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Sample records for corticosterone

  1. Genetics Home Reference: corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels of potassium in the blood (hyponatremia and hyperkalemia, respectively). Individuals with corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency can also ... acid in the blood (metabolic acidosis). The hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis associated with corticosterone methyloxidase deficiency ...

  2. Hippocampal kindling: corticosterone modulation of induced seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, E.R. de; Cottrell, G.A.; Nyakas, C.; Bohus, B.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) and corticosterone replacement was studied on seizures induced by hippocampal kindling. A complex series of changes occurred in after-discharge (AD) and behavioural depression (BD) during the immediate hours after ADX, culminating at day 1 in markedly decreased AD a

  3. Toluene depresses plasma corticosterone in pregnant rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Karin S; Hansen, Åse Marie; Hass, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    Combined exposure to stressors and chemicals may result in synergistic effects. The effects of prenatal exposure to the organic solvent toluene resemble those observed in offspring of gestationally stressed dams, a possible common mechanism being transfer of stress-/toluene-induced increments...... of corticosteroids from the maternal to the foetal compartment. Pregnant rats were subjected to either 1500 ppm toluene 6 hr/day and/or a schedule of "Chronic mild stress" during the last two weeks of gestation. Exposure to toluene was associated with reduced birth weight and lower maternal weight gain, the latter...... being enhanced by maternal stress. A depressant effect of toluene on maternal corticosterone was observed, hence the study does not provide immediate evidence that transfer of elevated levels of corticosterone from the maternal to the foetal compartment mediates the effects of prenatal exposure...

  4. Maternal corticosterone regulates nutrient allocation to fetal growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Owen R; Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda N; Fowden, Abigail L

    2012-11-01

    Stresses during pregnancy that increase maternal glucocorticoids reduce birth weight in several species. However, the role of natural glucocorticoids in the mother in fetal acquisition of nutrients for growth remains unknown. This study aimed to determine whether fetal growth was reduced as a consequence of altered amino acid supply when mice were given corticosterone in their drinking water for 5 day periods in mid to late pregnancy (day, D, 11-16 or D14-19). Compared to controls drinking tap water, fetal weight was always reduced by corticosterone. At D16, corticosterone had no effect on materno-fetal transfer of [(14)C]methylaminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB), although placental MeAIB accumulation and expression of the Slc38a1 and Slc38a2 transporters were increased. However, at D19, 3 days after treatment ended, materno-fetal transfer of MeAIB was increased by 37% (P < 0.04). During treatment at D19, placental accumulation and materno-fetal transfer of MeAIB were reduced by 40% (P < 0.01), although expression of Slc38a1 was again elevated. Permanent reductions in placental vascularity occurred during the earlier but not the later period of treatment. Placental Hsd11b2 expression, which regulates feto-placental glucocorticoid bioavailability, was also affected by treatment at D19 only. Maternal corticosterone concentrations inversely correlated with materno-fetal MeAIB clearance and fetal weight at D19 but not D16. On D19, weight gain of the maternal carcass was normal during corticosterone treatment but reduced in those mice treated from D11 to D16, in which corticosterone levels were lowest. Maternal corticosterone is, therefore, a physiological regulator of the amino acid supply for fetal growth via actions on placental phenotype.

  5. Comparing techniques for measuring corticosterone in tadpoles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pablo BURRACO; Rosa ARRIBAS; Saurabh S KULKARNI; Daniel R BUCHHOLZ; Ivan GOMEZ-MESTRE

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a key role in mediating stress responses in vertebrates. Corticosterone (CORT) is the main glu-cocorticoid produced in amphibians, birds, and reptiles, and regulates several metabolic functions. The most common methods for quantifying CORT are competitive binding immunoassays: radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). RIA has been broadly used since the 1980’s but it requires radioactivity. Commercial EIA kits permit quantifying hormone levels without radioactivity although the requirement for a larger sample volume may be a strong limitation for measurements involving larval amphibians. Here we usedXenopus laevis tadpoles to compare the performance of three commonly used procedures for determination of CORT: RIA on a chloroform extract of whole-body homogenate, EIA on plasma, and EIA on supernatant of whole-body homogenate. We treated tadpoles with exogenous CORT at 0, 25, 50, and 100 nM. RIA could distinguish between 0 and 25 nM, and EIA on plasma between 0 and 50 nM, whereas whole-body homogenate EIA only detected significant differences between 0 and 100 nM. Each procedure presents advantages and disadvantages regarding sensitivity, the use of radioactivity, sample size, handling time, and economic cost. RIA is preferred when studying small-bodied animals from which blood samples cannot be obtained. When CORT level differences are intermediate and blood sampling is possible, EIA on plasma is a good non-radioactive alternative. EIA on whole-body homogenates may be useful to assess qualitative changes in CORT levels when considerable differences are expected. Finally, we discuss our findings in the context of previous studies on CORT in amphibians [Current Zoology 61 (5): 835–845, 2015].

  6. Corticosterone predicts nocturnal restlessness in a long-distance migrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenaar, Cas; Klinner, Thomas; Stöwe, Mareike

    2014-07-01

    The decision made by migrating birds to stop refueling and to depart from stopover depends on cues from innate rhythms, intrinsic factors such as fuel reserves, and extrinsic factors such as weather conditions. The physiological mechanism behind this decision, however, is largely unexplored. The transition from refueling to flight involves an increase in both locomotion and energetic demands. Because, at baseline levels, corticosterone stimulates locomotion and is involved in the mobilization of energy, this hormone could encourage departure of migrants. We collected field data on baseline corticosterone, migratory restlessness, and actual departure in northern wheatears at stopover. Additionally, in refueling long-term captive conspecifics, we measured migratory restlessness while simultaneously collecting droppings to determine glucocorticoid metabolite (GCM) levels. We found that migratory restlessness at stopover was positively correlated with corticosterone level. Similarly, in refueling long-term captive birds, migratory restlessness was positively correlated with concurrently measured GCM levels in droppings. To our best knowledge, our study is the first to simultaneously measure a hormonal signal and migratory restlessness. In conclusion, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that, by increasing locomotor activity, baseline corticosterone is involved in the regulation of departure of migrants at stopover. Future studies could reveal how corticosterone is up-regulated in migrants that are ready to depart.

  7. Corticosterone alters AMPAR mobility and facilitates bidirectional synaptic plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, S.; Henley, J.M.; Holman, D.; Zhou, M.; Wiegert, O.; van Spronsen, M.; Joëls, M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Krugers, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The stress hormone corticosterone has the ability both to enhance and suppress synaptic plasticity and learning and memory processes. However, until today there is very little known about the molecular mechanism that underlies the bidirectional effects of stress and corticosteroid hormon

  8. Corticosterone alters AMPAR mobility and facilitates bidirectional synaptic plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Martin (Stéphane); J.M. Henley (Jeremy); D. Holman (David); M. Zhou (Ming); O. Wiegert (Olof); M. van Spronsena (Myrrhe); M. Joëls (Marian); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper); H.J. Krugers (Harmen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The stress hormone corticosterone has the ability both to enhance and suppress synaptic plasticity and learning and memory processes. However, until today there is very little known about the molecular mechanism that underlies the bidirectional effects of stress and corticost

  9. Hippocampal Fast Glutamatergic Transmission Is Transiently Regulated by Corticosterone Pulsatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarabdjitsingh, R Angela; Pasricha, Natasha; Smeets, Johanna A S; Kerkhofs, Amber; Mikasova, Lenka; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that corticosteroid hormones (such as corticosterone) are released in ultradian pulses as a natural consequence of pituitary-adrenal interactions. All organs, including the brain, are thus exposed to pulsatile changes in corticosteroid hormone level, important to

  10. Corticosterone and Dispersal in Western Screech-Owls (Otus kennicottii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    James R. Belthoff; Alfred M., Jr. Dufty

    1997-01-01

    Belthoff and Dufty (in press) posed a model for dispersal in screech-owls and similar nonmigratory birds. The model is based on interactions among hormonal changes, body condition, and locomotor activity patterns. It predicts that corticosterone increases in blood plasma prior to dispersal under endogenous and exogenous influences, and this increase mediates the...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1200 - Corticosterone test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corticosterone test system. 862.1200 Section 862.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  12. Role of corticosterone on sleep homeostasis induced by REM sleep deprivation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ricardo Borges; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Sleep is regulated by humoral and homeostatic processes. If on one hand chronic elevation of stress hormones impair sleep, on the other hand, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation induces elevation of glucocorticoids and time of REM sleep during the recovery period. In the present study we sought to examine whether manipulations of corticosterone levels during REM sleep deprivation would alter the subsequent sleep rebound. Adult male Wistar rats were fit with electrodes for sleep monitoring and submitted to four days of REM sleep deprivation under repeated corticosterone or metyrapone (an inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis) administration. Sleep parameters were continuously recorded throughout the sleep deprivation period and during 3 days of sleep recovery. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone were also evaluated. Metyrapone treatment prevented the elevation of corticosterone plasma levels induced by REM sleep deprivation, whereas corticosterone administration to REM sleep-deprived rats resulted in lower corticosterone levels than in non-sleep deprived rats. Nonetheless, both corticosterone and metyrapone administration led to several alterations on sleep homeostasis, including reductions in the amount of non-REM and REM sleep during the recovery period, although corticosterone increased delta activity (1.0-4.0 Hz) during REM sleep deprivation. Metyrapone treatment of REM sleep-deprived rats reduced the number of REM sleep episodes. In conclusion, reduction of corticosterone levels during REM sleep deprivation resulted in impairment of sleep rebound, suggesting that physiological elevation of corticosterone levels resulting from REM sleep deprivation is necessary for plentiful recovery of sleep after this stressful event.

  13. Corticosterone and decision-making in male Wistar rats : the effect of corticosterone application in the infralimbic and orbitofrontal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koot, Susanne; Koukou, Magdalini; Baars, Annemarie; Hesseling, Peter; van t Klooster, J.; Joëls, Marian; van den Bos, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    Corticosteroid hormones, released after stress, are known to influence neuronal activity and produce a wide range of effects upon the brain. They affect cognitive tasks including decision-making. Recently it was shown that systemic injections of corticosterone (CORT) disrupt reward-based decision-ma

  14. Repeatability of baseline corticosterone and short-term corticosterone stress responses, and their correlation with testosterone and body condition in a terrestrial breeding anuran (Platymantis vitiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Edward J; Cockrem, John F; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2013-06-01

    Repeatability of physiological response variables, such as the stress hormone corticosterone, across numerous sampling occasions is an important assumption for their use as predictors of behaviour, reproduction and fitness in animals. Very few studies have actually tested this assumption in free-living animals under uncontrolled natural conditions. Non-invasive urine sampling and standard capture handling protocol have enabled the rapid quantification of baseline corticosterone and short-term corticosterone stress responses in anuran amphibians. In this study, established non-invasive methods were used to monitor physiological stress and urinary testosterone levels in male individuals of the terrestrial breeding Fijian ground frog (Platymantis vitiana). Adult male frogs (n = 20) were sampled at nighttime on three repeated occasions at intervals of 14 days during their annual breeding season on Viwa Island, Fiji. All frogs expressed urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to the capture and handling stressor, with some frogs showing consistently higher urinary corticosterone responses than others. Ranks of corticosterone values at 0, 4 and 8 h, and the corrected rank were highly significant (r = 0.75-0.99) between the three repeated sampling occasions. Statistical repeatabilities were high for baseline corticosterone (r = 0.973) and for corticosterone values at 2 h (r = 0.862), 4 h (r = 0.861), 6 h (r = 0.820) and 8 h (r = 0.926), and also for the total (inclusive of baseline corticosterone values) and the corrected integrated responses (index of the acute response) [r = 0.867 and r = 0.870]. Urinary testosterone levels also showed high statistical repeatability (r = 0.78). Furthermore, variation in baseline and short-term corticosterone stress responses was greater between individuals than within individuals. Baseline urinary corticosterone was significantly negatively correlated with the corrected integrated corticosterone response (r = -0.3, p breeding period

  15. Protecting embryos from stress: Corticosterone effects and the corticosterone response to capture and confinement during pregnancy in a live-bearing lizard (Hoplodactylus maculatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, A.; Tyrrell, C.L.; Preest, M.R.; Thorburn, D.; Guillette, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    Hormones in the embryonic environment, including those of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, have profound effects on development in eutherian mammals. However, little is known about their effects in reptiles that have independently evolved viviparity. We investigated whether exogenous corticosterone affected embryonic development in the viviparous gecko Hoplodactylus maculatus, and whether pregnant geckos have a corticosterone response to capture and confinement that is suppressed relative to that in non-pregnant (vitellogenic) females and males. Corticosterone implants (5 mg, slow-release) administered to females in mid-pregnancy caused a large elevation of corticosterone in maternal plasma (Pgrowth and development (P=0.069-0.073), developmental abnormalities and eventual abortions. Cool temperature produced similar reductions in embryonic growth and development (P???0.036 cf. warm controls), but pregnancies were eventually successful. Despite the potentially harmful effects of elevated plasma corticosterone, pregnant females did not suppress their corticosterone response to capture and confinement relative to vitellogenic females, and both groups of females had higher responses than males. Future research should address whether lower maternal doses of corticosterone produce non-lethal effects on development that could contribute to phenotypic plasticity. Corticosterone implants also led to increased basking in pregnant females (P<0.001), and basal corticosterone in wild geckos (independent of reproductive condition) was positively correlated with body temperature (P<0.001). Interactions between temperature and corticosterone may have broad significance to other terrestrial ectotherms, and body temperature should be considered as a variable influencing plasma corticosterone concentrations in all future studies on reptiles. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Beeswax corticosterone implants produce long-term elevation of plasma corticosterone and influence condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michelle L; Davies, Scott; Moore, Ignacio T; Schoenle, Laura A; Kerman, Kaan; Vernasco, Ben J; Sewall, Kendra B

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids can play a critical role in modulating life-history trade-offs. However, studying the effects of glucocorticoids on life-history often requires experimentally elevating plasma glucocorticoid concentrations for several weeks within normal physiological limits and without repeated handling of the animal. Recently, implants made of beeswax and testosterone (T) were shown to have release dynamics superior to some currently available T implants, and these beeswax implants dissolved, eliminating the need to recapture the animal. We evaluated the utility of beeswax implants containing four different dosages of corticosterone (CORT; the primary glucocorticoid in birds) and their effect on several condition indices in a captive colony of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). The three implants with the greatest CORT doses (0.05, 0.1, and 0.5mg) produced spikes in plasma CORT concentrations 20h after treatment, but were within the limits that zebra finches may normally experience. The 0.5mg CORT implant elevated plasma CORT between typical baseline and restraint stress levels reported in other studies of zebra finches for the entire 35day experiment. Birds in the 0.5mg implant group were heavier, had greater furcular fat scores, and had lower hematocrit than birds in the control and other CORT implant groups. Beeswax CORT implants are a low cost method of elevating plasma CORT for a prolonged time. Furthermore, because there is no need to remove these implants at the end of a study, this method may be amenable to studies of free-ranging animals.

  17. Corticosterone responses to capture and restraint in emperor and Adelie penguins in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrem, John F; Potter, Murray A; Barrett, D Paul; Candy, E Jane

    2008-03-01

    Birds respond to capture, handling and restraint with increased secretion of corticosterone, a glucocorticoid hormone that helps birds adjust to stressful situations. Hoods are reported to calm birds, but possible effects of hoods on corticosterone responses have not been reported for any bird. Corticosterone responses to restraint in Adelie penguins held by their legs with their head covered by a hood were markedly lower than responses of penguins restrained in a mesh bag inside a cardboard box (corticosterone at 30 min 15.69+/-1.72 cf. 28.32+/-2.75 ng/ml). The birds restrained by the two methods were sampled at the same location but in different years, so the differences in corticosterone responses cannot unequivocally be ascribed to an effect of hoods to reduce corticosterone responses. Corticosterone responses have been measured in some penguins, but not in the largest, the emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri). The relationship between body mass and corticosterone responses to capture and restraint in penguins was examined in emperor penguins captured on sea ice in McMurdo Sound and Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) captured at Cape Bird, Ross Island, Antarctica. Total integrated corticosterone responses were higher in the emperor than the Adelie penguins, but corrected integrated corticosterone responses, which represent the increase in corticosterone from initial concentrations and hence the corticosterone response to restraint, were the same. The results for the emperor and Adelie penguins, together with data from other penguin species, suggest that there is no relationship between the size of corticosterone responses and body mass in penguins.

  18. The metabolic clearance rate of corticosterone in lean and obese male Zucker rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, B.D.; Corll, C.B.; Porter, J.R.

    1989-06-01

    The obese Zucker rat is an animal model of human juvenile-onset obesity. These rats exhibit numerous endocrine and metabolic abnormalities. Adrenalectomy of obese rats has been shown to reduce or reverse several of these abnormalities, thereby implying that corticosterone may contribute to the expression of obesity in this animal. Furthermore, it has been shown that the circadian rhythm of plasma corticosterone is disturbed in obese Zucker rats resulting in elevated morning plasma corticosterone concentrations in obese rats as compared to lean rats. In a effort to better elucidate the mechanism of the elevated morning levels of plasma corticosterone, the metabolic clearance rate of corticosterone was determined in the morning for lean and obese male Zucker rats (12 to 20 weeks). Additionally, the biliary and urinary excretion of labeled corticosterone and/or its metabolites were determined. The metabolic clearance rate of corticosterone was significantly greater in obese rats than in their lean counterparts. Both the metabolic clearance rate and the volume of compartments significantly correlated with body weight. No correlation was found between body weight and the elimination rate constant. The increased metabolic clearance rate of obese rats appeared to be due to an increase in the physiologic distribution of corticosterone and not to an alteration in the enzymes responsible for corticosterone metabolism. It appears that the metabolic clearance rate of corticosterone in obese Zucker rats does not contribute to elevated morning concentrations of plasma corticosterone previously observed in these animals. It suggests that the adrenal corticosterone secretion rate must actually be greater than one would expect from the plasma corticosterone concentrations alone.

  19. [Corticosterone level in testes of rats in varying adrenal functional activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokha, A M; Doroshkevich, N A; Voronov, P P; Antsulevich, S N; Kashko, M F

    1992-01-01

    The presence of corticosterone in rat testes was demonstrated by combining HPLC and RIA techniques. The presence of the hormone was also taken into account. The testicular corticosterone content was shown to depend upon the functional activity of the adrenals and to diminish acutely after adrenalectomy. Analysis of correlation between the concentration of the hormones in the plasma and testes has shown corticosterone to be formed by testicular cells.

  20. Yolk and albumen corticosterone concentrations in eggs laid by white versus brown caged laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navara, K J; Pinson, S E

    2010-07-01

    Maternal stress in birds can have permanent transgenerational effects through the transmission of stress hormones to offspring via the egg yolk. Previous studies have shown that White Leghorn hens show a heightened response to stress compared with Hy-Line Brown hens, producing significantly more corticosterone and displaying longer bouts of tonic immobility after handling, whereas baseline levels of corticosterone are similar between the strains. We tested the hypothesis that higher stress responsiveness would correspond to chronic accumulation and thus higher concentrations of corticosterone in egg yolks after exposure to stressors associated with routine maintenance. Eggs were collected from white and brown hens that were undisturbed except for daily feeding and routine egg collections. Corticosterone was quantified in plasma, egg yolks, and albumen and compared between strains. We predicted that corticosterone concentrations in yolk would be higher in eggs from white versus brown hens but that albumen corticosterone would not differ between strains due to the short term of albumen deposition. As predicted, yolk corticosterone concentrations were significantly higher in eggs produced by white hens, approximately twice those found in eggs laid by brown hens. Plasma and albumen concentrations of corticosterone were similar between groups. These results suggest that offspring hatching from eggs laid by White Leghorn hens are exposed to significantly more corticosterone through concentration in the egg yolk, which could permanently imprint offspring physiology and behavior.

  1. Corticosterone and fear behaviour in white and brown caged laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisse, F; Cockrem, J F

    2006-04-01

    Physiological and behavioural measures of stress in caged hens on a commercial farm were compared between White Leghorn and brown Hyline strains, and between three tiers of cages. Blood and faecal samples were collected from undisturbed birds for corticosterone measurements. Plasma corticosterone responses to a stressor were measured by the collection of blood samples after 15, 30, and 60 min of a handling stressor. Tonic immobility and novel object tests were used to measure fear behaviour. Plasma corticosterone in undisturbed hens and faecal corticosterone did not differ between White Leghorn and brown Hyline hens, whereas the plasma corticosterone response to a handling stressor was greater in White Leghorns. The duration of tonic immobility, latency to first head movement and number of head movements in tonic immobility tests were greater in white than brown birds, whereas the number of inductions was less for tonic immobility tests. There were no differences between the strains in their responses to a novel object. There were no differences between tiers in plasma corticosterone or corticosterone responses or tonic immobility responses, and no consistent differences in responses of birds to a novel object. This is the first study in which plasma and faecal corticosterone concentrations and fear behaviour have been measured together in laying hens, and the first description of plasma corticosterone responses to handling over 60 min for caged laying hens on a commercial farm. The study has shown the value of measuring endocrine and behavioural variables together to provide objective data on characteristics of different strains of hens.

  2. Mercury correlates with altered corticosterone but not testosterone or estradiol concentrations in common loons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Melinda D; Evers, David C; Kenow, Kevin P; Meyer, Michael W; Pokras, Mark; Romero, L Michael

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the relation between environmental mercury exposure and corticosterone concentrations in free-living adult common loons (Gavia immer). We determined blood and feather mercury concentrations and compared them to testosterone, estradiol, and stress-induced plasma corticosterone concentrations. Although neither testosterone nor estradiol correlated with Hg levels, there was a robust positive relation between blood Hg and stress-induced corticosterone concentrations in males, but not in females. The lack of an effect in females may have been due to overall less contamination in females. There were no significant correlations between feather Hg and stress-induced corticosterone in either sex. To help determine whether Hg had a causal effect on corticosterone, we investigated the impact of experimental Hg intake on the corticosterone stress response in captive juvenile loons. Juveniles were subjected to three different feeding regimes: 0, 0.4 and 1.2μg Hg (as MeHgCL)/g wet weight (ww) fish. We then measured baseline and 30min post-solitary confinement stressor corticosterone concentrations. The Hg fed chicks exhibited a decreased ability to mount a stress response. From these data, we conclude that Hg contamination does appear to alter the corticosterone response to stress, but not in a consistent predictable pattern. Regardless of the direction of change, however, exposure to mercury contamination and the resulting impact on the corticosterone stress response in common loons may substantially impact health, fitness and survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition of proliferation, migration and proteolysis contribute to corticosterone-mediated inhibition of angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Shikatani

    Full Text Available The angiostatic nature of pharmacological doses of glucocorticoid steroids is well known. However, the consequences of pathophysiological elevation of endogenous glucocorticoids are not well established. In the current study, we hypothesized that the angiostatic effect of corticosterone, an endogenous glucocorticoid in rodents, occurs through multi-faceted alterations in skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and proteolysis. Chronic corticosterone treatment significantly reduced the capillary to fiber ratio in the tibialis anterior muscle compared to that of placebo-treated rats. Corticosterone inhibited endothelial cell sprouting from capillary segments ex vivo. Similarly, 3-dimensional endothelial cell spheroids treated with corticosterone for 48 hours showed evidence of sprout regression and reduced sprout length. Endothelial cell proliferation was reduced in corticosterone treated cells, coinciding with elevated FoxO1 and reduced VEGF production. Corticosterone treated endothelial cells exhibited reduced migration, which correlated with a reduction in RhoA activity. Furthermore, corticosterone treated endothelial cells in both 3-dimensional and monolayer cultures had decreased MMP-2 production and activation resulting in decreased proteolysis by endothelial cells, limiting their angiogenic potential. Promoter assays revealed that corticosterone treatment transcriptionally repressed MMP-2, which may map to a predicted GRE between -1510 and -1386 bp of the MMP-2 promoter. Additionally, Sp1, a known transcriptional activator of MMP-2 was decreased following corticosterone treatment. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms by which pathophysiological levels of endogenous glucocorticoids may exert angiostatic effects.

  4. Regulation of corticosterone production by vasopressin during water restriction and after drinking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotus, Cheryl; Osborn, John W; Nieto, Pilar Ariza; Engeland, William C

    2003-12-01

    Plasma vasopressin (VP) and corticosterone have each been shown to be rapidly suppressed after drinking in different models of osmotic stimulation in rats; however, no causal relationship between these responses has been investigated. Studies were performed to determine if plasma VP and corticosterone are reduced in parallel after drinking and if manipulation of plasma VP affects plasma, ACTH corticotropins and corticosterone in a model of water restriction. A strong correlation between changes in plasma VP and corticosterone, but not between plasma ACTH and corticosterone, was observed after drinking induced by 6 days of water restriction. Similarly, ingestion of isotonic saline resulted in a biphasic VP response that was paralleled by adrenal and plasma corticosterone, but not by plasma ACTH. Administration of an immunoneutralizing antibody directed against VP resulted in a rapid decrease in plasma corticosterone, but not ACTH, in water-restricted rats, but not in rats receiving water ad libitum. These data suggest that during dehydration, elevated plasma VP can stimulate the production of corticosterone by the adrenal, independently of ACTH. Moreover, they support the hypothesis that the decline in corticosterone after restriction-induced drinking is due, in part, to a decline in plasma VP.

  5. Mercury correlates with altered corticosterone but not testosterone or estradiol concentrations in common loons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceshini, Melinda D.; Evers, David C.; Kenow, Kevin P.; Meyer, Michael W.; Pokras, Mark; Romero, L. Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the relation between environmental mercury exposure and corticosterone concentrations in free-living adult common loons (Gavia immer). We determined blood and feather mercury concentrations and compared them to testosterone, estradiol, and stress-induced plasma corticosterone concentrations. Although neither testosterone nor estradiol correlated with Hg levels, there was a robust positive relation between blood Hg and stress-induced corticosterone concentrations in males, but not in females. The lack of an effect in females may have been due to overall less contamination in females. There were no significant correlations between feather Hg and stress-induced corticosterone in either sex. To help determine whether Hg had a causal effect on corticosterone, we investigated the impact of experimental Hg intake on the corticosterone stress response in captive juvenile loons. Juveniles were subjected to three different feeding regimes: 0, 0.4 and 1.2 μg Hg (as MeHgCL)/g wet weight (ww) fish. We then measured baseline and 30 min post-solitary confinement stressor corticosterone concentrations. The Hg fed chicks exhibited a decreased ability to mount a stress response. From these data, we conclude that Hg contamination does appear to alter the corticosterone response to stress, but not in a consistent predictable pattern. Regardless of the direction of change, however, exposure to mercury contamination and the resulting impact on the corticosterone stress response in common loons may substantially impact health, fitness and survival.

  6. Corticosterone responses and personality in birds: Individual variation and the ability to cope with environmental changes due to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrem, John F

    2013-09-01

    Birds can respond to an internal or external stimulus with activation of the HPA axis and secretion of corticosterone. There is considerable individual variation in corticosterone responses, and individual responses can be very different from the mean response for a group of birds. Corticosterone responses and behavioural responses to environmental stimuli are determined by individual characteristics called personality. It is proposed that birds with low corticosterone responses and proactive personalities are likely to be more successful (have greater fitness) in constant or predictable conditions, whilst birds with reactive personalities and high corticosterone responses will be more successful in changing or unpredictable conditions. The relationship between corticosterone responses and fitness thus depends on the prevailing environmental conditions, so birds with either low or high corticosterone responses can have the greatest fitness and be most successful, but in different situations. It is also proposed that birds with reactive personalities and high corticosterone responses will be better able to cope with environmental changes due to climate change than birds with proactive personalities and relatively low corticosterone responses. Phenotypic plasticity in corticosterone responses can be quantified using a reaction norm approach, and reaction norms can be used to determine the degree of plasticity in corticosterone responses of individual birds, and mean levels of plasticity in responses of species of birds. Individual corticosterone responses and personality, and reaction norms for corticosterone responses, can in future be used to predict the ability of birds to cope with environmental changes due to climate change.

  7. Role of corticosterone on sleep homeostasis induced by REM sleep deprivation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Borges Machado

    Full Text Available Sleep is regulated by humoral and homeostatic processes. If on one hand chronic elevation of stress hormones impair sleep, on the other hand, rapid eye movement (REM sleep deprivation induces elevation of glucocorticoids and time of REM sleep during the recovery period. In the present study we sought to examine whether manipulations of corticosterone levels during REM sleep deprivation would alter the subsequent sleep rebound. Adult male Wistar rats were fit with electrodes for sleep monitoring and submitted to four days of REM sleep deprivation under repeated corticosterone or metyrapone (an inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis administration. Sleep parameters were continuously recorded throughout the sleep deprivation period and during 3 days of sleep recovery. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone were also evaluated. Metyrapone treatment prevented the elevation of corticosterone plasma levels induced by REM sleep deprivation, whereas corticosterone administration to REM sleep-deprived rats resulted in lower corticosterone levels than in non-sleep deprived rats. Nonetheless, both corticosterone and metyrapone administration led to several alterations on sleep homeostasis, including reductions in the amount of non-REM and REM sleep during the recovery period, although corticosterone increased delta activity (1.0-4.0 Hz during REM sleep deprivation. Metyrapone treatment of REM sleep-deprived rats reduced the number of REM sleep episodes. In conclusion, reduction of corticosterone levels during REM sleep deprivation resulted in impairment of sleep rebound, suggesting that physiological elevation of corticosterone levels resulting from REM sleep deprivation is necessary for plentiful recovery of sleep after this stressful event.

  8. Rapid stress-induced corticosterone rise in the hippocampus reverses serial memory retrieval pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, F; Tronche, C; Piérard, C; Liscia, P; Drouet, I; Coutan, M; Béracochéa, D

    2010-01-01

    We previously showed that an acute stress (electric footshocks) induced both a rapid plasma corticosterone rise and a reversal of serial memory retrieval pattern in a contextual serial discrimination (CSD) task. This study is aimed at determining (i) if the rapid stress effects on CSD performance are mediated by the hippocampus; (ii) if hippocampal corticosterone membrane receptor activation is involved in the rapid stress effects on CSD performance. In experiment 1, microdialysis in the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) was used to measure the stress-induced corticosterone rise; in parallel, the effect of acute stress on CSD performance was evaluated. In addition, the functional involvement of corticosterone in the behavioral effects of stress was assessed by administering metyrapone, a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor, before stress. In experiment 2, the involvement of hippocampal corticosterone membrane receptors in the stress-induced reversal of CSD performance was studied by injecting corticosterone-bovine serum albumin (BSA) (a membrane-impermeable complex) in the dHPC in non stressed mice. Results showed that (i) the acute stress induced a rapid (15 min) and transitory (90 min) corticosterone rise into the hippocampus dHPC, and a reversal of serial memory retrieval pattern; (ii) both the endocrinal and memory stress-induced effects were blocked by metyrapone; (iii) corticosterone-BSA injection into the dHPC in non stressed mice mimicked the effects of stress on serial retrieval pattern. Overall, our study is first to show that (i) a rapid stress-induced corticosterone rise into the dHPC transitorily reverses serial memory retrieval pattern and (ii) hippocampal corticosterone membrane receptors activation is involved in the rapid effects of acute stress on serial memory retrieval.

  9. The human fetus preferentially secretes corticosterone, rather than cortisol, in response to intra-partum stressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Wynne-Edwards

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Fetal stress is relevant to newborn outcomes. Corticosterone is rarely quantified in human clinical endocrinology and is found at much lower concentrations than cortisol. However, fetal corticosterone is a candidate hormone as a fetal stress signal. OBJECTIVE: Test the hypothesis that preferential fetal corticosterone synthesis occurs in response to fetal intra-partum stress. DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparison of paired serum corticosteroid concentrations in umbilical artery and vein from 300 women providing consent at admission to a General Hospital Labor and Delivery unit. Pre-term and multiple births were excluded, leaving 265 healthy deliveries. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Corticosterone and cortisol concentrations determined by LC-MS/MS for umbilical cord venous (V and arterial (A samples and used to calculate fetal synthesis (A-V and proportional fetal synthesis ([A-V]/V. Chart-derived criteria stratified samples by type of delivery, maternal regional analgesia, augmentation of contractions, and clinical rationale for emergent Caesarian delivery. RESULTS: Cortisol concentrations were higher than corticosterone concentrations; however, the fetus preferentially secretes corticosterone (148% vs 49% proportional increase for cortisol and differentially secretes corticosterone as fetal stress increases. Fetal corticosterone synthesis is elevated after passage through the birth canal relative to Caesarian deliveries. For vaginal deliveries, augmentation of contractions does not affect corticosteroid concentrations whereas maternal regional analgesia decreases venous (maternal concentrations and increases fetal synthesis. Fetal corticosterone synthesis is also elevated after C-section indicated by cephalopelvic disproportion after labor, whereas cortisol is not. CONCLUSIONS: The full-term fetus preferentially secretes corticosterone in response to fetal stress during delivery. Fetal corticosterone could serve as a biomarker of fetal stress.

  10. The human fetus preferentially secretes corticosterone, rather than cortisol, in response to intra-partum stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E; Edwards, Heather E; Hancock, Trina M

    2013-01-01

    Fetal stress is relevant to newborn outcomes. Corticosterone is rarely quantified in human clinical endocrinology and is found at much lower concentrations than cortisol. However, fetal corticosterone is a candidate hormone as a fetal stress signal. Test the hypothesis that preferential fetal corticosterone synthesis occurs in response to fetal intra-partum stress. Cross-sectional comparison of paired serum corticosteroid concentrations in umbilical artery and vein from 300 women providing consent at admission to a General Hospital Labor and Delivery unit. Pre-term and multiple births were excluded, leaving 265 healthy deliveries. Corticosterone and cortisol concentrations determined by LC-MS/MS for umbilical cord venous (V) and arterial (A) samples and used to calculate fetal synthesis (A-V) and proportional fetal synthesis ([A-V]/V). Chart-derived criteria stratified samples by type of delivery, maternal regional analgesia, augmentation of contractions, and clinical rationale for emergent Caesarian delivery. Cortisol concentrations were higher than corticosterone concentrations; however, the fetus preferentially secretes corticosterone (148% vs 49% proportional increase for cortisol) and differentially secretes corticosterone as fetal stress increases. Fetal corticosterone synthesis is elevated after passage through the birth canal relative to Caesarian deliveries. For vaginal deliveries, augmentation of contractions does not affect corticosteroid concentrations whereas maternal regional analgesia decreases venous (maternal) concentrations and increases fetal synthesis. Fetal corticosterone synthesis is also elevated after C-section indicated by cephalopelvic disproportion after labor, whereas cortisol is not. The full-term fetus preferentially secretes corticosterone in response to fetal stress during delivery. Fetal corticosterone could serve as a biomarker of fetal stress.

  11. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Depressive-Like Behaviors and Metabolic Abnormalities Induced by Chronic Corticosterone Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic glucocorticoid exposure is known to cause depression and metabolic disorders. It is critical to improve abnormal metabolic status as well as depressive-like behaviors in patients with long-term glucocorticoid therapy. This study aimed to investigate the effects of resveratrol on the depressive-like behaviors and metabolic abnormalities induced by chronic corticosterone injection. Male ICR mice were administrated corticosterone (40 mg/kg by subcutaneous injection for three weeks. Resveratrol (50 and 100 mg/kg, fluoxetine (20 mg/kg and pioglitazone (10 mg/kg were given by oral gavage 30 min prior to corticosterone administration. The behavioral tests showed that resveratrol significantly reversed the depressive-like behaviors induced by corticosterone, including the reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. Moreover, resveratrol also increased the secretion of insulin, reduced serum level of glucose and improved blood lipid profiles in corticosterone-treated mice without affecting normal mice. However, fluoxetine only reverse depressive-like behaviors, and pioglitazone only prevent the dyslipidemia induced by corticosterone. Furthermore, resveratrol and pioglitazone decreased serum level of glucagon and corticosterone. The present results indicated that resveratrol can ameliorate depressive-like behaviors and metabolic abnormalities induced by corticosterone, which suggested that the multiple effects of resveratrol could be beneficial for patients with depression and/or metabolic syndrome associated with long-term glucocorticoid therapy.

  12. Corticosterone treatment of pregnant low dose endotoxin-treated rats : Inhibition of the inflammatory response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, MM; Slot, K; Koiter, TR; Schuiling, GA

    2000-01-01

    PROBLEM: Can the endotoxin-induced inflammatory response, underlying experimental pre-eclampsia, in pregnant rats be inhibited by corticosterone? METHOD OF STUDY: On day 10 of pregnancy, rats were implanted with pellets containing 25% corticosterone and 75% cholesterol (n = 10) or with 100% choleste

  13. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Depressive-Like Behaviors and Metabolic Abnormalities Induced by Chronic Corticosterone Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Ya-Min; Shen, Ji-Duo; Chen, Jun-Jie; Pei, Yang-Yi; Fang, Xiao-Yan

    2016-10-13

    Chronic glucocorticoid exposure is known to cause depression and metabolic disorders. It is critical to improve abnormal metabolic status as well as depressive-like behaviors in patients with long-term glucocorticoid therapy. This study aimed to investigate the effects of resveratrol on the depressive-like behaviors and metabolic abnormalities induced by chronic corticosterone injection. Male ICR mice were administrated corticosterone (40 mg/kg) by subcutaneous injection for three weeks. Resveratrol (50 and 100 mg/kg), fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) and pioglitazone (10 mg/kg) were given by oral gavage 30 min prior to corticosterone administration. The behavioral tests showed that resveratrol significantly reversed the depressive-like behaviors induced by corticosterone, including the reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. Moreover, resveratrol also increased the secretion of insulin, reduced serum level of glucose and improved blood lipid profiles in corticosterone-treated mice without affecting normal mice. However, fluoxetine only reverse depressive-like behaviors, and pioglitazone only prevent the dyslipidemia induced by corticosterone. Furthermore, resveratrol and pioglitazone decreased serum level of glucagon and corticosterone. The present results indicated that resveratrol can ameliorate depressive-like behaviors and metabolic abnormalities induced by corticosterone, which suggested that the multiple effects of resveratrol could be beneficial for patients with depression and/or metabolic syndrome associated with long-term glucocorticoid therapy.

  14. Influence of bombesin, CCK, secretin and CRF on corticosterone concentration in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, L D; Porter, J R

    1988-01-01

    The ingestion of food increases adrenoglucocorticoid secretion in humans and rats and influences the circadian periodicity of ACTH and corticosterone in rats fed on restricted schedules. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the brain-gut polypeptides CCK33 (10 U/kg), bombesin (10 micrograms/kg) and secretin (10 U/kg) on corticosterone concentrations in fed rats. The responses were compared to that of CRF (1 micrograms/kg). All experiments were begun at 10 a.m., 3 hours after the lights came on. The rats were given single, IP injections of peptide or vehicle (1 ml/kg) then sacrificed 0, 5, 10, 15, 30 or 60 minutes later. Corticosterone was measured fluorometrically. The control injection (vehicle) alone caused a mild stress response with corticosterone levels peaking between 10 and 15 minutes after the injection then returning to baseline. Both CCK33 and bombesin significantly increased corticosterone to approximately 2.5-fold above the control level in a fashion similar to that of CRF. In all three instances corticosterone levels peaked at 30 minutes post-injection. Secretin had no effect on corticosterone secretion. None of the peptides tested stimulated in vitro corticosterone output from isolated adrenal cells. These findings indicate that both CCK and bombesin cause pituitary-adrenal activation which may be related to the response of this system to food ingestion.

  15. Treatment with corticosterone delays cutaneous wound healing in male and female salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jessica R; Woodley, Sarah K

    2015-05-15

    In vertebrates, exposure to stressors and stress hormones has a number of physiological effects including modulation of immune function. These effects on immune function have been well studied in mammals, but less is known in other groups, in particular amphibians. To analyze the effects of exposure to stressors and the stress hormone corticosterone, we monitored cutaneous wound healing as a measure of integrated immunity in male and female semi-terrestrial salamanders (Desmognathus ochrophaeus) that were chased to induce endogenous release of corticosterone or were treated with physiologically relevant doses of corticosterone. As predicted, subjects treated daily with corticosterone healed more slowly than did controls. In contrast, subjects that had been chased daily healed at the same rate as controls. Surprisingly, repeated chasing did not elevate plasma corticosterone despite causing drops in body mass and survival. Additionally, females healed more slowly than males, possibly due to energetic constraints.

  16. Long-Term Exposure to High Corticosterone Levels Inducing a Decrease of Adenylate Kinase 1 Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yu'nan; SHEN Jia; SU Hui; HUANG Yufang; XING Dongming; DU Lijun

    2009-01-01

    Corticosterone, a principal glucocorticoid synthesized in the rodent adrenal cortex, can be cumula-tively toxic to hippocampal neurons, the cause of which is not known. The present study determined whether the cytosol adenylate kinase (AK) system was involved in the neuronal damage induced by long-term exposure to high corticosterone levels. We investigated the effects of long-term exposure to high corticosterone levels on AK1 activity, AK1 mRNA expression, and energy levels in cultured hippocampal neurons. The results show that long-term exposure to high corticosterone levels induces a reduction of the cultured hippocampal neuron viability, significantly reduces energy levels, and causes a time-dependant re-duction of the AK1 activity. These findings indicate that changes in the AK system might be the mechanism underlying neuronal damage induced by long-term exposure to high corticosterone levels.

  17. Distribution and time course of corticosterone excretion in faeces and urine of female mice with varying systemic concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Hau, Jann; Jacobsen, Kirsten R;

    2010-01-01

    distribution and time course of corticosterone excretion, after intravenous injection of varying corticosterone concentrations, was investigated in female mice. Female BALB/c mice excreted 60% of all corticosterone in the urine with an approximate delay of 5h from tail vein administration. The remaining 40...

  18. Are corticosterone levels a good indicator of food availability and reproductive performance in a kittiwake colony?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanctot, Richard B.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Gill, V.A.; Eens, M.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the use of corticosterone to gauge forage availability and predict reproductive performance in black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) breeding in Alaska during 1999 and 2000. We modeled the relationship between baseline levels of corticosterone and a suite of individual and temporal characteristics of the sampled birds. We also provided supplemental food to a sample of pairs and compared their corticosterone levels with that of pairs that were not fed. Corticosterone levels were a good predictor of forage availability in some situations, although inconsistencies between corticosterone levels and reproductive performance of fed and unfed kittiwakes suggested that this was not always the case. In general, higher corticosterone levels were found in birds that lacked breeding experience and in birds sampled shortly after arriving from their wintering grounds. All parameters investigated, however, explained only a small proportion of the variance in corticosterone levels. We also investigated whether corticosterone, supplemental feeding, year of the study, breeding experience, body weight, and sex of a bird were able to predict laying, hatching, and fledging success in kittiwakes. Here, breeding experience, year of the study, and body weight were the best predictors of a bird's performance. Corticosterone level and supplemental feeding were good predictors of kittiwake reproductive performance in some cases. For example, corticosterone levels of birds sampled during the arrival stage reliably predicted laying success, but were less reliable at predicting hatching and fledging success. Counts of active nests with eggs or chicks may be more reliable estimates of the actual productivity of the colony. Supplemental feeding had strong effects on kittiwake productivity when natural forage was poor, but had little effect when natural forage was plentiful. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  19. Sympathetic nervous system contributes to enhanced corticosterone levels following chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, Steven A; Ionadi, Amy; McKay, Erin; Douglas, Xavier; Johnson, John D

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to chronic stress often elevates basal circulating glucocorticoids during the circadian nadir and leads to exaggerated glucocorticoid production following exposure to subsequent stressors. While glucocorticoid production is primarily mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, there is evidence that the sympathetic nervous system can affect diurnal glucocorticoid production by direct actions at the adrenal gland. Experiments here were designed to examine the role of the HPA and sympathetic nervous system in enhancing corticosterone production following chronic stress. Rats were exposed to a four-day stress paradigm or control conditions then exposed to acute restraint stress on the fifth day to examine corticosterone and ACTH responses. Repeated stressor exposure resulted in a small increase in corticosterone, but not ACTH, during the circadian nadir, and also resulted in exaggerated corticosterone production 5, 10, and 20min following restraint stress. While circulating ACTH levels increased after 5min of restraint, levels were not greater in chronic stress animals compared to controls until following 20min. Administration of astressin (a CRH antagonist) prior to restraint stress significantly reduced ACTH responses but did not prevent the sensitized corticosterone response in chronic stress animals. In contrast, administration of chlorisondamine (a ganglionic blocker) returned basal corticosterone levels in chronic stress animals to normal levels and reduced early corticosterone production following restraint (up to 10min) but did not block the exaggerated corticosterone response in chronic stress animals at 20min. These data indicate that increased sympathetic nervous system tone contributes to elevated basal and rapid glucocorticoid production following chronic stress, but HPA responses likely mediate peak corticosterone responses to stressors of longer duration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Effects of intracerebroventricular injection of histamine and related compounds on corticosterone release in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, S; Okumura, Y; Kamei, C; Tasaka, K

    1993-07-01

    1. The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of histamine and related compounds on plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone concentrations were studied in conscious rats. 2. Histamine at doses of 5-20 micrograms kg-1 rapidly increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations almost simultaneously, and subsequent courses were also similar to each other. However, in the case of CRF-41 (i.v.), the plasma ACTH concentration first increased followed by an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. Even in hypophysectomized rats, a significant increase in plasma corticosterone concentration was induced by histamine at doses of 20 and 50 micrograms kg-1. 3. Histamine at doses of 10 and 20 micrograms kg-1 elicited an increase in the amplitude of adrenal nerve activity, and electrical stimulation to the adrenal nerves resulted in an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. 4. Both H1-agonist (2-methylhistamine) and H2-agonists (4-methylhistamine and impromidine) also induced similar effects to those of histamine. Pretreatment with pyrilamine caused an inhibition of histamine-induced increase in plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations, while both cimetidine and ranitidine failed to inhibit this effect. However, both H2-blockers were effective in inhibiting the 4-methylhistamine-induced elevation of plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations. 5. Neither (R)-alpha-methylhistamine nor thioperamide had a significant effect, indicating that the H3-receptor is not involved in the histamine-induced increase in plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations. 6. From these findings, it was concluded that (1) electrical signals transmitted from the brain to the adrenal gland through the neurones may be involved in the rapid corticosterone release induced by histamine, and (2) not only H1- but also H2-receptors are implicated in histamine-induced hormone secretions in rats, though the contribution of the H2-receptor is

  1. High plasma corticosterone levels persist during frequent automatic blood sampling in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Adem, Bashir; Royo, Felix

    2005-01-01

    Corticosterone levels in blood may be used as a marker of stress in rodents, provided that the blood sampling procedure itself is non-stressful. Automated blood sampling equipment (Accusampler) allows blood sampling without any interference with the animal and might be useful as a tool for an on...... the importance of considering the frequency of blood withdrawal during automated blood sampling. This parameter may have an impact on the experimental results when using blood corticosterone levels as a stress marker, but also during any in vivo study where blood is collected, since high corticosterone levels...... may affect the normal physiology of the animals....

  2. Geniposide protects human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against corticosterone-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Chen; Fawei Wang; Miao Geng; Hongyan Chen; Dongmei Duan

    2011-01-01

    In vitro cultured human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were pretreated with 50 or 5 μg/mL geniposide for 12 hours and exposed to 400 μmol/L corticosterone. Corticosterone exposure in cultures not pretreated with geniposide resulted in inhibited cell growth, reduced cell survival, and increased P53 and P21 protein expression. However, in geniposide pretreated SH-SY5Y cells, cell viability and the number of cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle were significantly increased, P21 and P53 protein expression was reduced, and cell apoptosis was inhibited following corticosterone exposure. These results indicate that geniposide can protect SH-SY5Y cells against high-dose corticosterone-induced injury.

  3. Dynamics of plasma catecholamine and corticosterone concentrations during reinforced and extinguished operant behavior in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, S.F.; de Beun, R; Slangen, J L; van der Gugten, J

    1990-01-01

    Plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A) and corticosterone (CS) concentrations were determined simultaneously in permanently heart-cannulated rats before and during the performance of reinforced and nonreinforced (extinguished) operant behavior. Shortly before the experimental food-reinforced (VI

  4. Quantitative autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)corticosterone receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapolsky, R.M.; McEwen, B.S. (Rockefeller Univ., New York (USA)); Rainbow, T.C. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia (USA). School of Medicine)

    1983-07-25

    The authors have quantified corticosterone receptors in rat brain by optical density measurements of tritium-film autoradiograms. Rats were injected i.v. with 500 ..mu..Ci (/sup 3/H)corticosterone to label brain receptors. Frozen sections of brain were cut with a cryostat and exposed for 2 months against tritium-sensitive sheet film (LKB Ultrofilm). Tritium standards were used to convert optical density readings into molar concentrations of receptor. High levels of corticosterone receptors were present throughout the pyramidal and granule cell layers of the hippocampus. Moderate levels of receptors were found in the neuropil of the hippocampus, the lateral septum, the cortical nucleus of the amygdala and the entorhinal cortex. All other brain regions had low levels of receptors. These results extend previous non-quantitative autoradiographic studies of corticosterone receptors and provide a general procedure for the quantitative autoradiography of steroid hormone receptors in brain tissue.

  5. Dynamics of plasma catecholamine and corticosterone concentrations during reinforced and extinguished operant behavior in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, S.F.; de Beun, R; Slangen, J L; van der Gugten, J

    Plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A) and corticosterone (CS) concentrations were determined simultaneously in permanently heart-cannulated rats before and during the performance of reinforced and nonreinforced (extinguished) operant behavior. Shortly before the experimental food-reinforced (VI

  6. Corticosterone stress response in tree swallows nesting near polychlorinated biphenyl- and dioxin-contaminated rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, M.D.; Custer, Christine M.; Custer, T.W.; Reed, J.M.; Romero, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    We assayed baseline and stress-induced corticosterone concentrations from adult female and nestling tree swallows, Tachycineta bicolor, from New England, USA, sites with different levels of contamination with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Corticosterone was compared over 2 years from a highly contaminated PCB site along the Housatonic River (Berkshire County, MA, USA), a midrange contaminated site upstream, and a reference site. Adult females (n = 29), sampled only in 2003, showed an inverted-U association with PCBs, with higher stress-induced corticosterone with midrange contamination than at the high-contamination site. In nestlings, stress-induced corticosterone was highest for the highly contaminated site compared with the other sites in 2003 (n = 53, 29 nests), with no difference among sites in 2004 (n = 93, 27 nests). In 2004, we began testing mechanisms underlying these changes in nestlings at the high- and low-PCB sites. Corticosterone response to dexamethasone injection (used to test negative feedback) was not different between sites, but stress-induced corticosterone was reduced at the contaminated site after adrenocorticotropin hormone injection (used to test adrenal responsiveness), suggesting an inhibited ability to mount a stress response. We also compared nestlings from a stretch of the Woonasquatucket River, Rhode Island, USA, heavily contaminated with TCDD (n = 80, 43 nests) with nestlings from an upstream site that had lower levels of TCDD and the Berkshire County reference site. Although there were no stress-induced differences, baseline corticosterone was lower at the higher TCDD site than at the reference site. Altogether these findings suggest that tree swallows chronically exposed to high PCB and TCDD levels exhibit altered baseline and stress-induced corticosterone responses, but the patterns of alteration might not be predictable. ?? 2008 SETAC.

  7. Faecal corticosterone levels of dogs relinquished to a shelter in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the baseline level of faecal corticosterone in dogs relinquished to a shelter and compared changes in it caused by social events that dogs experienced. Faecal corticosterone was measured to assess the average stress levels of dogs that depend on the actual conditions of the shelter. One category of subject animals was dogs relinquished by their owner or stray dogs who were penned in a group (group RG) or caged individually due to their incompatibility (group RI), and t...

  8. Increased corticosterone in peripubertal rats leads to long-lasting alterations in social exploration and aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana eVeenit

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress during childhood and adolescence enhances the risk of psychopathology later in life. We have previously shown that subjecting male rats to stress during the peripubertal period induces long-lasting effects on emotion and social behaviors. As corticosterone is increased by stress and known to exert important programming effects, we reasoned that increasing corticosterone might mimic the effects of peripubertal stress. To this end, we injected corticosterone (5 mg/kg on 7 scattered days during the peripuberty period (P28-P30, P34, P36, P40 and P42, following the same experimental schedule as for stress administration in our peripubertal paradigm. We measured play behavior in the homecage and, at adulthood, the corticosterone response to novelty and behavioral responses in tests for anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, aggression and social exploration. As compared to vehicle, corticosterone-treated animals exhibit more aggressive play behavior during adolescence, increased aggressive behavior in a resident-intruder test while reduced juvenile exploration and corticosterone reactivity at adulthood. Whereas the corticosterone treatment mimicked alterations induced by the peripuberty stress protocol in the social domain, it did not reproduce previously observed effects of peripuberty stress on increasing anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, respectively evaluated in the elevated plus maze and the forced swim tests. Our findings indicate that increasing corticosterone levels during peripuberty might be instrumental to program alterations in the social domain observed following stress, whereas other factors might need to be recruited for the programming of long-term changes in emotionality. Our study opens the possibility that individual differences on the degree of glucocorticoid activation during peripuberty might be central to defining differences in vulnerability to develop psychopathological disorders coursing with alterations in

  9. Amphetamine withdrawal differentially affects hippocampal and peripheral corticosterone levels in response to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Brenna; Scholl, Jamie L; Tu, Wenyu; Watt, Michael J; Renner, Kenneth J; Forster, Gina L

    2016-08-01

    Amphetamine withdrawal is associated with heightened anxiety-like behavior, which is directly driven by blunted stress-induced glucocorticoid receptor-dependent serotonin release in the ventral hippocampus. This suggests that glucocorticoid availability in the ventral hippocampus during stress may be reduced during amphetamine withdrawal. Therefore, we tested whether amphetamine withdrawal alters either peripheral or hippocampal corticosterone stress responses. Adult male rats received amphetamine (2.5mg/kg, ip) or saline for 14 days followed by 2 weeks of withdrawal. Contrary to our prediction, microdialysis samples from freely-moving rats revealed that restraint stress-induced corticosterone levels in the ventral hippocampus are enhanced by amphetamine withdrawal relative to controls. In separate groups of rats, plasma corticosterone levels increased immediately after 20min of restraint and decreased to below stress-naïve levels after 1h, indicating negative feedback regulation of corticosterone following stress. However, plasma corticosterone responses were similar in amphetamine-withdrawn and control rats. Neither amphetamine nor stress exposure significantly altered protein expression or enzyme activity of the steroidogenic enzymes 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD1) or hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PD) in the ventral hippocampus. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that amphetamine withdrawal potentiates stress-induced corticosterone in the ventral hippocampus, which may contribute to increased behavioral stress sensitivity previously observed during amphetamine withdrawal. However, this is not mediated by either changes in plasma corticosterone or hippocampal steroidogenic enzymes. Establishing enhanced ventral hippocampal corticosterone as a direct cause of greater stress sensitivity may identify the glucocorticoid system as a novel target for treating behavioral symptoms of amphetamine withdrawal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  10. Effects of intracerebroventricular injection of histamine and related compounds on corticosterone release in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsujimoto, S.; Okumura, Y.; Kamei, C.; Tasaka, K.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of histamine and related compounds on plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone concentrations were studied in conscious rats. 2. Histamine at doses of 5-20 micrograms kg-1 rapidly increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations almost simultaneously, and subsequent courses were also similar to each other. However, in the case of CRF-41 (i.v.), the plasma ACTH concentration first increased followed by an ...

  11. Sex differences in plasma corticosterone in desert tortoises, Gopherus agassizii, during the reproductive cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, V A; Grumbles, J S; Rostal, D C

    2001-04-15

    Blood samples from 30 female and 20 male adult desert tortoises, Gopherus agassizii, were collected at monthly intervals during the annual reproductive cycle (April to October). Plasma corticosterone and the sex steroids in each of the samples were analyzed by radioimmunoassay. Mean corticosterone levels in males were significantly higher than in females (P spermatogenesis and intense male-male combat. These results support similar data from other reptiles that suggest increased glucocorticoid secretion during periods of increased activity and metabolism.

  12. Modulation in Wistar Rats of Blood Corticosterone Compartmentation by Sex and a Cafeteria Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, María del Mar; Holmgren-Holm, Fredrik; Grasa, Maria del Mar; Esteve, Montserrat; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2013-01-01

    In the metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoid activity is increased, but circulating levels show little change. Most of blood glucocorticoids are bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), which liver expression and circulating levels are higher in females than in males. Since blood hormones are also bound to blood cells, and the size of this compartment is considerable for androgens and estrogens, we analyzed whether sex or eating a cafeteria diet altered the compartmentation of corticosterone in rat blood. The main corticosterone compartment in rat blood is that specifically bound to plasma proteins, with smaller compartments bound to blood cells or free. Cafeteria diet increased the expression of liver CBG gene, binding plasma capacity and the proportion of blood cell-bound corticosterone. There were marked sex differences in blood corticosterone compartmentation in rats, which were unrelated to testosterone. The use of a monoclonal antibody ELISA and a polyclonal Western blot for plasma CBG compared with both specific plasma binding of corticosterone and CBG gene expression suggested the existence of different forms of CBG, with varying affinities for corticosterone in males and females, since ELISA data showed higher plasma CBG for males, but binding and Western blot analyses (plus liver gene expression) and higher physiological effectiveness for females. Good cross- reactivity to the antigen for polyclonal CBG antibody suggests that in all cases we were measuring CBG.The different immunoreactivity and binding affinity may help explain the marked sex-related differences in plasma hormone binding as sex-linked different proportions of CBG forms. PMID:23451210

  13. Evaluation of response to restraint stress by salivary corticosterone levels in adult male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Masakatsu; Tohei, Atsushi; Sato, Takumi; Amao, Hiromi

    2016-06-01

    Saliva as a sampling method is a low invasive technique for the detection of physiologically active substances, as opposed to sampling the plasma or serum. In this study, we obtained glucocorticoids transferred from the blood to the saliva from mice treated with 2.0 mg/kg via an intraperitoneal injection of cortisol. Next, to evaluate the effect of restraint stress using mouse saliva-collected under anesthesia by mixed anesthetic agents-we measured plasma and salivary corticosterone levels at 60 min after restraint stress. Moreover, to evaluate salivary corticosterone response to stress in the same individual mouse, an adequate recovery period (1, 3 and 7 days) after anesthesia was examined. The results demonstrate that exogenous cortisol was detected in the saliva and the plasma, in mice treated with cortisol. Restraint stress significantly increased corticosterone levels in both the plasma and saliva (Pstress significantly increased salivary corticosterone levels in all three groups (1-, 3- and 7-day recovery). However, the statistical evidence of corticosterone increase is stronger in the 7-day recovery group (Plevels in saliva reflect its levels in the plasma, and salivary corticosterone is a useful, less-invasive biomarker of physical stress in mice. The present study may contribute to concepts of Reduction and Refinement of the three Rs in small animal experiments.

  14. Assessing Stress in Arctic Lemmings: Fecal Metabolite Levels Reflect Plasma Free Corticosterone Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauteux, Dominique; Gauthier, Gilles; Berteaux, Dominique; Bosson, Curtis; Palme, Rupert; Boonstra, Rudy

    Interest in the ecology of stress in wild populations has triggered the development of noninvasive methods for quantifying stress hormones. Measurement of fecal corticosteroid metabolites (FCMs) is one such method, but it is still unclear whether FCMs can be a reliable proxy of free plasma glucocorticoids. To assess the validity of this assumption, we carried out a robust assessment on brown lemmings (Lemmus trimucronatus) from Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada, that were hand captured and anesthetized and related plasma glucocorticoid levels to fecal metabolite glucocorticoid levels. We examined endogenous factors that could explain interindividual variability. Blood corticosterone was measured from samples obtained on capture and 30 min later, and FCM levels were measured from animals kept in captivity for 72 h. Plasma free corticosterone increased 135-fold over baseline values 30 min after capture, which confirmed that initial handling was perceived as a stressor. We found that FCM levels were highly related with free (marginal [Formula: see text] = 0.53) but not with total ([Formula: see text] = 0.02) corticosterone levels, regardless of age, sex, and reproductive condition. FCM levels started increasing 2 h after capture and reached maximum levels 4 h after capture. No circadian rhythm in FCMs was found. Plasma total corticosterone levels were much higher in adult females compared with adult males, but this difference was much smaller when measuring free corticosterone levels and FCM levels. Our results suggest that FCM levels are good measures of stress by being closely related to plasma free corticosterone levels in brown lemmings.

  15. The effect of exogenous corticosterone on West Nile virus infection in Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Jennifer C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The relationship between stress and disease is thought to be unambiguous: chronic stress induces immunosuppression, which likely increases the risk of infection. However, this link has not been firmly established in wild animals, particularly whether stress hormones affect host responses to zoonotic pathogens, which can be transmitted to domesticated animal, wildlife and human populations. Due to the dynamic effects of stress hormones on immune functions, stress hormones may make hosts better or poorer amplifying hosts for a pathogen contingent on context and the host species evaluated. Using an important zoonotic pathogen, West Nile virus (WNV and a competent host, the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis, we tested the effects of exogenous corticosterone on response to WNV infection. Corticosterone was administered at levels that individuals enduring chronic stressors (i.e., long-term inclement weather, food shortage, anthropogenic pollution might experience in the wild. Corticosterone greatly impacted mortality: half of the corticosterone-implanted cardinals died between five - 11 days post-inoculation whereas only one of nine empty-implanted (control birds died. No differences were found in viral titer between corticosterone- and empty-implanted birds. However, cardinals that survived infections had significantly higher average body temperatures during peak infection than individuals that died. In sum, this study indicates that elevated corticosterone could affect the survival of WNV-infected wild birds, suggesting that populations may be disproportionately at-risk to disease in stressful environments.

  16. The effect of exogenous corticosterone on West Nile virus infection in Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jennifer C; Nakamura, Ayaka; Coon, Courtney Ac; Martin, Lynn B

    2012-04-21

    The relationship between stress and disease is thought to be unambiguous: chronic stress induces immunosuppression, which likely increases the risk of infection. However, this link has not been firmly established in wild animals, particularly whether stress hormones affect host responses to zoonotic pathogens, which can be transmitted to domesticated animal, wildlife and human populations. Due to the dynamic effects of stress hormones on immune functions, stress hormones may make hosts better or poorer amplifying hosts for a pathogen contingent on context and the host species evaluated. Using an important zoonotic pathogen, West Nile virus (WNV) and a competent host, the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), we tested the effects of exogenous corticosterone on response to WNV infection. Corticosterone was administered at levels that individuals enduring chronic stressors (i.e., long-term inclement weather, food shortage, anthropogenic pollution) might experience in the wild. Corticosterone greatly impacted mortality: half of the corticosterone-implanted cardinals died between five - 11 days post-inoculation whereas only one of nine empty-implanted (control) birds died. No differences were found in viral titer between corticosterone- and empty-implanted birds. However, cardinals that survived infections had significantly higher average body temperatures during peak infection than individuals that died. In sum, this study indicates that elevated corticosterone could affect the survival of WNV-infected wild birds, suggesting that populations may be disproportionately at-risk to disease in stressful environments.

  17. Apigenin reverses depression-like behavior induced by chronic corticosterone treatment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lianjin; Guo, Xiaohua; Li, Yang; Yang, Xin; Han, Yuanyuan

    2016-03-05

    Previous researches found that apigenin exerted antidepressant-like effects in rodents. However, it is unclear whether the neurotrophic system is involved in the antidepressant-like effects of apigenin. Our present study aimed to explore the neurotrophic related mechanism of apigenin in depressive-like mice induced by chronic corticosterone treatment. Mice were repeatedly injected with corticosterone (40 mg/kg) subcutaneously (s.c) once daily for consecutive 21 days. Apigenin (20 and 40 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) were administered 30 min prior to the corticosterone injection. The behavioral tests indicated that apigenin reversed the reduction of sucrose preference and the elevation of immobility time in mice induced by chronic corticosterone treatment. In addition, the increase in serum corticosterone levels and the decrease in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in corticosterone-treated mice were also ameliorated by apigenin administration. Taken together, our findings intensively confirmed the antidepressant-like effects of apigenin and indicated that the antidepressant-like mechanism of apigenin was mediated, at least partly by up-regulation of BDNF levels in the hippocampus.

  18. Corticosterone mediated costs of reproduction link current to future breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossin, Glenn T; Phillips, Richard A; Lattin, Christine R; Romero, L Michael; Williams, Tony D

    2013-11-01

    Life-history theory predicts that costs are associated with reproduction. One possible mediator of costs involves the secretion of glucocorticoid hormones, which in birds can be measured in feathers grown during the breeding period. Glucocorticoids mediate physiological responses to unpredictable environmental or other stressors, but they can also function as metabolic regulators during more predictable events such as reproduction. Here we show that corticosterone ("Cort") in feathers grown during the breeding season reflects reproductive effort in two Antarctic seabird species (giant petrels, Macronectes spp.). In females of both species, but not males, feather Cort ("fCort") was nearly 1.5-fold higher in successful than failed breeders (those that lost their eggs/chicks), suggesting a cost of successful reproduction, i.e., high fCort levels in females reflect the elevated plasma Cort levels required to support high metabolic demands of chick-rearing. Successful breeding also led to delayed moult prior to winter migration. The fCort levels and pre-migration moult score that we measured at the end of current breeding were predictive of subsequent reproductive effort in the following year. Birds with high fCort and a delayed initiation of moult were much more likely to defer breeding in the following year. Cort levels and the timing of moult thus provide a potential mechanism for the tradeoff between current and future reproduction.

  19. Ultradian corticosterone pulses balance glutamatergic transmission and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabdjitsingh, Ratna Angela; Jezequel, Julie; Pasricha, Natasha; Mikasova, Lenka; Kerkhofs, Amber; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2014-09-30

    The rodent adrenal hormone corticosterone (CORT) reaches the brain in hourly ultradian pulses, with a steep rise in amplitude before awakening. The impact of a single CORT pulse on glutamatergic transmission is well documented, but it remains poorly understood how consecutive pulses impact on glutamate receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity. By using high-resolution imaging and electrophysiological approaches, we report that a single pulse of CORT to hippocampal networks causes synaptic enrichment of glutamate receptors and increased responses to spontaneously released glutamatergic vesicles, collectively abrogating the ability to subsequently induce synaptic long-term potentiation. Strikingly, a second pulse of CORT one hour after the first--mimicking ultradian pulses--completely normalizes all aspects of glutamate transmission investigated, restoring the plastic range of the synapse. The effect of the second pulse is precisely timed and depends on a nongenomic glucocorticoid receptor-dependent pathway. This normalizing effect through a sequence of CORT pulses--as seen around awakening--may ensure that hippocampal glutamatergic synapses remain fully responsive and able to encode new stress-related information when daily activities start.

  20. Inhibitory effects of digoxin and digitoxin on corticosterone production in rat zona fasciculata-reticularis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shyi-Wu; Pu, Hsaio-Fung; Kan, Shu-Fen; Tseng, Chiung-I; Lo, Ming-Jae; Wang, Paulus S

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the direct effects and action mechanisms of digitalis on the production of corticosterone in rat adrenocortical cells. Male rats were challenged with digoxin (1 microg ml(-1) kg(-1)) in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH, 5 microg ml(-1) kg(-1)) administered by intravenous injection to the right jugular vein. Blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, and 120 min following the challenge. The concentration of corticosterone in the rat plasma samples was measured by radioimmunoassay. Zona fasciculata-reticularis (ZFR) cells in male rats were prepared and then incubated with or without digoxin or digitoxin in the presence or absence of ACTH (10(-9) m), forskolin (10(-7) m), 8-bromo-cyclic 3' : 5'-adenosine monophosphate (10(-4) m), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, 10(-5) m), trilostane (10(-6) m), 25-OH-cholesterol (10(-5) m), pregnenolone (10(-5) m), progesterone (10(-5) m), or deoxycorticosterone (10(-5) m) at 37 degrees C for 1 h before collection of the media. Corticosterone or pregnenolone levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. A single injection of digoxin did not alter the basal level of plasma corticosterone, but did inhibit the level of plasma corticosterone released in response to ACTH in vivo. Administration of digoxin or digitoxin decreased both spontaneous and ACTH-stimulated release of corticosterone in vitro. Digoxin (10(-7)-10(-5) m) and digitoxin (10(-7)-10(-5) m), but not ouabain (10(-7)-10(-5) m), dose-dependently inhibited corticosterone production in response to forskolin and 8-Br-cyclic AMP in rat ZFR cells. Both digoxin (10(-6)-10(-5) m) and digitoxin (10(-6)-10(-5) m) attenuated corticosterone production in response to CPA. Digoxin (10(-5) m) or digitoxin (10(-5) m) inhibited cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (cytochrome P450scc) activity (catalyses conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone in the presence of trilostane) in rat ZFR cells. The enzyme activity of 11 beta

  1. Hair corticosterone measurement in mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Rebecca L; Browne, Caroline A; Lucki, Irwin

    2017-09-01

    In diabetes, glucocorticoid secretion increases secondary to hyperglycemia and is associated with an extensive list of disease complications. Levels of cortisol in humans, or corticosterone in rodents, are usually measured as transitory biomarkers of stress in blood or saliva. Glucocorticoid concentrations accumulate in human or animal hair over weeks and could more accurately measure the cumulative stress burden of diseases like chronic diabetes. In this study, corticosterone levels were measured in hair in verified rodent models of diabetes mellitus. To induce type 1 diabetes, C57BL/6J mice were injected with streptozotocin and blood and hair samples were collected 28days following induction. Leptin receptor deficient (db/db) mice were used as a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes and blood and hair samples were collected at 8weeks of age, after the development of hyperglycemia and obesity. Corticosterone levels from serum, new growth hair and total growth hair were analyzed using an enzyme immunoassay. Corticosterone levels in new growth hair and serum were significantly elevated in both models of diabetes compared to controls. In contrast, corticosterone levels in old hair growth did not differ significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic animals. Thus, hair removal and sampling of new hair growth was a more sensitive procedure for detecting changes in hair corticosterone levels induced by periods of hyperglycemia lasting for 4weeks in mice. These results validate the use of hair to measure long-term changes in corticosterone induced by diabetes in rodent models. Further studies are now needed to validate the utility of hair cortisol as a tool for measuring the stress burden of individuals with diabetes and for following the effects of long-term medical treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of teratogens on maternal corticosterone levels and cleft incidence in A/J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Jones, P; Hansen, D K; Sheehan, D M; Holson, R R

    1992-01-01

    It is unknown whether orofacial clefting, one consequence of teratogenic exposure, results from a direct interaction between the teratogen and the embryonic palate, or indirectly from maternal alterations caused by the teratogen. In the current study pregnant A/J mice were exposed to one of three cleft-inducing agents in order to examine the relationship between drug-induced clefting and the response of maternal plasma corticosterone to drug administration. The agents used, haloperidol (HAL), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), or phenytoin (PHT), were administered in teratogenic doses between 0800 and 0930 on gestational day 10 (GD 10). For corticosterone determinations, mice were dosed on GD 10, and blood was collected at 1, 4, 24, or 48 hr after dosing. For fetal evaluation of cleft lip and/or cleft palate, mice were dosed on GD 10 and killed on GD 18. Phenytoin was the most potent inducer of cleft lip and palate and induced a sustained elevation of plasma corticosterone in maternal animals. The other treatments, in order of decreasing potency to induce clefting and/or cause an elevation of corticosterone in plasma were 2,4,5-T > HAL > controls. Correlations between maternal corticosterone levels and clefting incidence were very high at all time points examined; total exposure (area under the curve) was also highly correlated. A linear relationship between drug-induced increases in maternal corticosterone levels and the incidence of clefting in A/J mice was evident. Based on these findings, we believe that increased maternal corticosterone levels may play a role in orofacial clefting in A/J mice.

