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Sample records for corticospinal tract damage

  1. Fully Automated Detection of Corticospinal Tract Damage in Chronic Stroke Patients

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    Ming Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural integrity of the corticospinal tract (CST after stroke is closely linked to the degree of motor impairment. However, current methods for measurement of fractional atrophy (FA of CST based on region of interest (ROI are time-consuming and open to bias. Here, we used tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS together with a CST template with healthy volunteers to quantify structural integrity of CST automatically. Two groups of patients after ischemic stroke were enrolled, group 1 (10 patients, 7 men, and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA scores ⩽ 50 and group 2 (12 patients, 12 men, and FMA scores = 100. CST of FAipsi, FAcontra, and FAratio was compared between the two groups. Relative to group 2, FA was decreased in group 1 in the ipsilesional CST (P<0.01, as well as the FAratio (P<0.01. There was no significant difference between the two subgroups in the contralesional CST (P=0.23. Compared with contralesional CST, FA of ipsilesional CST decreased in group 1 (P<0.01. These results suggest that the automated method used in our study could detect a surrogate biomarker to quantify the CST after stroke, which would facilitate implementation of clinical practice.

  2. Evaluation of ischemic corticospinal tract damage by diffusion tensor MRI. Its significance to predict functional outcome of corona radiata infarct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    Motor impairment is one of the most frequent symptoms among stroke patients and often leads to poststroke dependency. Recent advances of diffusion tensor MR imaging made it possible to identify corticospinal tract (CST) three-dimensionally and evaluate structural damage, so precise evaluation of the ischemic CST damage became feasible.Motor impairment, lesion size and location upon diffusion weighted MR image and clinical outcome were assessed in 23 acute to subacute capsular and corona radiata infarct patients. According to the lesion size, patients were grouped into A, maximal diameter below 15 mm and B, that above 15 mm. Motor impairment was graded severe: limb movement synergy level, moderate: selective muscle activity possible and mild: isolated movements well co-ordinated, each corresponding to Brunnstrom stage 1-3, 4-5, and 6, respectively. Outcome at the time of discharge was assessed by modified Rankin Scale (mRS), discharge destination and length of hospital stay were also registered. Diffusion tensor MR imaging was conducted in 15 corona radiata infarct patients at 2.3+-2.2 days from the onset of the clinical symptoms. CST was 3-dimensionally identified with dTV. II. SR and Volume-one 1.72 and CST-FA ratio (ipsi-/contralesional CST-FA) and CST-Area% (CST lesion free area/whole CST area) were obtained at the level where ischemic damage was most prominent and correlation of these parameters to motor impairment and clinical outcome was studied. CST-FA ratio and CST-Area% were in good correlation to motor impairment at presentation. Patients with severe motor impairment had lower CST-FA ratio and CSF-Area% than those with moderate or mild. CST-FA ratio was 0.73+-0.22 in patients with poor clinical outcome (mRS 3-6) and 0.93+-0.09 with good clinical outcome (mRS 0-2) (p=0.038). Diffusion tensor MR imaging is useful in evaluating motor impairment and predicting functional outcome of corona radiata infarct patient in the acute to subacute stage. (author)

  3. Patterns of structural reorganization of the corticospinal tract in children with Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamson, David O; Juhász, Csaba; Shin, Joseph; Behen, Michael E; Guy, William C; Chugani, Harry T; Jeong, Jeong-Won

    2014-04-01

    Reorganization of the corticospinal tract after early damage can limit motor deficit. In this study, we explored patterns of structural corticospinal tract reorganization in children with Sturge-Weber syndrome. Five children (age 1.5-7 years) with motor deficit resulting from unilateral Sturge-Weber syndrome were studied prospectively and longitudinally (1-2 years follow-up). Corticospinal tract segments belonging to hand and leg movements were separated and their volume was measured by diffusion tensor imaging tractography using a recently validated method. Corticospinal tract segmental volumes were normalized and compared between the Sturge-Weber syndrome children and age-matched healthy controls. Volume changes during follow-up were also compared with clinical motor symptoms. In the Sturge-Weber syndrome children, hand-related (but not leg-related) corticospinal tract volumes were consistently decreased in the affected cerebral hemisphere at baseline. At follow-up, two distinct patterns of hand corticospinal tract volume changes emerged. (1) Two children with extensive frontal lobe damage showed a corticospinal tract volume decrease in the lesional hemisphere and a concomitant increase in the nonlesional (contralateral) hemisphere. These children developed good hand grasp but no fine motor skills. (2) The three other children, with relative sparing of the frontal lobe, showed an interval increase of the normalized hand corticospinal tract volume in the affected hemisphere; these children showed no gross motor deficit at follow-up. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography can detect differential abnormalities in the hand corticospinal tract segment both ipsi- and contralateral to the lesion. Interval increase in the corticospinal tract hand segment suggests structural reorganization, whose pattern may determine clinical motor outcome and could guide strategies for early motor intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Corticospinal tract damage in patients with severe diffuse axonal injury in a chronic stage on diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and motor evoked potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasokawa, Yu-to; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Iwama, Toru; Okumura, Ayumi; Shinoda, Jun; Miwa, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the disturbed motor function of the corticospinal tract (CST) of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance (DTMR) imaging and motor evoked potential (MEP) examination, and to analyze these comparatively. Forty-three patients (86 sides of the CST) with severe DAI in a chronic stage underwent DTMR imaging and MEP examination using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Fractional anisotrophy (FA) values of 6 regions of interests (ROIs) in the CST were measured on FA map obtained from DTMR imaging. The lowest FA value among the FA values of the 6 ROIs in each of the CSTs was defined as the minimum FA value. And the lowest magnetic stimulation strength that could derive MEP was defined as the minimum threshold of MEP. The mean minimum FA value of the CSTs in which MEP could not be obtained even by the maximum strength of magnetic stimulation (the MEP (-) group) was significantly lower than that of the CSTs in which MEP could be obtained (the MEP (+) group). In the MEP (+) group, the minimum FA value decreased with the increase of the minimum threshold of MEP with a significant correlation. These results demonstrate that physiological motor dysfunction disclosed on MEP is significantly correlated with morphological damage of the CST observed on DTMR imaging in patients with DAI in a chronic stage. DTMR imaging is strongly suggested to be helpful to evaluate disturbed motor function and to infer its severity in DAI. (author)

