...

  15. Glucocorticoid- and androgen-secreting black adrenocortical adenomas: unique cause of corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanabe, Akiyo; Aiba, Motohiko; Hizuka, Naomi; Takano, Kazue; Zhang, Jun; Young, William F

    2011-01-01

    To describe the unique association of corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome caused by cortisol- and androgen-secreting black adrenal cortical adenomas with myelolipomatous change. We report the clinical, laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings from 2 patients who presented with androgen excess and typical signs and symptoms of Cushing syndrome. Endocrine investigations showed high serum cortisol concentrations that lacked diurnal rhythm, undetectable plasma corticotropin concentrations, and absence of serum cortisol suppression after overnight dexamethasone suppression tests. Serum levels of adrenal androgens were elevated. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed unilateral adrenal masses (largest lesional diameters 4.0 and 3.1 cm). On the basis of the plurihormonal hypersecretion and the imaging characteristics, adrenocortical carcinoma was considered as a possible diagnosis. However, histopathologic analysis in both patients revealed black adrenal cortical adenomas with myelolipomatous change. After surgery, adrenal androgens normalized, and the signs and symptoms of Cushing syndrome and androgen excess resolved. There was no evidence of recurrent disease at last follow-up. A unique form of corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome is described: cortisol- and androgen-secreting black adrenal cortical adenomas with myelolipomatous change. Although most patients with corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome associated with androgen excess prove to have adrenocortical carcinoma, the clinician should be aware of the possibility of benign, black adrenal adenomas in this clinical setting.

  16. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  17. Pore geometry of ceramic device: The key factor of drug release kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Release kinetics of tigecycline, a potential antibiotic in treatment of osteomyelitis, from calcium hydroxyapatite (CHA, as one of the most important ceramic materials in bone tissue engineering, was investigated in this study. Tigecycline, in solid state, was mixed with CHA powder and the obtained mixture was compressed into tablets using two different pressures. These tablets were immersed in a phosphate-buffered saline solution and tigecycline release was measured by a UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The total release time was 5 or 28 days, depending on the pressure applied during compression. It was shown that there is a close relationship between pore sizes and drug release rate. The drug release kinetics was interpreted on the base of pore sizes and pore size distribution. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172026

  18. Nitric oxide-releasing agents enhance cytokine-induced tumor necrosis factor synthesis in human mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eigler, A; Sinha, B; Endres, S

    1993-01-01

    In septic shock tumor necrosis factor (TNF) leads to increased nitric oxide (NO) production by induction of NO synthase. An inverse regulatory effect, the influence of NO on cytokine synthesis, has rarely been investigated. The present study assessed the influence of NO-releasing agents on TNF produ

  19. Platelet-rich plasma preparation using three devices : Implications for platelet activation and platelet growth factor release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Peter A. M.; Mahoney, Christine Brown; Hoffmann, Johannes J. M. L.; Schonberger, Jacques P. A. M.; Box, Henk A. M.; Van Zundert, Andre; Knape, Johannes T. A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In this study, three commercial systems for the preparation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were compared and platelet growth factors release was measured. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers donated whole blood that was fractionated by a blood cell separator, and a table-top centrifuge to pre

  20. Direct measurement of human plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone by two-site immunoradiometric assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linton, E.A.; McLean, C.; Nieuwenhuyzen Kruseman, A.C.; Tilders, F.J.; Van der Veen, E.A.; Lowry, P.J.

    1987-05-01

    A ''two-site'' immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) which allows the direct estimation of human CRH (hCRH) in plasma is described. Using this IRMA, basal levels of CRH in normal subjects ranged from 2-28 pg/mL (mean, 15 +/- 7 (+/- SD) pg/mL; n = 58). Values in men and women were similar. Plasma CRH values within this range were also found in patients with Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, and Nelson's syndrome, with no correlation between plasma CRH and ACTH levels in these patients. Elevated plasma CRH levels were found in pregnant women near term (1462 +/- 752 (+/- SD) pg/mL; n = 55), and the dilution curve of this CRH-like immunoreactivity paralleled the IRMA standard curve. After its immunoadsorption from maternal plasma, this CRH-like material eluted on reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with a retention time identical to that of synthetic CRH and had equipotent bioactivity with the synthetic peptide in the perfused anterior pituitary cell bioassay. Circulating CRH was not detected in Wistar rats, even after adrenalectomy and subsequent ether stress. Synthetic hCRH was degraded by fresh human plasma relatively slowly; 65% of added CRH remained after 1 h of incubation at 37 C. Degradation was inhibited by heat treatment (54 C; 1 h), cold treatment (4 C; 4 h), or freezing and thawing. Loss of synthetic rat CRH occurred more rapidly when fresh rat plasma was used; only 20% of added CRH remained under the same conditions. The inability to measure CRH in peripheral rat plasma may be due to the presence of active CRH-degrading enzymes which fragment the CRH molecule into forms not recognized by the CRH IRMA.

  1. Elevated Midpregnancy Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Is Associated with Prenatal, But Not Postpartum, Maternal Depression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rich-Edwards, J. W; Mohllajee, A. P; Kleinman, K; Hacker, M. R; Majzoub, J; Wright, R. J; Gillman, M. W

    2008-01-01

    Context: Elevated hypothalamic CRH has been implicated in melancholic major depression in nonpregnant individuals, but the role of placental CRH in maternal prenatal and postpartum depression is largely unexplored. Objective...

  2. Analysis of the potential of cancer cell lines to release tissue factor-containing microvesicles: correlation with tissue factor and PAR2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettelaie, Camille; Collier, Mary Ew; Featherby, Sophie; Benelhaj, Naima E; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Despite the association of cancer-derived circulating tissue factor (TF)-containing microvesicles and hypercoagulable state, correlations with the incidence of thrombosis remain unclear. In this study the upregulation of TF release upon activation of various cancer cell lines, and the correlation with TF and PAR2 expression and/or activity was examined. Microvesicle release was induced by PAR2 activation in seventeen cell lines and released microvesicle density, microvesicle-associated TF activity, and phoshpatidylserine-mediated activity were measured. The time-course for TF release was monitored over 90 min in each cell line. In addition, TF mRNA expression, cellular TF protein and cell-surface TF activities were quantified. Moreover, the relative expression of PAR2 mRNA and cellular protein were analysed. Any correlations between the above parameters were examined by determining the Pearson's correlation coefficients. TF release as microvesicles peaked between 30-60 min post-activation in the majority of cell lines tested. The magnitude of the maximal TF release positively correlated with TF mRNA (c = 0.717; p microvesicle release. However, TF release in resting cells did not significantly correlate with any of the parameters examined. Furthermore, TF mRNA expression correlated with PAR2 mRNA expression (c = 0.745; p < 0.001). In conclusion, our data suggest that TF and PAR2 mRNA, and PAR2 protein are better indicators of the ability of cancer cells to release TF and may constitute more accurate predictors of risk of thrombosis.

  3. Functional specificity of amino acid at position 246 in the tRNA mimicry domain of bacterial release factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, M; Ito, K; Nakamura, Y

    1996-01-01

    The termination of protein synthesis in bacteria requires codon-specific polypeptide release factors RF-1 (UAG/UAA specific) and RF-2 (UGA/UAA specific). We have proposed that release factors mimic tRNA and recognize the stop codon for polypeptide release (Nakamura et al (1996) Cell 87, 147-150). In contrast to the textbook view, genetic experiments have indicated that Escherichia coli RF-2 terminates translation very weakly at UAA while Salmonella RF-2 decodes this signal efficiently. Moreover, an excess of E coli RF-2 was toxic to cells while an excess of Salmonella RF-2 was not. These two RF-2 proteins are identical except for 16 out of 365 amino acids. Fragment swap experiments and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that a residue at position 246 is solely responsible for these two phenotypes. Upon substituting Ala (equivalent to Salmonella RF-2) for Thr-246 of E coli RF-2, the protein acquired increased release activity for UAA as well as for UGA. These results led us to conclude that E coli RF-2 activity is potentially weak and that the amino acid at position 246 plays a crucial role, not for codon discrimination, but for stop codon recognition or polypeptide release, presumably constituting an essential moiety of tRNA mimicry or interacting with peptidyltransferase centers of the ribosome.

  4. The molecular and biological analysis of ixodid ticks histamine release factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenga, Albert; Azad, Abdu F

    2005-01-01

    We previously described a Dermacentor varibialis (DV) cDNA that encodes a ubiquitously expressed and tick saliva-secreted functional histamine release factor (HRF) homolog. In this study gene specific primers based on DVHRF open reading frame nucleotide sequence were utilized to amplify three orthologs, from the wood tick, D. andersoni (DA), the black legged tick, the southern cattle tick, Boophilus microplus (BM) and the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (AA). At nucleotide level, sequence comparisons revealed 98 89 and 84% similarity to DVHRF for DAHRF, AAHRF and BMHRF, respectively, while predicted polypeptide comparisons revealed 98, 96 and 91% similarity for DAHRF, AAHRF and BMHRF respectively. Phylogenetically, the tick HRF clade, while distinct (100% bootstrap value), is closely related to other arthropods, but distantly related to vertebrate and protozoan clades. Consistent with sequence similarity analysis, a DVHRF-specific northern blotting probe hybridized a approximately 900 base pair (bp) mRNA band on all RNA blots. Likewise a mouse polyclonal antibody to E. coli-expressed recombinant (r) DVHRF, cross-reacted baculovirus-expressed non-fusion rAAHRF, rDAHRF, and rBMHRF. As revealed by northern blotting analysis of larvae and nymph RNA, DVHRF mRNA is expressed in both immature and mature ticks indicating that its transcription is not developmentally regulated. Unlike rHRF/TCTP proteins of other organisms, the calcium-binding function may not be conserved for tick HRF homologs as revealed by the 45CaCl2+ overlay assay. Apparent global expression of DVHRF and its orthologs make this protein family an ideal target antigen for development of novel tick control strategies targeting multiple tick species.

  5. Conformational origin of a difficult coupling in a human growth hormone releasing factor analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deber, C M; Lutek, M K; Heimer, E P; Felix, A M

    1989-01-01

    During the solid-phase synthesis of the human growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) analog [Ala15, Leu27, Asn28] -GRF(1-32)-OH, incorporation of Boc-Gln16 was determined to be incomplete. While aggregation of growing resin-bound peptide chains with concomitant beta-sheet formation and "precipitation" has been proposed to account in general for such "difficult coupling," no feature of sequence in the Gln16 region of this GRF analog provided an immediate rationale for this result. We now report 500 MHz 1H NMR spectra of a series of resin-bound GRF segments surrounding the Gln16 position (19-32 through 14-32), swelled in dimethylsulfoxide-d6 solutions [GRF(14-32) = Leu14-Ala-Gln-Leu-Ser(Bzl)-Ala-Arg(Tos)-Lys(CIZ)-Leu- Leu-Gln-Asp(OcHex)-Ile-Leu-Asn-Arg(Tos)-Gln-Gln-Gly32-PAM resin]. While relatively sharp spectra are observed for GRF(19-32), components with resonances broadened by an order-of-magnitude appear in spectra of the 18-32 and 17-32 peptide-resin, and the entire spectrum of 16-32 is ill-resolved and highly broadened. Subsequent spectra sharpen again (15-32, 14-32). These combined synthesis/spectroscopic experimental results, in conjunction with predictive analyses using standard Chou-Fasman 2 degrees structure parameters, suggest that the completeness of the Gln16 coupling is hindered by formation of a specific, folded beta-sheet/beta-turn structure in GRF(16-32) (with the turn located at 18-21, "upstream" of the difficult coupling site), and accompanying aggregation of peptide chains. This analysis suggests that awareness of such potential beta-sheet/beta-turn sequences can guide analog choices, and/or facilitate pre-programming of synthesis steps in anticipation of problem couplings.

  6. Corticortophin releasing factor 2 receptor agonist treatment significantly slows disease progression in mdx mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Paula J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy results from mutation of the dystrophin gene, causing skeletal and cardiac muscle loss of function. The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy is widely utilized to evaluate the potential of therapeutic regimens to modulate the loss of skeletal muscle function associated with dystrophin mutation. Importantly, progressive loss of diaphragm function is the most consistent striated muscle effect observed in the mdx mouse model, which is the same as in patients suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Methods Using the mdx mouse model, we have evaluated the effect that corticotrophin releasing factor 2 receptor (CRF2R agonist treatment has on diaphragm function, morphology and gene expression. Results We have observed that treatment with the potent CRF2R-selective agonist PG-873637 prevents the progressive loss of diaphragm specific force observed during aging of mdx mice. In addition, the combination of PG-873637 with glucocorticoids not only prevents the loss of diaphragm specific force over time, but also results in recovery of specific force. Pathological analysis of CRF2R agonist-treated diaphragm muscle demonstrates that treatment reduces fibrosis, immune cell infiltration, and muscle architectural disruption. Gene expression analysis of CRF2R-treated diaphragm muscle showed multiple gene expression changes including globally decreased immune cell-related gene expression, decreased extracellular matrix gene expression, increased metabolism-related gene expression, and, surprisingly, modulation of circadian rhythm gene expression. Conclusion Together, these data demonstrate that CRF2R activation can prevent the progressive degeneration of diaphragm muscle associated with dystrophin gene mutation.

  7. Pathways involved in gut mucosal barrier dysfunction induced in adult rats by maternal deprivation: corticotrophin-releasing factor and nerve growth factor interplay

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) increases gut paracellular permeability (GPP) through mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF), and modifies corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and corticosterone levels. CRF, corticosterone and mast cells are involved in stress-induced mucosal barrier impairment. Consequently, this study aimed to specify whether corticosteronaemia and colonic expression of both preproCRF and CRF are modified by NMD, and to determine if altered expression may participate...

  8. PEGylated PLGA Nanoparticles as Tumor Ecrosis Factor-α Receptor Blocking Peptide Carriers: Preparation,Characterization and Release in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; YANG Anshu; LI Zhuoya; XU Huibi; YANG Xiangliang

    2007-01-01

    To assess the merits of PEGylated poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PEG-PLGA) nanoparticles as drug carriers for tumor necrosis factor-α receptor blocking peptide (TNFR-BP), PEG-PLGA copolymer,which could be used to prepare the stealth nanoparticles, was synthesized with methoxypolyethyleneglycol,DL-lactide and glycolide. The structure of PEG-PLGA was confirmed with 1H-NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy,and the molecular weight (MW) was determined by gel permeation chromatography. Fluorescent FITC-TNFR-BP was chosen as model protein and encapsulated within PEG-PLGA nanoparticles using the double emulsion method. Atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy were employed to characterize the stealth nanoparticles fabricated for morphology, size with polydispersity index and zeta potential. Encapsulation efficiency (EE) and the release of FITC-TNFR-BP in nanoparticles in vitro were measured by the fluorescence measurement. The stealth nanoparticles were found to have the mean diameter less than 270 nm and zeta potential less than-20 mV. In all nanoparticle formulations, more than 45% of EE were obtained. FITC-TNFR-BP release from the PEG-PLGA nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic pattern, initial burst release and consequently sustained release. The experimental results show that PEG-PLGA nanoparticles possess the potential to develop as drug carriers for controlled release applications of TNFR-BP.

  9. Asbestos fibres and man made mineral fibres: induction and release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha from rat alveolar macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Ljungman, A G; Lindahl, M.; Tagesson, C

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Mounting evidence suggests that asbestos fibres can stimulate alveolar macrophages to generate the potent inflammatory and fibrogenic mediator, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and that this may play an important part in the onset and development of airway inflammation and lung fibrosis due to asbestos fibre inhalation. Little is known, however, about the ability of other mineral fibres to initiate formation and release of TNF-alpha by alveolar macrophages. Therefore the ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-2355 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-2355 ref|NP_004373.2| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 isofo...rm 2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA35718.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA51052.1| corticotrophin releasing... factor receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR19768.1| corticotropin releasing hormone recepto...r 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH96836.1| Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Hom...o sapiens] dbj|BAG70280.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_004373.2 1e-165 80% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1661 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1661 ref|NP_004373.2| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 isofo...rm 2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA35718.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA51052.1| corticotrophin releasing... factor receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR19768.1| corticotropin releasing hormone recepto...r 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH96836.1| Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Hom...o sapiens] dbj|BAG70280.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_004373.2 1e-125 71% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-1208 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-1208 ref|NP_004373.2| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 isofo...rm 2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA35718.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA51052.1| corticotrophin releasing... factor receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR19768.1| corticotropin releasing hormone recepto...r 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH96836.1| Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Hom...o sapiens] dbj|BAG70280.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_004373.2 0.0 96% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-1504 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-1504 ref|NP_004373.2| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 isofo...rm 2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA35718.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA51052.1| corticotrophin releasing... factor receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR19768.1| corticotropin releasing hormone recepto...r 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH96836.1| Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Hom...o sapiens] dbj|BAG70280.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_004373.2 0.0 97% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-0911 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-VPAC-01-0911 ref|NP_004373.2| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 isofo...rm 2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA35718.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA51052.1| corticotrophin releasing... factor receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR19768.1| corticotropin releasing hormone recepto...r 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH96836.1| Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Hom...o sapiens] dbj|BAG70280.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_004373.2 5e-71 57% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-1460 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-1460 ref|NP_004373.2| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 isofo...rm 2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA35718.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA51052.1| corticotrophin releasing... factor receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR19768.1| corticotropin releasing hormone recepto...r 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH96836.1| Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Hom...o sapiens] dbj|BAG70280.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_004373.2 0.0 82% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-02-0161 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-02-0161 ref|NP_004373.2| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 isofo...rm 2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA35718.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA51052.1| corticotrophin releasing... factor receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR19768.1| corticotropin releasing hormone recepto...r 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH96836.1| Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Hom...o sapiens] dbj|BAG70280.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_004373.2 0.0 92% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-2017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MEUG-01-2017 ref|NP_004373.2| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 isofo...rm 2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA35718.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA51052.1| corticotrophin releasing... factor receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR19768.1| corticotropin releasing hormone recepto...r 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH96836.1| Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Hom...o sapiens] dbj|BAG70280.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_004373.2 0.0 88% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MLUC-01-0880 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MLUC-01-0880 ref|NP_004373.2| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 isofo...rm 2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA35718.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA51052.1| corticotrophin releasing... factor receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR19768.1| corticotropin releasing hormone recepto...r 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH96836.1| Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Hom...o sapiens] dbj|BAG70280.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_004373.2 0.0 91% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0603 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0603 ref|NP_004373.2| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 isofo...rm 2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAA35718.1| corticotropin releasing factor receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA51052.1| corticotrophin releasing... factor receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAR19768.1| corticotropin releasing hormone recepto...r 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH96836.1| Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Hom...o sapiens] dbj|BAG70280.1| corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] NP_004373.2 0.0 95% ...