  3. Baseline plasma corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting and rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Jennifer E; Norton, Terry M; Andrews, Kimberly M; Nelson, Steven E; Parker, Clare E; Romero, L Michael; Mitchell, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of hormonal responses to stress in reptiles relies on acquisition of baseline corticosterone concentrations; however, the stress associated with the restraint needed to collect the blood samples can affect the results. The purpose of this study was to determine a time limit for the collection of blood samples to evaluate baseline corticosterone, haematological and biochemical results in nesting (n = 11) and rehabilitating (n = 16) loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). Blood samples were collected from the dorsal cervical sinus of each turtle immediately after touching the animal (t 0; 0-3 min) and 3 (t 3; 3-6 min), 6 (t 6; 6-9 min; nesting turtles only), 10 (t 10; 10-13 min) and 30 min (t 30; rehabilitating turtles only) after the initial hands-on time. Consistent between the rehabilitating and nesting turtles, there was a subtle yet significant increase in white blood cell counts over time. Despite the fact that white blood cell counts increased during the sampling period, there was no direct correlation between white blood cell count and corticosterone in the sampled turtles. In the nesting turtles, significant elevations in corticosterone were noted between t 0 and t 3 (P = 0.014) and between t 0 and t 6 (P = 0.022). Values at t 10 were not significantly different from those at t 0 (P = 0.102); however, there was a trend for the corticosterone values to continue to increase. These results suggest that sampling of nesting loggerhead sea turtles within 3 min of handling will provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in their natural environment. Significant elevations in corticosterone were also noted in the rehabilitating loggerhead sea turtles between t 0 and t 10 (P = 0.02) and between t 0 and t 30 of sampling (P = 0.0001). These results suggest that sampling of loggerhead sea turtles within 6 min of handling should provide baseline corticosterone concentrations in a rehabilitation setting. The

  4. Corticosterone metabolites originating as a consequence of solvated electron (e(-)aq) emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenn, Eric; Mitulović, Goran; Quint, Ruth-Maria; Getoff, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Corticosterone in water-ethanol solution can eject "solvated electrons" (eaq(-)) when excited into the singlet state by monochromatic UV-light (λ=254 nm). As a consequence of this process free radicals and H(+) ions were also generated. Hence, the objectives of this study were to determine the quantum yield, Q, at different corticosterone concentrations, and elucidate the fate of the generated free radicals and the involved reaction mechanisms. Because of the formation of associates, which consume a part of the emitted eaq(-), the Q decrease with increase of cortisone concentration. Additionally the H(+) ions scavenge and convert a part of the ejected eaq(-) into H-atoms. In comparsion with progesterone, the Q of corticosterone is much higher. Evidently, this effect is due to the two OH groups of corticosterone, which act as intense emission centres for eaq(-). Thereby, the generated free radicals from corticosterone lead to formation of metabolites, which were analyzed by combination of liquid-chromatography with mass spectrometry (LC/MS) method. Two of them were identified: 5α-pregnan-3α, 21-diol-11, 20-dione and 20β-dihydroxycortisone. Both have the same mass number of 348.230. To explain the involved, rather complicated processes, a probable reaction mechanism is suggested. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Latent inhibition is disrupted by acute and repeated administration of corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, U.; Feldon, J.; Weiner, I.

    1998-12-01

    Latent inhibition (LI), namely, a retardation in conditioning to a stimulus, as a consequence of its prior non- reinforced pre-exposure, is disrupted in amphetamine-treated rats and humans and in some subsets of schizophrenic patients. One factor that has been repeatedly implicated in precipitating and/or exacerbating psychotic episodes is stress. Since a principal biological response to stress is the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, leading, as its end product, to the secretion of corticosterone, the present experiments tested whether increase in corticosterone levels following exogenous corticosterone administration would disrupt LI. Both repeated (Experiment 1) and acute (Experiment 2) administration of corticosterone led to LI disruption, providing evidence for the involvement of the HPA axis alterations in LI and further supporting the viability of disrupted LI as an animal model of psychosis. Both regimens also increased amphetamine-induced activity. We suggest that disrupted LI may reflect a cognitive mechanism whereby prolonged periods of increased corticosterone levels can lead to 'sensory flooding' characteristic of psychosis.

  6. Roles of paroxetine and corticosterone on adult mammalian ciliary body cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; LAU Benson WM; YAU Suk-yu; LI Suk-yee; LEUNG Nelson; WANG Ning-li; TANG Siu-wa; LEE Tatia MC; SO Kwok-fai

    2010-01-01

    Background The neurogenesis in retina of adult mammals is generally abolished, and this renders the retina lack of regenerative capacity.Despite this, there is a small population of nestin-positive cells in the ciliary epithelium which retains neurogenic potential.The present study aimed at investigating the effect of two drugs, corticosterone and paroxetine, on the cell proliferation of the ciliary body.Methods Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were given vehicle, corticosterone, paroxetine, or both corticosterone and paroxetine treatment for 14 days.Cell proliferation in the ciliary body was quantified using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry.Co-labelling of BrdU and stem cell marker was used to phenotype the BrdU immunoreactive cells.Results Corticosterone treatment suppressed while paroxetine treatment increased the cell proliferation of the ciliary body.Co-labelling with cell markers revealed that the BrdU positive cells also showed nestin expression but not glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP).Conclusions The results illustrate that proliferation of retinal progenitor cells situated in ciliary body are subjected to regulation by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and corticosteroid, which is similar to our previous findings in neurogenic regions in central nervous system (CNS).Paroxetine treatment could reverse the suppressive effect of corticosterone on ciliary body cell proliferation.This provides information for future investigation of retinal stem cell biology and potential treatment of retinal degenerative diseases.

  7. Corticosterone inhibits normal and FSH-induced testicular recrudescence in the lizard, Mabuya carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajurvedi, H N; Nijagal, B S

    2000-12-01

    Administration (ip) of 1, 10, or 20 microg corticosterone (alternate days for 30 days) to adult male Mabuya carinata did not affect the seasonal recrudescence of spermatogenesis whereas administration of 40 microg corticosterone did result in inhibition of spermatogenesis. Further, administration of FSH (10 IU/lizard/alternate day for 30 days) during the quiescent phase of the testicular cycle stimulated spermatogenetic and steroidogenic activity of the testis as shown by significant increases in the mean number of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids and serum levels of testosterone. In addition there were abundant spermatozoa in the lumen of the tubules in FSH-treated lizards. Administration of 10 IU FSH + 40 microg corticosterone (per lizard on alternate days for 30 days) increased the mean number of primary and secondary spermatocytes whereas the mean number of spermatids did not show significant variation compared with that of controls. Further, the mean numbers of spermatocytes and spermatids and serum levels of testosterone were significantly less when compared to those of FSH alone treated lizards. In addition, FSH-induced development of epididymis was also inhibited by corticosterone treatment. The results indicate that corticosterone inhibits FSH-induced testicular recrudescence, possibly by suppressing testosterone secretion in M. carinata.

  8. Corticosterone rapidly promotes respiratory burst of mouse peritoneal macrophages via non-genomic mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wen-lei; MA Qian; ZHANG Lu-ding; HUANG Jun-long; ZHOU Jian; LIU Lei; SHEN Xing-hua; JIANG Chun-lei

    2011-01-01

    Background The immunomodulatory effects of glucocorticoids (GCs) have been described as bimodal. High concentration of GCs exerts immunosuppressive effects and low levels of GCs are immunopermissive. While the immunosuppressive mechanisms of GCs have been investigated intensely, the immunopermissive effects of GCs remain unclear. A lot of studies showed GCs could exert rapid non-genomic actions. We herein studied the rapid immunopromoting effects of GCs.Methods We observed the rapid (within 30 minutes) effects of corticosterone on respiratory burst of mouse peritoneal macrophages and studied their mechanisms. The superoxide anions were measured by cytochrome C reduction assay.Protein kinase C phosphorylation was measured by Western blotting and membrane fluidity was evaluated by fluorescence polarization measurement.Results The 10-8 mol/L and 10-7 mol/L corticosterone rapidly increased the superoxide anions production by macrophages, which were insensitive to GC-receptor antagonist, mifepristone, and protein-synthesis inhibitor,cycloheximide. Corticosterone coupled to bovine serum albumin was able to mimic the effects of corticosterone. The effects were independent of protein kinase C pathway and the change in membrane fluidity.Conclusions The results indicate that corticosterone rapidly promote the superoxide anions production by mouse peritoneal macrophages may through non-genomic mechanisms. This study may contribute to understanding the effects of GCs under stress condition and the physiological significance of nongenomic effects of GCs.

  9. Habituation of adult Magellanic penguins to human visitation as expressed through behavior and corticosterone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brian G; Boersma, P Dee; Wingfield, John C

    2006-02-01

    Ecotourism is increasing worldwide; hence, it is important to know how wildlife are affected behaviorally and physiologically by human visitation. We studied the effects of human visitation on the Magellanic Penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) at Punta Tombo, Argentina, by monitoring changes in defensive head turns and plasma corticosterone (a hormone secreted in response to stress) for penguins with and without a history of tourist visitation. Habituation to human visitation was rapid. In penguins with no previous exposure to tourists, the number of defensive head turns and level of plasma corticosterone decreased significantly within 5 days of one 15-minute visit/day. Penguins living in tourist-visited and undisturbed areas secreted more corticosterone when captured and restrained than penguins visited by a person. Penguins in tourist areas, however did not show as strong a corticosterone response to capture and restraint as did penguins in areas without tourists. This difference was due to a decreased capability of the adrenocortical tissue to secrete corticosterone in tourist-visited birds. Although our data show no direct negative effects of tourism on Magellanic Penguins at Punta Tombo, consequences of a modification of physiological capabilities (e.g., adrenocortical function) may not become apparent until much later in life. The physiological differences between tourist-visited and undisturbed groups of Magellanic Penguins emphasize the importance of monitoring the effects of anthropogenic disturbances on wildlife at multiple levels.

  10. Relationship of climatic conditions to fecal corticosterone levels of captive cheetahs reared in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Katsuji; Une, Yumi; Ito, Shu; Yamabe, Marino; Toyoda, Hideto; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    To assess the stress level of cheetahs reared in Japan and to identify the prime components of the climatic conditions that affect their thermal stress, fecal corticosterone was monitored for 8 months from May to the following January. A total of 203 fecal samples were gathered in the morning from seven adult cheetahs that were kept at a zoological garden in Wakayama, Japan. Cheetahs were on exhibit singly or together with a harmonious conspecific during the day, but housed singly at night. Although the monthly fluctuation in corticosterone concentrations was not significant, the concentrations were relatively low during the summer season. Individual differences among cheetahs and the interaction effect between individual and month on the corticosterone concentrations were significant. Whereas the corticosterone concentrations negatively correlated with air temperature, they were positively correlated with the amount of rainfall. The highest air temperature and the amount of rainfall were extracted as the prime factors affecting corticosterone concentrations. These results suggest that cheetahs reared in Japan are somewhat subjected to thermal stress, particularly on cooler and/or rainy days.

  11. An introduced competitor elevates corticosterone responses of a Native Lizard (Varanus varius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Tim S; Anson, Jennifer R; Narayan, Edward; Lockwood, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormone profiles are increasingly used as physiological markers to infer the strength of species interactions that can influence fitness and ensuing population dynamics of animals. Here we investigated two aims. First, we measured the effect of a 90-min capture stress protocol on the plasma corticosterone responses of a large native Australian lizard, the lace monitor (Varanus varius). Second, we compared the basal and postcapture stress corticosterone responses of lace monitors in habitats where they were exposed to high or low densities of the European red fox (Vulpes vulpes), an introduced competitor. Lace monitors responded to the capture stress protocol by significantly increasing plasma levels of corticosterone above basal at 45- and 90-min-postcapture blood-sampling intervals. In habitats with high fox densities, lace monitors produced a significantly greater basal and capture-stress-induced corticosterone response compared to individuals in low-fox density habitat. A significant interaction among fox density, time postcapture, and body condition was also found to influence plasma corticosterone values. These results suggest competition with red fox, perhaps via nutritional stress and increased hypersensitivity of the adrenocortical axis in lizards. At present, without further research, we do not understand whether such responses mediate lizard fitness or whether they have adaptive or maladaptive consequences for lizard populations in response to red fox competition. Nevertheless, our results help broaden understanding of the physiological implications arising from species interactions and specifically how introduced competitors could mediate diverse impacts on native biodiversity.

  12. ABCC1 confers tissue-specific sensitivity to cortisol versus corticosterone: A rationale for safer glucocorticoid replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Mark; Mackenzie, Scott D; Taylor, Ashley I; Homer, Natalie Z M; Livingstone, Dawn E; Mouras, Rabah; Morgan, Ruth A; Mole, Damian J; Stimson, Roland H; Reynolds, Rebecca M; Elfick, Alistair P D; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R

    2016-08-17

    The aim of treatment in congenital adrenal hyperplasia is to suppress excess adrenal androgens while achieving physiological glucocorticoid replacement. However, current glucocorticoid replacement regimes are inadequate because doses sufficient to suppress excess androgens almost invariably induce adverse metabolic effects. Although both cortisol and corticosterone are glucocorticoids that circulate in human plasma, any physiological role for corticosterone has been neglected. In the brain, the adenosine 5'-triphosphate-binding cassette transporter ABCB1 exports cortisol but not corticosterone. Conversely, ABCC1 exports corticosterone but not cortisol. We show that ABCC1, but not ABCB1, is expressed in human adipose and that ABCC1 inhibition increases intracellular corticosterone, but not cortisol, and induces glucocorticoid-responsive gene transcription in human adipocytes. Both C57Bl/6 mice treated with the ABCC1 inhibitor probenecid and FVB mice with deletion of Abcc1 accumulated more corticosterone than cortisol in adipose after adrenalectomy and corticosteroid infusion. This accumulation was sufficient to increase glucocorticoid-responsive adipose transcript expression. In human adipose tissue, tissue corticosterone concentrations were consistently low, and ABCC1 mRNA was up-regulated in obesity. To test the hypothesis that corticosterone effectively suppresses adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) without the metabolic adverse effects of cortisol, we infused cortisol or corticosterone in patients with Addison's disease. ACTH suppression was similar, but subcutaneous adipose transcripts of glucocorticoid-responsive genes were higher after infusion with cortisol rather than with corticosterone. These data indicate that corticosterone may be a metabolically favorable alternative to cortisol for glucocorticoid replacement therapy when ACTH suppression is desirable, as in congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and justify development of a pharmaceutical preparation

  13. Post-operative corticosterone levels in plasma and feces of mice subjected to permanent catheterization and automated blood sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbom, Renée; Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Kalliokoski, Otto; Hau, Jann; Abelson, Klas S P

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surgical placement of permanent arterial catheters on plasma corticosterone levels, fecal corticosterone excretion and body weight in male BALB/c/Sca mice. In addition, the effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine in doses of 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg body weight on these parameters were studied. A catheter was placed in the carotid artery during isoflurane anesthesia. Immediately after surgery, the mice were connected to an AccuSampler® μ and blood samples for plasma corticosterone quantification were collected automatically during the first 24 h postoperatively. All fecal boli produced 24 h before and 24 h after surgery were collected for fecal corticosterone excretion measures and the pre- and post-operative body weights were registered. Plasma corticosterone levels were in the range of 150-300 ng/ml after the surgical procedure and the body weight was significantly lower 24 h after surgery compared to its pre-operative value. Contrary to what was expected, the total fecal corticosterone excretion was significantly reduced 24 h after surgery, as was the defecation. Buprenorphine treatment significantly lowered the plasma corticosterone levels, but had no effect on fecal corticosterone excretion or body weight change. It was concluded that surgical placement of an arterial catheter induces a significant stress response, as judged by its effect on plasma corticosterone and body weight. Voluntary ingestion of buprenorphine improved postoperative recovery by lowering plasma corticosterone concentrations. Neither fecal corticosterone excretion nor body weight change seems suitable for postoperative stress assessment in mice in the present experimental setup.

  14. Levels of fecal corticosterone in sandhill cranes during a human-led migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartup, B.K.; Olsen, G.H.; Czekala, Nancy M.; Paul-Murphy, J.; Langenberg, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Fourteen captive-reared greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) were conditioned to follow ultralight aircraft to promote migration between Wisconsin and Florida (U SA) after release. Fecal samples were collected throughout the training period in Wisconsin and during a 1,977-km human-led migration to Florida to determine fecal corticosterone (FC) concentrations by radioimmunoassay. The mean (?SE) FC concentration during the training period was 1O9.5?7.5 ng/g and was representative of baseline levels recorded previously from sandhill cranes. Fecal corticosterone concentrations increased in early migration compared to concentrations 1 mo prior to departure (Pmigration period. The variability of FC concentrations in individual samples was greater throughout the migration than the training period. Increases in FC during migration were modest and generally consistent with normal corticosterone elevations observed in migrating birds.

  15. Impact of surgical severity and analgesic treatment on plasma corticosterone in rats during surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldkuhl, Renée; Klockars, Anica; Hau, Jann;

    2010-01-01

    of the present investigation was to study the effect of surgical severity and analgesic treatment on circulating corticosterone in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Male rats were treated with either lidocaine infiltrated during surgery, buprenorphine (0.05 or 0.1 mg/kg subcutaneously) or saline subcutaneously. Each...... to saline treatment after catheterisation but not after laparotomy. Buprenorphine treatment reduced the corticosterone levels during the first hour after surgery after both catheterisation and laparotomy. The higher buprenorphine dose led to an earlier and more pronounced reduction, especially after...... laparotomy. In the present study, the corticosterone response during surgery in laboratory rats is correlated with the severity of the procedure, and buprenorphine reduces the surgical stress response more effectively than lidocaine treatment....

  16. Acute restraint stress and corticosterone transiently disrupts novelty preference in an object recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-López, Viviana; Torres-Berrio, Angélica; González-Martínez, Lina; Múnera, Alejandro; Lamprea, Marisol R

    2015-09-15

    The object recognition task is a procedure based on rodents' natural tendency to explore novel objects which is frequently used for memory testing. However, in some instances novelty preference is replaced by familiarity preference, raising questions regarding the validity of novelty preference as a pure recognition memory index. Acute stress- and corticosterone administration-induced novel object preference disruption has been frequently interpreted as memory impairment; however, it is still not clear whether such effect can be actually attributed to either mnemonic disruption or altered novelty seeking. Seventy-five adult male Wistar rats were trained in an object recognition task and subjected to either acute stress or corticosterone administration to evaluate the effect of stress or corticosterone on an object recognition task. Acute stress was induced by restraining movement for 1 or 4h, ending 30 min before the sample trial. Corticosterone was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before the test trial which was performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial. Four-hour, but not 1-h, stress induced familiar object preference during the test trial performed 1h after the sample trial; however, acute stress had no effects on the test when performed 24h after sample trial. Systemic administration of corticosterone before the test trial performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial also resulted in familiar object preference. However, neither acute stress nor corticosterone induced changes in locomotor behaviour. Taken together, such results suggested that acute stress probably does not induce memory retrieval impairment but, instead, induces an emotional arousing state which motivates novelty avoidance.

  17. Corticosterone response to gestational stress and postpartum memory function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Zahra; Mehla, Jogender; Afrashteh, Navvab; Kolb, Bryan E; Mohajerani, Majid H

    2017-01-01

    Maternal stress is a common adversity during pregnancy. Gestational corticosterone alternations are thought to contribute to the etiology of postpartum behavioral disturbances. However, the impact of stress during pregnancy, in particular noise exposure, on gestational corticosterone fluctuations and spatial cognition in postpartum mice has not been fully understood yet. We hypothesized that noise exposure during pregnancy negatively affects gestational corticosterone levels and postpartum memory function in the dams similar to the physical stressors. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to either one of two stress conditions or a control condition. The noise stress (NS) was induced by presenting a loud intermittent 3000 Hz frequency on gestational days (GDs) 12, 14, and 16 for 24 hours, whereas the physical stress (PS) consisted of restraint and exposure to an elevated platform on GDs 12-16. Plasma corticosterone level was collected on GDs 11 and 17, and Morris water task (MWT) was carried out 30 days after parturition. Compared to the control group, the level of corticosterone in the stressed groups was significantly increased on GD17 relative to GD11. Significantly longer swim time and lower swim speed were observed in both stressed groups relative to the control group. Probe time was significantly shorter in the NS group than the other groups. The delta corticosterone level was significantly correlated with the swim time as well as the probe time in the three groups. Given the results, the adverse effects of gestational noise exposure on the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation and postpartum spatial learning and memory function were as large as/ or a bit stronger than the physical stresses. The findings suggest the significance of conservation against loud noise exposure in daily living, as well as need to further notice to the different aspects of gestational stress in mothers' behavior like offspring.

  18. Protracted treatment with corticosterone reduces breeding success in a long-lived bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bethany F; Daunt, Francis; Monaghan, Pat; Wanless, Sarah; Butler, Adam; Heidinger, Britt J; Newell, Mark; Dawson, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    Determining the physiological mechanisms underpinning life-history decisions is essential for understanding the constraints under which life-history strategies can evolve. In long-lived species, where the residual reproductive value of breeders is high, adult survival is a key contributor to lifetime reproductive success. We therefore expect that when adult survival is compromised during reproduction, mechanisms will evolve to redirect resources away from reproduction, with implications for reproductive hormones, adult body mass, nest attendance behaviour and breeding success. We investigated whether manipulating corticosterone, to simulate exposure to an environmental stressor, affected the secretion of prolactin and breeding success in the black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla. We used implanted Alzet® osmotic pumps to administer corticosterone to incubating kittiwakes at a constant rate over a period of approximately 8days. Manipulated birds were compared with sham implanted birds and control birds, which had no implants. There was no significant difference in the body mass of captured individuals at the time of implantation and implant removal. Corticosterone-implanted males showed lower nest attendance during the chick rearing period compared to sham-implanted males; the opposite pattern was found in females. Corticosterone treated birds showed a marginally significant reduction in breeding success compared to sham-implanted individuals, with all failures occurring at least 1week after implant removal. However, prolactin concentrations at implant removal were not significantly different from initial values. We were unable to measure the profile of change in corticosterone during the experiment. However, our results suggest a delayed effect of elevated corticosterone on breeding success rather than an immediate suppression of prolactin concentrations causing premature failure.

  19. Corticosterone Time-Dependently Modulates [beta]-Adrenergic Effects on Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zhenwei; Krugers, Harm J.; Joels, Marian

    2007-01-01

    Previous experiments in the hippocampal CA1 area have shown that corticosterone can facilitate long-term potentiation (LTP) in a rapid non-genomic fashion, while the same hormone suppresses LTP that is induced several hours after hormone application. Here, we elaborated on this finding by examining whether corticosterone exerts opposite effects on…

  20. Effect of Corticosterone and Hen Body Mass on Primary Sex Ratio in Laying Hen (Gallusgallus), Using Unincubated Eggs1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslam, M.A.; Groothuis, T.G.G.; Smits, M.A.; Woelders, H.

    2014-01-01

    In various studies, chronic elevation of corticosterone levels in female birds under natural or experimental conditions resulted in female biased offspring sex ratios. In chicken, one study with injected corticosterone resulted in a male sex ratio bias. In the current study, we chronically elevated

  1. Forced desynchrony reveals independent contributions of suprachiasmatic oscillators to the daily plasma corticosterone rhythm in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotus, Cheryl; Lilley, Travis R; Neal, Adam S; Suleiman, Nicole L; Schmuck, Stefanie C; Smarr, Benjamin L; Fischer, Brian J; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is required for the daily rhythm of plasma glucocorticoids; however, the independent contributions from oscillators within the different subregions of the SCN to the glucocorticoid rhythm remain unclear. Here, we use genetically and neurologically intact, forced desynchronized rats to test the hypothesis that the daily rhythm of the glucocorticoid, corticosterone, is regulated by both light responsive and light-dissociated circadian oscillators in the ventrolateral (vl-) and dorsomedial (dm-) SCN, respectively. We show that when the vlSCN and dmSCN are in maximum phase misalignment, the peak of the plasma corticosterone rhythm is shifted and the amplitude reduced; whereas, the peak of the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) rhythm is also reduced, the phase is dissociated from that of the corticosterone rhythm. These data support previous studies suggesting an ACTH-independent pathway contributes to the corticosterone rhythm. To determine if either SCN subregion independently regulates corticosterone through the sympathetic nervous system, we compared unilateral adrenalectomized, desynchronized rats that had undergone either transection of the thoracic splanchnic nerve or sham transection to the remaining adrenal. Splanchnicectomy reduced and phase advanced the peak of both the corticosterone and ACTH rhythms. These data suggest that both the vlSCN and dmSCN contribute to the corticosterone rhythm by both reducing plasma ACTH and differentially regulating plasma corticosterone through an ACTH- and sympathetic nervous system-independent pathway.

  2. Forced desynchrony reveals independent contributions of suprachiasmatic oscillators to the daily plasma corticosterone rhythm in male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Wotus

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN is required for the daily rhythm of plasma glucocorticoids; however, the independent contributions from oscillators within the different subregions of the SCN to the glucocorticoid rhythm remain unclear. Here, we use genetically and neurologically intact, forced desynchronized rats to test the hypothesis that the daily rhythm of the glucocorticoid, corticosterone, is regulated by both light responsive and light-dissociated circadian oscillators in the ventrolateral (vl- and dorsomedial (dm- SCN, respectively. We show that when the vlSCN and dmSCN are in maximum phase misalignment, the peak of the plasma corticosterone rhythm is shifted and the amplitude reduced; whereas, the peak of the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH rhythm is also reduced, the phase is dissociated from that of the corticosterone rhythm. These data support previous studies suggesting an ACTH-independent pathway contributes to the corticosterone rhythm. To determine if either SCN subregion independently regulates corticosterone through the sympathetic nervous system, we compared unilateral adrenalectomized, desynchronized rats that had undergone either transection of the thoracic splanchnic nerve or sham transection to the remaining adrenal. Splanchnicectomy reduced and phase advanced the peak of both the corticosterone and ACTH rhythms. These data suggest that both the vlSCN and dmSCN contribute to the corticosterone rhythm by both reducing plasma ACTH and differentially regulating plasma corticosterone through an ACTH- and sympathetic nervous system-independent pathway.

  3. Plasma corticosterone levels in laying hens from three different housing systems: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Asdrubali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical and thyroidal hormones are physiological indicators of various forms of stress in the fowl. In order to establish possible variations in corticosterone levels, blood samples were collected from ISA Brown hens reared in three different housing systems (cage, floor and organic way. Results showed that corticosterone concentrations were highest in caged hens, intermediate in organic reared hens and lowest in floor reared hens. It could be assumed that in the last one system birds have an adequate space in controlled environment that permits them to satisfy, though partially, their behavioural needs without the presence of different chronic stress factors acting in the other systems.

  4. Inhibitory effects of digoxin and digitoxin on corticosterone production in rat zona fasciculata-reticularis cells

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the direct effects and action mechanisms of digitalis on the production of corticosterone in rat adrenocortical cells.Male rats were challenged with digoxin (1 μg ml−1 kg−1) in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH, 5 μg ml−1 kg−1) administered by intravenous injection to the right jugular vein. Blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, and 120 min following the challenge. The concentration of corticosterone in the rat plasma sam...

  5. Effect of corticosterone and hen body mass on primary sex ratio in laying hen (Gallus gallus), using unincubated eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad Aamir; Groothuis, Ton G G; Smits, Mari A; Woelders, Henri

    2014-04-01

    In various studies, chronic elevation of corticosterone levels in female birds under natural or experimental conditions resulted in female biased offspring sex ratios. In chicken, one study with injected corticosterone resulted in a male sex ratio bias. In the current study, we chronically elevated blood plasma corticosterone levels through corticosterone feeding (20 mg/kg feed) for 14 days using 30 chicken hens in each of treatment and control groups and studied the primary offspring sex ratio (here defined as the proportion of male fertile eggs determined in freshly laid eggs, i.e., without egg incubation). Mean plasma corticosterone concentrations were significantly higher in the treatment group but were not associated with sex ratio, laying rate, and fertility rate. Corticosterone treatment by itself did not affect egg sex but affected sex ratio as well as laying rate and fertility rate in interaction with hen body mass. Body mass had a negative association with sex ratio, laying rate, and fertility rate per hen in the corticosterone group, but a positive association with sex ratio in untreated hens. These interactions were already seen when taking the body mass at the beginning of the experiment, indicating intrinsic differences between light and heavy hens with regard to their reaction to corticosterone treatment. The effects on laying rate, fertility rate, and sex ratio suggest that some factor related to body mass act together with corticosterone to modulate ovarian functions. We propose that corticosterone treatment in conjunction with hen body mass can interfere with meiosis, which can lead to meiotic drive and to chromosomal aberrations resulting in postponed ovulation or infertile ova.

  6. Baseline corticosterone levels are higher in migrating than sedentary common blackbirds in autumn, but not in spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenaar, Cas; Müller, Florian; Klinner, Thomas; Bairlein, Franz

    2015-12-01

    Corticosterone at baseline levels is thought to be mainly involved in the regulation of uptake, storage and release of energy, processes central to avian migration. Consequently, corticosterone levels are thought to be upregulated during migration, but the temporal pattern of its secretion during migration is not well defined. For example, although it appears that corticosterone levels decrease from flight to stopover, it is unknown if levels at stopover are still elevated and it is largely unclear how these levels compare to non-migratory life-history stages. Furthermore, what role corticosterone plays in crucial migratory processes, such as refueling and departure from stopover, is far from understood. We here determined baseline corticosterone levels in migrating and resident common blackbirds (Turdus merula), sampled simultaneously on Helgoland, a stopover site that also supports a sedentary breeding population. In autumn, migrants had higher corticosterone levels than residents, but in spring levels did not differ between the two groups. Corticosterone levels of migrants were very similar in spring and autumn, whereas in residents levels tended to be higher in spring than autumn. Higher levels in residents in spring than autumn most likely reflect the higher daily workload faced by birds during the pre-breeding than the post-breeding period. Our study thus indicates that, relative to the levels observed in residents in autumn, in spring baseline corticosterone levels were moderately elevated in both migrants and residents and that in autumn levels were moderately elevated in migrants only. Currently, corticosterone's main function at stopover is thought to lie in the regulation of departure. Because most migrant blackbirds stay only one or two days on Helgoland, our results are in line with this idea and suggest that migrating blackbirds up-regulated their corticosterone level in anticipation of an oncoming flight bout.

  7. Timing is essential for rapid effects of corticosterone on synaptic potentiation in the mouse hippocampus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegert, O.; Joëls, M.; Krugers, H.

    2006-01-01

    Stress facilitates memory formation, but only when the stressor is closely linked to the learning context. These effects are, at least in part, mediated by corticosteroid hormones. Here we demonstrate that corticosterone rapidly facilitates synaptic potentiation in the mouse hippocampal CA1 area

  8. Timing is Essential for Rapid Effects of Corticosterone on Synaptic Potentiation in the Mouse Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joels, Marian; Krugers, Harm; Wiegert, Olof

    2006-01-01

    Stress facilitates memory formation, but only when the stressor is closely linked to the learning context. These effects are, at least in part, mediated by corticosteroid hormones. Here we demonstrate that corticosterone rapidly facilitates synaptic potentiation in the mouse hippocampal CA1 area when high levels of the hormone and high-frequency…

  9. Corticosterone Administration to Promote Fear Memory Forgetting in an Animal Model of PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    suggests that systemic administration of corticosterone can enhance the memory forgetting process in animals and in healthy humans (de Quervain ...Aerni, A., et al. "Low-dose cortisol for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder." Am.J.Psychiatry 161.8 (2004): 1488-90. 12 de Quervain , D. J

  10. Experimental test of the effect of introduced hematophagous flies on corticosterone levels of breeding Darwin's finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutie, Sarah A; Koop, Jennifer A H; French, Susannah S; Clayton, Dale H

    2013-11-01

    Parasites can negatively affect the evolutionary fitness of their hosts by eliciting physiological stress responses. Parasite-induced stress can be monitored by measuring changes in the adrenal steroid hormone corticosterone. We examined the effect of an invasive parasite on the corticosterone concentrations of a common species of Darwin's finch, the medium ground finch (Geospiza fortis). Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae) is a parasitic nest fly recently introduced to the Galapagos Islands, where it feeds on the blood of nestlings and breeding adult female finches. Previous work shows that P. downsi significantly reduces the reproductive success of several species of finches. We predicted that the effect of P. downsi on host reproductive success is mediated by stress responses in breeding female finches. High stress levels could reduce the ability of females to invest in offspring, thus decreasing their reproductive success. To test this hypothesis, we experimentally manipulated the abundance of P. downsi in nests, then measured baseline and acute stress-induced corticosterone levels, body condition, and hematocrit (red blood cell content). Acute stress-induced corticosterone levels increased over baseline levels, but this response did not differ significantly with parasite treatment. There was also no significant difference in the body condition or hematocrit of females from parasitized versus non-parasitized nests. Our results suggest that the lower reproductive success of females from parasitized nests is not mediated by a physiological stress response.

  11. Corticosterone infused into the dorsal striatum selectively enhances memory consolidation of cued water-maze training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirarte, Gina L.; Sofia Ledesma de la Teja, I.; Casillas, Miriam; Serafin, Norma; Prado-Alcala, Roberto A.; Roozendaal, Benno

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones enhance memory consolidation of hippocampus-dependent spatial/contextual learning, but little is known about their possible influence on the consolidation of procedural/implicit memory. Therefore, in this study we examined the effect of corticosterone (2, 5, or 10 ng) infused

  12. Influence of corticosterone on FSH-induced ovarian recrudescence in the lizard Mabuya carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijagal, B S; Yajurvedi, H N

    1999-09-01

    Administration of bovine FSH (10 IU/lizard/alternate day for 30 days) in the postbreeding quiescent phase of the ovarian cycle caused a significant increase in the mean number of oogonia and oocytes, the relative weight of the oviduct, and the liver and serum estradiol levels compared to those of controls. In addition, the FSH-treated lizards showed a vitellogenic growth of follicles and development through to preovulatory follicles. However, the administration of corticosterone simultaneously with FSH (10 IU FSH + 40 microgram corticosterone/lizard/alternate day for 30 days) did not result in these changes and the ovaries resembled those of controls. The results indicate the absence of ovarian refractoriness to gonadotropic stimulation during the quiescent phase of the reproductive cycle and inhibition of FSH-induced ovarian recrudescence by corticosterone. It is suggested that corticosterone treatment reduces FSH-induced steroidogenic activity of the ovary, leads to impairment in vitellogenin secretion by the liver, and results as well in the failure of vitellogenic follicular growth in Mabuya carinata.

  13. Corticosterone infused into the dorsal striatum selectively enhances memory consolidation of cued water-maze training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirarte, Gina L.; Sofia Ledesma de la Teja, I.; Casillas, Miriam; Serafin, Norma; Prado-Alcala, Roberto A.; Roozendaal, Benno

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones enhance memory consolidation of hippocampus-dependent spatial/contextual learning, but little is known about their possible influence on the consolidation of procedural/implicit memory. Therefore, in this study we examined the effect of corticosterone (2, 5, or 10 ng) infused

  14. Relative binding affinity of steroids for the corticosterone receptor system in rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kloet, E R; Veldhuis, H D; Wagenaars, J L; Bergink, E W

    1984-01-01

    In cytosol of the hippocampus corticosterone displays highest affinity for the sites that remain available for binding in the presence of excess RU 26988, which is shown to be a "pure" glucocorticoid. A rather high affinity (greater than or equal to 25%) was found for 11 beta-hydroxyprogesterone, 21

  15. Plasma catecholamine, corticosterone and glucose responses to repeated stress in rats : Effect of interstressor interval length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, S.F.; Koopmans, S.J.; Slangen, J L; Van der Gugten, J

    1990-01-01

    Plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A), corticosterone (CS) and glucose concentrations were determined in blood frequently sampled via a cardiac catheter from freely behaving rats exposed to five successive trials of water-immersion stress (WIS) with an interval between successive trials (interst

  16. Delayed behavioral effects of postnatal exposure to corticosterone in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spencer, K. A.; Verhulst, S.

    2007-01-01

    Early developmental conditions can significantly influence the growth and survival of many animal species. We studied the consequences of exposure to corticosterone (CORT), a stress hormone, during the nestling stage on two behavioral traits (neophobia, social dominance) measured when the birds had

  17. Direct activating effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) on brown adipose tissue are attenuated by corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Beukel, Johanna C; Grefhorst, Aldo; Quarta, Carmelo; Steenbergen, Jacobie; Mastroberardino, Pier G; Lombès, Marc; Delhanty, Patric J; Mazza, Roberta; Pagotto, Uberto; van der Lely, Aart Jan; Themmen, Axel P N

    2014-11-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) and brown-like cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) can dissipate energy through thermogenesis, a process mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). We investigated whether stress hormones ACTH and corticosterone contribute to BAT activation and browning of WAT. ACTH and corticosterone were studied in male mice exposed to 4 or 23°C for 24 h. Direct effects were studied in T37i mouse brown adipocytes and primary cultured murine BAT and inguinal WAT (iWAT) cells. In vivo effects were studied using (18)F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Cold exposure doubled serum ACTH concentrations (P=0.03) and fecal corticosterone excretion (P=0.008). In T37i cells, ACTH dose-dependently increased Ucp1 mRNA (EC50=1.8 nM) but also induced Ucp1 protein content 88% (P=0.02), glycerol release 32% (P=0.03) and uncoupled respiration 40% (P=0.003). In cultured BAT and iWAT, ACTH elevated Ucp1 mRNA by 3-fold (P=0.03) and 3.7-fold (P=0.01), respectively. In T37i cells, corticosterone prevented induction of Ucp1 mRNA and Ucp1 protein by both ACTH and norepinephrine in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent fashion. ACTH and GR antagonist RU486 independently doubled BAT (18)F-deoxyglucose uptake (P=0.0003 and P=0.004, respectively) in vivo. Our results show that ACTH activates BAT and browning of WAT while corticosterone counteracts this. © FASEB.

  18. TCDD and corticosterone on testicular steroidogenesis and antioxidant system of epididymal sperm in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanabalan, S; Mathur, P P; Latha, P

    2015-09-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an endocrine-disrupting environmental pollutant, has been found to cause male reproductive toxicity. Glucocorticoids have been found to influence the metabolic pathway of TCDD. Stress, which affects the male reproductive function, is marked by an increase in the level and activity of glucocorticoids in the body. The present study was carried out to understand the effect of TCDD on testicular steroidogenesis and sperm antioxidant system under the influence of increased level of corticosterone in the body. Adult male rats were treated with either TCDD (100 ng/kg bw/ day) or corticosterone (3 mg/kg bw/day) or both for 15 days. Treatment with either TCDD or corticosterone was found to suppress the levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and androgen-binding protein and reduce the activities of steroidogenic enzymes in testis while increasing oxidative stress in ventral prostate, seminal vesicles and epididymal sperm. In rats treated with both TCDD and corticosterone, the suppression of testicular steroidogenesis and increase in oxidative stress observed in ventral prostate, seminal vesicles and epididymal sperm were significant as compared to TCDD alone treated rats. The levels of Fas and FasL proteins were also increased in rats subjected to either TCDD or corticosterone treatment. In rats treated with both compounds, the increase observed in testicular levels of Fas and FasL was significant as compared to TCDD alone treated rats. Effect of TCDD on testicular steroidogenesis and antioxidant system of epididymal sperm may get enhanced under increased level of glucocorticoids in the body.

  19. Enduring neurobehavioral effects of early life trauma mediated through learning and corticosterone suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Moriceau

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Early life trauma alters later life emotions, including fear. To better understand mediating mechanisms, we subjected pups to either predictable or unpredictable trauma, in the form of paired or unpaired odor-0.5mA shock conditioning which, during a sensitive period, produces an odor preference and no learning respectively. Fear conditioning and its neural correlates were then assessed after the sensitive period at postnatal day (PN13 or in adulthood, ages when amygdala-dependent fear occurs. Our results revealed that paired odor-shock conditioning starting during the sensitive period (PN8-12 blocked fear conditioning in older infants (PN13 and pups continued to express olfactory bulb-dependent odor preference learning. This PN13 fear learning inhibition was also associated with suppression of shock-induced corticosterone, although the age appropriate amygdala-dependent fear learning was reinstated with systemic corticosterone (3mg/kg during conditioning. On the other hand, sensitive period odor-shock conditioning did not prevent adult fear conditioning, although freezing, amygdala and hippocampal 2-DG uptake and corticosterone levels were attenuated compared to adult conditioning without infant conditioning. Normal levels of freezing, amygdala and hippocampal 2-DG uptake were induced with systemic corticosterone (5mg/kg during adult conditioning. These results suggest that the contingency of early life trauma mediates at least some effects of early life stress through learning and suppression of corticosterone levels. However, developmental differences between infants and adults are expressed with PN13 infants’ learning consistent with the original learned preference, while adult conditioning overrides the original learned preference with attenuated amygdala-dependent fear learning.

  20. The effect of morphine consumption on plasma corticosteron concentration and placenta development in pregnant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Kazemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have shown that morphine consumption during pregnancy may delay embryo development or cause abnormal nervous system function. Objective: The present study focused on the effect of maternal morphine consumption on development of placenta and blood corticosteron concentration in addictive pregnant mothers.Materials and Methods: 24 female rats, 170-200g weight, were used. The experimental groups after pregnancy received an oral dose of 0.05 mg/ml of morphine by tap water while the control group received only tap water. On 10th and 14th day of pregnancy, rats were anesthetized and placenta removed surgically, 1ml blood was collected from each pregnant mother from retro-orbital sinus, the concentration of blood corticosteron was determined by corticosteron Elisa kit after centrifugation. The fixed tissue was processed, sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Placenta was studied microscopically according to the thickness of layers, area of blood cisterns, and the number of cells.Results: Comparing the plasma corticosteron concentration of the treatment and the control groups, not only a severe increase in the treatment group was detected, but also the thickness of maternal and embryonic portions of the placenta at day 10th and 14th of gestation was different significantly (p≤0.05. Furthermore, an increase in number of cells in maternal and embryonic portion of placenta and a decrease in blood cistern area were demonstrated in both the experimental and the control groups.Conclusion: The effects of morphine, including an increase in blood concentration of corticosteron, in dependent pregnant mothers were seen. Development of placenta in the experimental group was delayed.

  1. Corticosterone regulates both naturally occurring and cocaine-induced dopamine signaling by selectively decreasing dopamine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Ebben, Amanda L; Kurtoglu, Beliz; Lovell, Marissa E; Bohn, Austin T; Jasek, Isabella A; Baker, David A; Mantsch, John R; Gasser, Paul J; Wheeler, Robert A

    2017-10-01

    Stressful and aversive events promote maladaptive reward-seeking behaviors such as drug addiction by acting, in part, on the mesolimbic dopamine system. Using animal models, data from our lab and others show that stress and cocaine can interact to produce a synergistic effect on reward circuitry. This effect is also observed when the stress hormone corticosterone is administered directly into the nucleus accumbens (NAc), indicating that glucocorticoids act locally in dopamine terminal regions to enhance cocaine's effects on dopamine signaling. However, prior studies in behaving animals have not provided mechanistic insight. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, we examined the effect of systemic corticosterone on spontaneous dopamine release events (transients) in the NAc core and shell in behaving rats. A physiologically relevant systemic injection of corticosterone (2 mg/kg i.p.) induced an increase in dopamine transient amplitude and duration (both voltammetric measures sensitive to decreases in dopamine clearance), but had no effect on the frequency of transient release events. This effect was compounded by cocaine (2.5 mg/kg i.p.). However, a second experiment indicated that the same injection of corticosterone had no detectable effect on the dopaminergic encoding of a palatable natural reward (saccharin). Taken together, these results suggest that corticosterone interferes with naturally-occurring dopamine uptake locally, and this effect is a critical determinant of dopamine concentration specifically in situations in which the dopamine transporter is pharmacologically blocked by cocaine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Short-term, high-dose administration of corticosterone by injection facilitates trace eyeblink conditioning in young male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth-Eidsaune, Christine L; Hennessy, Michael B; Claflin, Dragana I

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids released as part of the physiological response to stress are known to affect cognitive function, presumably via effects on the hippocampus. Trace classical eyeblink conditioning is an associative learning task which depends on the hippocampus and has been used to examine the development of learning processes in young mammals. Previously, we demonstrated deficits in trace eyeblink conditioning associated with postnatal administration of the glucocorticoid corticosterone by creating a sustained elevation with methods such as subcutaneous timed-release pellets and osmotic mini-pumps which were active over several days. In the present study, we examined the effects of an oscillating pattern of corticosterone elevation on subsequent trace eyeblink conditioning. Twice daily corticosterone injections (high, low, or vehicle) were administered over a 3-day period, starting at postnatal day 15. Then, on postnatal day 28, animals underwent trace classical eyeblink conditioning to examine the possible influence of earlier corticosterone elevations on the development of learning and memory. Eyeblink conditioning was affected by corticosterone treatments, but only for males, and only very early in acquisition; Males receiving the high dose of corticosterone exhibited facilitation of learning relative to controls. These data demonstrate that oscillating corticosterone elevations produce opposite effects on this associative learning task than do sustained elevations.

  3. Delayed effects of corticosterone on slow after-hyperpolarization potentials in mouse hippocampal versus prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup G Pillai

    Full Text Available The rodent stress hormone corticosterone changes neuronal activity in a slow and persistent manner through transcriptional regulation. In the rat dorsal hippocampus, corticosterone enhances the amplitude of calcium-dependent potassium currents that cause a lingering slow after-hyperpolarization (sAHP at the end of depolarizing events. In this study we compared the putative region-dependency of the delayed effects of corticosterone (approximately 5 hrs after treatment on sAHP as well as other active and passive properties of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from three prefrontal areas, i.e. the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortex, with the hippocampus of adult mice. In agreement with previous studies, corticosterone increased sAHP amplitude in the dorsal hippocampus with depolarizing steps of increasing amplitude. However, in the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortices we did not observe any modifications of sAHP amplitude after corticosterone treatment. Properties of single action potentials or % ratio of the last spike interval with respect to the first spike interval, an indicator of accommodation in an action potential train, were not significantly affected by corticosterone in all brain regions examined. Lastly, corticosterone treatment did not induce any lasting changes in passive membrane properties of hippocampal or cortical neurons. Overall, the data indicate that corticosterone slowly and very persistently increases the sAHP amplitude in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, while this is not the case in the cortical regions examined. This implies that changes in excitability across brain regions reached by corticosterone may vary over a prolonged period of time after stress.

  4. The corticosterone synthesis inhibitor metyrapone prevents hypoxia/ischemia-induced loss of synaptic function in the rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krugers, HJ; Maslam, S; Korf, J; Joëls, M

    2000-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Ischemia is accompanied by abundant corticosterone secretion, which could potentially exacerbate brain damage via activation of glucocorticoid receptors. We addressed whether manipulating steroid levels during ischemia affects hippocampal synaptic function along with neuronal

  5. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone

    OpenAIRE

    Gaelle eDominguez; Pierre eFaucher; Nadia eHenkous; Ali eKrazem; Christophe ePierard; Daniel eBeracochea

    2014-01-01

    Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (dHPC) in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1...

  6. Effects of exogenous corticosterone on locomotor activity in the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, W B; Holberton, R L

    1999-11-01

    We investigated the effects of exogenous corticosterone on the locomotor activity of captive red-eared slider turtles, Trachemys scripta elegans. An increase in plasma corticosterone often increases locomotor activity in mammals and birds, but there are no reported findings for turtles. In this study turtles implanted with corticosterone-filled Silastic((R)) implants showed a significant increase in caged locomotor activity when compared to control animals with empty implants. Corticosterone-treated turtles also showed a significant increase in plasma corticosterone concentration when pre-trial plasma samples were compared to post-trial plasma samples, while control turtles exhibited no such increase, validating the effectiveness of our implants to deliver corticosterone. Although corticosterone remained high at the end of the activity trials, the increase in activity was ephemeral in nature, peaking within 48 hr after the implant was in place. This suggests that the effects of corticosterone on behavior may be context-dependent (i.e., whether the turtles can find food) and concentration-dependent, and that there are underlying physiological mechanisms, perhaps mediated at the receptor level in the brain, involved in locomotor activity behavior in slider turtles. Environmental perturbations that cause a reduction in available food resources may cause the organism to increase its level of locomotor activity to increase food encounter rate but later reduce activity to conserve energy reserves. These data are important when considering behavioral and physiological mechanisms involved in a turtle's response to changing conditions in habitat quality. J. Exp. Zool. 284:637-644, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex-dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaelle eDominguez; Pierre eFaucher; Nadia eHenkous; Ali eKrazem; Christophe ePierard; Daniel eBeracochea

    2014-01-01

    Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (dHPC) in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1...

  8. Plasma concentrations of corticosterone and buprenorphine in rats subjected to jugular vein catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldkuhl, Renée; Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Kalliokoski, Otto Henrik;

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the postoperative plasma concentrations of corticosterone and buprenorphine in male Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats, treated with buprenorphine administered either through subcutaneous (SC) injection or through voluntary ingestion (VI). The animals were treated...... with buprenorphine for pre-emptive analgesia prior to surgical placement of a jugular catheter, followed by automated blood sampling during 96 h. Buprenorphine was administered on a regular basis throughout the experiment, and blood was collected on selected time points. Body weight was measured before and 96 h...... after surgery. It was found that the two rat stocks responded in a similar manner to both buprenorphine treatments, with the exception of body weight change in Wistar rats, in which body weight was reduced after SC treatment. The plasma concentration of corticosterone was significantly higher in the SC...

  9. Blood concentrations of lactate, glucose and corticosterone in dispersing hatchling sea turtles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M. Pereira

    2012-11-01

    Natal dispersal of sea turtles is an energetically demanding activity that is fuelled primarily by aerobic metabolism. However, during intense exercise reptiles can use anaerobic metabolism to supplement their energy requirements. We assessed anaerobic metabolism in dispersing hatchling loggerhead and flatback turtles by measuring the concentrations of blood lactate during crawling and at different times during the first four hours of their frenzy swim. We also measured concentrations of blood glucose and corticosterone. Blood lactate (12.13 to 2.03 mmol/L, glucose (6.25 to 3.8 mmol/L and corticosterone (8.13 to 2.01 ng/mL concentrations decreased significantly over time in both loggerhead and flatback hatchlings and no significant differences were found between the species. These results indicate that anaerobic metabolism makes a significant contribution to the dispersal phase of hatchling sea turtles during the beach crawl and the first few hours of the frenzy swim.

  10. A non-invasive stress assay shows that tadpole populations infected with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis have elevated corticosterone levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin R Gabor

    Full Text Available Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd is a fungus that causes the disease chytridiomycosis and is associated with widespread amphibian declines. Populations vary in their susceptibility to Bd infections, and the virulence of the infecting lineage can also vary. Both of these factors may manifest as a differential physiological stress response. In addition, variation in disease susceptibility across amphibian populations may be influenced by immunosuppression caused by chronic stress imposed by environmental factors. Here, we use a non-invasive water-borne hormone technique to assess stress levels (corticosterone of free-living tadpole populations that are infected by Bd. We found that corticosterone release rates were higher in infected populations of two species of tadpoles (Alytes obstetricans and A. muletensis than in an uninfected population for both species. The relationship between corticosterone and the intensity of infection differed between species, with only the infected A. obstetricans population showing a significant positive correlation. The higher corticosterone release rates found in A. obstetricans may be an outcome of infection by a highly virulent lineage of Bd (BdGPL, whereas A. muletensis is infected with a less virulent lineage (BdCAPE. These results suggest that different lineages of Bd impose different levels of stress on the infected animals, and that this may influence survival. The next step is to determine whether higher corticosterone levels make individuals more susceptible to Bd or if Bd infections drive the higher corticosterone levels.

  11. Imipramine protects against the deleterious effects of chronic corticosterone on depression-like behavior, hippocampal reelin expression, and neuronal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Erin Y; Fournier, Neil M; Lussier, April L; Romay-Tallon, Raquel; Caruncho, Hector J; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2015-07-03

    We have hypothesized that a downregulation of reelin and deficient maturation of adult-born hippocampal neurons are important factors in the pathogenesis of depression. This hypothesis is based on previous work showing that depression-like behavior in rats treated with protracted corticosterone develops in concert with decreased dendritic complexity in newborn hippocampal granule neurons and decreased reelin expression in the proliferative subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. In addition, heterozygous reeler mice with approximately 50% of normal brain levels of reelin are more vulnerable to the depressogenic effects of corticosterone than wild-type mice. The purpose of this experiment was to provide pharmacological validation for the link between reelin, neuronal maturation, and depression by examining whether the deleterious effects of corticosterone on these measures could be prevented by co-administration of the antidepressant imipramine. Rats received corticosterone injections, corticosterone injections plus either 10 or 15mg/kg imipramine injections, or vehicle injections for 21 consecutive days. They were then subjected to the forced swim test to assess depression-like behavior and sacrificed for immunohistochemical examination of immature neuron number and dendritic complexity and the presence of reelin+cells. We found that corticosterone increases depression-like behavior, decreases the number of reelin+cells in the subgranular zone, and decreases the number and complexity of immature neurons in the granule cell layer. All of these behavioral and cellular phenotypes were prevented by imipramine, providing further support for the idea that reelin is involved in the pathogenesis of depression.

  12. Long-lasting increase of corticosterone after fear memory reactivation: anxiolytic effects and network activity modulation in the ventral hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Anne; Çalışkan, Gürsel; Oitzl, Melly S; Heinemann, Uwe; Stork, Oliver

    2013-02-01

    Pathological fear and anxiety can be studied, in rodents, with fear conditioning and exposure to reminder cues. These paradigms are thought to critically involve the ventral hippocampus, which also serves as key site of glucocorticoid action in the brain. Here, we demonstrate a long-lasting reduction of kainate-induced gamma oscillations in slice preparations of the ventral hippocampal area CA3, 30 days after a single fear conditioning training. Reduction of gamma power was sensitive to corticosterone application and associated with a decrease in glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA expression across strata of the ventral hippocampal CA3. A fear reactivation session 24 h after the initial conditioning normalized receptor expression levels and attenuated the corticosterone-mediated recovery of gamma oscillations. It moreover increased both baseline and stimulus-induced corticosterone plasma levels and evoked a generalization of fear memory to the background context. Reduced ventral hippocampal gamma oscillation in both fear reactivated and non-reactivated mice were associated with a decrease of anxiety-like behavior in an elevated plus maze. Taking advantage of the circadian fluctuation in corticosterone, we demonstrated the association of high endogenous basal corticosterone plasma concentrations during morning hours with reduced anxiety-like behavior in fear reactivated mice. The anxiolytic effect of the hormone was verified with local applications to the ventral hippocampus. Our data suggest that corticosterone acting on ventral hippocampal network activity has anxiolytic-like effects following fear exposure, highlighting its potential therapeutic value for anxiety disorders.

  13. Context-dependent effects of feather corticosterone on growth rate and fledging success of wild passerine nestlings in heterogeneous habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodjak, Jaanis; Mägi, Marko; Rooni, Uku; Tilgar, Vallo

    2015-12-01

    Life history theory seeks answers to questions about how suites of traits, like growth rate, body mass and survival, have coevolved to maximize the fitness of individuals. In stochastic environments, individual fitness may be closely linked to environmental conditions experienced early in life. When conditions deteriorate, animals have to adapt physiologically to avoid detrimental effects to growth and survival. Hormones such as glucocorticoids are potentially important mediators of developmental plasticity, although their function is quite poorly understood in free-living animals to date. In this study, we used brood-size manipulation in wild great tits (Parus major) to see whether resource (e.g. food) availability can change feather corticosterone levels, somatic growth and fledging success in nestlings raised in habitats of different quality. Recent studies suggest that feather corticosterone offers a long-term hormonal measure for the main avian glucocorticoid by integrating the plasma levels of corticosterone over the whole nestling period. We showed that feather corticosterone, growth rate and fledging success were significantly affected by the treatment only in coniferous forests where growth conditions had a tendency to be poorer than in deciduous forests. We also found that feather corticosterone was negatively related to fledging success, and this effect was more pronounced in coniferous habitat. Our results suggest that feather corticosterone could offer an important physiological measure for nestling performance, mediated by a context-dependent developmental trade-off between immediate and future survival.

  14. Conditioned taste aversion: modulation by 5-HT receptor activity and corticosterone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boris, Gorzalka; Hanson, Laura; Harrington, J

    2003-01-01

    Two experiments were designed to elucidate the involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system in the acquisition of lithium chloride-conditioned taste aversion. In Experiment 1, rats were administered either vehicle or 50 mg/kg nefazodone daily fo......, corticosterone-treated animals required more trials to reach extinction. These results suggest the involvement of both the 5-HT system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in lithium chloride-conditioned taste aversion....

  15. Excretion and measurement of corticosterone and testosterone metabolites in bank voles (Myodes glareolus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipari, Saana; Ylönen, Hannu; Palme, Rupert

    2017-03-01

    The bank vole is a commonly used model species in behavioral and ecophysiological studies. Thus, presenting a validated method for noninvasive monitoring of corticosterone and testosterone secretion is of high relevance. Here, we evaluated the effect of time of day and an ACTH challenge test on measured fecal corticosterone (FCM) and testosterone (FTM) metabolites in both sexes. Furthermore, we performed radiometabolism experiments for both steroids and sexes to study metabolism and excretion of (3)H-corticosterone and (3)H-testosterone. FCM and FTM were analysed with a 5α-pregnane-3β,11β,21-triol-20-one enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and a testosterone (measuring 17β-hydroxyandrostanes) EIA, respectively. Males had significantly higher FCM levels than females and their main excretion route was via the feces (∼72%), whereas females excreted nearly equal portions in both feces and urine. For testosterone the main excretion route was via the feces in both sexes (∼80%). The time course of excretion was similar in both sexes, but for the first time a significant difference between injected steroids was found: Corticosterone was excreted faster than testosterone, both in urine (median of peak levels: 4h vs 6h) and feces (6h vs 8h). Several metabolites were present in the feces and the tested EIAs reacted with some of them. Time of day had a significant effect on measured fecal steroid metabolites. As expected, males had significantly higher FTM levels than females. ACTH administration significantly increased FCM values; peaks were observed 4-8h after injection. In conclusion, both tested EIAs proved suited for a noninvasive measurement of glucocorticoids and androgens in bank voles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of morphine consumption on plasma corticosteron concentration and placenta development in pregnant rats

    OpenAIRE

    Masoomeh Kazemi; Hedayat Sahraei; Mahnaz Azarnia; Leila Dehghani; Hossein Bahadoran; Elaheh Tekieh1

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that morphine consumption during pregnancy may delay embryo development or cause abnormal nervous system function. Objective: The present study focused on the effect of maternal morphine consumption on development of placenta and blood corticosteron concentration in addictive pregnant mothers. Materials and Methods: 24 female rats, 170-200g weight, were used. The experimental groups after pregnancy received an oral dose of 0.05 mg/ml of morphine by tap ...

  17. Individual variation in corticosterone and personality traits in the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Source: Variation in personality traits is predicted to reflect physiology, but the extent to which variations in stress hormones derive from differences in personality and/or state-dependent factors remains unclear. To investigate this, wild blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) were briefly brought into captivity and scored for personality and corticosterone (Cort) concentrations. More active females had lower baseline Cort than less active individuals. Exploratory tendency and neophobia did not ...

  18. Reduced emotional and corticosterone responses to stress in μ-opioid receptor knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ide, Soichiro; Sora,Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Minami, Masabumi; Uhl, George R.; Ishihara, Kumatoshi

    2009-01-01

    The detailed mechanisms of emotional modulation in the nervous system by opioids remain to be elucidated, although the opioid system is well known to play important roles in the mechanisms of analgesia and drug dependence. In the present study, we conducted behavioral tests of anxiety and depression and measured corticosterone concentrations in both male and female μ-opioid receptor knockout (MOP-KO) mice to reveal the involvement of μ-opioid receptors in stress-induced emotional responses. M...

  19. Reduced emotional and corticosterone responses to stress in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Soichiro; Sora, Ichiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Minami, Masabumi; Uhl, George R; Ishihara, Kumatoshi

    2010-01-01

    The detailed mechanisms of emotional modulation in the nervous system by opioids remain to be elucidated, although the opioid system is well known to play important roles in the mechanisms of analgesia and drug dependence. In the present study, we conducted behavioral tests of anxiety and depression and measured corticosterone concentrations in both male and female mu-opioid receptor knockout (MOP-KO) mice to reveal the involvement of mu-opioid receptors in stress-induced emotional responses. MOP-KO mice entered more and spent more time in the open arms of the elevated plus maze compared with wild-type mice. MOP-KO mice also displayed significantly decreased immobility in a 15 min tail-suspension test compared with wild-type mice. Similarly, MOP-KO mice exhibited significantly decreased immobility on days 2, 3, and 4 in a 6 min forced swim test conducted for 5 consecutive days. The increase in plasma corticosterone concentration induced by tail-suspension, repeated forced swim, or restraint stress was reduced in MOP-KO mice compared with wild-type mice. Corticosterone levels were not different between wild-type and MOP-KO mice before stress exposure. In contrast, although female mice tended to exhibit fewer anxiety-like responses in the tail-suspension test in both genotypes, no significant gender differences were observed in stress-induced emotional responses. These results suggest that MOPs play an important facilitatory role in emotional responses to stress, including anxiety- and depression-like behavior and corticosterone levels.

  20. Feather corticosterone reveals stress associated with dietary changes in a breeding seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Alexis; Watanuki, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Dale M; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ito, Motohiro; Callahan, Matt; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Hatch, Scott; Elliott, Kyle; Slater, Leslie; Takahashi, Akinori; Kitaysky, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Changes in climate and anthropogenic pressures might affect the composition and abundance of forage fish in the world's oceans. The junk-food hypothesis posits that dietary shifts that affect the quality (e.g., energy content) of food available to marine predators may impact their physiological state and consequently affect their fitness. Previously, we experimentally validated that deposition of the adrenocortical hormone, corticosterone, in feathers is a sensitive measure of nutritional stress in seabirds. Here, we use this method to examine how changes in diet composition and prey quality affect the nutritional status of free-living rhinoceros auklets (Cerorhinca monocerata). Our study sites included the following: Teuri Is. Japan, Middleton Is. central Gulf of Alaska, and St. Lazaria Is. Southeast Alaska. In 2012 and 2013, we collected "bill loads" delivered by parents to feed their chicks (n = 758) to document dietary changes. We deployed time-depth-temperature recorders on breeding adults (n = 47) to evaluate whether changes in prey coincided with changes in foraging behavior. We measured concentrations of corticosterone in fledgling (n = 71) and adult breeders' (n = 82) feathers to determine how birds were affected by foraging conditions. We found that seasonal changes in diet composition occurred on each colony, adults dove deeper and engaged in longer foraging bouts when capturing larger prey and that chicks had higher concentrations of corticosterone in their feathers when adults brought back smaller and/or lower energy prey. Corticosterone levels in feathers of fledglings (grown during the breeding season) and those in feathers of adult breeders (grown during the postbreeding season) were positively correlated, indicating possible carryover effects. These results suggest that seabirds might experience increased levels of nutritional stress associated with moderate dietary changes and that physiological responses to changes in prey composition

  1. The effects of Tremella aurantia on testosterone and corticosterone productions in normal and diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hui-Chen; Yang, Jyuer-Ger; Liu, Bi-Ching; Chen, Yen-Wen; Huang, Yuan-Li; Poon, Song Ling; Liu, Ming-Yie; Huang, Bu-Miin

    2004-01-01

    Tremella aurantia (TA) has been traditionally used as food and crude medicine in Chinese society. The polysaccharide isolated from the fruiting bodies of TA exhibits significant hypoglycemic activity in diabetic mouse models of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Diabetes will cause sexual dysfunction in patients. In the present study, we examined if the treatment of TA on IDDM and NIDDM rats will restore steroidogenesis and then the reproductive function. The fruiting bodies (FB), mycelium (TM) and polysaccharide (GX) of TA were fed to the IDDM and NIDDM rats, and testosterone and corticosterone levels in plasma, the weight of steroidogenic organs, and the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and P450scc enzyme were determined. Plasma testosterone productions were significantly suppressed with the feeding of FB or TM in normal rat (p diabetes rats (p 0.05). There was no significant difference of the testosterone production between normal and NIDDM rats (p > 0.05). In plasma corticosterone production, there were no differences among control, FB- or TM-fed normal rats (p > 0.05). Corticosterone levels were reduced in IDDM rats compared to control, and FB or TM could restore its level. Corticosterone levels were induced in NIDDM rats compared to control (p feeding in NIDDM rat had lesser testis weight compared to NIDDM rats. The expression of StAR protein and P450scc enzyme were not different among groups in IDDM and NIDDM rats. Plasma testosterone productions were suppressed in normal rats with the feeding of TA (FB and TM). IDDM rats did have lower testosterone, but not in NIDDM, and FB or TM could not restore the inhibitory effects. The induction of IDDM or NIDDM rats did affect steroidogenesis and steroidogenic organ weights, and the feeding of TA had different effects on steroidogenesis in different types of diabetic rats.

  2. Acute effects of bergamot oil on anxiety-related behaviour and corticosterone level in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiyudthong, Somrudee; Marsden, Charles A

    2011-06-01

    Bergamot essential oil (BEO), Citrus aurantium subsp. bergamia (Risso) Wright & Arn. (Rutaceae), is used widely in aromatherapy to reduce stress and anxiety despite limited scientific evidence. A previous study showed that BEO significantly increased gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in rat hippocampus, suggesting potential anxiolytic properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of BEO (1.0%, 2.5% and 5.0% w/w) administered to rats on both anxiety-related behaviours (the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and hole-board tests) and stress-induced levels of plasma corticosterone in comparison with the effects of diazepam. Inhalation of BEO (1% and 2.5%) and injection of diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the percentage of open arm entries on the EPM. The percentage time spent in the open arms was also significantly enhanced following administration of either BEO (2.5% and 5%) or diazepam. Total arm entries were significantly increased with the highest dose (5%), suggesting an increase in locomotor activity. In the hole-board test, 2.5% BEO and diazepam significantly increased the number of head dips. 2.5% BEO and diazepam attenuated the corticosterone response to acute stress caused by exposure to the EPM. In conclusion, both BEO and diazepam exhibited anxiolytic-like behaviours and attenuated HPA axis activity by reducing the corticosterone response to stress.

  3. Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation through activating the NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Wen-Zhu [Anesthesia and Operation Center, Hainan Branch of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Hainan 572013 (China); Anesthesia and Operation Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Miao, Yu-Liang [Department of Anesthesiology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Wen-Zhi [Department of Anesthesiology, Beijing Military General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100700 (China); Wu, Wei, E-mail: wwzwgk@163.com [Department of Head and Neck Surgery of Otolaryngology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); Li, Bao-Wei [Department of Head and Neck Surgery of Otolaryngology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); An, Li-Na [Department of Anesthesiology, Armed Police General Hospital, Beijing 100039 (China); Fang, Wei-Wu [Department of Anesthesiology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); Mi, Wei-Dong, E-mail: elite2005gg@163.com [Anesthesia and Operation Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Leptin promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells isolated from embryonic mouse hippocampus. • Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation. • The effects of leptin are partially mediated by upregulating NR2B subunits. - Abstract: Corticosterone inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The removal of corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation has been reported to contribute to neural regeneration. Leptin has been shown to regulate brain development, improve angiogenesis, and promote neural regeneration; however, its effects on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation remain unclear. Here we reported that leptin significantly promoted the proliferation of hippocampal NSCs in a concentration-dependent pattern. Also, leptin efficiently reversed the inhibition of NSCs proliferation induced by corticosterone. Interestingly, pre-treatment with non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801, specific NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NR2B, significantly blocked the effect of leptin on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. Furthermore, corticosterone significantly reduced the protein expression of NR2B, whereas pre-treatment with leptin greatly reversed the attenuation of NR2B expression caused by corticosterone in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our findings demonstrate that leptin reverses the corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. This process is, at least partially mediated by increased expression of NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

  4. Failure of adrenal corticosterone production in POMC-deficient mice results from lack of integrated effects of POMC peptides on multiple factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpac, Jason; Czyzewska, Katarzyna; Kern, Andras; Brush, Richard S; Anderson, Robert E; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2008-08-01

    Production of corticosteroids from the adrenal gland is a multistep process in which corticosterone is enzymatically processed from its precursor cholesterol. The main hormone regulating the production of corticosterone is the proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Adrenals of POMC-deficient (POMC(-/-)) mice do not produce corticosterone either at basal levels or in response to acute stimulation with ACTH. However, pharmacological amounts of ACTH delivered continuously elicit corticosterone production over time. To define the relative effects of ACTH on individual factors involved in corticosterone production, parameters of adrenal cholesterol metabolism and steroidogenesis were examined in POMC(-/-) mice compared with wild-type and ACTH-treated mutant mice. POMC(-/-) adrenals lack cholesterol esters (CE); adrenal CE is restored with ACTH treatment. However, discontinuation of ACTH treatment stops corticosterone production despite the presence of adrenal CE. Failure of corticosterone production by POMC(-/-) adrenals occurs despite the constitutive presence of transcripts of genes required for cholesterol metabolism and steroidogenesis. Levels of key proteins involved in selective cholesterol uptake and steroidogenesis were attenuated; ACTH treatment increased these protein levels, most significantly those of the receptor responsible for selective uptake of CE, scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI). Our studies reveal that failure of corticosterone production of POMC(-/-) adrenal glands and its pharmacological reconstitution by ACTH are not mediated by any one individual protein, but rather as an integrated effect on multiple factors from import of the substrate cholesterol to its conversion to corticosterone.

  5. [Posttrial injections of corticosterone in dorsal hippocampus of the BALB/c mouse facilitate extinction of appetitive operant conditioning in the Skinner box].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheau, J; Destrade, C; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1982-06-28

    Corticosterone was injected bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus of BALB/c Mice immediately after the first extinction session of an operant conditioning in a Skinner box. Compared with the control animals the Mice that received 1 or 0.1 microgram corticosterone exhibited 24 hrs. later, faster extinction of this conditioning. With a 0.01 microgram dose of corticosterone in each hippocampus we obtained an accelerated extinction during the session. These data suggest that corticosterone modulates hippocampal mechanisms involved in memory processes.

  6. Short-term repeated corticosterone administration enhances glutamatergic but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Joanna; Blasiak, Anna; Czerw, Anna; Tylko, Grzegorz; Sowa, Joanna; Hess, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that stress impairs performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks in rats due to the action of glucocorticoids involved in the stress response. Skilled reaching and walking are controlled by the primary motor cortex (M1); however, it is not known whether stress-related impairments in skilled motor tasks are related to functional and/or structural alterations within the M1. We studied the effects of single and repeated injections of corticosterone (twice daily for 7 days) on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) recorded from layer II/III pyramidal neurons in ex vivo slices of the M1, prepared 2 days after the last administration of the hormone. We also measured the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal cells and the protein levels of selected subunits of AMPA, NMDA, and GABAA receptors after repeated corticosterone administration. Repeatedly administered corticosterone induced an increase in the frequency but not in the amplitude of sEPSCs, while a single administration had no effect on the recorded excitatory currents. The frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs as well as the excitability of pyramidal cells were changed neither after single nor after repeated corticosterone administration. Treatment with corticosterone for 7 days did not modify the density of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons. Corticosterone influenced neither the protein levels of GluA1, GluA2, GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B subunits of glutamate receptors nor those of α1, β2, and γ2 subunits of the GABAA receptor. The increase in sEPSCs frequency induced by repeated corticosterone administration faded out within 7 days. These data indicate that prolonged administration of exogenous corticosterone selectively and reversibly enhances glutamatergic, but not GABAergic transmission in the rat motor cortex. Our results suggest that corticosterone treatment results in an enhancement of spontaneous glutamate release from presynaptic

  7. Variation in testosterone and corticosterone in amphibians and reptiles: relationships with latitude, elevation, and breeding season length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenaar, Cas; Husak, Jerry; Escallón, Camilo; Moore, Ignacio T

    2012-11-01

    Latitudinal variation in life-history traits has been the focus of numerous investigations, but underlying hormonal mechanisms have received much less attention. Steroid hormones play a central role in vertebrate reproduction and may be associated with life-history trade-offs. Consequently, circulating concentrations of these hormones vary tremendously across vertebrates, yet interspecific geographic variation in male hormone concentrations has been studied in detail only in birds. We here report on such variation in amphibians and reptiles, confirming patterns observed in birds. Using phylogenetic comparative analyses, we found that in amphibians, but not in reptiles, testosterone and baseline corticosterone were positively related to latitude. Baseline corticosterone was negatively related to elevation in amphibians but not in reptiles. For both groups, testosterone concentrations were negatively related to breeding-season length. In addition, testosterone concentrations were positively correlated with baseline corticosterone in both groups. Our findings may best be explained by the hypothesis that shorter breeding seasons increase male-male competition, which may favor increased testosterone concentrations that modulate secondary sexual traits. Elevated energetic demands resulting from greater reproductive intensity may require higher baseline corticosterone. Thus, the positive relationship between testosterone and corticosterone in both groups suggests an energetic demand for testosterone-regulated behavior that is met with increased baseline glucocorticoid concentrations.