  5. Evaluation of ischemic damage of the corticospinal tract by diffusion tensor MRI. Utility in predicting functional outcome of corona radiata infarcts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hideki; Matsuno, Akira; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Nakaguchi, Hiroshi; Murakami, Mineko; Ono, Seiichi; Takeuchi, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Motor impairment is one of the most frequent symptoms among stroke patients and often leads to post-stroke dependency, so evaluation of motor symptoms and underlining corticospinal tract (CST) damage is of prime importance. Motor impairment, ischemic lesion by diffusion weighted MRI, and clinical outcome were assessed in 15 acute to early subacute corona radiata infarct patients. Motor impairment was graded severe: limb movement synergy level, moderate: selective muscle activity possible and mild: isolated movements are well coordinated. Outcome at the time of discharge was assessed by modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Diffusion tensor MRI (GE Signa Excite system 1.5 T, Echo Planar Imaging, MPG 15) was conducted at 2.3±2.2 days from the onset of the clinical symptoms. CST was delineated 3-dimensionally with dTV.II.SR and Volume-one 1.72. CST-FA (fractional anisotropy) ratio and CST-Area % were calculated at the slice where CST-infarct overlap was maximal. CST-FA ratio and CST-Area % showed good correlation to motor impairment at presentation. Patients with severe motor impairment had lower CST-FA ratio and CSF-Area % than those with moderate or mild. CST-FA ratio was 0.73±0.22 in patients with poor clinical outcome (mRS 3-6) and 0.93±0.09 with good clinical outcome (mRS 0-2) (p=0.038). Diffusion tensor MRI is useful in evaluating ischemic CST damage and predicting functional outcome in patients with corona radiata infarcts in the acute to subacute stage. (author)

  6. Biotinylated dextran amine anterograde tracing of the canine corticospinal tract?

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xiao; Lv, Guangming; Wu, Huiqun; Ji, Dafeng; Sun, Zhou; Li, Yaofu; Tang, Lemin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was microinjected into the left cortical motor area of the canine brain. Fluorescence microscopy results showed that a large amount of BDA-labeled pyramidal cells were visible in the left cortical motor area after injection. In the left medulla oblongata, the BDA-labeled corticospinal tract was evenly distributed, with green fluorescence that had a clear boundary with the surrounding tissue. The BDA-positive corticospinal tract entered into the ...

  7. Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract in the brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Onomura, Kentaro; Ohno, Masato

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract in the brain stem was studied in 25 patients with chronic supratentorial vascular accidents. In the relatively early stages, at least three months after ictus, increased signal intensities in axial T 2 -weighted images - with or without decreased signal intensities in axial T 1 -weighted images - were observed in the brain stem ipsilaterally. In later stages, at least six months after ictus, shrinkage of the brain stem ipsilaterally - with or without decreased signal intensities - was clearly observed in axial T 1 -weighted images. MRI is therefore regarded a sensitive diagnostic modality for evaluating wallerian degeneration in the brain stem. (author)

  8. The corticospinal tract in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: an MRI study

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    Hofmann, E.; Warmuth-Metz, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Ochs, G.; Pelzl, A. [Department of Neurology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1998-02-01

    Cortical motor neurone loss and corticospinal tract (CST) degeneration are typical of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). It is a matter of debate whether qualitative assessment of the CST by MRI is useful in the diagnosis. It is also an open question whether quantitative determination of the T2 relaxation times can improve its value. Signal intensity along the CST on 14 consecutive slices was assessed using arbitrary visual rating on double-echo T2-weighted and proton-density spin-echo images of 21 patients with ALS and 21 age- and sex-matched controls. T2 was determined quantitatively. On the T2-weighted images the patients` ratings did not differ from that of controls. The T2 of patients and controls showed no statistical difference in any slice. There was no correlation between T2 and patient age, duration of the disease, or predominant bulbar, lower or upper motor neurone signs. The only correlation between MRI findings and disease was on the proton-density images: all cases in which the CST was poorly seen were controls; a clearly high-signal CST was seen only in the patients. High conspicuity of the CST was thus specific but not sensitive for the diagnosis of ALS. T2-weighted images and measurement of T2 were not useful for diagnosis. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 26 refs.

  9. Corticospinal tract insult alters GABAergic circuitry in the mammalian spinal cord

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    Jeffrey B. Russ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During perinatal development, corticospinal tract (CST projections into the spinal cord help refine spinal circuitry. Although the normal developmental processes that are controlled by the arrival of corticospinal input are becoming clear, little is known about how perinatal cortical damage impacts specific aspects of spinal circuit development, particularly the inhibitory microcircuitry that regulates spinal reflex circuits. In this study, we sought to determine how ischemic cortical damage impacts the synaptic attributes of a well-characterized population of inhibitory, GABAergic interneurons, called GABApre neurons, which modulates the efficiency of proprioceptive sensory terminals in the sensorimotor reflex circuit. We found that putative GABApre interneurons receive CST input and, using an established mouse model of perinatal stroke, that cortical ischemic injury results in a reduction of CST density within the intermediate region of the spinal cord, where these interneurons reside. Importantly, CST alterations were restricted to the side contralateral to the injury. Within the synaptic terminals of the GABApre interneurons, we observed a dramatic upregulation of the 65-isoform of the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65. In accordance with the CST density reduction, GAD65 was elevated on the side of the spinal cord contralateral to cortical injury. This effect was not seen for other GABApre synaptic markers or in animals that received sham surgery. Our data reveal a novel effect of perinatal stroke that involves severe deficits in the architecture of descending spinal pathways, which in turn appear to promote molecular alterations in a specific spinal GABAergic circuit.