  20. ENDOTOXIN RELEASE AND TUMOR-NECROSIS-FACTOR FORMATION DURING CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSEN, NJG; VANOEVEREN, W; GU, YJ; VANVLIET, MH; EIJSMAN, L; WILDEVUUR, CRH

    1992-01-01

    Endotoxin, when released into the systemic circulation during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), might induce activation of plasmatic systems and blood cells during CPB, in addition to a material-dependent blood activation during CPB. However, the role of endotoxin in the development of this so-called wh

  1. Factor VII-activating protease: Mechanism and regulation of nucleosome release from dead cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is indispensable for tissue homeostasis and is a fundamental principle of inflammation and lymphocyte generation. Rapid removal and destruction of cellular corpses is critical and insufficient removal may lead to the release of cellular content into the environment. These immunogenic "hos

  2. Adenosine inhibits neutrophil vascular endothelial growth factor release and transendothelial migration via A2B receptor activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wakai, A

    2012-02-03

    The effects of adenosine on neutrophil (polymorphonuclear neutrophils; PMN)-directed changes in vascular permeability are poorly characterized. This study investigated whether adenosine modulates activated PMN vascular endothelial growth factor (vascular permeability factor; VEGF) release and transendothelial migration. PMN activated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, 10 ng\\/mL) were incubated with adenosine and its receptor-specific analogues. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF. PMN transendothelial migration across human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers was assessed in vitro. Adhesion molecule receptor expression was assessed flow cytometrically. Adenosine and some of its receptor-specific analogues dose-dependently inhibited activated PMN VEGF release. The rank order of potency was consistent with the affinity profile of human A2B receptors. The inhibitory effect of adenosine was reversed by 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, an A2 receptor antagonist. Adenosine (100 microM) or the A2B receptor agonist 5\\'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 100 microM) significantly reduced PMN transendothelial migration. However, expression of activated PMN beta2 integrins and HUVEC ICAM-1 were not significantly altered by adenosine or NECA. Adenosine attenuates human PMN VEGF release and transendothelial migration via the A2B receptor. This provides a novel target for the modulation of PMN-directed vascular hyperpermeability in conditions such as the capillary leak syndrome.

  3. Cardiac regeneration by pharmacologically active microcarriers releasing growth factors and/or transporting adipose-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia Savi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that cardiac regeneration through local delivery of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs, activation of resident cardiac stem cells via growth factors (GFs [hepatocyte growth factor (HGF and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1:GFs] or both, are improved by pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs interacting with cells/molecules conveyed on their surface. Rats with one-month old myocardial infarction were treated with ASCs, ASCs+PAMs, GF-releasing PAMs, ASCs+GF-releasing PAMs or vehicle. Two weeks later, hemodynamic function and inducibility of ventricular arrhythmias (VAs were assessed. Eventually, the hearts were subjected to anatomical and immunohistochemical analyses. A significant ASCs engraftment and the largest improvement in cardiac mechanics occurred in ASC+GF-releasing PAM rats which by contrast were more vulnerable to VAs. Thus, PAMs may improve cell/GF-based cardiac regeneration although caution should be paid on the electrophysiological impact of their physical interaction with the myocardium.

  4. The nucleotide exchange factors Grp170 and Sil1 induce cholera toxin release from BiP to enable retrotranslocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey M; Inoue, Takamasa; Chen, Grace; Tsai, Billy

    2015-06-15

    Cholera toxin (CT) intoxicates cells by trafficking from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the catalytic CTA1 subunit hijacks components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to retrotranslocate to the cytosol and induce toxicity. In the ER, CT targets to the ERAD machinery composed of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1-Sel1L complex, in part via the activity of the Sel1L-binding partner ERdj5. This J protein stimulates BiP's ATPase activity, allowing BiP to capture the toxin. Presumably, toxin release from BiP must occur before retrotranslocation. Here, using loss-and gain-of-function approaches coupled with binding studies, we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) Grp170 and Sil1 induce CT release from BiP in order to promote toxin retrotranslocation. In addition, we find that after NEF-dependent release from BiP, the toxin is transferred to protein disulfide isomerase; this ER redox chaperone is known to unfold CTA1, which allows the toxin to cross the Hrd1-Sel1L complex. Our data thus identify two NEFs that trigger toxin release from BiP to enable successful retrotranslocation and clarify the fate of the toxin after it disengages from BiP.

  5. A tubular gelatin scaffold capable of the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor and mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jixiang; Yang, Fanwen; He, Fupo; Tian, Xiumei; Tang, Shuo; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    A tubular gelatin scaffold for the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and mitomycin C (MMC) was fabricated. EGF was incorporated using silk fibroin carriers, and MMC was planted using polylactide (PLA) microspheres. The relationship between scaffold properties and crosslinking degrees was evaluated. As the crosslinking degree was increased from 23.7% to 65.3%, the mechanical properties of the scaffold obviously improved, and the compressive modulus increased to approximately 65kPa. The mass degradation of the scaffold was also controlled from 9 days to approximately 1 month. In vitro release tests indicated that the scaffold mainly released EGF in the early period and MMC in the later period. Urethral epithelial cells (UECs) and urethral scar derived fibroblast cells (UFCs) were coseeded in the scaffold at a ratio of 1:1. After 9 days of coculture, immunostaining results displayed that the proportion of UECs continuously increased to approximately 71%. These changes in cell proportion were confirmed by the results of Western blot analysis. Therefore, the scaffold promoted the growth but inhibited the regeneration of UFCs. This scaffold for time-dependent controlled release of multiple biofactors may be potentially useful in urethral reconstruction and other tissue engineering studies.

  6. THE EFFECT OF BASIC FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR SLOW-RELEASE MICROCAPSULES ON ANGIOGENESIS IN INFARCTED RABBIT MYOCARDIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱洪生; 连锋; 郑家豪

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To observe the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) slow-release microcapsules on angiogen esis in infarcted myocardial regions. Methods. Myocardial infarction was induced in 24 New Zealand rabbits by ligating the root of left anterior de scending coronary artery. Group Ⅰ (n = 8) served as control, group Ⅱ (n = 8) as a blank microcapsule group, group Ⅲ (n = 8, each microcapsule contains lμg bFGF) as micrpcapsule group. In group Ⅱ and Ⅲ, 5 blank microcapsules or bFGF slow-release microcapsules were implanted into myocardium underneath the epicardium between the left ante fior descending coronary artery and left circumflex artery. Infarct size was evaluated by infarcted weight/left ventricle weight ratio and angiogenesis was evaluated by immunohistochemical examinations 5 weeks later. Results. As compared with group Ⅰ and Ⅱ, rabbits treated with bFGF slow-release microcapsules showed higher microvessel counts (group Ⅰ 37.75 + 4.50, group Ⅱ 38.37 ± 4.98, vs. group Ⅲ 135.50 ± 4.81, P < 0. 001 ) and less infarcted weight/left ventricle weight (group Ⅰ 16.8% ± 0.4%, group Ⅱ 16.7% ± 0.5%, vs. group Ⅲ 7.0% ± 0.2% ,P< 0.001). Conclusions. Subepicardial administration of bFGF slow-release microcapsule in the infarcted rabbit model results in effective angiogenesis and reduction in infarct size.

  7. Protein corona change the drug release profile of nanocarriers: the "overlooked" factor at the nanobio interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Shahed; Serpooshan, Vahid; Sakhtianchi, Ramin; Müller, Beate; Landfester, Katharina; Crespy, Daniel; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    The emergence of nanocarrier systems in drug delivery applications has ushered in rapid development of new classes of therapeutic agents which can provide an essential breakthrough in the fight against refractory diseases. However, successful clinical application of nano-drug delivery devices has been limited mainly due to the lack of control on sustained release of therapeutics from the carriers. A wide range of sophisticated approaches employs the formation of crosslinkable, non-crosslinkable, stimuli-responsive polymer nanocarriers in order to enhance their delivery efficiency. Despite the extensive research conducted on the development of various nanocarriers, the effect of the biological milieu on the drug release profile of these constructs is not yet fully investigated. In particular, the formation of a protein corona on the surface of nanocarriers, when they interact with living organisms in vivo is largely decisive for their biological function. Using a number of synthetized (i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and polymeric nanocapsules) and commercialized nanocarriers (i.e., Abraxane®, albumin-bound paclitaxel drug), this study demonstrates that the protein corona can shield the nanocarriers and, consequently, alters the release profile of the drugs from the nanocarriers. More specifically, the protein corona could significantly reduce the burst effect of either protein conjugated nanocarriers or carriers with surface loaded drug (i.e., SPIONs). However, the corona shell only slightly changed the release profile of polymeric nanocapsules. Therefore, the intermediary, buffer effect of the protein shells on the surface of nanoscale carriers plays a crucial role in their successful high-yield applications in vivo.

  8. Bacteria-induced release of white cell--and platelet-derived vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Werther, K; Mynster, T;

    2001-01-01

    endothelial growth factor (VEGF), may be involved in this process. Therefore, we studied the in vitro release of VEGF from white blood cells and platelets stimulated by bacterial antigens and supernatants from stored red cell components. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight units of whole blood (WB) and eight units...... of the supernatants were removed from the units and frozen at -80 degrees C. WB from other healthy donors was stimulated for 2 h with sodium chloride (controls), with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone, or with LPS plus supernatants from the non-filtered or prestorage leucofiltered WB units (diluted 1....... CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular VEGF may accumulate in non-filtered red cell components, but this can be prevented by prestorage leucocyte depletion using filtration. In addition, bacterial antigens appear to induce release of VEGF from white blood cells and platelets. Addition of supernatants from stored, non...

  9. Surgical wound healing using hemostatic gauze scaffold loaded with nanoparticles containing sustained-release granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan W

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Weien Yuan1,2, Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: The therapeutic strategies for malignant melanoma are still cancer chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and tumor resection. However, these therapeutic strategies often lead to a reduced neutrophilic granulocyte count or loss of more blood after surgical tumor resection. In this study, we developed a formulation of hemostatic gauze impregnated with sustained-release granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF with increasing of the neutrophilic granulocyte count in the blood following chemotherapy and decreasing blood loss after surgical tumor resection.Methods: We designed a formulation with both hemostatic properties and increased neutrophil content to be used in cancer chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and tumor resection, comprising a hemostatic gauze as a scaffold and (G-CSF-loaded dextran nanoparticles coated with polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA solution fabricated by direct spray-painting onto the scaffold and then vacuum-dried at room temperature. The performance of this system was evaluated in vitro and in vivo.Results: Nearly zero-order release of G-CSF was recorded for 12–14 days, and the cumulative release of G-CSF retained over 90% of its bioactivity in a NFS-60 cell line proliferation assay when the scaffold was incubated in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4 at 37°C. The in vivo hemostatic efficacy of this formulation was greater than that of native G-CSF, the scaffold directly spray-painted with G-CSF solution or PLGA organic solution as a coating, or when a blank scaffold was covered with the coating.Conclusion: Our results suggest that this formulation has both hemostatic properties and increased neutrophil activity.Keywords: hemostatic gauze scaffold, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, bioactivity

  10. Sequential antibiotic and growth factor releasing chitosan-PAAm semi-IPN hydrogel as a novel wound dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulat, Mehlika; Kahraman, Anıl Sera; Tan, Nur; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare a novel wound dressing material which provides burst release of an antibiotic in combination with sustained release of growth factor delivery. This might be beneficial for the prevention of infections and to stimulate wound healing. As a wound dressing material, the semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) hydrogel based on polyacrylamide (PAAm) and chitosan (CS) was synthesized via free radical polymerization. Ethylene glycol dimethacrylate was used for cross-linking of PAAm to form semi-IPN hydrogel. The hydrogel shows high water content (∼1800%, in dry basis) and stable swelling characteristics in the pH range of the wound media (∼4.0-7.4). The antibiotic, piperacillin-tazobactam, which belongs to the penicillin group was loaded into the hydrogel. The therapeutic serum dose of piperacillin-tazobactam for topic introduction was reached at 1st hour of the release. Additionally, in order to increase the mitogenic activity of hydrogel, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was embedded into the CS-PAAm in different amounts. Cell culture studies were performed with L929 mouse fibroblasts and the simulated cell growth was investigated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The successful sustained release behavior of CS-PAAm hydrogel for EGF maintained the presence of EGF in the culture up to 5 days and the highest mitochondrial activities were recorded for the 0.4 μg EGF-loaded/mg of hydrogel group. In conclusion, CS-PAAm semi-IPN hydrogel loaded with piperacillin-tazobactam and EGF could be proposed for an effective system in wound-healing management.

  11. The membrane fraction of homogenized rat kidney contains an enzyme that releases epidermal growth factor from the kidney membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1991-01-01

    High levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) are excreted in the urine and high levels of mRNA for the EGF-precursor have been demonstrated in the kidney. The EGF-precursor is a membrane bound peptide in the kidney, but little is known about the renal processing of the precursor. The present stud....... The EGF releasing enzyme is inhibited by the serine proteinase inhibitor aprotinin and by low temperatures (4 degrees C). The pH optimum of the reaction is pH 7.5-8.0....

  12. Executive Order 12898 and Social, Economic, and Sociopolitical Factors Influencing Toxic Release Inventory Facility Location in EPA Region 6: A Multi-Scale Spatial Assessment of Environmental Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrea Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Release Inventory facilities are among the many environmental hazards shown to create environmental inequities in the United States. This project examined four factors associated with Toxic Release Inventory, specifically, manufacturing facility location at multiple spatial scales using spatial analysis techniques (i.e., O-ring statistic and…

  13. Executive Order 12898 and Social, Economic, and Sociopolitical Factors Influencing Toxic Release Inventory Facility Location in EPA Region 6: A Multi-Scale Spatial Assessment of Environmental Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrea Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Release Inventory facilities are among the many environmental hazards shown to create environmental inequities in the United States. This project examined four factors associated with Toxic Release Inventory, specifically, manufacturing facility location at multiple spatial scales using spatial analysis techniques (i.e., O-ring statistic and…

  14. Identifying sources and controlling factors of arsenic release in saline groundwater aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-W. Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An integrated hydrogeochemical study is carried out to realize the occurrence of arsenic (As in a saline aquifer. Saline groundwater was mostly concentrated in the uppermost aquifer and non-saline water was in the lower aquifer in the study area. High As concentrations were found in both uppermost and lower aquifers. No correlation among salination, well depth and As concentration was observed. Both reducing and oxidizing forms of Fe oxyhydroxides were identified in the magnetic fractions, which were concentrated by high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS technique, revealing that the redox cycling of Fe occurred in the subsurface. High levels of Fe, HCO3-, DOC and NH4+ concentrations accompanying alkaline pH in the As-rich groundwater were consistent with the mechanism triggered by the microbial-mediated reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxides. A threshold value of 50 μg L−1. As concentration was used as an indicator for identification of active proceeding reductive dissolution of As-bearing Fe oxyhydroxides in the saline aquifer. Desorption behaviors of As were relevant to its valence in the sediments and the co-existence of anions. Experimental and numerical results showed that additions of Cl- and SO42-, which represented the main anions of saline water, had minor effect on leaching sedimentary As. Although bicarbonate addition resulted in less As desorption than that of phosphate on a molar basis, the contribution of bicarbonate to the total release of As was greater than phosphate due to the much higher concentration of bicarbonate in groundwater and the associated microbial mediation. Collectively, the chemical effect of saline water on the As-release to groundwater is mild in the coastal aquifer.