  8. Central immune overactivation in the presence of reduced plasma corticosterone contributes to swim stress-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Roca, H; Quintero, L; Avila, R; Medina, S; De Freitas, M; Cárdenas, R

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely known that immunological, hormonal and nociceptive mechanisms are altered by exposure to repeated stress, the interplaying roles of each function in the development of post-stress hyperalgesia are not completely clear. Thus, we wanted to establish how interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), corticosterone and microglia interact to contribute in the development of hyperalgesia following repeated forced swim. Rats were subjected to either forced swim, sham swim or non-conditioned. Each group was then treated with minocycline, ketoconazole, or saline. Thermal nociception was measured via the hot plate test, before and after the behavioral conditioning, whereas blood and lumbar spinal cord tissue samples were obtained at the end of the protocol. Serum levels of corticosterone, spinal tissue concentration of IL-1β and spinal OX-42 labeling (microglial marker) were determined. Rats exposed to forced swim stress developed thermal hyperalgesia along with elevated spinal tissue IL-1β, increased OX-42 labeling and relatively diminished serum corticosterone. Pre-treatment with minocycline and ketoconazole prevented the development of thermal hyperalgesia and the increase in IL-1β, without significantly modifying serum corticosterone. These results suggest that the development of forced swim-induced thermal hyperalgesia requires the simultaneous presence of increased spinal IL-1β, microglial activation, and relatively decreased serum corticosterone.

  9. Stress in the wild: chronic predator pressure and acute restraint affect plasma DHEA and corticosterone levels in a songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, A E M; Zanette, L Y; Clinchy, M; Goodenough, N; Soma, K K

    2013-05-01

    The effects of chronic stressors on glucocorticoid levels are well described in laboratory rodents, but far less is known about the effects of chronic stressors on wild animals or on dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels. DHEA can be produced by the adrenal cortex and has prominent antiglucocorticoid properties. Here, we examined wild songbirds to elucidate the relationship between chronic predator pressure and plasma DHEA and corticosterone levels. We measured circulating steroid levels at baseline and after acute restraint in the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. During the breeding season, males in low predator pressure (LPP) environments had higher baseline DHEA levels than males in high predator pressure (HPP) environments. Also, acute restraint decreased DHEA levels in LPP males only but increased corticosterone levels in HPP and LPP males similarly. During the nonbreeding season, DHEA and corticosterone levels were lower than during the breeding season, and acute restraint decreased DHEA levels in both HPP and LPP males. Unlike males, breeding females showed no effect of predator pressure on baseline DHEA or corticosterone levels. These data suggest that naturalistic chronic and acute stressors affect circulating DHEA and corticosterone levels in wild animals and highlight the importance of using multiple endpoints when studying the physiological effects of chronic stress.

  10. Water maze performance and changes in serum corticosterone levels in zinc-deprived and pair-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y; Mouat, M F; Harris, R B S; Coffield, J A; Grider, A

    2003-04-01

    The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate the learning and short- and long-term memory of zinc-deprived (ZD) and pair-fed (PF) rats in a Morris water maze (MWM) and (2) to monitor the serum corticosterone levels of these rats before and after swimming. Young Sprague-Dawley rats (aged 27-31 days) consumed AIN-93G diet for 10 days, and then were separated into ad libitum control (CT), PF and ZD groups. The zinc content of the diet was 25-30 ppm (CT and PF) or preference for the target zone in the first 15 s of the probing test. When the total 120 s of the probing test was considered, there were no differences in preference for the target zone, but thigmotaxia was greater in the PF than the CT group. The only behavioral change of the ZD group was thigmotaxia observed during the 120-s probing test following training, indicating the increment of anxiety. Morning basal corticosterone levels before swim training were significantly elevated in the PF group on Day 15 of dietary treatment, whereas a significant elevation of the basal corticosterone level in the ZD group was not statistically significant until Day 22. The data indicate an association between impaired learning, poor searching strategy and elevated corticosterone in the PF group. In contrast, the ZD rats showed normal cognitive performance but had elevated corticosterone and increased anxiety-like behavior (thigmotaxia).

  11. Corticosterone may interact with peripubertal development to shape adult resistance to social defeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latsko, Maeson S; Farnbauch, Laure A; Gilman, T Lee; Lynch, Joseph F; Jasnow, Aaron M

    2016-06-01

    Studies of social stress in adult mice have revealed two distinct defeat-responsive behavioral phenotypes; "susceptible" and "resistant," characterized by social avoidance and social interaction, respectively. Typically, these phenotypes are observed at least 1day after the last defeat in adults, but may extend up to 30days later. The current study examined the impact of peripubertal social defeat on immediate (1day) and adult (30day) social stress phenotypes and neuroendocrine function in male C57BL/6 mice. Initially, peripubertal (P32) mice were resistant to social defeat. When the same mice were tested for social interaction again as adults (P62), two phenotypes emerged; a group of mice were characterized as susceptible evidenced by significantly lower social interaction, whereas the remaining mice exhibited normal social interaction, characteristic of resistance. A repeated analysis of corticosterone revealed that the adult (P62) resistant mice had elevated corticosterone following the social interaction test as juveniles. This was when all mice, regardless of adult phenotype, displayed equivalent levels of social interaction. Peripubertal corticosterone was positively correlated with adult social interaction levels in defeated mice, suggesting early life stress responsiveness impacts adult social behavior. In addition, adult corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) was elevated in all defeated mice, but there were no differences in CRF mRNA expression between the phenotypes. Thus, there is a delayed appearance of social stress-responsive phenotypes suggesting that early life stress exposure, combined with the resultant physiological responses, may interact with pubertal development to influence adult social behavior.

  12. Effects of developmental manganese, stress, and the combination of both on monoamines, growth, and corticosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles V. Vorhees

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental exposure to manganese (Mn or stress can each be detrimental to brain development. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to two housing conditions and Mn from postnatal day (P4–28. Within each litter two males and two females were assigned to the following groups: 0 (vehicle, 50, or 100 mg/kg Mn by gavage every other day. Half the litters were reared in cages with standard bedding and half with no bedding. One pair/group in each litter had an acute shallow water stressor before tissue collection (i.e., standing in shallow water. Separate litters were assessed at P11, 19, or 29. Mn-treated rats raised in standard cages showed no change in baseline corticosterone but following acute stress increased more than controls on P19; no Mn effects were seen on P11 or P29. Mn increased neostriatal dopamine in females at P19 and norepinephrine at P11 and P29. Mn increased hippocampal dopamine at P11 and P29 and 5-HT at P29 regardless of housing or sex. Mn had no effect on hypothalamic dopamine, but increased norepinephrine in males at P29 and 5-HT in males at all ages irrespective of rearing condition. Barren reared rats showed no or opposite effects of Mn, i.e., barren rearing + Mn attenuated corticosterone increases to acute stress. Barren rearing also altered the Mn-induced changes in dopamine and norepinephrine in the neostriatum, but not in the hippocampus. Barren rearing caused a Mn-associated increase in hypothalamic dopamine at P19 and P29 not seen in standard reared Mn-treated groups. Developmental Mn alters monoamines and corticosterone as a function of age, stress (acute and chronic, and sex.

  13. Impact of stress and levels of corticosterone on the development of breast cancer in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De la Roca-Chiapas JM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available José María De la Roca-Chiapas,1 Gloria Barbosa-Sabanero,2 Jorge Antonio Martínez-García,3 Joel Martínez-Soto,1 Víctor Manuel Ramos-Frausto,1 Leivy Patricia González-Ramírez,1 Ken Nowack4 1Department of Psychology, 2Department of Medical Sciences, Division of Health Sciences, Campus Leon-University of Guanajuato, Guanajuato, 3General Regional Hospital of Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico; 4Envisia Learning, Inc., Santa Monica, CA, USA Abstract: Stress is experienced during cancer, and impairs the immune system's ability to protect the body. Our aim was to investigate if isolation stress has an impact on the development of tumors in rats, and to measure the size and number of tumors and the levels of corticosterone. Breast cancer was induced in two groups of female rats (N=20 by administration of a single dose of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea 50 mg/kg. Rats in the control group (cancer induction condition were allowed to remain together in a large cage, whereas in the second group, rats were also exposed to a stressful condition, that is, isolation (cancer induction and isolation condition, CIIC. The CIIC group displayed anxious behavior after 10 weeks of isolation. In the CIIC group, 16 tumors developed, compared with only eleven tumors in the control cancer induction condition group. In addition, compared with the control group, the volume of tumors in the CIIC group was greater, and more rats had more than one tumor and cells showed greater morphological damage. Levels of corticosterone were also significantly different between the two groups. This study supports the hypothesis that stress can influence the development of cancer, but that stress itself is not a sufficient factor for the development of cancer in rats. The study also provides new information for development of experimental studies and controlled environments. Keywords: breast cancer, corticosterone, isolation condition, psychoneuroimmunology, stress

  14. Effects of Stress, Corticosterone, and Epinephrine Administration on Learning in Place and Response Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Sadowski, Renee N.; Jackson, Gloria R.; Wieczorek, Lindsay A.; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    These experiments examined the effects of prior stress, corticosterone, or epinephrine on learning in mazes that can be solved efficiently using either place or response strategies. In a repeated stress condition, rats received restraint stress for 6 h/day for 21 days, ending 24 h before food-motivated maze training. In two single-stress conditions, rats received a 1-h episode of restraint stress ending 30 min or 24 h prior to training. Single stress ending 30 min prior to training resulted i...

  15. Cholesterol deregulation induced by chronic corticosterone (CORT) stress in pectoralis major of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yujing; Fu, Wenyan; Wang, Song; Ni, Yingdong; Zhao, Ruqian

    2014-10-01

    Chronic endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) excess in mammals is associated with metabolic dysfunction and dyslipidemia that are characterized by increased plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol (Tch) levels. However, the effects of chronic GC administration on cholesterol metabolism, particularly in muscle tissues of broiler chickens, are unknown. In this study, broiler chickens were treated chronically with vehicle (CON) or corticosterone (CORT) for 2 weeks. Chronic CORT treatment significantly increased Tch levels in pectoralis major muscle (PMC) (p0.05). Western blot results showed that the levels of total GR (p=0.08) tended to be increased and nuclear GR protein (pchickens by increasing cholesterol synthesis and uptake.

  16. Berberine up-regulates the BDNF expression in hippocampus and attenuates corticosterone-induced depressive-like behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji-Duo; Ma, Li-Gang; Hu, Chun-Yue; Pei, Yang-Yi; Jin, Shuang-Li; Fang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Yu-Cheng

    2016-02-12

    Depression is increasingly become a global public healthy problem. This study was to investigate whether berberine could attenuate the depressive-like behavior induced by repeated corticosterone injection and explore the possible mechanisms. The present results showed that exogenous corticosterone injection caused depressive-like behaviors in mice, such as decreased sucrose intake in sucrose preference test (SPT) and increased immobility time in forced swimming test (FST). These behavioral alterations were accompanying with the decreased BDNF mRNA and protein levels in hippocampus and the elevated serum corticosterone levels. Treatment with berberine prevented these changes above. Our findings confirmed the antidepressant-like effect of berberine and suggested its mechanisms might be partially mediated by up-regulation of BDNF in hippocampus.

  17. Relationship between plasma and tissue corticosterone in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus): implications for stress physiology and animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, C R; Hemsworth, P H; Leury, B J; Tilbrook, A J

    2015-01-01

    This study directly compared the dynamics of change in plasma corticosterone concentration with the dynamics of change in tissue corticosterone concentration in laying hens. In concert, we measured the rate of gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, and glycolysis in the liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, and heart. We evaluated these changes acutely, over 3 h in response to an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) injection, and chronically, over 24 h in response to food and water deprivation. In response to ACTH injection, there was a significant (P physiology under acute and chronic conditions. Our data suggest that extending our evaluation of stress to the site of corticosterone action, that is, the target tissue, may enhance our ability to evaluate stress and the welfare of laying hens.

  18. Effect of stress and dexamethasone treatment on circadian rhythms of melatonin and corticosterone in ring dove (Streptopelia risoria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Carmen; Marchena, Jose María; Lea, Robert William; Harvey, Steve; Rodríguez, Ana Beatriz

    2002-03-01

    The possible relationship between the circadian rhythm of blood levels of melatonin and corticosterone in ring dove (Streptopelia risoria) subjected to both immobilization stress and immobilization stress plus dexamethasone treatment were studied. The results show changes in the circadian rhythm of melatonin, with increased daytime levels in situations of stress accompanied by increased corticosterone levels. The highest blood melatonin levels over the 24 h of the study were obtained when the animals were treated with dexamethasone and then subjected to stress. Given the antioxidant role of melatonin, our results support the idea ofmelatonin-corticosterone coupling with the possibility that melatonin released in situations of stress counteracts the adverse effects of glucocorticoids on the organism.

  19. The effect of isoflurane anaesthesia and vasectomy on circulating corticosterone and ACTH in BALB/c mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Kalliokoski, Otto; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte;

    2012-01-01

    The use of blood corticosterone and faecal corticosterone metabolites as biomarkers of post-surgical stress and pain in laboratory animals has increased during the last decade. However, many aspects of their reliability in laboratory mice remain uninvestigated. This study investigated serum...... compared to anaesthetised mice not treated with dexamethasone. Thus, dexamethasone effectively inhibited the corticosterone response in the anaesthetised-only mice, but not in the mice subjected to surgery. In conclusion, both isoflurane anaesthesia and vasectomy during isoflurane anaesthesia resulted...... in an increase in serum glucocorticoids, but the negative feedback mechanism of newly operated mice, was altered. This may have consequences for the interpretation of glucocorticoids measurements as a biomarker of post-surgical stress in mice....

  20. Effect of ether inhalation by adrenalectomized pregnant rats on the adrenal corticosterone concentration in norma, decapitated, and encephalectomized fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negellen-Perchellet, E; Cohen, A

    1975-01-01

    The influence of decapitation or encephalectomy (total removal of the brain leaving the pituitary in place) on the adrenal corticosterone concentration of the 20-day-old rat fetus has been studied in normal pregnant rats, in adrenalectomized pregnant rats, and in adrenalectomized pregnant rats subjected to the stress conditions of inhalation of ether for 40 min. Decapitation or encephalectomy of the fetus always results in a drop in adrenal corticosterone concentration within 4 h which is prevented in 15 min by injecting 3.2 mU of hog ACTH into the decapitated fetus. In mothers adrenalectomized in order to avoid a negative feedback reaction of maternal corticosteroids on the fetal pituitary-adrenal system, ether inhalation causes an important rise in adrenal corticosterone concentration in normal fetuses but not in decapitated or encephalectomized ones. Thus ether, which crosses the placental barrier, is a stressor agent for the fetal rat.

  1. Elevated corticosterone levels and severe weather conditions decrease parental investment of incubating Adélie penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Anne-Mathilde; Massemin, Sylvie; Handrich, Yves; Raclot, Thierry

    2013-03-01

    Corticosterone, the main stress hormone in birds, mediates resource allocation, allowing animals to adjust their physiology and behaviour to changes in the environment. Incubation is a time and energy-consuming phase of the avian reproductive cycle. It may be terminated prematurely, when the parents' energy stores are depleted or when environmental conditions are severe. In this study, the effects of experimentally elevated baseline corticosterone levels on the parental investment of incubating male Adélie penguins were investigated. Incubation duration and reproductive success of 60 penguins were recorded. The clutches of some birds were replaced by dummy eggs, which recorded egg temperatures and rotation rates, enabling a detailed investigation of incubation behaviour. Corticosterone levels of treated birds were 2.4-fold higher than those of controls 18 days post treatment. Exogenous corticosterone triggered nest desertion in 61% of the treated birds; consequently reducing reproductive success, indicating that corticosterone can reduce or disrupt parental investment. Regarding egg temperatures, hypothermic events became more frequent and more pronounced in treated birds, before these birds eventually abandoned their nest. The treatment also significantly decreased incubation temperatures by 1.3°C and lengthened the incubation period by 2.1 days. However, the number of chicks at hatching was similar among successful nests, regardless of treatment. Weather conditions appeared to be particularly important in determining the extent to which corticosterone levels affected the behaviour of penguins, as treated penguins were more sensitive to severe weather conditions. This underlines the importance of considering the interactions of organisms with their environment in studies of animal behaviour and ecophysiology.

  2. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gaelle; Faucher, Pierre; Henkous, Nadia; Krazem, Ali; Piérard, Christophe; Béracochéa, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus (dHPC) in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1 that an acute stress (3 electric footschocks; 0.9 mA each) delivered before memory testing reversed the memory retrieval pattern (MRP) in a serial discrimination task in which mice learned two successive discriminations. More precisely, whereas non-stressed animals remembered accurately the first learned discrimination and not the second one, stressed mice remembered more accurately the second discrimination but not the first one. We demonstrated that local inactivation of dHPC or mPFC with the anesthetic lidocaine recruited the dHPC activity in non-stress conditions whereas the stress-induced MRP inversion recruited the mPFC activity. In a second experiment, we showed that acute stress induced a very similar time-course evolution of corticosterone rises within both the mPFC and dHPC. In a 3rd experiment, we found however that in situ injections of corticosterone either within the mPFC or the dHPC before memory testing favored the emergence of the mPFC-dependent MRP but blocked the emergence of the dHPC-dependent one. Overall, our study evidences that the simultaneous increase of corticosterone after stress in both areas induces a shift from dHPC (non-stress condition) to mPFC-dependent MRP and that corticosterone is critically involved in mediating the deleterious effects of stress on cognitive functions involving the mPFC-HPC interplay.

  3. Stress induced a shift from dorsal hippocampus to prefrontal cortex-dependent memory retrieval: role of regional corticosterone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle eDominguez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the deleterious effects of stress on memory retrieval are due to a dysfunction of the hippocampo-prefrontal cortex interplay. The role of the stress-induced regional corticosterone increase in such dysfunction remains however unclear, since there is no published study as yet dedicated to measuring corticosterone concentrations simultaneously in both the prefrontal cortex (mPFC and the hippocampus (dHPC in relation with memory impairments. To that aim, we first showed in Experiment 1 that an acute stress (3 electric footschocks; 0.9 mA each delivered before memory testing reversed the memory retrieval pattern (MRP in a serial discrimination task in which mice learned two successive discriminations. More precisely, whereas non-stressed animals remembered accurately the first learned discrimination and not the second one, stressed mice remembered more accurately the second discrimination but not the first one. We demonstrated that local inactivation of dHPC or mPFC with the anesthetic lidocaine recruited the dHPC activity in non-stress conditions whereas the stress-induced MRP inversion recruited the mPFC activity. In a second experiment, we showed that acute stress induced a very similar time-course evolution of corticosterone rises within both the mPFC and dHPC. In a 3rd experiment, we found however that in situ injections of corticosterone either within the mPFC or the dHPC before memory testing favored the emergence of the mPFC-dependent MRP but blocked the emergence of the dHPC-dependent one. Overall, our study evidences that the simultaneous increase of corticosterone after stress in both areas induces a shift from dHPC (non stress condition to mPFC-dependent memory retrieval pattern and that corticosterone is critically involved in mediating the deleterious effects of stress on cognitive functions involving the mPFC-HPC interplay.

  4. Behavior and pro-inflammatory cytokine variations among submissive and dominant mice engaged in aggressive encounters: moderation by corticosterone reactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude Audet

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial stressors contribute to the pathophysiology of affective disorders and variations of cytokine functioning have been implicated in this process. The present investigation demonstrated, in mice, the impact of stressful aggressive encounters on activity levels, plasma corticosterone and cytokine concentrations, and on cytokine mRNA expression within the prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus. As glucocorticoids have been tied to cytokine variations, mice were subdivided into low or high corticosterone responders, defined in terms of circulating hormone levels 75 min post-confrontation. Interestingly, stressor-induced effects among low and high responders varied as a function of whether mice were submissive or dominant during the aggressive bout. Agonistic encounters elicited subsequent hyperactivity, particularly among low corticosterone responders and among dominant mice. Plasma levels of corticosterone and interleukin (IL-6 concomitantly increased after aggressive encounters and varied with dominance status and with the low versus high corticosterone response. Among the low responders corticosterone and IL-6 increases were modest and only apparent among submissive mice, whereas among high responders these elevations were more pronounced and comparable in submissive and dominant mice. Aggressive episodes also increased IL-1B and IL-6 mRNA brain expression. The IL-1B rise was greater in the PFC and hippocampus of submissive mice that were low responders. Among high responders IL-1B and IL-6 increased in both groups, although in the PFC this effect was specific to dominant mice. The data are discussed in terms of their relevance to the impact of aggressive encounters on affective behaviors, and to the role that cytokines might play in this regard.

  5. H2S protects PC12 cells against toxicity of corticosterone by modulation of BDNF-TrkB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shenglan; Li, Wenting; Zou, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Tian, Ying; Xiao, Fan; Gu, Hongfeng; Tang, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-01

    Corticosterone, one of the glucocorticoids, is toxic to neurons and plays an important role in depressive-like behavior and depression. We previously showed that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a novel physiological mediator, plays an inhibitory role in depression. However, the mechanism underlying H2S-triggered antidepressant-like role is not clearly known. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophic factor, plays a neuroprotective role that is mediated by its high-affinity tropomysin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor. In this study, to investigate the underlying mechanism of H2S-induced antidepressant-like role, we explored whether H2S could protect neurons against corticosterone-mediated cyctotoxicity and whether this protective role of H2S was involved in the regulation of BDNF-TrkB pathway. Our data demonstrated that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), the donor of H2S, could prevent corticosterone-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in PC12 cells. NaHS not only induced the up-regulation of BDNF but also prevented the down-regulation of BDNF by corticosterone. It was also found that blocking BDNF-TrkB pathway by K252a, an inhibitor of TrkB, abolished the protection of H2S against corticosterone-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, accumulation of ROS, and loss of MMP. These results suggest that H2S protects against the neurotoxicity of corticosterone by modulation of the BDNF-TrkB pathway. © The Author 2015. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. Interaction between diazepam and hippocampal corticosterone after acute stress: impact on memory in middle-aged mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eBeracochea

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines (BDZ are widely prescribed in the treatment of anxiety disorders associated to aging. Interestingly, whereas a reciprocal interaction between the GABAergic system and HPA axis has been evidenced, there is to our knowledge no direct evaluation of the impact of BDZ on both hippocampus (HPC corticosterone concentrations and HPC-dependent memory in stressed middle-aged subjects. We showed previously that an acute stress induced in middle-aged mice severe memory impairments in a hippocampus-dependent task, and increased in parallel hippocampus corticosterone concentrations, as compared to non stressed middle-aged controls (Tronche et al., 2010. Based on these findings, the aims of the present study were to evidence the impact of diazepam (a positive allosteric modulator of the GABA-A receptor on HPC glucocorticoids concentrations and in parallel on HPC-dependent memory in acutely stressed middle-aged mice.Microdialysis experiments showed an interaction between diazepam doses and corticosterone concentrations into the HPC. From 0.25 mg/kg to 0.5 mg/kg, diazepam dose-dependently reduces intra-HPC corticosterone concentrations and in parallel, dose-dependently increased hippocampal-dependent memory performance. In contrast, the highest (1.0mg/kg diazepam dose induces a reduction in HPC corticosterone concentration, which was of greater magnitude as compared to the two other diazepam doses, but however decreased the hippocampal-dependent memory performance. In summary, our study provides first evidence that diazepam restores in stressed middle-aged animals the hippocampus-dependent response, in relation with HPC corticosterone concentrations. Overall, our data illustrate how stress and benzodiazepines could modulate cognitive functions depending on hippocampus activity.

  7. The number of insults and the cerebral damage after hypoxia/ischemia are altered after acute pretreatment with corticosterone and metyrapone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knollema, S; Kemper, RHA; Korf, J; Wiersma, A; Ter Horst, GJ; Krugers, HJ

    1997-01-01

    The role of glucocorticoids in neuronal viability is controversial. Most studies which describe the effects of glucocorticoids on ischemic brain damage use surgical adrenalectomy to induce a reduction in plasma corticosterone levels. In the present study we used metyrapone, a corticosterone synthesi

  8. Logging Affects Fledgling Sex Ratios and Baseline Corticosterone in a Forest Songbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshyk, Rhiannon; Nol, Erica; Burke, Dawn M.; Burness, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Silviculture (logging) creates a disturbance to forested environments. The degree to which forests are modified depends on the logging prescription and forest stand characteristics. In this study we compared the effects of two methods of group-selection (“moderate” and “heavy”) silviculture (GSS) and undisturbed reference stands on stress and offspring sex ratios of a forest interior species, the Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla), in Algonquin Provincial Park, Canada. Blood samples were taken from nestlings for corticosterone and molecular sexing. We found that logging creates a disturbance that is stressful for nestling Ovenbirds, as illustrated by elevated baseline corticosterone in cut sites. Ovenbirds nesting in undisturbed reference forest produce fewer male offspring per brood (proportion male = 30%) while logging with progressively greater forest disturbance, shifted the offspring sex ratio towards males (proportion male: moderate = 50%, heavy = 70%). If Ovenbirds in undisturbed forests usually produce female-biased broods, then the production of males as a result of logging may disrupt population viability. We recommend a broad examination of nestling sex ratios in response to anthropogenic disturbance to determine the generality of our findings. PMID:22432000

  9. Multi-matrix assay of cortisol, cortisone and corticosterone using a combined MEPS-HPLC procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracino, Maria A; Iacono, Corrado; Somaini, Lorenzo; Gerra, Gilberto; Ghedini, Nadia; Raggi, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    The development and validation of a bioanalytical assay for the simultaneous determination of cortisol, cortisone and corticosterone levels in several matrices, such as saliva, plasma, blood and urine samples have been described. The method is based on a rapid test which combines a microextraction by packed sorbent procedure and liquid chromatography-diode array technique. Chromatographic separation of the analytes (cortisol, cortisone and corticosterone) and the internal standard (methylprednisolone) was achieved in less than 10min on a reversed-phase pentafluorophenyl column using a mobile phase composed of phosphate buffer and acetonitrile. The assay was performed after an innovative microextraction procedure by means of C8 sorbent which guaranteed good clean-up of the matrices and satisfactory extraction yield of the analytes. Moreover, the method gave linear results over a range of 5-100ngmL(-1) and showed good selectivity and precision. This method was successfully applied for quantifying corticosteroids in specific matrices derived from some healthy volunteers in comparison to two socially diversified groups, namely former heroin addicts undergoing opioid replacement therapy and poly-drug abusers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Polysaccharides from wolfberry prevents corticosterone-induced inhibition of sexual behavior and increases neurogenesis.

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    Benson Wui-Man Lau

    Full Text Available Lycium barbarum, commonly known as wolfberry, has been used as a traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of infertility and sexual dysfunction. However, there is still a scarcity of experimental evidence to support the pro-sexual effect of wolfberry. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP on male sexual behavior of rats. Here we report that oral feeding of LBP for 21 days significantly improved the male copulatory performance including increase of copulatory efficiency, increase of ejaculation frequency and shortening of ejaculation latency. Furthermore, sexual inhibition caused by chronic corticosterone was prevented by LBP. Simultaneously, corticosterone suppressed neurogenesis in subventricular zone and hippocampus in adult rats, which could be reversed by LBP. The neurogenic effect of LBP was also shown in vitro. Significant correlation was found between neurogenesis and sexual performance, suggesting that the newborn neurons are associated with reproductive successfulness. Blocking neurogenesis in male rats abolished the pro-sexual effect of LBP. Taken together, these results demonstrate the pro-sexual effect of LBP on normal and sexually-inhibited rats, and LBP may modulate sexual behavior by regulating neurogenesis.

  11. Effects of novelty stress on hippocampal gene expression, corticosterone and motor activity in mice.

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    Kurumaji, Akeo; Umino, Masakazu; Nishikawa, Toru

    2011-10-01

    Exposure to novelty, a mild psychological stressor, induces neuronal activations in the hippocampus of rodents, which may play an important role in the adaptation to stress. We examined the changes in three parameters, i.e., gene expression in the hippocampus using a RT-PCR method, corticosterone and motor activity, in mice exposed to a new environment for 120min. A sharp and short-lasting increase in the gene expression of a set of stress-related genes previously reported, e.g., Fos and Nr4a1, was observed during the stress, with a similar pattern of changes in corticosterone. The motor activity gradually decreased during the novelty stress, indicating a process of adaptation to the new environment. In addition, in order to minimize the effects of elevated adrenal hormones by the stress, we carried out experiments on adrenalectomized (ADX) mice. However, the adrenalectomy produced minimal changes in the pattern and the magnitude of the gene response after the stress, while the motor activity showed a relatively slower pattern of adaptation in the ADX mice. Hence, the present study suggests that there was a coordinated adaptation process to the new environment in mice, and that the transcriptional response was mediated by neuronal networks rather than by adrenal hormones.

  12. Corticosterone metabolites in laying hen droppings-Effects of fiber enrichment, genotype, and daily variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alm, M; Holm, L; Tauson, R; Wall, H

    2014-10-01

    There is growing interest and concern for animal welfare in commercial poultry production. To evaluate stress and welfare in an objective and noninvasive way, fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in droppings can be analyzed. However, the influence of diet, genotype, and daily variations in FCM and production of droppings in laying hens has been poorly investigated. This study examined the effect of insoluble fiber by adding 3% ground straw pellets to the feed to Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL) and Lohmann Brown (LB) hens housed in furnished cages between 20 and 40 wk of age. In total, 960 hens were included in the study. Droppings were collected 4 times per day for 3 consecutive days and analyzed by corticosterone immunoassay. Biological validation confirmed the ability of the assay to detect changes in FCM levels. Inclusion of straw pellets in the feed increased FCM concentration in both hen genotypes and increased excretion rate of FCM in LB hens. The LB hens also produced greater amounts of droppings than LSL hens. Both FCM levels and production of droppings varied during the day, although no distinct diurnal rhythm was found. These findings demonstrate that when using FCM to evaluate stress and welfare in laying hens, many factors (e.g., diet, genotype used, and so on) need to be taken into account to allow accurate interpretation of the results. In addition, under certain conditions, excretion rate of FCM might be more appropriate to use compared with FCM concentration.

  13. Effects of sheltering on behavior and fecal corticosterone level of elderly dogs

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    Katsuji Uetake

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Japan, the human population is aging rapidly, and the abandonment of dogs by the elderly people who have died or been hospitalized becomes a problem. It is hypothesized that elderly dogs have difficulty adapting to the novel circumstances when brought to an animal shelter. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess stress levels and demonstrate stress responses of elderly dogs just after admission to an animal shelter. As stress indicators, fecal corticosterone levels and changes in the ethogram of the dogs were investigated during the first week of admittance. Fecal corticosterone levels (mean ± SE stayed high during the first week of residence, although they fell gently from the day after admittance (16650.1 ± 3769.7 ng/g to the seventh day (12178.4 ± 2524.4 ng/g (P <0.001. The proportions of behavioral expressions changed as the days passed (P < 0.001. In particular, stereotypies decreased from 35.7% on the first day to 2.6% on the sixth day, and time spent sleeping increased from 0.0% to 42.7%. These results indicate that elderly dogs admitted to an animal shelter seem to behaviorally adapt themselves to their novel circumstances, but might be stressed even on the seventh day of residence.

  14. Short term response of insulin, glucose, growth hormone and corticosterone to acute vibration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolkas, C. B.; Leon, H. A.; Chackerian, M.

    1971-01-01

    Study carried out to obtain some notion of the initial phasing and interactive effects among some hormones known to be responsive to vibration stress. Sprague-Dawley derived rats were exposed to the acute effects of confinement and confinement with lateral (plus or minus G sub y) vibration. The coincident monitoring of glucose, insulin, growth hormone, and corticosterone plasma levels, during and immediately subsequent to exposure to brief low level vibration, exhibits the effects of inhibition of insulin release by epinephrine. The ability of insulin (IRI) to return rapidly to basal levels, from appreciably depressed levels during vibration, in the face of elevated levels of glucose is also shown. Corticosterone responds with almost equal rapidity, but in opposite phase to the IRI. The immuno-assayable growth hormone (IGH) dropped from a basal level of 32 ng/ml to 7.3 ng/ml immediately subsequent to vibration and remained at essentially that level throughout the experiment (60 min). Whether these levels represent a real fall in the rat or whether they merely follow the immuno-logically deficient form is still in question.

  15. Effects of Sheltering on Behavior and Fecal Corticosterone Level of Elderly Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Katsuji; Yang, Chu Han; Endo, Aki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the human population is aging rapidly, and the abandonment of dogs by the elderly people who have died or been hospitalized becomes a problem. It is hypothesized that elderly dogs have difficulty adapting to the novel circumstances when brought to an animal shelter. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess stress levels and demonstrate stress responses of elderly dogs just after admission to an animal shelter. As stress indicators, fecal corticosterone levels and changes in the ethogram of the dogs were investigated during the first week of admittance. Fecal corticosterone levels (mean ± SE) stayed high during the first week of residence, although they fell gently from the day after admittance (16650.1 ± 3769.7 ng/g) to the seventh day (12178.4 ± 2524.4 ng/g) (P < 0.001). The proportions of behavioral expressions changed as the days passed (P < 0.001). In particular, stereotypies decreased from 35.7% on the first day to 2.6% on the sixth day, and time spent sleeping increased from 0.0 to 42.7%. These results indicate that elderly dogs admitted to an animal shelter seem to behaviorally adapt themselves to their novel circumstances but might be stressed even on the seventh day of residence.

  16. Blood Biochemistry and Plasma Corticosterone Concentration in Broiler Chickens Under Heat Stress

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    Elvis Alexander Díaz López

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High ambient temperatures cause susceptibility to heat stress in broiler chickens, generating metabolic changes. This paper seeks to determine the changes in blood biochemistry and plasma corticosterone concentration, as well as in glucose, total protein, albumin, globulin, sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium in broiler chickens under chronic heat stress and at ambient temperature conditions at the Colombian Amazonian piedmont. 21-days-old male chickens of two lines were studied, distributed in an unrestricted random design, in a two-factor scheme, with four treatments. Five repetitions per treatment were performed, and 25 animals per experimental unit examined. Broilers were fed a basic diet of corn and soybean meal with 3,100 kcal ME and 19.5% protein until they reached 42 days of age. The line factor had no effect on the evaluated variables (p ≥ 0.05. However, there was statistically significant difference (p ≤ 0.05 in all variables when concentrations of metabolites in broilers under chronic heat stress were compared to those of chickens exposed to ambient temperatures at the Colombian Amazon piedmont. In conclusion, blood biochemistry suffered significant changes under both experimental temperatures, with more physiological detriment in broilers under chronic heat stress. Concentration of corticosterone became the most sensitive and consistent indicator of the physiological condition of chronic heat stress.

  17. Influence of starvation on heart contractility and corticosterone level in rats.

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    Lee, Sung Ryul; Ko, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Marquez, Jubert; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The physiological changes, including cardiac modification, that occur during starvation are not yet completely understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a 2-week starvation period on heart contractility, muscle mass, and irisin and corticosterone levels in rats. Rats in the starved group showed a significant reduction in the body, heart, kidney, and muscle weight (n = 23, p echocardiography were further compared with the body-weight-matched control group. Starvation reduced the left ventricle mass; however, this difference was not significant compared with the body-weight-matched group (p > 0.05). In the starvation group, the impairment of cardiac output was dependent on the reduction in stroke volume and heart rate. Starvation induced a severe reduction in ejection fraction and fractional shortening when compared with the body-weight-matched control group (p < 0.05). In summary, prolonged starvation, which leads to a deficiency of available nutrition, increases the stress-related corticosterone level, impairs the cardiac output, and is associated with changes in cardiac morphogeometry.

  18. Effects of Endotoxin and Psychological Stress on Redox Physiology, Immunity and Feather Corticosterone in Greenfinches.

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    Richard Meitern

    Full Text Available Assessment of costs accompanying activation of immune system and related neuroendocrine pathways is essential for understanding the selective forces operating on these systems. Here we attempted to detect such costs in terms of disruption to redox balance and interference between different immune system components in captive wild-caught greenfinches (Carduelis chloris. Study birds were subjected to an endotoxin-induced inflammatory challenge and temporary exposure to a psychological stressor (an image of a predator in a 2*2 factorial experiment. Injection of bacterial endotoxin resulted in up-regulation of two markers of antioxidant protection - erythrocyte glutathione, and plasma oxygen radical absorbance (OXY. These findings suggest that inflammatory responses alter redox homeostasis. However, no effect on markers of oxidative damage to proteins or DNA in erythrocytes could be detected. We found no evidence that the endotoxin injection interfered with antibody production against Brucella abortus antigen or the intensity of chronic coccidiosis. The hypothesis of within-immune system trade-offs as a cost of immunity was thus not supported in our model system. We showed for the first time that administration of endotoxin can reduce the level of corticosterone deposited into feathers. This finding suggests a down-regulation of the corticosterone secretion cascade due to an endotoxin-induced immune response, a phenomenon that has not been reported previously. Exposure to the predator image did not affect any of the measured physiological parameters.

  19. Effects of stress, mimicked by administration of corticosterone in drinking water, on the expression of chicken cytokine and chemokine genes in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shini, S; Kaiser, P

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we identify molecular mediators that participate in the regulation of the immune response during corticosterone-induced stress in chickens. At 7 weeks of age, 120 chickens were exposed for 1 week to corticosterone treatment. Cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression levels were evaluated in peripheral blood and splenic lymphocytes. Expression levels of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-18 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta4 mRNA were significantly up-regulated in lymphocytes 3 h after first treatment with corticosterone. TGF-beta4 and IL-18 remained elevated 1 week post-initial treatment. Compared with controls, corticosterone-treated birds showed greater expression levels of chemokine (CC) mRNA, particularly for CCLi2, CCL5 (RANTES), CCL16 and CXCLi1, in peripheral and splenic lymphocytes 3 h post-initial exposure. CCLi2 mRNA was highly expressed in splenocytes at all time-points. Administration of corticosterone significantly increased circulating corticosterone concentrations and decreased total lymphocyte counts at 3, 24 h and 1 week post-initiation of corticosterone treatment. There was a positive correlation between plasma corticosterone concentrations and CCL5 and CCL16 mRNA at 3 h post-initial administration. At 1 week post-initial treatment, corticosterone concentrations correlated positively with CCL5 and negatively with IL-18 mRNA level. Conditions associated with significant changes in corticosterone levels might therefore affect the immune response by increasing pro-inflammatory responses, leading to potential modulation of the Th1/Th2 balance.

  20. Corticosterone levels in relation to trace element contamination along an urbanization gradient in the common blackbird (Turdus merula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meillère, Alizée; Brischoux, François; Bustamante, Paco; Michaud, Bruno; Parenteau, Charline; Marciau, Coline; Angelier, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    In a rapidly urbanizing world, trace element pollution may represent a threat to human health and wildlife, and it is therefore crucial to assess both exposition levels and associated effects of trace element contamination on urban vertebrates. In this study, we investigated the impact of urbanization on trace element contamination and stress physiology in a wild bird species, the common blackbird (Turdus merula), along an urbanization gradient (from rural to moderately urbanized areas). Specifically, we described the contamination levels of blackbirds by 4 non-essential (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb) and 9 essential trace elements (As, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Se, Zn), and explored the putative disrupting effects of the non-essential element contamination on corticosterone levels (a hormonal proxy for environmental challenges). We found that non-essential trace element burden (Cd and Pb specifically) increased with increasing urbanization, indicating a significant trace element contamination even in medium sized cities and suburban areas. Interestingly, the increased feather non-essential trace element concentrations were also associated with elevated feather corticosterone levels, suggesting that urbanization probably constrains birds and that this effect may be mediated by trace element contamination. Future experimental studies are now required to disentangle the influence of multiple urban-related constraints on corticosterone levels and to specifically test the influence of each of these trace elements on corticosterone secretion.

  1. Corticosterone time-dependently modulates {beta}-adrenergic effects on long-term potentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pu, Z.; Krugers, H.; Joëls, M.

    2007-01-01

    Previous experiments in the hippocampal CA1 area have shown that corticosterone can facilitate long-term potentiation (LTP) in a rapid non-genomic fashion, while the same hormone suppresses LTP that is induced several hours after hormone application. Here, we elaborated on this finding by examining

  2. Corticosterone evaluation in Wistar rats infected with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi during the chronic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Leony Cristina; Brazão, Vânia; Filipin, Marina Del Vecchio; Santello, Fabricia Helena; Toldo, Mírian Paula Alonso; Caldeira, Jerri C; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for mediating the effects of stress on Trypanosoma cruzi infection is crucial for determining the full impact of stress on Chagas' disease and for devising effective interventions. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a steroid hormone synthesized from pregnenolone, is secreted by the adrenal cortex in response to stress. Although its physiologic role has not been fully defined, DHEA has been shown to modulate immune function. In the present study, we evaluated the levels of corticosterone and the ability of T. cruzi infection to modulate the expression of Th2 cytokines in Wistar rats with chronic Chagas' disease submitted to repetitive stress. The animals submitted to stress displayed enhanced levels of corticosterone as compared to control counterparts. Stress and infection triggered the most elevated concentrations of corticosterone. DHEA significantly reduced corticosterone levels for infected and stressed animals with DHEA. The infected animals displayed enhanced levels of IL-10 and IL-4 as compared to control ones. Stress combined with infection triggered the higher levels of IL-10 and IL-4. DHEA alone and combined with infection and stress significantly increased IL-10 and IL-4 levels. Then, this study might provide additional clues about factors that regulate some of the immunoregulatory aspects of T. cruzi infection and might offer new opportunities for therapeutic interventions.

  3. Hippocampal corticosterone receptors and novelty-induced behavioral activity : effect of kainic acid lesion in the hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakas, C; De Kloet, E R; Veldhuis, H D; Bohus, B

    1983-01-01

    Rats were injected bilaterally in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus with kainic acid (KA) or with artificial CSF and their behavior and brain corticosterone (B) receptor systems were studied. The hippocampal KA injection destroyed part of the pyramidal neurons and of the dentate gyrus neurons. Thes

  4. Delayed type hypersensitivity reaction as indicator of cellular immune competence in broiler chickens exposed to dietary corticosterone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Gielkens, A.; Huurne, ter A.A.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Three experiments were performed to evaluate the delayed type hypersensitivity test against keyhole limpet haemocyanin as a parameter to measure stress-induced cellular immune suppression. The test was optimised for broiler chickens and evaluated in a stress model in which plasma corticosterone

  5. Effects of various Eleutherococcus senticosus cortex on swimming time, natural killer activity and corticosterone level in forced swimming stressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho

    2004-12-01

    The cortex of Eleutherococcus senticosus (Rupr. & Maxim.) Maxim. has been used extensively in Russia, China, Korea and Japan as an adaptogen whose properties are the ability to increase as non-specific body resistance to stress and fatigue. Although it has been reported that Eleutherococcus senticosus has anti-fatigue and anti-stress actions, their actions are still unclear on the relationship between immune system, especially natural killer (NK) activity and endocrine system (corticosterone level). We compared the effects of the water extracts (A, B, C, D and E) of five Eleutherococcus senticosus cortex on the swimming time, NK activity and blood corticosterone level using forced swimming stressed mice. Among five kinds, C, D and E extracts significantly prolonged the swimming time. C and D extracts inhibited the reduction of NK activity and the corticosterone elevation induced by forced swimming. The contents of eleutheroside E, isoflaxidin and eleutherosides B plus E were in the order C > D > E > B > A and C > E > D > A > B extracts, respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that eleutheroside E may be contributed to the anti-fatigue action, the recovery of the reduction of NK activity and the inhibition of corticosterone elevation induced by swimming stress.

  6. Increased depressive behaviour in females and heightened corticosterone release in males to swim stress after adolescent social stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Iva Z; Wilton, Aleena; Styles, Amy; McCormick, Cheryl M

    2008-06-26

    We previously reported that males undergoing chronic social stress (SS) (daily 1h isolation and new cage partner on days 30-45 of age) in adolescence habituated (decreased corticosterone release) to the homotypic stressor, but females did not. Here, we report that adolescent males exposed to chronic social stress had potentiated corticosterone release to a heterotypic stressor (15 min of swim stress) compared to acutely stressed and control males. The three groups of males did not differ in depressive-like behaviour (time spent immobile) during the swim stress. Corticosterone release in socially stressed females was elevated 45 min after the swim stress compared to acutely stressed and control females, and socially stressed females exhibited more depressive behaviour (longer durations of immobility and shorter durations of climbing) than the other females during the swim stress. Separate groups of rats were tested as adults several weeks after the social stress, and there were no group differences in corticosterone release after the swim stress. The only group difference in behaviour among the adults was more time spent climbing in socially stressed males than in controls. Thus, there are sex-specific effects of social stress in adolescence on endocrine responses and depressive behaviour to a heterotypic stressor, but, unlike for anxiety, substantial recovery is evident in adulthood in the absence of intervening stress exposures.

  7. Effects of chlordiazepoxide and buspirone on plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels in rats under basal and stress conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, S.F.; Slangen, J L; van der Gugten, J

    The effects of the classical benzodiazepine (BDZ) anxiolytic drug chlordiazepoxide (CDP) and the non-BDZ anxiolytic agent buspirone (BUSP) on basal and stress-induced plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A) and corticosterone (CS) release were investigated. Male Wistar rats provided with a

  8. Automated blood cell count: a sensitive and reliable method to study corticosterone-related stress in broilers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Huurne, ter A.A.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    In chickens the heterophil/lymphocyte ratio (H/L) has proved to be a valuable tool in stress related research. In general, H/L is determined with the microscopic differential count on a blood film. We evaluated automated analysis for measuring blood cell parameters in relation to corticosterone in a

  9. Delayed type hypersensitivity reaction as indicator of cellular immune competence in broiler chickens exposed to dietary corticosterone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Gielkens, A.; Huurne, ter A.A.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Three experiments were performed to evaluate the delayed type hypersensitivity test against keyhole limpet haemocyanin as a parameter to measure stress-induced cellular immune suppression. The test was optimised for broiler chickens and evaluated in a stress model in which plasma corticosterone leve

  10. Synergized resmethrin and corticosterone alter the chicken's response to west nile virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowski, Mark David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Franson, J Christian [US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY; Mostl, Erich [UNIV OF VIENNA; Porter, Warren P [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Hofmeister, Erik K [US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    2009-01-01

    Debate concerning arbovirus control strategies remains contentious because concern regarding the relative risk of viral infection and environmental toxicant exposure is high but inadequately characterized. Taking this into account, mosquito control agencies employ aerial insecticides only after arbovirus surveillance data indicate high local mosquito-infection-rates. Successfully mitigating the risk of adult-mosquito-control insecticides ('adulticides') to non-target species such as humans, domestic animals, fish, beneficial insects and wildlife, while increasing their efficacy to reduce arbovirus outbreak intensity requires targeted scientific data from animal toxicity studies and environmental monitoring activities. Wild birds are an important reservoir host for WNv and are potentially exposed to insecticides used for mosquito control. However, no risk assessments have evaluated whether insecticides augment or extend the potential transmissibility of West Nile virus (WNv) in birds. In order to augment existing resmethrin risk assessments, we aimed to determine whether synergized resmethrin (SR) may cause chickens to develop an elevated or extended WN viremia and if subacute stress may affect its immunotoxicity. We distributed 40 chickens into four groups then exposed them prior to and during WNv infection with SR (50 {mu}g/l resmethrin + 150 {mu}g/l piperonyl butoxide) and/or 20 mg/I corticosterone (CORT) in their drinking-water. Corticosterone was given for 10 continuous days and SR was given for 3 alternate days starting the 3rd day of CORT exposure, then chickens were subcutaneously inoculated with WNv on the 5th day of CORT treatment. Compared to controls, CORT treatment extended and elevated viremia, enhanced WNv-specific antibody and increased the percentage of birds that shed oral virus, whereas SR treatment extended viremia, depressed WNv-specific IgG, and increased the percentage of CORT-treated birds that shed oral virus. Corticosterone and SR

  11. What factors drive prolactin and corticosterone responses to stress in a long-lived bird species (snow petrel Pagodroma nivea)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelier, Frédéric; Moe, Børge; Blanc, Samuel; Chastel, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that individuals should adapt their parental investment to the costs and benefits of the current reproductive effort. This could be achieved by modulating the hormonal stress response, which may shift energy investment away from reproduction and redirect it toward survival. In birds, this stress response consists of a release of corticosterone that may be accompanied by a decrease in circulating prolactin, a hormone involved in the regulation of parental care. We lack data on the modulation of the prolactin stress response. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that individuals should modulate their prolactin stress response according to the fitness value of the current reproductive effort relative to the fitness value of future reproduction. Specifically, we examined the influence of breeding status (failed breeders vs. incubating birds) and body condition on prolactin and corticosterone stress responses in a long-lived species, the snow petrel Pagodroma nivea. When facing stressors, incubating birds had higher prolactin levels than failed breeders. However, we found no effect of body condition on the prolactin stress response. The corticosterone stress response was modulated according to body condition but was not affected by breeding status. We also performed an experiment using injections of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and found that the modulation of the corticosterone stress response was probably associated with a reduction in ACTH release by the pituitary and a decrease in adrenal sensitivity to ACTH. In addition, we examined whether prolactin and corticosterone secretion were functionally linked. We found that these two hormonal stress responses were not correlated. Moreover, injection of ACTH did not affect prolactin levels, demonstrating that short-term variations in prolactin levels are not governed directly or indirectly by ACTH release. Thus, we suggest that the corticosterone and prolactin responses to short

  12. Prior exposure to capture heightens the corticosterone and behavioural responses of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) to acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Gemma; Turner, Emma; Dann, Peter; Harcourt, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Studies of physiology can provide important insight into how animals are coping with challenges in their environment and can signal the potential effects of exposure to human activity in both the short and long term. In this study, we measured the physiological and behavioural response of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) that were naïve to human activity over 30 min of capture and handling. We assessed relationships between corticosterone secretion, behaviour, sex and time of day in order to characterize the determinants of the natural stress response. We then compared the response of these naïve penguins with the responses of female little penguins that had been exposed to research activity (bimonthly nest check and weighing) and to both research activity (monthly nest check and weighing) and evening viewing by tourists. We found that corticosterone concentrations increased significantly over 30 min of capture, with naïve penguins demonstrating a more acute stress response during the day than at night. Penguins that had previously been exposed to handling at the research and research/visitor sites showed elevated corticosterone concentrations and consistently more aggressive behaviour after 30 min compared with naïve birds, although there were no significant differences in baseline corticosterone concentrations. Our findings demonstrate that these little penguins have not habituated to routine capture, but rather mount a heightened physiological and behavioural response to handling by humans. Less invasive research monitoring techniques, such as individual identification with PIT tags and automatic recording and weighing, and a reduction in handling during the day should be considered to mitigate some of the potentially negative effects of disturbance. Given the paucity of data on the long-term consequences of heightened stress on animal physiology, our study highlights the need for further investigation of the relationship between the corticosterone

  13. Both transient and continuous corticosterone excess inhibit atherosclerotic plaque formation in APOE*3-leiden.CETP mice.

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    Hanna E Auvinen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The role of glucocorticoids in atherosclerosis development is not clearly established. Human studies show a clear association between glucocorticoid excess and cardiovascular disease, whereas most animal models indicate an inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on atherosclerosis development. These animal models, however, neither reflect long-term glucocorticoid overexposure nor display human-like lipoprotein metabolism. AIM: To investigate the effects of transient and continuous glucocorticoid excess on atherosclerosis development in a mouse model with human-like lipoprotein metabolism upon feeding a Western-type diet. METHODS: Pair-housed female APOE*3-Leiden.CETP (E3L.CETP mice fed a Western-type containing 0.1% cholesterol for 20 weeks were given corticosterone (50 µg/ml for either 5 (transient group or 17 weeks (continuous group, or vehicle (control group in the drinking water. At the end of the study, atherosclerosis severity, lesion area in the aortic root, the number of monocytes adhering to the endothelial wall and macrophage content of the plaque were measured. RESULTS: Corticosterone treatment increased body weight and food intake for the duration of the treatment and increased gonadal and subcutaneous white adipose tissue weight in transient group by +35% and +31%, and in the continuous group by +140% and 110%. Strikingly, both transient and continuous corticosterone treatment decreased total atherosclerotic lesion area by -39% without lowering plasma cholesterol levels. In addition, there was a decrease of -56% in macrophage content of the plaque with continuous corticosterone treatment, and a similar trend was present with the transient treatment. CONCLUSION: Increased corticosterone exposure in mice with human-like lipoprotein metabolism has beneficial, long-lasting effects on atherosclerosis, but negatively affects body fat distribution by promoting fat accumulation in the long-term. This indicates that the increased

  14. Chronic ethanol exposure increases the non-dominant glucocorticoid, corticosterone, in the near-term pregnant guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Amy J; Dobson, Christine C; Brien, James F; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E; Reynolds, James N

    2014-08-01

    Maternal-fetal signaling is critical for optimal fetal development and postnatal outcomes. Chronic ethanol exposure alters programming of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, resulting in a myriad of neurochemical and behavioral alterations in postnatal life. Based on a recent study which showed that human intra-partum fetal stress increased fetal secretion of corticosterone, the non-dominant glucocorticoid, this investigation tested the hypothesis that an established model of HPA axis programming, chronic maternal ethanol administration to the pregnant guinea pig, would result in preferential elevation of corticosterone, which is also the non-dominant glucocorticoid. Starting on gestational day (GD) 2, guinea pigs received oral administration of ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day) or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding. Each treatment was administered daily and continued until GD 45, 55, or 65 (approximately 3 days pre-term), when pregnant animals were euthanized and fetuses delivered by Caesarean section. Maternal and fetal plasma samples were collected. After sample preparation (protein precipitation and C-18 solid phase extraction), plasma cortisol and corticosterone concentrations were determined simultaneously by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. As predicted, chronic ethanol exposure increased both fetal and maternal plasma corticosterone concentration in late gestation. In contrast, plasma cortisol did not differ across maternal treatments in maternal or fetal samples. The plasma concentration of both maternal glucocorticoids increased with gestational age. Thus, corticosterone, the non-dominant glucocorticoid, but not cortisol, was elevated by chronic ethanol exposure, which may have effects on HPA function in later life.

  15. Eggshell appearance does not signal maternal corticosterone exposure in Japanese quail: an experimental study with brown-spotted eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Duval

    Full Text Available Reproduction is a critical period for birds as they have to cope with many stressful events. One consequence of an acute exposure to stress is the release of corticosterone, the avian stress hormone. Prolonged stress can have negative impacts on the immune system, resulting in, for example, increased oxidative stress. Through maternal effects, females are known to modulate their investment in eggs content according to their own physiological condition. Less is known about maternal investment in eggshells, especially in pigments. The two main eggshell pigments may possess opposite antioxidant properties: protoporphyrin (brown is a pro-oxidant, whereas biliverdin (blue-green is an antioxidant. In Japanese quail, we know that the deposition of both pigments is related to female body condition. Thus, a chronic stress response may be reflected in eggshell coloration. Using female Japanese quails that lay brown-spotted eggs, we explored whether physiological exposure to corticosterone induces a change in female basal stress and antioxidant factors, and eggshell pigment concentration, spectrophotometric reflectance, and maculation coverage. We supplemented adult females over a 2 week period with either peanut oil (control or corticosterone (treatment. We collected pre- and post-supplementation eggs and analysed the effect of corticosterone treatment on female physiology and eggshell appearance parameters. Except for corticosterone-fed birds which laid eggs with brighter spots, supplementation had no significant effect on female physiology or eggshell pigment concentration, reflectance and maculation. The change in eggshell spot brightness was not detected by a photoreceptor noise-limited color opponent model of avian visual perception. Our data confirms that eggshell reflectance in spotted eggs varies over the laying sequence, and spot reflectance may be a key factor that is affected by females CORT exposure, even if the changes are not detected by an

  16. Application of a naturalistic psychogenic stressor in periadolescent mice: effect on serum corticosterone levels differs by strain but not sex

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    Klein Laura C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a first step in determining whether psychogenic stressors might be incorporated into periadolescent mouse models of stress, we evaluated whether a commonly used psychogenic stressor, exposure to red fox urine, alters serum corticosterone levels in periadolescent C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice. Findings In a 1-day experiment, forty-eight 38-day-old C57BL/6J (N = 12 males; N = 12 females and DBA/2J (N = 12 males; N = 12 females mice were exposed to 10-min of red fox urine via cotton ball (N = 12 C57BL/6J mice; N = 12 DBA/2J mice or to a non-saturated cotton ball (N = 12 C57BL/6J mice; N = 12 DBA/2J mice. All mice were sacrificed 15-min after cotton ball exposure and serum was collected for corticosterone assessment. Overall, there was a main effect for strain such that C57BL/6J male and female mice displayed higher corticosterone levels than did male and female DBA/2J mice. There were no main effects for sex or odor exposure. However, there was a significant strain by odor exposure interaction, whereby, within odor-exposed mice, DBA/2J mice displayed lower corticosterone levels (ng/mL compared to C57BL/6J mice, regardless of sex. Further, among DBA/2J mice, predator odor exposure reduced corticosterone levels compared to no odor exposure. Conclusions Findings indicate that mouse strain, but not sex, may play an important role in the efficacy of a predator odor among periadolescent mice.

  17. Comparison of time-dependent effects of (+-methamphetamine or forced swim on monoamines, corticosterone, glucose, creatine, and creatinine in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudelsky Gary A

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (MA use is a worldwide problem. Abusers can have cognitive deficits, monoamine reductions, and altered magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings. Animal models have been used to investigate some of these effects, however many of these experiments have not examined the impact of MA on the stress response. For example, numerous studies have demonstrated (+-MA-induced neurotoxicity and monoamine reductions, however the effects of MA on other markers that may play a role in neurotoxicity or cell energetics such as glucose, corticosterone, and/or creatine have received less attention. In this experiment, the effects of a neurotoxic regimen of (+-MA (4 doses at 2 h intervals on brain monoamines, neostriatal GFAP, plasma corticosterone, creatinine, and glucose, and brain and muscle creatine were evaluated 1, 7, 24, and 72 h after the first dose. In order to compare MA's effects with stress, animals were subjected to a forced swim test in a temporal pattern similar to MA administration [i.e., (30 min/session 4 times at 2 h intervals]. Results MA increased corticosterone from 1–72 h with a peak 1 h after the first treatment, whereas glucose was only increased 1 h post-treatment. Neostriatal and hippocampal monoamines were decreased at 7, 24, and 72 h, with a concurrent increase in GFAP at 72 h. There was no effect of MA on regional brain creatine, however plasma creatinine was increased during the first 24 h and decreased by 72 h. As with MA treatment, forced swim increased corticosterone more than MA initially. Unlike MA, forced swim reduced creatine in the cerebellum with no change in other brain regions while plasma creatinine was decreased at 1 and 7 h. Glucose in plasma was decreased at 7 h. Conclusion Both MA and forced swim increase demand on energy substrates but in different ways, and MA has persistent effects on corticosterone that are not attributable to stress alone.

  18. Effects of intranasal and peripheral oxytocin or gastrin-releasing peptide administration on social interaction and corticosterone levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Pamela; Awadia, Alisha; Zhao, Leah; Ensan, Donna; Silva, Dinuka; Cayer, Christian; James, Jonathan S; Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul

    2016-02-01

    The intranasal route of drug administration has gained increased popularity as it is thought to allow large molecules, such as peptide hormones, more direct access to the brain, while limiting systemic exposure. Several studies have investigated the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in humans as this peptide is associated with prosocial behavior. There are, however, few preclinical studies investigating the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in rodents. Oxytocin modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and it has been suggested that oxytocin's ability to increase sociability may occur through a reduction in stress reactivity. Another peptide that appears to influence both social behavior and HPA axis activity is gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), but it is not known if these GRP-induced effects are related. With this in mind, in the present study, we assessed the effects of intranasal and intraperitoneal oxytocin and GRP administration on social interaction and release of corticosterone in rats. Intranasal and intraperitoneal administration of 20, but not 5 μg, of oxytocin significantly increased social interaction, whereas intranasal and peripheral administration of GRP (20 but not 5 μg) significantly decreased levels of social interaction. In addition, while intranasal oxytocin (20 μg) had no effect on blood corticosterone levels, a marked increase in blood corticosterone levels was observed following intraperitoneal oxytocin administration. With GRP, intranasal (20 μg) but not peripheral administration increased corticosterone levels. These findings provide further evidence that intranasal peptide delivery can induce behavioral alterations in rodents which is consistent with findings from human studies. In addition, the peptide-induced changes in social interaction were not linked to fluctuations in corticosterone levels.

  19. Altered entrainment to the day/night cycle attenuates the daily rise in circulating corticosterone in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollars, Patricia J; Weiser, Michael J; Kudwa, Andrea E; Bramley, Jayne R; Ogilvie, Malcolm D; Spencer, Robert L; Handa, Robert J; Pickard, Gary E

    2014-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a circadian oscillator entrained to the day/night cycle via input from the retina. Serotonin (5-HT) afferents to the SCN modulate retinal signals via activation of 5-HT1B receptors, decreasing responsiveness to light. Consequently, 5-HT1B receptor knockout (KO) mice entrain to the day/night cycle with delayed activity onsets. Since circulating corticosterone levels exhibit a robust daily rhythm peaking around activity onset, we asked whether delayed entrainment of activity onsets affects rhythmic corticosterone secretion. Wheel-running activity and plasma corticosterone were monitored in mice housed under several different lighting regimens. Both duration of the light:dark cycle (T cycle) and the duration of light within that cycle was altered. 5-HT1B KO mice that entrained to a 9.5L:13.5D (short day in a T = 23 h) cycle with activity onsets delayed more than 4 h after light offset exhibited a corticosterone rhythm in phase with activity rhythms but reduced 50% in amplitude compared to animals that initiated daily activity entrainment suggested that the endogenous rhythm of adrenal responsiveness to ACTH remained aligned with SCN-driven behavioral activity. Circadian clock gene expression in the adrenal cortex of these same animals suggested that the adrenal circadian clock was also aligned with SCN-driven behavior. Under T cycles entrainment to short day (winter-like) conditions, manifest as long delays in activity onset after light offset, severely reduces the amplitude of the diurnal rhythm of plasma corticosterone. Such a pronounced reduction in the glucocorticoid rhythm may alter rhythmic gene expression in the central nervous system and in peripheral organs contributing to an array of potential pathophysiologies.

  20. Effects of high-intensity interval versus mild-intensity endurance training on metabolic phenotype and corticosterone response in rats fed a high-fat or control diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Youqing; Huang, Guoyuan; McCormick, Bryan P; Song, Tao; Xu, Xiangfeng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of high-intensity interval training (HI) to mild-intensity endurance training (ME), combined with a high-fat diet (HFD) or control diet (CD) on metabolic phenotype and corticosterone levels in rats. Fifty-three rats were randomized to 6 groups according to diet and training regimen as follows: CD and sedentary (CS, n = 11), CD and ME (CME, n = 8), CD and HI (CHI, n = 8), HFD and sedentary (HS, n = 10), HFD and ME (HME, n = 8), and HFD and HI (HHI, n = 8). All exercise groups were trained for 10 weeks and had matched running distances. Dietary intake, body composition, blood metabolites, and corticosterone levels were measured. Histological lipid droplets were observed in the livers. The HFD led to hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and higher body fat (all, P 0.06), as well as higher corticosterone levels (P training improved fat weight, glucose, and lipid profiles, and reduced corticosterone levels (P training compared to ME training. Reductions in HFD-induced body weight gain, blood glucose and lipid profiles, and corticosterone levels, as well as improvements in QUICKI were better with HHI compared to HME. Correlation analyses revealed that corticosterone levels were significantly associated with phenotype variables (P training, HI training contributes to greater improvements in metabolic and corticosterone responses, leading to a greater reduction in susceptibility to HFD-induced disorders.

  1. Corticosterone regulates expression of BDNF and trkB but not NT-3 and trkC mRNA in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, M J; Hoetelmans, R W; de Kloet, E R; Vreugdenhil, E

    1997-05-15

    Corticosterone has profound effects on growth, differentiation, and synaptic transmission of hippocampal neurons by activation of mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). In the present study we tested if neurotrophins can be implicated in these effects. For this purpose we injected 30, 300, and 1,000 microg corticosterone s.c. (per kg body weight) in adrenalectomized rats and measured the mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine receptor kinase (trk)B, neurotrophin (NT)-3, and trkC in hippocampal cell fields at 6 hr after steroid administration by in situ hybridization. NT-3 and trkC mRNA did not show significant changes in any hippocampal region after the various doses of corticosterone. BDNF mRNA decreased after corticosterone administration dose dependently, resulting in a maximal suppression of 35, 20, and 50% in dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1, respectively. Interestingly, trkB responded to corticosterone in an inverted U-shaped fashion in CA3 and dentate gyrus: the low dose of corticosterone increased trkB mRNA expression in both regions by approximately 30%, while the effect of the two higher doses was not different from the vehicle injected controls. In conclusion, we found differential effects of low and high doses of corticosterone on BDNF and trkB expression in hippocampus, which suggests involvement of a coordinated MR- and GR-mediated action.

  2. Interactions between ecology, demography, capture stress, and profiles of corticosterone and glucose in a free-living population of Australian freshwater crocodiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Tim S; Tucker, Anton D; Limpus, Colin J; Whittier, Joan M

    2003-06-01

    In this study we examined three aspects pertaining to adrenocortical responsiveness in free-ranging Australian freshwater crocodiles (Crocodylus johnstoni). First, we examined the ability of freshwater crocodiles to produce corticosterone in response to a typical capture-stress protocol. A second objective addressed the relationship between capture stress, plasma glucose and corticosterone. Next we examined if variation in basal and capture-stress-induced levels of plasma corticosterone was linked to ecological or demographic factors for individuals in this free-ranging population. Blood samples obtained on three field trips were taken from a cross-sectional sample of the population. Crocodiles were bled once during four time categories at 0, 0.5, 6, and 10h post-capture. Plasma corticosterone increased significantly with time post-capture. Plasma glucose also significantly increased with duration of capture-stress and exhibited a positive and significant relationship with plasma corticosterone. Significant variation in basal or stress induced levels of corticosterone in crocodiles was not associated with any ecological or demographic factors including sex, age class or the year of capture that the crocodiles were sampled from. However, three immature males had basal levels of plasma corticosterone greater than 2 standard deviations above the mean. While crocodiles exhibited a pronounced adrenocortical and hyperglycaemic response to capture stress, limited variation in adrenocortical responsiveness due to ecological and demographic factors was not evident. This feature could arise in part because this population was sampled during a period of environmental benigness.

  3. Biomedical Evaluation of Cortisol, Cortisone, and Corticosterone along with Testosterone and Epitestosterone Applying Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bączek, Tomasz; Olędzka, Ilona; Konieczna, Lucyna; Kowalski, Piotr; Plenis, Alina

    2012-01-01

    The validated micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) was proposed for the determination of five steroid hormones in human urine samples. That technique allowed for the separation and quantification of cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, testosterone, and epitestosterone and was sensitive enough to detect low concentrations of these searched steroids in urine samples at the range of 2–300 ng/mL. The proposed MEKC technique with solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure was simple, rapid, and has been successfully applied as a routine procedure to analyze steroids in human urine samples. The MEKC method offered a potential in clinical routine practice because of the short analysis time (8 min), low costs, and simultaneous analysis of five endogenous hormones. Due to its simplicity, speed, accuracy, and high recovery, the proposed method could offer a tool to determine steroid hormones as potential biomarkers in biomedical investigations, what was additionally revealed with healthy volunteers. PMID:22536129

  4. Quantitative effects of diet on fecal corticosterone metabolites in two strains of laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of glucocorticoids excreted in feces is becoming a widespread technique for determining animal wellbeing in a wide variety of settings. In the present study an extraction protocol and an ELISA assay for quantifying fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in BALB/c and C57bl/6 mice were...... validated. Lower ratios of solvent (ethanol) to mass of fecal sample were found to be sufficient in extracting FCM compared to what has been reported previously. Feeding mice a high energy diet, high in fat content (60% of calories from fat), significantly lowered the FCM excretion, approximately halving...... the FCM output. This diet also reduced the fecal mass voided to approximately a third of that of the regular diet. The two reductions were not correlated. A difference in defecation pattern was seen between the two strains, with the BALB/c mice having a more pronounced diurnal rhythm compared to the C57bl...

  5. Biomedical Evaluation of Cortisol, Cortisone, and Corticosterone along with Testosterone and Epitestosterone Applying Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Bączek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The validated micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC was proposed for the determination of five steroid hormones in human urine samples. That technique allowed for the separation and quantification of cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, testosterone, and epitestosterone and was sensitive enough to detect low concentrations of these searched steroids in urine samples at the range of 2–300 ng/mL. The proposed MEKC technique with solid-phase extraction (SPE procedure was simple, rapid, and has been successfully applied as a routine procedure to analyze steroids in human urine samples. The MEKC method offered a potential in clinical routine practice because of the short analysis time (8 min, low costs, and simultaneous analysis of five endogenous hormones. Due to its simplicity, speed, accuracy, and high recovery, the proposed method could offer a tool to determine steroid hormones as potential biomarkers in biomedical investigations, what was additionally revealed with healthy volunteers.

  6. Assessment on Application of Chinese Herbal Medicine in the Process of Corticosterone Reduction in Nephrotic Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in the process of corticosterone (CS) reduction in nephrotic syndrome. Methods: One hundred and twenty patients of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome sensitive to prednisone treatment were divided into two groups randomly. The dosage of prednisone used was conventionally reduced in both groups but CHM herbal treatment was added to the treated group in the period of prednisone reduction. The effect of CHM was estimated by observing the recurrence rate of disease and side-effects of prednisone. Results: The recurrence rate of disease and the occurrence rate of side-effects of prednisone in the treated group were less than those in the control group significantly (P<0.01). Conclusion: Additional CHM in the process of CS reduction in treating CS sensitive nephrotic syndrome could markedly abate the recurrence rate of disease and the side-effect of CS reduction.

  7. Pycnogenol ameliorates depression-like behavior in repeated corticosterone-induced depression mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Mochizuki, Miyako; Hasegawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be a mechanism of major depression. Pycnogenol (PYC) is a natural plant extract from the bark of Pinus pinaster Aiton and has potent antioxidant activities. We studied the ameliorative effect of PYC on depression-like behavior in chronic corticosterone- (CORT-) treated mice for 20 days. After the end of the CORT treatment period, PYC (0.2 mg/mL) was orally administered in normal drinking water. Depression-like behavior was investigated by the forced swimming test. Immobility time was significantly longer by CORT exposure. When the CORT-treated mice were supplemented with PYC, immobility time was significantly shortened. Our results indicate that orally administered PYC may serve to reduce CORT-induced stress by radical scavenging activity.