  10. Quantitative measures of walking and strength provide insight into brain corticospinal tract pathology in multiple sclerosis

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    Nora E Fritz

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative measures of strength and walking are associated with brain corticospinal tract pathology. The addition of these quantitative measures to basic clinical information explains more of the variance in corticospinal tract fractional anisotropy and magnetization transfer ratio than the basic clinical information alone. Outcome measurement for multiple sclerosis clinical trials has been notoriously challenging; the use of quantitative measures of strength and walking along with tract-specific imaging methods may improve our ability to monitor disease change over time, with intervention, and provide needed guidelines for developing more effective targeted rehabilitation strategies.

  11. Is Intraoperative Diffusion tensor Imaging at 3.0T Comparable to Subcortical Corticospinal tract Mapping?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostrý, S.; Belšan, T.; Otáhal, Jakub; Beneš, V.; Netuka, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 5 (2013), s. 797-807 ISSN 0148-396X Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : corticospinal tract * intraoperative tractography * intraoperative image distortion * motor -evoked potentials * subcortical mapping Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.031, year: 2013

  12. REGENERATIVE GROWTH OF CORTICOSPINAL TRACT AXONS VIA THE VENTRAL COLUMN AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY IN MICE

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    Steward, Oswald; Zheng, Binhai; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Hofstadter, Maura; Sharp, Kelli; Yee, Kelly Matsudaira

    2008-01-01

    Studies that have assessed regeneration of corticospinal tract (CST) axons in mice following genetic modifications or other treatments have tacitly assumed that there is little if any regeneration of CST axons in normal mice in the absence of some intervention. Here, we document a previously unrecognized capability for regenerative growth of CST axons in normal mice that involves growth past the lesion via the ventral column. Mice received dorsal hemisection injuries at thoracic level 6–7, wh...

  13. Somatotopic Arrangement and Location of the Corticospinal Tract in the Brainstem of the Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Sung Ho

    2011-01-01

    The corticospinal tract (CST) is the most important motor pathway in the human brain. Detailed knowledge of CST somatotopy is important in terms of rehabilitative management and invasive procedures for patients with brain injuries. In this study, I conducted a review of nine previous studies of the somatotopical location and arrangement at the brainstem in the human brain. The results of this review indicated that the hand and leg somatotopies of the CST are arranged medio-laterally in the mi...

  14. Impaired transmission in the corticospinal tract and gait disability in spinal cord injured persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Lundell, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    with the degree of foot drop, as measured by toe elevation and ankle angle excursion in the first part of swing. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to elicit motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the TA. The amplitude of the MEPs at rest and their latency during contraction were correlated to the degree...... that transmission in the corticospinal tract is of importance for lifting the foot during the swing phase of human gait....

  15. Patterns of structural reorganization of the corticospinal tract in children with Sturge-Weber syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamson, David O.; Juhász, Csaba; Shin, Joseph; Behen, Michael E.; Guy, William C.; Chugani, Harry T.; Jeong, Jeong-Won

    2014-01-01

    Background Reorganization of the corticospinal tract (CST) after early damage can limit motor deficit. In this study, we explored patterns of structural CST reorganization in children with Sturge-Weber syndrome. Methods Five children (age 1.5-7 years) with motor deficit due to unilateral Sturge-Weber syndrome were studied prospectively and longitudinally (1-2 years follow-up). CST segments belonging to hand and leg movements were separated, and their volume was measured by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography using a recently validated method. CST segmental volumes were normalized and compared between the SWS children and age-matched healthy controls. Volume changes during follow-up were also compared to clinical motor symptoms. Results In the SWS children, hand-related (but not leg-related) CST volumes were consistently decreased in the affected cerebral hemisphere at baseline. At follow-up, two distinct patterns of hand CST volume changes emerged: (i) Two children with extensive frontal lobe damage showed a CST volume decrease in the lesional hemisphere and a concomitant increase in the non-lesional (contralateral) hemisphere. These children developed good hand grasp but no fine motor skills. (ii) The three other children, with relative sparing of the frontal lobe, showed an interval increase of the normalized hand CST volume in the affected hemisphere; these children showed no gross motor deficit at follow-up. Conclusions DTI tractography can detect differential abnormalities in the hand CST segment both ipsi- and contralateral to the lesion. Interval increase in the CST hand segment suggests structural reorganization, whose pattern may determine clinical motor outcome and could guide strategies for early motor intervention. PMID:24507695

  16. Corticospinal tract integrity and motor function following neonatal stroke: a case study

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    Gordon Anne L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New MRI techniques enable visualisation of corticospinal tracts and cortical motor activity. The objective of this case study was to describe the magnetic resonance evidence of corticospinal pathway reorganisation following neonatal stroke. Case presentation An 11 year old boy with a neonatal right middle cerebral artery territory ischaemic stroke was studied. Functional MRI was undertaken with a whole hand squeezing task, comparing areas of cortical activation between hands. White matter tracts, seeded from the area of peak activation in the cortex, were visualised using a diffusion weighted imaging probabilistic tractography method. Standardised evaluations of unilateral and bilateral motor function were undertaken. Clinically, the child presented with a left hemiparesis. Functional MRI demonstrated that movement of the hemiparetic hand resulted in activation in the ipsi-lesional (right hemisphere only. Diffusion tractography revealed pathways in the right (lesioned hemisphere tracked perilesionally to the cortical area identified by functional MRI. Conclusion Our case demonstrates that neonatal stroke is associated with maintenance of organization of corticospinal pathways sufficient to maintain some degree of hand function in the affected hemisphere. Functional MRI and diffusion weighted imaging tractography may inform our understanding of recovery, organisation and reorganisation and have the potential to monitor responses to intervention following neonatal stroke.

  17. Three-dimensional white matter tractography by diffusion tensor imaging in ischaemic stroke involving the corticospinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunimatsu, A.; Aoki, S.; Masutani, Y.; Abe, O.; Mori, H.; Ohtomo, K.