  15. Factors affecting lead release in sodium silicate-treated partial lead service line replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Emily; Payne, Sarah Jane O; Hofmann, Ron; Andrews, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Water quality parameters affecting sodium silicate performance in partial lead service line replacements were examined using a fractional factorial experimental design and static pipe systems. An external copper wire was used to create a galvanic connection between a former lead service line and a new copper pipe. The pipe systems were filled with lab prepared water made to mimic real water quality. Water was changed on a three times per week basis. A 2(4-1) fractional factorial design was used to evaluate the impact of alkalinity (15 mg L(-1) or 250 mg L(-1) as CaCO3), nitrate (1 mg L(-1) or 7 mg L(-1) as N), natural organic matter (1 mg L(-1) or 7 mg L(-1) as dissolved organic carbon), and disinfectant type (1 mg L(-1) chlorine or 3 mg L(-1) monochloramine), resulting in eight treatment conditions. Fractional factorial analysis revealed that alkalinity, natural organic matter and monochloramine had a significant positive effect on galvanic current. Natural organic matter and monochloramine also had a significant positive effect with respect to both total and dissolved lead release. For the treatment conditions examined, 67-98% of the lead released through galvanic currents was stored as corrosion scales and predominantly comprised of particulate lead (96.1-99.9%) for all eight treatments. The use of monochloramine and the presence of natural organic matter (7 mg L(-1)) were not favourable for corrosion control in sodium silicate-treated partial lead service line replacements, although further studies would be required to characterize optimal water quality parameters for specific water quality types. For utilities operating with sodium silicate as a corrosion inhibitor, this work offers further evidence regarding the consideration of chlorine as a secondary disinfectant instead of monochloramine, as well as the value of controlling natural organic matter in distributed water.

  16. Adenosine A2B receptor-mediated leukemia inhibitory factor release from astrocytes protects cortical neurons against excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moidunny Shamsudheen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF have been widely reported. In the central nervous system (CNS, astrocytes are the major source for LIF, expression of which is enhanced following disturbances leading to neuronal damage. How astrocytic LIF expression is regulated, however, has remained an unanswered question. Since neuronal stress is associated with production of extracellular adenosine, we investigated whether LIF expression in astrocytes was mediated through adenosine receptor signaling. Methods Mouse cortical neuronal and astrocyte cultures from wild-type and adenosine A2B receptor knock-out animals, as well as adenosine receptor agonists/antagonists and various enzymatic inhibitors, were used to study LIF expression and release in astrocytes. When needed, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post-hoc test was used for statistical analysis. Results We show here that glutamate-stressed cortical neurons induce LIF expression through activation of adenosine A2B receptor subtype in cultured astrocytes and require signaling of protein kinase C (PKC, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs: p38 and ERK1/2, and the nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB. Moreover, LIF concentration in the supernatant in response to 5′-N-ethylcarboxamide (NECA stimulation was directly correlated to de novo protein synthesis, suggesting that LIF release did not occur through a regulated release pathway. Immunocytochemistry experiments show that LIF-containing vesicles co-localize with clathrin and Rab11, but not with pHogrin, Chromogranin (CgA and CgB, suggesting that LIF might be secreted through recycling endosomes. We further show that pre-treatment with supernatants from NECA-treated astrocytes increased survival of cultured cortical neurons against glutamate, which was absent when the supernatants were pre-treated with an anti-LIF neutralizing antibody. Conclusions

  17. TRPC3 Regulates Release of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor From Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Vohra, Pawan K.; Thompson, Michael A.; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M.; Singh, Brij B.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca2+ signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors suc...

  18. Improved wound healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer with controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Wei [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang Hailun [Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Jin Faguang [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)], E-mail: nidewenzhang@163.com; Yu Chunyan [Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Chu Dongling [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang Lin [Department of Internal Medicine, 316 Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100093 (China); Lu Xian [93942 Unit Hospital of PLA, Xianyang 710012 (China)

    2008-07-14

    The purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of the wound dressing containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded microspheres on promoting healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer. In this study, the pressure-induced ulcer in swine was used as a model to demonstrate the hypothesis that controlled release of bFGF has the potential to provide optimal healing milieu for chronic wounds in the repair process. Average size of the microspheres was 14.36 {+-} 3.56 {mu}m and the network gelatin sponges were characterized with an average pore size of 80-160 {mu}m. Both the in vitro release efficiency and the protein bioactivity revealed that bFGF was released from the microspheres in a controlled manner and it was biologically active as assessed by its ability to induce the proliferation of fibroblasts. Pressure-induced ulcer was created at 500 g/cm{sup 2} pressure loaded on swine dorsal skin 12 h daily for 2 consecutive days. After removal of the pressure load, the gelatin sponge containing bFGF gelatin microspheres or bFGF in solution was implanted into the wound. Swine were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 21 days after implantation, and a full-thickness biopsy was taken and stained for histological analysis. It was observed that controlled release of bFGF provided an accelerated recovery in the wound areas. Histological investigations showed that the dressings were biocompatible and had capability of proliferating fibroblasts and inducing neovascularisation. The present study implied the clinical potential of gelatin sponge with bFGF microspheres to promote the healing in pressure-induced decubitus ulcer.

  19. THE EFFECT OF BASIC FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR SLOW-RELEASE MICROCAPSULES ON ANGIOGENESIS IN INFARCTED RABBIT MYOCARDIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱洪生; 连锋; 郑家豪

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To observe the effect of basic flbroblast growth factor (bFGF) slow-release mierocapsules on angiogen-esis in infarcted myocardial regions.Methods. Myocardial infarction was induced in 24 New Zealand rabbits by ligating the root of left anterior de-scending coronary artery. Group Ⅰ (n=8) served as control, group Ⅱ (n=8) as a blank mieroeapsule group, group Ⅲ (n= 8, each mierocapsule contains 1μg bFGF) as mierpcapsule group. In group Ⅱ and Ⅲ, 5 blank mierocapsules or bFGF slow-release mierocapsules were implanted into myocardium underneath the epieardium between the left ante-rior descending coronary artery and left circumflex artery. Infarct size was evaluated by infarcted weight/left ventricle weight ratio and angiogenesis was evaluated by immunohistochemieal examinations 5 weeks later.Results. As compared with group Ⅰ and Ⅱ , rabbits treated with bFGF slow-release mierocapsules showed higher microvessel counts (group Ⅰ37.75±4.50, group Ⅱ8.37 ±4.98,vs.group Ⅲ 135.50±4.81,P<0.001) and lessinfarcted weight/left ventricle weight ( group Ⅰ 16.8 % ± 0.4 %, group Ⅱ 16.7 % ± 0.5 %, vs. group Ⅲ 7.0 % ±0.2%,P< 0.001).Conclusions. Subepicardial administration of bFGF slow-release microcapsule in the infarcted rabbit model results in effective angiogenesis and reduction in infarct size.

  20. Investigation of some factors affecting on release of radon-222 from phosphogypsum waste associated with phosphate ore processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, M A; El Afifi, E M; Nayl, A A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is oriented to investigate the influence of some physicochemical factors such as radium distribution, grain size, moisture content and chemical constituents on releases of radon-222 from the accumulated phosphogypsum (PG) waste. The emanation fraction, activity concentration in the pore and the surface exhalation rate of radon-222 in the bulk PG waste are 34.5 ± 0.3%, 238.6 ± 7.8 kBq m(-3) and 213 ± 6.9 mBq m(-2) s(-1), respectively. These values were varied and enhanced slightly in the fine grain sizes (F1 radon from residue PG waste was controlled positively by radium (Ra-226), calcium (CaSO4) and strontium (SrO). About 67% of radon release attributed to the grain size below 0.5 mm, while 33% due to the large grain size above 0.5 mm. The emanation fraction of Rn-222 is increased with moisture content and the maximum emanation is ∼43% of moisture of 3-8%. It reduced slowly with the continuous increase in moisture till 20%. Due to PG waste in situ can be enhancing the background to the surround workers and/or public. Therefore, the environmental negative impacts due to release of Rn-222 can be minimized by legislation to restrict its civil uses, or increasing its moisture to ∼10%, or by the particle size separation of the fine fraction containing the high levels of Ra-226 followed by a suitable chemical treatment or disposal; whereas the low release amount can be diluted and used in cement industry, roads or dam construction.

  1. Gene Regulation System of Vasopressin and Corticotoropin-Releasing Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Yoshida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurohypophyseal hormones, arginine vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH, play a crucial role in the physiological and behavioral response to various kinds of stresses. Both neuropeptides activate the hypophysialpituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, which is a central mediator of the stress response in the body. Conversely, they receive the negative regulation by glucocorticoid, which is an end product of the HPA axis. Vasopressin and CRH are closely linked to immune response; they also interact with pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, as for vasopressin, it has another important role, which is the regulation of water balance through its potent antidiuretic effect. Hence, it is conceivable that vasopressin and CRH mediate the homeostatic responses for survival and protect organisms from the external world. A tight and elaborate regulation system of the vasopressin and CRH gene is required for the rapid and flexible response to the alteration of the surrounding environments. Several important regulatory elements have been identified in the proximal promoter region in the vasopressin and CRH gene. Many transcription factors and intracellular signaling cascades are involved in the complicated gene regulation system. This review focuses on the current status of the basic research of vasopressin and CRH. In addition to the numerous known facts about their divergent physiological roles, the recent topics of promoter analyses will be discussed.

  2. Coadministration of adipose-derived stem cells and control-released basic fibroblast growth factor facilitates angiogenesis in a murine ischemic hind limb model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi-Ishihara, Hisako; Tobita, Morikuni; Tajima, Satoshi; Tanaka, Rica; Oshita, Takashi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have angiogenic potential owing to their differentiation into endothelial cells and their release of angiogenic growth factors to elicit paracrine effects. In addition, control-released basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) sustained with a gelatin hydrogel also supports effective angiogenesis. We sought to determine if coadministration of ASCs and control-released bFGF into murine ischemic limbs facilitates angiogenesis. Levels of growth factors in the conditioned media of ASCs cultured with or without control-released bFGF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. A murine ischemic hind limb model was generated and intramuscularly injected with the following: gelatin hydrogel (group 1), a high number of ASCs (group 2), control-released bFGF (group 3), a small number of ASCs and control-released bFGF (group 4), and a high number of ASCs and control-released bFGF (group 5). Macroscopic and microscopic vascular changes were evaluated until day 7 by laser Doppler perfusion imaging and histologic analyses, respectively. Secretion of hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and transforming growth factor-β1 was enhanced by control-released bFGF. Vascular improvement was achieved in groups 4 and 5 according to laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and CD31 immunohistochemical staining demonstrated an increase in the vascular density, vessel diameter, and thickness of vessel walls in groups 4 and 5. Cells positively stained for CD146, α-smooth muscle actin, and transforming growth factor-β1 were observed around vessel walls in groups 4 and 5. These findings suggest that coadministration of ASCs and control-released bFGF facilitates angiogenesis in terms of vessel maturation in a murine ischemic hind limb model. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to osteoblast tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 results in activation of nuclear factor kappa B and release of interleukin-6 in bone infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claro, Tânia; Widaa, Amro; McDonnell, Cormac; Foster, Timothy J; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kerrigan, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the major pathogen among the staphylococci and the most common cause of bone infections. These infections are mainly characterized by bone destruction and inflammation, and are often debilitating and very difficult to treat. Previously we demonstrated that S. aureus protein A (SpA) can bind to osteoblasts, which results in inhibition of osteoblast proliferation and mineralization, apoptosis, and activation of osteoclasts. In this study we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to demonstrate that osteoblast tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR-1) is responsible for the recognition of and binding to SpA. TNFR-1 binding to SpA results in the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). In turn, NFκB translocates to the nucleus of the osteoblast, which leads to release of interleukin 6 (IL-6). Silencing TNFR-1 in osteoblasts or disruption of the spa gene in S. aureus prevented both NFκB activation and IL-6 release. As well as playing a key role in proinflammatory reactions, IL-6 is also an important osteotropic factor. Release of IL-6 from osteoblasts results in the activation of the bone-resorbing cells, the osteoclasts. Consistent with our results described above, both silencing TNFR-1 in osteoblasts and disruption of spa in S. aureus prevented osteoclast activation. These studies are the first to demonstrate the importance of the TNFR-1-SpA interaction in bone infection, and may help explain the mechanism through which osteoclasts become overactivated, leading to bone destruction. Anti-inflammatory drug therapy could be used either alone or in conjunction with antibiotics to treat osteomyelitis or for prophylaxis in high-risk patients.

  4. Activity-dependent release of precursor nerve growth factor, conversion to mature nerve growth factor, and its degradation by a protease cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Martin A; Cuello, A Claudio

    2006-04-25

    In this report, we provide direct demonstration that the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF) is released in the extracellular space in an activity-dependent manner in its precursor form (proNGF) and that it is in this compartment that its maturation and degradation takes place because of the coordinated release and the action of proenzymes and enzyme regulators. This converting protease cascade and its endogenous regulators (including tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen, neuroserpin, precursor matrix metalloproteinase 9, and tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase 1) are colocalized in neurons of the cerebral cortex and released upon neuronal stimulation. We also provide evidence that this mechanism operates in in vivo conditions, as the CNS application of inhibitors of converting and degrading enzymes lead to dramatic alterations in the tissue levels of either precursor NGF or mature NGF. Pathological alterations of this cascade in the CNS might cause or contribute to a lack of proper neuronal trophic support in conditions such as cerebral ischemia, seizure and Alzheimer's disease or, conversely, to excessive local production of neurotrophins as reported in inflammatory arthritis pain.

  5. 76 FR 61098 - Exposure Factors Handbook: 2011 Edition; Release of Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... and soil adherence factors; consumption of fruits and vegetables, fish, meats, dairy products, and... National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) within EPA's Office of Research and Development. The... the Recent Additions and Publications menus at http://www.epa.gov/ncea . Paper copies of the report...

  6. Tumor necrosis factor/cachectin interacts with endothelial cell receptors to induce release of interleukin 1

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor/cachectin (TNF) has been implicated as a mediator of the host response in sepsis and neoplasia. Recent work has shown that TNF can modulate endothelial cell hemostatic properties, suggesting that endothelium is a target tissue for TNF. This led us to examine whether endothelial cells have specific binding sites for TNF and augment the biological response to TNF by elaborating the inflammatory mediator, IL-1. Incubation of 125I-recombinant human TNF with confluent, cultur...

  7. TRPC3 regulates release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from human airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Pawan K; Thompson, Michael A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M; Singh, Brij B; Prakash, Y S

    2013-12-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca(2+) signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors such as cytokines. In human ASM, we tested the hypothesis that TRPC3 regulates BDNF secretion. At baseline, intracellular BDNF was present, and BDNF secretion was detectable by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of cell supernatants or by real-time fluorescence imaging of cells transfected with GFP-BDNF vector. Exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) (20ng/ml, 48h) or a mixture of allergens (ovalbumin, house dust mite, Alternaria, and Aspergillus extracts) significantly enhanced BDNF secretion and increased TRPC3 expression. TRPC3 knockdown (siRNA or inhibitor Pyr3; 10μM) blunted BDNF secretion, and prevented inflammation effects. Chelation of extracellular Ca(2+) (EGTA; 1mM) or intracellular Ca(2+) (BAPTA; 5μM) significantly reduced secreted BDNF, as did the knockdown of SOCE proteins STIM1 and Orai1 or plasma membrane caveolin-1. Functionally, secreted BDNF had autocrine effects suggested by phosphorylation of high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase TrkB receptor, prevented by chelating extracellular BDNF with chimeric TrkB-Fc. These data emphasize the role of TRPC3 and Ca(2+) influx in the regulation of BDNF secretion by human ASM and the enhancing effects of inflammation. Given the BDNF effects on Ca(2+) and cell proliferation, BDNF secretion may contribute to altered airway structure and function in diseases such as asthma.

  8. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  9. Induction of Microglial Activation by Mediators Released from Mast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Microglia are the resident immune cells in the brain and play a pivotal role in immune surveillance in the central nervous system (CNS. Brain mast cells are activated in CNS disorders and induce the release of several mediators. Thus, brain mast cells, rather than microglia, are the “first responders” due to injury. However, the functional aspects of mast cell-microglia interactions remain uninvestigated. Methods: Conditioned medium from activated HMC-1 cells induces microglial activation similar to co-culture of microglia with HMC-1 cells. Primary cultured microglia were examined by flow cytometry analysis and confocal microscopy. TNF- alpha and IL-6 were measured with commercial ELISA kits. Cell signalling was analysed by Western blotting. Results: In the present study, we found that the conditioned medium from activated HMC-1 cells stimulated microglial activation and the subsequent production of the pro-inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-6. Co-culture of microglia and HMC-1 cells with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH for 24, 48 and 72 hours increased TNF-α and IL-6 production. Antagonists of histamine receptor 1 (H1R, H4R, proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2 or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 reduced HMC-1-induced pro-inflammatory factor production and MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathway activation. Conclusions: These results imply that activated mast cells trigger microglial activation. Interactions between mast cells and microglia could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for CNS inflammation-related diseases.

  10. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate the release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and soluble IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor from MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confort, C; Rochefort, H; Vignon, F

    1995-09-01

    The growth of hormone-responsive MCF7 human breast cancer cells is controlled by steroid hormones and growth factors. By metabolic labeling of cells grown in steroid- and growth factor-stripped serum conditions, we show that insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) increase by approximately 5-fold the release of several proteins including cathepsin D, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and soluble forms of the multifunctional IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptor. Two soluble forms of IGF-II/M6P receptors were detected, one major (approximately 260 kilodaltons) and one minor (approximately 85 kilodaltons) that probably represents a proteolytic fragment of the larger soluble molecule. IGFs increased receptor release in a dose-dependent fashion with 50-60% of newly synthesized receptor released at 5-10 nM IGFs. The release of IGF-II/M6P receptors correlated with the levels of secreted cathepsin D in different human breast cancer cells or in rats stable transfectants that are constitutively expressing variable levels of human cathepsin D. IGFs had a stronger effect on IGF-II/M6P receptor release, whereas estradiol treatment preferentially enhanced the release of protease and antiprotease. We thus demonstrate that in human breast cancer cells, IGFs not only act as strong mitogens but also regulate release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, IGF-II/M6P-soluble receptor, and cathepsin D; three proteins that potentially regulate cell proliferation and/or invasion.