  8. Pycnogenol Ameliorates Depression-Like Behavior in Repeated Corticosterone-Induced Depression Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Mei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is considered to be a mechanism of major depression. Pycnogenol (PYC is a natural plant extract from the bark of Pinus pinaster Aiton and has potent antioxidant activities. We studied the ameliorative effect of PYC on depression-like behavior in chronic corticosterone- (CORT- treated mice for 20 days. After the end of the CORT treatment period, PYC (0.2 mg/mL was orally administered in normal drinking water. Depression-like behavior was investigated by the forced swimming test. Immobility time was significantly longer by CORT exposure. When the CORT-treated mice were supplemented with PYC, immobility time was significantly shortened. Our results indicate that orally administered PYC may serve to reduce CORT-induced stress by radical scavenging activity.

  9. Changes in eosinophil and corticosterone levels and catecholamine metabolism during emotionalpainful stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, V.V.; Manukhin, B.N.; Petrova, V.A.

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study blood levels of eosinophils, corticosterone (CS), adrenalin, noradrenalin (NA), and dopamine (DA) during the development of the stress reaction, and also to study neuronal uptake and synthesis of catecholamines in the adrenals and heart. In some animal groups, the neuronal uptake of /sup 3/H-NA and the intensity of /sup 3/H-Na and /sup 3/H-DA synthesis from /sup 3/H-tyrosine were investigated by a method described previously, 2 h after the end of induction of emotional-painful stress (EPS). Radioactivity was measured on an SL-30 liquid scintillation counter. A regular relationship was found between changes in blood eosinophil level, the CH concentration, and catecholamine metabolism in the course of EPS.

  10. A chronic increase of corticosterone age-dependently reduces systemic DNA damage from oxidation in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Anders; Kalliokoski, Otto; Forsberg, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    differences. In old animals, CORT caused a borderline significant reduction of RNA oxidation in CNS, which was paralleled by a normalization of performance in an object location memory test. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that chronic stress-associated levels of CORT can reduce nucleic acid......Stress and depression are associated with an acceleration of brain and bodily aging; effects which have been attributed to chronic elevations of glucocorticoids. We tested the hypothesis that a three week administration of stress-associated levels of corticosterone (CORT, the principal rodent...... glucocorticoid) would increase systemic and CNS DNA and RNA damage from oxidation; a phenomenon known to be centrally involved in the aging process. We also hypothesized that older individuals would be more sensitive to this effect and that the chronic CORT administration would exacerbate age-related memory...

  11. Corticosterone modulation of neurotransmitter receptors in rat hippocampus: a quantitative autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biegon, A. (Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc., Nutley, NJ (USA). Dept. of Pharmacology); Rainbow, T.C. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia (USA). School of Medicine); McEwen, B.S. (Rockefeller Univ., New York (USA))

    1985-04-22

    The effect of adrenalectomy (ADX) and corticosterone (CORT) replacement on neurotransmitter receptors was studied in dorsal hippocampus of rat using quantitative autoradiography. ADX for one week causes an increase in (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding to 5-HT/sub 1/ receptors which is significant in the CA1 cell field. CORT treatment of ADX rats for 3-5 days results in localized reductions of (/sup 3/H)5-HT binding including a partial reversal of the increase observed after ADX in CA1. CORT treatment of ADX animals also decreases binding of (/sup 3/H)QNB to muscarinic receptors in the dorsal hippocampus, with a significant effect in an area designated as subiculum. No influence of CORT was detected on (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding to alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors in dorsal hippocampus. Possible mechanisms for hormone effects on neurotransmitter receptor levels are discussed.

  12. Quantitative effects of diet on fecal corticosterone metabolites in two strains of laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte;

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of glucocorticoids excreted in feces is becoming a widespread technique for determining animal wellbeing in a wide variety of settings. In the present study an extraction protocol and an ELISA assay for quantifying fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in BALB/c and C57bl/6 mice were...... validated. Lower ratios of solvent (ethanol) to mass of fecal sample were found to be sufficient in extracting FCM compared to what has been reported previously. Feeding mice a high energy diet, high in fat content (60% of calories from fat), significantly lowered the FCM excretion, approximately halving......, but had a considerably lesser impact on data than did the difference in diet. The study demonstrates some problematic consequences of expressing FCM excretion as a measure of fecal dry mass. The study also serves to emphasize the caution that must be exercised when interpreting FCM excretion...

  13. Corticosterone in relation to body mass in Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) affected by unusual sea ice conditions at Ross Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrem, J F; Potter, M A; Candy, E J

    2006-12-01

    Penguins naturally fast each year during breeding and again whilst moulting, and may lose more than 40% of body mass during a fast. Fasting in emperor (Aptenodytes forsteri) and king (Aptenodytes patagonicus) penguins has been divided into three phases, with phase III characterised by an increased rate of body mass loss, increased plasma corticosterone concentrations, and a change in behaviour leading to abandonment of the breeding attempt and return to sea to feed. Initial corticosterone concentrations and corticosterone responses to a handling stressor were measured in the current study to determine if they increase during phase III of fasting in Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae). The study was conducted in 2001 at the northern Cape Bird colony on Ross Island, Antarctica. Penguin breeding on Ross Island was disrupted in the 2001-2002 summer by a large iceberg (B15A) which stopped the normal movement of sea ice in the Ross Sea. Penguins departing from the Cape Bird colony were lighter than returning or incubating birds (3.39+/-0.10cf. 4.16+/-0.06 and 4.07+/-0.08kg). It is likely that the departing birds were males that had been lighter than normal when they arrived at the colony. Initial plasma corticosterone concentrations were higher in departing than returning or incubating penguins (6.89+/-1.69cf. 2.36+/-0.42 and 1.08+/-0.19ng/ml). Corticosterone responses to handling were also greater in departing penguins. Initial plasma corticosterone, concentrations at 30min and total and corrected integrated corticosterone responses were inversely related to body mass in departing penguins, whereas there were no relationships in arriving penguins. beta-hydroxybutyrate and uric acid concentrations were consistent with departing birds having entered phase III of fasting. The results indicate that corticosterone and corticosterone responses are elevated in phase III of fasting in the Adelie penguin.

  14. Effects of anesthesia and blood sampling techniques on plasma metabolites and corticosterone in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Myrtha; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2010-04-19

    Blood is routinely sampled from laboratory animals in biomedical research, and many of the commonly applied sampling techniques require anesthesia. Acute effects of many sampling and anesthesia procedures may confound the results, but those effects are incompletely characterized. We here compare the effects of four common anesthesia procedures (inhalation anesthesia with ether (EA) or isoflurane (IA) and intraperitoneal injection anesthesia with xylazin/ketamine (XKA) or medetomidine/midazolam/fentanyl (MMFA)) on plasma concentrations of glucose, lactate, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), and corticosterone in blood obtained from a previously implanted jugular vein (JV) catheter with the effect of JV blood sampling from non-anesthetized, freely-moving rats (JV-NA). Also, we included in the comparison two other blood sampling procedures usually performed without anesthesia (NA), i.e., puncture of the saphenic vein (SV) and tail incision (TI). Whereas the control procedure (JV-NA) did not significantly affect any of the target parameters, plasma glucose increased from 14 (JV-IA) to 44 (JV-MMFA) % (all Ps=0.05 when compared with the control procedure) in all blood samples collected in anesthesia and was 12 and 14% lower (both Pssamples, respectively. Plasma lactate increased from 74 (JV-IA) to 226% (SV-NA) (all Pssampling and anesthesia procedures except for JV-XKA and JV-MMF. Plasma NEFAs increased to 52% (P0.05). Finally, only the JV-EA and the JV-MMFA procedures increased plasma corticosterone (+525 and +353%, respectively, both Pssampling procedures can have profound acute effects on plasma metabolite and hormone concentrations. This must be considered for the design and interpretation of blood sampling experiments in laboratory animals. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Fructose increases corticosterone production in association with NADPH metabolism alterations in rat epididymal white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Paula D; Santander, Yanina A; Gerez, Estefania M; Höcht, Christian; Polizio, Ariel H; Mayer, Marcos A; Taira, Carlos A; Fraga, Cesar G; Galleano, Monica; Carranza, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an array of closely metabolic disorders that includes glucose intolerance/insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Fructose, a highly lipogenic sugar, has profound metabolic effects in adipose tissue, and has been associated with the etiopathology of many components of the metabolic syndrome. In adipocytes, the enzyme 11 β-HSD1 amplifies local glucocorticoid production, being a key player in the pathogenesis of central obesity and metabolic syndrome. 11 β-HSD1 reductase activity is dependent on NADPH, a cofactor generated by H6PD inside the endoplasmic reticulum. Our focus was to explore the effect of fructose overload on epididymal white adipose tissue (EWAT) machinery involved in glucocorticoid production and NADPH and oxidants metabolism. Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed with a fructose solution (10% (w/v) in tap water) during 9 weeks developed some characteristic features of metabolic syndrome, such as hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension. In addition, high levels of plasma and EWAT corticosterone were detected. Activities and expressions of H6PD and 11 β-HSD1, NAPDH content, superoxide anion production, expression of NADPH oxidase 2 subunits, and indicators of oxidative metabolism were measured. Fructose overloaded rats showed an increased potential in oxidant production respect to control rats. In parallel, in EWAT from fructose overloaded rats we found higher expression/activity of H6PD and 11 β-HSD1, and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio. Our in vivo results support that fructose overload installs in EWAT conditions favoring glucocorticoid production through higher H6PD expression/activity supplying NADPH for enhanced 11 β-HSD1 expression/activity, becoming this tissue a potential extra-adrenal source of corticosterone under these experimental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone and their in vitro effects on lizard skeletal muscle lactate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, T T; Dalessio, P M; Carr, J A; Wickler, S J; Mazzeo, R S

    1993-09-01

    Lizard skeletal muscles utilize primarily lactate as a gluconeogenic substrate for glycogen replenishment following exercise. To understand the influence of selected hormones on this process, we measured changes in plasma catecholamines and corticosterone resulting from exercise in the lizard Dipsosaurus dorsalis and then investigated the physiological effects of those hormones on skeletal muscle lactate and glucose metabolism in vitro. Plasma epinephrine (Epi), norepinephrine, and corticosterone (Cort) increased 5.8, 10.2, and 2.2 times, respectively, after 5 min of exhaustive exercise. Epi and Cort levels remained elevated after 2 h of recovery. Skeletal muscle fiber bundles isolated from the red and white regions of the iliofibularis muscle were incubated 2 h at 40 degrees C in the presence of postexercise concentrations of [14C]lactate (15 mM) and glucose (8.5 mM) in the presence and absence of Epi or Cort. Red muscle oxidized both substrates at 2-3 times the rate of white muscle, and both red and white fibers oxidized lactate at 5-10 times the rate of glucose oxidation. Epi had a stimulatory effect on lactate oxidation by white muscle. Lactate incorporation into glycogen proceeded at 2-3 times the rate of glucose incorporation in both muscle types, with rates in red muscle again 2-3 times that for white muscle. Epi stimulated lactate carbon incorporation into glycogen by 50-140% in both red and white muscle but had no effect on glucose incorporation into glycogen in either tissue. We interpret these data as evidence that epinephrine stimulates lactate removal by skeletal muscle. Cort had no effect on lactate metabolism in either muscle type.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Environmentally relevant bouts of cooling stimulate corticosterone secretion in free-living eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) nestlings: potential links between maternal behavior and corticosterone exposure in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Sharon E; Kern, Michael D

    2014-01-15

    In vertebrates, exposure to stressful stimuli or to elevated glucocorticoids early in development can contribute to phenotypic variation that may have significant fitness consequences. In species with altricial young, offspring may be partially buffered from elevations in glucocorticoids by a period of low glucocorticoid responsiveness to stressors coupled with high levels of parental care. Because altricial young depend heavily on their parents for warmth, parental brooding behavior could buffer offspring from glucocorticoid exposure associated with cooling. We studied eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) with two goals: (1) to determine whether an experimental drop in body temperature such as that which might occur when a brooding female is off the nest was sufficient to stimulate glucocorticoid secretion in young chicks, and (2) to examine the extent to which chicks experienced such bouts of cooling in the field. We subjected chicks to treatments simulating nest temperatures while females were brooding or absent from the nest. We also recorded chick surface temperatures and ambient temperatures at nests during the first week of the brood period. Reductions of surface temperature of less than 10°C significantly elevated corticosterone secretion in chicks as young as 5days old, and thermal and hormonal responses of chicks to cooling increased in an age-dependent manner. One quarter of broods experienced repeated, natural bouts of cooling of this magnitude or greater in the nest. Our data suggest that natural variations in maternal brooding patterns can result in differential exposure of offspring to glucocorticoids, and this may have important phenotypic consequences later in life.

  18. Altered entrainment to the day/night cycle attenuates the daily rise in circulating corticosterone in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Sollars

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN is a circadian oscillator entrained to the day/night cycle via input from the retina. Serotonin (5-HT afferents to the SCN modulate retinal signals via activation of 5-HT1B receptors, decreasing responsiveness to light. Consequently, 5-HT1B receptor knockout (KO mice entrain to the day/night cycle with delayed activity onsets. Since circulating corticosterone levels exhibit a robust daily rhythm peaking around activity onset, we asked whether delayed entrainment of activity onsets affects rhythmic corticosterone secretion. Wheel-running activity and plasma corticosterone were monitored in mice housed under several different lighting regimens. Both duration of the light:dark cycle (T cycle and the duration of light within that cycle was altered. 5-HT1B KO mice that entrained to a 9.5L:13.5D (short day in a T = 23 h cycle with activity onsets delayed more than 4 h after light offset exhibited a corticosterone rhythm in phase with activity rhythms but reduced 50% in amplitude compared to animals that initiated daily activity <4 h after light offset. Wild type mice in 8L:14D (short day in a T = 22 h conditions with highly delayed activity onsets also exhibited a 50% reduction in peak plasma corticosterone levels. Exogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH stimulation in animals exhibiting highly delayed entrainment suggested that the endogenous rhythm of adrenal responsiveness to ACTH remained aligned with SCN-driven behavioral activity. Circadian clock gene expression in the adrenal cortex of these same animals suggested that the adrenal circadian clock was also aligned with SCN-driven behavior. Under T cycles <24 h, altered circadian entrainment to short day (winter-like conditions, manifest as long delays in activity onset after light offset, severely reduces the amplitude of the diurnal rhythm of plasma corticosterone. Such a pronounced reduction in the glucocorticoid rhythm may alter rhythmic gene expression in

  19. Inhibition of immobilization stress-induced anorexia, behavioral deficits, and plasma corticosterone secretion by injected leptin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Zeba; Akbar, Nazia; Yasmin, Farzana; Haleem, Muhammad A; Haleem, Darakhshan J

    2013-05-01

    Leptin, originally identified as an anti-obesity hormone, also has an important role in the regulation of mood and emotion. The present study was designed to monitor effects of injected leptin on immobilization stress-induced anorexia, behavioral deficits, and plasma corticosterone secretion in rats. Exposure to 2 h immobilization stress decreased food intake and body weight in saline-injected animals. Animals exposed to open field, elevated plus maze, and light-dark transition tests the day following immobilization exhibited anxiety-like behavior. Leptin injected at doses of 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg also decreased food intake and body weight in unstressed animals and elicited anxiolytic effects at dose of 0.5 mg/kg, monitored on the following day. Immobilization-induced decreases in food intake, body weight, as well as stress-induced behavioral deficits in the open field, elevated plus maze, and light-dark transition test were reversed by exogenous leptin in a dose-dependent (0.1-0.5 mg/kg) manner. Acute exposure to 2 h immobilization produced a fourfold rise in plasma levels of corticosterone. Animals injected with leptin at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg, but not at dose of 0.5 mg/kg, exhibited a marginal increase in plasma corticosterone. Immobilization-induced increases of plasma corticosterone were reversed by leptin injected at doses of 0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg. The data suggest that exogenous leptin can reduce stress perception, resulting in an inhibition of stress effects on the activity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and behavior. The reported pharmacological effects of leptin represent an innovative approach for the treatment of stress-related disorders.

  20. Impact of season and social challenge on testosterone and corticosterone levels in a year-round territorial bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landys, Meta M; Goymann, Wolfgang; Schwabl, Ingrid; Trapschuh, Monika; Slagsvold, Tore

    2010-07-01

    Plasma testosterone increases during breeding in many male vertebrates and has long been implicated in the promotion of aggressive behaviors relating to territory and mate defense. Males of some species also defend territories outside of the breeding period. For example, the European nuthatch (Sitta europaea) defends an all-purpose territory throughout the year. To contribute to the growing literature regarding the hormonal correlates of non-breeding territoriality, we investigated the seasonal testosterone and corticosterone profile of male (and female) nuthatches and determined how observed hormone patterns relate to expression of territorial aggression. Given that non-breeding territoriality in the nuthatch relates to the reproductive context (i.e., defense of a future breeding site), we predicted that males would exhibit surges in plasma testosterone throughout the year. However, we found that males showed elevated testosterone levels only during breeding. Thus, testosterone of gonadal origin does not appear to be involved in the expression of non-breeding territoriality. Interestingly, territorial behaviors of male nuthatches were stronger in spring than in autumn, suggesting that in year-round territorial species, breeding-related testosterone elevations may upregulate male-male aggression above non-breeding levels. In females, plasma testosterone was largely undetectable. We also examined effects of simulated territorial intrusions (STIs) on testosterone and corticosterone levels of breeding males. We found that STIs did not elicit a testosterone response, but caused a dramatic increase in plasma corticosterone. These data support the hypothesis that corticosterone rather than testosterone may play a role in the support of behavior and/or physiology during acute territorial encounters in single-brooded species.

  1. A comparative evaluation of acute stress and corticosterone on the process of learning and emotional memory in rat

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    Vafaei AA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Previous studies suggested that stressful events that release Glucocorticoid from adrenal cortex and also injection of agonists of glucocorticoids receptors probably affect emotional learning and memory process and modulate them. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of acute stress and systemic injection of Corticosterone (as agonist of glucocorticoid receptors on acquisition (ACQ, consolidation (CONS and retrieval (RET of emotional memory in rat. "nMethods: In this experimental study we used 180 male Wistar rats (220-250. At the first rats was training in one trial inhibitory avoidance task. On the retention test given 48 h after training, the latency to re-enter the dark compartment of the apparatus (Step-through latency, STL and the time spent in light chamber (TLC were recorded during 10 min test. Intraperitoneal corticosterone in doses of 0.5, 1 and 3mg/kg injected 30min before, immediately after instruction and 30min before retrieval test. Also some groups received 10min stressful stimulation by restrainer at the same time. At the end locomotor's activity was measured for all animals. "nResults: The data indicated that administration of corticosterone 30min before ACQ (1mg/kg, and immediately after CONS (1, 3mg/kg enhance and 30min before RET (1, 3mg/kg impair emotional memory (p<0.05. Acute stress impaired emotional memory in all phases (p<0.05. Also acute stress and injection of Corticosterone have not significantly affect motor activity.  "nConclusions: These findings show that Glucocorticoid receptors in activation dependently plays an important role in modulation of emotional spatial memory processes (ACQ, CONS and RET in new information for emotional events and these effects varies in different phases.

  2. Inactivation of basolateral amygdala prevents chronic immobilization stress-induced memory impairment and associated changes in corticosterone levels.

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    Tripathi, Sunil Jamuna; Chakraborty, Suwarna; Srikumar, B N; Raju, T R; Shankaranarayana Rao, B S

    2017-07-01

    Chronic stress causes detrimental effects on various forms of learning and memory. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) not only plays a crucial role in mediating certain forms of memory, but also in the modulation of the effects of stress. Chronic immobilization stress (CIS) results in hypertrophy of the BLA, which is believed to be one of the underlying causes for stress' effects on learning. Thus, it is plausible that preventing the effects of CIS on amygdala would preclude its deleterious cognitive effects. Accordingly, in the first part, we evaluated the effect of excitotoxic lesion of the BLA on chronic stress-induced hippocampal-dependent spatial learning using a partially baited radial arm maze task. The BLA was ablated bilaterally using ibotenic acid prior to CIS. Chronically stressed rats showed impairment in spatial learning with decreased percentage correct choice and increased reference memory errors. Excitotoxic lesion of the BLA prevented the impairment in spatial learning and reference memory. In the retention test, lesion of the BLA was able to rescue the chronic stress-induced impairment. Interestingly, stress-induced enhanced plasma corticosterone levels were partially prevented by the lesion of BLA. These results motivated us to evaluate if the same effects can be observed with temporary inactivation of BLA, only during stress. We found that chronic stress-induced spatial learning deficits were also prevented by temporary inactivation of the BLA. Additionally, temporary inactivation of BLA partially precluded the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone levels. Thus, inactivation of BLA precludes stress-induced spatial learning deficits, and enhanced plasma corticosterone levels. It is speculated that BLA inactivation-induced reduction in corticosterone levels during stress, might be crucial in restoring spatial learning impairments. Our study provides evidence that amygdalar modulation during stress might be beneficial for strategic

  3. Saikosaponin D acts against corticosterone-induced apoptosis via regulation of mitochondrial GR translocation and a GR-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zong-Yang; Jiang, Yu-Mao; Liu, Ya-Min; Guo, Zhi; Shen, Sheng-Nan; Liu, Xin-Min; Pan, Rui-Le

    2014-08-04

    Saikosaponin D is an agonist of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and our preliminary study showed that it possesses neuroprotective effects in corticosterone-treated PC12 cells. However, further proof is required, and the molecular mechanisms of this neuroprotection remain unclear. This study sought to further examine the cytoprotective efficiency and potential mechanisms of action of Saikosaponin D in corticosterone-treated PC12 cells. The cells were treated with 250 μM corticosterone in the absence or presence of Saikosaponin D for 24 h; cell viability was then determined, and Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide (PI) and annexin/PI double staining, and TUNEL staining were performed. Next, mPTP, MMP, [Ca(2+)]i, translocation of the GR to the nucleus and Western blot analyses for caspase-3, caspase-9, cytochrome C, GR, GILZ, SGK-1, NF-Κb (P65), IκB-α, Bad, Akt, Hsp90 and HDAC-6 were investigated. The neuroprotective effects of Saikosaponin D were further confirmed by Hoechst 33342/PI, annexin/PI and TUNEL staining assays. These additional data suggested that Saikosaponin D partially reversed the physiological changes induced by corticosterone by inhibiting the translocation of the GR to the mitochondria, restoring mitochondrial function, down-regulating the expression of pro-apoptotic-related signalling events and up-regulating anti-apoptotic-related signalling events. These findings suggest that SSD exhibited its anti-apoptotic effects via differential regulation of mitochondrial and nuclear GR translocation, partial reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and selective activation of the GR-dependent survival pathway.

  4. Forced Desynchrony Reveals Independent Contributions of Suprachiasmatic Oscillators to the Daily Plasma Corticosterone Rhythm in Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is required for the daily rhythm of plasma glucocorticoids; however, the independent contributions from oscillators within the different subregions of the SCN to the glucocorticoid rhythm remain unclear. Here, we use genetically and neurologically intact, forced desynchronized rats to test the hypothesis that the daily rhythm of the glucocorticoid, corticosterone, is regulated by both light responsive and light-dissociated circadian oscillators in the ventrol...

  5. Abnormal response to stress and impaired NPS-induced hyperlocomotion, anxiolytic effect and corticosterone increase in mice lacking NPSR1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hongyan; Mingler, Melissa K; McBride, Melissa L.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Williams, Michael T.; Vorhees, Charles V.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2010-01-01

    NPSR1 is a G protein coupled receptor expressed in multiple brain regions involved in modulation of stress. Central administration of NPS, the putative endogenous ligand of NPSR1, can induce hyperlocomotion, anxiolytic effects and activation of the HPA axis. The role of NPSR1 in the brain remains unsettled. Here we used NPSR1 gene-targeted mice to define the functional role of NPSR1 under basal conditions on locomotion, anxiety- and/or depression-like behavior, corticosterone levels, acoustic...

  6. Effects of physical restraint and electrical stunning on plasma corticosterone, postmortem metabolism, and quality of broiler breast muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J C; Huang, M; Wang, P; Zhao, L; Xu, X L; Zhou, G H; Sun, J X

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of physical restraint and electrical stunning on plasma corticosterone, postmortem metabolism, and quality of broiler breast muscle. Before slaughter, a total of 160 Arbor Acres broilers were randomly categorized into 2 replicate pens (80 broilers per pen) and every pen was randomly divided into 4 groups (free struggle, physical restraint, free struggle and electrical stunning, and physical restraint and electrical stunning; n=20 per group). Glucose, lactate, and corticosterone were determined on blood plasma samples. Pectoralis major were removed after evisceration and used for determination of meat quality, energy metabolism, and calpain activity. In this study, reducing free struggle by physical restraint combined with electrical stunning improved (P<0.05) meat water holding capacity. Free struggle preslaughter and during bleeding increased (P<0.05) breast muscle redness, energy metabolism, and autolysis of μ/m-calpain and decreased (P<0.05) meat shear values. Physical restraint and electrical stunning decreased (P<0.05) plasma corticosterone level.

  7. Impact of Diet Supplemented by Coconut Milk on Corticosterone and Acute Phase Protein Level under High Stocking Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid SHAKERI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of coconut milk supplementation on corticosterone and acute phase protein level under high stocking density. A total 300 Cobb 500 male chicks were placed in cages and stocked as 10 birds/cage (normal stocking density and 15 birds/cage (high stocking density. The treatments were as (i control diet and stocked at 10 and 15 birds/cage (ii control diet + 3% coconut milk from 1-42 day and stocked at 10 and 15 birds/cage (iii control diet + 5% coconut milk from 1-42 day and stocked at 10 and 15 birds/cage. On day 42, 20 birds per treatment were slaughtered to collect blood samples. The results showed higher level of corticosterone and acute phase protein level in control diet compare to other supplemented diets with coconut milk. In conclusion, coconut milk decreased the level of corticosterone and acute phase protein when chicks were subjected to high stocking density.

  8. Intracerebroventricular administration of chicken oxyntomodulin suppresses food intake and increases plasma glucose and corticosterone concentrations in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Kazuhisa; Saneyasu, Takaoki; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Shimatani, Tomohiko; Aoki, Koji; Nakanishi, Kiwako; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2014-04-03

    Central administration of proglucagon-derived peptides, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and oxyntomodulin (OXM), suppresses food intake in both mammals and birds. Recent findings suggest that GLP-1 receptor is involved in the anorexigenic action of OXM in both species. However, mammalian (bovine) OXM was used in chicken studies, even though the amino acid sequence and peptide length of chicken OXM differ from those of bovine OXM. In the present study, we examined the effect of chicken OXM on food intake and plasma components in chicks to investigate the mechanisms underlying the OXM effect. Male 8-day-old chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) were used in all experiments. Intracerebroventricular administration of chicken OXM significantly suppressed food intake in chicks. Plasma concentrations of glucose and corticosterone were significantly increased by chicken OXM. These phenomena were also observed after bovine OXM injection in chicks. In contrast, central administration of chicken GLP-1 significantly decreased plasma glucose concentration and did not affect plasma corticosterone concentration. We previously showed that central administration of chicken glucagon significantly increased plasma concentrations of glucose and corticosterone in chicks. All our findings suggest that the mechanism underlying the anorexigenic action of OXM is similar to that of glucagon in chicks.

  9. Benzodiazepine effect of {sup 125}I-iomazenil-benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Ibaragi, 305-8575 (Japan)]. E-mail: gzl13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Uchiyama, Mayuki [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan); Mori, Yutaka [Department of Radiology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 105-8461 (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    To test the change in free or unoccupied benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) density in response to diazepam, we investigated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding and serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats, which received psychological stress using a communication box for 5 days, were divided into two groups according to the amount of administered diazepam: no diazepam [D (0)] group and 10 mg/kg per day [D (10)] group of 12 rats each. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-IMZ of the D (10) group were significantly lower (P<.05) than those of the D (0) group in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus. The serum corticosterone level ratio in the D (10) group was significantly lower than that in the D (0) group (P<.05). From the change in serum corticosterone levels, diazepam attenuated the psychological stress produced by the physical stress to animals in adjacent compartments. From the reduced binding of {sup 125}I-IMZ, it is clear that diazepam competed with endogenous ligand for the free BZR sites, and the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus are important areas in which {sup 125}I-IMZ binding is strongly affected by administration of diazepam.

  10. Morphine-induced sensitization of locomotor activity in mice: effect of social isolation on plasma corticosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francès, H; Graulet, A; Debray, M; Coudereau, J P; Guéris, J; Bourre, J M

    2000-03-31

    This study examined the influence of social isolation on behavioural sensitization to the locomotor effect of morphine and the link between this behaviour and plasma corticosterone concentrations. Four weeks isolation induced an increase in the locomotor effect of morphine. In social and isolated mice, repeated administrations (6) of morphine (one injection every 3 or 4 days) followed by 3 h in an actimeter induced behavioural sensitization to the locomotor effect of morphine. No interaction was observed between social isolation and behavioural sensitization to morphine. Resocializing previously isolated mice for 3 weeks reduced the morphine-induced locomotor effect without altering the behavioural sensitization. Corticosterone plasma levels were more increased (416%) in mice isolated 5 weeks than in mice isolated for 2 weeks (243%) and they return to the control levels following 3 weeks of resocialization. Since there was no interaction between the increase in morphine locomotor effect induced by social isolation and the morphine-induced behavioural sensitization, it is suggested that each of these two events acts independently. Whether or not a common mechanism (plasma corticosterone levels?) partly underlies both effects, the result resembles a simple additive effect.

  11. [Effect of ming-men mixture on corticosterone-rats' neuro-endocrino-immunological network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, D F; Shen, Z Y; Zhang, L J

    1995-03-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary adrenal-thymus(HPAT) axis is an important form of the neuroendocrino-immunological network (NEIN). To study the essential link between Ming-Men, Kidney and the NEIN, the corticosterone (CORT) injected rats was used. The CORT The CORT caused HPAT axis inhibiting model was established and then the regulation of Ming-Men mixture (MMM) was observed. The results showed that the number of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) positive neurones in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, CRF positive neurofibril in in median eminence, anterior pituitary ACTH positive secretory cells decreased markedly in the CORT inhibited rats and the immunohistochemical ABC staining became lighter than the control. We also observed that there was atrophy in adrenal, especially fasculate zone became thinner compared with the control. The thymus atrophied, the number of lymphocytes and thymic corpuscles decreased obviously. The content of ACTH and CORT in plasma decreased, the proliferative reaction of lymphocytes, interleukin-2 and the inductive ability of gamma-IFN reduced. After the MMM was instilled into stomach in experimental group, it was foiund that MMM could improve the inhibition on HPAT axis caused by CORT significantly, P < 0.01. It suggested that MMM possibly was an effective and ideal prescription which could regulate the HPAT axis.

  12. Corticosterone induces rapid spinogenesis via synaptic glucocorticoid receptors and kinase networks in hippocampus.

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    Yoshimasa Komatsuzaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modulation of dendritic spines under acute stress is attracting much attention. Exposure to acute stress induces corticosterone (CORT secretion from the adrenal cortex, resulting in rapid increase of CORT levels in plasma and the hippocampus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrated the mechanisms of rapid effect (∼1 h of CORT on the density and morphology of spines by imaging neurons in adult male rat hippocampal slices. The application of CORT at 100-1000 nM induced a rapid increase in the density of spines of CA1 pyramidal neurons. The density of small-head spines (0.2-0.4 µm was increased even at low CORT levels (100-200 nM. The density of middle-head spines (0.4-0.5 µm was increased at high CORT levels between 400-1000 nM. The density of large-head spines (0.5-1.0 µm was increased only at 1000 nM CORT. Co-administration of RU486, an antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (GR, abolished the effect of CORT. Blocking a single kinase, such as MAPK, PKA, PKC or PI3K, suppressed CORT-induced enhancement of spinogenesis. Blocking NMDA receptors suppressed the CORT effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results imply that stress levels of CORT (100-1000 nM drive the spinogenesis via synaptic GR and multiple kinase pathways.

  13. Prenatal corticosterone exposure programs growth, behavior, reproductive function and genes in the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkareem A. Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review paper was to understand the role of prenatal corticosterone exposure on growth, aggressive behavior, reproductive performance and gene expression in the chicken. The phenotype, physiology, reproductive function and behavioral characteristics of an organism are not only influenced by genetic factors, but also by environmental factors that play a critical role in shaping offspring morphology. Exposure to excess glucocorticoids during embryonic development influences offspring growth, physiology and behaviors associated with alterations of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and serotonergic system gene expression. Another influential factor for phenotype, physiology and behavioral development is maternal derived steroid hormones that deposit in the egg. In avian species, maternal influences have aroused much attention after the discovery that avian eggs contain a variety of maternal derived steroid hormones. In addition, the environment condition during ontogeny has played a critical role in behavioral development. In avian species, for example laying chicken, high quality mother care produced chicks that were less fearful. Laying hen maternal care is found to reduce cannibalistic pecking phenomenon. Genetic selection and selection experiments will also play a critical role in animals breeding for the housing systems of the future. To optimize animal welfare and to reduce risks factors such as pecking behavior, fundamental approaches are required that merge selection of the optimal genotype with provision of a positive environment for parents and offspring, both throughout ontogeny and later life.

  14. Low dose of corticosterone treatment with exercise increases hippocampal cell proliferation, and improves cognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suk-Yu Yau; Jada Chia-Di Lee; Benson Wui-Man Lau; Tatia M.C. Lee; Yick-Pang Ching; Siu-Wa Tang; Kwok-Fai So

    2011-01-01

    Intermediate level of stress is beneficial for brain functions, whereas extreme low level or high level of stress is deleterious. We have previously shown that chronic exposure to high doses of corticosterone (CORT) suppressed hippocampal plasticity and physical exercise in terms of running counteracted the detrimental effects of CORT treatment. We aimed to study whether a mild stress, that mimicked by a treatment with low CORT dose, improved hippocampal plasticity in terms of hippocampal cell proliferation and dendritic remodeling, and to examine whether running with CORT treatment showed an additive effect on improving hippocampal plasticity. The rats were treated with 20 mg/kg CORT for 14 days with or without running, followed by Morris water maze test or forced swim test. The hippocampal proliferating cells was labeled by intraperitoneal injection of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. The dendritic morphology was analyzed using Golgi staining method. Treatment with 20 mg/kg CORT alone yielded a higher number of hippocampal cell proliferation and significantly increased dendritic branching compared to vehicle-treated non-runners, but had no behavioral effects. In contrast, CORT treatment with running showed an additive increase in hippocampal cell proliferation and dendritic remodeling that was associated with improved spatial learning and decreased depression-like behavior; however, there was no additive improvement in behavior compared to vehicle-treated runners. These findings suggest that mild stress does not always cause detrimental effect on the brain, and combining mild stress with running could promote hippocampal plasticity via inducing cell proliferation and dendritic remodeling.

  15. Acupuncture Stimulation Alleviates Corticosterone-Induced Impairments of Spatial Memory and Cholinergic Neurons in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombi Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine whether acupuncture improves spatial cognitive impairment induced by repeated corticosterone (CORT administration in rats. The effect of acupuncture on the acetylcholinergic system was also investigated in the hippocampus. Male rats were subcutaneously injected with CORT (5 mg/kg once daily for 21 days. Acupuncture stimulation was performed at the HT7 (Sinmun acupoint for 5 min before CORT injection. HT7 acupoint is located at the end of transverse crease of ulnar wrist of forepaw. In CORT-treated rats, reduced spatial cognitive function was associated with significant increases in plasma CORT level (+36% and hippocampal CORT level (+204% compared with saline-treated rats. Acupuncture stimulation improved the escape latency for finding the platform in the Morris water maze. Consistently, the acupuncture significantly alleviated memory-associated decreases in cholinergic immunoreactivity and mRNA expression of BDNF and CREB in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate that stimulation of HT7 acupoint produced significant neuroprotective activity against the neuronal impairment and memory dysfunction.

  16. Continuous corticosterone delivery via the drinking water or pellet implantation: A comparative study in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Sylvia J; Weber, Marie-Christin; Henneicke, Holger; Kim, Sarah; Zhou, Hong; Seibel, Markus J

    2016-12-01

    In order to investigate the effects of glucocorticoid excess in rodent models, reliable methods of continuous glucocorticoid delivery are essential. The current study compares two methods of corticosterone (CS) delivery in regards to their ability to induce typical adverse outcomes such as fat accrual, insulin resistance, sarcopenia and bone loss. Eight-week-old mice received CS for 4weeks either via the drinking water (25-100μgCS/mL) or through weekly surgical implantation of slow release pellets containing 1.5mg CS. Both methods induced abnormal fat mass accrual, inhibited lean mass accretion and bone expansion, suppressed serum osteocalcin levels and induced severe insulin resistance. There was a clear dose dependant relationship between the CS concentrations in the drinking water and the severity of the phenotype, with a concentration of 50μg CS/mL drinking water most closely matching the metabolic changes induced by weekly pellet implantations. In contrast to pellets, however, delivery of CS via the drinking water resulted in a consistent diurnal exposure pattern, closely mimicking the kinetics of clinical glucocorticoid therapy. In addition, the method is safe, inexpensive, easily adjustable, non-invasive and avoids operative stress to the animals. Our data demonstrate that delivery of CS via the drinking water has advantages over weekly implantations of slow-release pellets. A dose of 50μg CS/mL drinking water is appropriate for the investigation of chronic glucocorticoid excess in mice.

  17. Effect of Cage Type on Fecal Corticosterone Concentration in Buck Rabbits During the Reproductive Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornale, Paolo; Macchi, Elisabetta; Renna, Manuela; Prola, Liviana; Perona, Giovanni; Mimosi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Fecal corticosterone concentration (FCC) was measured in 14 buck rabbits individually housed in standard-dimension cages (SC) or in bigger cages (BC; with a volume more than double that of SC and equipped with a plastic foot mat) during 4 consecutive reproductive cycles. Cage type and reproductive phase (estrous synchronization of doe rabbits, artificial insemination, partum, preweaning, and postweaning) were not statistically significant but tendentially affected FCCs (.05 Buck rabbits housed in SC showed higher FCCs than those housed in BC (27.42 pg g(- 1) dried feces and 25.57 pg g(- 1), respectively; SEM = 2.952). The highest FCC values were detected at artificial insemination (BC, 27.91 pg g(- 1); SC, 30.45 pg g(- 1); SEM = 3.520), highlighting that the phase of semen collection could be one of the most critical moments for buck rabbits, although further investigations are needed. These preliminary results suggest that measurement of FCC could be used as an indicator of chronic stress in buck rabbits.

  18. Effects of chronic treatment with corticosterone and imipramine on fos immunoreactivity and adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, L; dos Santos, T B; Britto, L R G; Céspedes, I C; Garcia, M C; Spadari-Bratfisch, R C; Medalha, C C; de Castro, G M; Montesano, F T; Viana, M B

    2013-02-01

    In a previous study we showed that rats chronically treated with corticosterone (CORT) display anxiogenic behavior, evidenced by facilitation of avoidance responses in the elevated T-maze (ETM) model of anxiety. Treatment with the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine significantly reversed the anxiogenic effects of CORT, while inhibiting ETM escape, a response related to panic disorder. To better understand the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these behavioral effects, analysis of c-fos protein immunoreactivity (fos-ir) was used here to map areas activated by chronic CORT (200 mg pellets, 21-day release) and imipramine (15 mg/kg, IP) administration. We also evaluated the number of cells expressing the neurogenesis marker doublecortin (DCX) in the hippocampus and measured plasma CORT levels on the 21st day of treatment. Results showed that CORT increased fos-ir in the ventrolateral septum, medial amygdala and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus and decreased fos-ir in the lateral periaqueductal gray. Imipramine, on the other hand, increased fos-ir in the medial amygdala and decreased fos-ir in the anterior hypothalamus. CORT also decreased the number of DCX-positive cells in the ventral and dorsal hippocampus, an effect antagonized by imipramine. CORT levels were significantly higher after treatment. These data suggest that the behavioral effects of CORT and imipramine are mediated through specific, at times overlapping, neuronal circuits, which might be of relevance to a better understanding of the physiopathology of generalized anxiety and panic disorder.

  19. Effects of chronic corticosterone and imipramine administration on panic and anxiety-related responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, L; Dos Reis, B B; de Castro, G M; Medalha, C C; Viana, M B

    2011-10-01

    It is known that chronic high levels of corticosterone (CORT) enhance aversive responses such as avoidance and contextual freezing. In contrast, chronic CORT does not alter defensive behavior induced by the exposure to a predator odor. Since different defense-related responses have been associated with specific anxiety disorders found in clinical settings, the observation that chronic CORT alters some defensive behaviors but not others might be relevant to the understanding of the neurobiology of anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic CORT administration (through surgical implantation of a 21-day release 200 mg pellet) on avoidance acquisition and escape expression by male Wistar rats (200 g in weight at the beginning of the experiments, N = 6-10/group) tested in the elevated T-maze (ETM). These defensive behaviors have been associated with generalized anxiety and panic disorder, respectively. Since the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine is successfully used to treat both conditions, the effects of combined treatment with chronic imipramine (15 mg, ip) and CORT were also investigated. Results showed that chronic CORT facilitated avoidance performance, an anxiogenic-like effect (P Imipramine significantly reversed the anxiogenic effect of CORT (P imipramine inhibited escape responses, a panicolytic-like effect. Unlike chronic CORT, imipramine also decreased locomotor activity in an open field. These data suggest that chronic CORT specifically altered ETM avoidance, a fact that should be relevant to a better understanding of the physiopathology of generalized anxiety and panic disorder.

  20. Amygdala activation by corticosterone alters visceral and somatic pain in cycling female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Jenny K; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2011-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is often seen in women, and symptom severity is known to vary over the menstrual cycle. In addition, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis enhances symptomology and patients with IBS have increased activation of the amygdala, a brain region known to facilitate HPA output. However, little is known about the effects of amygdala activation during different stages of the menstrual cycle. We therefore investigated the effects of amygdala activation on somatic and visceral pain perception over the rat estrous cycle. Female Wistar rats were implanted with either corticosterone (Cort) or cholesterol as a control onto the dorsal margin of the central amygdala. Visceral sensitivity was quantified by recording the visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) and somatic sensitivity was assessed via the Von Frey test. In cholesterol controls, both visceral and somatic sensitivity varied over the estrous cycle. Rats in proestrus/estrus responded to CRD with an increased VMR compared with rats in metestrus/diestrus. Somatic sensitivity followed a similar pattern with enhanced sensitivity during proestrus/estrus compared with metestrus/diestrus. Elevated amygdala Cort induced visceral hypersensitivity during metestrus/diestrus but had no effect during proestrus/estrus. In contrast, elevated amygdala Cort increased somatic sensitivity during both metestrus/diestrus and proestrus/estrous. These results suggests that amygdala activation by Cort eliminates spontaneously occurring differences in visceral and somatic pain perception, which could explain the lowered pain thresholds and higher incidence of somatic pain observed in women with IBS.

  1. The effects of group and single housing and automated animal monitoring on urinary corticosterone levels in male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Remi; Kovalainen, Miia; Leppäluoto, Juhani; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Mäkelä, Kari A

    2016-02-01

    Mice are used extensively in physiological research. Automated home-cage systems have been developed to study single-housed animals. Increased stress by different housing conditions might affect greatly the results when investigating metabolic responses. Urinary corticosteroid concentration is considered as a stress marker. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of different housing conditions and an automated home-cage system with indirect calorimetry located in an environmental chamber on corticosterone levels in mice. Male mice were housed in different conditions and in automated home-cage system to evaluate the effects of housing and measuring conditions on urine corticosterone levels. Corticosterone levels in single-housed mice in the laboratory animal center were consistently lower compared with the group-housed mice. Single-housed mice in a separate, small animal unit showed a rise in their corticosterone levels a day after they were separated to their individual cages, which decreased during the following 2 days. The corticosterone levels of group-housed mice in the same unit were increased during the first 7 days and then decreased. On day 7, the corticosterone concentrations of group-housed mice were significantly higher compared with that of single-housed mice, including the metabolic measurement protocol. In conclusion, single housing caused less stress when compared with group-housed mice. In addition, the urine corticosterone levels were decreased in single-housed mice before the metabolic measurement started. Thus, stress does not affect the results when utilizing the automated system for measuring metabolic parameters like food and water intake and calorimetry.

  2. p-Chloro-diphenyl diselenide reverses memory impairment-related to stress caused by corticosterone and modulates hippocampal [(3)H]glutamate uptake in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zborowski, Vanessa A; Sari, Marcel H M; Heck, Suélen O; Stangherlin, Eluza C; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W; Zeni, Gilson

    2016-10-01

    Chronic stress or chronically high levels of glucocorticoids can result in memory impairment. This study aimed to investigate if 4,4'-dichloro-diphenyl diselenide (p-ClPhSe)2 reverses memory impairment-related to stress caused by corticosterone administration in mice and its possible mechanism of action. Swiss mice received corticosterone (20μg/ml) in their drinking water during four weeks. In the last week, the animals were treated with (p-ClPhSe)2 (1 or 5mg/kg) by the intragastric route (i.g.) once a day for 7days. The cognitive performance of mice was assessed through the object recognition test (ORT), the object location test (OLT) and the step-down passive avoidance test (SDPA), some of predictive tests of memory. Biochemical parameters were determined and locomotor activity of mouse was performed to gain insight in (p-ClPhSe)2 toxicity. The findings demonstrated that treatment with (p-ClPhSe)2 in both doses was effective in reversing memory deficits in the ORT, the OLT and the SDPA caused by corticosterone exposure in mice. Treatment with (p-ClPhSe)2 at both doses reversed the increase in the [(3)H] glutamate uptake by hippocampal slices of mice treated with corticosterone. By contrast, [(3)H] glutamate uptake by brain cortical slices was not altered in mice exposed to corticosterone. The Na(+)K(+)ATPase activity was not altered in hippocampus and cerebral cortices of mice treated with corticosterone. There was no sign of toxicity in mice treated with (p-ClPhSe)2. This organoselenium compound reversed memory impairment-related to stress caused by corticosterone and modulated hippocampal [(3)H]glutamate uptake in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic regulation of NMDAR function in the adult brain by the stress hormone corticosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiu Chung eTse

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress and corticosteroids dynamically modulate the expression of synaptic plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in the developed brain. Together with alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPAR, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR are critical mediators of synaptic function and are essential for the induction of many forms of synaptic plasticity. Regulation of NMDAR function by cortisol/corticosterone (CORT may be fundamental to the effects of stress on synaptic plasticity. Recent reports of the efficacy of NMDAR antagonists in treating certain stress-associated psychopathologies further highlight the importance of understanding the regulation of NMDAR function by CORT. Knowledge of how corticosteroids regulate NMDAR function within the adult brain is relatively sparse, perhaps due to a common belief that NMDAR function is relatively stable in the adult brain. We review recent results from our laboratory and others demonstrating dynamic regulation of NMDAR function by CORT in the adult brain. In addition, we consider the issue of how differences in the early life environment may program differential sensitivity to modulation of NMDAR function by CORT and how this may influence synaptic function during stress. Findings from these studies demonstrate that NMDAR function in the adult hippocampus remains sensitive to even brief exposures to CORT and that the capacity for modulation of NMDAR may be programmed, in part, by the early life environment. Modulation of NMDAR function may contribute to dynamic regulation of synaptic plasticity and adaptation in the face of stress, however enhanced NMDAR function may be implicated in mechanisms of stress related psychopathologies including depression.

  4. Altered development and protein metabolism in skeletal muscles of broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) by corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H; Lin, H; Jiao, H C; Song, Z G; Zhao, J P; Jiang, K J

    2007-05-01

    Two trials were conducted to investigate the effect of corticosterone (CORT) on protein metabolism and the amino acid composition in muscle tissues of broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus). In Trial 1, two groups of 30 broiler chickens were subjected to control or CORT treatment (30 mg/kg diet) from 28 to 39 days of age. In Trial 2, three groups of chickens of 28 days of age were randomly subjected to one of the following treatments for 7 days: CORT (30 mg/kg diet), pair-fed (maintaining the same feed intake as CORT treatment) and control treatments. The body mass gain and feed efficiency was significantly decreased by CORT treatment, while the food intake was decreased. The breast and thigh masses (% body mass) were significantly suppressed by CORT treatment, while the abdominal fat and liver masses (%) were obviously increased. The plasma levels of glucose, urate and total amino acid were significantly elevated by CORT treatment. The capacity for protein synthesis, estimated by RNA:protein ratio, were significantly suppressed by CORT in M. pectoralis major and M. biceps femoris. The 3-methylhistidine concentrations were significantly increased in both M. pectoralis major and M. biceps femoris of CORT chickens, compared to control but not the pair-fed chickens. The amino acid composition of M. pectoralis major and M. biceps femoris was not significantly affected by CORT treatment. In conclusion, the arrested growth in skeletal muscles induced by CORT administration has tissue specificity. The CORT treatment retards the growth of skeletal muscle by suppressed protein synthesis and augmented protein catabolism.

  5. Temperature has species-specific effects on corticosterone in alligator lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telemeco, Rory S; Addis, Elizabeth A

    2014-09-15

    In response to conditions that threaten homeostasis and/or life, vertebrates generally increase production of glucocorticoid hormones, such as corticosterone (CORT), which induces an emergency physiological state referred to as the stress response. Given that extreme temperatures pose a threat to performance and survival, glucocorticoid upregulation might be an important component of a vertebrate ectotherm's response to extreme thermal conditions. To address this hypothesis, we experimentally examined the effects of body temperature (10, 20, 28, and 35°C; 5-h exposure) on CORT in two congeneric species of lizard naturally exposed to different thermal environments, northern and southern alligator lizards (Elgaria coerulea and Elgaria multicarinata, respectively). In both species, CORT was similarly elevated at medium and high temperatures (28 and 35°C, respectively), but CORT was only elevated at low temperatures (10°C) in southern alligator lizards. We also examined CORT before and after adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) challenge. In both species, ACTH induced higher CORT levels than any temperature, suggesting that these animals could respond to further stressors at all experimental temperatures. Finally, we compared our laboratory results to measurements of CORT in field-active southern alligator lizards. Plasma CORT concentrations from our laboratory experiment had the same mean and less variance than the field lizards, suggesting that our laboratory lizards displayed CORT within natural levels. Our results demonstrate that body temperature directly affects CORT in alligator lizards. Moreover, the CORT response of these lizards appears to be adapted to their respective thermal environments. Species-specific differences in the thermal CORT response might be common in vertebrate ectotherms and have implications for species' biogeography and responses to climate change.

  6. Quantitative effects of diet on fecal corticosterone metabolites in two strains of laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte; Hau, Jann; Abelson, Klas S P

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of glucocorticoids excreted in feces is becoming a widespread technique for determining animal wellbeing in a wide variety of settings. In the present study an extraction protocol and an ELISA assay for quantifying fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) in BALB/c and C57bl/6 mice were validated. Lower ratios of solvent (ethanol) to mass of fecal sample were found to be sufficient in extracting FCM compared to what has been reported previously. Feeding mice a high energy diet, high in fat content (60% of calories from fat), significantly lowered the FCM excretion, approximately halving the FCM output. This diet also reduced the fecal mass voided to approximately a third of that of the regular diet. The two reductions were not correlated. A difference in defecation pattern was seen between the two strains, with the BALB/c mice having a more pronounced diurnal rhythm compared to the C57bl/6 mice. Furthermore, throughout the experiment, the C57bl/6 mice excreted significantly higher levels of FCM compared to the BALB/c mice. The mice were also challenged with synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and dexamethasone (DEX). The effect of the challenges could readily be detected, but had a considerably lesser impact on data than did the difference in diet. The study demonstrates some problematic consequences of expressing FCM excretion as a measure of fecal dry mass. The study also serves to emphasize the caution that must be exercised when interpreting FCM excretion in conjunction with an uncontrolled or varied diet, or perturbations of gastro-intestinal functioning.

  7. Changes in corticosterone concentrations and behavior during Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Ashley C; Foltz, Sarah L; Adelman, James S; Moore, Ignacio T; Hawley, Dana M

    2016-09-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones are important for energy mobilization as well as regulation of the immune system, and thus these hormones are particularly likely to both influence and respond to pathogen infection in vertebrates. In this study, we examined how the glucocorticoid stress response in house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus) interacts with experimental infection of the naturally-occurring bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). We also investigated whether infection-induced concentrations of corticosterone (CORT), the primary glucocorticoid in birds, were associated with the expression of sickness behavior, the lethargy typically observed in vertebrates early in infection. We found that experimental infection with MG resulted in significantly higher CORT levels on day 5 post-infection, but this effect appeared to be limited to female house finches only. Regardless of sex, infected individuals with greater disease severity had the highest CORT concentrations on day 5 post-infection. House finches exposed to MG exhibited behavioral changes, with infected birds having significantly lower activity levels than sham-inoculated individuals. However, CORT concentrations and the extent of sickness behaviors exhibited among infected birds were not associated. Finally, pre-infection CORT concentrations were associated with reduced inflammation and pathogen load in inoculated males, but not females. Our results suggest that the house finch glucocorticoid stress response may both influence and respond to MG infection in sex-specific ways, but because we had a relatively low sample size of males, future work should confirm these patterns. Finally, manipulative experiments should be performed to test whether the glucocorticoid stress response acts as a brake on the inflammatory response associated with MG infection in house finches.

  8. Corticosterone and Exogenous Glucose Alter Blood Glucose levels, Neurotoxicity, and Vascular Toxicity Produced by Methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, John F; Tranter, Karen M; Sarkar, Sumit; George, Nysia I; Hanig, Joseph P; Kelly, Kimberly A; Michalovicz, Lindsay T; Miller, Diane B; O'Callaghan, James P

    2017-08-09

    Our previous studies have raised the possibility that altered blood glucose levels may influence and/or be predictive of methamphetamine (METH) neurotoxicity. This study evaluated the effects of exogenous glucose and corticosterone (CORT) pretreatment alone or in combination with METH on blood glucose levels and the neural and vascular toxicity produced. METH exposure consisted of four sequential injections of 5, 7.5, 10, and 10 mg/kg (2h between injections) D-METH. The three groups given METH in combination with saline, glucose (METH+Glucose), or CORT (METH+CORT) had significantly higher glucose levels compared to the corresponding treatment groups without METH except at 3 h after the last injection. At this last time point, the METH and METH+Glucose groups had lower levels than the non-METH groups, while the METH+CORT group did not. CORT alone or glucose alone did not significantly increase blood glucose. Mortality rates for the METH+CORT (40%) and METH+Glucose (44%) groups were substantially higher than the METH (< 10%) group. Additionally, METH+CORT significantly increased neurodegeneration above all other treatments (≈ 2.5-fold in the parietal cortex). Thus, maintaining elevated levels of glucose during METH exposure increases lethality and may exacerbate neurodegeneration. Neuroinflammation, specifically microglial activation, was associated with degenerating neurons in the parietal cortex and thalamus after METH exposure. The activated microglia in the parietal cortex were surrounding vasculature in most cases and the extent of microglial activation was exacerbated by CORT pretreatment. Our findings implicate elevated blood levels of glucose and hyperthermia in METH-induced neurotoxicity, neurovascular damage, and lethality, and that acute elevation of CORT exacerbates both neurotoxicity and neuroinflammation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Peripheral mechanisms contributing to the glucocorticoid hypersensitivity in proopiomelanocortin null mice treated with corticosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Zoi; Coll, Anthony P; Kenyon, Christopher J; Morton, Nicholas M; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Seckl, Jonathan R; Chapman, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) deficiency causes severe obesity through hyperphagia of hypothalamic origin. However, low glucocorticoid levels caused by adrenal insufficiency mitigate against insulin resistance, hyperphagia and fat accretion in Pomc−/− mice. Upon exogenous glucocorticoid replacement, corticosterone-supplemented (CORT) Pomc−/− mice show exaggerated responses, including excessive fat accumulation, hyperleptinaemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the peripheral mechanisms underlying this glucocorticoid hypersensitivity, we examined the expression levels of key determinants and targets of glucocorticoid action in adipose tissue and liver. Despite lower basal expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), which generates active glucocorticoids within cells, CORT-mediated induction of 11β-HSD1 mRNA levels was more pronounced in adipose tissues of Pomc−/− mice. Similarly, CORT treatment increased lipoprotein lipase mRNA levels in all fat depots in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with exaggerated fat accumulation. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels were selectively elevated in liver and retroperitoneal fat of Pomc−/− mice but were corrected by CORT in the latter depot. In liver, CORT increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels specifically in Pomc−/− mice, consistent with their insulin-resistant phenotype. Furthermore, CORT induced hypertension in Pomc−/− mice, independently of adipose or liver renin–angiotensin system activation. These data suggest that CORT-inducible 11β-HSD1 expression in fat contributes to the adverse cardiometabolic effects of CORT in POMC deficiency, whereas higher GR levels may be more important in liver. PMID:17592030

  10. The Arcuate Nucleus: A Site of Fast Negative Feedback for Corticosterone Secretion in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Escobar, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Variations in circulating corticosterone (Cort) are driven by the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), mainly via the sympathetic autonomic nervous system (ANS) directly stimulating Cort release from the adrenal gland and via corticotropin-releasing hormone targeting the adenohypophysis to release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Cort feeds back through glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Here we show in male Wistar rats that PVN neurons projecting to the adrenal gland do not express GRs, leaving the question of how the ANS in the PVN gets information about circulating Cort levels to control the adrenal. Since the arcuate nucleus (ARC) shows a less restrictive blood–brain barrier, expresses GRs, and projects to the PVN, we investigated whether the ARC can detect and produce fast adjustments of circulating Cort. In low Cort conditions (morning), local microdialysis in the ARC with type I GR antagonist produced a fast and sustained increase of Cort. This was not observed with a type II antagonist. At the circadian peak levels of Cort (afternoon), a type II GR antagonist, but not a type I antagonist, increased Cort levels but not ACTH levels. Antagonist infusions in the PVN did not modify circulating Cort levels, demonstrating the specificity of the ARC to give Cort negative feedback. Furthermore, type I and II GR agonists in the ARC prevented the increase of Cort after stress, demonstrating the role of the ARC as sensor to modulate Cort release. Our findings show that the ARC may be essential to sense blood levels of Cort and adapt Cort secretion depending on such conditions as stress or time of day. PMID:28275717

  11. Maternal condition but not corticosterone is linked to offspring sex ratio in a passerine bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay J Henderson

    Full Text Available There is evidence of offspring sex ratio adjustment in a range of species, but the potential mechanisms remain largely unknown. Elevated maternal corticosterone (CORT is associated with factors that can favour brood sex ratio adjustment, such as reduced maternal condition, food availability and partner attractiveness. Therefore, the steroid hormone has been suggested to play a key role in sex ratio manipulation. However, despite correlative and causal evidence CORT is linked to sex ratio manipulation in some avian species, the timing of adjustment varies between studies. Consequently, whether CORT is consistently involved in sex-ratio adjustment, and how the hormone acts as a mechanism for this adjustment remains unclear. Here we measured maternal baseline CORT and body condition in free-living blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus over three years and related these factors to brood sex ratio and nestling quality. In addition, a non-invasive technique was employed to experimentally elevate maternal CORT during egg laying, and its effects upon sex ratio and nestling quality were measured. We found that maternal CORT was not correlated with brood sex ratio, but mothers with elevated CORT fledged lighter offspring. Also, experimental elevation of maternal CORT did not influence brood sex ratio or nestling quality. In one year, mothers in superior body condition produced male biased broods, and maternal condition was positively correlated with both nestling mass and growth rate in all years. Unlike previous studies maternal condition was not correlated with maternal CORT. This study provides evidence that maternal condition is linked to brood sex ratio manipulation in blue tits. However, maternal baseline CORT may not be the mechanistic link between the maternal condition and sex ratio adjustment. Overall, this study serves to highlight the complexity of sex ratio adjustment in birds and the difficulties associated with identifying sex biasing mechanisms.

  12. Effects of chronic corticosterone and imipramine administration on panic and anxiety-related responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Diniz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is known that chronic high levels of corticosterone (CORT enhance aversive responses such as avoidance and contextual freezing. In contrast, chronic CORT does not alter defensive behavior induced by the exposure to a predator odor. Since different defense-related responses have been associated with specific anxiety disorders found in clinical settings, the observation that chronic CORT alters some defensive behaviors but not others might be relevant to the understanding of the neurobiology of anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic CORT administration (through surgical implantation of a 21-day release 200 mg pellet on avoidance acquisition and escape expression by male Wistar rats (200 g in weight at the beginning of the experiments, N = 6-10/group tested in the elevated T-maze (ETM. These defensive behaviors have been associated with generalized anxiety and panic disorder, respectively. Since the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine is successfully used to treat both conditions, the effects of combined treatment with chronic imipramine (15 mg, ip and CORT were also investigated. Results showed that chronic CORT facilitated avoidance performance, an anxiogenic-like effect (P < 0.05, without changing escape responses. Imipramine significantly reversed the anxiogenic effect of CORT (P < 0.05, although the drug did not exhibit anxiolytic effects by itself. Confirming previous observations, imipramine inhibited escape responses, a panicolytic-like effect. Unlike chronic CORT, imipramine also decreased locomotor activity in an open field. These data suggest that chronic CORT specifically altered ETM avoidance, a fact that should be relevant to a better understanding of the physiopathology of generalized anxiety and panic disorder.

  13. G-CSF, but not corticosterone, mediates circulating neutrophilia induced by febrile-range hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Garrettson S; Carlson, Drew E; Hester, Lisa; He, Ju-Ren; Bagby, Gregory J; Singh, Ishwar S; Hasday, Jeffery D

    2005-05-01

    We previously showed that sustained exposure to febrile-range hyperthermia (FRH) for 24 h caused an increase in circulating granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels and a peripheral neutrophilia in mice (Hasday J, Garrison A, Singh I, Standiford T, Ellis G, Rao S, He JR, Rice P, Frank M, Goldblum S, and Viscardi R. Am J Pathol 162: 2005-2017, 2003). In this study, we utilized a conscious temperature-clamped mouse model to analyze the kinetics of G-CSF expression and peripheral neutrophil expansion and the contributions of FRH-induced G-CSF expression, glucocorticoid generation, and catecholamine-induced neutrophil demargination. In conscious mice housed at an ambient temperature of 34.5 degrees C, core temperature rapidly equilibrated at 39.5-40 degrees C. Peripheral neutrophil counts increased 2-fold after 24-h exposure to hyperthermia, peaked at 3.6-fold baseline levels after 36-h exposure to FRH, and returned to baseline levels after 42 h of sustained hyperthermia. Plasma G-CSF levels were increased by 6.8-fold after 24 h and peaked at 40-fold baseline levels after 36 h in the hyperthermic mice. Plasma corticosterone levels peaked at 3.3-fold baseline levels after 30-h sustained hyperthermia and returned to baseline by 42 h. Immunoneutralization of G-CSF blocked FRH-induced peripheral neutrophilia, but blockade of the glucocorticoid receptor with mifepristone failed to modify FRH-induced neutrophilia. Epinephrine induced similar increases in peripheral blood absolute neutrophil counts in euthermic mice (2.2-fold increase) and mice exposed to FRH for 36 h (1.8-fold increase). Collectively, these data suggest that FRH-induced expression of G-CSF drives the sustained peripheral neutrophilia that occurs during sustained (36 h) hyperthermia, whereas glucocorticoid generation and catecholamine-induced demargination play little role in this response.

  14. Effects of different timing of stress on corticosterone, BDNF and memory in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2015-02-01

    Learning and memory seem to be affected by chronic stress. Previous reports have considered chronic stress as a precipitating factor of different neuropsychological disorders, while others reported neurobiological adaptations following stress. The present study investigated the effects of chronic stress before, after, and during learning on the changes of learning and memory, on serum and hippocampal levels of corticosterone (CORT), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and body weight in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=10) including Control (Co), Stress-Learning-Rest (St-L-Re), Rest-Learning-Stress (Re-L-St), and Stress-Learning-Stress (St-L-St) groups. The chronic restraint stress was applied 6 h/day for 21 days. Moreover, the passive avoidance test was used to assess memory deficit, 1, 7, and 21 days after training. At the end of experiments, CORT and BDNF levels were measured. The findings did not support adaptation in chronic stress conditions. The acquisition time as well as the short and mid-term memories was significantly impaired in the St-L-Re group. Short, mid, and long-term memories were significantly impaired in the Re-L-St and St-L-St groups compared with the Co group, as a result of the enhancement of CORT and reduction of BDNF levels. In the St-L-St group, changes in memory functions were less pronounced than in the Re-L-St group. Also, body weight declined following the chronic stress, while recovery period enhanced the body weight gain in stressed rats. It can be concluded that a potential time-dependent involvement of stress and recovery period on the level of BDNF. Longer duration time of chronic stress might promote adaptive effects on memory and CORT level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Corticosterone regulates expression of CCL2 in the intact and chemically injured hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Alvin R; Sriram, Krishnan; O'Callaghan, James P

    2006-05-15

    Expression of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), also known as, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, increases in response to disease-, trauma-, or toxicant-induced damage to the central nervous system (CNS). In the periphery, endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoids are known to suppress CCL2 expression associated with inflammatory conditions. However, such actions of glucocorticoids on CCL2 expression in the CNS remain unknown. Here, we explored the effects of the glucocorticoid, corticosterone (CORT), on the expression of CCL2 and its receptors, CCR2 and CCR5, in the hippocampal formation using intact, adrenalectomized (ADX) and trimethyltin (TMT)-treated rats. An immunosuppressive regimen of CORT did not alter the mRNA expression of CCL2 or its receptors in the hippocampus. ADX, however, markedly increased the expression of CCL2 and CCR2 mRNAs in the hippocampus, while CORT replacement reversed the effects of ADX on CCL2 gene expression. Hippocampal damage resulting from systemic administration of the organometallic neurotoxicant, TMT, was associated with microglial activation, as evidenced by enhanced expression of microglial markers integrin alphaM (CD11b) and F4/80, as well as, microglia-associated factors, CCL2 and IL-1alpha. An immunosuppressive dose of CORT, suppressed TMT-induced expression of CCL2. Given the association of CCL2 with microglial activation, it appears that CORT may play a role in regulating microglial activation. However, CORT treatment did not alter TMT-mediated neuronal damage and astrogliosis. Such observations suggest that injury-related expression of microglia-associated chemokines and cytokines may subserve a role unrelated to neuronal damage. In summary, our data indicate that in the CNS, CCL2 gene expression is under negative regulation by glucocorticoids.

  16. Corticosterone, but not Glucose, Treatment Enables Fasted Adrenalectomized Rats to Survive Moderate Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Chew, Gordon; Ha, Taryn; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1990-01-01

    Fed adrenalectomized rats survive the stress of hemorrhage and hypovolemia, whereas fasted adrenalectomized rats become hypotensive and hypoglycemic after the first 90 min and die within 4 hours (h). We have studied the effects of glucose and corticosterone (B) infusions after hemorrhage as well as treatment with B at the time of adrenalectomy on the capacity of chronically prepared, conscious, fasted, adrenalectomized rats to survive hemorrhage. We have also measured the magnitudes of vasoactive hormone responses to hemorrhage. Maintenance of plasma glucose concentrations did not sustain life; however, treatment of rats at the time of adrenalectomy with B allowed 100 percent survival, and acute treatment of adrenalectomized rats at the time of hemorrhage allowed about 50 percent survival during the 5-h posthemorrhage observation period. Rats in the acute B infusion group that died exhibited significantly increased plasma B and significantly decreased plasma glucose concentrations by 2 h compared to the rats that lived. Plasma vasopressin, renin, and norepinephrine responses to hemorrhage were markedly augmented in the adrenalectomized rats not treated with B, and plasma vasopressin concentrations were significantly elevated at 1 and 2 h in all of the rats that subsequently died compared to values in those that lived. We conclude that: 1) death after hemorrhage in fasted adrenalectomized rats is not a result of lack of glucose; 2) chronic and, to an extent, acute treatment of fasted adrenalectomized rats with B enables survival; 3) fasted adrenalectomized rats exhibit strong evidence of hepatic insufficiency which is not apparent in either fed adrenalectomized rats or B-treated fasted adrenalectomized rats; 4) death after hemorrhage in fasted adrenalectomized rats may result from hepatic failure as a consequence of marked splanchnic vasoconstriction mediated bv the actions of extraordinarily high levels of vasoactive hormones after hemorrhage; and 5) B appears to

  17. Effect of forced exercise and exercise withdrawal on memory, serum and hippocampal corticosterone levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that there are positive effects of exercise on learning and memory. Moreover, some studies have demonstrated that forced exercise plays the role of a stressor. This study was aimed at investigating the effects of different timing of exercise and exercise withdrawal on memory, and serum and hippocampal corticosterone (CORT) levels. Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: control, sham, exercise-rest (exercise withdrawal), rest-exercise (exercised group), and exercise-exercise (continuous exercise). Rats were forced to run on a treadmill for 1 h/day at a speed 20-21-m/min. Memory function was evaluated by the passive avoidance test in different intervals (1, 7 and 21 days) after foot shock. Findings showed that after the exercise withdrawal, short-term and mid-term memories, had significant enhancement compared to the control group, while the long-term memory did not present this result. In addition, the serum and hippocampal CORT levels were at the basal levels after the rest period in the exercise-rest group. In the rest-exercise group, exercise improved mid- and long-term memories, whereas continuous exercise improved all types short-, mid- and long-term memories, particularly the mid-term memory. Twenty-one and forty-two days of exercise significantly decreased the serum and hippocampal CORT levels. It seems that exercise for at least 21 days with no rest could affect biochemical factors in the brain. Also, regular continuous exercise plays an important role in memory function. Hence, the duration and withdraw of exercise are important factors for the neurobiological aspects of the memory responses.

  18. Acute corticosterone sexually dimorphically facilitates social learning and inhibits feeding in mice.

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    Choleris, Elena; Cazzin, Laura; Lymer, Jennifer M; Amor, Talya R; Lu, Ray; Kavaliers, Martin; Valsecchi, Paola

    2013-12-01

    In numerous species social learning is predominant and adaptive, yet, we know little of its neurobiological mechanisms. Social learning is modulated by motivations and emotions, in a manner that is often sexually dimorphic. Additionally, stress hormones acutely modulate the related social cognitive process of social recognition. Whether this is true even for social learning is currently unknown. We investigated the acute effects of the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) on the social transmission of food preferences (STFP) in male and female mice. During a brief social interaction an observer (OBS) acquires a food preference from a same-sex demonstrator (DEM). CORT (1.0, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg), its ethanol vehicle (0.1%), and saline solution (0.9%) were administered intraperitoneally to the OBS, 10 min before a 30-min social interaction. Levels of plasma CORT were assessed in other mice that had received the same doses of CORT and either had or had not gone through a 30 min social interaction 10 min post-treatment. Exogenous CORT elicited levels of plasma level comparable to those seen at the peak of the circadian cycle and facilitated the STFP with males responding more than females both in terms of the duration of the food preference and the minimum effective dose. CORT also sexually dimorphically inhibited feeding, with females showing a greater dose-response than males. Saline solution and ethanol vehicles also sexually dimorphically facilitated the STFP and reduced feeding, but less than CORT did. These results indicate that CORT facilitates social learning, like social recognition. Hence, CORT may generally increase social information processing.