    2003-01-01

    Diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) provides information on diffusion anisotropy, which can be expressed with three-dimensional (3D) white matter tractography. We used 3D white matter tractography to show the corticospinal tract in eight patients with acute or early subacute ischaemic stroke involving the posterior limb of the internal capsule or corona radiata and to assess involvement of the tract. Infarcts and the tract were shown simultaneously, providing information on their spatial relationships. In five of the eight patients, 3D fibre tract maps showed the corticospinal tract in close proximity to the infarct but not to pass through it. All these patients recovered well, with maximum improvement from the lowest score on manual muscle testing (MMT) up to the full score through rehabilitation. In the other three patients the corticospinal tract was shown running through the infarct; reduction in MMT did not necessarily improve favourably or last longer, other than in one patient. As 3D white matter tractography can show spatial relationships between the corticospinal tract and an infarct, it might be helpful in prognosis of gross motor function. (orig.)

  18. Three-dimensional white matter tractography by diffusion tensor imaging in ischaemic stroke involving the corticospinal tract

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    Kunimatsu, A.; Aoki, S.; Masutani, Y.; Abe, O.; Mori, H.; Ohtomo, K. [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo University, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8655, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-08-01

    Diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) provides information on diffusion anisotropy, which can be expressed with three-dimensional (3D) white matter tractography. We used 3D white matter tractography to show the corticospinal tract in eight patients with acute or early subacute ischaemic stroke involving the posterior limb of the internal capsule or corona radiata and to assess involvement of the tract. Infarcts and the tract were shown simultaneously, providing information on their spatial relationships. In five of the eight patients, 3D fibre tract maps showed the corticospinal tract in close proximity to the infarct but not to pass through it. All these patients recovered well, with maximum improvement from the lowest score on manual muscle testing (MMT) up to the full score through rehabilitation. In the other three patients the corticospinal tract was shown running through the infarct; reduction in MMT did not necessarily improve favourably or last longer, other than in one patient. As 3D white matter tractography can show spatial relationships between the corticospinal tract and an infarct, it might be helpful in prognosis of gross motor function. (orig.)

  19. Exercise promotes motor functional recovery in rats with corticospinal tract injury: anti-apoptosis mechanism

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    Ting-ting Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that exercise interventions can improve functional recovery after spinal cord injury, but the mechanism of action remains unclear. To investigate the mechanism, we established a unilateral corticospinal tract injury model in rats by pyramidotomy, and used a single pellet reaching task and horizontal ladder walking task as exercise interventions postoperatively. Functional recovery of forelimbs and forepaws in the rat models was noticeably enhanced after the exercises. Furthermore, TUNEL staining revealed significantly fewer apoptotic cells in the spinal cord of exercised rats, and western blot analysis showed that spinal cord expression of the apoptosis-related protein caspase-3 was significantly lower, and the expression of Bcl-2 was significantly higher, while the expression of Bax was not signifiantly changed after exercise, compared with the non-exercised group. Expression of these proteins decreased with time after injury, towards the levels observed in sham-operated rats, however at 4 weeks postoperatively, caspase-3 expression remained significantly greater than in sham-operated rats. The present findings indicate that a reduction in apoptosis is one of the mechanisms underlying the improvement of functional recovery by exercise interventions after corticospinal tract injury.

  20. The corticospinal tract lesion of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, Shin-ichi; Sobue, Gen; Mitsuma, Terunori; Yasuda, Takeshi; Kachi, Teruhiko.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging by gradient echo method demonstrated lesions of the lateral corticospinal tract at cervical cord levels in three ALS patients. Patient 1 was a 43-year-old woman with common from of ALS. She developed right-side predominant pyramidal signs, and right-side predominant prolongation of central motor conduction time. MRI showed hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal region of the lateral column at the 4th and 5th cervical segments with right-side predominacy. Patient 2 was a 65-year-old man with pseudopolyneuritic from of ALS, who showed lower motor neuron signs without a pyramidal sign. MRI of the 3rd and 4th cervical cord segments demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal part of the lateral column. Patient 3 was a 62-year-old man with common form of ALS, who showed marked bilateral pyramidal signs with Babinski's sign. MRI of the 5th cervical spinal cord segment demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsolateral column. MR images of the spinal cord thus obtained corresponded well to the postmortem confirmed degeneration of the spinal corticospinal tract. MRI of the spinal cord performed by gradient echo method would provide additional information on the upper motor neuron involvement in ALS. (author)

  1. The corticospinal tract lesion of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord

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    Terao, Shin-ichi; Sobue, Gen; Mitsuma, Terunori (Aichi Medical Univ., Nagakute (Japan)); Yasuda, Takeshi; Kachi, Teruhiko

    1994-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging by gradient echo method demonstrated lesions of the lateral corticospinal tract at cervical cord levels in three ALS patients. Patient 1 was a 43-year-old woman with common from of ALS. She developed right-side predominant pyramidal signs, and right-side predominant prolongation of central motor conduction time. MRI showed hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal region of the lateral column at the 4th and 5th cervical segments with right-side predominacy. Patient 2 was a 65-year-old man with pseudopolyneuritic from of ALS, who showed lower motor neuron signs without a pyramidal sign. MRI of the 3rd and 4th cervical cord segments demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsal part of the lateral column. Patient 3 was a 62-year-old man with common form of ALS, who showed marked bilateral pyramidal signs with Babinski's sign. MRI of the 5th cervical spinal cord segment demonstrated bilateral hypersignal intensity areas in the dorsolateral column. MR images of the spinal cord thus obtained corresponded well to the postmortem confirmed degeneration of the spinal corticospinal tract. MRI of the spinal cord performed by gradient echo method would provide additional information on the upper motor neuron involvement in ALS. (author).