  11. Incorporation of chitosan microspheres into collagen-chitosan scaffolds for the controlled release of nerve growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zeng

    Full Text Available Artifical nerve scaffold can be used as a promising alternative to autologous nerve grafts to enhance the repair of peripheral nerve defects. However, current nerve scaffolds lack efficient microstructure and neurotrophic support.Microsphere-Scaffold composite was developed by incorporating chitosan microspheres loaded with nerve growth factor (NGF-CMSs into collagen-chitosan scaffolds (CCH with longitudinally oriented microchannels (NGF-CMSs/CCH. The morphological characterizations, in vitro release kinetics study, neurite outgrowth assay, and bioactivity assay were evaluated. After that, a 15-mm-long sciatic nerve gap in rats was bridged by the NGF-CMSs/CCH, CCH physically absorbed NGF (NGF/CCH, CCH or nerve autograft. 16 weeks after implantation, electrophysiology, fluoro-gold retrograde tracing, and nerve morphometry were performed.The NGF-CMSs were evenly distributed throughout the longitudinally oriented microchannels of the scaffold. The NGF-CMSs/CCH was capable of sustained release of bioactive NGF within 28 days as compared with others in vitro. In vivo animal study demonstrated that the outcomes of NGF-CMSs/CCH were better than those of NGF/CCH or CCH.Our findings suggest that incorporation of NGF-CMSs into the CCH may be a promising tool in the repair of peripheral nerve defects.

  12. The regulation and function of fibroblast growth factor 8 and its function during gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuron development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson CJ Chung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, numerous studies solidified the hypothesis that fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling regulates neuroendocrine progenitor cell proliferation, fate-specification, and cell survival, and therefore is critical for the regulation and maintenance of homeostasis of the body. One important example that underscores the involvement of FGF signaling during neuroendocrine cell development is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuron ontogenesis. Indeed, transgenic mice with reduced olfactory placode (OP Fgf8 expression do not have GnRH neurons. This observation indicates the requirement of FGF8 signaling for the emergence of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuronal system in the embryonic OP, the putative birth place of GnRH neurons. Mammalian reproductive success depends on the presence of GnRH neurons to stimulate gonadotropin secretion from the anterior pituitary, which activates gonadal steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. Together, these observations are critical for understanding the function of GnRH neurons and their control of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis to maintain fertility. Taken together, these studies illustrate that GnRH neuron emergence, and hence HPG-function is vulnerable to genomic and molecular signals that abnormally modify Fgf8 expression in the developing mouse OP. In this short review, we focus on research that is aimed at unraveling how androgen, all-trans retinoic acid and epigenetic modifies control mouse OP Fgf8 transcription in the context of GnRH neuronal development, and mammalian reproductive success.

  13. Effect of controlled release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 from collagen gel on neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Wu, Yunfeng; Wang, Hao; Chang, Jun; Ma, Guangwen; Yin, Zongsheng

    2016-01-20

    This study aimed to examine the effect of controlled release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) from collagen gel on rat neural stem cells (NSCs). With three groups of collagen gel, BDNF/collagen gel, and NT-3/collagen gel as controls, BDNF and NT-3 were tested in the BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel group at different time points. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that BDNF and NT-3 were steadily released from collagen gels for 10 days. The cell viability test and the bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay showed that BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel supported the survival and proliferation of NSCs. The results also showed that the length of processes was markedly longer and differentiation percentage from NSCs into neurons was much higher in the BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel group than those in the collagen gel, BDNF/collagen gel, and NT-3/collagen gel groups. These findings suggest that BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel could significantly improve the ability of NSCs proliferation and differentiation.

  14. The effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on glutamate-injured neuroarchitecture and arachidonic acid release in adult hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelseher, S; Pfenninger, E; Georgieff, M

    1996-01-22

    During development in culture, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) protected immature primary hippocampal neurons against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. We investigated the effects of bFGF on mature, differentiated rat hippocampal neurons cultured for 10-12 days after an 8-min exposure to 500 microM glutamate. Seven days post-injury, hippocampal cells demonstrated severe reductions in cellular viability and axonal and dendritic outgrowth, which were accompanied by a marked increase in [3H]arachidonic acid (ARA) release from prelabelled neurons. bFGF applied post-injury attenuated cell death and cytoarchitectural destruction at all concentrations used (500 pg/ml, 1, 10, 20 ng/ml). However, neurite elongation and branching processes were only significantly protected by 10 ng/ml bFGF. [3H]ARA release decreased in a dose-related fashion within a concentration range of 1-10 ng/ml bFGF. 20 ng/ml bFGF was not superior to 10 ng/ml bFGF. Therefore, bFGF's neurotropic actions appear to be concentration-dependent. Our data suggest that bFGF applied post-injury may have a neuroprotective potential for mature, differentiated, completely polarized hippocampal neurons.

  15. Apoptotic neutrophils containing Staphylococcus epidermidis stimulate macrophages to release the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsson, Asa; Lind, Sara; Ohman, Lena; Nilsdotter-Augustinsson, Asa; Lundqvist-Setterud, Helen

    2008-06-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are usually nosocomial and involve colonization of biomaterials. The immune defense system cannot efficiently control the bacteria during these infections, which often results in protracted chronic inflammation, in which a key event is disturbed removal of neutrophils by tissue macrophages. While ingesting uninfected apoptotic neutrophils, macrophages release anti-inflammatory cytokines that lead to resolution of inflammation. In clinical studies, we have previously found elevated levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 in synovial fluid from prostheses infected with coagulase negative staphylococci. We show that macrophages phagocytosing apoptotic neutrophils containing S. epidermidis released TNF-alpha and interleukin-6, whereas macrophages phagocytosing spontaneously apoptotic neutrophils did not. This difference was not due to dissimilar phagocytic capacities, because macrophages ingested both types of neutrophils to the same extent. The activation was induced mainly by the apoptotic neutrophils themselves, not by the few remaining extracellular bacteria. Macrophages were not activated by apoptotic neutrophils that contained paraformaldehyde-killed S. epidermidis. Proinflammatory reactions induced by clearance of apoptotic neutrophils containing S. epidermidis might represent an important mechanism to combat the infective agent. This activation of macrophages may contribute to the development of chronic inflammation instead of inflammation resolution.

  16. Parvalbumin Interneurons of Central Amygdala Regulate the Negative Affective States and the Expression of Corticotrophin-Releasing Hormone During Morphine Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Shen, Minjie; Jiang, Changyou

    2016-01-01

    Background: The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a crucial component of the neuronal circuitry mediating aversive emotion. Its role in the negative affective states during drug withdrawal includes changes in opioidergic, GABAergic, and corticotropin-releasing factor neurotransmission. However, the modulation of the neurobiological interconnectivity in the CeA and its effects in the negative reinforcement of drug dependents are poorly understood. Method: We performed electrophysiological recordings to assess the membrane excitability of parvalbumin (PV)+ interneurons in the CeA during chronic morphine withdrawal. We tested the morphine withdrawal–induced negative affective states, such as the aversive (assessed by conditioned place aversion), anxiety (assessed by elevated plus maze), and anhedonic-like (assessed by saccharin preference test) behaviors, as well as the mRNA level of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) via optogenetic inhibition or activation of PV+ interneurons in the CeA. Result: Chronic morphine withdrawal increased the firing rate of CeA PV+ interneurons. Optogenetic inhibition of the activity of CeA PV+ interneurons attenuated the morphine withdrawal–induced negative affective states, such as the aversive, anxiety, and anhedonic-like behaviors, while direct activation of CeA PV+ interneurons could trigger those negative affective-like behaviors. Optogenetic inhibition of the CeA PV+ interneurons during the morphine withdrawal significantly attenuated the elevated CRH mRNA level in the CeA. Conclusion: The activity of PV+ interneurons in the CeA was up-regulated during chronic morphine withdrawal. The activation of PV+ interneurons during morphine withdrawal was crucial for the induction of the negative emotion and the up-regulation of CRH mRNA levels in the CeA. PMID:27385383

  17. The Antimicrobial Peptide Human Beta-Defensin-3 Is Induced by Platelet-Released Growth Factors in Primary Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-released growth factors (PRGF and its related clinically used formulations (e.g., Vivostat Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF® contain a variety of chemokines, cytokines, and growth factors and are therefore used to support healing of chronic, hard-to-heal, or infected wounds. Human beta-defensin-3 (hBD-3 is an antimicrobial peptide inducibly expressed in human keratinocytes especially upon wounding. The potent antimicrobial activity of hBD-3 together with its wound closure-promoting activities suggests that hBD-3 may play a crucial role in wound healing. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of PRGF on hBD-3 expression in human primary keratinocytes in vitro. In addition, we investigated the influence of Vivostat PRF on hBD-3 expression in artificially generated human skin wounds in vivo. PRGF treatment of primary keratinocytes induced a significant, concentration- and time-dependent increase in hBD-3 gene expression which was partially mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. In line with these cell culture data, in vivo experiments revealed an enhanced hBD-3 expression in experimentally produced human wounds after the treatment with Vivostat PRF. Thus, the induction of hBD-3 may contribute to the beneficial effects of thrombocyte concentrate lysates in the treatment of chronic or infected wounds.

  18. Factors to predict positive results of gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulation test in girls with suspected precocious puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo-Kyoung; Rhie, Young Jun; Son, Chang Sung; Park, Sang Hee; Lee, Kee-Hyoung

    2012-02-01

    Sometimes, the clinical findings and the results of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test are inconsistent in girls with early breast development and bone age advancement. We aimed to investigate the factors predicting positive results of the GnRH stimulation test in girls with suspected central precocious puberty (CPP). We reviewed the records of 574 girls who developed breast budding before the age of 8 yr and underwent the GnRH stimulation test under the age of 9 yr. Positive results of the GnRH stimulated peak luteinizing hormone (LH) level were defined as 5 IU/L and over. Girls with the initial positive results (n = 375) showed accelerated growth, advanced bone age and higher serum basal LH, follicle-stimulating hormone, and estradiol levels, compared to those with the initial negative results (n = 199). Girls with the follow-up positive results (n = 64) showed accelerated growth and advanced bone age, compared to those with the follow-up negative results. In the binary logistic regression, the growth velocity ratio was the most significant predictive factor of positive results. We suggest that the rapid growth velocity is the most useful predictive factor for positive results in the GnRH stimulation test in girls with suspected precocious puberty.

  19. In vitro release of growth factors from platelet-rich fibrin (PRF): a proposal to optimize the clinical applications of PRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen Yao; Kuo, Ya Po; Tseng, Yu Hong; Su, Ching-Hua; Burnouf, Thierry

    2009-07-01

    Determine the release of growth factors (GF) from platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and supernatant serum to optimize clinical use. Platelet-derived growth factors-AB (PDGF-AB), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were quantified in PRF releasate and in the supernatant serum (N = 8) over 300 minutes after clot formation. Protein profiles were determined by SDS-PAGE. Mean quantity of PDGF-AB, TGF-ss1, VEGF, and EGF in PRF releasate increased significantly to about 52, 72, 1, and 3 ng, respectively, whereas mean IGF-1 content remained at 250 ng. GF was also found in serum supernatant. Protein profiles of the releasates and the supernatant serum were similar. The PRF membrane should be used immediately after formation to maximize release of GF to the surgical site. The remaining fluid can be recovered as an additional source of GF for grafting.

  20. Efficacy of unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin and both combined for releasing total and free tissue factor pathway inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, R; Scazziota, A; Rouvier, J

    1998-01-01

    Unfractionated heparin (UFH) exerts its anticoagulant properties by increasing the inactivation of thrombin and activated factor X by antithrombin III. Apart from this main action release of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) from endothelial cells could also be important for the antithrombotic activity of heparins. Four different heparin preparations were injected subcutaneously into 5 healthy volunteers 1 week apart: (1) UFH 2,500 IU fix dose (FixUFH), (2) 1 mg/kg body weight of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), (3) the combined LMWH-adjusted dose plus UFH 2,500 IU fix dose (ComHep) and (4) UFH 2,500 IU/10 kg body weight (UFHvar). Plasma samples were drawn before and 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h afterwards. FixUFH did not affect the concentration of total and free TFPI. Total TFPI increased in the 1st hour after LMWH injection from 74 to 124 ng/ml (p < 0.01), after ComHep from 82 to 144 ng/ml (p < 0.01), and after UFHvar from 91 to 113 ng/ml (p < 0.05). All observed elevations were significant at the peak value (+/- 2 h, p < 0.01 compared with baselines). The increase of free TFPI produced by UFHvar (74.5 and 70.5 ng/ml) was significantly higher than with LMWH (42.8 and 38.0 ng/ml) at 2 and 4 h (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively). UFHvar and ComHep but not LMWH produced a statistically significant increase of free TFPI compared with FixUFH at 2, 4 and 6 h (p < 0. 01). We concluded that at comparable therapeutic doses, subcutaneous UFHvar released more free TFPI than LMWH and ComHep. A synergism between LMWH and low dose of UFH was found in 4-, 6- and 12-hour blood samples.

  1. [Determination of head scatter factors released from a scanning-type therapeutic accelerator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoharu

    2003-07-01

    The MM50 is a racetrack microtron capable of taking out photon beams and electron beams with energies of up to 50 MeV. It flattens the beam by the beam-scanning method, while the microtron MM22 utilizes a flattening filter. The head-scatter factors (hereafter called S(h)), which are important for evaluating the output of the photon beam of the MM50 and MM22, were measured using a mini-phantom and build-up cap. S(h) measured with the build-up cap showed the influence of contaminated electrons, whereas S(h) measured with the mini-phantom showed less influence, even for 50 MV photon beams. Compared with the MM22, the MM50 showed less change in S(h) according to field size and energy. The reason for this seemed to be that the MM50 has a smaller extra-focal region than other accelerators equipped with flattening filters and, therefore, can essentially be considered a point source by using the beam-scanning method without a flattening filter. This study demonstrated that photons scattered by the flattening filter used for beam flattening in typical medical accelerators mainly contribute to S(h).

  2. Brain changes in Alzheimer's disease patients with implanted encapsulated cells releasing nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Westman, Eric; Eyjolfsdottir, Helga; Almqvist, Per; Lind, Göran; Linderoth, Bengt; Seiger, Ake; Blennow, Kaj; Karami, Azadeh; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Wiberg, Maria; Simmons, Andrew; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Wahlberg, Lars; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2015-01-01

    New therapies with disease-modifying effects are urgently needed for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nerve growth factor (NGF) protein has demonstrated regenerative and neuroprotective effects on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in animal studies. In addition, AD patients treated with NGF have previously shown improved cognition, EEG activity, nicotinic binding, and glucose metabolism. However, no study to date has analyzed brain atrophy in patients treated with NGF producing cells. In this study we present MRI results of the first clinical trial in patients with AD using encapsulated NGF biodelivery to the basal forebrain. Six AD patients received the treatment during twelve months. Patients were grouped as responders and non-responders according to their twelve-months change in MMSE. Normative values were created from 131 AD patients from ADNI, selecting 36 age- and MMSE-matched patients for interpreting the longitudinal changes in MMSE and brain atrophy. Results at baseline indicated that responders showed better clinical status and less pathological levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1-42. However, they showed more brain atrophy, and neuronal degeneration as evidenced by higher CSF levels of T-tau and neurofilaments. At follow-up, responders showed less brain shrinkage and better progression in the clinical variables and CSF biomarkers. Noteworthy, two responders showed less brain shrinkage than the normative ADNI group. These results together with previous evidence supports the idea that encapsulated biodelivery of NGF might have the potential to become a new treatment strategy for AD with both symptomatic and disease-modifying effects.

  3. Corticotropin-independent Cushing's syndrome caused by an ectopic adrenal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, A R; Basaria, S; Udelsman, R; Westra, W H; Wand, G S

    2000-08-01

    Although nonsecreting suprarenal embryonic remnants are frequently found in the urogenital tract, adenomatous transformation resulting in glucocorticoid excess is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 63-yr-old woman that presented with new-onset hirsutism, facial plethora, hypertension, centripetal obesity, and a proximal myopathy. The 24-h urinary free cortisol excretion rate was elevated, and the serum ACTH level was suppressed. The patient failed an overnight and low dose dexamethasone suppression test and did not respond to CRH stimulation. In light of the undetectable baseline morning ACTH levels and the blunt response to CRH, the diagnosis of corticotropin-independent Cushing's syndrome was made. Imaging studies revealed normal adrenal glands and enlargement of a left pararenal nodule incidentally observed 4 yr before the onset of symptoms. Dramatic resolution of symptoms was observed after surgical removal of the 3.5-cm mass. Pathological exam confirmed adrenocortical adenoma in ectopic adrenal tissue. The case reported here represents the unusual circumstance in which the development of adenomatous transformation of ectopic adrenal tissue has been prospectively observed with imaging studies. It illustrates the importance of considering ectopic corticosteroid-secreting tumors in the context of corticotropin-independent Cushing's syndrome.