  19. Diffuse traumatic brain injury affects chronic corticosterone function in the rat

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    Rachel K Rowe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As many as 20–55% of patients with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI experience chronic endocrine dysfunction, leading to impaired quality of life, impaired rehabilitation efforts and lowered life expectancy. Endocrine dysfunction after TBI is thought to result from acceleration–deceleration forces to the brain within the skull, creating enduring hypothalamic and pituitary neuropathology, and subsequent hypothalamic–pituitary endocrine (HPE dysfunction. These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that a single diffuse TBI results in chronic dysfunction of corticosterone (CORT, a glucocorticoid released in response to stress and testosterone. We used a rodent model of diffuse TBI induced by midline fluid percussion injury (mFPI. At 2months postinjury compared with uninjured control animals, circulating levels of CORT were evaluated at rest, under restraint stress and in response to dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid commonly used to test HPE axis regulation. Testosterone was evaluated at rest. Further, we assessed changes in injury-induced neuron morphology (Golgi stain, neuropathology (silver stain and activated astrocytes (GFAP in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN of the hypothalamus. Resting plasma CORT levels were decreased at 2months postinjury and there was a blunted CORT increase in response to restraint induced stress. No changes in testosterone were measured. These changes in CORT were observed concomitantly with altered complexity of neuron processes in the PVN over time, devoid of neuropathology or astrocytosis. Results provide evidence that a single moderate diffuse TBI leads to changes in CORT function, which can contribute to the persistence of symptoms related to endocrine dysfunction. Future experiments aim to evaluate additional HP-related hormones and endocrine circuit pathology following diffuse TBI.

  20. Benefits and costs of increased levels of corticosterone in seabird chicks.

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    Kitaysky, A S; Kitaiskaia, E V; Piatt, J F; Wingfield, J C

    2003-01-01

    Seabird chicks respond to food shortages by increasing corticosterone (cort) secretion, which is probably associated with fitness benefits and costs. To examine this, we experimentally increased levels of circulating cort in captive black-legged kittiwake chicks fed ad libitum. We found that cort-implanted chicks begged more frequently and were more aggressive compared to controls. These behavioral modifications must be beneficial to chicks as they facilitate acquisition of food from the parents and might trigger brood reduction and reduced competition for food. Cort-implanted chicks also increased food intake; however, their growth rates were similar to controls. To examine the costs of chronically increased circulating levels of cort, we removed cort implants and, after a 10-day recovery period, tested cognitive abilities of young kittiwakes. We found that the ability of kittiwakes to associate a visual cue with the presence of food in a choice situation was compromised by the experimental elevation of cort during development. To examine the long-term costs of increased levels of cort, 8 months later we tested the performance of the same individuals in a spatial task requiring them to make a detour around a barrier in order to escape from an enclosure. Individuals treated with cort during development took significantly more time to solve this task compared to controls. The results of this study suggest that the adrenocortical response of a developing bird to environmental stressors is associated with both benefits (increased food intake, foraging behavior, and aggression) and costs (low growth efficiency and compromised cognitive abilities later in life). This provides an evolutionary framework for relating juvenile physiological traits to fitness of birds in subsequent life-history stages.

  1. Single-dose and chronic corticosterone treatment alters c-Fos or FosB immunoreactivity in the rat cerebral cortex.

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    Szakács, Réka; Fazekas, Ildikó; Mihály, András; Krisztin-Péva, Beáta; Juhász, Anna; Janka, Zoltán

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of single-dose and chronic corticosterone treatment on the inducible transcription factor c-Fos and FosB, and thereby to estimate the effects of high-doses of corticosterone on calcium-dependent neuronal responses in the rat cerebral cortex. At the same time we investigated the distribution of interneurons containing calretinin (CR), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in chronically treated animals in order to collect data on the involvement of inhibitory neurons in this process. Adult male rats were injected subcutaneously with 10mg corticosterone, whereas controls received the vehicle (sesame oil). The animals were fixed by transcardial perfusion 12 and 24h following single corticosterone injection, and the brains were processed for c-Fos and FosB immunohistochemistry. To investigate the effects of repeated corticosterone administration, rats were daily treated with the same amount of corticosterone (10mg/animal, subcutaneously) for 21 days. Controls were injected with vehicle. At the end of the experiment, the rats were perfused and immunohistochemistry was used to detect the presence of the FosB protein, CR, VIP and NPY. Quantitative evaluation of immunolabelled cells was performed in the neocortex and the hippocampus. The number of immunoreactive nuclei per unit area was used as a quantitative measure of the effects of corticosterone. It was found that a single-dose administration of corticosterone resulted in a significant, time-dependent increase of c-Fos protein immunoreactivity in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, as well as in regions CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus 12 and 24h post-injection with respect to control animals. Significant enhancement of c-Fos immunoreactivity was also observed in the neocortex at 12 and 24h post-injection. Single-dose treatment did not significantly alter FosB immunolabelling. Repeated administration of corticosterone produced a complex

  2. Does corticosterone regulate the onset of breeding in free-living birds?: The CORT-Flexibility Hypothesis and six potential mechanisms for priming corticosteroid function.

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    Lattin, Christine R; Breuner, Creagh W; Michael Romero, L

    2016-02-01

    For many avian species, the decision to initiate breeding is based on information from a variety of environmental cues, including photoperiod, temperature, food availability, and social interactions. There is evidence that the hormone corticosterone may be involved in delaying the onset of breeding in cases where supplemental cues, such as low food availability and inclement weather, indicate that the environment is not suitable. However, not all studies have found the expected relationships between breeding delays and corticosterone titers. In this review, we present the hypothesis that corticosterone physiology mediates flexibility in breeding initiation (the "CORT-Flexibility Hypothesis"), and propose six possible corticosterone-driven mechanisms in pre-breeding birds that may delay breeding initiation: altering hormone titers, negative feedback regulation, plasma binding globulin concentrations, intracellular receptor concentrations, enzyme activity and interacting hormone systems. Based on the length of the breeding season and species-specific natural history, we also predict variation in corticosterone-regulated pre-breeding flexibility. Although few studies thus far have examined mechanisms beyond plasma hormone titers, the CORT-Flexibility Hypothesis is grounded on a solid foundation of research showing seasonal variation in the physiological stress response and knowledge of physiological mechanisms modulating corticosteroid effects. We propose six possible mechanisms as testable and falsifiable predictions to help clarify the extent of HPA axis regulation of the initiation of breeding.

  3. Effect of age, breeding experience and senescence on corticosterone and prolactin levels in a long-lived seabird: the wandering albatross.

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    Angelier, Frédéric; Shaffer, Scott A; Weimerskirch, Henri; Chastel, Olivier

    2006-10-01

    Although several studies have described age-specific pattern of breeding performance, physiological and endocrine mechanisms underlying the variation in reproductive success in relation to age are poorly understood. We described baseline levels of: (1) corticosterone, which can trigger nest desertion when secreted at high levels, and (2) prolactin, a hormone known to trigger parental behaviour in incubating known-aged (7-39 years old) wandering albatrosses (Diomedea exulans). In this long-lived species, reproductive performance increases with age and breeding experience before it stabilizes in middle-aged individuals and declines in senescent individuals. We found that breeding experience was a much better statistical predictor of hormone levels than age. Baseline corticosterone levels slightly increased with advancing experience and reached maximal levels about the sixth breeding attempt. Similarly, prolactin levels were positively correlated with breeding experience in males. No such relationship was found in females, but first-time breeding females had lower prolactin levels than experienced females. This parallel increases in hormonal levels with advancing experience could result from improvements of skills, development of an endocrine system adapted to energetic constraints of reproduction or may mirror a higher investment in reproduction. Corticosterone levels decreased in senescent birds, but such a decline was not observed for prolactin. Low corticosterone levels in senescent birds could be associated with a lower ability to secrete/sustain elevated corticosterone levels or with a decreased parental expenditure.

  4. Chronic corticosterone decreases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein in the hippocampus, but not in the frontal cortex, of the rat.

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    Jacobsen, Jacob P R; Mørk, Arne

    2006-09-19

    This study examined the effects of chronic corticosterone (32 mg/kg/day, s.c., 21 days) on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. Because evidence suggests that BDNF is an important determinant of the function of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system, we also quantified tissue levels of 5-HT and its major metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), to investigate if changes in BDNF mRNA and protein paralleled changes in the 5-HT system. Corticosterone modestly decreased BDNF protein (-16.6%) in whole hippocampus and BDNF mRNA (-19%) in the CA3 area. In contrast, BDNF mRNA and protein in the frontal cortex were unchanged. In both the frontal cortex and hippocampus, tissue levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA were increased and decreased, respectively. Combined, these data suggests that the effects of corticosterone on the BDNF system are not linked to the effects on the 5-HT systems. However, our findings do suggest that chronic corticosterone impairs hippocampal BDNF function, a finding with potential relevance for the hippocampal atrophy reported in major depression. Additionally, as inferred from the alterations in tissue levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA, chronic corticosterone may influence the function of the 5-HT system.

  5. Glucocorticoid-like effects of antihepatocarcinogen Rotenone are mediated via enhanced serum corticosterone levels: Molecular Fitting and Receptor Activation Studies

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    Youssef Jihan

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest that rotenone alters cell signal transduction pathways in a manner similar to glucocorticoids. Histological and biochemical markers of glucocorticoid effects in vivo, evaluated in our laboratories, provide further evidence for similarities in the activity of glucocorticoids and rotenone. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which rotenone produces glucocorticoid-like effects. Methods Male B6C3F1 mice were treated for 7 days with rotenone (600 ppm in diet, the glucocorticoid antagonist RU486 (2 mg/kg/day, ip, corticosterone (2 mg/kg/day, ip, or both rotenone and RU 486. Control mice received drug-free diet and the vehicle (corn oil, ip. Following preservation in 10% neutral buffered formalin, tissues were embedded in paraffin. Sections were stained with hematoxylin, eosin, and were examined by light microscopy. Tissue sections were processed for in situ enzymatic end labeling of 3'-hydroxy-DNA strand breaks, a measure of apoptosis. Corticosterone was quantified in sera, using a solid phase radioimmunoassay kit. Cells (cell line 1470.2 derived from C127 mouse mammary adenocarcinoma cells were transiently transfected with 5 μg of pLTRLuc and 1 μg of β-Galactosidase expression vectors using a BTX square-wave pulser at 155 V, 4 pulses (40 ms each. Cells were then treated with dexamethasone, rotenone, or a mixture of both for 6 hr, harvested and assayed for luciferase and β-Galactosidase activity. Using Root Mean Square (RMS fit analysis (Alchemy™, Tripose, Inc., St Louis, MO, we assessed possible structural similarities between rotenone and corticosterone, dehydrocorticosterone, glucocorticoid antagonists ZK 98.299, and RU 486. RMS fit was calculated by selecting three atoms in each of the molecules, followed by calculating the distance between these atoms. An RMS value of zero between two molecules indicates identical molecular characteristics. A positive value suggests

  6. Effects of stress and corticosterone in two post-training periods, on spatial memory consolidation in adult male Wistar rats.

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    Jeimmy Marcela Cerón

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Memory consolidation is the process of gradual stabilization of long-term memory after learning (Alberini & Taubenfeld, 2008. This process involves the activation of intracellular signaling cascades that lead to the reorganization of synaptic proteins. Activation of these signaling pathways can regulate gene expression and protein synthesis (Brivanlou & Darnell, 2002. It is considered that the new proteins synthesized after learning are responsible for the changes in the neural architecture associated with memory consolidation (Mileusnic, 2004. In this sense, it has been shown that consolidation may be interrupted by inhibiting protein synthesis, leading to forgetfulness of the experience (Meeter & Murre, 2004. Although the dominant hypothesis is that memory consolidation requires a single molecular cascade, it has been suggested that multiple sets of synaptic modifications are required to reinforce changes after memory acquisition (Wittenber & Tsien, 2002. Consistently, recent studies have shown that protein synthesis associated with memory consolidation occurs in at least two post-training periods: immediately and 3-6 hours after training (Igaz et al., 2002; Bekinschtein et al., 2007. These memory consolidation periods share some molecular phenomena; however, each period is also associated with events that are different from the other (Igaz et al., 2002. To date, there is a substantial amount of evidence showing that stressful events may facilitate neuronal function and cognition. The term "stress" usually refers to a nonspecific response of the body to stimuli that threaten the physiological/psychological homeostasis (Selye, 1976; Chrousos et al., 1988. The stress response is associated with the activation of two physiological systems: the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and the sympathetic adrenomedullary (SAM. Glucocorticoids (cortisol in humans and corticosterone in rodents are steroid hormones secreted by the adrenal glands as a

  7. [Blockade of NMDA receptor enhances corticosterone-induced downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression in the rat hippocampus through cAMP response element binding protein pathway].

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    Feng, Hao; Lu, Li-Min; Huang, Ying; Zhu, Yi-Chun; Yao, Tai

    2005-10-25

    High concentration of corticosterone leads to morphological and functional impairments in hippocampus, ranging from a reversible atrophy of pyramidal CA3 apical dendrites to the impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) and hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor play an important role in this effect. Because of the importance of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the functions of the hippocampal neurons, alteration of the expression of BDNF is thought to be involved in the corticosterone effect on the hippocampus. To determine whether change in BDNF in the hippocampus is involved in the corticosterone effect, we injected corticosterone (2 mg/kg, s.c.) to Sprague-Dawley rats and measured the mRNA, proBDNF and mature BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus. We also measured the phosphorylation level of the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Furthermore, we intraperitoneally injected NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 (0.1 mg/kg) 30 min before corticosterone administration to investigate whether and how MK801 affected the regulation of BDNF gene expression by corticosterone. Our results showed that 3 h after single s.c. injection of corticsterone, the expression of BDNF mRNA, proBDNF and mature BDNF protein decreased significantly (PBDNF gene expression in the rat hippocampus by corticosterone. We also found that either applying corticosterone or co-applying corticosterone with MK801 downregulated the phosphoration level of CREB, the latter (corticosterone plus MK801) being more effective (PBDNF gene expression in the rat hippocampus through CREB pathway and that blockade of NMDA receptor enhances this effect of corticosterone in reducing BDNF expression.

  8. Corticosterone metabolite concentrations in greater sage-grouse are positively associated with the presence of cattle grazing

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    Jankowski, M.D.; Russell, R.E.; Franson, J. Christian; Dusek, R.J.; Hines, M.K.; Gregg, M.; Hofmeister, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    The sagebrush biome in the western United States is home to the imperiled greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and encompasses rangelands used for cattle production. Cattle grazing activities have been implicated in the range-wide decline of the sage-grouse, but no studies have investigated the relationship between the physiological condition of sage-grouse and the presence of grazing cattle. We sampled 329 sage-grouse across four sites (two grazed and two ungrazed) encompassing 13 600 km2 during the spring and late summer–early autumn of 2005 to evaluate whether demographic factors, breeding status, plasma protein levels, and residence in a cattle-grazed habitat were associated with the stress hormone corticosterone. Corticosterone was measured in feces as immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites (ICM). Males captured during the lekking season exhibited higher ICM levels than all others. Prenesting female sage-grouse captured in a grazed site had higher ICM levels than those in ungrazed sites and prenesting female plasma protein levels were negatively correlated with ICM concentrations. With the use of a small-scale spatial model, we identified a positive correlation between cattle pat count and sage-grouse ICM levels. Our model indicated that ICM levels increased by 2.60 ng · g−1 dry feces for every increase in the number of cow pats found in the vicinity. Management practices will benefit from future research regarding the consistency and mechanism(s) responsible for this association and, importantly, how ICM levels and demographic rates are related in this species of conservation concern.

  9. Associations of corticosterone and testosterone with alcohol drinking in F2 populations derived from AA and ANA rat lines.

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    Etelälahti, Tiina J; Saarikoski, Sirkku T; Eriksson, C J Peter

    2011-08-01

    In our previous studies on alcohol-preferring AA (Alko alcohol) and nonpreferring ANA (Alko nonalcohol) rats, we have observed that the AA rats exhibit lower endogenous levels of corticosterone, higher testosterone levels, and more frequent alcohol-induced testosterone elevations when compared with ANA rats. The objective of the present study was to get more conclusive evidence for the potential role of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axes in alcohol drinking by using the F2 experimental design. Alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-nonpreferring ANA rat lines were crossbred to form a F1 population from which the final F2 population was derived. Male animals were challenged with a priming alcohol dose after which a 3 weeks' voluntary alcohol drinking period took place. After a washout period of 1 week, one-half of the 40 highest and 40 lowest alcohol drinkers were challenged with a second dose of alcohol and the other half with saline. Serum testosterone and corticosterone levels were measured before and during the test. Higher endogenous testosterone levels were detected in the rats of the high alcohol consumption group compared with the low consumption group. Also supporting the original AA/ANA line differences, a trend for lower endogenous corticosterone levels were measured in the high alcohol consumption group compared with the low consumption group. The alcohol challenge test after the drinking period resulted in a higher frequency (38%) of testosterone elevations in the high drinkers compared with the low drinkers (5%). The present data confirms the validity of the positive connections between testosterone elevation and increased alcohol drinking, as well as between testosterone reduction and decreased alcohol drinking, in AA and ANA rats.

  10. Calorie restriction and corticosterone elevation during lactation can each modulate adult male fear and anxiety-like behaviour.

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    Govic, Antonina; Bell, Veronica; Samuel, Anil; Penman, Jim; Paolini, Antonio G

    2014-09-01

    Early life events, such as calorie restriction (CR) and elevated glucocorticoids, can calibrate the lifelong behavioural and physiological profile of an individual. Stress reactivity in adulthood is particularly sensitive to early life events; however, the consequence to fear and anxiety-like behaviour is less clear. Consequently, the current study sought to examine the effects of post-natal CR and glucocorticoid elevation, long considered powerful programming stimuli, on the subsequent fear and anxiety behaviour of the adult offspring. Rat dams received either corticosterone (200 μg/ml) supplementation in drinking water (CORT) or a 25% CR from post-natal day (PND) 1 to 11. Responses to the elevated plus maze (EPM), open field and a predator odour (TMT; 2,5-dihydro-2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline) were characterised in the adult male offspring. Both treatment conditions resulted in enhanced fear responses to TMT, characterised by heightened risk assessment and increased avoidance of TMT. CORT nursed offspring further demonstrated an anxiogenic profile in the open field. Basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function was unchanged in CORT adult offspring, whilst corticosterone concentration was elevated by post-natal CR. CR and CORT treated dams both exhibited greater anxiety-like behaviour in the EPM. A modest and temporary enhancement of maternal care was observed in CR and CORT treated dams, with CR dams further exhibiting rapid pup retrieval latencies. The results indicate enhanced emotionality in the adult male progeny of dams exposed to CR and corticosterone supplementation during the post-natal period. The modest enhancement of maternal care observed by both treatments is unlikely to have influenced the behavioural profile of the offspring.

  11. Anti-depressant and anxiolytic like behaviors in PKCI/HINT1 knockout mice associated with elevated plasma corticosterone level

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    Wang Jia

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinase C interacting protein (PKCI/HINT1 is a small protein belonging to the histidine triad (HIT family proteins. Its brain immunoreactivity is located in neurons and neuronal processes. PKCI/HINT1 gene knockout (KO mice display hyper-locomotion in response to D-amphetamine which is considered a positive symptom of schizophrenia in animal models. Postmortem studies identified PKCI/HINT1 as a candidate molecule for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We investigated the hypothesis that the PKCI/HINT1 gene may play an important role in regulating mood function in the CNS. We submitted PKCI/HINT1 KO mice and their wild type (WT littermates to behavioral tests used to study anti-depressant, anxiety like behaviors, and goal-oriented behavior. Additionally, as many mood disorders coincide with modifications of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis function, we assessed the HPA activity through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results Compared to the WT controls, KO mice exhibited less immobility in the forced swim (FST and the tail suspension (TST tests. Activity in the TST tended to be attenuated by acute treatment with valproate at 300 mg/kg in KO mice. The PKCI/HINT1 KO mice presented less thigmotaxis in the Morris water maze and spent progressively more time in the lit compartment in the light/dark test. In a place navigation task, KO mice exhibited enhanced acquisition and retention. Furthermore, the afternoon basal plasma corticosterone level in PKCI/HINT1 KO mice was significantly higher than in the WT. Conclusion PKCI/HINT1 KO mice displayed a phenotype of behavioral and endocrine features which indicate changes of mood function, including anxiolytic-like and anti-depressant like behaviors, in conjunction with an elevated corticosterone level in plasma. These results suggest that the PKCI/HINT 1 gene could be important for the mood regulation function in the CNS.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor SU5416 suppresses lymphocyte generation and immune responses in mice by increasing plasma corticosterone.

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    Jamison J Grailer

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors (VEGFRs are attractive therapeutic candidates for cancer treatment. One such small molecule VEGFR inhibitor, SU5416, limits angiogenesis in vivo and is widely used for investigating VEGFR signaling in tumor pathophysiology. Herein, we describe novel actions of SU5416 on the immune system. Treatment of mice with SU5416 for 3 days induced significant reductions in size and cellularity of peripheral lymph nodes. Interestingly, SU5416 did not affect initial lymphocyte localization to peripheral lymph nodes but did reduce lymphocyte accumulation during long-term migration assays. Treatment with SU5416 also induced severe loss of double-positive thymocytes resulting in thymic atrophy and a reduction in peripheral B cells. Furthermore, immune responses following immunization were reduced in mice treated with SU5416. Findings of thymic atrophy and reduced weight gain during SU5416 treatment suggested elevated corticosterone levels. Indeed, a significant 5-fold increase in serum corticosterone was found 4 hours after treatment with SU5416. Importantly, adrenalectomy negated the effects of SU5416 treatment on primary immune tissues, and partial reversal of SU5416-induced changes was observed following blockade of glucocorticoid receptors. SU5416 has been reported to inhibit the activation of latent transforming growth factor (TGF-β, a cytokine involved in the regulation of glucocorticoid release by the adrenal glands. Interestingly, treatment with a TGF-β receptor inhibitor, showed a similar phenotype as SU5416 treatment, including elevated serum corticosterone levels and thymic atrophy. Therefore, these results suggest that SU5416 induces glucocorticoid release directly from the adrenal glands, possibly by inhibition of TGF-β activation.

  13. Sensitization of restraint-induced corticosterone secretion after chronic restraint in rats: Involvement of 5-HT7 receptors

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    García-Iglesias, Brenda B.; Mendoza-Garrido, María E; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Noyola-Díaz, Martha; Terrón, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress. We examined the effect of chronic restraint stress (CRS; 20 min/day) as compared to control (CTRL) conditions for 14 days, on: 1) restraint-induced ACTH and corticosterone (CORT) secretion in rats pretreated with vehicle or SB-656104 (a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist); 2) 5-HT7 receptor-like immunoreactivity (5-HT7-LI) and protein in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and adrenal glands (AG); 3...

  14. Differential effects of the novel antidepressant tianeptine on L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-elicited corticosterone release and body weight loss.

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    Broqua, P; Baudrie, V; Chaouloff, F

    1992-06-01

    Biochemical and behavioural experiments have indicated that the novel antidepressant tianeptine stimulates 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake. The present study has explored the influence of acute tianeptine pretreatment upon corticosterone release and body weight loss following L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) administration in conscious rats. Administration of 5-HTP (20 mg/kg i.v.) increased plasma corticosterone levels to a similar extent in rats pretreated either with saline or tianeptine (10 mg/kg i.p., 60 min beforehand). Besides, prior administration of benserazide (50 mg/kg i.p., 30 min beforehand), an inhibitor of peripheral aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, prevented 5-HTP-induced corticosterone release in both saline- and tianeptine-pretreated rats. However, combined administration of benserazide and 5-HTP decreased overnight body weight in saline-, but not in tianeptine-pretreated rats. These results suggest that tianeptine preferentially activates 5-HT reuptake in central serotonergic neurones.

  15. Chronic stress induces structural alterations in splenic lymphoid tissue that are associated with changes in corticosterone levels in wistar-kyoto rats.

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    Hernandez, María Eugenia; Martinez-Mota, Lucia; Salinas, Citlaltepetl; Marquez-Velasco, Ricardo; Hernandez-Chan, Nancy G; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Streber, María L; Granados-Camacho, Ivonne; Becerril, Enrique; Javier, Baquera-Heredia; Pavón, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder patients present chronic stress and decreased immunity. The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY) is a strain in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is overactivated. To determine whether chronic stress induces changes in corticosterone levels and splenic lymphoid tissue, 9-week-old male rats were subject to restraint stress (3 h daily), chemical stress (hydrocortisone treatment, 50 mg/Kg weight), mixed stress (restraint plus hydrocortisone), or control treatment (without stress) for 1, 4, and 7 weeks. The serum corticosterone levels by RIA and spleens morphology were analyzed. Corticosterone levels as did the structure, size of the follicles and morphology of the parenchyma (increase in red pulp) in the spleen, varied depending on time and type of stressor. These changes indicate that chronic stress alters the immune response in the spleen in WKY rats by inducing morphological changes, explaining in part the impaired immunity that develops in organisms that are exposed to chronic stress.

  16. Selective hypoaldosteronism due to combined defects of the conversion from inactive renin to active renin and the aldosterone biosynthesis from corticosterone.

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    Muto, S; Akai, Y; Ono, S; Kusano, E; Asano, Y

    2001-07-01

    A 24-year-old Japanese woman with IgA nephropathy exhibited a decreased serum aldosterone level with normal plasma renin activity after toxemia of pregnancy. Our studies revealed selective hypoaldosteronism with normal adrenoglucocorticoid functions. Levels of serum corticosterone and deoxycorticosterone were normal. Resting plasma renin activity was normal, and plasma levels of total and inactive renin were increased. Rapid ACTH administration failed to stimulate any secretion of aldosterone, whereas it adequately increased serum cortisol, deoxycorticosterone, and corticosterone concentrations. Responses of both plasma renin activity and serum aldosterone level to the furosemide-posture challenge were blunted. Angiotensin II also failed to stimulate any secretion of aldosterone despite a progressive rise in blood pressure and an appropriate increase in serum corticosterone. These results suggest that combined defects of the conversion from inactive renin to active renin and aldosterone biosynthesis are the causes of selective hypoaldosteronism in our patient.

  17. Elevated corticosterone levels decrease reproductive output of chick-rearing Adélie penguins but do not affect chick mass at fledging.

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    Thierry, Anne-Mathilde; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Raclot, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Study of physiological mechanisms can help us to understand how animals respond to changing environmental conditions. In particular, stress hormones (i.e. glucocorticoids, such as corticosterone) are described as mediating resource allocation, allowing animals to adjust their physiology and behaviour to predictable and unpredictable changes in the environment. In this study, we investigated the effects of an experimental increase in baseline corticosterone levels on the breeding effort and the reproductive output of chick-rearing male Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae). The number of chicks per nest, their body mass, and their size were monitored throughout the study. Direct observations allowed measurement of the time spent foraging at sea and caring for the young on the nest. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected for isotope analysis. Although all birds raised at least one chick, reproductive output was decreased by 42% in corticosterone-treated birds compared with control birds. The increase in corticosterone levels during the guard stage did not affect the mass of surviving chicks or the brood mass at fledging. Corticosterone-treated males spent on average 21% more time at the nest than control birds. However, the duration of foraging trips was similar between both groups. In addition, the similarity of isotopic signatures suggests that both groups foraged at similar locations and ingested the same prey species. The detailed on-land behaviour of birds should be examined in further studies to clarify the possible links between corticosterone levels, brooding time, and reproductive output. Understanding the relationships between glucocorticoids, fitness, and ultimately population dynamics is fundamental to enabling conservation physiology as a discipline to be successful in helping to manage species of conservation concern.

  18. Metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor antagonists improve behavioral and prefrontal dopaminergic alterations in the chronic corticosterone-induced depression model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ago, Yukio; Yano, Koji; Araki, Ryota; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Kita, Yuki; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Onoe, Hirotaka; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Nakazato, Atsuro; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Baba, Akemichi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2013-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptor antagonists have an antidepressant-like effect, but the exact mechanism still remains unclear. This study examined the effects of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists in chronic corticosterone-treated mice which could be used as an animal model of depression. In the forced swim test, the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists MGS0039 (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and LY341495 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p) significantly reduced the increased immobility time of mice pretreated with corticosterone (20 mg/kg, s.c.) for 21 days, while desipramine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and fluoxetine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. The antidepressant-like effect of LY341495 was not blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Systemic administration of LY341495 did not affect basal release of glutamate, dopamine or serotonin in the prefrontal cortex of the control or chronic corticosterone-treated mice. Chronic corticosterone markedly enhanced high K(+)-induced release of dopamine, but not serotonin or glutamate, in the prefrontal cortex. This neurochemical change was blocked by systemic administration of MGS0039 and LY341495, but not desipramine or fluoxetine. These results suggest that chronic corticosterone-treated mice could be used as an animal model of treatment-resistant depression. This study also suggests that the prefrontal dopaminergic system is involved in the antidepressant-like effect of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists in the chronic corticosterone-induced depression model.

  19. Hypericum Perforatum Decreased Hippocampus TNF-α and Corticosterone Levels with No Effect on Kynurenine/Tryptophan Ratio in Bilateral Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bakly, Wesam M; Hasanin, Amany H

    2014-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect Hypericum Perforatum (HP), on behavioral changes, corticosterone, TNF-α levels and tryptophan metabolism and disposition in bilateral ovariectomized rats compared to 17α -ethinylestradiol. Behavioral analysis by measuring immobility time in forced swimming test and open field test, serum and hippocampal corticosterone and TNF-α along with hippocampal kynurenine/tryptophan ratio were determined in mature ovariectomized rats treated orally either by HP at three different doses 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg/day or by 17α-ethinylestradiol 30 µg/kg/day for 30 days. Ovariectomized rats showed significant increase in immobility time in the forced swimming test. Along with elevation in serum and hippocampal TNF-α and corticosterone levels associated with significant increase in hippocampal kynurenine/tryptophan ratio. Immobility time in the forced swimming test was decreased in rats treated by different doses of HP in a dose dependent manner and 17α-ethinylestradiol with no concomitant changes in the open field test. Only Rats treated with HP exhibited significant decrease in the elevated serum and hippocampal TNF-α and corticosterone, which couldn't explain the associated insignificant effect on hippocampaus kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in comparison to ovariectomized untreated rats. It is concluded that increased tryptophan metabolism toward kynurenine secondary to elevated corticosterone and TNF-α might be one of the pathohphysiological mechanisms that could explain depression like state observed in this rat model. Further, the observed attenuating effect of HP on TNF-α and corticosterone could contribute in its antidepressant effect in this animal model by other ways than their effects on tryptophan-kynurenine metabolism pathway.

  20. Diel changes in plasma melatonin and corticosterone concentrations in tropical Nazca boobies (Sula granti) in relation to moon phase and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlow, Elisa M; Hau, Michaela; Anderson, David J; Wikelski, Martin

    2003-10-01

    We investigated the effects of moon phases and age on diel rhythms of plasma melatonin and corticosterone in free-living Nazca boobies (Sula granti) on the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador. Melatonin and corticosterone secretion are regulated by the circadian system and the two hormones play a role in the control of locomotor activity and foraging, which can be influenced by moon phases. These seabirds have a long life span and in many vertebrates circadian function deteriorates with age. The functioning of the circadian system under different environmental conditions and changes related to age are poorly understood and hardly studied in wild birds. Nazca boobies had generally low plasma melatonin concentrations but showed a diel variation with higher concentrations at 00:00 and 16:00h. The diel variations in melatonin concentrations disappeared during full moon, suggesting that natural light levels at night can suppress melatonin secretion in Nazca boobies. Maximal melatonin concentrations tended to decline in older birds (10-19 years). Birds showed a clear diel variation in basal plasma corticosterone with a peak in the early morning, before the active period begins, and low concentrations throughout the day. As with melatonin, there were no diel variations in corticosterone at full moon, which may be due to different activity patterns in response to food availability or changes in the circadian system. While other studies have found a relationship between corticosterone and melatonin, we found no such correlation in Nazca boobies. The lunar cycle appears to affect the hormone titers of Nazca boobies both directly and indirectly. First, melatonin rhythms can be directly affected by the light intensity associated with full moon. Second, prey availability may change foraging patterns and can therefore indirectly alter corticosterone secretion in Nazca boobies.

  1. Corticosterone microinjected into nucleus pontis oralis increases tonic immobility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Herrera, Vicente; Trujillo-Ferrara, José G; Miranda-Páez, Abraham; De La Cruz, Fidel; Zamudio, Sergio R

    2011-09-01

    Tonic immobility (TI) is also known as "immobility response", "immobility reflex", "animal hypnosis", etc. It is an innate antipredatory behavior characterized by an absence of movement, varying degrees of muscular activity, and a relative unresponsiveness to external stimuli. Experimentally, TI is commonly produced by manually forcing an animal into an inverted position and restraining it in that position until the animal becomes immobile. Part of the neural mechanism(s) of TI involves the medullo-pontine reticular formation, with influence from other components of the brain, notably the limbic system. It has been observed that TI is more prolonged in stressed animals, and systemic injection of corticosterone (CORT) also potentiates this behavior. At present, the anatomical brain regions involved in the CORT modulation of TI are unknown. Thus, our study was made to determine if some pontine areas could be targets for the modulation of TI by CORT. A unilateral nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) microinjection of 1 μL of CORT (0.05 μg/1 μL) in rats resulted in clear behavioral responses. The animals had an increased duration of TI caused by clamping the neck (in this induction, besides of body inversion and restraint, there is also clamping the neck), with an enhancement in open-field motor activity, which were prevented by pretreatment injection into PnO with 1 μL of the mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonist spironolactone (0.5 μg/1 μL) or 1 μL of the glucocorticoid-receptor antagonist mifepristone (0.5 μg/1 μL). In contrast, these behavioral changes were not seen when CORT (0.05 μg/1 μL) was microinjected into medial lemniscus area or paramedian raphe. Our data support the idea that, in stressful situations, glucocorticoids released from adrenals of the prey reach the PnO to produce a hyper arousal state, which in turn can prolong the duration of TI.

  2. Acclimatization of mice to different cage types and social groupings with respect to fecal secretion of IgA and corticosterone metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Cathrine Juel; Kalliokoski, Otto; Abelson, Klas Sp

    2012-01-01

    Stress associated with transport and change of environment may have widespread effects on physiological parameters in laboratory animals. To investigate the time needed for mice to acclimatize to a new environment, based on fecal IgA and corticosterone excretion, eightweek-old BALB/c mice of both...... from each cage on routine cage changing. There was no significant difference in corticosterone excretion in feces between animals housed in the different cage types or between animals housed in different group sizes. IgA excretion for both males and females was found to be affected by transfer of mice...

  3. Effects of voluntarily-ingested buprenorphine on plasma corticosterone levels, body weight, water intake, and behaviour in permanently catheterised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldkuhl, Renée; Hau, Jann; Abelson, Klas S P

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the peri- and postoperative effect of pre-emptive analgesia through voluntary ingestion of buprenorphine in Nutella, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. An arterial catheter was inserted and the rats were connected to an automated blood sampling device (AccuSampler). Blood samples were drawn up to 18 h after surgery and the plasma concentrations of corticosterone were quantified. Postoperative changes in water intake and body weight were recorded, and the behaviour of the rats was analysed during two 30-min periods. Pre-emptive oral buprenorphine treatment reduced the plasma corticosterone levels in the postoperative period, compared to controls treated with local anaesthetics. Buprenorphine-treated rats consumed more water and maintained body weight better. Behavioural observations indicated that buprenorphine changed the behaviour in non-operated rats but there was no difference in the operated rats. The present study strengthens the hypothesis that pre-emptive oral buprenorphine in Nutella is suitable for treatment of postoperative pain in rats.

  4. Rapid effect of stress concentration corticosterone on glutamate receptor and its subtype NMDA receptor activity in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲; 孙继虎; 王春安

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To study the rapid effect of glucocorticoids(GCs)on NMDA receptor activity in hippocampal neurons in stress and to elucidate its underlying probable membrane mechanisms.Methods:Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the effect of stress concentration corticosterone(B)on the responses of cultured hippocampal neurons to glutamate and NMDA(N-methy-D-asparatic acid).To make clear the target of B,intracellular dialysis of B(10 μ mol/L)through patch pipette and extracellular application of bovine serum albumin-conjugated corticosterone(B-BSA,10 μmol/L)were carried out to observe their influence on peak amplitude of NMDA-evoked current.Results:B had a rapid,reversible and inhibitory effect on peak amplitude of GLU- or NMDA-evoked current in cultured hippocampal neurons.Furthermore,B-BSA had the inhibitory effect on INMDA as that of B,but intracellularly dialyzed B had no significant effect on INMDA.Conclusion:These results suggest that under the condition of stress,GCs may rapidly,negatively regulate excitatory synaptic receptors-glutamate receptors(GluRs),especially NMDA receptor(NMDAR)in central nervous system,which is mediated by rapid membrane mechanisms,but not by classical,genomic mechanisms.

  5. Xiao Yao San against Corticosterone-Induced Stress Injury via Upregulating Glucocorticoid Receptor Reaction Element Transcriptional Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoping Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have revealed that uncontrollable stress can impair the synaptic plasticity and firing property of hippocampal neurons, which influenced various hippocampal-dependent tasks including memory, cognition, behavior, and mood. In this work, we had investigated the effects and mechanisms of the Chinese herbal medicine Xiao Yao San (XYS against corticosterone-induced stress injury in primary hippocampal neurons (PHN cells. We found that XYS and RU38486 could increase cell viabilities and decrease cell apoptosis by MTT, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry assays. In addition, we observed that XYS notably inhibited the nuclear translocation of GR and upregulated the mRNA and protein expressions levels of Caveolin-1, GR, BDNF, TrkB, and FKBP4. However, XYS downregulated the FKBP51 expressions. Furthermore, the results of the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and double luciferase reporter gene detection indicated that FKBP4 promotes the transcriptional activity of GR reaction element (GRE by binding with GR, and FKBP51 processed the opposite action. The in vivo experiment also proved the functions of XYS. These results suggested that XYS showed an efficient neuroprotection against corticosterone-induced stress injury in PHN cells by upregulating GRE transcriptional activity, which should be developed as a potential candidate for treating stress injury in the future.

  6. Brief anesthesia by isoflurane alters plasma corticosterone levels distinctly in male and female rats: implications for tissue collection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhbat, Mandakh; Merrill, Liana; Kelly, Sean D.; Lee, Vanessa K.; Neigh, Gretchen N.

    2016-01-01

    Euthanasia by anesthetic agents is commonly performed prior to tissue collection in order to minimize pain and distress to the animal. However, depending on their mechanism of action as well as administration regimen, different methods of anesthesia may trigger an acute stress response through engaging the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which can impact numerous other physiological processes that the researcher may wish to examine as endpoints. We investigated the effects of the commonly used anesthetic agent isoflurane on two different endpoints related to the stress response: plasma corticosterone levels and gene expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as well as several of its regulators including FK506-binding protein 51 (Fkbp5) in the hippocampus of male and female rats. Our results indicate that brief exposure to anesthesia by isoflurane prior to decapitation can alter plasma corticosterone levels differentially in male and female rats within minutes without impacting gene expression in the hippocampus. We conclude that collection methods can influence stress-related physiological endpoints in female rats and the potential influence of even brief anesthesia as well as sex differences in response to anesthesia should be evaluated during the experimental design process and data interpretation. This finding is particularly important in light of new NIH standards regarding sex and reproducibility, and care should be taken to be certain that sex differences in endpoints of interest are not an artifact of sex differences in response to collection paradigms. PMID:26946276

  7. Neonatal corticosterone administration in rodents as a tool to investigate the maternal programming of emotional and immune domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Macrì

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal experiences exert persistent influences on individual development. These influences encompass numerous domains including emotion, cognition, reactivity to external stressors and immunity. The comprehensive nature of the neonatal programming of individual phenotype is reverberated in the large amount of experimental data collected by many authors in several scientific fields: biomedicine, evolutionary and molecular biology. These data support the view that variations in precocious environmental conditions may calibrate the individual phenotype at many different levels. Environmental influences have been traditionally addressed through experimental paradigms entailing the modification of the neonatal environment and the multifactorial (e.g. behaviour, endocrinology, cellular and molecular biology analysis of the developing individual's phenotype. These protocols suggested that the role of the mother in mediating the offspring's phenotype is often associated with the short-term effects of environmental manipulations on dam's physiology. Specifically, environmental manipulations may induce fluctuations in maternal corticosteroids (corticosterone in rodents which, in turn, are translated to the offspring through lactation. Herein, I propose that this mother-offspring transfer mechanism can be leveraged to devise experimental protocols based on the exogenous administration of corticosterone during lactation. To support this proposition, I refer to a series of studies in which these protocols have been adopted to investigate the neonatal programming of individual phenotype at the level of emotional and immune regulations. While these paradigms cannot replace traditional studies, I suggest that they can be considered a valid complement.

  8. {sup 125}I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level during psychological stress in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi E-mail: GZL13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Mori, Yutaka

    2004-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that benzodiazepine receptor density decreases in response to stress, we correlated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding with serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats were divided into four groups; control group (CON, 10 rats), no physical or psychological stress; and one-, three-, and five-day stress groups of 12 rats each (1-DAY, 3-DAY, and 5-DAY, respectively), receiving psychological stress for the given number of days. Psychological stress were given to rats with a communication box. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-iomazenil of the 3-DAY and 5-DAY showed that {sup 125}I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding was significantly reduced in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen (p<0.05). Serum corticosterone level ratio appeared to be slightly elevated in 3-DAY and 5-DAY, although this elevation was not significant. These data suggest that {sup 125}I-IMZ is a useful radioligand to reflect received stress and its binding in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen is strongly affected by psychological stress.

  9. ZK91587: a novel synthetic antimineralocorticoid displays high affinity for corticosterone (type I) receptors in the rat hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutanto, W.; de Kloet, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro cytosol binding assays have shown the properties of binding of a novel steroid, ZK91587 (15..beta.., 16..beta..b-methylene-mexrenone) in the brain of rats. Scatchard and Woolf analyses of the binding data reveal the binding of (/sup 3/H) ZK91587 to the total hippocampal coritcosteroid receptor sites with high affinity, and low capacity. When 100-fold excess RU28362 was included simultaneously with (/sup 3/H) ZK91587, the labelled steroid binds with the same affinity and capacity. Relative binding affinities (RBA) of various steroids for the Type I or Type II corticosteroid receptor in these animals are: Type I: ZK91587 = corticosterone (B) > cortisol (F); Type II: B > F >>> ZK91587. In the binding kinetic study, ZK91587 has a high association rate of binding in the rat. The steroid dissociates following a one slope pattern, indicating, the present data demonstrate that in the rat hippocampus, ZK91587 binds specifically to the Type I (corticosterone-preferring/mineralocorticoid-like receptor.

  10. Calbindin-D28K expression increases in the dorsolateral hippocampus following corticosterone treatment in female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Ashley L; Saldanha, Colin J; Bailey, David J

    2012-03-01

    The hippocampus (HP) in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) is important in the consolidation of spatial memories. Chronic, elevated levels of steroid hormones, like the glucocorticoids, can decrease this type of memory function in birds and mammals; neuronal atrophy, loss, and a decrease in synaptic contacts in the mammalian HP are observed as the underlying cause. Calbindin-D28k is constitutively expressed in cells of the nervous system but increases in concentration following a neurotoxic insult, protecting neurons against apoptotic cell death. We hypothesized that treatment of female zebra finches with a glucocorticoid (corticosterone) would increase calbindin expression in the HP and the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM), a region important for perceptual (song) memories, relative to "blank" controls. Additionally, because the HP in zebra finches appears similar to that in mammals, based on a variety of structural and functional factors, and as particular regions of the HP in mammals are more vulnerable to glucocorticoid-induced damage, we also hypothesized that expression of calbindin would vary among the HP subdivisions. Overall levels of calbindin were higher in the HP of corticosterone-treated birds, due almost entirely to elevated calbindin expression in the dorsolateral subdivision of the HP only. In contrast, the dorsomedial HP, ventral HP, and NCM appear less affected by glucocorticoid exposure. These results suggest a role for glucocorticoids in the modulation of HP- but not NCM-dependent memories as well as a further functional differentiation among the HP subdivisions.

  11. Brief Social Isolation in the Adolescent Wistar-Kyoto Rat Model of Endogenous Depression Alters Corticosterone and Regional Monoamine Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Reshma A; Sadananda, Monika

    2017-02-24

    The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY) model has been suggested as a model of adult and adolescent depression though face, predictive and construct validities of the model to depression remain equivocal. The suitability of the WKY as a diathesis model that tests the double-hit hypothesis, particularly during critical periods of brain and behavioural development remains to be established. Here, effects of post-weaning social isolation were assessed during early adolescence (~30pnd) on behavioural despair and learned helplessness in the forced swim test (FST), plasma corticosterone levels and tissue monoamine concentrations in brain areas critically involved in depression, such as prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, striatum and hippocampus. Significantly increased immobility in the FST was observed in socially-isolated, adolescent WKY with a concomitant increase in corticosterone levels over and above the FST-induced stress. WKY also demonstrated a significantly increased release and utilization of dopamine, as manifested by levels of metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in nucleus accumbens, indicating that the large dopamine storage pool evident during adolescence induces greater dopamine release when stimulated. The serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid was also significantly increased in nucleus accumbens, indicating increased utilization of serotonin, along with norepinephrine levels which were also signficantly elevated in socially-isolated adolescent WKY. Differences in neurochemistry suggest that social or environmental stimuli during critical periods of brain and behavioural development can determine the developmental trajectories of implicated pathways.

  12. The effects of neonatal handling on adrenocortical responsiveness, morphological development and corticosterone binding globulin in nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Buddy A; Breuner, Creagh W; Dufty, Alfred M

    2011-06-01

    Early developmental experiences play an important role in development of the adult phenotype. We investigated the effects of neonatal handling on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in a free-living avian species, the American kestrel (Falco sparverius). In the handled group (H), kestrel chicks were handled for 15 min/day from hatching until 26 days of age, after which time blood samples were collected for analysis of adrenal responsiveness and corticosterone binding globulin (CBG) levels. The non-handled control group (NH) was left undisturbed until 26 days of age when blood samples were collected and analyzed as above. Handled and NH kestrels did not differ in body condition index. Both total corticosterone (CORT) and CBG capacity were dampened significantly in H kestrels. However, free CORT did not differ between the two groups. In addition, hormone challenges of corticotropin releasing factor and adrenocorticotropin hormone were compared to saline injections to determine if the pituitary or the adrenal glands, respectively, were rendered more or less sensitive by handling. There was no difference in the responsiveness of H and NH kestrels to either hormone challenge. It is clear from these data that handling had an affect on fledgling phenotypic development, although whether the effects are permanent or ephemeral is unknown. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Corticosterone levels and behavioral changes induced by simultaneous exposure to chronic social stress and enriched environments in NMRI male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa-Gresa, Patricia; Ramos-Campos, Marta; Redolat, Rosa

    2016-05-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an experimental model which is believed to counteract some of the effects induced by stressors, although few studies have exposed rodents simultaneously to EE and stress. Our aim was to compare the short- and long-term effects of different housing conditions in mice submitted to chronic stress. 128 NMRI male mice arrived at our laboratory on postnatal day (PND) 21. During Phase I (PND 28), animals were randomly assigned to four experimental conditions: 1) EE+STRESS: mice housed in EE and submitted to social stress (n=32); 2) EE+NO STRESS: mice housed in EE without stress (n=32); 3) SE+STRESS: mice maintained in standard conditions (SE) and submitted to social stress (n=32); and 4) SE+NO STRESS (n=32). At the end of Phase I (PND 77), one cohort of 32 animals was used for behavioral assessment whereas another cohort of 32 was sacrificed for corticosterone analysis. Results indicated that EE animals showed less body weight, higher water and food intake, diminished anxiety response and decreased motor and exploratory behavior than SE mice. Mice exposed to stress gained less body weight, showed higher food and fluid intake and displayed decreased exploratory behavior than non-stressed mice. Furthermore, EE+STRESS group displayed significantly higher corticosterone levels than EE+NO STRESS group whereas EE+NO STRESS group showed lower levels than SE+NO STRESS. On PND 83, Phase II of the study began. Animals (n=96) were assigned to two different housing conditions: EE (n=48) and SE (n=48). On PND 112, corticosterone analysis (n=32) and behavioral study (n=64) were done. The factor "Housing Phase II" reached statistical significance. Results indicated that EE animals showed lower body weight and higher fluid intake than SE group, as well as decreased anxiety. No clear effects on motor and exploratory behavior or learning were observed. When long-term effects were analyzed, results indicated that "Initial Housing" condition was significant

  14. Antidepressant-like activity of red wine phenolic extracts in repeated corticosterone-induced depression mice via BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ying

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the antidepressant-like effect of red wine phenolic extracts in mouse model exposed to exogenous corticosterone. The results showed that 3-week corticosterone injections caused depression-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase immobility time in the forced swim test. Red wine phenolic extracts treatment significantly reduced serum corticosterone levels. Moreover, it was found that red wine phenolic extract increased the brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein (BNDF and Tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB phosphorylation and cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB phosphorylation levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. However, K252a, an inhibitor of TrkB, completely abolished those antidepressant-like effects. These results suggested that the red wine phenolic extracts produce an antidepressant-like effect in corticosterone-treated mice, at least in part, which is possibly mediated by modulating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, BDNF, TrkB and CREB phosphorylation levels in the brain region of mice.

  15. Dietary amino acids fed in free form and as protein components do not differently affects postprandial plasma insulin, glucagon, growth hormone and corticosterone responses in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolles, J.A.; Straten, van E.M.E.; Bremer, B.I.; Koopmanschap, R.E.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Schreurs, V.V.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined, whether the postprandial fate of dietary amino acids from different amino acid sources is regulated by the responses of insulin, glucagon, corticosterone and growth hormone (GH). Male Wistar rats were cannulated in the vena jugularis and assigned to dietary groups. The diets con

  16. Physiological effects of elevated plasma corticosterone concentrations in broiler chickens. An alternative means by which to assess the physiological effects of stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Huurne, ter A.A.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    Research on physical or psychological stress, in order to monitor objective parameters for animal welfare, is usually performed during experimental stress induction. To avoid treatment of animals with physical or physiological stress, addition of the stress-related hormone corticosterone to the drin

  17. Attenuation of stress-elicited brain catecholamines, serotonin and plasma corticosterone levels by calcined gold preparations used in Indian system of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Zahoor Ahmad; Gilani, Rabia Afzal; Sharma, Pragya; Vohora, Shashi Bharat

    2005-06-01

    Problems associated with mental health have increased tremendously in modern times. The search for effective and safe alternatives should, therefore, be pursued vigorously. Forced immobilization is one of the best explored models of stress in rats and the role of corticosterone, serotonin (5-HT) and catecholamines, i.e. norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine is well documented. We investigated the therapeutic potential of two gold preparations (Ayurvedic Swarna Bhasma and Unani Kushta Tila Kalan) in restraint induced stress at different time points of 1 hr, 2 hr and 4 hr. We pretreated rats with two gold preparations, Ayurvedic Swarna Bhasma and Unani Kushta Tila Kalan (25 mg/kg, orally for 10 days) prior to restraint stress. Brain catecholamine, serotonin and plasma corticosterone levels were determined following 1, 2 and 4 hr restraint stress, using HPLC and also plasma corticosterone using luminescence spectrophotometry. Gold preparations restored restraint stress-induced elevation in levels of brain catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopmine), 5-HT and plasma corticosterone to near normal levels. Gold, widely used in modern medicine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, is highly valued for various medicinal uses in Indian systems of medicine. Traditional gold preparations are attributed with tonic/rejuvenating and antioxidant properties. Our earlier studies revealed interesting analgesic, immunostimulant, adaptogenic and glycogen sparing properties in these preparations, but their effects in stress and depression have not been investigated yet. Significant restoration of altered values to near normal levels suggest potentials for gold preparations in stress and depression.

  18. Chronic restraint stress in rats causes sustained increase in urinary corticosterone excretion without affecting cerebral or systemic oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Anders; Maigaard, Katrine; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2013-01-01

    and Tnf). The metabolism cage housing in itself did not significantly influence a range of biological stress markers. In the restraint stress group, there was a sustained 2.5 fold increase in 24h corticosterone excretion from day 2 after stress initiation. However, neither whole-body nor cerebral measures...

  19. Corticosterone enhances N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling to promote isolated ventral tegmental area activity in a reconstituted mesolimbic dopamine pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jennifer N.; Saunders, Meredith A.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda J.; Reynolds, Anna R.; Bardo, Michael T.; Pauly, James R.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Elevations in circulating corticosteroids during periods of stress may influence activity of the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway by increasing glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor expression and/or function in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner. The current study employed organotypic co-cultures of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) to examine the effects of corticosterone exposure on NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal viability. Co-cultures were pre-exposed to vehicle or corticosterone (CORT; 1 μM) for 5 days prior to a 24 hour co-exposure to NMDA (200 μM). Co-cultures pre-exposed to a non-toxic concentration of corticosterone and subsequently NMDA showed significant neurotoxicity in the VTA only. This was evidenced by increases in propidium iodide uptake as well as decreases in immunoreactivity of the neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN). Co-exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-7-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; 50 μM) or the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone (10 μM) attenuated neurotoxicity. In contrast, the combination of corticosterone and NMDA did not produce any significant effects on either measure within the NAcc. Cultures of the VTA and NAcc maintained without synaptic contact showed no response to CORT or NMDA. These results demonstrate the ability to functionally reconstitute key regions of the mesolimbic reward pathway ex vivo and to reveal a GR-dependent enhancement of NMDA receptor-dependent signaling in the VTA. PMID:26631585

  20. The antipsychotics clozapine and olanzapine increase plasma glucose and corticosterone levels in rats: comparison with aripiprazole, ziprasidone, bifeprunox and F15063.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assié, Marie-Bernadette; Carilla-Durand, Elisabeth; Bardin, Laurent; Maraval, Mireille; Aliaga, Monique; Malfètes, Nathalie; Barbara, Michèle; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2008-09-11

    Several novel antipsychotics activate serotonin 5-HT1A receptors as well as antagonising dopamine D2/3 receptors. Such a pharmacological profile is associated with a lowered liability to produce extrapyramidal side effects and enhanced efficacy in treating negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, 5-HT1A receptor agonists increase plasma corticosterone and many antipsychotics disturb the regulation of glucose. Here, we compared the influence on plasma glucose and corticosterone of acute treatments with 'new generation' antipsychotics which target dopamine D2/3 receptors and 5-HT1A receptors, with that of atypical antipsychotics, and with haloperidol. Olanzapine and clozapine, antipsychotics that are known to produce weight gain and diabetes in humans, both at 10 mg/kg p.o., substantially increased plasma glucose (from 0.8 to 1.7 g/l) at 1 h after administration, an effect that returned to control levels after 4 h. In comparison, F15063 (40 mg/kg p.o.) was without effect at any time point. Olanzapine and clozapine dose-dependently increased plasma glucose concentrations as did SLV313 and SSR181507. Haloperidol and risperidone had modest effects whereas aripiprazole, ziprasidone and bifeprunox, antipsychotics that are not associated with metabolic dysfunction in humans, and F15063 had little or no influence on plasma glucose. The same general pattern of response was found for plasma corticosterone levels. The present data provide the first comparative study of conventional, atypical and 'new generation' antipsychotics on glucose and corticosterone levels in rats. A variety of mechanisms likely underlie the hyperglycemia and corticosterone release observed with clozapine and olanzapine, whilst the balance of dopamine D2/3/5-HT1A interaction may contribute to the less favourable impact of SLV313 and SSR181507 compared with that of bifeprunox and F15063.

  1. Maternal corticosterone but not testosterone level is associated with the ratio of second-to-fourth digit length (2D:4D) in field vole offspring (Microtus agrestis).

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    Lilley, Thomas; Laaksonen, Toni; Huitu, Otso; Helle, Samuli

    2010-03-30

    The steroid environment encountered by a foetus can strongly affect its post-natal physiology and behaviour. It has been proposed that steroid concentrations experienced in utero could be estimated from adults by measuring their second-to-fourth digit length ratio (2D:4D). However, there is still little direct evidence that intra-uterine steroid levels affect individual 2D:4D. We examined whether maternal pre-pregnancy testosterone and corticosterone levels (as estimates of intra-uterine testosterone and corticosterone exposure) affected the 2D:4D of pups in non-domesticated field voles (Microtus agrestis), measured by X-rays at the age of weaning (21 days). Furthermore, for the first time in a non-human species, we studied whether testosterone and corticosterone levels correlated with 2D:4D in adult females. We found that the maternal pre-pregnancy level of testosterone was not associated with offspring 2D:4D in either the left or the right paw. Instead, maternal pre-pregnancy corticosterone level was positively correlated with offspring 2D:4D in the right paw, but unrelated to 2D:4D in the left paw. In addition, the 2D:4D of adult females was not associated with either their circulating testosterone or corticosterone levels. Our results suggest that in field voles maternally administered testosterone is not a major determinant of offspring 2D:4D, whereas maternal stress appears to account for some of the variation in the 2D:4D of their offspring.

  2. Diverse action of repeated corticosterone treatment on synaptic transmission, neuronal plasticity, and morphology in superficial and deep layers of the rat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Joanna; Gugula, Anna; Blasiak, Anna; Bobula, Bartosz; Danielewicz, Joanna; Kania, Alan; Tylko, Grzegorz; Hess, Grzegorz

    2017-07-27

    One of the adverse effects of prolonged stress in rats is impaired performance of skilled reaching and walking tasks. The mechanisms that lead to these abnormalities are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared the effects of twice daily repeated corticosterone injections for 7 days on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), as well as on synaptic plasticity and morphology of layers II/III and V pyramidal neurons of the primary motor cortex (M1) of male Wistar rats. Corticosterone treatment resulted in increased frequency, but not amplitude, of mEPSCs in layer II/III neurons accompanied by increased complexity of the apical part of their dendritic tree, with no changes in the density of dendritic spines. The frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs as well as the parameters characterizing the complexity of the dendritic tree were not changed in layer V cells; however, their dendritic spine density was increased. While corticosterone treatment resulted in an increase in the amplitude of field potentials evoked in intralaminar connections within layer II/III, it did not influence field responses in layer V intralaminar connections, as well as the extent of chemically induced layer V long-term potentiation (chemLTP) by the application of tetraethylammonium (TEA, 25 mM). However, chemLTP induction in layer II/III was impaired in slices prepared from corticosterone-treated animals. These data indicate that repeated 7-day administration of exogenous corticosterone induces structural and functional plasticity in the M1, which occurs mainly in layer II/III pyramidal neurons. These findings shed light on potential sites of action and mechanisms underlying stress-induced impairment of motor functions.

  3. Corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptors mediate the motivation for voluntary wheel running in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebada, Mohamed Elsaed; Kendall, David A; Pardon, Marie-Christine

    2016-09-15

    Physical exercise can improve cognition but whether this is related to motivation levels is unknown. Voluntary wheel running is a rewarding activity proposed as a model of motivation to exercise. To question the potential effects of exercise motivation on subsequent behaviour, we used a pharmacological approach targeting some reward mechanisms. The stress hormone corticosterone has rewarding effects mediated by activation of low affinity glucocorticoid receptors (GR). To investigate whether corticosterone synthesis motivates exercise via activation of GRs and subsequently, impacts on behaviour, we treated C57BL/6J mice acutely with the inhibitor of corticosterone synthesis metyrapone (35mg/kg) or repeatedly with the GR antagonist mifepristone (30mg/kg) prior to 1-h running wheel sessions. To investigate whether reducing motivation to exercise impacts on behaviour, we antagonised running-induced dopamine D2/D3 receptors activation with sulpiride (25 or 50mg/kg) and assessed locomotor, anxiety-related and memory performance after 20 running sessions over 4 weeks. We found that corticosterone synthesis contributes to running levels, but the maintenance of running behaviour was not mediated by activation of GRs. Intermittent exercise was not associated with changes in behavioural or cognitive performance. The persistent reduction in exercise levels triggered by sulpiride also had limited impact on behavioural performance, although the level of performance for some behaviours was related to the level of exercise. Altogether, these findings indicate that corticosterone and dopamine D2/D3 receptor activation contribute to the motivation for wheel running, but suggest that motivation for exercise is not a sufficient factor to alter behaviour in healthy mice.

  4. The stress hormone corticosterone increases synaptic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors via serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK) regulation of the GDI-Rab4 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenhua; Yuen, Eunice Y; Yan, Zhen

    2010-02-26

    Corticosterone, the major stress hormone, plays an important role in regulating neuronal functions of the limbic system, although the cellular targets and molecular mechanisms of corticosteroid signaling are largely unknown. Here we show that a short treatment of corticosterone significantly increases alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR)-mediated synaptic transmission and AMPAR membrane trafficking in pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortex, a key region involved in cognition and emotion. This enhancing effect of corticosterone is through a mechanism dependent on Rab4, the small GTPase-controlling receptor recycling between early endosome and plasma membrane. Guanosine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI), which regulates the cycle of Rab proteins between membrane and cytosol, forms an increased complex with Rab4 after corticosterone treatment. Corticosterone also triggers an increased GDI phosphorylation at Ser-213 by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK). Moreover, AMPAR synaptic currents and surface expression and their regulation by corticosterone are altered by mutating Ser-213 on GDI. These results suggest that corticosterone, via SGK phosphorylation of GDI at Ser-213, increases the formation of GDI-Rab4 complex, facilitating the functional cycle of Rab4 and Rab4-mediated recycling of AMPARs to the synaptic membrane. It provides a potential mechanism underlying the role of corticosteroid stress hormone in up-regulating excitatory synaptic efficacy in cortical neurons.

  5. Progesterone regulates corticosterone elevation and alterations in spatial memory and exploratory behavior induced by stress in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Diaz-Burke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is sensitive to high levels of glucocorticoids during stress responses; it suffers biochemical and cellular changes that affect spatial memory and exploratory behavior, among others. We analyzed the influence of the neurosteroid progesterone (PROG on stress-induced changes in urinary corticosterone (CORT levels, spatial memory and exploratory behavior.Castrated adult male rats were implanted with PROG or vehicle (VEHI,and then exposed for ten days to chronic stress created by overcrowding or ultrasonic noise. PROG and CORT levels were assessed in urine using highperformanceliquid chromatography (HPLC. Implanted PROG inhibited the rise of stress-induced CORT, prevented spatial memory impairment in the Morris water maze, and eliminated increased exploratory behavior in the hole-board test. These results suggest a protective role of PROG, possibly mediated by its anxiolytic mechanisms, against corticosteroids elevation and the behavioral deficit generated by stressful situations.

  6. Leptin and prolactin, but not corticosterone, modulate body weight and thyroid function in protein-malnourished lactating rats.

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    Lisboa, P C; Passos, M C; Dutra, S C; Bonomo, I T; Denolato, A T; Reis, A M; Moura, E G

    2006-05-01

    To understand the role of hormonal changes in the lower food ingestion and body weight in protein-restricted lactating rats as well as the higher serum T (3), higher deiodination, iodide and T (3) milk transfer, we measured maternal serum prolactin, leptin, TSH and corticosterone, which are hormones that could influence those parameters. After birth, dams were separated into: control-fed with a 23 % protein diet (n = 12) and PR (protein-restricted)-fed with an 8 % protein diet (n = 12). At the 4 (th) and 21 (st) day of lactation, half of the animals in each group were sacrificed. PR dams presented hyperleptinemia (day 4: + 20 %; day 21: + 19 %; p thyroid hormone changes observed in protein-malnourished lactating rats.

  7. Pavlovian conditioning of corticotropin-releasing factor-induced increase of blood pressure and corticosterone secretion in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, M; Hellhammer, D; Murison, R; Vetter, H; Krause, U; Lehnert, H

    1992-05-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is clearly involved in the central regulation of the pituitary-adrenal axis and, moreover, of autonomic nervous system functions. Enhanced sympathetic activity with subsequent increases in blood pressure and heart rate and attenuation of the baroreceptor reflex results from the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of CRF. Additionally, the peptide has a variety of potent effects on behavioural responses in animals similar to those observed after an experimentally evoked stress. It was therefore of obvious interest to examine whether CRF is a possible mediator of the learning processes associated with physiological stress reaction patterns. This report clearly demonstrates a classical conditioning of the endocrine (i.e. corticosterone secretion) and haemodynamic (i.e. blood pressure) sequelae following central CRF application and thus indicates that this mechanism is of physiological significance for learned stress responses.

  8. Effects of Chlorophytum arundinaceum, Asparagus adscendens and Asparagus racemosus on pro-inflammatory cytokine and corticosterone levels produced by stress.

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    Kanwar, Anubha Singh; Bhutani, Kamlesh Kumar

    2010-10-01

    Chlorophytum arundinaceum, Asparagus adscendens and Asparagus racemosus are used in the Indian traditional system of medicine for improving the general state of health and for stress-related immune disorders. The effects of the methanol and aqueous extracts of the tuberous roots of these plants were examined in an experimental mouse model of stress, induced by swimming. The extracts were shown to exert an inhibitory effect on pro-inflammatory cytokines, namely interleukin 1β and tumour necrosis factor α, and on the production of nitric oxide in mouse macrophage cells RAW 264.7 stimulated by lipopolysaccharide in vitro. Similar inhibition was also observed in the production of interleukin 2 in EL 4 lymphoma cells stimulated by concanavalin A. Corticosterone levels in serum and adrenal glands were measured. The findings suggest that these plants may be beneficial in the management of stress and inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Towards a better preclinical model of PTSD: characterizing animals with weak extinction, maladaptive stress responses and low plasma corticosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Roman; Diwan, Mustansir; Nobrega, José N; Hamani, Clement

    2015-02-01

    Most of the available preclinical models of PTSD have focused on isolated behavioural aspects and have not considered individual variations in response to stress. We employed behavioural criteria to identify and characterize a subpopulation of rats that present several features analogous to PTSD-like states after exposure to classical fear conditioning. Outbred Sprague-Dawley rats were segregated into weak- and strong-extinction groups on the basis of behavioural scores during extinction of conditioned fear responses. Animals were subsequently tested for anxiety-like behaviour in the open-field test (OFT), novelty suppressed feeding (NSF) and elevated plus maze (EPM). Baseline plasma corticosterone was measured prior to any behavioural manipulation. In a second experiment, rats underwent OFT, NSF and EPM prior to being subjected to fear conditioning to ascertain whether or not pre-stress levels of anxiety-like behaviours could predict extinction scores. We found that 25% of rats exhibit low extinction rates of conditioned fear, a feature that was associated with increased anxiety-like behaviour across multiple tests in comparison to rats showing strong extinction. In addition, weak-extinction animals showed low levels of corticosterone prior to fear conditioning, a variable that seemed to predict extinction recall scores. In a separate experiment, anxiety measures taken prior to fear conditioning were not predictive of a weak-extinction phenotype, suggesting that weak-extinction animals do not show detectable traits of anxiety in the absence of a stressful experience. These findings suggest that extinction impairment may be used to identify stress-vulnerable rats, thus providing a useful model for elucidating mechanisms and investigating potential treatments for PTSD.

  10. Effects of Handling and Vehicle Injections on Adrenocorticotropic and Corticosterone Concentrations in Sprague–Dawley Compared with Lewis Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch-Feldman, Molly; Picetti, Roberto; Seip-Cammack, Katharine; Zhou, Yan; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is a key factor in the trajectory of the addiction-like cycle (a pattern of behavior characterized by escalating drug use, withdrawal, and relapse) in preclinical and clinical studies. Concentrations of HPA hormones change in laboratory animals in response to standard experimental procedures, including handling and vehicle injections. We compared HPA activity in adult male Lewis (inbred) and Sprague–Dawley (outbred) rats, 2 common strains in rodent models of addiction, after different schedules of handling and saline injections, to explore the extent to which HPA responses differ by strain and whether interindividual differences underlie addiction vulnerability. The 4 treatment conditions were no, short, or long handling and saline injections. In handled groups, rats were handled for 1 to 2 min for 3 times daily and were euthanized after 7 d (short handling) or 14 d (long handling). The injection schedule in the saline injection group mimicked that in a model of binge-like cocaine exposure. Across all treatment groups, concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone were higher in Sprague–Dawley than in Lewis rats. In Sprague–Dawley rats, corticosterone concentrations decreased after continued handling but remained constant in Lewis rats. Interindividual variability in hormone levels was greater in Sprague–Dawley than Lewis rats, although corticosterone variability decreased after continued handling. Prolactin did not differ between groups of either Sprague–Dawley and Lewis rats before or after handling. This study underscores the importance of prolonged handling before experimenter-provided drug-administration paradigms and of strain-associated differences that may affect study outcomes. PMID:25651089

  11. Effects of handling and vehicle injections on adrenocorticotropic and corticosterone concentrations in Sprague-Dawley compared with Lewis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch-Feldman, Molly; Picetti, Roberto; Seip-Cammack, Katharine; Zhou, Yan; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a key factor in the trajectory of the addiction-like cycle (a pattern of behavior characterized by escalating drug use, withdrawal, and relapse) in preclinical and clinical studies. Concentrations of HPA hormones change in laboratory animals in response to standard experimental procedures, including handling and vehicle injections. We compared HPA activity in adult male Lewis (inbred) and Sprague-Dawley (outbred) rats, 2 common strains in rodent models of addiction, after different schedules of handling and saline injections, to explore the extent to which HPA responses differ by strain and whether interindividual differences underlie addiction vulnerability. The 4 treatment conditions were no, short, or long handling and saline injections. In handled groups, rats were handled for 1 to 2 min for 3 times daily and were euthanized after 7 d (short handling) or 14 d (long handling). The injection schedule in the saline injection group mimicked that in a model of binge-like cocaine exposure. Across all treatment groups, concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone were higher in Sprague-Dawley than in Lewis rats. In Sprague-Dawley rats, corticosterone concentrations decreased after continued handling but remained constant in Lewis rats. Interindividual variability in hormone levels was greater in Sprague-Dawley than Lewis rats, although corticosterone variability decreased after continued handling. Prolactin did not differ between groups of either Sprague-Dawley and Lewis rats before or after handling. This study underscores the importance of prolonged handling before experimenter-provided drug-administration paradigms and of strain-associated differences that may affect study outcomes.

  12. Calorie restriction at increasing levels leads to augmented concentrations of corticosterone and decreasing concentrations of testosterone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levay, Elizabeth A; Tammer, Amanda H; Penman, Jim; Kent, Stephen; Paolini, Antonio G

    2010-05-01

    The influence of calorie restriction (CR) on increasing life span, enhancing immunocompetence, and reducing the incidence of age-related diseases is well established. Evidence points to the involvement of neuroendocrine alterations in these beneficial effects. Accordingly, we hypothesized that CR will result in significant alterations to the hormones investigated. Little attention has been directed toward ascertaining the doses of CR required to obtain such alterations and, indeed, whether a dose-response exists. Adult rats were subjected to 1 of 5 dietary regimens: control, CR12.5%, CR25%, CR37.5%, or CR50%. Rats were decapitated 3 weeks following the onset of restriction; and trunk blood was collected and assayed for concentrations of serum adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone, and testosterone, as well as plasma concentrations of noradrenalin and adrenalin. No effect was found as a result of dietary manipulation for serum concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone. However, all doses of CR resulted in increased serum corticosterone in a dose-response trend. A dose-response was also observed for serum testosterone, with higher doses of CR associated with lower testosterone. Concentrations of noradrenalin were not found to be altered by any CR dose, although a trend toward a down-regulation at CR50% was observed. Plasma adrenalin displayed a biphasic distribution with reductions observed at CR25% and CR50%, although the down-regulations only attained statistical significance relative to the CR37.5% and not the control group. As well as reporting the effect of CR on multiple hormones within individual animals, these results go some way in determining the optimal levels of CR needed to induce neuroendocrinologic alterations.