  2. Interlimb Dynamic after Unilateral Focal Lesion of the Cervical Dorsal Corticospinal Tract with Endothelin-1

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    Walther A. Carvalho

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Handedness is one of the most recognized lateralized behavior in humans. Usually, it is associated with manual superiority regarding performance proficiency. For instance, more than 90% of the human population is considered more skilled with the right hand, which is controlled by the left hemisphere, than with the left. However, during the performance of bimanual tasks, the two hands usually assume asymmetric roles, with one hand acting on objects while the other provides support, stabilizing the object. Traditionally, the role of the two hands is viewed as fixed. However, several studies support an alternate view with flexible assignments for the two hands depending on the task. The supporting role of the hand depends on a closed loop pathway based on proprioceptive inputs from the periphery. The circuit’s efferent arm courses through the dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST in rodents and terminate on spinal cord interneurons which modulate the excitability of motoneurons in the ventral horn. In the present work, we developed an experimental model of unilateral lesion targeting the cervical dCST with microinjections of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1 to evaluate the degree of flexibility of forelimb assignment during a food manipulation task. Our results show that just 3 days after unilateral corticospinal tract (CST injury in the cervical region, rats display severe motor impairment of the ipsilateral forepaw together with a remarkable reversal of motor assignment between the forelimbs.

  3. The optimal trackability threshold of fractional anisotropy for diffusion tensor tractography of the corticospinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunimatsu, Akira; Aoki, Shigeki; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Abe, Osamu; Hayashi, Naoto; Mori, Harushi; Masumoto, Tomohiko; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2004-01-01

    In order to ensure that three-dimensional diffusion tensor tractography (3D-DTT) of the corticospinal tract (CST), is performed accurately and efficiently, we set out to find the optimal lower threshold of fractional anisotropy (FA) below which tract elongation is terminated (trackability threshold). Thirteen patients with acute or early subacute ischemic stroke causing motor deficits were enrolled in this study. We performed 3D-DTT of the CST with diffusion tensor MR (magnetic resonance) imaging. We segmented the CST and established a cross-section of the CST in a transaxial plane as a region of interest. Thus, we selectively measured the FA values of the right and left corticospinal tracts at the level of the cerebral peduncle, the posterior limb of the internal capsule, and the centrum semiovale. The FA values of the CST were also measured on the affected side at the level where the clinically relevant infarction was present in isotropic diffusion-weighted imaging. 3D-DTT allowed us to selectively measure the FA values of the CST. Among the 267 regions of interest we measured, the minimum FA value was 0.22. The FA values of the CST were smaller and more variable in the centrum semiovale than in the other regions. The mean minus twice the standard deviation of the FA values of the CST in the centrum semiovale was calculated at 0.22 on the normal unaffected side and 0.16 on the affected side. An FA value of about 0.20 was found to be the optimal trackability threshold. (author)

  4. Diffusion imaging of reversible and irreversible microstructural changes within the corticospinal tract in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

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    Kouhei Kamiya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The symptoms of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH can be improved by shunt surgery, but prediction of treatment outcome is not established. We investigated changes of the corticospinal tract (CST in iNPH before and after shunt surgery by using diffusion microstructural imaging, which infers more specific tissue properties than conventional diffusion tensor imaging. Two biophysical models were used: neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI and white matter tract integrity (WMTI. In both methods, the orientational coherence within the CSTs was higher in patients than in controls, and some normalization occurred after the surgery in patients, indicating axon stretching and recovery. The estimated axon density was lower in patients than in controls but remained unchanged after the surgery, suggesting its potential as a marker for irreversible neuronal damage. In a Monte-Carlo simulation that represented model axons as undulating cylinders, both NODDI and WMTI separated the effects of axon density and undulation. Thus, diffusion MRI may distinguish between reversible and irreversible microstructural changes in iNPH. Our findings constitute a step towards a quantitative image biomarker that reflects pathological process and treatment outcomes of iNPH.

  5. Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract in the brain stem; MR imaging

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    Uchino, Akira; Onomura, Kentaro; Ohno, Masato (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1989-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract in the brain stem was studied in 25 patients with chronic supratentorial vascular accidents. In the relatively early stages, at least three months after ictus, increased signal intensities in axial T{sub 2}-weighted images - with or without decreased signal intensities in axial T{sub 1}-weighted images - were observed in the brain stem ipsilaterally. In later stages, at least six months after ictus, shrinkage of the brain stem ipsilaterally - with or without decreased signal intensities - was clearly observed in axial T{sub 1}-weighted images. MRI is therefore regarded a sensitive diagnostic modality for evaluating wallerian degeneration in the brain stem. (author).

  6. Somatotopic arrangement and location of the corticospinal tract in the brainstem of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho

    2011-07-01

    The corticospinal tract (CST) is the most important motor pathway in the human brain. Detailed knowledge of CST somatotopy is important in terms of rehabilitative management and invasive procedures for patients with brain injuries. In this study, I conducted a review of nine previous studies of the somatotopical location and arrangement at the brainstem in the human brain. The results of this review indicated that the hand and leg somatotopies of the CST are arranged medio-laterally in the mid to lateral portion of the cerebral peduncle, ventromedial-dorsolaterally in the pontine basis, and medio-laterally in the medullary pyramid. However, few diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have been conducted on this topic, and only nine have been reported: midbrain (2 studies), pons (4 studies), and medulla (1 study). Therefore, further DTI studies should be conducted in order to expand the literature on this topic. In particular, research on midbrain and medulla should be encouraged.