  4. Inhibitory activity of the white wine compounds, tyrosol and caffeic acid, on lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, L; Migliori, M; Filippi, C; Origlia, N; Panichi, V; Falchi, M; Bertelli, A A E; Bertelli, A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether tyrosol and caffeic acid are able to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release. TNF is one of the most important cytokines involved in inflammatory reactions. The results show that both tyrosol and caffeic acid are able to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha release from human monocytes, even at low doses. Their mechanisms of action are discussed and we conclude that high doses of the two compounds are not required to achieve effective inhibition of inflammatory reactions due to TNF-alpha release.

  5. Pathways involved in gut mucosal barrier dysfunction induced in adult rats by maternal deprivation: corticotrophin-releasing factor and nerve growth factor interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreau, Frederick; Cartier, Christel; Leveque, Mathilde; Ferrier, Laurent; Moriez, Raphael; Laroute, Valerie; Rosztoczy, Andras; Fioramonti, Jean; Bueno, Lionel

    2007-04-01

    Neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) increases gut paracellular permeability (GPP) through mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF), and modifies corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and corticosterone levels. CRF, corticosterone and mast cells are involved in stress-induced mucosal barrier impairment. Consequently, this study aimed to specify whether corticosteronaemia and colonic expression of both preproCRF and CRF are modified by NMD, and to determine if altered expression may participate in the elevated GPP in connection with NGF and mast cells. Male Wistar rat pups were either separated from postnatal days 2-14, or left undisturbed with their dam. At 12 weeks of age, adult rats were treated with mifepristone (an antagonist of corticoid receptors), alpha-helical CRF((9-41)) (a non-specific CRF receptor antagonist), or SSR-125543 (CRF-R(1) receptor antagonist). We also determined corticosteronaemia and both colonic preproCRF and CRF expression. Then, control rats were treated by CRF, doxantrazole (mast cell stabilizer), BRX-537A (a mast cell activator) and anti-NGF antibody. NMD did not modify colonic CRF level but increased colonic preproCRF expression and corticosteronaemia. Peripheral CRF, via CRF-R(1) receptor, but not corticosterone, was involved in the elevated GPP observed in these rats, through a mast-cell-mediated mechanism, since the increase of GPP induced by exogenous CRF was abolished by doxantrazole. Anti-NGF antibody treatment also reduced the elevated GPP induced by CRF or BRX-537A. CRF acts through CRF-R(1) receptors to stimulate NGF release from mast cells, which participates in the elevated GPP observed in NMD adult rats. This suggests that early traumatic experience induced neuro-endocrine dysfunction, involved in alterations of gut mucosal barrier.

  6. The protective effect of platelet released growth factors and bone augmentation (Bio-Oss(®)) on ethanol impaired osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Bayer, Andreas; Cremer, Tillman; Hock, Jennifer Vanessa Phi; Lethaus, Bernd; Kweider, Nisreen; Wruck, Christoph Jan; Drescher, Wolf; Jahr, Holger; Lippross, Sebastian; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh

    2017-07-31

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a known limiting factor for bone healing. One promising strategy to improve bone augmentation techniques with Bio-Oss(®) in oral and maxillofacial surgery might be the supportive application of platelet-concentrated biomaterials as platelet-released growth factor (PRGF). To address this matter, we performed an in vitro study investigating the protective effects of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) in ethanol (EtOH) treated osteoblasts. The SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cell line, with and without EtOH pretreatment was used. The cell viability, proliferation and alkali phosphatase activity (ALP) after application of 0%, 5% and 10% PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) were assessed. The application of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) in EtOH impaired osteoblasts showed a significant beneficial influence increasing the viability of the osteoblasts in cell culture. The synergistic effect of Bio-Oss(®) and 5% PRGF on the proliferation of osteoblasts was also demonstrated. Bio-Oss(®) only in combination with PRGF increases the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in EtOH pretreated cells. These results indicate that the simultaneous application of PRGF and Bio-Oss(®) inhibits EtOH induced bone healing impairment. Furthermore, in the cells, PRGF induced a protective mechanism which might promote bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. [Effects of PRF and released three growth factors on migration of rat adipose tissue-derived stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Wang, Ming-guo; Yang, Shuai; Li, Xiu-mei; Yang, Shi-mao; Li, Xue

    2015-12-01

    To analyze the effects of PRF and released three growth factors on migration of rat adipose tissue-derived stem cells and to investigate the mechanism of migration. The inguinal adipose tissue of rat was excised at aseptic condition to obtain primary ADSCs by enzyme digestion. Multi-directional differentiation was used to identify the ADSCs. PRF membrane was acquired through one time centrifuge. The cell migration was examined by Transwell assay and wound healing assay. The mRNA expression of MMP2 and MT1-MMP was tested by real-time PCR. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0 software package. Cell migration test showed that the migration of rat ADSCs in PRF group were significantly higher than those in the negative group(PPRF group than control group (PPRF and three growth factors consistently enhanced the migration of rat ADSCs in a dose-response manner. The migration increase of rat ADSCs may be associated with the up-regulation of MMP2 and MT1-MMP gene expression.

  8. Evaluation of skeletal tissue repair, part 2: enhancement of skeletal tissue repair through dual-growth-factor-releasing hydrogels within an ex vivo chick femur defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E L; Kanczler, J M; Gothard, D; Roberts, C A; Wells, J A; White, L J; Qutachi, O; Sawkins, M J; Peto, H; Rashidi, H; Rojo, L; Stevens, M M; El Haj, A J; Rose, F R A J; Shakesheff, K M; Oreffo, R O C

    2014-10-01

    There is an unmet need for improved, effective tissue engineering strategies to replace or repair bone damaged through disease or injury. Recent research has focused on developing biomaterial scaffolds capable of spatially and temporally releasing combinations of bioactive growth factors, rather than individual molecules, to recapitulate repair pathways present in vivo. We have developed an ex vivo embryonic chick femur critical size defect model and applied the model in the study of novel extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel scaffolds containing spatio-temporal combinatorial growth factor-releasing microparticles and skeletal stem cells for bone regeneration. Alginate/bovine bone ECM (bECM) hydrogels combined with poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PDLLGA)/triblock copolymer (10-30% PDLLGA-PEG-PLDLGA) microparticles releasing dual combinations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), chondrogenic transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) and the bone morphogenetic protein BMP2, with human adult Stro-1+bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), were placed into 2mm central segmental defects in embryonic day 11 chick femurs and organotypically cultured. Hydrogels loaded with VEGF combinations induced host cell migration and type I collagen deposition. Combinations of TGF-β3/BMP2, particularly with Stro-1+HBMSCs, induced significant formation of structured bone matrix, evidenced by increased Sirius red-stained matrix together with collagen expression demonstrating birefringent alignment within hydrogels. This study demonstrates the successful use of the chick femur organotypic culture system as a high-throughput test model for scaffold/cell/growth factor therapies in regenerative medicine. Temporal release of dual growth factors, combined with enriched Stro-1+HBMSCs, improved the formation of a highly structured bone matrix compared to single release modalities. These studies highlight the potential of a unique alginate/bECM hydrogel dual growth factor release

  9. Factor H Binds to Extracellular DNA Traps Released from Human Blood Monocytes in Response to Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Luke D.; Abdelfatah, Mahmoud A.; Jo, Emeraldo A. H.; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Westermann, Martin; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Lorkowski, Stefan; Zipfel, Peter F.; Skerka, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Upon systemic infection with human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans (C. albicans), human monocytes and polymorph nuclear neutrophilic granulocytes are the first immune cells to respond and come into contact with C. albicans. Monocytes exert immediate candidacidal activity and inhibit germination, mediate phagocytosis, and kill fungal cells. Here, we show that human monocytes spontaneously respond to C. albicans cells via phagocytosis, decondensation of nuclear DNA, and release of this decondensed DNA in the form of extracellular traps (called monocytic extracellular traps: MoETs). Both subtypes of monocytes (CD14++CD16−/CD14+CD16+) formed MoETs within the first hours upon contact with C. albicans. MoETs were characterized by the presence of citrullinated histone, myeloperoxidase, lactoferrin, and elastase. MoETs were also formed in response to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, indicating a general reaction of monocytes to infectious microbes. MoET induction differs from extracellular trap formation in macrophages as MoETs are not triggered by simvastatin, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis and inducer of extracellular traps in macrophages. Extracellular traps from both monocytes and neutrophils activate complement and C3b is deposited. However, factor H (FH) binds via C3b to the extracellular DNA, mediates cofactor activity, and inhibits the induction of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta in monocytes. Altogether, the results show that human monocytes release extracellular DNA traps in response to C. albicans and that these traps finally bind FH via C3b to presumably support clearance without further inflammation. PMID:28133459

  10. Revisiting the IFN-γ release assay: Whole blood or PBMC cultures? - And other factors of influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-07-01

    The interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) is a widely used test for the presence of a cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in vitro. This measure is used to test for infection with intracellular pathogens or for validating vaccine efficacy, and it is a widely used test for both human as well as cattle. However, there is no consensus whether to use whole blood cultures or purified PBMCs for the assay, and both cell populations are being used and results compared. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare different culture settings using immune cells from previously vaccinated calves, and to shed light on external factors that could influence the read out in terms of IFN-γ levels. It was found that optimal culture conditions varied between individual animals; when polyclonal activated, cells from whole blood cultures were most responsive, but when activated specifically, the optimal cell concentration/population varied with whole blood, 10×10(6)cells/ml PBMC and 5×10(6)cells/ml PBMC being the highest performing conditions. A further investigation of the distribution of cell populations in PBMCs compared to whole blood was conducted, and a significant (pcultures from five calves. Six plates (a-f) were tested and no significant difference in absolute levels of IFN-γ was detected in the six plates when cells were polyclonal and specifically activated. However, we observed a significant (pculture population, the concentration of cells being cultured, and the plastic ware used for the in vitro culture. These findings stress the importance of documenting the precise assay conditions when publishing results of in vitro IFN-γ release assays.

  11. Risk factors for acute chemical releases with public health consequences: Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance in the U.S., 1996–2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaye Wendy E

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Releases of hazardous materials can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. To reduce and prevent the public health consequences (victims or evacuations from uncontrolled or illegally released hazardous substances, a more comprehensive analysis is needed to determine risk factors for hazardous materials incidents. Methods Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES data from 1996 through 2001 were analyzed using bivariate and multiple logistic regression. Fixed-facility and transportation-related events were analyzed separately. Results For fixed-facility events, 2,327 (8% resulted in at least one victim and 2,844 (10% involved ordered evacuations. For transportation-related events, 759 (8% resulted in at least one victim, and 405 (4% caused evacuation orders. Fire and/or explosion were the strongest risk factors for events involving either victims or evacuations. Stratified analysis of fixed-facility events involving victims showed a strong association for acid releases in the agriculture, forestry, and fisheries industry. Chlorine releases in fixed-facility events resulted in victims and evacuations in more industry categories than any other substance. Conclusions Outreach efforts should focus on preventing and preparing for fires and explosions, acid releases in the agricultural industry, and chlorine releases in fixed facilities.

  12. Assessment of chronic spontaneous urticaria by serum-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha and matrix metalloproteinase-9 release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkencrone, Sidsel; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Skov, Per Stahl

    BACKGROUND Previous studies from our group have demonstrated that IgE-mediated basophil activation leads to release of TNFα that in turn can induce matrix metallo-proteinase-9 (MMP-9) release from monocytes. We wished to investigate if serum from chronic spontaneous urticaria-patients with auto......-antibodies against IgE/IgE-receptor could induce TNFα and MMP-9 release from donor PBMCs, and if release levels could be used to assess severity and activity of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). METHODS Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from whole blood from healthy donors and basophils...... observed to induce highly significant MMP-9 and TNFα release from donor PBMCs when compared to sera from healthy controls (pUrticaria assessment score (UAS) did not appear to correlate with release levels for histamine, TNFa or MMP-9 in either group but in the ASST+ group, the ASST score appeared...

  13. Corticotropin (ACTH)-reactive immunoglobulins in adolescents in relation to antisocial behavior and stress-induced cortisol response. The TRAILS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Johanna M; Fetissov, Serguei O; Legrand, Romain; Claeyssens, Sophie; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Verhulst, Frank C; Van Oort, Floor V A

    2013-12-01

    Elevated levels of corticotropin (ACTH)-reactive immunoglobulins (ACTH IgG) were found in males with conduct disorder, suggesting their involvement in the biology of antisocial behavior. We first aimed to confirm these findings in a large general population sample of adolescents. Secondly, we studied the association between ACTH IgG levels and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress. Free and total ACTH IgG levels were measured in sera of 1230 adolescents (15-18 years). HPA axis activity was determined by measuring salivary cortisol before, during, and after a social stress test. Antisocial behavior was assessed using the Antisocial Behavior Questionnaire. ACTH peptide and IgG affinity kinetics for ACTH were assayed in a subsample of 90 adolescents selected for high or low ACTH IgG levels. In boys, higher total ACTH IgG levels were associated with higher antisocial behavior scores (β=1.05, p=0.04), especially at high levels of free ACTH IgG. In girls, antisocial behavior was associated with low free ACTH IgG levels (β=-0.20, p=0.04). Stress-induced cortisol release was associated with free ACTH IgG in boys (βareaunderthecurve=-0.67, pantisocial behavior and HPA axis response to stress in adolescents. The mechanisms behind these associations, including different ACTH binding properties of IgG in subjects with antisocial behavior, deserve further attention.

  14. Migration inhibitory factor (MIF) released by macrophages upon recognition of immune complexes is critical to inflammation in Arthus reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Claudia N; Arras, Rosa H; Magalhães, Elisabeth S; Alves, Letícia S; Lessa, Luiz Paulo; Silva, Maria Helena; Ejzemberg, Regina; Canetti, Cláudio; Bozza, Marcelo T

    2009-05-01

    Deposition of immune complexes (IC) triggers Fc gamma R-dependent inflammation, leading to tissue damage in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous, immune glomerulonephritis, and several immune vasculitides. Evidences support a role for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in a number of inflammatory diseases, but the triggering of its secretion and its physiopathological role upon IC deposition remain elusive. Herein, we show that human macrophages secreted MIF after IC recognition, which in turn controlled the secretion of TNF. Macrophages from Mif-/- mice produced smaller amounts of TNF when stimulated with IgG-opsonized erythrocytes than wild-type (WT) cells. Using passive reverse Arthus reaction in the peritoneum and lungs as a model for IC-induced inflammation, we demonstrated that Mif-/- mice had a milder response, observed by reduced neutrophil recruitment, vascular leakage, and secretion of TNF, MIP-2, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine compared with WT controls. Adoptive transfer of alveolar macrophages from WT to Mif-/- mice rescued pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and TNF production upon passive reverse Arthus reaction. Our study indicates that Arthus inflammatory reaction is largely dependent on MIF and poses macrophages as a source of the MIF released upon IC recognition. These results give experimental support to the proposition that blockade of MIF might constitute an adjunctive, therapeutic approach to IC disease.

  15. Repair effect of diabetic ulcers with recombinant human epidermal growth factor loaded by sustained-release microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study the w/o/w extraction–evaporation technique was adopted to prepare poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loading recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF). The micro-spheres were characterized for morphology by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and particle size distribution. The release performances, the proliferation effects and therapeutic effects of rhEGF-loaded PLGA microspheres were all studied. The results showed that these spherical micro-spheres had a narrow size distribution and a high drug encapsulation efficiency (85.6%). RhEGF-loaded microspheres enhanced the growth rate of fibroblasts and wound healing more efficiently than pure rhEGF. The number of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the epidermis layer with the mi-crosphere treatment was significantly larger than those of the control groups. Overall locally sustained delivery of rhEGF from biodegradable PLGA microspheres may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic ulcer repair.

  16. Post-stroke recovery: the role of activity-dependent release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Antonio; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Clarkson, Andrew N

    2014-11-01

    Stroke remains the leading cause of long-term disability with no pharmacological approaches available to limit the degree of damage or aid in recovery. Considerable effort has been made to minimize neuronal damage using neuroprotective compounds. However, attempts have so far failed to translate into the clinic. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase type B are actively produced throughout the brain and are involved in regulating neuronal activity and normal day-to-day function. Further, BDNF has been shown to play a role in both protection and recovery of functions after stroke. This review focuses on the endogenous release of BDNF as well as activity-induced (pharmacological and physical) elevation in BDNF, and the role this plays during both acute (hours to days) and subacute (days to weeks) periods after stroke. Exogenous administration has previously been shown not to cross the blood-brain barrier; therefore, we have focused this review on approaches that allow us to directly stimulate, using pharmacological therapies and mimetics, physical activity and potential drug delivery systems that can be used to administer BDNF. Finally, we also discuss the role of BDNF polymorphisms and the influence of epigenetic regulation of BDNF on post-stroke recovery.

  17. Neither bovine somatotropin nor growth hormone-releasing factor alters expression of thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuco, A V; Binelli, M; Tucker, H A

    2011-10-01

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine to specific nuclear receptors. Organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, have been hypothesized to target the action of thyroid hormones on the mammary gland and play a role in mediating or augmenting a galactopoietic response to bovine somatotropin (bST). Additionally, tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones may be altered by changes in the number or affinity of nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones. In the present study, effects of bST and bovine growth hormone-releasing factor (bGRF) on thyroid hormone receptors in liver and mammary gland were studied. Lactating Holstein cows received continuous infusions of bST or bGRF for 63 d or served as uninfused controls. Nuclei were isolated from harvested mammary and liver tissues and incubated with [(125)I]-triiodothyronine. Treatments did not alter the capacity or affinity of specific binding sites for triiodothyronine in liver or mammary nuclei. Evaluation of transcript abundance for thyroid hormone receptors showed that isoforms of thyroid hormone receptor or retinoid receptor (which may influence thyroid receptor action) expressed in the mammary gland were not altered by bST or bGRF treatment. Data do not support the hypothesis that administration of bST or bGRF alters sensitivity of mammary tissue by changing expression of thyroid hormone receptors.