  13. An association between feather damaging behavior and corticosterone metabolite excretion in captive African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluca Costa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus are kept as pets and are frequently hand-reared. It has been observed that hand-reared African grey parrots may develop behavioral disorders such as feather damaging behavior (FDB. It is well known that chronic stress is involved in behavioral disorders in captive parrots. The main glucocorticoid in birds is corticosterone; its quantification provides information about adrenocortical activity and is considered to be a reliable indicator of stress levels in birds. We analyzed the differences in the excretion of corticosterone metabolites (CM in the droppings of African grey parrots characterized by: 1. different rearing histories (parent rearing vs. hand rearing; and 2. the presence or absence of FDB in hand-reared parrots. Methods A total of 82 African grey parrots that were kept in captivity were considered. According to breeding methods, three groups of birds were defined: 1. The parent-reared (PR parrots included birds kept in pairs (n = 30 pairs with a conspecific partner of the opposite sex. All of these birds were healthy and never showed FDB signs; 2. The healthy hand-reared parrots (H-HR included pet parrots individually kept, that were hand-reared and did not display any sign of FDB (n = 11, 7 males and 4 females; 3. The FDB hand-reared parrot (FDB-HR included pet parrots individually kept, that were hand-reared and displayed FDB (n = 11, 7 males and 4 females. Droppings were collected in the morning over three alternating days in autumn 2014 and spring 2015. The CM were determined using a multi-species corticosterone enzyme immunoassay kit. Split-plot repeated-measure ANOVA was used to examine any differences using group, season and group × season as the main factors. Results Different quantities of CM in droppings were found for the three groups. The mean CM value was 587 ng/g in the PR parrots, 494 ng/g in the H-HR parrots and 1,744 ng/g in the FDB-HR parrots, irrespective of the

  14. Neuroprotective effect of water extract of Panax ginseng on corticosterone-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells and its underlying molecule mechanisms.

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    Jiang, Yumao; Li, Zongyang; Liu, Yamin; Liu, Xinmin; Chang, Qi; Liao, Yonghong; Pan, Ruile

    2015-01-15

    The root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Family Araliaceae) is an important medicinal plant which has been employed as a panacea for more than 2,000 years in China. It has the actions of invigorating primordial qi, recovering pulse and desertion, engendering liquid, and calming spirit. The water extract of Panax ginseng (WEG) has been used to treat kinds of central nervous system disorders, such as depression, insomnia, Alzheimer׳s disease and Parkinson׳s disease. Our previous work has demonstrated that WEG possessed antidepressant-like activities in both acute and chronic stress models of depression. Nevertheless, there are no studies on the cytoprotection and potential mechanisms of WEG on corticosterone-induced apoptosis. The present study focuses on cytoprotection against corticosterone-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells and its underlying molecule mechanisms of the antidepressant-like effect of WEG. The PC12 cells were treated with 250 μmol/L corticosterone in the absence or presence of WEG for 24h, then 3-(4,5-dimethy thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) detection, Hoechst33342 staining and TUNEL staining were investigated to confirm the neuroprotection of WEG. Then, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i), reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, and the expression level of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), histone deactylase 6 (HDAC6), glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest and DNA damage inducible protein 153 (GADD153), X-box DNA-binding protein-1 (XBP-1), caspase-12, cytochrome C, inhibitor of caspase-activated deoxyribonuclease (ICAD), caspase-3 and caspase-9 were assessed by Western Blot analysis to understand the molecule mechanisms of neuroprotection of WEG. WEG partly reversed corticosterone-induced damage in PC12 cells, which increased cell viability, decreased LDH release

  15. Stress-sensitive organs and blood corticosterone after immobilization of active and passive rats immunized with glutamate-bovine serum albumin conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umryukhin, A E; Sotnikov, S V; Chekmareva, N Yu; Vetrile, L A; Zakharova, I A

    2014-12-01

    We studied stress-induced organ and hormonal responses in behaviorally active and passive rats against the background of immunization with glutamate-BSA conjugate. The relative weight of the adrenal glands after immobilization was lower in rats immunized with the conjugate in comparison with non-immunized animals. The weight of the adrenal glands in behaviorally active rats decreased in parallel with the decrease in blood corticosterone. In behaviorally active and passive rats immunized with the conjugate, ulcer formation in the stomach was slightly intensified after immobilization. It was hypothesized that immunization with glutamate-BSA conjugate suppresses activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal feedback mechanism underlying the production of glucocorticoid hormones, which is manifested in slightly increased ulceration due to attenuation of the gastroprotective action of corticosterone under stress.

  16. Chronic exposure to a low dose of ingested petroleum disrupts corticosterone receptor signalling in a tissue-specific manner in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus)

    OpenAIRE

    Lattin, Christine R.; Romero, L. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Stress-induced concentrations of glucocorticoid hormones (including corticosterone, CORT) can be suppressed by chronic exposure to a low dose of ingested petroleum. However, endocrine-disrupting chemicals could interfere with CORT signalling beyond the disruption of hormone titres, including effects on receptors in different target tissues. In this study, we examined the effects of 6 weeks of exposure to a petroleum-laced diet (1% oil weight:food weight) on tissue mass and intracellular CORT ...

  17. Potential antidepressant-like activity of silymarin in the acute restraint stress in mice: Modulation of corticosterone and oxidative stress response in cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakare, Vishnu N; Dhakane, Valmik D; Patel, Bhoomika M

    2016-10-01

    Silymarin is a polyphenolic flavanoid of Silybum marianum, elicited neuroprotection and antidepressant like activity in stressed model. It was found to increase 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels in the cortex and dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in the cerebellum in normal mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential antidepressant-like activity of silymarin in the acute restraint stress (ARS) in mice. The ARS was induced by immobilizing the mice for a period of 7h using rodent restraint device preventing them for any physical movement. One hour prior to ARS, silymarin was administered at doses of 100mg/kg and 200mg/kg per oral to non stressed and ARS mice. Various behavioral parameters like immobility time in force swim test, locomotor activity in open field test, and biochemical alterations, serum corticosterone, 5-HT, DA, NE level, malondialdehyde (MDA), and antioxidant enzymes (GSH, CAT and SOD) in hippocampus and cerebral cortex in non stressed and ARS subjected mice were investigated. Experimental findings reveals mice subjected to ARS exhibited significant increase immobility time, serum corticosterone, MDA formation and impaired SOD and CAT activities in hippocampus and cerebral cortex as compared to non stressed mice. Silymarin treatment (100mg/kg and 200mg/kg) significantly attenuated immobility time, corticosterone and restored the antioxidant enzymes after ARS. The present experimental findings indicate that silymarin exhibits antidepressant like activity probably either through alleviating oxidative stress by modulation of corticosterone response, and antioxidant defense system in hippocampus and cerebral cortex in ARS mice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  18. 5-HT7 receptor-mediated meningeal dilatation induced by 5-carboxamidotryptamine in rats is not altered by 5-HT depletion and chronic corticosterone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, E; Sánchez-Maldonado, C; Terrón, J A

    2011-01-01

    Low brain serotonin levels and high circulating levels of corticosterone are features of migraine. The 5-HT7 receptor was shown to mediate dilator responses to the 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT7 receptor agonist, 5-carboxamidotryptamine in the middle meningeal artery of rats. Here we analyzed the effect of serotonin depletion and chronic corticosterone treatment on 5-HT7 receptor-mediated dilatation induced by 5-carboxamidotryptamine in the middle meningeal artery of anesthetized rats. Two weeks before experiments, male Wistar rats received i.c.v. injections of vehicle or the neurotoxin, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine; upon recovery, animals received a chronic s.c. treatment (2 weeks) with vehicle (1 ml/kg/day) or corticosterone (20 mg/kg/day). At the end of treatments, animals were anesthetized and prepared for recording of blood pressure and blood flow in the middle meningeal artery, and i.v. drug administration. All animals received the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR-127935 (1 mg/kg, i.v.) alone or combined with the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB-269970 (1 mg/kg, i.v.). Topical 5-carboxamidotryptamine (0.01-1000 microM) to the exposed dura mater encephala produced decreases in diastolic blood pressure, variable changes in meningeal blood flow and increases in conductance (i.e. dilatation) in the middle meningeal artery. Meningeal dilator responses to 5-carboxamidotryptamine did not differ among treatment groups. In all cases, the combined treatment with GR-127935 + SB-269970 inhibited hypotensive and meningeal dilator responses to 5- carboxamidotryptamine. Together, these data do not support the notion that 5-HT7 receptors mediating dilatation in the middle meningeal artery are regulated by low brain serotonin levels and/or chronically high circulating levels of corticosterone. Further studies are required to elucidate the potential impact of these conditions and the role of 5-HT7 receptors in migraine.

  19. Effects of co-administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine with metyrapone on immobility time and plasma corticosterone concentration in rats subjected to the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogóz, Zofia; Skuza, Grazyna; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Budziszewska, Bogusława

    2008-01-01

    Major depression is frequently associated with hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, and glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitors have been shown to exert antidepressant action. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of co-administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine with metyrapone on immobility time and plasma corticosterone concentration in male Wistar rats subjected to the forced swim test. Metyrapone alone (50 mg/kg, but not 25 mg/kg) reduced the immobility time of rats in the forced swim test; moreover, both doses tested (25 and 50 mg/kg), dose-dependently decreased the stress-induced plasma corticosterone concentration. Joint administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine (10 mg/kg) and metyrapone (25 mg/kg - a dose inactive per se) exhibited antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test in rats. WAY 100636 (a 5-HT(1A) antagonist), but not prazosin (an alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist), used in doses ineffective in the forced swim test, inhibited the antidepressant-like effect induced by co-administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine with metyrapone (25 mg/kg). Combined treatment of fluoxetine or tianeptine and metyrapone inhibited stress-induced corticosterone secretion to a similar extent as metyrapone alone. The obtained results indicate that metyrapone potentiates the antidepressant-like activity of fluoxetine or tianeptine and that, among other mechanisms, 5-HT(1A) receptors may play some role in this effect. Moreover, metyrapone exerts a beneficial effect on the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. These findings suggest that the co-administration of metyrapone and an antidepressant drug may be useful for the treatment of drug-resistant depression and/or depression associated with a high cortisol level.

  20. Post-traumatic stress avoidance is attenuated by corticosterone and associated with brain levels of steroid receptor co-activator-1 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Annie M; Farooq, Muhammad A; Edwards, Scott; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) avoid trauma-related stimuli and exhibit blunted hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation at the time of stress. Our rodent model of stress mimics the avoidance symptom cluster of PTSD. Rats are classified as "Avoiders" or "Non-Avoiders" post-stress based on the avoidance of a predator-odor paired context. Previously, we found Avoiders exhibit an attenuated HPA stress response to predator odor. We hypothesized that corticosterone administration before stress would reduce the magnitude and incidence of stress-paired context avoidance. Furthermore, we also predicted that Avoiders would exhibit altered expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling machinery elements, including steroid receptor co-activator (SRC)-1. Male Wistar rats (n = 16) were pretreated with corticosterone (25 mg/kg) or saline and exposed to predator-odor stress paired with a context and tested for avoidance 24 h later. A second group of corticosterone-naïve rats (n = 24) were stressed (or not), indexed for avoidance 24 h later, and killed 48 h post-odor exposure to measure phosphorylated GR, FKBP51 and SRC-1 levels in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), central amygdala (CeA) and ventral hippocampus (VH), all brain sites that highly express GRs and regulate HPA function. Corticosterone pretreatment reduced the magnitude and incidence of avoidance. In Avoiders, predator-odor exposure led to lower SRC-1 expression in the PVN and CeA, and higher SRC-1 expression in the VH. SRC-1 expression in PVN, CeA and VH was predicted by prior avoidance behavior. Hence, a blunted HPA stress response may contribute to stress-induced neuroadaptations in central SRC-1 levels and behavioral dysfunction in Avoider rats.

  1. Effect of Embryo Thermal Stimulation on the Serum Levels of Immunoglobulins and Corticosterone, and Organ Histopathology of 1 day-old Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Flores

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Embryo thermal stimulation has been studied as a means to promote epigenetic changes and to improve broiler health and performance. This study aimed at evaluating immunoglobulin (IgM, IgG, and IgA titers, serum corticosterone levels, and organ integrity of day-old male Cobb(r and Ross(r broilers. Embryos were submitted to hot and cold stimuli (thermal stimulation on days 14-18 of incubation. The thermal manipulation treatments did not affect immunoglobulin titers of 1 day-old Cobb(r or Ross(r chicks, and caused severe bursal lesions (scores 3 and 4 in both strains. However, serum corticosterone levels of Cobb(r chicks were higher when embryos were submitted to hot stimulus (+1.39ºC compared with cold stimulus (+36 ºC. Serum corticosterone levels of Ross(r chicks were not affected by embryo temperature manipulation. The only effect of broiler breeder age was observed on IgM titers of Cobb(r chicks, which were higher in chicks from 33-wk-old breeders. Further studies are needed to detect the optimal period of embryo thermal stimulation.

  2. Corticosterone, cortisol, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase and uric acid plasma concentrations during foie gras production in male mule ducks (Anas platyrhynchos × Cairina moschata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, A; Delleur, V; Poulipoulis, A; Marlier, D

    2012-01-01

    1. Corticosterone, cortisol, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and uric acid (UA) plasma concentration were measured at 8 (7 days after group housing), 12 (after 7 days of force feeding) and 13 weeks of age (at slaughter after 12 days of force feeding), and 45 min after an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test at 8 weeks of age in 12 male mule ducks in an on-farm experiment. 2. No significant increase of corticosterone was found during the force-feeding period compared with the concentration after housing. 3. Comparison of corticosterone and cortisol values indicates that cortisol can be considered as a reliable acute stress indicator in future routine examinations. 4. Plasma concentrations of triglycerides and aspartate aminotransferase increased progressively from pre-force feeding period to slaughtering. 5. Plasma concentrations of uric acid increased from the start at 8 weeks of age to the mid-force feeding period but no difference was noticed between the mid-force feeding period and slaughtering. 6. It is concluded that acute stress induced by force-feeding is similar at the beginning and end of the commercial production of foie gras.

  3. Chronic Stress Induces Structural Alterations in Splenic Lymphoid Tissue That Are Associated with Changes in Corticosterone Levels in Wistar-Kyoto Rats

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    María Eugenia Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder patients present chronic stress and decreased immunity. The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY is a strain in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is overactivated. To determine whether chronic stress induces changes in corticosterone levels and splenic lymphoid tissue, 9-week-old male rats were subject to restraint stress (3 h daily, chemical stress (hydrocortisone treatment, 50 mg/Kg weight, mixed stress (restraint plus hydrocortisone, or control treatment (without stress for 1, 4, and 7 weeks. The serum corticosterone levels by RIA and spleens morphology were analyzed. Corticosterone levels as did the structure, size of the follicles and morphology of the parenchyma (increase in red pulp in the spleen, varied depending on time and type of stressor. These changes indicate that chronic stress alters the immune response in the spleen in WKY rats by inducing morphological changes, explaining in part the impaired immunity that develops in organisms that are exposed to chronic stress.

  4. Variation in immune function, body condition, and feather corticosterone in nestling Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) on reclaimed wetlands in the Athabasca oil sands, Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jane Harms, N., E-mail: naomi.harms@usask.c [University of Saskatchewan, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Pathology, 52 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5B4 (Canada); Fairhurst, Graham D., E-mail: graham.fairhurst@usask.c [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Biology, 112 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5E2 (Canada); Bortolotti, Gary R., E-mail: gary.bortolotti@usask.c [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Biology, 112 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5E2 (Canada); Smits, Judit E.G., E-mail: judit.smits@usask.c [University of Saskatchewan, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Pathology, 52 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5B4 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    In the Athabasca oil sands region of northern Alberta, mining companies are evaluating reclamation using constructed wetlands for integration of tailings. From May to July 2008, reproductive performance of 40 breeding pairs of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), plus growth and survival of nestlings, was measured on three reclaimed wetlands on two oil sands leases. A subset of nestlings was examined for i) feather corticosterone levels, ii) delayed-type hypersensitivity response, and iii) innate immune function. Nestlings on one of two wetlands created with oil sands process affected material (OSPM) were heavier and had greater wing-lengths, and mounted a stronger delayed-type hypersensitivity response compared those on the reference wetland. Corticosterone was significantly higher in male nestlings on one of two OSPM-containing wetland compared to the reference wetland. Body condition of 12-day-old female nestlings was inversely related to feather corticosterone. Under ideal weather conditions, reclaimed wetlands can support healthy populations of aerially-insectivorous birds. - Under ideal weather conditions, tree swallow nestlings on reclaimed OSPM-affected wetlands are in good body condition and mount strong cell-mediated immune responses.

  5. Cysteamine attenuates the decreases in TrkB protein levels and the anxiety/depression-like behaviors in mice induced by corticosterone treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Kutiyanawalla

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Stress and glucocorticoid hormones, which are released into the circulation following stressful experiences, have been shown to contribute significantly to the manifestation of anxiety-like behaviors observed in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF signaling through its receptor TrkB plays an important role in stress-mediated changes in structural as well as functional neuroplasticity. Studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms whereby TrkB signaling is regulated in chronic stress might provide valuable information for the development of new therapeutic strategies for several stress-related psychiatric disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the potential of cysteamine, a neuroprotective compound to attenuate anxiety and depression like behaviors in a mouse model of anxiety/depression induced by chronic corticosterone exposure. RESULTS: Cysteamine administration (150 mg/kg/day, through drinking water for 21 days significantly ameliorated chronic corticosterone-induced decreases in TrkB protein levels in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, cysteamine treatment reversed the anxiety and depression like behavioral abnormalities induced by chronic corticosterone treatment. Finally, mice deficient in TrkB, showed a reduced response to cysteamine in behavioral tests, suggesting that TrkB signaling plays an important role in the antidepressant effects of cysteamine. CONCLUSIONS: The animal studies described here highlight the potential use of cysteamine as a novel therapeutic strategy for glucocorticoid-related symptoms of psychiatric disorders.

  6. Chronic Stress Induces Structural Alterations in Splenic Lymphoid Tissue That Are Associated with Changes in Corticosterone Levels in Wistar-Kyoto Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, María Eugenia; Martinez-Mota, Lucia; Salinas, Citlaltepetl; Marquez-Velasco, Ricardo; Hernandez-Chan, Nancy G.; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Streber, María L.; Granados-Camacho, Ivonne; Becerril, Enrique; Javier, Baquera-Heredia; Pavón, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder patients present chronic stress and decreased immunity. The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY) is a strain in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is overactivated. To determine whether chronic stress induces changes in corticosterone levels and splenic lymphoid tissue, 9-week-old male rats were subject to restraint stress (3 h daily), chemical stress (hydrocortisone treatment, 50 mg/Kg weight), mixed stress (restraint plus hydrocortisone), or control treatment (without stress) for 1, 4, and 7 weeks. The serum corticosterone levels by RIA and spleens morphology were analyzed. Corticosterone levels as did the structure, size of the follicles and morphology of the parenchyma (increase in red pulp) in the spleen, varied depending on time and type of stressor. These changes indicate that chronic stress alters the immune response in the spleen in WKY rats by inducing morphological changes, explaining in part the impaired immunity that develops in organisms that are exposed to chronic stress. PMID:23533999

  7. Inhibiting corticosterone synthesis during fear memory formation exacerbates cued fear extinction memory deficits within the single prolonged stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Samantha M; Schreiber, William B; Stanfield, Briana R; Knox, Dayan

    2015-01-01

    Using the single prolonged stress (SPS) animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), previous studies suggest that enhanced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression leads to cued fear extinction retention deficits. However, it is unknown how the endogenous ligand of GRs, corticosterone (CORT), may contribute to extinction retention deficits in the SPS model. Given that CORT synthesis during fear learning is critical for fear memory consolidation and SPS enhances GR expression, CORT synthesis during fear memory formation could strengthen fear memory in SPS rats by enhancing GR activation during fear learning. In turn, this could lead to cued fear extinction retention deficits. We tested the hypothesis that CORT synthesis during fear learning leads to cued fear extinction retention deficits in SPS rats by administering the CORT synthesis inhibitor metyrapone to SPS and control rats prior to fear conditioning, and observed the effect this had on extinction memory. Inhibiting CORT synthesis during fear memory formation in control rats tended to decrease cued freezing, though this effect never reached statistical significance. Contrary to our hypothesis, inhibiting CORT synthesis during fear memory formation disrupted extinction retention in SPS rats. This finding suggests that even though SPS exposure leads to cued fear extinction memory deficits, CORT synthesis during fear memory formation enhances extinction retention in SPS rats. This suggests that stress-induced CORT synthesis in previously stressed rats can be beneficial.

  8. Effects of acute corticosterone treatment on male prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster): Territorial aggression does not accompany induced social preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Dimitri V; Phelps, Steven M

    2016-11-01

    Corticosterone (CORT) is a stress-related steroid hormone found in vertebrates, and is known to interact with behavior. In the socially monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), acute stress and specifically acute CORT administration have been shown to facilitate male social preference for a familiar female, and this effect has been described as facilitation of the monogamous pair bond. It is possible, however, that the effects of stress on social preference may initially represent a short-term coping strategy. Here we test whether the effect of acute CORT administration extends to territoriality, a defining component of the prairie vole monogamous suite of behaviors. Onset of territoriality would provide further support for an induced pair bond, whereas no increase in aggression would suggest an initial coping response. Using acute exogenous CORT injections followed by behavioral trials, we found a facilitation of social preference, but we did not find increased aggression. This result suggests that the social preference that develops in response to CORT is at least in part a coping response rather than facilitation of comprehensive monogamous pair bond behavior. Our results are consistent with previous studies both within prairie voles and across other taxa that suggest that social contact may be involved in the regulation of stress responses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Enduring good memories of infant trauma: rescue of adult neurobehavioral deficits via amygdala serotonin and corticosterone interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Cortés, Millie; Barr, Gordon A; Mouly, Anne Marie; Shionoya, Kiseko; Nuñez, Bestina S; Sullivan, Regina M

    2015-01-20

    Children form a strong attachment to their caregiver--even when that caretaker is abusive. Paradoxically, despite the trauma experienced within this relationship, the child develops a preference for trauma-linked cues--a phenomenon known as trauma bonding. Although infant trauma compromises neurobehavioral development, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between infant trauma bonding (i.e., learned preference for trauma cues) and the long-term effects of trauma (i.e., depressive-like behavior, amygdala dysfunction) are unknown. We modeled infant trauma bonding by using odor-shock conditioning in rat pups, which engages the attachment system and produces a life-long preference for the odor that was paired with shock. In adulthood, this trauma-linked odor rescues depressive-like behavior and amygdala dysfunction, reduces corticosterone (CORT) levels, and exerts repair-related changes at the molecular level. Amygdala microarray after rescue implicates serotonin (5-HT) and glucocorticoids (GCs), and a causal role was verified through microinfusions. Blocking amygdala 5-HT eliminates the rescue effect; increasing amygdala 5-HT and blocking systemic CORT mimics it. Our findings suggest that infant trauma cues share properties with antidepressants and safety signals and provide insight into mechanisms by which infant trauma memories remain powerful throughout life.

  10. Influence of temperature on the corticosterone stress-response: an experiment in the Children's python (Antaresia childreni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupoué, Andréaz; Brischoux, François; Lourdais, Olivier; Angelier, Frédéric

    2013-11-01

    To cope with environmental challenges, organisms have to adjust their behaviours and their physiology to the environmental conditions they face (i.e. allostasis). In vertebrates, such adjustments are often mediated through the secretion of glucocorticoids (GCs) that are well-known to activate and/or inhibit specific physiological and behavioural traits. In ectothermic species, most processes are temperature-dependent and according to previous studies, low external temperatures should be associated with low GC concentrations (both baseline and stress-induced concentrations). In this study, we experimentally tested this hypothesis by investigating the short term influence of temperature on the GC stress response in a squamate reptile, the Children's python (Antaresia childreni). Snakes were maintained in contrasting conditions (warm and cold groups), and their corticosterone (CORT) stress response was measured (baseline and stress-induced CORT concentrations), within 48h of treatment. Contrary to our prediction, baseline and stress-induced CORT concentrations were higher in the cold versus the warm treatment. In addition, we found a strong negative relationship between CORT concentrations (baseline and stress-induced) and temperature within the cold treatment. Although it remains unclear how cold temperatures can mechanistically result in increased CORT concentrations, we suggest that, at suboptimal temperature, high CORT concentrations may help the organism to maintain an alert state.

  11. Corticosterone activates Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase in primary hippocampal cells through rapid nongenomic mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Aiqun; QIU Jian; XIAO Lin; CHEN Yizhang

    2005-01-01

    Nongenomic effects of glucocorticoids (GC) in various cell types have been well documented, but it still remains unknown whether the mechanism also works in hippocampus which is a crucial target of glucocorticoids in neural system during physiological and/or pathophysiological processes. We present here that corticosterone (B) could rapidly activate Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in primarily cultured hippocampal cells within minutes, with a bell-shaped time dependent curve which peaked at 15min and then went down to normal level in 30 min. This activation was blocked by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Go6976), G protein inhibitor (GDPβs), and MEK(MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase) inhibitor(PD98059), but not by protein kinase A (PKA) inbibitor (H89), tyrosine kinase inhibitor (genistein), and glucocorticoid receptor ( GR ) antagonist (RU38486). Thus, the rapid activation of Erk1/2 MAPK in primary hippocampal cells induced by B was likely mediated by a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) pathway with involvement of PKC, which belonged to the nongenomic rather than genomic mechanism of GC' s effects.

  12. Corticosterone stress response shows long-term repeatability and links to personality in free-living Nazca boobies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Jacquelyn K; Anderson, David J

    2014-11-01

    The concept of "coping styles", or consistently different responses to stressors, is of broad interest in behavioral ecology and biomedicine. Two critical predictions of this concept are individual consistency of neurophysiological and behavioral responses (relative to population variability) and a negative relationship between aggression/proactivity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity. Recent studies failed to provide strong support for these predictions, especially outside of strictly controlled conditions, and long-term measures to test the first prediction are rare. Here, we demonstrate individual repeatability across 2-3years of maximum circulating corticosterone concentration [CORT] and area under the [CORT] response curve (AUCI) during a standard capture-restraint test in wild, free-living adult Nazca boobies (Sula granti). We also show that the stress response predicts the personality traits aggression and anxiety in these birds (measured in the wild); however, the strength of these results was weak. Maximum [CORT] and AUCI showed higher repeatability between years than baseline [CORT]. After controlling breeding status, sex, mass, date sampled, and their interactions, baseline [CORT] was most closely related to personality traits, followed by AUCI, and then maximum [CORT]. The direction of these relationships depended on whether the testing context was social or non-social. [CORT] parameters had little to no relationship with cross-context plasticity in personality traits. Our results generally affirm two critical predictions of coping styles, but match the emerging trend that these relationships are weak in the wild, and may depend on testing context.

  13. Reference levels for corticosterone and immune function in farmed saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) hatchlings using current Code of Practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, John W; Thomson, Peter C; Adams, Amanda L; Benedict, Suresh; Moran, Christopher; Isberg, Sally R

    2015-02-01

    To determine reference levels for on-farm stressors on immune responsiveness and growth rate, 253 hatchling crocodiles from 11 known breeding pairs were repeatedly measured and blood sampled during their first year. Plasma corticosterone (CORT) was used to quantify baseline stress levels in captive animals and were found to be lower (mean 1.83±SE 0.16 ng/mL) than previously reported in saltwater crocodile hatchlings. Two tests of immune function were also conducted. Innate constitutive immunity was assessed using bacterial killing assays (BKA) against two bacterial species: Escherichia coli and Providencia rettgeri, whereby the latter causes considerable economic loss to industry from septicaemic mortalities. Although the bactericidal capabilities were different at approximately 4 months old (32±3% for E. coli and 16±4% for P. rettgeri), the differences had disappeared by approximately 9 months old (58±2% and 68±6%, respectively). To assess immune responsiveness to a novel antigen, the inflammatory swelling response caused by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) injection was assessed but was only significantly different between Samplings 1 and 3 (5% LSD). There were no significant clutch effects for CORT or PHA but there were for both BKA traits. CORT was not significantly associated with growth (head length) or the immune parameters except for P. rettgeri BKA where higher CORT levels were associated with better bactericidal capability. As such, these results suggest that the crocodiles in this study are not stressed, therefore endorsing the management strategies adopted within the Australian industry Code of Practice.

  14. Environmental enrichment preceding early adulthood methylphenidate treatment leads to long term increase of corticosterone and testosterone in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Avital

    Full Text Available Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD has been emerging as a world-wide psychiatric disorder. There appears to be an increasing rate of stimulant drug abuse, specifically methylphenidate (MPH which is the most common treatment for ADHD, among individuals who do not meet the criteria for ADHD and particularly for cognitive enhancement among university students. However, the long term effects of exposure to MPH are unknown. Thus, in light of a developmental approach in humans, we aimed to test the effects of adolescence exposure to enriched environment (EE followed by MPH administration during early adulthood, on reactions to stress in adulthood. Specifically, at approximate adolescence [post natal days (PND 30-60] rats were reared in EE and were treated with MPH during early adulthood (PND 60-90. Adult (PND 90-92 rats were exposed to mild stress and starting at PND 110, the behavioral and endocrine effects of the combined drug and environmental conditions were assessed. Following adolescence EE, long term exposure to MPH led to decreased locomotor activity and increased sucrose preference. EE had a beneficial effect on PPI (attentive abilities, which was impaired by long term exposure to MPH. Finally, the interaction between EE and, exposure to MPH led to long-term elevated corticosterone and testosterone levels. In view of the marked increase in MPH consumption over the past decade, vigilance is crucial in order to prevent potential drug abuse and its long term detrimental consequences.

  15. Effects of stress, circadian rhythms, and dietary sodium on brain cell-nuclear uptake of aldosterone and corticosterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongue, B.G.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of the adrenal steroid hormones aldosterone (ALD) and corticosterone (CORT) in brain cell-nuclei has been implicated as a necessary step in the behavioral and physiological actions of these hormones. In vivo uptake of radioactively labeled ALD and CORT in adrenalectomized (ADX) rats indicates a strong cell-nuclear localization of both of these hormones in limbic brain regions (such as hippocampus, septum and amygdala). Research using sub-cellular fractionation and radioimmunoassay (RIA), has confirmed both the presence of endogenously secreted CORT in cell-nuclei and its limbic localization in the brains of adrenal-intact rats. In this study, environmental and dietary factors were manipulated to induce variation in serum ALD and CORT. A series of experiments employing sub-cellular fractionation and RIA were performed, which reveal that: (1) endogenously secreted ALD and CORT, are concentrated by cell-nuclei of the brain in adrenal-intact rats, (2) the majority of the corticosteroids measured in ethanol extracts of brain cell-nuclei are associated with receptor molecules, and (3) the regional distribution of endogenously secreted ALD differs markedly from the predominantly limbic pattern predicted from in vivo uptake of labeled ALD in ADX rats. Instead, brain cell-nuclear ALD is heavily concentrated in the hypothalamus, which supports the hypothesized relationship between the interaction of ALD and angiotensin in the brain and the behavioral regulation of fluid/electrolyte balance.

  16. Dietary sodium butyrate alleviates the oxidative stress induced by corticosterone exposure and improves meat quality in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W H; Gao, F; Zhu, Q F; Li, C; Jiang, Y; Dai, S F; Zhou, G H

    2011-11-01

    The present study was to investigate the effects of dietary microencapsulated sodium butyrate (SB) and acute pre-slaughter stress, mimicked by subcutaneous corticosterone (CORT) administration, on BW, carcass characteristics, muscle antioxidant status, and meat quality of broiler chickens. A total of 120 1-d-old broiler chickens were fed a control diet (without SB) or a 0.4-g microencapsulated SB/kg diet. On 42 d, half of the birds from each treatment were given 1 single subcutaneous injection of CORT (4 mg/kg of BW in corn oil) to mimic acute stress, whereas the other half were injected with the same amount of corn oil (sham control). Three hours later, BW loss was determined and breast meat samples were collected. The results showed that the BW of the CORT-challenged groups lost much more than the sham control group (P stress (P chickens (P stress treatment on fatty acid composition was insignificant (P > 0.05). In addition, diet and stress did not significantly influence carcass characteristics and the chemical composition of breast meat (P > 0.05). These results suggest that microencapsulated SB was favorable for chickens in the presence of stress, which may be partially ascribed to the ability of SB to decrease catabolism and oxidative injury of tissues.

  17. Altered Rhythm of Adrenal Clock Genes, StAR and Serum Corticosterone in VIP Receptor 2-Deficient Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Georg, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The circadian time-keeping system consists of clocks in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and in peripheral organs including an adrenal clock linked to the rhythmic corticosteroid production by regulating steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Clock cells contain an autonomous molecular...... oscillator based on a group of clock genes and their protein products. Mice lacking the VPAC2 receptor display disrupted circadian rhythm of physiology and behaviour, and therefore, we using real-time RT-PCR quantified (1) the mRNAs for the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 in the adrenal gland and SCN, (2......) the adrenal Star mRNA and (3) the serum corticosterone concentration both during a light/dark (L/D) cycle and at constant darkness in wild type (WT) and VPAC2 receptor-deficient mice (VPAC2-KO). We also examined if PER1 and StAR were co-localised in the adrenal steroidogenic cells. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA showed...

  18. Stress Hormones Epinephrine and Corticosterone Selectively Modulate Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 Productive Infections in Adult Sympathetic, but Not Sensory, Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Angela M; Bertke, Andrea S

    2017-07-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infect and establish latency in peripheral neurons, from which they can reactivate to cause recurrent disease throughout the life of the host. Stress is associated with the exacerbation of clinical symptoms and the induction of recurrences in humans and animal models. The viruses preferentially replicate and establish latency in different subtypes of sensory neurons, as well as in neurons of the autonomic nervous system that are highly responsive to stress hormones. To determine if stress-related hormones modulate productive HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections within sensory and autonomic neurons, we analyzed viral DNA and the production of viral progeny after treatment of primary adult murine neuronal cultures with the stress hormones epinephrine and corticosterone. Both sensory trigeminal ganglion (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons expressed adrenergic receptors (activated by epinephrine) and the glucocorticoid receptor (activated by corticosterone). Productive HSV infection colocalized with these receptors in SCG but not in TG neurons. In productively infected neuronal cultures, epinephrine treatment significantly increased the levels of HSV-1 DNA replication and production of viral progeny in SCG neurons, but no significant differences were found in TG neurons. In contrast, corticosterone significantly decreased the levels of HSV-2 DNA replication and production of viral progeny in SCG neurons but not in TG neurons. Thus, the stress-related hormones epinephrine and corticosterone selectively modulate acute HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in autonomic, but not sensory, neurons.IMPORTANCE Stress exacerbates acute disease symptoms resulting from HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections and is associated with the appearance of recurrent skin lesions in millions of people. Although stress hormones are thought to impact HSV-1 and HSV-2 through immune system suppression, sensory and autonomic neurons that become infected

  19. Patterns of stress responses shift during seasonal life-history transitions: An analysis comparing baseline, maximal and integrated corticosterone in female red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayger, Catherine A; Lutterschmidt, Deborah I

    2017-03-18

    Glucocorticoids often rise and fall with a variety of external and internal cues and frequently vary among life-history stages. This suggests that changing glucocorticoids may coordinate life-history transitions. To explore this hypothesis, we asked if the time-course of stress-induced glucocorticoid levels differ between two life-history transitions (i.e., spring and fall migration) in female red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis). We collected non-migratory females from a communal den and migratory females from a road along the migration route and treated them with 4h of capture stress; plasma corticosterone was measured before, during and after capture stress. During the spring, den-collected females exhibited a stress-induced peak in corticosterone at an earlier sampling time than migrating, road-collected females. Because the pattern of corticosterone responses varied with migratory state, negative feedback on and/or sensitivity of the hypothalamus-pituitaryadrenal (HPA) axis may be linked to spring migration. During the fall, capture stress elicited an increase in corticosterone in den-collected females but not in migrating, road-collected females. Baseline corticosterone was higher and both maximal and integrated corticosterone responses were lower during the fall compared to spring, indicating that stress responses are smaller when baseline corticosterone is elevated, perhaps due to a "ceiling effect". These data suggest that HPA axis regulation changes during seasonal migration, possibly via altering negative feedback, HPA axis sensitivity, or some other mechanism. This study supports the hypothesis that glucocorticoids coordinate life-history events and suggests that examining a suite of stress response characteristics is most informative for understanding the function of HPA modulation.

  20. The acceleration of amygdala kindling epileptogenesis by chronic low-dose corticosterone involves both mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Couper, Abbie; O'Brien, Terence J; Salzberg, Michael R; Jones, Nigel C; Rees, Sandra M; Morris, Margaret J

    2007-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that low-dose corticosterone (CS) administration, used as a model of the effect of chronic stress, accelerates epileptogenesis in the electrical amygdala kindling rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). This current study examined the relative contributions to this effect of mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) subtypes of glucocorticoid receptors. Female non-epileptic wistar rats 10-13 weeks of age were implanted with a bipolar electrode into the left amygdala. Five treatment groups were subjected to rapid amygdala kindling: water-control (n=9), CS treated (6 mg/100 ml added to drinking water; n=9), CS+spironolactone (MR antagonist, 50 mg/kg sc; n=9), CS+mifepristone (GR antagonist, 25 mg/kg sc; n=9), and CS+both antagonists (n=7). Rats were injected with vehicle or the relevant antagonist twice daily for the entire kindling period. Experimental groups differed significantly in the number of stimulations required to reach the 'fully kindled state' (Racine, 1972) ANOVA, F(4,38)=2.73, p=0.04). Amygdala kindling was accelerated in the CS-treated group compared with water controls (mean stimulations for full kindling: 45.2 vs. 86.5, pkindling rates in these groups not significantly different from water-treated subjects (p=0.26 and 0.29, respectively). The kindling rates in the MR and GR antagonist treatment groups did not significantly differ from each other (p=0.93), nor from the combined treatment group (mean stimulations: 62.8, p=0.59 and 0.54, respectively). This study demonstrates that activation of both high-affinity (MR) and low-affinity (GR) glucocorticoid receptors are involved in mediating CS-induced acceleration of amygdala kindling epileptogenesis.

  1. Exogenous prenatal corticosterone exposure mimics the effects of prenatal stress on adult brain stress response systems and fear extinction behavior.

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    Bingham, Brian C; Sheela Rani, C S; Frazer, Alan; Strong, Randy; Morilak, David A

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to early-life stress is a risk factor for the development of cognitive and emotional disorders later in life. We previously demonstrated that prenatal stress (PNS) in rats results in long-term, stable changes in central stress-response systems and impairs the ability to extinguish conditioned fear responding, a component of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Maternal corticosterone (CORT), released during prenatal stress, is a possible mediator of these effects. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether fetal exposure to CORT at levels induced by PNS is sufficient to alter the development of adult stress neurobiology and fear extinction behavior. Pregnant dams were subject to either PNS (60 min immobilization/day from ED 14-21) or a daily injection of CORT (10mg/kg), which approximated both fetal and maternal plasma CORT levels elicited during PNS. Control dams were given injections of oil vehicle. Male offspring were allowed to grow to adulthood undisturbed, at which point they were sacrificed and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), hippocampus, hypothalamus, and a section of the rostral pons containing the locus coeruleus (LC) were dissected. PNS and prenatal CORT treatment decreased glucocorticoid receptor protein levels in the mPFC, hippocampus, and hypothalamus when compared to control offspring. Both treatments also decreased tyrosine hydroxylase levels in the LC. Finally, the effect of prenatal CORT exposure on fear extinction behavior was examined following chronic stress. Prenatal CORT impaired both acquisition and recall of cue-conditioned fear extinction. This effect was additive to the impairment induced by previous chronic stress. Thus, these data suggest that fetal exposure to high levels of maternal CORT is responsible for many of the lasting neurobiological consequences of PNS as they relate to the processes underlying extinction of learned fear. The data further suggest that adverse prenatal environments constitute a

  2. Cajaninstilbene Acid Prevents Corticosterone-Induced Apoptosis in PC12 Cells by Inhibiting the Mitochondrial Apoptotic Pathway

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    Bao-Ping Jiang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cajaninstilbene acid (3-hydroxy-4-prenyl-5-methoxystilben-2 -carboxylic acid, CSA, a natural stilbene isolated from the leaves of Cajanus cajan, has attracted considerable attention for its wide range of pharmacological activities. This study investigated whether CSA protects against corticosterone (CORT-induced injury in PC12 cells and examined the potential mechanisms underlying this protective effect. Methods: Cell viability and cytotoxicity were detected using a 3-(4,5-desethyithiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay kit, respectively. PC12 cell apoptosis was measured using Hoechst 33342 staining and a DNA fragmentation assay kit, and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations were assessed by fluorescent labelling. Next, the mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTPs and mitochondrial membrane potentials (∆Ψm were detected using a colorimetric mPTP detection kit and a 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1 kit, respectively. Finally, cytochrome c, caspase-3 and inhibitor of caspase-activated deoxyribonuclease (ICAD expression levels were monitored by western blot analysis. Results: Treatment with 100 µmol/l CORT induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells. However, CSA dose-dependently increased cell viability and decreased LDH release as well as CORT-induced apoptosis. Mechanistically, compared with the CORT-treated group, CSA strongly attenuated intracellular Ca2+ overload and restored mitochondrial functions, including mPTPs and ∆Ψm. Furthermore, the down-regulation of cytochrome c and ICAD protein expression and the blockage of caspase-3 activity were observed upon CSA treatment. Conclusions: In summary, our data are the first to show that the in vitro antidepressant-like effect of CSA may be attributed to the cytoprotection of neurons and that such neuroprotective mechanisms are correlated with intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis

  3. Influence of Dermanyssus gallinae (poultry red mite) invasion on the plasma levels of corticosterone, catecholamines and proteins in layer hens.

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    Kowalski, A; Sokół, R

    2009-01-01

    The results of studies conducted in 2006 revealed that mass red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) invasions cause somatic stress which may be responsible for the pathophysiological mechanism of decreased egg production, lower humoral immunity and higher mortality in layer hens. The aim of this study was to validate the above research results, to investigate whether in addition to somatic stress, red mite invasions cause psychogenic stress due to the activation of the sympatho-adrenomedullar system, and to determine the level of stress resulting from red mite infestations in comparison with a short, 1.5 h period of acute immobilisation stress. The study investigated 36 HY-Line Brown layer hens divided into three groups: a non-infested control group, an experimental group infested with red mites and a non-infested experimental group subjected to acute immobilisation stress for 1.5 h. Blood samples were taken from all hens for the determination of the levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline, albumin, and alpha-, beta- and gamma-globulins. The results validated the previous reports on the occurrence of somatic stress and on a significant decrease in y-globulin levels (p < or = 0.01) in the group of birds infested with red mites, in comparison with the control group. Adrenaline levels in infested hens were indicative of psychogenic stress. Based on a comparison of hormonal indicators in all hen groups, the level of somatic stress resulting from red mite infestation can be classified as moderate, while the level of psychogenic stress can be interpreted as high. A significant drop in y-globulin levels in the blood of birds infested with red mites also shows that the invasion induces chronic stress which lowers the humoral immunity of hens.

  4. Individual variation in baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels predicts parental effort by nesting mourning doves

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    Miller, David A.; Vleck, Carol M.; Otis, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine systems have an important mechanistic role in structuring life-history trade-offs. During breeding, individual variation in prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone (CORT) levels affects behavioral and physiological processes that drive trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance. We examined patterns in baseline (BL) and stress induced (SI; level following a standard capture-restraint protocol) levels of PRL and CORT for breeding mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). We determined whether the relationship of adult condition and parental effort to hormone levels in wild birds was consistent with life-history predictions. Both BL PRL and BL CORT level in adults were positively related to nestling weight at early nestling ages, consistent with the prediction of a positive relationship of hormone levels to current parental effort of adults and associated increased energy demand. Results are consistent with the two hormones acting together at baseline levels to limit negative effects of CORT on reproduction while maintaining beneficial effects such as increased foraging for nestling feeding. Our data did not support predictions that SI responses would vary in response to nestling or adult condition. The magnitude of CORT response in the parents to our capture-restraint protocol was negatively correlated with subsequent parental effort. Average nestling weights for adults with the highest SI CORT response were on average 10–15% lighter than expected for their age in follow-up visits after the stress event. Our results demonstrated a relationship between individual hormone levels and within population variation in parental effort and suggested that hormonal control plays an important role in structuring reproductive decisions for mourning doves.

  5. Effect of water deprivation on baseline and stress-induced corticosterone levels in the Children's python (Antaresia childreni).

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    Dupoué, Andréaz; Angelier, Frédéric; Lourdais, Olivier; Bonnet, Xavier; Brischoux, François

    2014-02-01

    Corticosterone (CORT) secretion is influenced by endogenous factors (e.g., physiological status) and environmental stressors (e.g., ambient temperature). Heretofore, the impact of water deprivation on CORT plasma levels has not been thoroughly investigated. However, both baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT are expected to respond to water deprivation not only because of hydric stress per se, but also because CORT is an important mineralocorticoid in vertebrates. We assessed the effects of water deprivation on baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT, in Children's pythons (Antaresia childreni), a species that experiences seasonal droughts in natural conditions. We imposed a 52-day water deprivation on a group of unfed Children's pythons (i.e., water-deprived treatment) and provided water ad libitum to another group (i.e., control treatment). We examined body mass variations throughout the experiment, and baseline CORT and stress-induced CORT at the end of the treatments. Relative body mass loss averaged ~10% in pythons without water, a value 2 to 4 times higher compared to control snakes. Following re-exposition to water, pythons from the water-deprived treatment drank readily and abundantly and attained a body mass similar to pythons from the control treatment. Together, these results suggest a substantial dehydration as a consequence of water deprivation. Interestingly, stress-induced but not baseline CORT level was significantly higher in water-deprived snakes, suggesting that baseline CORT might not respond to this degree of dehydration. Therefore, possible mineralocorticoid role of CORT needs to be clarified in snakes. Because dehydration usually induces adjustments (reduced movements, lowered body temperature) to limit water loss, and decreases locomotor performances, elevated stress-induced CORT in water-deprived snakes might therefore compensate for altered locomotor performances. Future studies should test this hypothesis.

  6. Individual variation in baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels predicts parental effort by nesting mourning doves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David A; Vleck, Carol M; Otis, David L

    2009-10-01

    Endocrine systems have an important mechanistic role in structuring life-history trade-offs. During breeding, individual variation in prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone (CORT) levels affects behavioral and physiological processes that drive trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance. We examined patterns in baseline (BL) and stress induced (SI; level following a standard capture-restraint protocol) levels of PRL and CORT for breeding mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). We determined whether the relationship of adult condition and parental effort to hormone levels in wild birds was consistent with life-history predictions. Both BL PRL and BL CORT level in adults were positively related to nestling weight at early nestling ages, consistent with the prediction of a positive relationship of hormone levels to current parental effort of adults and associated increased energy demand. Results are consistent with the two hormones acting together at baseline levels to limit negative effects of CORT on reproduction while maintaining beneficial effects such as increased foraging for nestling feeding. Our data did not support predictions that SI responses would vary in response to nestling or adult condition. The magnitude of CORT response in the parents to our capture-restraint protocol was negatively correlated with subsequent parental effort. Average nestling weights for adults with the highest SI CORT response were on average 10-15% lighter than expected for their age in follow-up visits after the stress event. Our results demonstrated a relationship between individual hormone levels and within population variation in parental effort and suggested that hormonal control plays an important role in structuring reproductive decisions for mourning doves.

  7. Endocrine and physiological changes in response to chronic corticosterone: a potential model of the metabolic syndrome in mouse.

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    Karatsoreos, Ilia N; Bhagat, Sarah M; Bowles, Nicole P; Weil, Zachary M; Pfaff, Donald W; McEwen, Bruce S

    2010-05-01

    Numerous clinical and experimental studies have linked stress to changes in risk factors associated with the development of physiological syndromes, including metabolic disorders. How different mediators of the stress response, such as corticosterone (CORT), influence these changes in risk remains unclear. Although CORT has beneficial short-term effects, long-term CORT exposure can result in damage to the physiological systems it protects acutely. Disruption of this important physiologic signal is observed in numerous disparate disorders, ranging from depression to Cushing's syndrome. Thus, understanding the effects of chronic high CORT on metabolism and physiology is of key importance. We explored the effects of 4-wk exposure to CORT dissolved in the drinking water on the physiology and behavior of male mice. We used this approach as a noninvasive way of altering plasma CORT levels while retaining some integrity in the diurnal rhythm present in normal animals. This approach has advantages over methods involving constant CORT pellets, CORT injections, or adrenalectomy. We found that high doses of CORT (100 microg/ml) result in rapid and dramatic increases in weight gain, increased adiposity, elevated plasma leptin, insulin and triglyceride levels, hyperphagia, and decreased home-cage locomotion. A lower dose of CORT (25 microg/ml) resulted in an intermediate phenotype in some of these measures but had no effect on others. We propose that the physiological changes observed in the high-CORT animals approximate changes observed in individuals suffering from the metabolic syndrome, and that they potentially serve as a model for hypercortisolemia and stress-related obesity.

  8. High-dose corticosterone after fear conditioning selectively suppresses fear renewal by reducing anxiety-like response.

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    Wang, Hongbo; Xing, Xiaoli; Liang, Jing; Bai, Yunjing; Lui, Zhengkui; Zheng, Xigeng

    2014-09-01

    Exposure therapy is widely used to treat anxiety disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, preventing the return of fear is still a major challenge after this behavioral treatment. An increasing number of studies suggest that high-dose glucocorticoid treatment immediately after trauma can alleviate the symptoms of PTSD in humans. Unknown is whether high-dose glucocorticoid treatment following fear conditioning suppresses the return of fear. In the present study, a typical fear renewal paradigm (AAB) was used, in which the fear response to an auditory cue can be restored in a novel context (context B) when both training and extinction occur in the same context (context A). We trained rats for auditory fear conditioning and administered corticosterone (CORT; 5 and 25mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle with different delays (1 and 24h). Forty-eight hours after drug injection, extinction was conducted with no drug in the training context, followed by a test of tone-induced freezing behavior in the same (AAA) or a shifted (AAB) context. Both immediate and delayed administration of high-dose CORT after fear conditioning reduced fear renewal. To examine the anxiolytic effect of CORT, independent rats were trained for cued or contextual fear conditioning, followed by an injection of CORT (5 and 25mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle at a 1 or 24h delay. One week later, anxiety-like behavior was assessed in the elevated plus maze (EPM) before and after fear expression. We found that high-dose CORT decreased anxiety-like behavior without changing tone- or context-induced freezing. These findings indicate that a single high-dose CORT administration given after fear conditioning may selectively suppress fear renewal by reducing anxiety-like behavior and not by altering the consolidation, retrieval, or extinction of fear memory.

  9. Corticosterone induced morphological changes of hippocampal and amygdaloid cell lines are dependent on 5-HT7 receptor related signal pathway.

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    Xu, Y; Zhang, C; Wang, R; Govindarajan, S S; Barish, P A; Vernon, M M; Fu, C; Acharya, A P; Chen, L; Boykin, E; Yu, J; Pan, J; O'Donnell, J M; Ogle, W O

    2011-05-19

    Stress is an unavoidable life experience. It induces mood, cognitive dysfunction and plasticity changes in chronically stressed individuals. Among the various brain regions that have been studied, the hippocampus and amygdala have been observed to have different roles in controlling the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (limbic-HPA axis). This study investigated how the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) affects neuronal cells. The first aim is to test whether administration of CORT to hippocampal and amygdaloid cell lines induces different changes in the 5-HT receptor subtypes. The second goal is to determine whether stress induced morphological changes in these two cell lines were involved in the 5-HT receptor subtypes expression. We now show that 5-HT(7) receptor mRNA levels were significantly upregulated in HT-22 cells, but downregulated in AR-5 cells by exposure to a physiologically relevant level of CORT (50 μM) for 24 h, which was later confirmed by primary hippocampal and amygdaloid neuron cultures. Additionally, pretreatment of cells with 5-HT(7) antagonist SB-269970 or agonist LP-44 reversed CORT induced cell lesion in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, CORT induced different changes in neurite length, number of neurites and soma size in HT-22 and AR-5 cells were also reversed by pretreatment with either SB-269970 or LP-44. The different effects of 5-HT(7) receptors on cell lines were observed in two members of the Rho family small GTPase expression: the Cdc-42 and RhoA. These observed results support the hypothesis that 5-HT may differentially modulate neuronal morphology in the hippocampus and amygdala depending on the expression levels of the 5-HT receptor subtypes during stress hormone insults.

  10. Stress-related changes in cerebral catecholamine and indoleamine metabolism: lack of effect of adrenalectomy and corticosterone.

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    Dunn, A J

    1988-08-01

    The concentrations of catecholamine and indoleamine metabolites were measured in intact and adrenalectomized mice to determine whether adrenal hormones mediate or modulate the stress-induced responses. Thirty minutes of footshock resulted in significant increases of the ratios of the dopamine (DA) catabolite, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), to DA in prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, striatum, hypothalamus, and brainstem, and of homovanillic (HVA)/DA ratios in nucleus accumbens, striatum, amygdala, and hypothalamus. Ratios of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol to norepinephrine (NE) were also increased in prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, septum, amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and brainstem. The concentration of NE was decreased in amygdala. 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA)/5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) ratios and free tryptophan were also increased in every brain region. Very similar data were obtained from mice restrained for 30 min. Adrenalectomy resulted in increased HVA/DA ratios in prefrontal cortex and striatum, and 5-HIAA/5-HT in septum. The stress-related changes were largely similar in adrenalectomized mice. Significant interactions between adrenalectomy and footshock treatment occurred in prefrontal cortical DOPAC/DA and hypothalamic NE which was depleted only in adrenalectomized mice, suggesting tendencies for these measures to be more responsive in adrenalectomized mice. Corticosterone administration (0.5-2.0 mg/kg s.c.) which resulted in plasma concentrations in the physiological range did not alter the concentrations of the cerebral metabolites measured in any region. We conclude that adrenal hormones do not mediate cerebral catecholamine or indoleamine metabolism in stress, although adrenalectomy may affect HVA and 5-HIAA metabolism, and there was a tendency for catecholamines to be more sensitive to stress in adrenalectomized animals.

  11. The stress hormone corticosterone in a marine top predator reflects short-term changes in food availability

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    Barrett, Robert T; Erikstad, Kjell E; Sandvik, Hanno; Myksvoll, Mari; Jenni-Eiermann, Susi; Kristensen, Ditte L; Moum, Truls; Reiertsen, Tone K; Vikebø, Frode

    2015-01-01

    In many seabird studies, single annual proxies of prey abundance have been used to explain variability in breeding performance, but much more important is probably the timing of prey availability relative to the breeding season when energy demand is at a maximum. Until now, intraseasonal variation in prey availability has been difficult to quantify in seabirds. Using a state-of-the-art ocean drift model of larval cod Gadus morhua, an important constituent of the diet of common guillemots Uria aalge in the southwestern Barents Sea, we were able to show clear, short-term correlations between food availability and measurements of the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) in parental guillemots over a 3-year period (2009–2011). The model allowed the extraction of abundance and size of cod larvae with very high spatial (4 km) and temporal resolutions (1 day) and showed that cod larvae from adjacent northern spawning grounds in Norway were always available near the guillemot breeding colony while those from more distant southerly spawning grounds were less frequent, but larger. The latter arrived in waves whose magnitude and timing, and thus overlap with the guillemot breeding season, varied between years. CORT levels in adult guillemots were lower in birds caught after a week with high frequencies of southern cod larvae. This pattern was restricted to the two years (2009 and 2010) in which southern larvae arrived before the end of the guillemot breeding season. Any such pattern was masked in 2011 by already exceptionally high numbers of cod larvae in the region throughout chick-rearing period. The findings suggest that CORT levels in breeding birds increase when the arrival of southern sizable larvae does not match the period of peak energy requirements during breeding. PMID:25859335

  12. Chronic stress alters concentrations of corticosterone receptors in a tissue-specific manner in wild house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

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    Lattin, Christine R; Romero, L Michael

    2014-07-15

    The physiological stress response results in release of glucocorticoid hormones such as corticosterone (CORT). Whereas short-term activation of this response helps animals cope with environmental stressors, chronic activation can result in negative effects including metabolic dysregulation and reproductive failure. However, there is no consensus hormonal profile of a chronically stressed animal, suggesting that researchers may need to look beyond hormone titers to interpret the impacts of chronic stress. In this study, we brought wild house sparrows (Passer domesticus) into captivity. We then compared glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor concentrations in sparrows exposed either to a standardized chronic stress protocol (n=26) or to standard husbandry conditions (controls; n=20). We used radioligand binding assays to quantify receptors in whole brain, liver, kidneys, spleen, gonads, gastrocnemius and pectoralis muscle, omental and subcutaneous fat, and bib and back skin. In most tissues, CORT receptors did not differ between controls and stressed animals, although we found marginal increases in receptor density in kidney and testes in stressed birds at some time points. Only in pectoralis muscle was there a robust effect of chronic stress, with both receptor types higher in stressed animals. Increased pectoralis sensitivity to CORT with chronic stress may be part of the underlying mechanism for muscle wasting in animals administered exogenous CORT. Furthermore, the change in pectoralis was not paralleled by gastrocnemius receptors. This difference may help explain previous reports of a greater effect of CORT on pectoralis than on other muscle types, and indicate that birds use this muscle as a protein reserve. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Prior high corticosterone exposure reduces activation of immature neurons in the ventral hippocampus in response to spatial and nonspatial memory.

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    Workman, Joanna L; Chan, Melissa Y T; Galea, Liisa A M

    2015-03-01

    Chronic stress or chronically high glucocorticoids attenuate adult hippocampal neurogenesis by reducing cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in male rodents. Neurons are still produced in the dentate gyrus during chronically high glucocorticoids, but it is not known whether these new neurons are appropriately activated in response to spatial memory. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine whether immature granule neurons generated during chronically high glucocorticoids (resulting in a depressive-like phenotype) are differentially activated by spatial memory retrieval. Male Sprague Dawley rats received either 40 mg/kg corticosterone (CORT) or vehicle for 18 days prior to behavioral testing. Rats were tested in the forced swim test (FST) and then tested in a spatial (hippocampus-dependent) or cued (hippocampus-independent) Morris Water Maze. Tissue was then processed for doublecortin (DCX) to identify immature neurons and zif268, an immediate early gene product. As expected, CORT increased depressive-like behavior (greater immobility in the FST) however, prior CORT modestly enhanced spatial learning and memory compared with oil. Prior CORT reduced the number of DCX-expressing cells and proportion of DCX-expressing cells colabeled for zif268, but only in the ventral hippocampus. Prior CORT shifted the proportion of cells in the ventral hippocampus away from postmitotic cells and toward immature, proliferative cells, likely due to the fact that postmitotic cells were produced and matured during CORT exposure but proliferative cells were produced after high CORT exposure ceased. Compared with cue training, spatial training slightly increased DCX-expressing cells and shifted cells toward the postmitotic stage in the ventral hippocampus. These data suggest that the effects of CORT and spatial training on immature neurons are more pronounced in the ventral hippocampus. Further, high CORT reduced activation of immature neurons, suggesting that exposure

  14. Different patterns of amygdala priming differentially affect dentate gyrus plasticity and corticosterone, but not CA1 plasticity.

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    Rose-Marie eVouimba

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced activation of the amygdala is involved in the modulation of memory processes in the hippocampus. However, stress effects on amygdala and memory remain complex. The activation of the basolateral amygdala (BLA was found to modulate plasticity in other brain areas, including the hippocampus. We previously demonstrated a differential effect of BLA priming on LTP in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG. While BLA priming suppressed long term potentiation (LTP in CA1, it was found to enhance it in the DG. However, since the amygdala itself is amenable to experience-induced plasticity it is thus conceivable that when activity within the amygdala is modified this will have impact on the way the amygdala modulates activity and plasticity in other brain areas. In the current study we examined the effects of different patterns of BLA activation on the modulation of LTP in the DG and CA1, as well as on serum corticosterone (CORT. In CA1, BLA priming impaired LTP induction as was reported before. In contrast, in the DG, varying BLA stimulation intensity and frequency resulted in differential effects on LTP, ranging from no effect to strong impairment or enhancement. Varying BLA stimulation patterns resulted in also differential alterations in Serum CORT, leading to higher CORT levels being positively correlated with LTP magnitude in DG but not in CA1.The results support the notion of a differential role for the DG in aspects of memory, and add to this view the possibility that DG-associated aspects of memory will be enhanced under more emotional or stressful conditions. It is interesting to think of BLA patterns of activation and the differential levels of circulating CORT as two arms of the emotional and stress response that attempt to synchronize brain activity to best meet the challenge. It is foreseeable to think of abnormal such synchronization under extreme conditions, which would lead to the development of maladaptive behavior.

  15. Expanding the actions of cortisol and corticosterone in wild vertebrates: A necessary step to overcome the emerging challenges.

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    Vera, Federico; Zenuto, Roxana; Antenucci, C Daniel

    2017-05-15

    We conducted a review of scientific articles published between 2000 and 2014 and evaluated how frequently various aspects of cortisol and corticosterone (CORT) actions have been considered in studies on wild vertebrates. Results show that (1) the notion that CORT are stress-responsive hormones is central in our theoretical frameworks and it is reflected by the fact that several articles refer to CORT as "stress hormones". (2) The large majority of studies do not contemplate the possibility of decrease and no change in CORT levels in response to chronic stressors. (3) Our ideas about CORT actions on energy balance are slanted towards the mobilization of energy, though there are several studies considering -and empirically addressing- CORT's orexigenic actions, particularly in birds. (4) The roles of CORT in mineral-water balance, though widely documented in the biomedical area, are virtually ignored in the literature about wild vertebrates, with the exception of studies in fish. (5) Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) independent regulation of CORT secretion is also very scarcely considered. (6) The preparative, permissive, suppressive and stimulatory actions of CORT, as described by Sapolsky et al. (2000), are not currently considered by the large majority of authors. We include an extension of the Preparative Hypothesis, proposing that the priming effects of baseline and stress-induced CORT levels increase the threshold of severity necessary for subsequent stimuli to become stressors. Studies on animal ecology and conservation require integration with novel aspects of CORT actions and perspectives developed in other research areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic corticosterone-mediated dysregulation of microRNA network in prefrontal cortex of rats: relevance to depression pathophysiology.

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    Dwivedi, Y; Roy, B; Lugli, G; Rizavi, H; Zhang, H; Smalheiser, N R

    2015-11-17

    Stress plays a major role in inducing depression, which may arise from interplay between complex cascades of molecular and cellular events that influence gene expression leading to altered connectivity and neural plasticity. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have carved their own niche owing to their innate ability to induce disease phenotype by regulating expression of a large number of genes in a cohesive and coordinated manner. In this study, we examined whether miRNAs and associated gene networks have a role in chronic corticosterone (CORT; 50 mg  kg(-1) × 21 days)-mediated depression in rats. Rats given chronic CORT showed key behavioral features that resembled depression phenotype. Expression analysis revealed differential regulation of 26 miRNAs (19 upregulated, 7 downregulated) in prefrontal cortex of CORT-treated rats. Interaction between altered miRNAs and target genes showed dense interconnected molecular network, in which multiple genes were predicated to be targeted by the same miRNA. A majority of altered miRNAs showed binding sites for glucocorticoid receptor element, suggesting that there may be a common regulatory mechanism of miRNA regulation by CORT. Functional clustering of predicated target genes yielded disorders such as developmental, inflammatory and psychological that could be relevant to depression. Prediction analysis of the two most prominently affected miRNAs miR-124 and miR-218 resulted into target genes that have been shown to be associated with depression and stress-related disorders. Altogether, our study suggests miRNA-mediated novel mechanism by which chronic CORT may be involved in depression pathophysiology.

  17. Brain activation in response to visceral stimulation in rats with amygdala implants of corticosterone: an FMRI study.

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    Anthony C Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although visceral pain of gastrointestinal (GI origin is the major complaint in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS it remains poorly understood. Brain imaging studies suggest a defect in brain-gut communication in IBS with a greater activation of central arousal circuits including the amygdala. Previously, we found that stereotaxic implantation of corticosterone (CORT onto the amygdala in rats induced anxiety and colonic hypersensitivity. In the present study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to identify specific brain sites activated in a rat model characterized by anxiety and colonic hypersensitivity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anesthetized male rats received micropellets (30 microg each of either CORT or cholesterol (CHOL, to serve as a control, implanted stereotaxically on the dorsal margin of each amygdala. Seven days later, rats were anesthetized and placed in the fMRI magnet (7T. A series of isobaric colorectal balloon distensions (CRD - 90s 'off', 30s 'on', 8 replicates at two pressures (40 and 60 mmHg were performed in a standard block-design. Cross correlation statistical analysis was used to determine significant differences between distended and non-distended states in CORT and CHOL-treated animals. Analysis of the imaging data demonstrated greater overall brain activation in response to CRD in rats with CORT implants compared to CHOL controls. Additionally, CORT implants produced significant positive bilateral increases in MRI signal in response to CRD in specific nuclei known as integration sites important in anxiety and pain perception. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that chronic exposure of the amygdala to elevated levels of CORT enhances overall brain activation in response to CRD, and identified other specific brain regions activated in response to mechanical distension of the colon. These results demonstrate the feasibility of performing fMRI imaging in a rodent

  18. Testosterone manipulation postcastration does not alter cloacal gland growth differences in male quail selected for divergent plasma corticosterone stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busso, J M; Satterlee, D G; Roberts, M L; Buchanan, K L; Evans, M R; Marin, R H

    2010-12-01

    Japanese quail selected for reduced (low-stress, LS) rather than exaggerated (high-stress, HS) plasma corticosterone response to brief restraint have consistently shown greater cloacal gland (CG) development, an androgen-dependent trait. In this study, the effects of testosterone implants on levels of plasma testosterone and CG development in castrated LS and HS quail were determined. Stress-line males were castrated and randomly allocated to 1 of 3 testosterone treatments: the empty testosterone (ET), low testosterone (LT), or high testosterone (HT) implant group. Cloacal gland volume was determined at 4 weekly intervals that represented ranges of 1 to 9 d, 8 to 17 d, 15 to 24 d, and 22 to 31 d after castration and testosterone implantation. Levels of plasma testosterone were also assessed at the end of the study. Development of the CG was affected by quail line (LS > HS), testosterone treatment (HT > LT > ET), and time of measurement (1 to 9 d quail, but not in ET-treated quail). However, even though HT implant treatments induced higher CG development than did LT treatments beyond the first interval of CG volume measurement, and despite the finding of greater CG volumes in LS than HS quail during the last 2 measurement intervals within each of the LT and HT groups, no interaction was observed between testosterone implant dosages and quail stress line on CG volume. Thus, by the end of the study, regardless of testosterone dose, CG volume was consistently greater in LS quail than in their HS counterparts. In addition, although, as expected, the testosterone implant treatment significantly altered levels of plasma testosterone (HT > LT > ET), neither quail line nor its interaction with testosterone treatment affected plasma testosterone. The present findings suggest that the often-observed depressed CG development in the HS line may be independent of testosterone effects.

  19. Maternal exposure to low levels of corticosterone during lactation protects against experimental inflammatory colitis-induced damage in adult rat offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Petrella

    Full Text Available Opposing emotional events (negative/trauma or positive/maternal care during the postnatal period may differentially influence vulnerability to the effects of stress later in life. The development and course of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease are negatively affected by persistent stress, but to date the role of positive life events on these pathologies has been entirely unknown. In the present study, the effect of early life beneficial experiences in the development of intestinal dysfunctions, where inflammation and stress stimuli play a primary role, was investigated. As a "positive" experimental model we used adult male rat progeny nursed by mothers whose drinking water was supplemented with moderate doses of corticosterone (CORT (0.2 mg/ml during the lactation period. Such animals have been generally shown to cope better with different environmental situations during life. The susceptibility to inflammatory experimental colitis induced by intracolonic infusion of TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid was investigated in CORT-nursed rats in comparison with control rats. This mild increase in maternal corticosterone during lactation induced, in CORT-nursed rats, a long lasting protective effect on TNBS-colitis, characterized by improvements in some indices of the disease (increased colonic myeloperoxidase activity, loss of body weight and food intake and by the involvement of endogenous peripheral pathways known to participate in intestinal disorder development (lower plasma corticosterone levels and colonic mast cell degranulation, alterations in the colonic expression of both corticotrophin releasing factor/CRF and its receptor/CRH-1R. All these findings contribute to suggesting that the reduced vulnerability to TNBS-colitis in CORT-nursed rats is due to recovery from the colonic mucosal barrier dysfunction. Such long lasting changes induced by mild hormonal manipulation during lactation, making the adult also

  20. Effects of Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) extract on neurogenesis associated with serum corticosterone and GABA in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dae Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Kim, Woosuk; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Choong Hyun; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Hwang, In Koo

    2011-02-01

    Lemon balm, leaves of Melissa officinalis L., has been used for anti-anxiety and spasmolytics. We observed the extract of Melissa officinalis L. (MOE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of middle-aged mice (12 months of age) using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX), respectively. We also observed changes in corticosterone, GAD67 and GABA-transaminase (GABA-T) to check their possible mechanisms related to neurogenesis. We administered 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE to the animals once a day for 3 weeks. For labeling of newly generated cells, we also administered 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) twice a day for 3 days from the day of the first MOE treatment. Administration of 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE dose-dependently increased Ki67 positive nuclei to 244.1 and 763.9% of the vehicle-treated group, respectively. In addition, 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE significantly increased DCX positive neuroblasts with well-developed (tertiary) dendrites. Furthermore, MOE administration significantly increased BrdU/calbindin D-28 k double labeled cells (integrated neurons into granule cells in the DG) to 245.2% of the vehicle-treated group. On the other hand, administration of MOE reduced corticosterone levels in serum and decreased GABA-T levels in the DG homogenates. These results suggest that MOE increases cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and integration into granule cells by decreasing serum corticosterone levels as well as by increasing GABA levels in the mouse DG.

  1. Effect of acute swim stress on plasma corticosterone and brain monoamine levels in bidirectionally selected DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains differing in fear recall and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Caroline A; Hanke, Joachim; Rose, Claudia; Walsh, Irene; Foley, Tara; Clarke, Gerard; Schwegler, Herbert; Cryan, John F; Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz

    2014-12-01

    Stress-induced changes in plasma corticosterone and central monoamine levels were examined in mouse strains that differ in fear-related behaviors. Two DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains with a DBA/2J background, which were originally bred for a high (H-FSS) and low fear-sensitized acoustic startle reflex (L-FSS), were used. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin and their metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were studied in the amygdala, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and brainstem. H-FSS mice exhibited increased fear levels and a deficit in fear extinction (within-session) in the auditory fear-conditioning test, and depressive-like behavior in the acute forced swim stress test. They had higher tissue noradrenaline and serotonin levels and lower dopamine and serotonin turnover under basal conditions, although they were largely insensitive to stress-induced changes in neurotransmitter metabolism. In contrast, acute swim stress increased monoamine levels but decreased turnover in the less fearful L-FSS mice. L-FSS mice also showed a trend toward higher basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels and an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin in the hypothalamus and brainstem 30 min after stress compared to H-FSS mice. Moreover, the dopaminergic system was activated differentially in the medial prefrontal cortex and striatum of the two strains by acute stress. Thus, H-FSS mice showed increased basal noradrenaline tissue levels compatible with a fear phenotype or chronic stressed condition. Low corticosterone levels and the poor monoamine response to stress in H-FSS mice may point to mechanisms similar to those found in principal fear disorders or post-traumatic stress disorder.

  2. Dietary ethyl-eicosapentaenoic acid but not soybean oil reverses central interleukin-1-induced changes in behavior, corticosterone and immune response in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cai; Leonard, Brian E; Horrobin, David F

    2004-03-01

    Omega (n)-3 and n-6 fatty acids are important membrane components of neurons and immune cells, and related to psychiatric and inflammatory diseases. Increased ratio of n-6/n-3 in the blood has been reported in depressed patients and in students following stress exposure. The n-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (ethyl-EPA) suppresses inflammation and has antidepressant properties. Interleukin (IL)-1beta can stimulate corticosterone secretion, induce anxiety and stress-like behavior and inflammatory responses. This study was to evaluate the effect of diets enriched with coconut oil, ethyl-EPA and soybean oil on central IL-1beta induced stress and anxiety-like behavior, induced changes in the concentration of prostaglandin (PG) E2 and corticosterone and the release of IL-10. Groups of rats were fed with either 5% coconut oil (as control diet), 0.2% EPA with 4.8% coconut oil or 1% EPA with 4% coconut oil and 5% soybean oil for 7 weeks. The central administration of IL-1beta induced sickness, stress and anxiety-like behavior as indicated by a reduction in body weight, decreased time spent, and the number of entries, into the open arms of the elevated plus maze and decreased exploration and entry into the central zone of the "open field" apparatus. IL-1beta also increased PGE2 and corticosterone concentrations and decreased the release of IL-10 from leucocytes. Food enriched with ethyl-EPA but not soybean oil, significantly attenuated most of these changes. These results demonstrate that ethyl-EPA has anti-inflammatory, anti-stress and anti-anxiety effects in rats.