  7. Motor cortex electrical stimulation augments sprouting of the corticospinal tract and promotes recovery of motor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Jason B.; Martin, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal system—with its direct spinal pathway, the corticospinal tract (CST) – is the primary system for controlling voluntary movement. Our approach to CST repair after injury in mature animals was informed by our finding that activity drives establishment of connections with spinal cord circuits during postnatal development. After incomplete injury in maturity, spared CST circuits sprout, and partially restore lost function. Our approach harnesses activity to augment this injury-dependent CST sprouting and to promote function. Lesion of the medullary pyramid unilaterally eliminates all CST axons from one hemisphere and allows examination of CST sprouting from the unaffected hemisphere. We discovered that 10 days of electrical stimulation of either the spared CST or motor cortex induces CST axon sprouting that partially reconstructs the lost CST. Stimulation also leads to sprouting of the cortical projection to the magnocellular red nucleus, where the rubrospinal tract originates. Coordinated outgrowth of the CST and cortical projections to the red nucleus could support partial re-establishment of motor systems connections to the denervated spinal motor circuits. Stimulation restores skilled motor function in our animal model. Lesioned animals have a persistent forelimb deficit contralateral to pyramidotomy in the horizontal ladder task. Rats that received motor cortex stimulation either after acute or chronic injury showed a significant functional improvement that brought error rate to pre-lesion control levels. Reversible inactivation of the stimulated motor cortex reinstated the impairment demonstrating the importance of the stimulated system to recovery. Motor cortex electrical stimulation is an effective approach to promote spouting of spared CST axons. By optimizing activity-dependent sprouting in animals, we could have an approach that can be translated to the human for evaluation with minimal delay. PMID:24994971

  8. Wallerian Degeneration Beyond the Corticospinal Tracts: Conventional and Advanced MRI Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin Jie; Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Vossough, Arastoo; Kumar, Sunil; Loevner, Laurie A; Mohan, Suyash

    2017-05-01

    Wallerian degeneration (WD) is defined as progressive anterograde disintegration of axons and accompanying demyelination after an injury to the proximal axon or cell body. Since the 1980s and 1990s, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences have been shown to be sensitive to changes of WD in the subacute to chronic phases. More recently, advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), have demonstrated some of earliest changes attributed to acute WD, typically on the order of days. In addition, there is increasing evidence on the value of advanced MRI techniques in providing important prognostic information related to WD. This article reviews the utility of conventional and advanced MRI techniques for assessing WD, by focusing not only on the corticospinal tract but also other neural tracts less commonly thought of, including corticopontocerebellar tract, dentate-rubro-olivary pathway, posterior column of the spinal cord, corpus callosum, limbic circuit, and optic pathway. The basic anatomy of these neural pathways will be discussed, followed by a comprehensive review of existing literature supported by instructive clinical examples. The goal of this review is for readers to become more familiar with both conventional and advanced MRI findings of WD involving important neural pathways, as well as to illustrate increasing utility of advanced MRI techniques in providing important prognostic information for various pathologies. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  9. Ephrin-B3 is the midline barrier that prevents corticospinal tract axons from recrossing, allowing for unilateral motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullander, K; Croll, S D; Zimmer, M; Pan, L; McClain, J; Hughes, V; Zabski, S; DeChiara, T M; Klein, R; Yancopoulos, G D; Gale, N W

    2001-04-01

    Growing axons follow highly stereotypical pathways, guided by a variety of attractive and repulsive cues, before establishing specific connections with distant targets. A particularly well-known example that illustrates the complexity of axonal migration pathways involves the axonal projections of motor neurons located in the motor cortex. These projections take a complex route during which they first cross the midline, then form the corticospinal tract, and ultimately connect with motor neurons in the contralateral side of the spinal cord. These obligatory contralateral connections account for why one side of the brain controls movement on the opposing side of the body. The netrins and slits provide well-known midline signals that regulate axonal crossings at the midline. Herein we report that a member of the ephrin family, ephrin-B3, also plays a key role at the midline to regulate axonal crossing. In particular, we show that ephrin-B3 acts as the midline barrier that prevents corticospinal tract projections from recrossing when they enter the spinal gray matter. We report that in ephrin-B3(-/-) mice, corticospinal tract projections freely recross in the spinal gray matter, such that the motor cortex on one side of the brain now provides bilateral input to the spinal cord. This neuroanatomical abnormality in ephrin-B3(-/-) mice correlates with loss of unilateral motor control, yielding mice that simultaneously move their right and left limbs and thus have a peculiar hopping gait quite unlike the alternate step gait displayed by normal mice. The corticospinal and walking defects in ephrin-B3(-/-) mice resemble those recently reported for mice lacking the EphA4 receptor, which binds ephrin-B3 as well as other ephrins, suggesting that the binding of EphA4-bearing axonal processes to ephrin-B3 at the midline provides the repulsive signal that prevents corticospinal tract projections from recrossing the midline in the developing spinal cord.

  10. The effect of electrical stimulation of the corticospinal tract on motor units of the human biceps brachii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nicolas Caesar; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, Simon C

    2002-01-01

    In healthy human subjects, descending motor pathways including the corticospinal tract were stimulated electrically at the level of the cervicomedullary junction to determine the effects on the discharge of motoneurones innervating the biceps brachii. Post-stimulus time histograms (PSTHs) were...... constructed for 15 single motor units following electrical stimulation of the corticospinal tract and for 11 units following electrical stimulation of large diameter afferents at the brachial plexus. Responses were assessed during weak voluntary contraction. Both types of stimulation produced a single peak...... in the two conditions when the intensity of the stimulation was adjusted so that responses of the same size could be compared. Estimates of the descending conduction velocity and measurements of presumed peripheral conduction time suggest that there is less than 0.5 ms for spinal events (including synaptic...

  11. Activation of less affected corticospinal tract and poor motor outcome in hemiplegic pediatric patients: a diffusion tensor tractography imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hyun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The less affected hemisphere is important in motor recovery in mature brains. However, in terms of motor outcome in immature brains, no study has been reported on the less affected corticospinal tract in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the condition of the less affected corticospinal tract and motor function in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Forty patients with hemiplegia due to perinatal or prenatal injury (13.7 ± 3.0 months and 40 age-matched typically developing controls were recruited. These patients were divided into two age-matched groups, the high functioning group (20 patients and the low functioning group (20 patients using functional level of hemiplegia scale. Diffusion tensor tractography images showed that compared with the control group, the patient group of the less affected corticospinal tract showed significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value. Significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value in the low functioning group were observed than in the high functioning group. These findings suggest that activation of the less affected hemisphere presenting as increased fiber number and decreased fractional anisotropy value is related to poor motor function in pediatric hemiplegic patients.