  18. Repair effect of diabetic ulcers with recombinant human epidermal growth factor loaded by sustained-release microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG XiaoQing; XU Jun; WANG WeiCai; Luo Hao; LIANG XiaoFei; Zhang Lei; Wang HanJie; Wang PengHua; CHANG Jin

    2008-01-01

    In this study the w/o/w extraction-evaporation technique was adopted to prepare poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loading recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF). The micro-spheres were characterized for morphology by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and particle size distribution. The release performances, the proliferation effects and therapeutic effects of rhEGF-Ioaded PLGA microspheres were all studied. The results showed that these spherical micro-spheres had a narrow size distribution and a high drug encapsulation efficiency (85.6%). RhEGF-ioaded microspheres enhanced the growth rate of fibroblasts and wound healing more efficiently than pure rhEGF. The number of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the epidermis layer with the mi-crosphere treatment was significantly larger than those of the control groups. Overall locally sustained delivery of rhEGF from biodegradable PLGA microspheres may serve as a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic ulcer repair.

  19. The hemK gene in Escherichia coli encodes the N5-glutamine methyltransferase that modifies peptide release factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Champ, Stéphanie; Engström, Åke; Ehrenberg, Måns; Buckingham, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    Class 1 peptide release factors (RFs) in Escherichia coli are N5-methylated on the glutamine residue of the universally conserved GGQ motif. One other protein alone has been shown to contain N5-methylglutamine: E.coli ribosomal protein L3. We identify the L3 methyltransferase as YfcB and show that it methylates ribosomes from a yfcB strain in vitro, but not RF1 or RF2. HemK, a close orthologue of YfcB, is shown to methylate RF1 and RF2 in vitro. hemK is immediately downstream of and co-expressed with prfA. Its deletion in E.coli K12 leads to very poor growth on rich media and abolishes methylation of RF1. The activity of unmethylated RF2 from K12 strains is extremely low due to the cumulative effects of threonine at position 246, in place of alanine or serine present in all other bacterial RFs, and the lack of N5-methylation of Gln252. Fast-growing spontaneous revertants in hemK K12 strains contain the mutations Thr246Ala or Thr246Ser in RF2. HemK and YfcB are the first identified methyltransferases modifying glutamine, and are widely distributed in nature. PMID:11847124

  20. Histamine release factor from Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer): characterization and in vitro assessment as a protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Kathryn; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Offer, Jill E; Sparks, Nicholas H C; Wright, Harry W; Huntley, John F

    2009-03-01

    A cDNA encoding a 174-amino-acid orthologue of a tick histamine release factor (HRF) was identified from the haematophagous poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. The predicted D. gallinae HRF protein (Dg-HRF-1) sequence is highly conserved with the tick HRFs (identity 52-54%) and to a lesser degree with translationally controlled tumour proteins (TCTP) from mammals and other invertebrates (range 38-47%). Phylogenetically, Dg-HRF-1 partitions with the tick HRF clade suggesting a shared linage and potentially similar function(s). A recombinant Dg-HRF-1 protein (rDg-HRF-1) was produced and shown to induce degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro, confirming conservation of the histamine-releasing function in D. gallinae. Polyclonal antibodies were generated in rabbits and hens to rDg-HRF-1. Western blotting demonstrated that native Dg-HRF is a soluble protein and immunohistochemical staining of mite sections revealed that the distribution of Dg-HRF, although ubiquitous, is more common in mite reproductive, digestive and synganglion tissues. A survey of hens housed continuously in a mite-infested commercial poultry unit failed to identify IgY specific for recombinant or native Dg-HRF, indicating that Dg-HRF is not exposed to the host during infestation/feeding and may therefore have potential as a vaccine using the concealed antigen approach. To test the protective capability of rDg-HRF-1, fresh heparinised chicken blood was enriched with yolk-derived anti-Dg-HRF IgY antibodies and fed to semi-starved mites using an in vitro feeding system. A statistically significant increase in mortality was shown (P=0.004) in mites fed with anti-Dg-HRF IgY after just one blood meal. The work presented here demonstrates, to our knowledge for the first time, the feasibility of vaccinating hens with recombinant D. gallinae antigens to control mite infestation and the potential of rDg-HRF-1 as a vaccine antigen.

  1. 78 FR 14533 - Official Release of EMFAC2011 Motor Vehicle Emission Factor Model for Use in the State of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... available on the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Web site: http://www.arb.ca.gov/msei/modeling.htm... California were developed using EMFAC2007 (released by CARB in October 2007) or EMFAC2002 (released by CARB... April 6, 2012 letter, CARB requested that EPA approve EMFAC2011 for use in developing SIPs and in...

  2. Distribution of capsular types and production of muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) of Streptococcus suis strains isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Smith, H.E.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Peperkamp, K.; Vecht, U.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus suis strains (n=411), isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries were serotyped using specific antisera against serotype 1 to 28, and were phenotyped on the basis of their muramidase-released-protein (MRP) and extracellular-factor protein (EF) production. Overall, S. suis

  3. Protection of pigs against challenge with virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains by a muramidase-released protein and extracellular factor vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Vecht, U.; Stockhofe Zurwieden, N.; Smith, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) vaccine in preventing infection and disease in pigs challenged either with a homologous or a heterologous Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strain (MRP EF ) was compared with the efficacy of a vaccine containing formalin-k

  4. Tuberculosis screening in patients with psoriasis before antitumour necrosis factor therapy : comparison of an interferon-gamma release assay vs. tuberculin skin test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laffitte, E.; Janssens, J. P.; Roux-Lombard, P.; Thielen, A. M.; Barde, C.; Marazza, G.; Panizzon, R. G.; Saurat, J-H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Antitumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) treatments may reactivate latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). For detecting LTBI, the tuberculin skin test (TST) has low sensitivity and specificity. Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) have been shown to be more sensitive and specific than TST.

  5. Three-dimensional Printed Scaffolds with Gelatin and Platelets Enhance In vitro Preosteoblast Growth Behavior and the Sustained-release Effect of Growth Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our experiments confirmed that the 3D printed scaffolds we had designed could provide a sustained-release effect for growth factors and improve the proliferation of preosteoblasts with little cytotoxicity in vitro. They may hold promise as bone graft substitute materials in the future.

  6. 新型大球包膜控释复合肥养分释放特征及影响因素%Properties and Impacting Factors of Nutrient Releasing of New Large Spherical Coated Controlled-Release Compound Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长洲; 张民; 杨越超

    2013-01-01

    The writing revolves around the effect of such factors as coating thickness , application amount of cell opener , temperature and granular diameter on release rate of nutrition of large spherical coated controlled-release compound fertilizer by using water extraction method .The experiment results have showed that releasing rate of nitrogen and potassium is obviously higher than that of phosphorus . Reducing coating thickness or increasing amount of cell opener can increase release rate of different nutrients .At temperature of 25~40 ℃, there has been no obvious releasing difference of nitrogen , phosphorus and potassium .However , when the temperature is raised from 40 ℃to 60 ℃, the release rate of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium has been increased remarkably .It has been concluded increasing spherical diameter of large spherical coated controlled-release compound fertilizer can not directly affect release rate of nitrogen , phosphorus and potassium greatly , but it brings the benefits of saving coat material and reducing production costs .%通过水溶出率法试验测定了包膜厚度、开孔剂添加量、温度和球径大小等因素对大球包膜控释复合肥养分释放速率的影响。试验结果表明:氮素和钾素的释放率显著大于磷素释放率,减小膜厚或增加开孔剂添加量均可加快各养分释放速率;当温度在25~40℃时,其氮、磷、钾的释放速率无显著变化,但温度从40℃升高至60℃时,氮、磷、钾的释放速率均显著加快;增大大球包膜控释复合肥的球径并未显著影响氮、磷、钾的释放速率,但节省了包膜材料,可降低生产成本。

  7. In vitro stress effect on degradation and drug release behaviors of basic fibroblast growth factor--poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) microsphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Yu, Zeping; Lang, Yun; Hu, Juanyu; Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang; Tu, Chongqi; Yang, Tianfu; Song, Yueming; Duan, Hong; Pei, Fuxing

    2016-01-01

    To study the degradation and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) release activity of bFGF - poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) microsphere (bFGF-PLGA MS) under stress in vitro, including the static pressure and shearing force-simulating mechanical environment of the joint cavity. First, bFGF-PLGA MSs were created. Meanwhile, two self-made experimental instruments (static pressure and shearing force loading instruments) were initially explored to provide stress-simulating mechanical environment of the joint cavity. Then, bFGF-PLGA MSs were loaded into the two instruments respectively, to study microsphere degradation and drug release experiments. In the static pressure loading experiment, normal atmospheric pressure loading (approximately 0.1 MPa), 0.35 MPa, and 4.0 MPa pressure loading and shaking flask oscillation groups were designed to study bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and bFGF release. In the shearing force loading experiment, a pulsating pump was used to give the experimental group an output of 1,000 mL/min and the control group an output of 10 mL/min to carry out bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and drug release experiments. Changes of bFGF-PLGA MSs, including microsphere morphology, quality, weight-average molecular weight of polymer, and microsphere degradation and bFGF release, were analyzed respectively. In the static pressure loading experiment, bFGF-PLGA MSs at different pressure were stable initially. The trend of molecular weight change, quality loss, and bFGF release was consistent. Meanwhile, microsphere degradation and bFGF release rates in the 4.0 MPa pressure loading group were faster than those in the normal and 0.35 MPa pressure loading groups. It was the fastest in the shaking flask group, showing a statistically significant difference (P<0.0001). In the shearing force loading experiment, there were no distinctive differences in the rates of microsphere degradation and bFGF release between experimental and control group. Meanwhile, microsphere degradation

  8. Lactate induces tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and interleukin-1beta release in microglial- and astroglial-enriched primary cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Anna K; Rönnbäck, Lars; Hansson, Elisabeth

    2005-06-01

    Hyperammonaemia has deleterious effects on the CNS in patients with liver dysfunction. Cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of hyperammonaemia are largely unknown, although astrocytes have been the main target of interest. This study investigated how treatment with NH4Cl and lactate, which increase in the brain as a consequence of hyperammonaemia, affects cells in primary rat cultures enriched in either astrocytes or microglia. Morphological changes were studied over time using light microscopy. Release of the proinflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1beta was measured using ELISA. NH4Cl was found to induce vacuole formation in both culture systems. Lactate treatment altered astrocytic appearance, resulting in increased space between individual cells. Microglia adopted a round morphology with either NH4Cl or lactate treatment. Lactate, but not NH4Cl, induced release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in both astroglial- and microglial-enriched cultures, while IL-1beta was released only in microglial cultures. Cytokine release was higher in the microglial- than in the astroglial-enriched cultures. Additionally, the astroglial-enriched cultures containing approximately 10% microglial cells released more cytokines than cultures containing about 5% microglial cells. Taken together, our data suggest that most TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1beta release comes from microglia. Thus, microglia could play an important role in the pathological process of hyperammonaemia.

  9. Deconstructing the Iboga Alkaloid Skeleton: Potentiation of FGF2-induced Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Release by a Novel Compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassaway, Madalee M; Jacques, Teresa L; Kruegel, Andrew C; Karpowicz, Richard J; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Shu; Myer, Yves; Sames, Dalibor

    2016-01-15

    Modulation of growth factor signaling pathways in the brain represents a new experimental approach to treating neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, and addiction. Neurotrophins and growth factors exert synaptic, neuronal, and circuit level effects on a wide temporal range, which suggests a possibility of rapid and lasting therapeutic effects. Consequently, identification of small molecules that can either enhance the release of growth factors or potentiate their respective pathways will provide a drug-like alternative to direct neurotrophin administration or viral gene delivery and thus represents an important frontier in chemical biology and drug design. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), in particular, has been implicated in marked reduction of alcohol consumption in rodent addiction models, and the natural product ibogaine, a substance used traditionally in ritualistic ceremonies, has been suggested to increase the synthesis and release of GDNF in the dopaminergic system in rats. In this report, we describe a novel iboga analog, XL-008, created by unraveling the medium size ring of the ibogamine skeleton, and its ability to induce release of GDNF in C6 glioma cells. Additionally, XL-008 potentiates the release of GDNF induced by fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), another neurotrophin implicated in major depressive disorder, increasing potency more than 2-fold (from 7.85 ± 2.59 ng/mL to 3.31 ± 0.98 ng/mL) and efficacy more than 3-fold. The GDNF release by both XL-008 and the FGF2/XL-008 mixture was found to be mediated through the MEK and PI3K signaling pathways but not through PLCγ in C6 glioma cells.

  10. NESHAP Area-Specific Dose-Release Factors for Potential Onsite Member-of-the-Public Locations at SRS using CAP88-PC Version 4.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimor, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-09

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the use of the computer model CAP88-PC to estimate the total effective doses (TED) for demonstrating compliance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 2006), the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations. As such, CAP88 Version 4.0 was used to calculate the receptor dose due to routine atmospheric releases at the Savannah River Site (SRS). For estimation, NESHAP dose-release factors (DRFs) have been supplied to Environmental Compliance and Area Closure Projects (EC&ACP) for many years. DRFs represent the dose to a maximum receptor exposed to 1 Ci of a specified radionuclide being released into the atmosphere. They are periodically updated to include changes in the CAP88 version, input parameter values, site meteorology, and location of the maximally exposed individual (MEI). In this report, the DRFs were calculated for potential radionuclide atmospheric releases from 13 SRS release points. The three potential onsite MEI locations to be evaluated are B-Area, Three Rivers Landfill (TRL), and Savannah River Ecology Lab Conference Center (SRELCC) with TRL’s onsite workers considered as members-of-the-public, and the potential future constructions of dormitories at SRELCC and Barracks at B-Area. Each MEI location was evaluated at a specified compass sector with different area to receptor distances and was conducted for both ground-level and elevated release points. The analysis makes use of area-specific meteorological data (Viner 2014). The resulting DRFs are compared to the 2014 NESHAP offsite MEI DRFs for three operational areas; A-Area, H-Area, and COS for a release rate of 1 Ci of tritium oxide at 0 ft. elevation. CAP88 was executed again using the 2016 NESHAP MEI release rates for 0 and 61 m stack heights to determine the radionuclide dose at TRL from the center-of-site (COS).

  11. Maternal behavior in transgenic mice with reduced fibroblast growth factor receptor function in gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks Leah R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and their receptors (FGFRs are necessary for the proper development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons, which are key activators of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. Transgenic mice that have the targeted expression of a dominant negative FGFR (dnFGFR in GnRH neurons (dnFGFR mice have a 30% decrease of GnRH neurons. Additionally, only 30–40% of the pups born to the transgenic dams survive to weaning age. These data raised the possibility that FGFR defects in GnRH neurons could adversely affect maternal behavior via novel mechanisms. Methods We first determined if defective maternal behavior in dnFGFR mothers may contribute to poor pup survival by measuring pup retrieval and a battery of maternal behaviors in primiparous control (n = 10–12 and dnFGFR (n = 13–14 mothers. Other endocrine correlates of maternal behaviors, including plasma estradiol levels and hypothalamic pro-oxyphysin and GnRH transcript levels were also determined using enzyme-linked immunoassay and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Results Maternal behaviors (% time crouching with pups, time off pups but not feeding, time feeding, and total number of nesting bouts were not significantly different in dnFGFR mice. However, dnFGFR dams were more likely to leave their pups scattered and took significantly longer to retrieve each pup compared to control dams. Further, dnFGFR mothers had significantly lower GnRH transcripts and circulating E2, but normal pro-oxyphysin transcript levels. Conclusions Overall, this study suggests a complex scenario in which a GnRH system compromised by reduced FGF signaling leads to not only suboptimal reproductive physiology, but also suboptimal maternal behavior.