  3. Improved determination of urinary cortisol and cortisone, or corticosterone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet absorbance detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, M; Mormède, P

    1997-11-21

    A sensitive assay was developed for the determination of low levels of free (unconjugated) glucocorticoids in human, swine (cortisol and cortisone) and rat urine (corticosterone and 11-dehydrocorticosterone), using solid-phase extraction and HPLC with UV absorbance detection (254 nm). Precise quantitation is allowed by the use of internal standards (dexamethasone for swine urine and Reichstein's substance S for rat urine). This simple method allows the use of small urine samples (less than 2 ml), and is suitable for a wide range of applications in human and animal clinical and physiological studies.

  4. Pretreatment with aldosterone or corticosterone blocks the memory-enhancing effects of nimodipine, captopril, CGP 37,849, and strychnine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondadori, C; Gentsch, C; Hengerer, B; Ducret, T; Borkowski, J; Racine, A; Lederer, R; Haeusler, A

    1992-01-01

    Oral pretreatment with aldosterone or corticosterone blocked the memory-enhancing effects of the calcium antagonist nimodipine, the ACE inhibitor captopril, the NMDA blocker CGP 37,849, and the glycine antagonist strychnine in a passive-avoidance test in mice. The memory-disturbing effects of phenobarbitone, diazepam, CGP 37,849 and scopolamine were not influenced by the hormonal pretreatment. These findings could indicate the involvement of a steroid-sensitive mechanism in drug-induced improvement of memory. In the light of clinical observations showing elevated cortisol levels in Alzheimer patients, the results might also explain why only a limited number of these patients respond to therapy with memory enhancers.

  5. Sensitization of restraint-induced corticosterone secretion after chronic restraint in rats: Involvement of 5-HT7 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Iglesias, Brenda B.; Mendoza-Garrido, María E.; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Noyola-Díaz, Martha; Terrón, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress. We examined the effect of chronic restraint stress (CRS; 20 min/day) as compared to control (CTRL) conditions for 14 days, on: 1) restraint-induced ACTH and corticosterone (CORT) secretion in rats pretreated with vehicle or SB-656104 (a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist); 2) 5-HT7 receptor-like immunoreactivity (5-HT7-LI) and protein in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and adrenal glands (AG); 3) baseline levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in PVN and AG; and 4) 5-HT-like immunoreactivity (5-HT-LI) in AG and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) protein in PVN and AG. On day 15, animals were subdivided into Treatment and No treatment groups. Treatment animals received an i.p. injection of vehicle or SB-656104; No Treatment animals received no injection. Sixty min later, Treatment animals were either decapitated with no further stress (0 min) or submitted to acute restraint (10, 30, 60 or 120 min); hormone serum levels were measured. No Treatment animals were employed for the rest of measurements. CRS decreased body weight gain and increased adrenal weight. In CTRL animals, acute restraint increased ACTH and CORT secretion in a time of restraint-dependent manner; both responses were inhibited by SB-656104. Exposure to CRS abolished ACTH but magnified CORT responses to restraint as compared to CTRL conditions; SB-656104 had no effect on ACTH levels but significantly inhibited sensitized CORT responses. In CTRL animals, 5-HT7-LI was detected in magnocellular and parvocellular subdivisions of PVN and sparsely in adrenal cortex. Exposure to CRS decreased 5-HT7-LI and protein in the PVN, but increased 5-HT7-LI in the adrenal cortex and protein in whole AG. Higher 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels were detected in PVN and AG from CRS animals but 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio increased in AG only. Finally, whereas 5-HT-LI was sparsely observed in the adrenal cortex

  6. Effects of diet and stress mimicked by corticosterone administration on early postmortem muscle metabolism of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H; Sui, S J; Jiao, H C; Jiang, K J; Zhao, J P; Dong, H

    2007-03-01

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of preslaughter physiological states mimicked by long- or short-term administration of corticosterone (CORT) and dietary energy sources on muscle glycogen contents and meat quality of broiler chickens. In experiment 1, the broilers were fed a high lipid diet (LD) or a normal diet (ND) that differed in carbohydrate (3.8%) and lipid (2.5%) contents from 21 d of age. From 28 d of age onwards, 50% of the chickens in each dietary treatment were subjected to CORT treatment (30 mg/kg of diet). At 7 and 11 d after CORT supplementation, musculus pectoralis major was sampled before and immediately after slaughter and analyzed for glycogen, pH, and R-value. In experiment 2, broilers, fed with the LD or ND diet from 21 d of age were subjected to 1 single s.c. injection of CORT (4 mg/kg of BW) for 3 h to mimicked acute stress at 46 d of age. In experiment 3, broiler chickens were supplied with water supplemented with glucose (30 g/L) for 1 wk before slaughter and were then subjected to the same CORT treatment as experiment 2. Blood and muscle samples were respectively obtained before and immediately after slaughter and analyzed for plasma glucose, urate and lactic acid, and muscle variables. Plasma concentrations of glucose and urate were significantly increased by acute CORT administration, whereas the lactic acid was not changed. Neither dietary energy source nor water glucose supplementation had any influence on the plasma variables. Dietary energy source or water glucose supplementation could not alter glycogen stores in musculus pectoralis major. Breast muscle glycogen stores were increased by stress mimicked by long-term CORT administration rather than by acute treatment. Preslaughter stress reactions had no relation to the depletion of breast muscle glycogen during the initial postmortem period. The initial breast muscle pH was significantly decreased by long-term CORT administration. The result suggests that short

  7. Effect of atrazine and fenitrothion at no-observed-effect-levels (NOEL) on amphibian and mammalian corticosterone-binding-globulin (CBG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Sandra E; Sernia, Conrad; Bradley, Adrian J

    2014-11-01

    This study determines the effect of atrazine and fenitrothion no-observed-effect-levels (NOEL) on the binding of corticosterone (B) to corticosterone-binding-globulin (CBG) in an amphibian and a mammal. Plasma from five cane toads and five Wistar rats was exposed to atrazine and fenitrothion at the NOEL approved for Australian fresh water residues and by the World Health Organization (WHO). The concentration required to displace 50% (IC50) of B binding to CBG was determined by a competitive microdialysis protein assay. Competition studies showed that both atrazine and fenitrothion at NOEL are able to compete with B for CBG binding sites in toad and rat plasma. The IC50 levels for atrazine in toads and rats were 0.004 nmol/l and 0.09 nmol/l respectively. In the case of fenitrothion the IC50 level found in toads was 0.007 nmol/l, and 0.025 nmol/l in rats. Plasma dilution curves showed parallelism with the curve of B, demonstrating that these agro-chemicals are competitively inhibiting binding to CBG. The displacement of B by atrazine and fenitrothion would affect the total:free ratio of B and consequently disrupt the normal stress response. This is the first time that the potential disruptive effect of atrazine and fenitrothion on B-CBG interaction at the NOELs has been demonstrated in amphibian and mammalian models.

  8. 5,7-DHT lesion of the dorsal raphe nuclei impairs object recognition but not affective behavior and corticosterone response to stressor in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieben, Cindy K J; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Blokland, Arjan

    2006-04-03

    Previous studies with acute tryptophan depletion, leading to transient central 5-HT reductions, showed no effects on affective behavior but impaired object memory. In the present study, the behavioral effects of a 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) lesion in the dorsal raphe were evaluated in animal models of anxiety (open field test), depression (forced swimming test), behavioral inhibition (discrete fixed interval test) and cognition (object recognition task). The corticosterone response to a stress condition was examined at several intervals after 5,7-DHT treatment. The substantial reduction in neuronal 5-HT markers in the dorsal raphe did not affect anxiety-related, depressive-like or impulsive behavior. Compared to the SHAM group, the lesioned rats showed a lower response latency to obtain a reward, indicating a quick and accurate reaction to a stimulus. No differences were found in the progressive ratio test for food motivation. A marked impairment in object recognition was found. The 5,7-DHT treatment did not affect the corticosterone response to a stressful situation. Overall, these results corroborate studies with acute tryptophan depletion suggesting a role of 5-HT in object memory, but not affective behavior.

  9. Chronic combined stress induces selective and long-lasting inflammatory response evoked by changes in corticosterone accumulation and signaling in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskunov, Aleksey; Stepanichev, Mikhail; Tishkina, Anna; Novikova, Margarita; Levshina, Irina; Gulyaeva, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    Hippocampus is believed to be selectively vulnerable to stress. We hypothesized that this phenomenon may be mediated by relatively high vulnerability to neuroinflammation related to impairments of local glucocorticoid metabolism and signaling. We have evaluated inflammatory responses induced by acute or chronic combined stress in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus as well as circulating and brain corticosterone (CS) levels as well as expression of corticosterone target genes. The hippocampus showed higher stress-induced expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β as compared to the cerebral cortex. A month after the termination of the chronic stress, IL-1β mRNA in the cerebral cortex reached control level, while in the hippocampus it remained significantly increased. Under chronic stress, the maladaptive inflammatory response in hippocampus was accompanied by a significant increase in local CS levels, as compared to cerebral cortex. Under acute stress, the increased CS level induced changes in CS-regulated genes expression (CRF and IGF1), while this phenomenon was not observed after chronic stress. Thus, the hippocampus appears to be more vulnerable to stress-induced inflammation as compared to the neocortex and demonstrates persistent inflammatory response induced by chronic stress. Stress-induced maladaptive inflammatory response is associated with a selective increase in hippocampal CS accumulation and changes in CS signaling.

  10. Antidepressant effects of curcumin and HU-211 coencapsulated solid lipid nanoparticles against corticosterone-induced cellular and animal models of major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaolie; Zhu, Yanjing; Wang, Mei; Jing, Guoxin; Zhu, Rongrong; Wang, Shilong

    2016-01-01

    Major depression is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with few treatment approaches. The use of nontargeted antidepressants induced many side effects with their low efficacy. A more precise targeting strategy is to develop nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems; hence, we employed solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to encapsulate HU-211 and curcumin (Cur). The antidepressant effects of the dual-drug nanoparticles (Cur/SLNs-HU-211) for major depression treatment were investigated in corticosterone-induced cellular and animal models of major depression. Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can effectively protect PC12 cells from corticosterone-induced apoptosis and can release more dopamine, which may be associated with the higher uptake of Cur/SLNs-HU-211 shown by cellular uptake behavior analysis. Additionally, Cur/SLNs-HU-211 significantly reduced the immobility time in forced swim test, enhanced fall latency in rotarod test, and improved the level of dopamine in mice blood. Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can deliver more Cur to the brain and thus produce a significant increase in neurotransmitters level in brain tissue, especially in the hippocampus and striatum. The results of Western blot and immunofluorescence revealed that Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can significantly enhance the expression of CB1, p-MEK1, and p-ERK1/2. Our study suggests that Cur/SLNs-HU-211 may have great potential for major depression treatment. PMID:27757031

  11. Effect of fish oil and coconut fat supplementation on depressive-type behavior and corticosterone levels of prenatally stressed male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsonelo, Elizabethe Cristina; Suchecki, Deborah; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes

    2011-04-18

    Prenatal stress (PNS) during critical periods of brain development has been associated with numerous behavioral and/or mood disorders in later life. These outcomes may result from changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, which, in turn, can be modulated by environmental factors, such as nutritional status. In this study, the adult male offspring of dams exposed to restraint stress during the last semester of pregnancy and fed different diets were evaluated for depressive-like behavior in the forced swimming test and for the corticosterone response to the test. Female Wistar rats were allocated to one of three groups: regular diet, diet supplemented with coconut fat or with fish oil, offered during pregnancy and lactation. When pregnancy was confirmed, they were distributed into control or stress groups. Stress consisted of restraint and bright light for 45 min, three times per day, in the last week of pregnancy. The body weight of the adult offspring submitted to PNS was lower than that of controls. In the forced swimming test, time of immobility was reduced and swimming was increased in PNS rats fed fish oil and plasma corticosterone levels immediately after the forced swimming test were lower in PNS rats fed regular diet than their control counterparts; this response was reduced in control rats whose mothers were fed fish oil and coconut fat. The present results indicate that coconut fat and fish oil influenced behavioral and hormonal responses to the forced swimming test in both control and PNS adult male rats.

  12. Baseline and stress-induced levels of corticosterone in male and female Afrotropical and European temperate stonechats during breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbeck, Beate; Helm, Barbara; Illera, Juan Carlos; Mortega, Kim G; Smiddy, Patrick; Evans, Neil P

    2017-05-22

    Latitudinal variation in avian life histories falls along a slow-fast pace of life continuum: tropical species produce small clutches, but have a high survival probability, while in temperate species the opposite pattern is found. This study investigated whether differential investment into reproduction and survival of tropical and temperate species is paralleled by differences in the secretion of the vertebrate hormone corticosterone (CORT). Depending on circulating concentrations, CORT can both act as a metabolic (low to medium levels) and a stress hormone (high levels) and, thereby, influence reproductive decisions. Baseline and stress-induced CORT was measured across sequential stages of the breeding season in males and females of closely related taxa of stonechats (Saxicola spp) from a wide distribution area. We compared stonechats from 13 sites, representing Canary Islands, European temperate and East African tropical areas. Stonechats are highly seasonal breeders at all these sites, but vary between tropical and temperate regions with regard to reproductive investment and presumably also survival. In accordance with life-history theory, during parental stages, post-capture (baseline) CORT was overall lower in tropical than in temperate stonechats. However, during mating stages, tropical males had elevated post-capture (baseline) CORT concentrations, which did not differ from those of temperate males. Female and male mates of a pair showed correlated levels of post-capture CORT when sampled after simulated territorial intrusions. In contrast to the hypothesis that species with low reproduction and high annual survival should be more risk-sensitive, tropical stonechats had lower stress-induced CORT concentrations than temperate stonechats. We also found relatively high post-capture (baseline) and stress-induced CORT concentrations, in slow-paced Canary Islands stonechats. Our data support and refine the view that baseline CORT facilitates energetically

  13. High levels of corticosterone and gene expression of star, cyp17a2, hsd3b, cyp21, hsd11b2 during acute stress in common carp with interrenal hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nematollahi, M.A.; Pelt-Heerschap, van H.M.L.; Atsma, W.; Komen, J.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the acute stress response in a common carp strain (E5) with interrenal hyperplasia due to 17a-hydroxylase deficiency, and in an isogenic standard (STD) carp strain. Cortisol, corticosterone and the head kidney-somatic index were measured during and after a 3 h net confinement stress.

  14. The Effects of Acute Restraint Stress on Plasma Levels of Prolactin and Corticosterone across Life-History Stages in a Short-Lived Bird: Gambel's White-Crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jesse S; Meddle, Simone L; Wingfield, John C

    2015-01-01

    The general reproductive effort model attempts to predict the resources that will be allocated to a current reproductive bout or to future survival by aborting the current reproductive attempt. Life-history theory predicts that short-lived species should devote more resources toward a reproductive event because brood value is far greater compared with that of long-lived species that have multiple breeding opportunities. Previous bird studies have used patterns of hormone secretion to understand the regulation of parental investment in response to environmental challenges, such as stress. The two key hormones investigated have been prolactin, which promotes parental investment, and corticosterone, which can reduce parental investment. Research on long-lived seabirds showed that prolactin levels decrease in response to a stressor, but the magnitude of the decline was positively correlated with future reproductive potential. However, little is known about the role of prolactin in short-lived species. Here we present prolactin and corticosterone data from a short-lived Arctic breeding, migratory songbird-the white-crowned sparrow, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii-at multiple stages of the breeding and nonbreeding seasons following standardized acute restraint stress. These data show that both prolactin and corticosterone are modulated seasonally. Corticosterone levels increased significantly in response to acute restraint stress during the breeding season in both sexes, but prolactin levels did not change in response to acute restraint stress at any stage of the annual cycle. We found no relationship between corticosterone or prolactin at either baseline or peak induced levels during any stage of breeding.

  15. Effects of stock density on the laying performance, blood parameter, corticosterone, litter quality, gas emission and bone mineral density of laying hens in floor pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H. K.; Park, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of stocking density on the performance, egg quality, leukocyte concentration, blood biochemistry, corticosterone levels, bone mineral density, and noxious gas emission of laying hens were investigated. Eight hundred 34-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) were randomly assigned to one of 4 treatments, each of which was replicated 4 times. Four stocking densities, including 5, 6, 7, and 10 birds/m2, were compared. A commercial-type basal diet was formulated to meet or exceed nutrient recommendations for laying hens from the National Research Council. The diet was fed to the hens ad libitum for 8 wk. Results indicated that hen-day egg production, egg mass, and feed intake were less for (P laying performance of Hy-Line brown laying hens. PMID:27578881

  16. Postsurgical food and water consumption, fecal corticosterone metabolites, and behavior assessment as noninvasive measures of pain in vasectomized BALB/c mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Kalliokoski, Otto; Teilmann, Anne C

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of pain and stress is a common challenge when working with laboratory mice. The aim of the current study was to identify noninvasive parameters to assess the severity and duration of possible pain and stress after vasectomy in BALB/c mice. Mice underwent isoflurane anesthesia...... with or without vasectomy. Body weight, food and water intake, and fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM) were measured 3 d before and 3 d after the procedure. Behavior was recorded 1, 2, 4, and 8 h after the procedure. Food and water consumption and defecation were reduced postoperatively in the vasectomized......-related behaviors, but not FCM, may be useful as noninvasive parameters to assess postoperative pain and stress in vasectomized mice....

  17. Plasma thyroid hormones and corticosterone levels in blood of chicken embryos and post hatch chickens exposed during incubation to 1800 MHz electromagnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Pawlak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study attempted to determine the effect of a 1800 MHz electromagnetic field (EMF (only carrier frequency on thyroxine (T4, triiodothyronine (T3 and corticosterone (CORT concentrations in the blood plasma of chick embryos, and to investigate the effect of electromagnetic field (EMF exposure during embryogenesis on the level of these hormones in birds that are ready for slaughter. Material and Methods: Throughout the incubation period, embryos from the experimental group were exposed to a 1800 MHz EMF with power density of 0.1 W/m2, 10 times during 24 h for 4 min. Blood samples were collected to determine T4, T3 and CORT concentrations on the 12th (E12 and 18th (E18 day of incubation, from newly hatched chicks (D1 and from birds ready for slaughter (D42. Results: The experiment showed that T4 and T3 concentrations decreased markedly and CORT levels increased in the embryos and in the newly hatched chicks exposed to EMF during embryogenesis. However, no changes were found in the level of the analyzed hormones in the birds ready for slaughter. Differences in T4 and T3 plasma concentrations between the EMF-exposed group and the embryos incubated without additional EMF were the highest in the newly hatched chicks, which may be indicative of the cumulative effect of electromagnetic field on the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPT. Discussion: The obtained results suggest that additional 1800 MHz radio frequency electromagnetic field inhibits function of HPT axis, however, it stimulates hypothalamo- pituitary-adrenal axis by inducing adrenal steroidogenic cells to synthesize corticosterone. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which radio EMFs affect HPT and HPA axis function in the chicken embryos.

  18. Differential cellular FGF-2 upregulation in the rat facial nucleus following axotomy, functional electrical stimulation and corticosterone: a possible therapeutic target to Bell's palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Gabriela P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The etiology of Bell's palsy can vary but anterograde axonal degeneration may delay spontaneous functional recovery leading the necessity of therapeutic interventions. Corticotherapy and/or complementary rehabilitation interventions have been employed. Thus the natural history of the disease reports to a neurotrophic resistance of adult facial motoneurons leading a favorable evolution however the related molecular mechanisms that might be therapeutically addressed in the resistant cases are not known. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 pathway signaling is a potential candidate for therapeutic development because its role on wound repair and autocrine/paracrine trophic mechanisms in the lesioned nervous system. Methods Adult rats received unilateral facial nerve crush, transection with amputation of nerve branches, or sham operation. Other group of unlesioned rats received a daily functional electrical stimulation in the levator labii superioris muscle (1 mA, 30 Hz, square wave or systemic corticosterone (10 mgkg-1. Animals were sacrificed seven days later. Results Crush and transection lesions promoted no changes in the number of neurons but increased the neurofilament in the neuronal neuropil of axotomized facial nuclei. Axotomy also elevated the number of GFAP astrocytes (143% after crush; 277% after transection and nuclear FGF-2 (57% after transection in astrocytes (confirmed by two-color immunoperoxidase in the ipsilateral facial nucleus. Image analysis reveled that a seven days functional electrical stimulation or corticosterone led to elevations of FGF-2 in the cytoplasm of neurons and in the nucleus of reactive astrocytes, respectively, without astrocytic reaction. Conclusion FGF-2 may exert paracrine/autocrine trophic actions in the facial nucleus and may be relevant as a therapeutic target to Bell's palsy.

  19. Escitalopram or novel herbal mixture treatments during or following exposure to stress reduce anxiety-like behavior through corticosterone and BDNF modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravid Doron

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are a major public health concern worldwide. Studies indicate that repeated exposure to adverse experiences early in life can lead to anxiety disorders in adulthood. Current treatments for anxiety disorders are characterized by a low success rate and are associated with a wide variety of side effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anxiolytic effects of a novel herbal treatment, in comparison to treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram. We recently demonstrated the anxiolytic effects of these treatments in BALB mice previously exposed to one week of stress. In the present study, ICR mice were exposed to post natal maternal separation and to 4 weeks of unpredictable chronic mild stress in adolescence, and treated during or following exposure to stress with the novel herbal treatment or with escitalopram. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated in the elevated plus maze. Blood corticosterone levels were evaluated using radioimmunoassay. Brain derived neurotrophic factor levels in the hippocampus were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that (1 exposure to stress in childhood and adolescence increased anxiety-like behavior in adulthood; (2 the herbal treatment reduced anxiety-like behavior, both when treated during or following exposure to stress; (3 blood corticosterone levels were reduced following treatment with the herbal treatment or escitalopram, when treated during or following exposure to stress; (4 brain derived neurotrophic factor levels in the hippocampus of mice treated with the herbal treatment or escitalopram were increased, when treated either during or following exposure to stress. This study expands our previous findings and further points to the proposed herbal compound's potential to be highly efficacious in treating anxiety disorders in humans.

  20. Effects of stock density on the laying performance, blood parameter, corticosterone, litter quality, gas emission and bone mineral density of laying hens in floor pens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H K; Park, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, C H

    2016-12-01

    The effects of stocking density on the performance, egg quality, leukocyte concentration, blood biochemistry, corticosterone levels, bone mineral density, and noxious gas emission of laying hens were investigated. Eight hundred 34-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) were randomly assigned to one of 4 treatments, each of which was replicated 4 times. Four stocking densities, including 5, 6, 7, and 10 birds/m(2), were compared. A commercial-type basal diet was formulated to meet or exceed nutrient recommendations for laying hens from the National Research Council. The diet was fed to the hens ad libitum for 8 wk. Results indicated that hen-day egg production, egg mass, and feed intake were less for (P floor and broken eggs and eggshell strength were greater (P < 0.01) for 10 birds/m(2) stock density than other stock densities. There were no significant differences in the level of leukocytes among densities. However, heterophils and the H/L ratio were greater (P < 0.01) for 10 birds/m(2) than in stock density of 6 or 7 birds/m(2) Serum corticosterone was greater (P < 0.01) 10 birds/m(2) than stock density than other stock densities. Litter moisture and gas emission (CO2 and NH3) were greater (P < 0.01) for 10 birds/m(2) than stock density than 6 and 7 birds/m(2) stock density. Bone mineral content was not influenced by increasing stock density. However, bone mineral density was less (P < 0.05) for 10 m(2) stock density than other stock densities. These results indicate that increasing the density beyond 5 birds/m(2) elicits some negative effects on laying performance of Hy-Line brown laying hens. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  1. Chronic Early-life Stress in Rat Pups Alters Basal Corticosterone, Intestinal Permeability, and Fecal Microbiota at Weaning: Influence of Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaoui, Nabila; Jacobs, Jonathan P; Larauche, Muriel; Biraud, Mandy; Million, Mulugeta; Mayer, Emeran; Taché, Yvette

    2017-01-30

    Wistar rat dams exposed to limited nesting stress (LNS) from post-natal days (PND) 2 to 10 display erratic maternal behavior, and their pups show delayed maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and impaired epithelial barrier at PND10 and a visceral hypersensitivity at adulthood. Little is known about the impact of early life stress on the offspring before adulthood and the influence of sex. We investigated whether male and female rats previously exposed to LNS displays at weaning altered corticosterone, intestinal permeability, and microbiota. Wistar rat dams and litters were maintained from PND2 to 10 with limited nesting/bedding materials and thereafter reverted to normal housing up to weaning (PND21). Control litters had normal housing. At weaning, we monitored body weight, corticosterone plasma levels (enzyme immunoassay), in vivo intestinal to colon permeability (fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4 kDa) and fecal microbiota (DNA extraction and amplification of the V4 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene). At weaning, LNS pups had hypercorticosteronemia and enhanced intestinal permeability with females > males while body weights were similar. LNS decreased fecal microbial diversity and induced a distinct composition characterized by increased abundance of Gram positive cocci and reduction of fiber-degrading, butyrate-producing, and mucus-resident microbes. These data indicate that chronic exposure to LNS during the first week post-natally has sustained effects monitored at weaning including hypercorticosteronemia, a leaky gut, and dysbiosis. These alterations may impact on the susceptibility to develop visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats and have relevance to the development of irritable bowel syndrome in childhood.

  2. Feather corticosterone levels are related to age and future body condition, but not to subsequent fitness, in a declining migratory songbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boves, Than J.; Fairhurst, Graham D.; Rushing, Clark S.; Buehler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    In migratory species, breeding and non-breeding locations are geographically separate, yet the effects of conditions from one stage may carry over to affect a subsequent stage. Ideally, to understand the mechanisms and implications of ‘carry-over effects’, one would need to follow individuals throughout the year, quantify potential environmental causal factors and physiological mediators during multiple life-history stages, and measure downstream fitness. Owing to current limitations of tracking technology, this is impossible for small, long-distance migrants, so indirect methods to characterize carry-over effects are required. Corticosterone (CORT) is a suspected physiological mediator of carry-over effects, but when collected from blood it provides only a physiological snapshot at that point in time. When extracted from feathers, however, feather corticosterone (CORTf) provides a measure of responses to stressors from previous, and longer, time periods. We collected feathers grown during two life-history stages (post-breeding and subsequent wintering) from individuals of two age classes of a rapidly declining migratory songbird, the cerulean warbler (Setophaga cerulea), on their breeding grounds and quantified CORTf concentrations. We then monitored reproduction and survival of individuals and analysed relationships among CORTf and age, body condition and future fitness. Compared with older males, second-year males had higher CORTf concentrations during both stages. When controlling for age and year, body condition at capture was positively related to CORTf concentrations from winter (especially for older birds). However, we found no relationships between CORTf and fitness (as defined by reproduction and survival). Thus, elevated CORT may represent a beneficial physiological response (e.g. hyperphagia prior to migration), particularly for certain life-history stages, and may mediate the condition in which individuals transition between stages. But for those

  3. Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes from rats chronically treated with corticosterone: The protective effect of oxytocin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanić, Dušanka; Plećaš-Solarović, Bosiljka; Petrović, Jelena; Bogavac-Stanojević, Nataša; Sopić, Miron; Kotur-Stevuljević, Jelena; Ignjatović, Svetlana; Pešić, Vesna

    2016-08-25

    Contemporary lifestyle is commonly associated with chronic stress, an environmental factor contributing to development of various psychological and somatic disorders. Increased levels of glucocorticoids, observed in the chronic stress, induce the production of reactive oxygen species leading to genotoxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chronic administration of oxytocin (OXY) 10 IU/400 μL/day, s.c., for 14 days, a hormone presumed to exert antioxidant effect, may prevent DNA damage in the comet assay of peripheral blood lymphocytes of Wistar rats treated chronically with corticosterone (CORT) 100 mg/L ad libitum, per os, for 21 days, as well as, to influence some plasma oxidative stress parameters, i.e. levels of total lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), and malondialdehyde (MDA), and the activity of antioxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). Even though there was no reduction in overall number of damaged cells after oxytocin treatment only, the marked increase in total comet score (TCS) after incubation with H2O2 in CORT group compared to controls, was absent in the CORT + OXY experimental group. Furthermore, significant decrease of highly damaged cells compared to corticosterone group was noted. Chronic oxytocin administration thus protected lymphocytes from high intensity damage that leads to cellular death. In addition, treatment with OXY along with CORT, significantly decreased concentration of LOOH in plasma, and increased SOD compared to CORT treatment only. This finding corresponds well with current reports on beneficial effects of OXY in conditions of HPA axis hyperactivity, and supports the hypothesis of OXY-mediated antioxidant action.

  4. Exocytosis sensitivity to growth hormone-releasing hormone in subsets of GH cells in rats under different corticosterone conditions. Ultrastructural study using microwave irradiation for fixation and immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Hitoshi; Han, Fang; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2004-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) cells in the rat anterior pituitary have been morphologically classified into three subtypes: type I (mature) containing large secretory granules about 350 nm in diameter, type II (intermediate) containing a mixture of large and small granules, and type III (immature) containing small granules about 150 nm in diameter. However, the functional implications of morphological heterogeneity, especially the different sensitivities to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) under different corticosteroid conditions have not been elucidated to date. In the present study, by application of microwave irradiation (MWI) for fixation and immunocytochemistry, new findings of the exocytotic response have been revealed among the subsets of GH cells following adrenalectomy (ADX), corticosterone treatment and/or GRH treatment. The MWI gave effective results for fixation, especially for the permeability of the fixative, and showed good results for immunoelectron microscopy using the protein-A gold method. Moreover, the use of MWI greatly shortened the fixation, processing and immunolabeling times without compromising the quality of ultrastructural preservation and the specificity of labeling. The number of exocytotic figures was low in all subtypes of GH cells in the sham-operated control rats. GRH treatment induced a significant increase in exocytosis in each subtype of GH cells, particularly in type I (mature) and type II (intermediate) GH cells in the control rats. GRH injection to rats for 4 days after ADX also showed an increase in exocytosis, but the degree was significantly less in comparison with the GRH injection in the control group. Corticosterone replacement given to ADX rats induced a clear recovery of the exocytotic response to GRH to the control level. Serum GH content measured by radioimmunoassay correlated with these morphological results. These results suggest that the secretion of GH stimulated by GRH is closely related to corticosteroids, and

  5. Antidepressant effects of curcumin and HU-211 coencapsulated solid lipid nanoparticles against corticosterone-induced cellular and animal models of major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He XL

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiaolie He,* Yanjing Zhu,* Mei Wang, Guoxin Jing, Rongrong Zhu, Shilong Wang Research Center for Translational Medicine at East Hospital, School of Life Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Major depression is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with few treatment approaches. The use of nontargeted antidepressants induced many side effects with their low efficacy. A more precise targeting strategy is to develop nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems; hence, we employed solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs to encapsulate HU-211 and curcumin (Cur. The antidepressant effects of the dual-drug nanoparticles (Cur/SLNs-HU-211 for major depression treatment were investigated in corticosterone-induced cellular and animal models of major depression. Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can effectively protect PC12 cells from corticosterone-induced apoptosis and can release more dopamine, which may be associated with the higher uptake of Cur/SLNs-HU-211 shown by cellular uptake behavior analysis. Additionally, Cur/SLNs-HU-211 significantly reduced the immobility time in forced swim test, enhanced fall latency in rotarod test, and improved the level of dopamine in mice blood. Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can deliver more Cur to the brain and thus produce a significant increase in neurotransmitters level in brain tissue, especially in the hippocampus and striatum. The results of Western blot and immunofluorescence revealed that Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can significantly enhance the expression of CB1, p-MEK1, and p-ERK1/2. Our study suggests that Cur/SLNs-HU-211 may have great potential for major depression treatment. Keywords: major depression, curcumin, HU-211, solid lipid nanoparticles, dopamine

  6. Chronic Early-life Stress in Rat Pups Alters Basal Corticosterone, Intestinal Permeability, and Fecal Microbiota at Weaning: Influence of Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaoui, Nabila; Jacobs, Jonathan P; Larauche, Muriel; Biraud, Mandy; Million, Mulugeta; Mayer, Emeran; Taché, Yvette

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Wistar rat dams exposed to limited nesting stress (LNS) from post-natal days (PND) 2 to 10 display erratic maternal behavior, and their pups show delayed maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and impaired epithelial barrier at PND10 and a visceral hypersensitivity at adulthood. Little is known about the impact of early life stress on the offspring before adulthood and the influence of sex. We investigated whether male and female rats previously exposed to LNS displays at weaning altered corticosterone, intestinal permeability, and microbiota. Methods Wistar rat dams and litters were maintained from PND2 to 10 with limited nesting/bedding materials and thereafter reverted to normal housing up to weaning (PND21). Control litters had normal housing. At weaning, we monitored body weight, corticosterone plasma levels (enzyme immunoassay), in vivo intestinal to colon permeability (fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4 kDa) and fecal microbiota (DNA extraction and amplification of the V4 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene). Results At weaning, LNS pups had hypercorticosteronemia and enhanced intestinal permeability with females > males while body weights were similar. LNS decreased fecal microbial diversity and induced a distinct composition characterized by increased abundance of Gram positive cocci and reduction of fiber-degrading, butyrate-producing, and mucus-resident microbes. Conclusions These data indicate that chronic exposure to LNS during the first week post-natally has sustained effects monitored at weaning including hypercorticosteronemia, a leaky gut, and dysbiosis. These alterations may impact on the susceptibility to develop visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats and have relevance to the development of irritable bowel syndrome in childhood. PMID:27829577

  7. Changes in serum and urinary corticosterone and testosterone during short-term capture and handling in the cane toad (Rhinella marina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Edward J; Cockrem, John; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2013-09-15

    Non-invasive endocrine monitoring with minimally invasive biological samples, such as urine, is being used widely for conservation biology research on amphibians. Currently, it is unknown how closely urinary measurements correspond with the traditional serum hormone measurements. We compared urinary and serum concentrations of corticosterone (CORT) and testosterone (T) in adult male cane toads (Rhinella marina) using a standard capture and handling (short-term stressor) protocol. Free-living male cane toads were captured and sampled for baseline urine (0h) with a second urine sample taken at 0.5h and hourly between 1 and 8h. A single blood sample was collected from each toad after the final urine sampling and capture handling. The mean serum CORT concentration increased between 0 and 0.5h, reaching the highest level between 6 and 8h. The mean urinary CORT concentration increased with a lag-time of 1h and continued to increase up to 8h. The mean level of serum T decreased between 0 and 7h and increased between 7 and 8h. Mean urinary T concentration decreased with a lag-time of 0.5h. Urinary T levels did not change between 4 and 8h. Mean serum T levels reached 50% of the original 0h value at 1h while mean serum CORT levels reached 200% of the original 0h value within 0.5h. Mean urinary T levels reached 50% of the original 0h value within 3h while mean urinary CORT levels reached 200% of the original 0h value within 3h. The inter-individual variation in baseline serum and urinary CORT and T levels were highly comparable, suggesting that baseline urine sample provides a reliable indicator of the physiological status of the animal. Overall, the results have demonstrated that urine sampling and standard capture handling protocol provide reliable measures of baseline corticosterone and testosterone, as well as short-term stress hormone responses in amphibians.

  8. Bilateral lesions of suprachiasmatic nuclei affect circadian rhythms in (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into deoxyribonucleic acid in mouse intestinal tract, mitotic index of corneal epithelium, and serum corticosterone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheving, L.E.; Tsai, T.H.; Powell, E.W.; Pasley, J.N.; Halberg, F.; Dunn, J.

    1983-03-01

    Investigations into the role of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the coordination of circadian rhythms have presented differing results. Several reports have shown that ablation of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCNA) alters the phase and amplitude of rhythms but does not abolish them. The present study investigates the effect of SCNA on the rhythms in cell proliferation in various regions of the intestinal tract as measured by the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-thymidine into deoxyribonucleic acid, in the mitotic activity of the corneal epithelium, and in serum corticosterone levels. The study involved mice with verified lesions of the SCN (six to 13 mice per time point) and control groups of both sham-operated and unoperated mice (seven of each per time point). The mice were killed in groups that represented seven time points over a single 24 hr span (3 hr intervals with the 0800 hr sampled both at start and end of the series). The tissues examined were the tongue, esophagus, gastric stomach, and colon for DNA synthesis, the corneal epithelium for mitotic index, and blood serum for corticosterone level. The most consistent result of SCNA was a phase advance in the rhythms in cell proliferation in the tongue, esophagus, gastric stomach, colon, and corneal epithelium. A reduction in rhythm amplitude occurred in the tongue, esophagus, and corneal epithelium; however, there was an amplitude increase for the stomach, colon, and serum corticosterone. The mesor (rhythm-adjusted mean) was increased by SCNA in all tissues except the corneal epithelium. These findings further support the role of the suprachiasmatic nuclear area in the control of rhythms in cell proliferation and corticosterone production, by acting as a ''phase-resetter'' and as a modulator of rhythm amplitude.

  9. Longitudinal studies of plasma aldosterone, corticosterone, deoxycorticosterone, progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, cortisol, and cortisone determined simultaneously in mother and child at birth and during the early neonatal period. I. Spontaneous delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippell, W G; Becker, H; Versmold, H T; Bidlingmaier, F; Knorr, D

    1978-06-01

    In order to obtain the still lacking reference data of individual plasma steroids in the immediate postnatal period needed for the assessment of adrenocortical function in various neonatal maladaptation syndromes, aldosterone (A), corticosterone, deoxycorticosterone (DOC), progesterone (P), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), cortisol, and cortisone were simultaneously followed in the same human newborn in a single 250-500 microliters peripheral plasma sample obtained at constant times during the first week of life using a mechanized Sephadex LH-20 multicolumn chromatography and standardized RIAs. Mean concentrations in 12 spontaneously delivered full term newborns of either sex and in paired umbilical (UV) and peripheral maternal (MV) venous plasma are given in the table. Besides significant maternoumbilical gradients in each steroid, DOC, P, 17-OHP, and cortisone, originating predominantly from the fetoplacental unit, disappear rapidly with steadily increasing half-lives. A, corticosterone, and cortisol, however, remain elevated in comparison with later infancy, with the exception of a marked "glucocorticoid dip" in cortisol and corticosterone levels between 2 and 12 h after birth.

  10. Simultaneous determination of urinary cortisol, cortisone and corticosterone in parachutists, depressed patients and healthy controls in view of biomedical and pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenis, Alina; Konieczna, Lucyna; Olędzka, Ilona; Kowalski, Piotr; Bączek, Tomasz

    2011-05-01

    A rapid and sensitive reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method (RP-LC) with UV detection has been developed for the determination of free cortisol, cortisone and corticosterone in human urine. The assay was performed after a solid-phase extraction procedure (SPE) with dexamethasone as the internal standard. Chromatographic separation was carried out on a Nucleosil 100 C(18) analytical column using a mixture of acetonitrile and water (30 : 70, v/v) as a mobile phase at a flow-rate of 1 mL min(-1). Spectrophotometric detection was performed at 240 nm. The method has been validated for accuracy, precision, selectivity, linearity, recovery and stability. The absolute recoveries of glucocorticoids were above 94.6%. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.5 and 2 ng mL(-1), respectively, for all analytes. Linearity was confirmed in the range of 2-300 ng mL(-1) with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9997 for all steroid hormones. The proposed method was sensitive, robust and specific allowing reliable quantification of steroid hormones. This method was successfully applied for determination of three endogenous glucocorticoid levels in human urine. The studies were performed on 20 sedentary healthy volunteers in comparison to two socially diversified groups, namely 10 parachutists before and after jump and 10 patients with depression. Pharmacokinetic studies performed on these groups indicated that urinary free cortisol and cortisol-to-cortisone ratios can be treated as biomarkers of stress and depressive disorders.

  11. Effect of Beta-Asarone on Impairment of Spatial Working Memory and Apoptosis in the Hippocampus of Rats Exposed to Chronic Corticosterone Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bombi; Sur, Bongjun; Cho, Seong-Guk; Yeom, Mijung; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    β-asarone (BAS) is an active component of Acori graminei rhizoma, a traditional medicine used clinically in treating dementia and chronic stress in Korea. However, the cognitive effects of BAS and its mechanism of action have remained elusive. The purpose of this study was to examine whether BAS improved spatial cognitive impairment induced in rats following chronic corticosterone (CORT) administration. CORT administration (40 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) resulted in cognitive impairment in the avoidance conditioning test (AAT) and the Morris water maze (MWM) test that was reversed by BAS (200 mg/kg, i.p). Additionally, as assessed by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis, the administration of BAS significantly alleviated memory-associated decreases in the expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) proteins and mRNAs in the hippocampus. Also, BAS administration significantly restored the expression of Bax and Bcl-2 mRNAs in the hippocampus. Thus, BAS may be an effective therapeutic for learning and memory disturbances, and its neuroprotective effect was mediated, in part, by normalizing the CORT response, resulting in regulation of BDNF and CREB functions and anti-apoptosis in rats. PMID:26535083

  12. The effect of neonatal maternal stress on plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone, leptin, and ghrelin in adult male rats exposed to acute heterotypic stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubová, A; Štofková, A; Jurčovičová, J; Šlamberová, R

    2016-12-22

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is important for maintenance of homeostasis during stress. Recent studies have shown a connection between the HPA axis and adipose tissue. The present study investigated the effect of acute heterotypic stress on plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), corticosterone (CORT), leptin, and ghrelin in adult male rats with respect to neonatal maternal social and physical stressors. Thirty rat mothers and sixty of their male progeny were used. Pups were divided into three groups: unstressed control (C), stressed by maternal social stressor (S), stressed by maternal social and physical stressors (SW). Levels of hormones were measured in adult male progeny following an acute swimming stress (10 min) or no stress. ELISA immunoassay was used to measured hormones. The ACTH and CORT levels were significantly increased in all groups of adult progeny after acute stress; however, CORT levels were significantly lower in both neonatally stressed groups compared to controls. After acute stress, plasma leptin levels were decreased in the C and SW groups but increased in the S group. The data suggest that long-term neonatal stressors lead to lower sensitivity of ACTH receptors in the adrenal cortex, which could be a sign of stress adaptation in adulthood. Acute stress in adult male rats changes plasma levels of leptin differently relative to social or physical neonatal stressors.

  13. Environmental temperature and stocking density effects on acute phase proteins, heat shock protein 70, circulating corticosterone and performance in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Pardis; Zulkifli, Idrus; Amat Jajuli, Nurfarahin; Farjam, Abdoreza Soleimani; Ramiah, Suriya Kumari; Amir, Anna Aryani; O'Reily, Emily; Eckersall, David

    2015-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of different stocking densities on serum corticosterone (CORT), ovotransferrin (OVT), α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and ceruloplasmin (CP) concentrations, brain heat shock protein (HSP) 70 expression and performance in broiler chickens exposed to unheated and heated conditions. Day-old chicks were stocked at 0.100 m2/bird (low density (LD)) or 0.063 m2/bird (high density (HD)), in battery cages and housed in environmentally controlled rooms. From 21 to 35 days of age, birds from each stocking density group were exposed to either 24 or 32 °C. Growth performance was recorded during the heat treatment period, and blood and brain samples were collected to determine CORT, OVT, AGP, CP and HSP 70 levels on day 35. Heat treatment but not stocking density was detrimental to growth performance. There were significant temperature × density interactions for CORT, CP and OVT on day 35. Although HD elevated CORT, CP and OVT when compared to LD, the effects of the former were more obvious under heated condition. Both temperature and density had significant effect on AGP and HSP 70. In conclusion, irrespective of temperature, high stocking density was physiologically stressful to broiler chickens, as indicated by CORT, AGP, CP, OVT and HSP 70, but not detrimental to growth performance and survivability. As it was shown in the present study, AGP, CP and OVT could be useful biomarkers to determine the effect of overcrowding and high temperature on the welfare of broiler chickens.

  14. The utility of fecal corticosterone metabolites and animal welfare assessment protocols as predictive parameters of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Jørgensen, Pernille Schønning; Pipper, Christian Bressen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of various non-invasive parameters for the prediction of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model in male C.B-17 SCID (C.B-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid)) mice. The study showed that body weight, food and water consumpt......The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of various non-invasive parameters for the prediction of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model in male C.B-17 SCID (C.B-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid)) mice. The study showed that body weight, food and water...... consumption, and an animal welfare assessment (AWA) protocol revealed marked differences between control and cancer lines as the size of the tumor increased. However, only the AWA protocol was effective in predicting the tumor size and the level of fecal corticosterone metabolites (FCM). FCM levels were......, however, negatively-correlated to the AWA score, and the tumor size, both when evaluated on a given day and when accumulated over the entire period. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that body weight and food and water consumption were negatively-affected as tumor developed but only the animal...

  15. Depression-like behaviors in mice subjected to co-treatment of high-fat diet and corticosterone are ameliorated by AICAR and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weina; Zhai, Xiaofeng; Li, Haipeng; Ji, Liu

    2014-03-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are highly co-morbid, and there may be a bi-directional connection between the two. Herein, we have described a mouse model of a depression-like and insulin-resistant (DIR) state induced by the co-treatment of high-fat diet (HFD) and corticosterone (CORT). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d- ribofuranoside (AICAR), a pharmacological activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), was originally used to improve insulin resistance (IR). Interestingly, our results show a clear potential for AICAR as a putative antidepressant with a chronic action on the DIR mice. In contrast to the traditional antidepressants, AICAR as a promising antidepressant avoids reducing insulin actions of skeletal muscle in the context of long-term HFD. Exercise also produced antidepressant effects. Our data suggest that the effects of AICAR and exercise on DIR may further increase our understanding on the link between depression and diabetes.

  16. Repeated exposure to corticosterone increases depression-like behavior in two different versions of the forced swim test without altering nonspecific locomotor activity or muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Wendie; Fournier, Neil M; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2009-08-01

    We have recently shown that repeated high dose injections of corticosterone (CORT) reliably increase depression-like behavior on a modified one-day version of the forced swim test. The main purpose of this experiment was to compare the effect of these CORT injections on our one-day version of the forced swim test and the more traditional two-day version of the test. A second purpose was to determine whether altered behavior in the forced swim test could be due to nonspecific changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength. Separate groups of rats received a high dose CORT injection (40 mg/kg) or a vehicle injection once per day for 21 consecutive days. Then, half the rats from each group were exposed to the traditional two-day forced swim test and the other half were exposed to our one-day forced swim test. After the forced swim testing, all the rats were tested in an open field and in a wire suspension grip strength test. The CORT injections significantly increased the time spent immobile and decreased the time spent swimming in both versions of the forced swim test. However, they had no significant effect on activity in the open field or grip strength in the wire suspension test. These results show that repeated CORT injections increase depression-like behavior regardless of the specific parameters of forced swim testing, and that these effects are independent of changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength.

  17. Corticosterone impairs reconsolidation of novel object recognition memory in rats%皮质酮损害大鼠新颖物体识别记忆的再巩固

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周梅芳; 王波; 田绍文; 谭德容; 旷昕

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The formation of long-term memory includes acquisition, consolidation and reconsolidation. Reconsolidation is very important for the new memory transforming into stable memory. Stress is an important environmental factor in the process of learning and memory. Corticosterone is very important for stress response. At present, research about the impact of corticosterone on reconsolidation of novel object recognition memory is less. Thus, it is very important to test the impact of corticosterone on reconsolidation of novel object recognition memory in rats. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of corticosterone on the reconsolidation of novel object recognition memory in rats. METHODS: (1) The rats were intraperitoneal y injected with corticosterone (0.1, 1 and 3 mg/kg) immediately after reactivation. The discrimination index was used to assess memory performance and calculated as the difference in time exploring the novel and familiar objects. (2) The rats were intraperitoneal y injected with corticosterone (3 mg/kg) 6 hours after reactivation. The discrimination index was used to assess memory performance and calculated as the difference in time exploring the novel and familiar objects. (3) The rats were intraperitoneal y injected with corticosterone 3 mg/kg without reactivation. The discrimination index was used to assess memory performance and calculated as the difference in time exploring the novel and familiar objects. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Immediate injection of corticosterone 3 mg/kg after reactivation significantly decreased the discrimination index. At 6 hours after reactivation or without reactivation, corticosterone administration did not impact the discrimination index. These results confirmed that corticosterone administration immediately after reactivation impairs the reconsolidation of novel object recognition memory. The damage effect depends on the reactivation experience and the specific time window after reactivation.%背景:长时程

  18. Maternal postpartum corticosterone and fluoxetine differentially affect adult male and female offspring on anxiety-like behavior, stress reactivity, and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobinath, Aarthi R; Workman, Joanna L; Chow, Carmen; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Galea, Liisa A M

    2016-02-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) affects approximately 15% of mothers, disrupts maternal care, and can represent a form of early life adversity for the developing offspring. Intriguingly, male and female offspring are differentially vulnerable to the effects of PPD. Antidepressants, such as fluoxetine, are commonly prescribed for treating PPD. However, fluoxetine can reach offspring via breast milk, raising serious concerns regarding the long-term consequences of infant exposure to fluoxetine. The goal of this study was to examine the long-term effects of maternal postpartum corticosterone (CORT, a model of postpartum stress/depression) and concurrent maternal postpartum fluoxetine on behavioral, endocrine, and neural measures in adult male and female offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley dams were treated daily with either CORT or oil and fluoxetine or saline from postnatal days 2-23, and offspring were weaned and left undisturbed until adulthood. Here we show that maternal postpartum fluoxetine increased anxiety-like behavior and impaired hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis negative feedback in adult male, but not female, offspring. Furthermore, maternal postpartum fluoxetine increased the density of immature neurons (doublecortin-expressing) in the hippocampus of adult male offspring but decreased the density of immature neurons in adult female offspring. Maternal postpartum CORT blunted HPA axis negative feedback in males and tended to increase density of immature neurons in males but decreased it in females. These results indicate that maternal postpartum CORT and fluoxetine can have long-lasting effects on anxiety-like behavior, HPA axis negative feedback, and adult hippocampal neurogenesis and that adult male and female offspring are differentially affected by these maternal manipulations.

  19. Serotonin and corticosterone rhythms in mice exposed to cigarette smoke and in patients with COPD: implication for COPD-associated neuropathogenesis.

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    Isaac K Sundar

    Full Text Available The circadian timing system controls daily rhythms of physiology and behavior, and disruption of clock function can trigger stressful life events. Daily exposure to cigarette smoke (CS can lead to alteration in diverse biological and physiological processes. Smoking is associated with mood disorders, including depression and anxiety. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD have abnormal circadian rhythms, reflected by daily changes in respiratory symptoms and lung function. Corticosterone (CORT is an adrenal steroid that plays a considerable role in stress and anti-inflammatory responses. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT is a neurohormone, which plays a role in sleep/wake regulation and affective disorders. Secretion of stress hormones (CORT and 5HT is under the control of the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Since smoking is a contributing factor in the development of COPD, we hypothesize that CS can affect circadian rhythms of CORT and 5HT secretion leading to sleep and mood disorders in smokers and patients with COPD. We measured the daily rhythms of plasma CORT and 5HT in mice following acute (3 d, sub-chronic (10 d or chronic (6 mo CS exposure and in plasma from non-smokers, smokers and patients with COPD. Acute and chronic CS exposure affected both the timing (peak phase and amplitude of the daily rhythm of plasma CORT and 5HT in mice. Acute CS appeared to have subtle time-dependent effects on CORT levels but more pronounced effects on 5HT. As compared with CORT, plasma 5HT was slightly elevated in smokers but was reduced in patients with COPD. Thus, the effects of CS on plasma 5HT were consistent between mice and patients with COPD. Together, these data reveal a significant impact of CS exposure on rhythms of stress hormone secretion and subsequent detrimental effects on cognitive function, depression-like behavior, mood/anxiety and sleep quality in smokers and patients with COPD.

  20. Sources of variation in plasma corticosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone in the male northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis): I. Seasonal patterns and effects of stress and adrenocorticotropic hormone.

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    Fokidis, H Bobby

    2016-09-01

    The secretion of steroids from the adrenal gland is a classic endocrine response to perturbations that can affect homeostasis. During an acute stress response, glucocorticoids (GC), such as corticosterone (CORT), prepare the metabolic physiology and cognitive abilities of an animal in a manner that promotes survival during changing conditions. Although GC functions during stress are well established, much less is understood concerning how adrenal androgens, namely dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are influenced by stress. I conducted three field studies (one experimental and two descriptive) aimed at identifying how both CORT and DHEA secretion in free-living male northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), vary during acute stress; across different circulations (brachial vs. jugular); in response to ACTH challenge; and during the annual cycle. As predicted, restraint stress increased plasma CORT, but unexpectedly DHEA levels decreased, but the latter effect was only seen for blood sampled from the jugular vein, and not the brachial. The difference in DHEA between circulations may result from increased neural uptake of DHEA during stress. Injection with exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) increased CORT concentrations, but failed to alter DHEA levels, thus suggesting ACTH is not a direct regulator of DHEA. Monthly field sampling revealed distinct seasonal patterns to both initial and restraint stress CORT and DHEA levels with distinct differences in the steroid milieu between breeding and non-breeding seasons. These data suggest that the CORT response to stress remains relatively consistent, but DHEA secretion is largely independent of the response by CORT. Although CORT functions have been well-studied in wild animals, little research exists for the role of DHEA and their variable relationship sets the stage for future experimental research addressing steroid stress responses.

  1. Sources of variation in plasma corticosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone in the male northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis): II. Effects of urbanization, food supplementation and social stress.

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    Wright, Sarah; Fokidis, H Bobby

    2016-09-01

    Perturbations in an organism's environment can induce significant shifts in hormone secretory patterns. In this context, the glucocorticoid (GC) steroids secreted by the adrenal cortex have received much attention from ecologists and behaviorists due to their role in the vertebrate stress response. Adrenal GCs, such as corticosterone (CORT), are highly responsive to instability in environmental and social conditions. However, little is understood about how adrenal dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is influenced by changing conditions. We conducted field experiments to determine how circulating CORT and DHEA vary during restraint stress in the male northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis). Specifically, we examined how four different changes in the physical (urbanization and food availability) and social (territorial conflict, distress of a mate) environment affect CORT and DHEA levels. The majority of cardinals responded to restraint stress by increasing and decreasing CORT and DHEA, respectively, however this depended on sampling context. Cardinals sampled from urban habitats had both lower initial and restraint stress CORT concentrations, but a comparable DHEA pattern to those sampled from a forest. Supplementing food to territorial males did not alter circulating initial DHEA or CORT concentrations nor did it change the response to restraint stress when compared to unsupplemented controls. Exposing cardinals to varying durations of song playback, which mimics a territorial intrusion, did not affect CORT levels, but did attenuate the DHEA response to restraint stress. Examining a larger dataset of males captured before, after or at the same time as their female mate, allowed us to address how the stress of a captured mate affected the male's CORT and DHEA response. Males showed elevated initial and restraint CORT and DHEA when their female mate was captured first. Taken together, these data demonstrate that both CORT and DHEA secretion patterns depends on

  2. The prolactin response to an acute stressor in relation to parental care and corticosterone in a short-lived bird, the Eurasian hoopoe.

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    Schmid, Baptiste; Chastel, Olivier; Jenni, Lukas

    2011-10-01

    Prolactin plays an important role in mediating parental care in birds, but little is known about changes in prolactin levels when animals disrupt their reproductive behaviour during emergency life-history stages. We investigated the variation of prolactin levels with breeding stage, sex, body condition and as a response to a standardized acute stressor in a small short-lived bird, the Eurasian hoopoe Upupa epops under natural field conditions. We found higher baseline levels of prolactin in females during the brooding phase than in their mates which feed them and their chicks at this stage. Moreover, this is the first report of a differential prolactin stress-response between sexes with contrasting parental care within a breeding phase. Capture, handling and restraint induced a clear decrease of prolactin levels which was less pronounced in females at the very early stage of brooding compared to females in later stages. In contrast, the prolactin stress response in males remained nearly constant over the breeding stages and was stronger than in females. Baseline levels of prolactin, but not handling-induced levels, were positively correlated with body condition. We found a weak relationship between the decrease in prolactin due to acute handling stress and handling-induced levels of corticosterone. Taken together, both baseline and stress response levels of prolactin were related to the amount of parental care, although we found no relationship with reproductive success. It appears that the response to an acute stressor in prolactin levels is finely tuned to parental duties and investment. Hence, prolactin appears to be involved in mediating the trade-off between current reproduction versus self-maintenance and future reproduction.

  3. Feather corticosterone reveals effect of moulting conditions in the autumn on subsequent reproductive output and survival in an Arctic migratory bird.

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    Harms, N Jane; Legagneux, Pierre; Gilchrist, H Grant; Bêty, Joël; Love, Oliver P; Forbes, Mark R; Bortolotti, Gary R; Soos, Catherine

    2015-02-07

    For birds, unpredictable environments during the energetically stressful times of moulting and breeding are expected to have negative fitness effects. Detecting those effects however, might be difficult if individuals modulate their physiology and/or behaviours in ways to minimize short-term fitness costs. Corticosterone in feathers (CORTf) is thought to provide information on total baseline and stress-induced CORT levels at moulting and is an integrated measure of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity during the time feathers are grown. We predicted that CORTf levels in northern common eider females would relate to subsequent body condition, reproductive success and survival, in a population of eiders nesting in the eastern Canadian Arctic during a capricious period marked by annual avian cholera outbreaks. We collected CORTf data from feathers grown during previous moult in autumn and data on phenology of subsequent reproduction and survival for 242 eider females over 5 years. Using path analyses, we detected a direct relationship between CORTf and arrival date and body condition the following year. CORTf also had negative indirect relationships with both eider reproductive success and survival of eiders during an avian cholera outbreak. This indirect effect was dramatic with a reduction of approximately 30% in subsequent survival of eiders during an avian cholera outbreak when mean CORTf increased by 1 standard deviation. This study highlights the importance of events or processes occurring during moult on subsequent expression of life-history traits and relation to individual fitness, and shows that information from non-destructive sampling of individuals can track carry-over effects across seasons.

  4. Impact of water temperature and stressor controllability on swim stress-induced changes in body temperature, serum corticosterone, and immobility in rats.

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    Drugan, Robert C; Eren, Senem; Hazi, Agnes; Silva, Jennifer; Christianson, John P; Kent, Stephen

    2005-10-01

    The present study compared the effects of three different water temperatures (20, 25, and 30 degrees C) and stressor controllability on several physiological and behavioral endpoints in an intermittent swim stress paradigm. The escape latency of rats in the 20 and 25 degrees C water was less than that observed for the 30 degrees C group. Both escape and yoked groups at 20 and 25 degrees C exhibited moderate to severe hypothermia following the swim stress session that returned to prestress levels 30-40 min post-stress. At 30 degrees C core body temperature (Tb) only decreased by 1 degree C for either swim group. Following swim, serum corticosterone (CORT) levels were significantly elevated in both escape and yoked groups in comparison to confined and home cage controls. The confined control group showed a significant elevation that was approximately halfway between the home cage control and the swim stress groups. At 30 degrees C, there was still a significant elevation of serum CORT in both swim groups in comparison to confined and home cage controls. Therefore, 30 degrees C appears to be the optimal water temperature to evaluate stress controllability effects in the current paradigm. In a final experiment, swim stressor controllability effects were examined in a 5 min forced swim test (FST) 24 h following the initial stress exposure. Rats exposed to yoked-inescapable swim stress at 30 degrees C exhibited more immobility than their escapable swim stress and confined counterparts, while the escape and confined controls did not differ. These results demonstrate that the behavioral deficits observed in the FST are attributable to the stress of inescapable swim and not swim stress per se.

  5. Chronic corticosterone exposure persistently elevates the expression of memory-related genes in the lateral amygdala and enhances the consolidation of a Pavlovian fear memory.

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    Monsey, Melissa S; Boyle, Lara M; Zhang, Melinda L; Nguyen, Caroline P; Kronman, Hope G; Ota, Kristie T; Duman, Ronald S; Taylor, Jane R; Schafe, Glenn E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to stress has been widely implicated in the development of anxiety disorders, yet relatively little is known about the long-term effects of chronic stress on amygdala-dependent memory formation. Here, we examined the effects of a history of chronic exposure to the stress-associated adrenal steroid corticosterone (CORT) on the consolidation of a fear memory and the expression of memory-related immediate early genes (IEGs) in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA). Rats received chronic exposure to CORT (50 μg/ml) in their drinking water for 2 weeks and were then titrated off the CORT for an additional 6 days followed by a 2 week 'wash-out' period consisting of access to plain water. Rats were then either sacrificed to examine the expression of memory-related IEG expression in the LA or given auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning. We show that chronic exposure to CORT leads to a persistent elevation in the expression of the IEGs Arc/Arg3.1 and Egr-1 in the LA. Further, we show that rats with a history of chronic CORT exposure exhibit enhanced consolidation of a fear memory; short-term memory (STM) is not affected, while long-term memory (LTM) is significantly enhanced. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine following the chronic CORT exposure period was observed to effectively reverse both the persistent CORT-related increases in memory-related IEG expression in the LA and the CORT-related enhancement in fear memory consolidation. Our findings suggest that chronic exposure to CORT can regulate memory-related IEG expression and fear memory consolidation processes in the LA in a long-lasting manner and that treatment with fluoxetine can reverse these effects.

  6. Chronic corticosterone exposure persistently elevates the expression of memory-related genes in the lateral amygdala and enhances the consolidation of a Pavlovian fear memory.

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    Melissa S Monsey

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to stress has been widely implicated in the development of anxiety disorders, yet relatively little is known about the long-term effects of chronic stress on amygdala-dependent memory formation. Here, we examined the effects of a history of chronic exposure to the stress-associated adrenal steroid corticosterone (CORT on the consolidation of a fear memory and the expression of memory-related immediate early genes (IEGs in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA. Rats received chronic exposure to CORT (50 μg/ml in their drinking water for 2 weeks and were then titrated off the CORT for an additional 6 days followed by a 2 week 'wash-out' period consisting of access to plain water. Rats were then either sacrificed to examine the expression of memory-related IEG expression in the LA or given auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning. We show that chronic exposure to CORT leads to a persistent elevation in the expression of the IEGs Arc/Arg3.1 and Egr-1 in the LA. Further, we show that rats with a history of chronic CORT exposure exhibit enhanced consolidation of a fear memory; short-term memory (STM is not affected, while long-term memory (LTM is significantly enhanced. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI fluoxetine following the chronic CORT exposure period was observed to effectively reverse both the persistent CORT-related increases in memory-related IEG expression in the LA and the CORT-related enhancement in fear memory consolidation. Our findings suggest that chronic exposure to CORT can regulate memory-related IEG expression and fear memory consolidation processes in the LA in a long-lasting manner and that treatment with fluoxetine can reverse these effects.

  7. Variations in maternal care alter corticosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels, estrous cycle and folliculogenesis and stimulate the expression of estrogen receptors alpha and beta in the ovaries of UCh rats

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    Amorim João PA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in maternal care are associated with neonatal stress, hormonal disturbances and reproductive injuries during adulthood. However, the effects of these variations on sex hormones and steroid receptors during ovary development remain undetermined. This study aimed to investigate whether variations in maternal care are able to influence the hormonal profile, follicular dynamics and expression of AR, ER-alpha and ER-beta in the ovaries of UCh rat offspring. Methods Twenty-four adult UCh rats, aged 120 days, were randomly divided into two groups (UChA and UChB and mated. Maternal care was assessed from birth (day 0 to the 10th postnatal day (PND. In adulthood, twenty adult female rats (UChA and UChB offspring; n = 10/group, aged 120 days, were euthanized by decapitation during the morning estrus. Results UChA females (providing high maternal care more frequently displayed the behaviors of carrying pups, as well as licking/grooming and arched back nursing cares. Also, mothers providing high care had elevated corticosterone levels. Additionally, offspring receiving low maternal care showed the highest estrous cycle duration, increased corticosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels, overexpression of receptors ER-alpha and ER-beta, increased numbers of primordial, antral and mature follicles and accentuated granulosa cell proliferation. Conclusions Our study suggests that low maternal care alters corticosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels, disrupting the estrous cycle and folliculogenesis and differentially regulating the expression of ER-alpha and ER-beta in the ovaries of adult rats.

  8. Involvement of high plasma corticosterone status and activation of brain regional serotonin metabolism in long-term erythrosine-induced rearing motor hyper activity in young adult male rats.

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    Dalal, Arindam; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2010-07-01

    Long-term consumption of artificial food color(s) can induce behavioral hyperactivity in human and experimental animals, but no neurobiochemical mechanism is defined. This study investigates the role of brain regional serotonin metabolism including its turnover, MAO-A activity, and plasma corticosterone status in relation to behavioral disturbances due to an artificial food color, erythrosine. Long-term (15 or 30 consecutive days) erythrosine administration with higher dosage (10 or 100 mg/kg/day, p.o.) produced optimal hyperactive state in exploratory behavior (rearing motor activity) after 2 h of last erythrosine administration, in young adult male albino rats. Erythrosine-induced stimulation in brain regional (medulla-pons, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and corpus striatum) serotonin metabolism (measuring steady state levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA, MAO-A activity), including its turnover (pargyline-induced 5-HT accumulation and 5-HIAA declination rate), as well as plasma corticosterone were also observed depending on dosage(s) and duration(s) of erythrosine administration under similar experimental conditions. The lower dosage of erythrosine (1 mg/kg/day, p.o.) under similar conditions did not affect either of the above. These findings suggests (a) the induction as well as optimal effect of long-term erythrosine (artificial food color) on behavioral hyperactivity in parallel with increase in 5-HT level in brain regions, (b) the activation of brain regional serotonin biosynthesis in accordance with plasma corticosterone status under such behavioral hyperactivity, and (c) a possible inhibitory influence of the enhanced glucocorticoids-serotonin interaction on erythrosine-induced rearing motor hyperactivity in young adult mammals.

  9. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone secretion by perifused pituitary and adrenal glands from rodents exposed to 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).

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    Pitt, J A; Buckalew, A R; House, D E; Abbott, B D

    2000-10-26

    Although in utero maternal stress has been shown to have lasting effects on rodent offspring, fetal effects of chemically-induced alterations of the maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) have not been well studied. This study examined the effects of in vivo 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on pituitary-adrenal function in the male rat, pregnant female rat and pregnant female mouse. The secretion of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) in pituitary and adrenal glands, respectively, was assessed in ex vivo perifusion cultures. Male and pregnant female (gestation day 8) Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged once with 10 microgram/kg TCDD, pregnant female mice once with 24 microgram/kg TCDD, and euthanized 10 days later. Hemi-pituitary (rat) or whole anterior pituitaries (mice) and right adrenal glands from the same animal were quartered, perifused under baseline and stimulated conditions. In both males and pregnant females, TCDD did not affect corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-stimulated ACTH secretion. Neither total pituitary ACTH nor plasma ACTH was altered in either sex or species by TCDD treatment. ACTH-stimulated CORT secretion was not affected by TCDD in either sex or species, and adrenal tissue and plasma CORT levels were unchanged in males and pregnant females by TCDD. However, the plasma ACTH:CORT ratio was decreased about 46% in male rats treated with TCDD. Plasma CORT levels were 23-fold higher and plasma ACTH levels were 1.5-fold higher in pregnant females than in male rats. In male versus female rats, adrenal CORT and anterior pituitary ACTH tissue levels were about 7.5- and 1.75-fold higher and ACTH, respectively. Female mouse adrenal tissue CORT was about 4-fold greater than female rat. The reduced plasma ACTH:CORT ratio in the male rat suggests that TCDD disturbs HPA function. Exposure of male rat to a 5-fold higher dose in earlier studies clearly demonstrated effects of TCDD on male rat HPA. The present

  10. Skin Inqjuries Reduce Survival and Modulate Corticosterone, C-Reactive Protein, Complement Component 3, IgM, and Prostaglandin E2 after Whole-Body Reactor-Produced Mixed Field (n + γ-Photons Irradiation

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    Juliann G. Kiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin injuries such as wounds or burns following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury (RCI increase mortality more than whole-body γ-irradiation alone. Wound-induced decreases in survival after irradiation are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to systemic bacterial infection. Among these factors, radiation-induced increases in interleukin-6 (IL-6 concentrations in serum were amplified by skin wound trauma. Herein, the IL-6-induced stress proteins including C-reactive protein (CRP, complement 3 (C3, immunoglobulin M (IgM, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were evaluated after skin injuries given following a mixed radiation environment that might be found after a nuclear incident. In this report, mice received 3 Gy of reactor-produced mixed field (n+γ-photons radiations at 0.38 Gy/min followed by nonlethal skin wounding or burning. Both wounds and burns reduced survival and increased CRP, C3, and PGE2 in serum after radiation. Decreased IgM production along with an early rise in corticosterone followed by a subsequent decrease was noted for each RCI situation. These results suggest that RCI-induced alterations of corticosterone, CRP, C3, IgM, and PGE2 cause homeostatic imbalance and may contribute to reduced survival. Agents inhibiting these responses may prove to be therapeutic for RCI and improve related survival.

  11. Mechanism of nuclear factor of activated T-cells mediated FasL expression in corticosterone -treated mouse Leydig tumor cells

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    Wang Qian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fas and FasL is important mediators of apoptosis. We have previously reported that the stress levels of corticosterone (CORT, glucocorticoid in rat increase expression of Fas/FasL and activate Fas/FasL signal pathway in rat Leydig cells, which consequently leads to apoptosis. Moreover, our another study showed that nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT may play a potential role in up-regulation of FasL during CORT-treated rat Leydig cell. It is not clear yet how NFAT is involved in CORT-induced up-regulation of FasL. The aim of the present study is to investigate the molecular mechanisms of NFAT-mediated FasL expression in CORT-treated Leydig cells. Results Western blot analysis showed that NFAT2 expression is present in mouse Leydig tumor cell (mLTC-1. CORT-induced increase in FasL expression in mLTC-1 was ascertained by Western Blot analysis and CORT-induced increase in apoptotic frequency of mLTC-1 cells was detected by FACS with annexin-V labeling. Confocal imaging of NFAT2-GFP in mLTC-1 showed that high level of CORT stimulated NFAT translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NFAT2 significantly attenuated CORT-induced up-regulation of FasL expression in mLTC. These results corroborated our previous finding that NFAT2 is involved in CORT-induced FasL expression in rat Leydig cells and showed that mLTC-1 is a suitable model for investigating the mechanism of CORT-induced FasL expression. The analysis of reporter constructs revealed that the sequence between -201 and +71 of mouse FasL gene is essential for CORT-induced FasL expression. The mutation analysis demonstrated that CORT-induced FasL expression is mediated via an NFAT binding element located in the -201 to +71 region. Co-transfection studies with an NFAT2 expression vector and reporter construct containing -201 to +71 region of FasL gene showed that NFAT2 confer a strong inducible activity to the FasL promoter at its

  12. Bovine serum albumin as the dominant form of dietary protein reduces subcutaneous fat mass, plasma leptin and plasma corticosterone in high fat-fed C57/BL6J mice.