  12. Deterioration of pre-existing hemiparesis due to injury of the ipsilateral anterior corticospinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2013-05-29

    The anterior corticospinal tract (CST) has been suggested as one of the ipsilateral motor pathways, which contribute to motor recovery following stroke. In this study, we report on a patient who showed deterioration of pre-existing hemiparesis due to an injury of the ipsilateral anterior CST following a pontine infarct, as evaluated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). A 55-year-old male patient showed quadriparesis after the onset of an infarct in the right pontine basis. He had history of an infarct in the left middle cerebral artery territory 7 years ago. Consequently, he showed right hemiparesis before onset of the right pontine infarct. Following this, his right hemiparesis deteriorated whereas his left hemiparesis newly developed. The DTTs for whole CST of the right hemisphere in the patient and both hemispheres in control subjects descended through the known CST pathway. By contrast, the DTT for the left whole CST of the patient showed a complete injury finding. The DTTs for the anterior CST of control subjects passed through the known pathway of the CST from cerebral cortex to medulla and terminated in the anterior funiculus of the upper cervical cord. However, the DTT for right anterior CST in the patient showed discontinuation below the right pontine infarct. It appeared that the deterioration of the pre-existing right hemiparesis was ascribed to an injury of the right anterior CST due to the right pontine infarct.

  13. MRI of the intracranial corticospinal tracts in amyotrophic and primary lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretti-Viton, P.; Brunel, H.; Daniel, C.; Salazard, B.; Salamon, G. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital de la Timone, Marseille (France); Azulay, J.P.; Trefouret, S.; Pouget, J.; Serratrice, G. [Dept. of Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases, Hopital de la Timone, Marseille (France); Viton, J.M. [Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Hopital de la Timone, Marseille (France); Flori, A. [Medical Informatics Dept., Hopital Nord, Marseille (France)

    1999-10-01

    Our aim was to investigate the corticospinal tracts (CST) in motor neurone disease, using MRI, and to correlate findings with clinical data. We studied 31 patients with amyotrophic (ALS) and eight with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). The signal from the CST was classified into four grades on T2-weighted images, and compared to T2-weighted images of 37 age-matched control subjects. No abnormalities were seen in the CST on T1-weighted images and were rarely evident on proton-density weighting. Variable high signal in the CST was found on T2-weighted images in 35 patients, and in 29 control subjects. Our grades 0 and 1 were more frequent in control subjects, grades 2 and 3 more frequent in patients. We found no correlation between the high signal and clinical data, including the duration of the illness. We therefore conclude that this technique is neither sensitive nor specific except in grade 3 which is quite specific for ALS. In half the patients we found atrophy of the superior parietal gyrus, which merits further study. (orig.)

  14. MRI of the intracranial corticospinal tracts in amyotrophic and primary lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretti-Viton, P.; Brunel, H.; Daniel, C.; Salazard, B.; Salamon, G.; Azulay, J.P.; Trefouret, S.; Pouget, J.; Serratrice, G.; Viton, J.M.; Flori, A.

    1999-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the corticospinal tracts (CST) in motor neurone disease, using MRI, and to correlate findings with clinical data. We studied 31 patients with amyotrophic (ALS) and eight with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). The signal from the CST was classified into four grades on T2-weighted images, and compared to T2-weighted images of 37 age-matched control subjects. No abnormalities were seen in the CST on T1-weighted images and were rarely evident on proton-density weighting. Variable high signal in the CST was found on T2-weighted images in 35 patients, and in 29 control subjects. Our grades 0 and 1 were more frequent in control subjects, grades 2 and 3 more frequent in patients. We found no correlation between the high signal and clinical data, including the duration of the illness. We therefore conclude that this technique is neither sensitive nor specific except in grade 3 which is quite specific for ALS. In half the patients we found atrophy of the superior parietal gyrus, which merits further study. (orig.)

  15. Anatomical location of the corticospinal tract according to somatotopies in the centrum semiovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong Pyo; Chang, Pyung-Hun; Jang, Sung Ho

    2012-08-15

    Little is known about the somatotopic location of the corticospinal tract (CST) in the centrum semiovale (CS). We investigated the somatotopic location of the CST in the CS in the human brain using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Fifty-two healthy volunteers were recruited for this study. Diffusion tensor images (DTIs) were obtained at 1.5T, and CSTs for the hand and leg were obtained using FMRIB software. Normalized DTT images were reconstructed using the Montreal Neurological Institute echo-planar imaging template supplied with the SPM. Individual DTI data were calculated as number of pixels in the CS. In the mediolateral direction, average distances of the highest probabilistic locations for hand and leg somatotopies were 25.57 mm and 21.72 mm from the midline between the right and left hemispheres, respectively. For the anteroposterior direction, the average distance of the highest probabilistic locations for hand and leg somatotopies were 0.4 mm and 5.2 mm behind the horizontal line between the medial end of the central sulcus and midline, respectively. In conclusion, hand somatotopy of the CST was found to be located at about 26 mm lateral to the midline almost along the horizon line between the medial end of central sulcus and midline, and leg somatotopy of the CST was found to be located medioposteriorly to the hand somatotopy of the CST. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantifying diffusion MRI tractography of the corticospinal tract in brain tumors with deterministic and probabilistic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Monica; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Berman, Jeffrey I; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Nguyen, Christopher; Berger, Mitchel S; Henry, Roland G