  12. Oestradiol modulates the effects of leptin on energy homeostasis by corticotrophin-releasing factor type 2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, P B; Silva, L E C M; Rorato, R; Gomiero Alves, P; Antunes-Rodrigues, J; Elias, L L K

    2014-11-01

    In addition to its action in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) has been described as an anorexigenic neuropeptide, modulating food intake and energy expenditure. CRF synthesis is influenced by leptin, which would act to increase CRF neurone activation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gonadal hormones also participate in the regulation of energy homeostasis. The reduction of food intake and body weight gain in ovariectomised (OVX) rats treated with oestradiol is associated with an increase in CRF mRNA expression in the PVN. The present study aimed to investigate the role of CRF as a mediator of leptin responsiveness in the presence of oestradiol. Wistar female rats were bilaterally OVX and divided into three groups: OVX, OVX+E (i.e. treated with oestradiol) and OVX+PF (i.e. OVX pairfed with OVX+E). The rats received daily s.c. injections of either oestradiol cypionate or vehicle for 8 days. To evaluate the role of CRF on the effects of leptin, we performed an i.c.v. leptin injection (10 μg/5 μl) with or without previous i.c.v. treatment with an CRF-R2 antagonist. We observed that oestradiol replacement in OVX rats reduced body weight gain and food intake. The effects of exogenous leptin administration with respect to decreasing food intake and body weight, and increasing uncoupling protein-1 expression in the brown adipose tissue and neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus, were reversed by previous administration of a CRF-R2 antagonist only in oestradiol-treated OVX rats. These effects appear to be mediated by CRF-2 receptor because the antagonist of this receptor reversed the action of oestradiol on the effects of leptin. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  13. Accommodating the bacterial decoding release factor as an alien protein among the RNAs at the active site of the ribosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth S Poole; David J Young; Marjan E Askarian-Amiri; Debbie-Jane G Scarlett; Warren P Tate

    2007-01-01

    The decoding release factor (RF) triggers termination of protein synthesis by functionally mimicking a tRNA to span the decoding centre and the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) of the ribosome. Structurally, it must fit into a site crafted for a tRNA and surrounded by five other RNAs, namely the adjacent peptidyl tRNA carrying the completed polypeptide, the mRNA and the three rRNAs. This is achieved by extending a structural domain from the body of the protein that results in a critical conformational change allowing it to contact the PTC. A structural model of the bacterial termination complex with the accommodated RF shows that it makes close contact with the first, second and third bases of the stop codon in the mRNA with two separate loops of structure: the anticodon loop and the loop at the tip of helix a5. The anticodon loop also makes contact with the base following the stop codon that is known to strongly influence termination efficiency. It confirms the close contact of domain 3 of the protein with the key RNA structures of the PTC. The mRNA signal for termination includes sequences upstream as well as downstream of the stop codon, and this may reflect structural restrictions for specific combinations of tRNA and RF to be bound onto the ribosome together. An unbiased SELEX approach has been investigated as a tool to identify potential rRNA-binding contacts of the bacterial RF in its different binding conformations within the active centre of the ribosome.

  14. RELEASE OF PROGESTERONE AND TESTOSTERONE BY OVARIAN GRANULOSA CELLS AFTER ADDITION OF T-2 TOXIN AND ITS COMBINATION WITH GROWTH FACTOR IGF-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Maruniaková

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of T-2 toxin and combination of this toxin with growth factor IGF-I on secretion of ovarian hormones progesterone P4 and testosterone by ovarian granulosa cells (GCs of gilts. Ovarian granulosa cells were incubated withouth (control or with treatments at various doses for 48h: T-2 toxin (10, 100 and 1000 ng.ml-1 / T-2 toxin (10,100 and 1000 ng.ml-1 plus IGF-I (100 ng.ml-1. Progesterone and testosterone were determined by RIA. Progesterone release by GCs was significantly (P<0.05 inhibited after addition of T-2 toxin at all doses 10, 100, 1000 ng.ml-1. Release of testosterone was inhibited after addition of T-2 toxin at 10 and 100 ng.ml-1. On the other hand significant (P<0.05 stimulation of testosterone release at the highest dose 1000 ng.ml-1 was observed. T-2 toxin in combination with growth factor IGF-I inhibited significantly (P<0.05 progesterone release by GCs at all used doses 10, 100, 1000 ng.ml-1of T-2 toxin with 100 ng.ml-1 of IGF-I. Testosterone release was significantly (P<0.05 inhibited after addition of doses 100, 1000 ng.ml-1 of T-2 toxin with 100 ng.ml-1of IGF-I. Our in vitro results examined the dose-dependent effect of T-2 toxin and its combination with growth factor IGF-I on release of progesterone and testosterone by ovarian granulosa cells.

  15. Isolation of the gene and hypothalamic of cDNA for the common precursor of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and prolactin release-inhibiting factor in human and rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelman, J.P.; Mason, A.J.; Hayflick, J.S.; Seeburg, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    Cloned cDNAs encoding the precursor protein for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) and prolactin release-inhibiting factor (PIF) were isolated from libraries derived from human and rat hypothalamic mRNA. Nucleotide sequence analyses predict precursor proteins of 92 amino acids for both species and show identity between the human placental and human hypothalamic precursor proteins. Whereas the Gn-RH peptide structure is completely conserved in human and rat, the PIF domain of the precursor displays 70% interspecies homology. Genomic analyses revealed the presence of a single Gn-RH-PIF gene in human and rat containing sequences corresponding to the cDNA distributed across four exons.

  16. Bacterial antigen induced release of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGFR1 before and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mads N; Lykke, J; Werther, Kim

    2005-01-01

    -induced release of sVEGF and sVEGFR1 from whole blood in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty-one patients with abdominal diseases undergoing five different surgical procedures were included in the study. Blood samples were drawn from patients before and after the operation. White blood cells and platelets were...... significantly with neutrophil cell counts (0.53 led to increased release of sVEGF, which...

  17. FACTORS AFFECT THE RELEASE OF PSEUDOEPHDRINE HYDROCHLORIDE FROM THE UNCOATED CATION EXCHANGE RESIN—BASED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIZhenhua; PIHongqiong; 等

    2001-01-01

    In this paper,it was investigated that the effect of parameters such as the ionic strength,pH.counter-ion type of release medium,particle size.and cross linkage of cation exchange resin on the release of model drug pseudoephedrine hydrochloride(PE) from uncoated drug-resin complex.The drug-resin complex was pepared by the reaction of PE with strongly acidic cation exchange resin(001×4,001×7,001×14) .The result showed that the loading of PE increased with the increase of temperatures.The release of PE from drug-resin complex at 37℃ was monitored in vitro.From the experiments,it was found that the release rate of PE depends on the pH.comosition of the releasing media,increased at lower pH media or with increase of ionic strength of media.Moreover,the release rate of PE was inversely proportional to the cross-linkage and particle size of the cation exchange resin.

  18. FACTORS AFFECT THE RELEASE OF PSEUDOEPHDRINE HYDROCHLORIDE FROM THE UNCOATED CATION EXCHANGE RESIN-BASED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhenhua; PI Hongqiong; HE Binglin

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, it was investigated that the effect of parameters such as the ionic strength,pH, counter-ion type of release medium, particle size, and cross linkage of cation exchange resin on the release of model drug pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PE) from uncoated drug-resin complex.The drug-resin complex was prepared by the reaction of PE with strongly acidic cation exchange resin (001 ×4, 001 ×7, 001 ×14). The result showed that the loading of PE increased with the increase of temperatures. The release of PE from drug-resin complex at 37 ℃ was monitored in vitro.From the experiments, it was found that the release rate of PE depends on the pH, composition of the releasing media, increased at lower pH media or with increase of ionic strength of media. Moreover,the release rate of PE was inversely proportional to the cross-linkage and particle size of the cation exchange resin.

  19. Patterns of Plasma Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone, Progesterone, Estradiol, and Estriol Change and the Onset of Human Labor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Roger; Smith, Julia I; Shen, Xiaobin; Engel, Patricia J; Bowman, Maria E; McGrath, Shaun A; Bisits, Andrew M; McElduff, Patrick; Giles, Warwick B; Smith, David W

    2009-01-01

    ...) withdrawal and estrogen activation at the onset of human labor is unclear. Objectives: Our objectives were to determine associations of rates of change of circulating maternal CRH in midpregnancy with preterm delivery, CRH with estriol (E3...

  20. Gene by Environment Interaction and Resilience: Effects of Child Maltreatment and Serotonin, Corticotropin Releasing Hormone, Dopamine, and Oxytocin Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2013-01-01

    In this investigation, gene-environment interaction effects in predicting resilience in adaptive functioning among maltreated and nonmaltreated low-income children (N = 595) were examined. A multi-component index of resilient functioning was derived and levels of resilient functioning were identified. Variants in four genes, 5-HTTLPR, CRHR1, DRD4 -521C/T, and OXTR, were investigated. In a series of ANCOVAs, child maltreatment demonstrated a strong negative main effect on children’s resilient functioning, whereas no main effects for any of the genotypes of the respective genes were found. However, gene-environment interactions involving genotypes of each of the respective genes and maltreatment status were obtained. For each respective gene, among children with a specific genotype, the relative advantage in resilient functioning of nonmaltreated compared to maltreated children was stronger than was the case for nonmaltreated and maltreated children with other genotypes of the respective gene. Across the four genes, a composite of the genotypes that more strongly differentiated resilient functioning between nonmaltreated and maltreated children provided further evidence of genetic variations influencing resilient functioning in nonmaltreated children, whereas genetic variation had a negligible effect on promoting resilience among maltreated children. Additional effects were observed for children based on the number of subtypes of maltreatment children experienced, as well as for abuse and neglect subgroups. Finally, maltreated and nonmaltreated children with high levels of resilience differed in their average number of differentiating genotypes. These results suggest that differential resilient outcomes are based on the interaction between genes and developmental experiences. PMID:22559122

  1. Patterns of plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone, progesterone, estradiol, and estriol change and the onset of human labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger; Smith, Julia I; Shen, Xiaobin; Engel, Patricia J; Bowman, Maria E; McGrath, Shaun A; Bisits, Andrew M; McElduff, Patrick; Giles, Warwick B; Smith, David W

    2009-06-01

    Clinical prediction of preterm delivery is largely ineffective, and the mechanism mediating progesterone (P) withdrawal and estrogen activation at the onset of human labor is unclear. Our objectives were to determine associations of rates of change of circulating maternal CRH in midpregnancy with preterm delivery, CRH with estriol (E3) concentrations in late pregnancy, and predelivery changes in the ratios of E3, estradiol (E2), and P. A cohort of 500 pregnant women was followed from first antenatal visits to delivery during the period 2000-2004 at John Hunter Hospital, New South Wales, Australia, a tertiary care obstetric hospital. Unselected subjects were recruited (including women with multiple gestations) and serial blood samples obtained. CRH daily percentage change in term and preterm singletons at 26 wk, ratios E3/E2, P/E3, and P/E2 and the association between E3 and CRH concentrations in the last month of pregnancy (with spontaneous labor onset) were assessed. CRH percentage daily change was significantly higher in preterm than term singletons at 26 wk (medians 3.09 and 2.73; P = 0.003). In late pregnancy, CRH and E3 concentrations were significantly positively associated (P = 0.003). E3/E2 increased, P/E3 decreased, and P/E2 was unchanged in the month before delivery (medians: E3/E2, 7.04 and 10.59, P onset of labor. Our evidence provides a rationale for the use of CRH in predicting preterm birth and informs approaches to delaying labor using P supplementation.

  2. A combination of chondroitinase ABC, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and Nogo A antibody delayed-release microspheres for the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhang; Yueming Song

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) delayed-release microspheres, which were prepared using glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), on the delayed-release, controllability, and protection of GDNF activity. The present study is the first to combine chondroitinase ABC, GDNF, and Nogo A antibody delayed-release microspheres for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Results show that the combined therapy of chondroitinase ABC,GDNF, and Nogo A antibody microspheres can increase the immunoreaction of neurofilament 200in the injured spinal cord, and this therapeutic effect was better than chondroitinase ABC, GDNF, or Nogo A antibody microspheres administered singularly.

  3. The major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii induces release and gene expression of interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Lundgren, Bettina; Levine, S J

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) may play a central role in host defense and pathogenesis during Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. In order to investigate whether the major surface antigen (MSG) of human P. carinii is capable of eliciting...... the release of IL-8 and TNF-alpha, human monocytes were cultured in the presence of purified MSG. MSG-stimulated cells released significant amounts of IL-8 within 4 h, and at 20 h, cells stimulated with MSG released 45.5 +/- 9.3 ng of IL-8/ml versus 3.7 +/- 1.1 ng/ml for control cultures (P = 0...... with 0.2 to 5 microg of MSG/ml (P

  4. Controlled Release of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Osteoconductive and Biodegradable Properties of Beta-Tricalcium Phosphate in a Rat Calvarial Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Minagawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous bone grafts remain the gold standard for the treatment of congenital craniofacial disorders; however, there are potential problems including donor site morbidity and limitations to the amount of bone that can be harvested. Recent studies suggest that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF promotes fracture healing or osteogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether topically applied G-CSF can stimulate the osteoconductive properties of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP in a rat calvarial defect model. A total of 27 calvarial defects 5 mm in diameter were randomly divided into nine groups, which were treated with various combinations of a β-TCP disc and G-CSF in solution form or controlled release system using gelatin hydrogel. Histologic and histomorphometric analyses were performed at eight weeks postoperatively. The controlled release of low-dose (1 μg and 5 μg G-CSF significantly enhanced new bone formation when combined with a β-TCP disc. Moreover, administration of 5 μg G-CSF using a controlled release system significantly promoted the biodegradable properties of β-TCP. In conclusion, the controlled release of 5 μg G-CSF significantly enhanced the osteoconductive and biodegradable properties of β-TCP. The combination of G-CSF slow-release and β-TCP is a novel and promising approach for treating pediatric craniofacial bone defects.

  5. Steroid-induced polycystic ovaries in rats: effect of electro-acupuncture on concentrations of endothelin-1 and nerve growth factor (NGF, and expression of NGF mRNA in the ovaries, the adrenal glands, and the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloe Luigi

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies on the effect of repeated electro-acupuncture (EA treatments in rats with steriod-induced polycystic ovaries (PCO, EA has been shown to modulate nerve growth factor (NGF concentration in the ovaries as well as corticotropin releasing factor (CRF in the median eminence (ME. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that repeated EA treatments modulates sympathetic nerve activity in rats with PCO. This was done by analysing endothelin-1 (ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor involved in ovarian functions, as well as NGF and NGF mRNA expression involved in the pathophysiological process underlying steroid-induced PCO. The main result in the present study was that concentrations of ET-1 in the ovaries were significantly lower in the PCO group receiving EA compared with the healthy control group (p p p p

  6. The synergistic effect of nanotopography and sustained dual release of hydrophobic and hydrophilic neurotrophic factors on human mesenchymal stem cell neuronal lineage commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Benjamin Kim Kiat; Tan, Guo-Dong Sean; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2014-08-01

    A combination of nanotopography and controlled release is a potential platform for neuronal tissue engineering applications. Previous studies showed that combining both physical and chemical guidance was more effective than individual cues in the directional promotion of neurite outgrowth. Nanotopography can direct human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into neuronal lineage, while controlled release of neurotrophic factors can deliver temporally controlled biochemical signals. Hypothesizing that the synergistic effect will enhance neuronal lineage commitment of hMSCs, a fabrication method for multiple neurotrophic factors delivery from a single nanopatterned (350 nm gratings), poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) film was developed and evaluated. Our results showed a synergistic effect on hMSC differentiation cultured on substrates with both nanotopographical and biochemical cues. The protein/drug encapsulation into PCL nanopatterned films was first optimized using a hydrophilic model protein, bovine serum albumin. The hydrophobic retinoic acid (RA) molecule was directly incorporated into PCL films. To achieve sustained release, hydrophilic nerve growth factor (NGF) was first encapsulated within polyelectrolyte complexation fibers before they were embedded within the nanopatterned PCL film. Our results showed that nanotopography on the fabricated polymer films remained intact, while release of bioactive RA and NGF was sustained over a period of 3 weeks. Under the combinatorial effect of physical and biochemical cues, we observed an enhanced upregulation of neuronal genes such as microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and neurofilament light (NFL) as compared with sustained delivery of individual cues and bolus delivery. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that MAP2 and NFL gene upregulation in hMSCs was most pronounced on the nanogratings with sustained release of both RA and NGF. The fabricated platforms supported the sustained delivery of multiple

  7. Membrane vesicles containing matrix metalloproteinase-9 and fibroblast growth factor-2 are released into the extracellular space from mouse mesoangioblast stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Maria Elena; Geraci, Fabiana; Turturici, Giuseppina; Taverna, Simona; Albanese, Ida; Sconzo, Gabriella

    2010-07-01

    Certain proteins, including fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), have proved very effective in increasing the efficacy of mesoangioblast stem cell therapy in repairing damaged tissue. We provide the first evidence that mouse mesoangioblast stem cells release FGF-2 and MMP-9 in their active form through the production of membrane vesicles. These vesicles are produced and turned over continuously, but are stable for some time in the extracellular milieu. Mesoangioblasts shed membrane vesicles even under oxygen tensions that are lower than those typically used for cell culture and more like those of mouse tissues. These findings suggest that mesoangioblasts may themselves secrete paracrine signals and factors that make damaged tissues more amenable to cell therapy through the release of membrane vesicles. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) release after heparin stimulation is increased in Type 1 diabetic patients with albuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, PB; van Oerle, R; Hamulyak, K; Wolffenbuttel, BHR

    2003-01-01

    Aims To study heparin-stimulated TFPI release in relation to complications in Type 1 diabetic patients. Subjects and methods Nineteen uncomplicated Type 1 diabetic patients (group I) were compared with 18 patients with retinopathy (group II), and nine patients with retinopathy and albuminuria (group

  9. Chronic cigarette smoking enhances spontaneous release of tumour necrosis factor-α from alveolar macrophages of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Pessina

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Some biological effects of chronic cigarette smoking (two cigarettes for 2 h, daily for 4 months in rats were evaluated. During the smoking period, body weight of smoker rats was always significantly lower than that of control rats. Immediately after the last smoking session the carboxyhaemoglobin concentration in the blood was about 8.5% and the polymorphonuclear cells in the bronchoalveolar fluid increased significantly. At the same time, enzymatic analyses on the supernatants of bronchoalveolar fluid revealed a significant increase of β-glucuronidase in the smoker group. Alveolar macrophages, collected 0, 8 and 24 h after the last smoking session, significantly increased the generation of superoxide anion and, after incubation for 24 h at 37° C in a humidified atmosphere, released significantly high amounts of TNF-α. When challenged with lipopolysaccharide, alveolar macrophages of smoker rats released much more TNF-α but, in such a case, TNF-α release was about one half of that observed in the control group. Peritoneal macrophages of both control and smoker rats were unable either to generate high levels of superoxide anion or to release significant amounts of TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated the activated state of alveolar macrophages and the resting state of peritoneal macrophages.