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    McManus, Bettina L; Korpela, Riitta; Speakman, John R; Cryan, John F; Cotter, Paul D; Nilaweera, Kanishka N

    2015-08-28

    Increasing evidence suggests that the source of dietary protein can have an impact on weight gain and fat mass during high-fat feeding in both humans and rodents. The present study examined whether dietary bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the dominant source of protein alters energy balance and adiposity associated with high-fat feeding. C57/BL6J mice were given a diet with 10 % of energy from fat and 20 % of energy from casein or a diet with 45 % of energy from fat and either 20 % of energy from casein (HFD) or BSA (HFD+BSA) for 13 weeks. The HFD+BSA diet did not significantly alter daily energy expenditure, locomotor activity and RER, but did increase cumulative energy intake and percentage of lean mass while reducing feed efficiency and percentage of fat mass when compared with the HFD (Psubcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), the HFD+BSA diet increased the mRNA levels of PPARα (PPARA), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3), but reduced the mRNA level of leptin when compared with the HFD (P< 0·05). The SAT mRNA levels of PPARA, CPT1b and UCP3 were negatively correlated (P< 0·05) with SAT mass, which was reduced in HFD+BSA mice compared with HFD controls (P< 0·01). No differences in epididymal fat mass existed between the groups. The HFD+BSA diet normalised plasma leptin and corticosterone levels compared with the HFD (P< 0·05). While differences in leptin levels were associated with the percentage of fat mass (P< 0·01), changes in corticosterone concentrations were independent of the percentage of fat mass (P< 0·05). The data suggest that the HFD+BSA diet influences plasma leptin levels via SAT mass reduction where mRNA levels of genes linked to β-oxidation were increased, whereas differences in plasma corticosterone levels were not related to fat mass reduction.

  13. Concentrations of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and sex steroid hormones and the expression of the androgen receptor in the pituitary and adrenal glands of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

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    Kiezun, J; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-01-01

    Androgens take part in the regulation of puberty and promote growth and development. They play their biological role by binding to a specific androgen receptor (AR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of AR mRNA and protein in the pituitary and adrenal glands, to localize AR protein in luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing pituitary and adrenocortical cells, to determine plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone and the concentrations of corticosterone, testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4) and oestradiol (E2) in the adrenal glands of male turkeys at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. The concentrations of hormones and the expression of AR varied during development. The expression of AR mRNA and protein in pituitary increased during the growth. The increase of AR mRNA levels in pituitary occurred earlier than increase of AR protein. The percentage of pituitary cells expressing ARs in the population of LH-secreting cells increased in week 20. It suggests that AR expression in LH-producing pituitary cells is determined by the phase of development. The drop in adrenal AR mRNA and protein expression was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of adrenal androgens. Those results could point to the presence of a compensatory mechanism that enables turkeys to avoid the potentially detrimental effects of high androgen concentrations. Our results will expand our knowledge of the role of steroids in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys from the first month of age until maturity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Repeated administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine or 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane produces tolerance to its stimulatory effect on adrenocorticotropin hormone but not prolactin or corticosterone secretion in rats.

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    Mazzola-Pomietto, P; Aulakh, C S; Huang, S J; Murphy, D L

    1996-11-01

    In an attempt to clarify whether m-chlorophenylpiperazine-(m-CPP) and 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane-(DOI) induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropin hormone, corticosterone and prolactin secretion are mediated by the same or different mechanisms, we studied the time course of development of tolerance to the neuroendocrine effects of m-CPP (2.5 mg/kg/day) and DOI (2.5 mg/kg/day) in rats and, furthermore, also evaluated possible cross-tolerance in responses to m-CPP and DOI. We observed the development of tolerance in adrenocorticotropin hormone responses after a single i.p. injection of m-CPP. However, there was no cross-tolerance to DOI when chronic (13 days) m-CPP-treated animals were challenged with DOI (2.5 mg/kg). Injections of DOI (2.5 mg/kg) for six days were required before tolerance developed to the effect of DOI on adrenocorticotropin hormone. Furthermore, cross-tolerance was observed when DOI-treated animals (2.5 mg/kg/day x 6) were challenged with m-CPP (2.5 mg/kg) on day 7. In contrast, daily administration of m-CPP and DOI for 13 days did not produce tolerance to their stimulating effects on corticosterone and prolactin secretion. Hypothalamic levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid but not 5-HT were significantly reduced after acute or subchronic administration of both m-CPP and DOI. Furthermore, no change in the approximate 50% reduction in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid after m-CPP was observed after subchronic administration of this drug. These findings suggest that separate mechanisms mediate m-CPP and DOI-induced adrenocorticotropin hormone secretion in rats.

  15. Gene conversion in the CYP11B2 gene encoding P450c11AS is associated with, but does not cause, the syndrome of corticosterone methyloxidase II deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fardella, C.E.; Hum, D.W.; Rodriguez, H. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Cytochrome P450c11AS (aldosterone synthase) has 11{beta}hydroxylase, 18-hydroxylase, and 18-oxidase activities and is expressed solely in the adrenal zona glomerulosa. Corticosterone methyloxidase II (CMOII) deficiency denotes a rare disorder of adrenal steroidogenesis in which only the 18-oxidase activity of P450c11AS is disrupted, while the 11{beta}-hydroxylase and 18-hydroxylase activities persist. Such patients have elevated serum concentrations of corticosterone and 18-hydroxycorticosterone and very low or unmeasurable concentrations of aldosterone, often resulting in a clinical salt-losing crisis in infancy. We have sought mutations causing CMOII deficiency in outbred populations. In three of four unrelated P450c11AS alleles from two unrelated patients with CMOII deficiency, we found a gene conversion event in which exons 3 and 4 of the CYP11B2 gene encoding P450c11AS were changed to the sequence of the nearby CYP11B1 gene, which encodes the related enzyme P450c11{beta}. This conversion resulted in a mutant P450c11AS protein carrying three changes. We built seven vectors expressing P450c11AS carrying each mutation singly, each of the three possible pairs of mutations, and the triple mutation as found in the proband. The activities in steroidogenic MA-10 and JEG-3 cells were 10- to 20-fold higher. In these systems all of the mutants retained normal 18-oxidase activity, indicating that the detected gene conversion event is associated with but does not cause CMOII deficiency. None of the four CPY11B2 alleles in these two patients bore other identifiable mutations. These patients might have mutations in the promoters or other noncoding regions, or mutations in genes other than CYP11B2 may cause the syndrome of CMOII deficiency. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Uptake of mIBG and catecholamines in noradrenaline- and organic cation transporter-expressing cells: potential use of corticosterone for a preferred uptake in neuroblastoma- and pheochromocytoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Melanie [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Children' s University Hospital, D-72072 Tuebingen (Germany)], E-mail: melanie.bayer@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Kuci, Zyrafete [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Children' s University Hospital, D-72072 Tuebingen (Germany); Schoemig, Edgar; Gruendemann, Dirk [Department of Pharmacology, University of Koeln, D-50924 Koeln (Germany); Dittmann, Helmut [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Tuebingen, D-72072 Tuebingen (Germany); Handgretinger, Rupert; Bruchelt, Gernot [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Children' s University Hospital, D-72072 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    For imaging of neuroblastoma and phaeochromocytoma, [{sup 123}I]meta-iodobenzylguanidine ([{sup 123}I]mIBG) is routinely used, whereas [{sup 18}F]6-fluorodopamine ([{sup 18}F]6-FDA) is sporadically applied for positron emission tomography in pheochromocytoma. Both substances are taken up by catecholamine transporters (CATs). In competition, some other cell types are able to take up catecholamines and related compounds probably by organic cation (OCT) [extraneuronal monoamine (EMT)] transporters (OCT1, OCT2, OCT3=EMT). In this study, we investigated the uptake of radioiodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) as well as [{sup 3}H]dopamine (mimicring 6-fluorodopamine) and [{sup 3}H]noradrenaline. SK-N-SH (neuroblastoma) and PC-12 (phaeochromocytoma) cells were used and compared with HEK-293 cells transfected with OCT1, OCT2 and OCT3, respectively. In order to gain a more selective uptake in CAT expressing tumor cells, different specific inhibitors were measured. Uptake of mIBG into OCT-expressing cells was similar or even better as into both CAT-expressing cell lines, whereas dopamine and noradrenaline uptake was much lower in OCT-expressing cells. In presence of corticosterone (f.c. 10{sup -4} M], catecholamine and mIBG uptake into SK-N-SH and PC-12 cells was only slightly reduced. In contrast, this process was significantly inhibited in OCT2 and OCT3 transfected HEK-293 as well as in Caki-1 cells, which naturally express OCT3. We conclude that the well-known corticosteroid corticosterone might be used in combination with [{sup 18}F]6-FDA or [{sup 123}I]mIBG to improve specific imaging of neuroblastoma and pheochromocytoma and to reduce irradiation dose to nontarget organs in [{sup 131}I]mIBG treatment.

  17. The characteristic long-term upregulation of hippocampal NF-κB complex in PTSD-like behavioral stress response is normalized by high-dose corticosterone and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate administered immediately after exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Hagit; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Matar, Michael A; Zohar, Joseph; Kaplan, Zeev

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor for genes involved in cell survival, differentiation, inflammation, and growth. This study examined the role of NF-κB pathway in stress-induced PTSD-like behavioral response patterns in rats. Immunohistochemical technique was used to detect the expression of the NF-κB p50 and p65 subunits, I-κBα, p38, and phospho-p38 in the hippocampal subregions at 7 days after exposure to predator scent stress. Expression of p65 nuclear translocation was quantified by western blot as the level of NF-κB activation. The effects of intraperitoneally administered corticosterone or a selective NF-κB inhibitor (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC)) at 1 h post exposure on behavioral tests (elevated plus-maze and acoustic startle response) were evaluated 7 days later. Hippocampal expressions of those genes were subsequently evaluated. All data were analyzed in relation to individual behavior patterns. Extreme behavioral responder animals displayed significant upregulation of p50 and p65 with concomitant downregulation of I-κBα, p38, and phospho-p38 levels in hippocampal structures compared with minimal behavioral responders and controls. Immediate post-exposure treatment with high-dose corticosterone and PDTC significantly reduced prevalence rates of extreme responders and normalized the expression of those genes. Stress-induced upregulation of NF-κB complex in the hippocampus may contribute to the imbalance between what are normally precisely orchestrated and highly coordinated physiological and behavioral processes, thus associating it with stress-related disorders.

  18. Preventive mechanisms of Zhuyang-ningshen formula on the actionof depressive mice induced by corticosterone%助阳宁神方拮抗皮质酮致抑郁作用机制实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴建国; 王中立; 陈琳; 赵玉男; 詹瑧; 黄玉芳

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨助阳宁神方(ZNF)拮抗皮质酮诱导小鼠抑郁样行为的作用机制.方法:采用5-羟色氨酸(5-HTP)诱导的甩头行为模型和育亨宾毒性模型观察小鼠行为学改变;皮质酮皮下注射制备抑郁动物模型,Western blot及免疫组化检测给药4周后海马星形胶质细胞胶质纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)表达改变.结果:5-HTP诱导的甩头行为模型中,ZNF各组甩头次数与正常组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);ZNF未显著增加育亨宾毒性模型中小鼠死亡率(P>0.05);ZNF可上调模型组GFAP的表达下降.结论:ZNF抗抑郁作用可能不是通过影响单胺类神经递质产生,而可能与星形胶质细胞活性改变有关.%Objective: To explore the preventive effects of Zhuyang- ningshen formula ( ZNF) on action of depressive mice induced by corticosterone. Methods; The head-twitching test models induced by 5" hydroxytryptophane (5- HTP) and yohimbine antagonistic models were used to evaluate behavior change. Mice models were developed by subcutaneous corticosterone injection. The expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the hippocampal tissues were decteted after drug administion on the 4th week by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results; The rate of head-twitching behavior was not higher in ZNF groups than that in control group(P >0. 05) ; ZNF did not enhance the yohimbine-induced lethality (P >0. 05) ; In contrast to the control group, the levels of GFAP were significantly decreased in the model group. In contrast to the model group, all dosage of ZNF water decoction could significantly improve protein levels of GFAP in the hippocampal tissues. Conclusion; The anti- depression function of ZNF can not affect monoamine neurotransmitter mechanism, butinfluence regulation of activity in astrocyte.

  19. A mouse model of behavioral depression induced by repeated corticosterone injections%糖皮质激素注射建立小鼠行为抑郁症模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭军波; 季丽莉; 金雪花; 王振宇

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究糖皮质激素注射小鼠抑郁症样情感行为变化.方法 C57/B6雄性小鼠18只随机分为3组,模型组以20 mkg剂量每日1次注射皮质酮,持续21 d,另有生理盐水对照组每日注射等剂量生理盐水21 d,空白对照组不做任何处置,观察小鼠体重变化,用敞箱实验及糖水消耗试验测定动物行为.结果 抑郁模型组小鼠代表焦虑行为的敞箱试验得分明显降低、反应快感行为的奖赏糖水消耗百分比明显降低.结论 糖皮质激素持续注射法可用于制作行为小鼠抑郁模型,以及探究抑郁症行为变化发病机制以及寻找更适合治疗抑郁症的药物.%Objective To explore depression-like Emotional behavioral induced by repeated corticosterone injection. Methods C57/B6 male mice were divided into 3 groups. The model group received repeated injections of vehicle and 20 mg/kg of corticosterone for 21 days, while the saline control group injected daily dose of saline solution for 21 days, blank control group without any treatment. Thenwe bserved the body weight change of mice, used open-field test and sugar consumption test to determine the behaviors of these animals. Results Compare with the control group, the mice showed reduced squares crossing in the open-field test which reflect anxiety behavior, and significantly reduced preference in sucrose preference test which was a reaction behavior of the reward. The mice model of depression had been established successfully. Conclusion Clucocorticosteroid continuous injection method can successfully establish a reliable mouse behavioral depression model, and can be used to further explore the pathogenesis behavioral variation of depression as well as looking for drugs in the treatment of depression

  20. Icariin reverses corticosterone-induced depression-like behavior, decrease in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and metabolic network disturbances revealed by NMR-based metabonomics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Meng-Juan; Han, Bin; Wang, Shu-mei; Liang, Sheng-wang; Zou, Zhong-jie

    2016-05-10

    Previously published reports have revealed the antidepressant-like effects of icariin in a chronic mild stress model of depression and in a social defeat stress model in mice. However, the therapeutic effect of icariin in an animal model of glucocorticoid-induced depression remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanisms of icariin in a rat model of corticosterone (CORT)-induced depression by using a combination of behavioral and biochemical assessments and NMR-based metabonomics. The depression model was established by subcutaneous injections of CORT for 21 consecutive days in rats, as evidenced by reduced sucrose intake and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, together with an increase in immobility time in a forced swim test (FST). Icariin significantly increased sucrose intake and hippocampal BDNF level and decreased the immobility time in FST in CORT-induced depressive rats, suggesting its potent antidepressant activity. Moreover, metabonomic analysis identified eight, five and three potential biomarkers associated with depression in serum, urine and brain tissue extract, respectively. These biomarkers are primarily involved in energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism and gut microbe metabolism. Icariin reversed the pathological process of CORT-induced depression, partially via regulation of the disturbed metabolic pathways. These results provide important mechanistic insights into the protective effects of icariin against CORT-induced depression and metabolic dysfunction.

  1. 木豆叶醇提物对皮质酮诱导的PC12细胞损伤的保护作用%Protective Effect of Alcohol Extract of Cajanus cajan on Corticosterone-induced Lesion in Cultured PC12 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜保平; 刘亚旻; 李宗阳; 宋波; 潘瑞乐

    2012-01-01

    建立皮质酮诱导的PC12细胞损伤模型并观察木豆叶醇提物及不同组分对皮质酮损伤PC12细胞的保护作用.以100μ mol/L的皮质酮诱导PC12细胞损伤;损伤后的PC12细胞与木豆叶醇提物及不同组分孵育24h,通过形态学观察、MTT检测、LDH测定,研究各组分对皮质酮损伤PC12细胞的保护作用.结果表明,PC12细胞与皮质酮孵育48 h后细胞存活率明显降低,而LDH水平显著升高.而加入木豆叶醇提物及各组分时上述效果明显减轻,且存在明显的剂量依赖关系.从以上结果可知,木豆叶醇提物及不同组分对皮质酮损伤的PC12细胞均有保护作用,且醇提物的效果最好.%The aim of this paper was to establish the corticosterone-induced damage model in PC12 cells and study the protective activity of alcohol extracts and its fractions from Cajanus cajan on corticosterone-induced PC12 cells. PC12 cells were exposed to different concentrations of corticosterone to determine the optimum concentration of establishing the damage model,and then the injured PC12 cells were incubated with the alcohol extract and its fractions for 24 h. After that the neuroprotective effect on injured PC12 cells was investigated by morphological observation, LDH detection and MTT determination. The results showed that the survival rate of PC12 cells and the cells exposed to corticosterone (100 (μmol/L) for 48 h decreased obviously,with an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level,but the effect became weak when the alcohol extracts and its fractions from the C. cajan was added to the PC 12 cells,and it was in a dose-dependent manner. The author suggests that the alcohol extract and its fractions from C. cajan can generate a neuroprotective effect on injured PC 12 cells induced by corticosterone,and that of alcohol extract is the most significant.

  2. Maternal exposure to low levels of corticosterone during lactation protects adult rat progeny against TNBS-induced colitis: A study on GR-mediated anti-inflammatory effect and prokineticin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinni, Manuela; Zuena, Anna Rita; Marconi, Veronica; Petrella, Carla; Fusco, Ilaria; Giuli, Chiara; Canu, Nadia; Severini, Cinzia; Broccardo, Maria; Theodorou, Vassilia; Lattanzi, Roberta; Casolini, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The early phase of life represents a critical period for the development of an organism. Interestingly, early life experiences are able to influence the development of the gastrointestinal tract and the reactivity to colonic inflammatory stress. We recently demonstrated that adult male rats exposed to low doses of corticosterone during lactation (CORT-nursed rats) are protected against experimental colitis induced by the intracolonic infusion of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Based on these interesting results, we wanted to better investigate which cellular actors could be involved in the protection of CORT-nursed rats from TNBS-induced experimental colitis. Therefore, in the present work, we focused our attention on different factors implicated in GR-mediated anti-inflammatory effect. To address this issue, colonic tissues, collected from control and CORT-nursed healthy animals and from control and CORT-nursed colitic rats, were processed and the following inflammatory factors were evaluated: the expression of (i) glucocorticoid receptors (GR), (ii) glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ), (iii) phospho-p65NF-κB, (iv) the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α, (v) the prokineticins PK2 and PK2L and (vi) their receptors PKR1 and PKR2. We found that adult CORT-nursed rats, in comparison to controls, showed increased expression of colonic GR and reduced expression of pro-inflammatory molecules (IL-1β, TNF-α, PK2 and PK2L) in response to inflammatory colitis. The observed changes were associated with an increase in GILZ colonic expression and with a reduction in phospo-p65NF-κB colonic expression.

  3. The effect of social group size on feather corticosterone in the co-operatively breeding Smooth-billed Ani (Crotophaga ani): An assay validation and analysis of extreme social living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Joshua K.; Muir, Cameron; Hurd, Conner S.; Hing, Jing S.; Quinn, James S.

    2017-01-01

    Living closely with others can provide a myriad of fitness benefits, from shared territory defense to co-operative resource acquisition. Costs of social aggregation are not absent, however, and likely influence optimal and observed groups’ sizes in a social species. Here, we explored optimal group size in a joint-nesting cuckoo species (the Smooth-billed Ani, Crotophaga ani) using endocrine markers of stress physiology (corticosterone, or CORT). Smooth-billed Anis exhibit intense reproductive competition that is exacerbated in atypically large groups. We therefore hypothesized that intra-group competition (measured by social group size) mediates the desirability and physiological cost of social group membership in this species. To test this hypothesis, we captured 47 adult Smooth-billed Anis (31 males, 16 females) during the breeding seasons of 2012-2014 in south-western Puerto Rico, and documented social group sizes. Tail feathers were sampled and used to quantify CORT (pg/mg) in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) (n = 50). Our analyses show significant differences in feather-CORT of adults between categorical group sizes, with individuals from atypically large social groups (≥ x + 1SD) having highest mean concentrations (33.319 pg/mg), and individuals from atypically small social groups (≤ x − 1SD) having lowest mean concentrations (8.969 pg/mg). Whether reproductive competition or effort is responsible for elevated CORT in atypically large social groups, however, remains unclear. Our results suggest that living in atypically large groups is physiologically expensive and may represent an evolutionarily unstable strategy. To our knowledge, this is the first study to explore a correlation between stress physiology and group size in a joint-nesting species. PMID:28355280

  4. Co-Application of Corticosterone and Growth Hormone Upregulates NR2B Protein and Increases the NR2B:NR2A Ratio and Synaptic Transmission in the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada S. Mahmoud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This in vitro study aimed to investigate the possible mechanism underlying the protective effect of growth hormone (GH on hippocampal function during periods of heightened glucocorticoid exposure. Methods: This study was conducted between January and June 2005 at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, in Huntington, West Virginia, USA. The effects of the co-application of GH and corticosterone (CORT were tested at different concentrations on the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs of the hippocampal slices of rats in two different age groups. Changes in the protein expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR subunits NR1, NR2B and NR2A were measured in hippocampal brain slices treated with either artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF, low doses of CORT alone or both CORT and GH for three hours. Results: The co-application of CORT and GH was found to have an additive effect on hippocampal synaptic transmission compared to either drug alone. Furthermore, the combined use of low concentrations of GH and CORT was found to have significantly higher effects on the enhancement of fEPSPs in older rats compared to young ones. Both GH and CORT enhanced the protein expression of the NR2A subunit. Simultaneous exposure to low concentrations of GH and CORT significantly enhanced NR2B expression and increased the NR2B:NR2A ratio. In contrast, perfusion with CORT alone caused significant suppression in the NR1 and NR2B protein expression and a decrease in the NR2B:NR2A ratio. Conclusion: These results suggest that NMDARs provide a potential target for mediating the GH potential protective effect against stress and age-related memory and cognitive impairment.

  5. Cerebellin and des-cerebellin exert ACTH-like effects on corticosterone secretion and the intracellular signaling pathway gene expression in cultured rat adrenocortical cells--DNA microarray and QPCR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2009-04-01

    Precerebellins (Cbln) belong to the C1q/TNF superfamily of secreted proteins which have diverse functions. They are abundantly expressed in the cerebellum, however, three of them are also expressed in the rat adrenal gland. All members of the Cbln family form homomeric and heteromeric complexes with each other in vitro and it was suggested that such complexes play a crucial role in normal development of the cerebellum. The aim of our study was to investigate whether Cbln1-derived peptides, cerebellin (CER) and des-Ser1-cerebellin (desCER) are involved in regulating biological functions of rat adrenocortical cells. In the primary culture of rat adrenocortical cells, 24 h exposure to CER or desCER notably stimulated corticosterone output and inhibited proliferative activity and similar effects were evoked by ACTH. To study gene transcript regulation by CER, desCER and ACTH, we applied Oligo GEArray DNA Microarray: Rat Signal Transduction Pathway Finder. In relation to the control culture, 13 of the 113 transcripts present on the array were differentially expressed. These transcripts were either up- or down-regulated by ACTH and/or CER or desCER treatment. Validation of DNA Microarray data by QPCR revealed that only 5 of 13 genes studied were differentially expressed. Of those genes, Fos and Icam1 were up-regulated and Egr1 was down-regulated by ACTH, CER and desCER. The remaining two genes, Fasn (insulin signaling pathway) and Hspb1 (HSP27) (stress signaling pathway), were regulated only by CER and desCER, but not by ACTH. Thus, both CER and desCER have effects similar to and different from corticotrophin on the intracellular signaling pathway gene expression in cultured rat adrenocortical cells.

  6. 粪便皮质酮代谢产物含量作为一项肉鸡热舒适非侵入指标的研究%Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites Content:A Non-Invasive Index of Thermal Comfort in Broiler Chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏红光; 张敏红; 冯京海; 吴鑫; 胡春红

    2014-01-01

    研究粪便皮质酮代谢产物含量作为一项非侵入指标用于肉鸡热舒适评价的效果。本研究包括3个试验:试验1进行了肉鸡粪便皮质酮代谢产物含量的昼夜节律研究;试验2研究了35℃急性热应激2 h 对粪便皮质酮代谢产物含量的影响;试验3研究了10、14、18、22、26、30℃长期(14 d)温度处理对肉鸡粪便皮质酮代谢产物含量的影响。结果表明:1)粪便皮质酮代谢产物含量在06:00~16:00和18:00~04:00期间均没有显著的波动( P >0.05),但整体上白天(08:00~18:00)显著高于夜间(20:00~06:00)(P<0.05);2)急性热应激后2 h 内肉鸡粪便皮质酮代谢产物含量显著升高(P<0.05);3)在10~30℃范围内,肉鸡在不同的温度条件下适应1 d后粪便皮质酮代谢产物含量有显著差异(P<0.05),而超过3 d 之后则没有显著差异( P>0.05)。综上所述,粪便皮质酮代谢产物含量可作为一项非侵入指标对肉鸡热应激做出及时评价。%Fecal corticosterone metabolites content of broiler chickens was studied as a non-invasive index of thermal comfort valuation. Three experiments were conducted in this study:diurnal rhythm of fecal corticoster-one metabolites content was investigated in experiment 1;effects of 35 ℃ acute heat stress for 2 h on fecal cor-ticosterone metabolites content were studied in experiment 2;and in experiment 3,effects of 10,14,18,22, 26 and 30 ℃ prolonged temperature treatments for 14 days on fecal corticosterone metabolites content were re-searched. The results showed as follows:1)there was no marked fluctuation of fecal corticosterone metabolites content both during 06:00 to 16:00 and 18:00 to 04:00(P>0.05),but that was significantly lower at night-time(20:00 to 06:00)than at daytime(08:00 to 18:00)as a whole( P0.05). In conclusion,fecal corticosterone metabolites content can be used as a timely non

  7. Involvement of PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathways in the Protective Effect of Fluoxetine Against Corticosterone-Induced Cytotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bingqing; Li, Yiwen; Niu, Bo; Wang, Xinyi; Cheng, Yufang; Zhou, Zhongzhen; You, Tingting; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Haitao; Xu, Jiangping

    2016-08-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine is neuroprotective in several brain injury models. It is commonly used to treat major depressive disorder and related conditions, but its mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. Activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B/forkhead box O3a (PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a) and protein kinase A/cAMP-response element binding protein (PKA/CREB) signaling pathways has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and might be the downstream target of fluoxetine. Here, we used PC12 cells exposed to corticosterone (CORT) to study the neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine and the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a and PKA/CREB signaling pathways. Our results show that CORT reduced PC12 cells viability by 70 %, and that fluoxetine showed a concentration-dependent neuroprotective effect. Neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine were abolished by inhibition of PI3K, Akt, and PKA using LY294002, KRX-0401, and H89, respectively. Treatment of PC12 cells with fluoxetine resulted in increased phosphorylation of Akt, FoxO3a, and CREB. Fluoxetine also dose-dependently rescued the phosphorylation levels of Akt, FoxO3a, and CREB, following administration of CORT (from 99 to 110, 56 to 170, 80 to 170 %, respectively). In addition, inhibition of PKA and PI3K/Akt resulted in decreased levels of p-CREB, p-Akt, and p-FoxO3a in the presence of fluoxetine. Furthermore, fluoxetine reversed CORT-induced upregulation of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) and Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) via the PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a signaling pathway. H89 treatment reversed the effect of fluoxetine on the mRNA level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which was decreased in the presence of CORT. Our data indicate that fluoxetine elicited neuroprotection toward CORT-induced cell death that involves dual regulation from PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a and PKA/CREB pathways.

  8. Toluene depresses plasma corticosterone in pregnant rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Karin S; Hansen, Åse Marie; Hass, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    of corticosteroids from the maternal to the foetal compartment. Pregnant rats were subjected to either 1500 ppm toluene 6 hr/day and/or a schedule of "Chronic mild stress" during the last two weeks of gestation. Exposure to toluene was associated with reduced birth weight and lower maternal weight gain, the latter...

  9. Toluene depresses plasma corticosterone in pregnant rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, K. S.; Hansen, A. M.; Hass, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    Combined exposure to stressors and chemicals may result in synergistic effects. The effects of prenatal exposure to the organic solvent toluene resemble those observed in offspring of gestationally stressed dams, a possible common mechanism being transfer of stress-/toluene-induced increments of ...

  10. Effects of early enriched environment on long-term behavior development and serum corticosterone level in rats%早期丰富环境对大鼠远期行为发育及血清皮质酮的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马良; 陈燕惠; 韦立新

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨早期丰富环境对大鼠行为发育及血清皮质酮的影响.方法 将45只新生大鼠随机分为丰富环境组、空白对照组和隔离环境组,于大鼠生后31d分别采用开场实验、Lat迷宫测验评价大鼠焦虑、烦躁等行为;采用放射免疫学方法测定大鼠血清皮质酮水平.结果 丰富环境组血清皮质酮水平(8±3 ng/mL)较空白对照组(11±4 ng/mL)及隔离环境组(22±4 ng/mL)明显降低,差异有统计学意义(P <0.01).开场实验结果显示,丰富环境组大鼠穿越格子数、直立次数、理毛次数明显少于空白对照组及隔离环境组大鼠(P<0.05).Lat迷宫试验结果显示,丰富环境组大鼠穿越角落数、直立次数、斜搭在墙上的频率明显少于空白对照组与隔离环境组大鼠(P<0.05).结论 早期丰富环境使大鼠能保持较低的皮质酮水平,减缓焦虑、烦躁等行为,对促进脑发育有重要意义.%Objective To study the effects of early enriched environment on behavioral development and serum corticosterone level in rats. Methods Forty-five neonatal rats were randomly assigned into three groups:blank control,enriched environment and isolated environment. The open-field environment test and the Lat maze test were performed to assess anxiety/irritability-related behaviors of the rats on postnatal day 31. The level of serum corticosterone was measured by radioimmunology assay. Results The level of serum corticosterone in the enriched environment group (8 ± 3 ng/mL) was significantly lower than the blank control (11 ± 4 ng/mL) and the isolated groups (22 ± 4 ng/mL) (P < 0.01 ). The open-field environment test showed that the numbers of passing panels, keeping an erect posture and grooming were less than those in the blank control and the isolated groups (P < 0.05 ). According to the results of the Lat maze test, the frequencies of running across the corner, keeping an erect posture and leaning against the wall in the enriched

  11. The Effect of Xingpijieyu Decoction on Depressive Behavior and Serum 5-HT as well as Corticosterone of Depression Rats from Chronic Stress%醒脾解郁方对抑郁模型大鼠抑郁行为和血清5-羟色胺、皮质酮的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王椿野; 郭蓉娟

    2014-01-01

    目的:初步探索醒脾解郁方对抑郁模型大鼠的抗抑郁行为和血清激素、神经递质变化的影响。方法:本实验将 SD 大鼠随机分为4组:正常组、模型对照组、舍曲林对照组、中药(石菖蒲、西洋参、郁金、熟地黄)组,采用21 d 慢性不可预见性温和应激建立抑郁大鼠模型,以糖水偏爱和旷野试验移动距离评价各组大鼠抑郁行为,用 ELISA 法测定大鼠血清5-羟色胺、皮质酮含量,并比较醒脾解郁方对其影响的作用。结果:21 d 慢性应激建立大鼠抑郁模型后,与正常组比较,模型组体重降低明显(P <0.01),糖水偏爱率、旷场试验移动距离显著下降(P <0.01),同时模型组血清皮质酮含量显著增加(P <0.01)、5-HT 明显降低(P <0.01);与模型组比较,中药组和舍曲林组均能显著改善大鼠抑郁行为(P <0.05),并且醒脾解郁方和舍曲林均对抑郁大鼠血清皮质酮、5-HT 均有显著逆转作用(P <0.05)。结论:醒脾解郁方具有抗抑郁作用,并与舍曲林效果相当,并能逆转抑郁模型大鼠血清皮质酮、5-HT 的作用,这可能是其改善抑郁的作用机制。%Objective:To preliminarily explore the effect of Xingpijieyu decoction on depressive behavior and serum 5-HT and corticos-terone on depression model rats.Methods:SD rats were randomly divided into 4 groups:normal group,model control group,sertraline control group,and traditional Chinese medicine (stone calamus,American ginseng,radix curcumae,cultivated land)group.21 days chro-nic unpredictable mild stress was adopted to establish the rat model of depression,using sucrose preference and open-field test to evaluate depression of rats,and compare the change of 5-HT and corticosterone form every groups of rats by ELISA.Results:After 21 days of chro-nic stress depression rats model made,compared with normal group,weight,preference for sugar water rate

  12. Ação da Betametasona em Ratas Prenhes: Impacto sobre os Níveis de Corticosterona e Glândulas Adrenais Maternas e Fetais Effect of Betamethasone on Pregnant Rats: Impact on Corticosterone Level and Maternal and Fetal Adrenal Glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de Souza

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: a utilização repetitiva do corticóide antenatal objetivando acelerar a maturidade pulmonar fetal tem sido muito empregada no risco de parto prematuro, o que nos motivou a estudar a dosagem de corticosterona no termo e aspectos morfológicos das glândulas adrenais maternas e fetais de ratas albinas submetidas à ação da betametasona na segunda metade da prenhez, para verificar conseqüências dessa terapêutica. Métodos: utilizamos 30 ratas prenhes, distribuídas em 3 grupos numericamente iguais. As do Grupo I receberam betametasona nos dias 11, 12, 18 e 19 da prenhez. As do Grupo II receberam água destilada nesses dias (grupo controle, e as do Grupo III não receberam qualquer medicamento, constituindo grupo controle de estresse. Foram todas sacrificadas no 20º dia de prenhez, quando dosamos a corticosterona no sangue das matrizes e extirpamos as glândulas adrenais maternas e fetais para exame de microscopia óptica. Resultados: a dosagem de corticosterona plasmática foi significantemente menor no grupo tratado com betametasona (4,8 mg/dL, quando comparada aos grupos controles (17,7 e 26,8 mg/dL. À microscopia óptica observou-se intensa vacuolização citoplasmática na zona fasciculada das adrenais maternas e fetais no grupo que utilizou a betametasona, indicando intensa supressão adrenal secundária ao uso do medicamento. Conclusões: o uso repetitivo e prolongado de corticóides, em ratas prenhes, para acelerar a maturidade pulmonar fetal determina supressão adrenal materna e fetal.Purpose: the repetitive use of antenatal corticosteroid therapy for acceleration of fetal lung maturation has been common in cases at risk of preterm delivery. We studied the corticosterone levels at term and the morphologic aspects in the maternal and fetal adrenal glands submitted to the effect of betamethasone in the second half of rat pregnancy in order to verify its consequences. Methods: thirty female pregnant rats were divided into

  13. Evaluation of antidepressant effect and protective effect against corticosterone-induced PC12 cell injury of icariin%淫羊藿苷抗抑郁及对皮质酮致PC12细胞损伤的保护作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石翠格; 李慧; 王丽丽; 王宁; 王介东; 张树成; 徐志卿

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the antidepressant effect and the protective effect against corticosterone-induced PC12 cell neurotoxity of icariin. Methods:The antidepressant effects of icariin were evaluated by the tail suspension test in mice and the forced swimming tests in rats and mice. The animals were divided into four groups randomly:control group, low dose icariin group, high dose icariin group and amitriptyline group. The effects of icariin on immobility time were measured in the forced swimming test in rats and mice, together with the tail suspension test in mice. Likewise, PC12 cell injury model was induced by corticosterone and the protective effect of icariin on the cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Results:Icariin could signiifcantly decrease the immobility time in tail suspension test in mice, as well as the forced swimming tests in rats and mice, with the signiifcant differences when compared with the control group. In addition, icariin could improve the survival rate of PC12 cells injuried by corticosterone. Conclusion:Icariin possessed antidepressant effect and its antidepressant effect maybe involve in the protective effects of neural cells.%目的::研究淫羊藿苷的抗抑郁及对皮质酮致PC12细胞损伤的保护作用。方法:采用大/小鼠强迫游泳、小鼠悬尾三种实验模型,将动物随机分为对照组、淫羊藿苷低剂量组、淫羊藿苷高剂量组、阿米替林组,观察药物对大/小鼠强迫游泳不动时间、小鼠悬尾不动时间的影响;并在细胞水平建立皮质酮损伤PC12细胞模型,观察淫羊藿苷的细胞保护作用。结果:在大/小鼠强迫游泳和小鼠悬尾实验中,淫羊藿苷可显著缩短大/小鼠的强迫游泳不动时间和小鼠悬尾不动时间,与对照组相比差异有统计学意义(P <0.05);在皮质酮损伤PC12细胞的模型上,淫羊藿苷可显著提高PC12细胞的存活率,拮抗皮质酮诱导的细胞损伤作用。结

  14. Alterations of plasma corticosterone and hippocampal corticosteroid receptors in rats with the lasting emotionality following predator stress%捕食应激致大鼠持续性情绪唤醒障碍时血浆皮质酮及海马皮质类固醇受体表达变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆松; 王伟文; 吴渝宪; 林杭; 曹仁存; 向阳; 王俊

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨严重心理应激所致情感行为异常的相关神经生物学机制.方法 将136只雄性Wistar大鼠随机分为捕食应激组(以下简称应激组)和正常对照组(以下简称对照组),每组68只.以放射免疫分析法检测应激后1 h、1 d、1周,以及1,2,4个月时血浆皮质酮水平,并采用免疫组化和蛋白质免疫印迹法,检测海马糖皮质激素受体(GR)及盐皮质激素受体(MR)表达的变化规律.结果 (1)血浆皮质酮水平:应激后1 h应激组[(44.5±9.3)μg/L]高于对照组[(22.6±4.0)μg/L,P<0.01],但应激后1 d降至正常水平,而应激后1周至4个月则明显低于对照组[应激组分别为(μg/L)12.4±2.5,9.8±2.1,8.7±2.1,10.1±2.3,对照组分别为(μg/L)20.8±3.9,21.1±4.2,16.6±3.6及20.2±4.0;P<0.01].(2)海马GR和MR阳性免疫反应信号:应激后1 d免疫组化研究显示,应激大鼠海马及额叶皮层GR均较对照组增强(P<0.01),其中以海马结构的改变更明显(P<0.05);而MR则显著降低(P<0.01).海马免疫印迹检测进一步揭示,应激组海马GR表达于应激后1 d至4个月明显增高(P<0.05),而MR表达则于应激后1 h至1个月显著低于对照组(P<0.05).结论 捕食应激后大鼠出现血浆皮质酮双向变化、海马GR和MR失衡以及不同的变化规律,这种严重的心理应激在引发大鼠持续性情绪唤醒障碍中可能有重要作用.%Objective To explore the neurobiological basis involved in the pathogenesis of the lasting emotionality following severe psychological stress.Methods Altogether 136 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups,and the predator stress group(n=68)was for non-injurious exposure of cats until slightly frightened twitch and nares flaring due to polypnea for 6 min,and normal control group (n=68).The plasma concentrations of corticosterone and expressions of glucocorticoid (GR)and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in hippocampus were investigated by radioimmunoassay

  15. A comparative study to the effect of tianeptine and fluoxetine on open-field behaviour and serum corticosterone concentration%噻奈普汀与氟西汀对应激大鼠旷场行为及血清皮质酮水平影响的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强; 赵虎; 柳威; 陈夫银

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of tianeptine and fluoxetine on behaviour and serum corticosterone concentration changes induced by stress and its antidepression mechanism. Methods 33 rats were randomly allocated into control(n =6), 4 week-stress with saline(n =6), 4 week-stress with tianeptine(n =6)and 4 week-stress with fluoxetine (n =15) groups.Forced swimming test was used to set up stress animal model,and open-field test was used to assess the behavior,then concentration of serum corticosterone was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays(ELIA). Results The number of crossing and standing up of 4 week-stress with fluoxetine group[(73.53±43.66),(10.00±11.14)] were much higher than 4 week-stress with saline group[(7.67±3.01),P <0.01;(0.67±0.82),P <0.05],while no difference was found compared with control group and 4 week-stress with tianeptine group; the number of stool of 4 week-stress with fluoxetine [(3.40±2.47),P <0.01]and 4 week-stress with saline group[(3.17±3.19),P <0.05] were much lower than control group(7.00±1.79), while no difference was found compared with 4 week-stress with tianeptine group(4.67±2.34). Concentration of serum corticosterone of control group[(191.60±116.41)ng/ml] and 4 week-stress with fluoxetine group[(315.49±146.35)ng/ml] were both much lower than 4 week-stress with saline group[(765.37±250.87)ng/ml,P <0.01] and 4 week-stress with tianeptine group[(863.49±282.31)ng/ml,P <0.01].There was no difference when compared with the concentration of serum corticosterone of control group and 4 week-stress with fluoxetine group, while no difference was found when compared with 4 week-stress with saline group and 4 week-stress with tianeptine group. Conclusions Both tianeptine and fluoxetine can reverse stress-induced behavior changes, and the fluoxetine is even better to improve the depression induced by stress;meanwhile the effect of reverse the level of serum corticosterone concentration of fluoxetine is

  16. Effects of Zhuyang-Ningshen formula on function remodeling injury induced by corticosterone in the hippcamnpus%助阳宁神方拮抗皮质酮诱导海马功能重塑性损伤的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴建国; 陈琳; 王中立; 赵玉男; 黄玉芳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Zhuyang-Ningshen formula (ZNF) on function remodeling injury induced by corticosterone in the hippocampus. Methods The head-twitching test models were established by injection of 5-HTP in 50 mice, which were equally divided in 5 groups of N (normal control) ,F( treated with fluoxetine hydrochloride 3. 6 mg/kg) ,Nl(treated with gastric gavage of ZNF 1.9 g/kg), N2 (treated with ZNF 3.8 g/kg) and N3 (treated with ZNF 7. 6 g/kg). The head-twitching test was performed at 15 min after drug administration on the 3rd and 7th day. Mice depression model was developed by subcutaneous injection of corticosterone in 40 C57BL/6N mice, which were equally divided into 5 groups of MC(model control) ,FH(treated with fluoxetine hydrochloride 3. 6 mg/kg), ZNF1 (treated with ZNF 1. 9 g/kg), ZNF2 (treated with ZNF 3. 8 g/kg) and ZNF3(treated with ZNF 7. 6 g/kg). Another 8 mice were taken as group BC(blank control). Four weeks later, the mice were sacrificed by decapitation and the hippocampal tissues were rapidly collected for Western blot analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein(GFAP), neurofilament light chain protein (NF-L) and synaptic vescle protein(SYP). Results The rate of head-twitching behavior on the 3rd and 7th day was higher in group F than that in group N(80% and 90% vs. 40%) (P<0. 01). Compared to group NC,the expressions of GFAP,NF-Land SYP were down-regulated in group MC(P<0. 01 or P<0. 05), but up-regulated in groups of FH, ZNF1, ZNF2 and ZNF3 (P<0. 05). Conclution ZNF has a protective effect on astrocytes and neurons and against function remodeling injury induced by corticosterone in mice hippocampus.%目的 探讨助阳宁神方(ZNF)拮抗皮质酮诱导海马功能重塑性损伤的作用.方法 5羟-色氨酸(5-HTP)诱导的甩头行为模型实验中,50只ICR小鼠,随机均分为正常组、氟西汀组和高、中、低三个剂量ZNF胃饲组,在连续给药第3、7天的给药15 min后,记录各组甩头率.取40只C57

  17. Rapid activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase by corticosterone in PC12 cells%皮质酮快速激活PC12细胞中p38丝列原激活的蛋白激酶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓煜; 邱俭; 肖林; 朱剑琴; 陈宜张

    2001-01-01

    The present study using immunoblot showed that corticosterone (B) could induce a rapid activation of p38 in PC12 cells. The dose- and time-response curves were bell-shaped with a maximal activation at 10-9 mol/L and 15 min respectively. The activation was not affected by steroid nuclear receptor antagonist RU38486. Bovine serum albumin coupled B (B-BSA) could induce phosphorylation of p38. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein failed to block the phosphorylation, a fact suggesting that the tyrosine kinase activity is not involved in the pathway. On the other hand, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, could mimic the actions of B, while G6976, a PKC inhibitor, could completely abolish the phosphorylation induced by B. These results clearly demonstrate that B activates p38 MAPK readily via a putative membrane receptor through a PKC-dependent pathway.%实验旨在研究糖皮质激素快速、非基因组作用的细胞内信号传导机制.Western分析研究结果表明, 皮质酮可快速激活PC12细胞中p38丝列原激活的蛋白激酶(mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAPK), 时间、浓度曲线均为钟形, 最大激活为10-9 mol/L 和15 min.糖皮质激素受体阻断剂RU38486不能阻断此作用, 而小牛血清白蛋白耦联的皮质酮也能快速激活p38.受体酪氨酸激酶阻断剂genistein 对此作用无影响, 表明此快速作用不涉及受体酪氨酸激酶活性.此作用能被蛋白激酶C (protein kinase C, PKC)激动剂PMA模拟, 而被PKC阻断剂G6976所阻断.结果表明, 皮质酮可能通过推测的膜受体以PKC依赖的方式快速激活p38 MAPK.

  18. Metaplasticity of amygdalar responses to the stress hormone corticosterone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karst, H.; Berger, S.; Erdmann, G.; Schütz, G.; Joëls, M.

    2010-01-01

    High levels of corticosteroids (as circulate after stress) quickly and reversibly enhance hippocampal glutamatergic transmission via nongenomic actions requiring mineralocorticoid receptors. Subsequently, the hormone slowly and long-lastingly normalizes hippocampal cell function, through nuclear glu

  19. Concentration of fecal corticosterone metabolites in dominant versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-16

    Apr 16, 2014 ... establish the social index and determine the hierarchic positions of the buffalo heifers as low, moderate and high. ... Groups of buffalo heifers used in the social and sexual behavior test. Group .... Ciência e Cultura. 35:773-.

  20. Effects of moderate and small intensity exercise on corticosterone and interleukin-2 in serum and T lymphocyte subgroups in plasma of rats under repeated psychological stress%中小强度运动对反复心理应激大鼠血清皮质酮、白细胞介素2和血浆T淋巴细胞亚群的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张在宁; 尹金春; 颜军; 童昭岗

    2005-01-01

    the shock group as bystanders in order to produce psychological stress through visual sense and hearing sense. Each stress lasted for 30 minutes,once every other day for 2 continuous weeks. 30-minute exercise group: In the first week, the rats adapted to training for 10 minutes every day, and then they swam without load for 30 minutes once a day for 8 weeks. 60minute exercise group: In the first week, the rats adapted to training for 30minutes every day, and then they swam without load for 60 minutes once a day for 8 weeks. Stress plus 30-minute exercise group: The rats received the same exercise as that of the 30-minute exercise group and the same stress as that applied to the psychological stress group. Stress plus 60-minute exercise group: The rats received the same exercise as that of the 60-minute exercise group and the same stress as that of the psychological stress group. The contents of corticosterone and interleukin-2 in serum were detected with radioimmunoassay, and the number of T lymphocyte subgroups was determined with the method of enzyme labeling.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Effects of exercise of moderate and small intensity on serum corticosterone and interleukin-2 of stress rats. ②Effects of exercise of moderate and small intensity on T lymphocyte subgroups of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ in stressed rats.RESULTS: ①Effects of exercise of moderate and small intensity on serum corticosterone and interleukin-2 of stress rats: The serum levels of interleukin2 in stress rats were significantly lower than that of the rats in the control group, and the serum contents of corticosterone were significantly higher than that in the control group. The serum levels of interleukin-2 in the exercise group were significantly higher than that in the control group, and the serum contents of corticosterone were significantly higher than that in the control group. Compared with stress group, the level of interleukin-2 was significantly higher and the contents of corticosterone

  1. Influence of chronic corticosterone injection on depression-like behavior and brain glycogen levels in mice%慢性皮质酮注射对小鼠抑郁样行为及脑糖原水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张绘宇; 赵玉男; 王中立

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To study the effect of chronic corticosterone ( CORT) injection on the depression-like behav-iors and the brain glycogen level in mice.METHODS:Male C57BL/6N mice (n=40) were randomly divided into nor-mal control group and model group.The mice in model group were subcutaneously consecutively injected with CORT for 4 weeks.The mouse model of chronic stress depression was constructed.The forced swim test and open field experiment were conducted to prove chronic stress model.The serum level of CORT in the mice was measured by radioimmunoassay.The protein levels of hippocampal synaptophysin ( SYP) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor ( BDNF) were detected by West-ern blot.Hippocampus glycogen, glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase were determined by indirect fluorescence measurement.RESULTS:Compared with normal control group, the immobility time of the forced swim test in model group was significantly lengthened (P<0.01), and the ability of spontaneous activity was reduced (P<0.01), indicating that chronic CORT injection induced depression-like behaviors in mice.The CORT level increased significantly (P<0.01) in model group.CORT injection decreased the protein expression of hippocampal SYP and BDNF (P<0.01), reduced hipp-ocampal glycogen level (P<0.05) and glycogen synthase activity (P<0.05), and increased glycogen phosphorylase ac-tivity (P<0.05).CONCLUSION:Chronic CORT injection causes hippocampal neuron damage and induces the depres-sion-like behaviors of mice, which may be associated with decreasing hippocampal glycogen level by CORT.%目的:探讨慢性皮质酮注射对小鼠抑郁样行为以及脑糖原水平的影响。方法:将40只雄性C57 BL/6 N小鼠随机分为正常对照组与模型组,模型组小鼠连续4周给予皮质酮皮下注射,构建慢性应激抑郁障碍小鼠模型。采用强迫游泳实验和旷场实验验证慢性应激模型的建立;放免法测定小鼠血清中皮质酮( CORT)水平;采用蛋白免

  2. Applicability of Commercially Available ELISA Kits for the Quantification of Faecal Immunoreactive Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Kalliokoski, Otto; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    antibodies of different origin, the detection level and cross-reactivity towards different metabolites and other steroids differ considerably between assays. Thus, the validity of one assay for FCM quantification in stress assessment is not necessarily the same for another assay. Materials and Methods...

  3. Telomere length reflects reproductive effort indicated by corticosterone levels in a long-lived seabird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauch, Christina; Riechert, Juliane; Verhulst, Simon; Becker, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is a candidate biomarker of ageing and phenotypic quality, but little is known of the (physiological) causes of TL variation. We previously showed that individual common terns Sterna hirundo with high reproductive success had short telomeres independent of age, and this pattern

  4. Feather corticosterone levels and carotenoid-based coloration in common buzzard (Buteo buteo) nestlings

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Padilla, Jesús; Mougeot, François; Garcia, Jesus T.; Arroyo, Beatriz; Bortolotti, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    [EN]: Most of our understanding of the function of colored traits displayed by birds and the mechanisms that produce or maintain them comes from studies on adults. However, colored traits are often displayed by nestlings from a young age, and these traits may influence parent-offspring interactions or sibling competition. The mechanisms that may mediate the expression of those traits during growth are still fairly unknown in raptors. In this study, we examined a possible mediating effect of c...

  5. Bijnierschorsactiviteit bij CARA (Astma); onderzoek naar de corticosteron en cortisolspiegel in het bloed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weller, Herman Hendrik

    1965-01-01

    SAMENVATTING EN CONCLUSIES Het onderzoek werd opgezet teneinde enkele endocrinologische aspecten van het probleem 'astma' te benaderen, waarbij de bijnierschors activiteit centraal werd gesteld. vVerkhypothese was hierbij de gedachtengang dat er een nauwe verwantschap bestaat tussen het astma bronch

  6. Assessing costs of carrying geolocators using feather corticosterone in two species of aerial insectivore

    OpenAIRE

    Fairhurst, G.D.; Berzins, L. L.; Bradley, D W; Laughlin, A.J.; Romano, A.; Romano, M.; Scandolara, C.; Ambrosini, R; Dawson, R.D.; Dunn, P.O.; Hobson, K.A.; Liechti, F.; Marchant, T. A.; D. R. Norris; Rubolini, D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite benefits of using light-sensitive geolocators to track animal movements and describe patterns of migratory connectivity, concerns have been raised about negative effects of these devices, particularly in small species of aerial insectivore. Geolocators may act as handicaps that increase energetic expenditure, which could explain reported effects of geolocators on survival. We tested this ‘Energetic Expenditure Hypothesis’ in 12 populations of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and ba...

  7. A Coherent Pattern Among Social Behavior, Blood Pressure, Corticosterone and Catecholamine Measures in Individual Male Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FOKKEMA, DS; SMIT, K; VANDERGUGTEN, J; KOOLHAAS, JM

    1988-01-01

    Behavioral and physiological responses of 18 chronically cannulated male TMD-S3 rats were assessed during various social interactions with conspecifics, both with and without the possibility for physical contact (social vs. psychosocial stimulation). Response magnitudes (behavior, blood pressure, pl

  8. Antagonistic effects of aldosterone on corticosterone-mediated changes in exploratory behavior of adrenalectomized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, H D; De Kloet, E R

    1983-01-01

    The effect of aldosterone administration on exploratory activity of chronic adrenalectomized (10 days) male rats was investigated. Aldosterone (30 micrograms/100 g body wt sc) administered 1 hr or 30 min prior to the behavioral test failed to normalize disturbed exploratory activity of adrenalectomi

  9. Effects of active shock avoidance learning on hippocampal neurogenesis and plasma levels of corticosterone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Borght, Karin; Meerlo, Peter; Luiten, Paul G.M.; Eggen, Bart J.L.; van der Zee, Eddy A.

    2005-01-01

    Hippocampal granule neurons that are newly formed during adulthood might be involved in learning and memory processes. Experimental data suggest that only hippocampus-dependent learning tasks stimulate neurogenesis. To further address this issue, the effects of active shock avoidance (ASA) learning

  10. Effects of Ginkgo biloba on corticosterone stress responses after inescapable shock exposure in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markus, C.R.; Lammers, J.H.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Extracts from the leaves of the Ginkgo biloba tree (GBE) are found to be clinically effective in neuroprotection, cerebral and cardiovascular function and cognitive processing. Recent animal findings suggest that GBE also may improve stress adaptation and prevent learned helplessness, as evidenced b

  11. Central leptin stimulates corticosterone secretion at the onset of the dark phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, G.; Donahey, J.C.K.; Thiele, T.E.; Scheurink, A.J.W.; Steffens, A.B; Wilkinson, C.W.; Tenenbaum, R.; Campfield, L.A.; Burn, P.; Seeley, R.J.; Woods, S.C

    1997-01-01

    Leptin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue in proportion to body adiposity, is proposed to be involved in the central nervous regulation of food intake and body weight, In addition, evidence is emerging that leptin regulates neuroendocrine and metabolic functions as well, presumably via its action

  12. Supression of humoral immunity by perfluorooctanic acid is independent of elevated serum corticosterone concentration in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The T-cell-dependent antibody response is suppressed in mice exposed to 3.75, 7.5, 15, and 30 mg PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid)/kg body weight (bw). Reduced bw accompanied immunosuppression at 15 and 30 mg/kg. We investigated the hypothesis that the observed immunosuppression is s...

  13. Post-natal exposure to corticosterone affects standard metabolic rate in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spencer, K. A.; Verhulst, S.

    2008-01-01

    Post-natal stress has been shown to have important short and long term effects on many adult traits in birds. During stress, metabolic alterations often result in the mobilization of energy away from energy-sensitive functions such as growth, which could have significant implications for developing

  14. Effects of voluntarily-ingested buprenorphine on plasma corticosterone levels, body weight, water intake, and behaviour in permanently catheterised rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldkuhl, Renée; Hau, Jann; Abelson, Klas

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the peri- and postoperative effect of pre-emptive analgesia through voluntary ingestion of buprenorphine in Nutella, in male Sprague-Dawley rats. An arterial catheter was inserted and the rats were connected to an automated blood sampling device (AccuSampler). Blood samples...... in the operated rats. The present study strengthens the hypothesis that pre-emptive oral buprenorphine in Nutella is suitable for treatment of postoperative pain in rats....

  15. Influence of Momordica charantia on oxidative stress-induced perturbations in brain monoamines and plasma corticosterone in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Naga Kavitha

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: This study reveals the antistress activity of MC as it significantly reverted the stress-induced changes, and the activity might be attributed to its antioxidant activity since stress is known to involve several oxidative mechanisms.

  16. [Effect of dalargin on the content of endorphins, leucine-enkephalin ACTH and corticosterone of the blood of stressed rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkov, A I; Polonskiĭ, V M; Vinogradov, V A; Demina, D G; Smagin, V G

    1985-12-01

    Stress caused by acute cysteamine duodenal ulcer was induced in Wistar male rats. All the endogenous opioides under study were involved in the stress-reaction mechanism. Protective dalargin (synthetic enkephalin analogue) administration revealed a tendency towards normalization of endorphin, L-enkephalin and ACTH blood levels.

  17. Enduring good memories of infant trauma: Rescue of adult neurobehavioral deficits via amygdala serotonin and corticosterone interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Rincón-Cortés, Millie; Barr, Gordon A.; Mouly, Anne Marie; Shionoya, Kiseko; Nuñez, Bestina S.; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2015-01-01

    Infant trauma induces preference learning about trauma-linked cues but negatively programs neurobehavioral development. Despite clinical evidence that trauma-linked cues remain powerful throughout life, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between infant trauma cues and the long-term effects of trauma are unknown. Using a rodent model of trauma bonding, which produces a life-long preferred odor and enduring effects that parallel the sequelae of child abuse, we show that the infant trauma...

  18. Impacts of Moxibustion Therapy on Serum Corticosterone,Testosterone and Metabolism of Testicular Free Radicals in Rats with Fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢峻; 陈英松; 张洪林; 尹真祯; 邬卓文; 阿古拉; 赵百孝; 王臻

    2010-01-01

    目的:从对血清皮质酮、睾酮水平和睾丸自由基代谢的影响,探讨艾灸疗法对运动性疲劳大鼠的作用机理.方法:SD大鼠随机分为对照组、模型组和治疗组.采用21d力竭游泳方式制作运动性疲劳模型.在造模成功后第21d观察大鼠力竭游泳时间,并在末次运动后24 h取材.检测血清皮质酮、睾酮水平并计算睾酮/皮质酮比值,检测睾丸组织丙二醛(malondialdehyde,MDA)、谷胱甘肽(glutathione,GSH)、谷光甘肽过氧化酶(glutathione peroxidase,GSH-Px)和超氧化物歧化酶(superoxide dismutase,SOD)的变化.结果:艾灸可以明显延长力竭游泳时间;明显降低血清皮质酮水平和增高睾酮/皮质酮比值;显著降低睾丸MDA含量,升高GSH、GSH-Px,但对SOD活性无显著影响.结论:艾灸疗法提高睾酮/皮质酮比值,降低睾丸自由基水平和提高抗自由基氧化酶活性,可能是艾灸疗法发挥抗疲劳作用的部分机制之一.

  19. Sustained release of corticosterone in rats affects reactivity, but does not affect habituation to immobilization and acoustic stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanke, Marit A. C.; Fokkema, Dirk S.; Doornbos, Bennard; Postema, Folkert; Korf, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    Depression is often preceded by stressful life events and accompanied with elevated cortisol levels and glucocorticoid resistance. It has been suggested that a major depressive disorder may result from impaired coping with and adaptation to stress. The question is whether or not hypothalamus-pituita

  20. Both Transient and Continuous Corticosterone Excess Inhibit Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation in APOE*3-Leiden.CETP Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auvinen, H.E.; Wang, Y.; Princen, H.; Romijn, J.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Smit, J.W.A.; Meijer, O.C.; Biermasz, N.R.; Rensen, P.C.; Pereira, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The role of glucocorticoids in atherosclerosis development is not clearly established. Human studies show a clear association between glucocorticoid excess and cardiovascular disease, whereas most animal models indicate an inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on atherosclerosis develop

  1. Both Transient and Continuous Corticosterone Excess Inhibit Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation in APOE*3-Leiden.CETP Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auvinen, H.E.; Wang, Y.; Princen, H.; Romijn, J.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Smit, J.W.A.; Meijer, O.C.; Biermasz, N.R.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Pereira, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The role of glucocorticoids in atherosclerosis development is not clearly established. Human studies show a clear association between glucocorticoid excess and cardiovascular disease, whereas most animal models indicate an inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on atherosclerosis develop

  2. Maternal corticosterone elevation during egg formation in chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) influences offspring traits, partly via prenatal undernutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriksen, Rie; Rettenbacher, Sophie; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between maternal stress during pregnancy in humans and the subsequent physical and mental health disorders in their children has inspired a wide array of studies on animal models. Almost all of these studies have used mammalian species, but more recently oviparous species in which

  3. Short-term psychosocial stress protects photoreceptors from damage via corticosterone-mediated activation of the AKT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkwa, Tembei K; Neumann, Inga D; Tamm, Ernst R; Ohlmann, Andreas; Reber, Stefan O

    2014-02-01

    Apoptotic death of photoreceptors in hereditary retinal degenerations can be prevented by neuroprotective molecules. Here, we report that adrenal glucocorticoids (GC) released during psychosocial stress protect photoreceptors from apoptosis after light damage. Psychosocial stress is known to be the main type of stressor humans are exposed to and was induced here in mice by 10h of chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC). Photoreceptor damage was generated by subsequent exposure to white light. Short-term psychosocial stress prior to illumination significantly reduced the number of apoptotic photoreceptors, an effect that was absent in adrenalectomized (ADX) mice. The neuroprotective effect was completely restored in ADX mice substituted with GC. Moreover, phosphorylation of retinal AKT increased following CSC or exogenous GC treatment, an effect that was again absent in ADX mice exposed to CSC. Finally, inhibition of AKT signaling with triciribine blocked the stress- and GC-mediated neuroprotective effects on photoreceptors. In summary, we provide evidence that 1) short-term psychosocial stress protects photoreceptors from light-induced damage and 2) the protective effect is most likely mediated by GC-induced activation of the AKT signaling pathway.

  4. Both Transient and Continuous Corticosterone Excess Inhibit Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation in APOE*3-Leiden.CETP Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auvinen, H.E.; Wang, Y.; Princen, H.; Romijn, J.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Smit, J.W.A.; Meijer, O.C.; Biermasz, N.R.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Pereira, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The role of glucocorticoids in atherosclerosis development is not clearly established. Human studies show a clear association between glucocorticoid excess and cardiovascular disease, whereas most animal models indicate an inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on atherosclerosis develop

  5. Both Transient and Continuous Corticosterone Excess Inhibit Atherosclerotic Plaque Formation in APOE*3-Leiden.CETP Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auvinen, H.E.; Wang, Y.; Princen, H.; Romijn, J.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Smit, J.W.A.; Meijer, O.C.; Biermasz, N.R.; Rensen, P.C.; Pereira, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The role of glucocorticoids in atherosclerosis development is not clearly established. Human studies show a clear association between glucocorticoid excess and cardiovascular disease, whereas most animal models indicate an inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on atherosclerosis develop

  6. Overproduction of corticotropin-releasing hormone blocks germinal center formation: role of corticosterone and impaired follicular dendritic cell networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murray, S.E.; Rosenzweig, H.L.; Johnson, M.; Huising, M.O.; Sawicki, K.; Stenzel-Poore, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    xCorticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a central mediator in the response to stress, coordinating behavioral, autonomic and neuroendocrine activation. CRH overproduction is implicated in several affective disorders, including major depression, panic-anxiety disorder and anorexia-diseases also ass

  7. REGION-SPECIFIC ALTERATIONS OF CALBINDIN-D28K IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN THE RAT HIPPOCAMPUS FOLLOWING ADRENALECTOMY AND CORTICOSTERONE TREATMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRUGERS, HJ; MEDEMA, RM; POSTEMA, F; KORF, J

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was (i) to compare the immunocytochemical distribution of the calcium-binding protein calbindin-D28k (CB) in the hippocampus of rats with the pattern of neurodegeneration following adrenalectomy (ADX) using silver impregnation, and (ii) to investigate the CB-immunoreactivity in

  8. Stressful colours : corticosterone concentrations in a free-living songbird vary with the spectral composition of experimental illumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, Jenny Q.; de Jong, Maaike; Hau, Michaela; Visser, Marcel E.; van Grunsven, Roy H. A.; Spoelstra, Kamiel

    2015-01-01

    Organisms have evolved under natural daily light/dark cycles for millions of years. These cycles have been disturbed as night-time darkness is increasingly replaced by artificial illumination. Investigating the physiological consequences of free-living organisms in artificially lit environments is c

  9. Stressful colours: corticosterone concentrations in a free-living songbird vary with the spectral composition of experimental illumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, Jenny Q.; de Jong, Maaike; Hau, Michaela; Visser, Marcel E.; van Grunsven, Roy H. A.; Spoelstra, Kamiel

    2015-01-01

    Organisms have evolved under natural daily light/dark cycles for millions of years. These cycles have been disturbed as night-time darkness is increasingly replaced by artificial illumination. Investigating the physiological consequences of free-living organisms in artificially lit environments is c

  10. Stress hormone corticosterone enhances susceptibility to cortical spreading depression in familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shyti, Reinald; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; van Heiningen, Sandra H.; Meijer, Onno C.; Ayata, Cenk; Joëls, Marian; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Tolner, Else A.

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a putative migraine trigger, but the pathogenic mechanisms involved are unknown. Stress and stress hormones increase neuronal excitability by enhancing glutamatergic neurotransmission, but inhibitory effects have also been reported. We hypothesise that an acute rise in stress hormones, suc

  11. Clinical Observation of Tiaojining (调激宁) Granule Combined with Corticosterone in Treating Infantile Primary Nephrotic Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to observe the effect of Tiaojining granule (调激宁, TJNG) combined with corticosteroids (CS) to enhance the efficacy and alleviate the side-effects, the authors used the combination therapy of TJNG and CS in treating infantile primary nephrotic syndrome (IPNS) in 1990-1996, and the following is the summary of clinical data.

  12. Exposure to chronic psychosocial stress and corticosterone in the rat : Effects on spatial discrimination learning and hippocampal protein kinase C gamma immunoreactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krugers, HJ; Douma, BRK; Bohus, B; Korf, J; Luiten, PGM; Krugers, Harm J.

    1997-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated a striking increase of the immunoreactivity of the gamma-isoform of protein kinase C (PKC gamma-ir) in Ammon's horn and dentate gyrus (DC) of rodent hippocampus after training in a spatial orientation task. In the present study, we investigated how 8 days of psycho

  13. High corticosterone and sex reversal in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) with adrenal hyperplasia caused by P450c17a2 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nematollahi, M.A.; Pelt-Heerschap, van H.M.L.; Komen, H.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inheritance of adrenal hyperplasia, caused by 17a-hydroxylase deficiency, and its association with female to male sex reversal in common carp. Inbred strains used in this experiment were E4 (XX, female, normal), E5 (XX, male, adrenal hyperplasia) and E7

  14. GABA receptors in the region of the dorsomedial hypothalamus of rats are implicated in the control of melatonin and corticosterone release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Drijfhout, WJ; Westerink, BHC; vanHeerikhuize, JJ; vanderWoude, TP; vanderVliet, J

    1996-01-01

    Recently, anatomical evidence was presented that the mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) may utilize GABA to transmit diurnal information to the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). The present study provides further physiological evidence for the involvement of this GAB

  15. Muscle protein turnover in rats treated with corticosterone (CC) or/and nandrolone decanoate (ND) and fed an adequate or a low-protein diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santidrian, S.; Cuevillas, F.; Goena, M.; Larralde, J.

    1986-03-01

    In order to investigate the possible antagonistic effect between glucocorticoids and androgens on muscle protein turnover, the authors have measured the fractional rates of gastrocnemius muscle protein synthesis (k/sub s/) and degradation (k/sub d/) by the constant-intravenous-infusion method using L-//sup 14/C/-tyrosine in rats receiving via s.c. per 100 g b.wt. 10 mg of CC, or 2 mg of ND or CC+ND at the indicated doses, and fed either an 18% or 5% protein diets over a period of 5 days. As an additional index of protein synthesis, RNA activity (g of synthesized protein/day/g RNA) was determined as well. Results showed that as compared to vehicle-injected animals fed the adequate diet, CC-treated rats exhibited a reduction of muscle k/sub d/, while ND-treated rats had an outstanding increase of muscle k/sub s/. However, rats receiving CC+ND showed k/sub s/ and k/sub d/ values similar to those displayed by control animals. Nevertheless, when the steroids were injected to rats fed the low-protein diet, CC has a catabolic effect on muscle protein but by reducing k/sub s/, while the anabolic action of ND is still displayed but by a significant reduction of muscle k/sub d/. CC+ND given to these protein-deficient rats caused an increase in muscle k/sub s/ and a reduction in k/sub d/. These results might indicate that, at least in part, ND antagonizes the catabolic action of high doses of CC on muscle protein metabolism.

  16. GABA receptors in the region of the dorsomedial hypothalamus of rats are implicated in the control of melatonin and corticosterone release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A; Drijfhout, WJ; Westerink, BHC; vanHeerikhuize, JJ; vanderWoude, TP; vanderVliet, J

    1996-01-01

    Recently, anatomical evidence was presented that the mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) may utilize GABA to transmit diurnal information to the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). The present study provides further physiological evidence for the involvement of this GAB

  17. Reversal of corticosterone-induced BDNF alterations by the natural antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid alone and combined with desvenlafaxine: Emphasis on the neurotrophic hypothesis of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Meneses, Lucas Nascimento; Vasconcelos, Germana Silva; Silva, Márcia Calheiros Chaves; da Silva, Jéssica Calheiros; Macêdo, Danielle; de Lucena, David Freitas; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2015-12-15

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is linked to the pathophysiology of depression. We hypothesized that BDNF is one of the neurobiological pathways related to the augmentation effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) when associated with antidepressants. Female mice were administered vehicle or CORT 20mg/kg during 14 days. From the 15th to 21st days the animals were divided in groups that were further administered: vehicle, desvenlafaxine (DVS) 10 or 20mg/kg, ALA 100 or 200mg/kg or the combinations of DVS10+ALA100, DVS20+ALA100, DVS10+ALA200 or DVS20+ALA200. ALA or DVS alone or in combination reversed CORT-induced increase in immobility time in the forced swimming test and decrease in sucrose preference, presenting, thus, an antidepressant-like effect. DVS10 alone reversed CORT-induced decrease in BDNF in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST). The same was observed in the HC and ST of ALA200 treated animals. The combination of DVS and ALA200 reversed CORT-induced alterations in BDNF and even, in some cases, increased the levels of this neurotrophin when compared to vehicle-treated animals in HC and ST. Taken together, these results suggest that the combination of the DVS+ALA may be valuable for treating conditions in which BDNF levels are decreased, such as depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of fish oil and coconut fat supplementation on depressive-type behavior and corticosterone levels of prenatally stressed male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Borsonelo, Elizabethe Cristina [UNIFESP; Suchecki, Deborah; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes [UNIFESP

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal stress (PNS) during critical periods of brain development has been associated with numerous behavioral and/or mood disorders in later life. These outcomes may result from changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, which, in turn, can be modulated by environmental factors, such as nutritional status. in this study, the adult male offspring of dams exposed to restraint stress during the last semester of pregnancy and fed different diets were evaluated for depres...

  19. The Effects of Cortisol, Corticosterone, Insulin and Glucose Pre- and Post-Treatment on Heatstroke in Rats and the Kinetics of Uptake and Cellular Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-27

    Progreus Octaber 1985 - Decembr 1986 21 TM amrs or a mqm, cmaa ER , Ii AND GUXE M- AND POf--fEMT (N HEW1S𔃻IE IN PATS AND hE IMEMCS OF UPFMKE AND CELULAR ...the standards. Note: Tu anthruR method for qlycogen ws adapted E MIrtmaor., G.E.; Kir, E.,Jr.; Mclcn, C.E.; and Gliawn, W.H. 1967. Effects of Inalin

  20. The utility of fecal corticosterone metabolites and animal welfare assessment protocols as predictive parameters of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Jørgensen, Pernille Schønning; Pipper, Christian Bressen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of various non-invasive parameters for the prediction of tumor development and animal welfare in a murine xenograft model in male C.B-17 SCID (C.B-Igh-1(b)/IcrTac-Prkdc(scid)) mice. The study showed that body weight, food and water...