  10. The importance of cell density in the interpretation of growth factor effects on collagenase IV activity release and extracellular matrix production from C6 astrocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, M; McDonald, W; Del Maestro, R F

    1998-09-01

    We have examined the influence of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on the release of collagenase type IV activity and the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules using C6 astrocytoma cells in monolayer culture. Collagenase type IV activity was significantly increased in a dose dependent manner in the low cell density group by treatment with FGF-2 and VEGF but significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion in the high cell density group. These results were corroborated using Western blot technique with an antibody to gelatinase A. Addition of exogenous laminin and fibronectin to the media decreased collagenase type IV activity in a dose dependent fashion with the minimum concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml. Laminin and fibronectin reached a concentration of 0.1 microgram/ml in only the high cell density group after treatment with the growth factors tested. These findings indicate that C6 astrocytoma cells appear to have two regulatory mechanisms for collagenase type IV activity which are dependent on cell density. In a low cell density, C6 astrocytoma cells respond to the dominant effect of FGF-2 and VEGF by increasing the release of collagenase IV activity. In a high cell density collagenase type IV activity is decreased due to it's down regulation by released ECM molecules in response to FGF-2 and VEGF. These regulatory mechanisms may be crucial to the understanding of the coordination of tumor-associated angiogenesis by malignant glial cells.

  11. Sustained release of stromal cell derived factor-1 from an antioxidant thermoresponsive hydrogel enhances dermal wound healing in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunxiao; Hoshi, Ryan; Chen, Siyu; Yi, Ji; Duan, Chongwen; Galiano, Robert D; Zhang, Hao F; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2016-09-28

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Altered cell migration due to microcirculatory deficiencies as well as excessive and prolonged reactive oxygen species production are implicated in the delayed healing of DFUs. The goal of this research was to assess whether sustained release of SDF-1, a chemokine that promotes endothelial progenitor cell homing and angiogenesis, from a citrate-based antioxidant thermoresponsive polymer would significantly improve impaired dermal wound healing in diabetes. Poly (polyethylene glycol citrate-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) (PPCN) was synthesized via sequential polycondensation and free radical polymerization reactions. SDF-1 was entrapped via gelation of the PPCN+SDF-1 solution above its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and its release and bioactivity was measured. The effect of sustained release of SDF-1 from PPCN (PPCN+SDF-1) versus a bolus application of SDF-1 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) on wound healing was evaluated in a diabetic murine splinted excisional dermal wound model using gross observation, histology, immunohistochemistry, and optical coherence tomography microangiography. Increasing PPCN concentration decreased SDF-1 release rate. The time to 50% wound closure was 11days, 16days, 14days, and 17days for wounds treated with PPCN+SDF-1, SDF-1 only, PPCN only, and PBS, respectively. Wounds treated with PPCN+SDF-1 had the shortest time for complete healing (24days) and exhibited accelerated granulation tissue production, epithelial maturation, and the highest density of perfused blood vessels. In conclusion, sustained release of SDF-1 from PPCN is a promising and easy to use therapeutic strategy to improve the treatment of chronic non-healing DFUs.

  12. Effects of environmental factors on the production and release of matrix-bound phosphine from lake sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Jinju; WANG Qiang; NIU Xiaojun; WANG Xiaorong

    2007-01-01

    Effects of pH,temperature,and oxygen on the production and release of phosphine in eutrophic lake sediments were investigated under laboratory tests.Results indicated that the elimination of matrix-bound phosphine was accelerated under initial pH 1 or 12.Phosphine levels could reach maximum under initial pH 10.The contents of phosphine increased with the addition of alkali under pH 4-12]The rates of phosphine production and release from lake sediments varied with temperature.20℃ was the most favorable temperature for the production of matrix-bound phosphine.Oxygen showed little effect on matrix-bound phosphine.Matrix-bound phosphine concentrations in lake sediments were concluded to be dependent on a balance of natural generation and depletion processes.

  13. Factors affecting the design of slow release formulations of herbicides based on clay-surfactant systems. A methodological approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Del Carmen Galán-Jiménez

    Full Text Available A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ, mesotrione (MS and flurtamone (FL, whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i neutral: two berols (B048, B266 and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202; (ii cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15. Significant percent of active ingredient (a.i. in the clay/surfactant/herbicide formulations could be achieved only when most of the surfactant was added as micelles. MZ and FL were well solubilized by berols, whereas MS by ET/15. Sorption of surfactants on the clay mineral sepiolite occurred mostly by sorption of micelles, and the loadings exceeded the CEC. Higher loadings were determined for B266 and ET/15. The sorption of surfactants was modeled by using the Langmuir-Scatchard equation which permitted the determination of binding coefficients that could be used for further predictions of the sorbed amounts of surfactants under a wide range of clay/surfactant ratios. A possibility was tested of designing clay-surfactant based formulations of certain herbicides by assuming the same ratio between herbicides and surfactants in the formulations as for herbicides incorporated in micelles in solution. Calculations indicated that satisfactory FL formulations could not be synthesized. The experimental fractions of herbicides in the formulations were in agreement with the predicted ones for MS and MZ. The validity of this approach was confirmed in in vitro release tests that showed a slowing down of the release of a.i. from the designed formulations relative to the technical products. Soil dissipation studies with MS formulations also showed improved bioactivity of the clay-surfactant formulation relative to the commercial one. This methodological approach can be extended to other clay-surfactant systems for

  14. Peptidyl-prolyl isomerase 1 (Pin1) preserves the phosphorylation state of tissue factor and prolongs its release within microvesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettelaie, Camille; Collier, Mary E W; Featherby, Sophie; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2017-09-26

    The exposure and release of TF is regulated by post-translational modifications of its cytoplasmic domain. Here, the potential of Pin1 to interact with the cytoplasmic domain of TF, and the outcome on TF function was examined. MDA-MB-231 and transfected-primary endothelial cells were incubated with either Pin1 deactivator Juglone, or its control Plumbagin, as well as transfected with Pin1-specific or control siRNA. TF release into microvesicles following activation, and also phosphorylation and ubiquitination states of cellular-TF were then assessed. Furthermore, the ability of Pin1 to bind wild-type and mutant forms of overexpressed TF-tGFP was investigated by co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, the ability of recombinant or cellular Pin1 to bind to peptides of the C-terminus of TF, synthesised in different phosphorylation states was examined by binding assays and spectroscopically. Finally, the influence of recombinant Pin1 on the ubiquitination and dephosphorylation of the TF-peptides was examined. Pre-incubation of Pin1 with Juglone but not Plumbagin, reduced TF release as microvesicles and was also achievable following transfection with Pin1-siRNA. This was concurrent with early ubiquitination and dephosphorylation of cellular TF at Ser253. Pin1 co-immunoprecipitated with overexpressed wild-type TF-tGFP but not Ser258→Ala or Pro259→Ala substituted mutants. Pin1 did interact with Ser258-phosphorylated and double-phosphorylated TF-peptides, with the former having higher affinity. Finally, recombinant Pin1 was capable of interfering with the ubiquitination and dephosphorylation of TF-derived peptides. In conclusion, Pin1 is a fast-acting enzyme which may be utilised by cells to protect the phosphorylation state of TF in activated cells prolonging TF activity and release, and therefore ensuring adequate haemostasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Environmental Factors Affecting Production, Release, and Field Populations of Conidia of Alternaria alternata, the Cause of Brown Spot of Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, L W; Solel, Z; Gottwald, T R; Ibañez, A M; Zitko, S E

    1998-11-01

    ABSTRACT Alternaria brown spot, caused by Alternaria alternata pv. citri, affects many tangerines and their hybrids, causing loss of immature leaves and fruit and reducing the marketability of the remaining fruit. Conidial production of A. alternata was greatest on mature leaves moistened and maintained at near 100% relative humidity (RH) for 24 h, whereas leaves that had been soaked or maintained at moderate RH produced few conidia. Conidial release from filter paper cultures and infected leaves was studied in a computer-controlled environmental chamber. Release of large numbers of conidia was triggered from both substrates by sudden drops in RH or by simulated rainfall events. Vibration induced release of low numbers of conidia, but red/infrared irradiation had no effect. In field studies from 1994 to 1996, air sampling with a 7-day recording volumetric spore trap indicated that conidia were present throughout the year with periodic large peaks. The number of conidia captured was not closely related to rainfall amounts or average wind speed, but was weakly related to the duration of leaf wetness. Likewise, disease severity on trap plants placed in the field weekly during 1995 to 1996 was not closely related to conidial numbers or rainfall amounts, but was weakly related to leaf wetness duration. Sufficient inoculum appears to be available to allow infection to occur throughout the year whenever susceptible host tissue and moisture are available.

  16. Enhanced bone tissue formation by alginate gel-assisted cell seeding in porous ceramic scaffolds and sustained release of growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florczyk, Stephen J; Leung, Matthew; Jana, Soumen; Li, Zhensheng; Bhattarai, Narayan; Huang, Jerry I; Hopper, Richard A; Zhang, Miqin

    2012-12-01

    Increasing cell seeding efficiency in a tissue engineering construct can enhance cellular activity and tissue formation in vivo. Here, we demonstrate the use of alginate gel as a secondary phase material in 3D porous β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds to improve cell seeding and provide controlled release of growth factors for bone tissue engineering. Cells were seeded in scaffolds in three ways: conventional seeding (CS), alginate gel-assisted seeding (GS), and alginate GS with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2, GSB). In vitro study with MG-63 cells showed that cell seeding efficiency and cell population 1 week after seeding were significantly elevated in GS and GSB samples compared to CS samples. The GSB system demonstrated a sustained, steady release of BMP-2 over 2 weeks. In vivo, scaffolds seeded with rat mesenchymal stem cells were implanted ectopically into Sprague-Dawley rats for 8 weeks. GS and GSB samples exhibited improved osteogenic activity, with the GSB samples inducing the greatest osteocalcin and osteoid deposition. This study suggests that the alginate gel-assisted cell seeding increases seeding efficiency and allows for sustained release of growth factors. The use of the secondary phase polymer bolsters bone formation in vivo and has the potential for improving outcome in other tissue engineering applications.

  17. Sustained release of hepatocyte growth factor by cationic self-assembling peptide/heparin hybrid hydrogel improves β-cell survival and function through modulating inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyun; Zhang, Lanlan; Cheng, Jingqiu; Lu, Yanrong; Liu, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory response is a major cause of grafts dysfunction in islet transplantation. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) had shown anti-inflammatory activity in multiple diseases. In this study, we aim to deliver HGF by self-assembling peptide/heparin (SAP/Hep) hybrid gel to protect β-cell from inflammatory injury. The morphological and slow release properties of SAPs were analyzed. Rat INS-1 β-cell line was treated with tumor necrosis factor α in vitro and transplanted into rat kidney capsule in vivo, and the viability, apoptosis, function, and inflammation of β-cells were evaluated. Cationic KLD1R and KLD2R self-assembled to nanofiber hydrogel, which showed higher binding affinity for Hep and HGF because of electrostatic interaction. Slow release of HGF from cationic SAP/Hep gel is a two-step mechanism involving binding affinity with Hep and molecular diffusion. In vitro and in vivo results showed that HGF-loaded KLD2R/Hep gel promoted β-cell survival and insulin secretion, and inhibited cell apoptosis, cytokine release, T-cell infiltration, and activation of NFκB/p38 MAPK pathways in β-cells. This study suggested that SAP/Hep gel is a promising carrier for local delivery of bioactive proteins in islet transplantation. PMID:27729786

  18. Adrenomedullin stimulates renin release and renin mRNA in mouse juxtaglomerular granular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Krämer, B K; Kurtz, A

    1997-01-01

    The recently discovered peptide adrenomedullin (AM) alters blood pressure through effects on the resistance vessels. Moreover, AM modifies the secretion of corticotropin and aldosterone and could thereby indirectly influence blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Although...... on juxtaglomerular cells, possibly through increases in cAMP. AM could act as an autocrine/paracrine stimulatory factor in the control of renin secretion and renin gene expression....

  19. Effect of brain-derived neurotropic factor released from hypoxic astrocytes on gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor function in normal hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Liu; Tijun Dai

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes can release increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor during cerebral ischemia, but it is unclear whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor affects γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor function in normal neurons. Results from this study demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid at 100 μmol/L concentration raised the intracellular calcium level in neurons treated with medium from cultured hypoxic astrocytes, and the rise in calcium level could be inhibited by γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor antagonist bicuculline or brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor antagonist k252a. Γ-aminobutyric acid type A-gated current induced by 100 μmol/L γ-aminobutyric acid was in an inward direction in physiological conditions, but shifted to the outward direction in neurons when treated with the medium from cultured hypoxic astrocytes, and this effect could be inhibited by k252a. The reverse potential was shifted leftward to -93 Mv, which could be inhibited by k252a and Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter inhibitor bumetanide. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor was released from hypoxic astrocytes at a high level. It shifted the reverse potential of γ-aminobutyric acid type A-gated currents leftward in normal neurons by enhancing the function of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter, and caused γ-aminobutyric acid to exert an excitatory effect by activating γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor.

  20. Different effect of glutamine on macrophage tumor necrosis factor-alpha release and heat shock protein 72 expression in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengfan Liang; Xuemin Wang; Yuan Yuan; Quanhong Zhou; Chuanyao Tong; Wei Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage plays a vital role in sepsis. However, the modulatory effect of glutamine (Gln) on macrophage/ monocyte-mediate cytokines release is still controver-sial. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gin on macro-phage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release and heat shock protein (HSP) 72 expression in vivo and in vitro. Data from our study indicated that the increase of HSP72 expression was significant at 8 mM of Gln 4 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and became independent of Gin concentrations at 24 h, whereas TNF-α release was dose- and time-dependent on Gln. Heat stress (HS) induced more HSP72 and less TNF-α production compared with the non-HS group. However, the production of TNF-α in cells pretreated with HS was increased with increasing concentrations of Gln. Treatment with various concentrations of Gin for 1 h and then 0.5 mM Gin for 4h led to an increase in HSP72 expression, but not in TNF-α production. In sepsis model mice, Gin treatment led to a significantly lower intracellular TNF-α level and an increase in HSP72 expression in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Our results demonstrate that Gin directly increases TNF-α release of LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macro-phages in a dose-dependent manner, and also decreases mouse peritoneal macrophages TNF-α release in the sepsis model. Taken together, our data suggest that there may be more additional pathways by which Gln modulates cytokine production besides HSP72 expression in macrophage during sepsis.

  1. Phosphorylated form of adrenocorticotropin and corticotropin-like intermediary lobe peptide in human tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massias, J.F.; Hardouin, S.; Vieau, D.; Lenne, F.; Bertagna, X. (Univ Rene Descartes, Paris (France))

    1994-10-01

    Many peptides contribute to the heterogeneity of immunoreactive adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) in man. The use of a radioimmunoassay (RIA) specifically directed against the C-terminal end of ACTH allowed the precise study of the following four peptides: ACTH itself, corticotropin-like intermediary lobe peptide (CLIP) or ACTH and their phosphorylated forms on SeR[sup 31]. The authors have set up a high-performance liquid chromatography system that separates these four molecules in a single run, to establish their relative distributions in tumors responsible for Cushing's disease or for the ectopic ACTH syndrome, and to evaluate the possible interference of phospho-Ser[sup 31] on various RIA or immuno-radiometric assay (IRMA) recognition systems for ACTH. In this system, alkaline phosphatase treatment shifted the retention time of the phosphorylated peptides to that of their non-phosphorylated counterparts. In three tumors responsible for the ectopic ACTH syndrome, CLIP peptides were predominant in two and phosphorylated molecules represented between 22% and 50% of immuno-reactive materials. In five pituitary tumors responsible for Cushing's disease, ACTH peptides were predominant and the phosphorylated molecules varied between 35% and 75% in four of them. In the same tumor the ratios of phosphorylated to non-phosphorylated CLIP or ACTH were identical. The presence of phospho-Ser[sup 31] did not affect the recognition ability of two mid-ACTH and two C-terminal ACTH RIA's, nor of the ACTH IRMA. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Expression, biosynthesis and release of preadipocyte factor-1/ delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 in pancreatic -cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, B N; Carlsson, C; Møldrup, A

    2003-01-01

    Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis and the ov......Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis...

  3. Does Platelet-Rich Plasma Freeze-Thawing Influence Growth Factor Release and Their Effects on Chondrocytes and Synoviocytes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Roffi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PRP cryopreservation remains a controversial point. Our purpose was to investigate the effect of freezing/thawing on PRP molecule release, and its effects on the metabolism of chondrocytes and synoviocytes. PRP was prepared from 10 volunteers, and a half volume underwent one freezing/thawing cycle. IL-1β, HGF, PDGF AB/BB, TGF-β1, and VEGF were assayed 1 hour and 7 days after activation. Culture media of chondrocytes and synoviocytes were supplemented with fresh or frozen PRP, and, at 7 days, proliferation, gene expression, and secreted proteins levels were evaluated. Results showed that in the freeze-thawed PRP the immediate and delayed molecule releases were similar or slightly lower than those in fresh P