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion MRI tractography has been increasingly used to delineate white matter pathways in vivo for which the leading clinical application is presurgical mapping of eloquent regions. However, there is rare opportunity to quantify the accuracy or sensitivity of these approaches to delineate white matter fiber pathways in vivo due to the lack of a gold standard. Intraoperative electrical stimulation (IES) provides a gold standard for the location and existence of functional motor pathways that can be used to determine the accuracy and sensitivity of fiber tracking algorithms. In this study we used intraoperative stimulation from brain tumor patients as a gold standard to estimate the sensitivity and accuracy of diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) and q-ball models of diffusion with deterministic and probabilistic fiber tracking algorithms for delineation of motor pathways. We used preoperative high angular resolution diffusion MRI (HARDI) data (55 directions, b = 2000 s/mm(2)) acquired in a clinically feasible time frame from 12 patients who underwent a craniotomy for resection of a cerebral glioma. The corticospinal fiber tracts were delineated with DTI and q-ball models using deterministic and probabilistic algorithms. We used cortical and white matter IES sites as a gold standard for the presence and location of functional motor pathways. Sensitivity was defined as the true positive rate of delineating fiber pathways based on cortical IES stimulation sites. For accuracy and precision of the course of the fiber tracts, we measured the distance between the subcortical stimulation sites and the tractography result. Positive predictive rate of the delineated tracts was assessed by comparison of subcortical IES motor function (upper extremity, lower extremity, face) with the connection of the tractography pathway in the motor cortex. We obtained 21 cortical and 8 subcortical IES sites from intraoperative mapping of motor pathways. Probabilistic q-ball had the best

  17. Environmental enrichment mitigates the impact of ancestral stress on motor skill and corticospinal tract plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, J Keiko; Erickson, Zachary T; Metz, Gerlinde A S

    2016-10-06

    An adverse fetal environment in utero has been associated with long-term alterations in brain structure and function, and a higher risk of neurological disorders in later life. A common consequence of early adverse experience is impaired motor system function. A causal relationship for stress-associated impairments and a suitable therapy, however, have not been determined yet. To investigate the impact of ancestral stress on corticospinal tract (CST) morphology and fine motor performance in rats, and to determine if adverse programming by ancestral stress can be mitigated by environmental enrichment therapy in rats. The study examined F3 offspring generated by three lineages; one with prenatal stress only in the F1 generation, one with compounding effects of multigenerational prenatal stress, and a non-stress control lineage. F3 offspring from each lineage were injected with biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into the motor cortex for anterograde tracing of the CST. Examination of the CST revealed reduced axonal density in the ancestrally stressed lineages. These anatomical changes were associated with significant impairments in skilled walking, as indicated by reduced foot placement accuracy and disturbed inter-limb coordination. Therapeutic intervention by environmental enrichment reduced the neuromorphological consequences of ancestral stress and restored skilled walking ability. The data suggest a causal relationship between stress-induced abnormal CST function and loss of fine motor performance. Thus, ancestral stress may be a determinant of motor system development and motor skill. Environmental enrichment may represent an effective intervention for the adverse programming by ancestral stress and trauma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of perfusion lesion in corticospinal tract on response to reperfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Ruiting; Zhang, Sheng; Yan, Shenqiang; Lou, Min [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Hangzhou (China); Wang, Ze [Hangzhou Normal University, Center for Cognition and Brain Disorders, Institutes of Neurological Science, Hangzhou (China); Affiliated Hospital of Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Research in Assessment of Cognitive Impairments, Hangzhou (China); Campbell, Bruce C.V. [University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine and Neurology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Liebeskind, David S. [Los Angeles Stroke Center, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-12-15

    We aimed to examine the impact of corticospinal tract (CST) involvement in acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) patients on functional outcome and the interaction with reperfusion. We retrospectively examined data in consecutive anterior circulation AIS patients undergoing thrombolysis. MR perfusion (time to maximum of tissue residue function, Tmax) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) images were transformed into standard space and the volumes of CST involvement by Tmax > 6 s (CST-Tmax) and ADC < 620 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s (CST-ADC) lesions were calculated. Good outcome was defined as modified Rankin scale ≤ 2 at 3 months. Reperfusion was defined as a reduction in Tmax > 6 s lesion volume of ≥70% between baseline and 24 h. 82 patients were included. Binary logistic regression revealed that both CST-Tmax and CST-ADC volume at baseline were significantly associated with poor outcome (p < 0.05). The 24-h CST-ADC volume was correlated with baseline CST-ADC volume in patients with reperfusion (r = 0.79, p < 0.001) and baseline CST-Tmax volume in patients without reperfusion (r = 0.67, p < 0.001). In patients with CST-Tmax volume > 0 mL and CST-ADC volume < 3 mL, the rate of good outcome was higher in patients with reperfusion than those without (70.4% vs 38.1%, p = 0.04). The use of CST-Tmax in combination with CST-ADC provides prognostic information in patients considered for reperfusion therapies. (orig.)

  19. Somatotopic location of corticospinal tract at pons in human brain: a diffusion tensor tractography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Heon; Son, Su Min; Jang, Sung Ho

    2010-07-01

    No diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) study has yet investigated the somatotopic location of the corticospinal tract (CST) at the pons. In the current study, we used DTT to investigate the somatotopic location of the CST at the pons in the human brain. We recruited 25 healthy volunteers for this study. Diffusion tensor images (DTIs) were scanned using 1.5-T; CSTs for the hand and leg were obtained using FMRIB software. Normalized DTT was reconstructed using the Montreal Neurological Institute echo-planar imaging template supplied with the SPM. Individual DTI data were calculated as a pixel unit at the upper and lower pons. Relative average location of the highest probability point of the CST for the hand was 47.70%, with the standard from the midline to the most lateral point of the upper pons, and 35.87% at the lower pons. For the leg, the CST was located at 56.82% at the upper pons and 40.63% at the lower pons. For the anteroposterior direction from the most anterior point of the pons to the most anterior point of the fourth ventricle, the CST for the hand was located at 42.30% at the upper pons and 36.18% at the lower pons. For the leg, the CST was located at 45.68% and 39.01%, respectively. We found that the hand somatotopy of the CST was located at the antero-medial portion at the pons and that the leg somatotopy of the CST was located postero-laterally to the hand somatotopy of the CST. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Microstructural asymmetry of the corticospinal tracts predicts right-left differences in circle drawing skill in right-handed adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Angstmann, Steffen; Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Skimminge, Arnold; Jernigan, Terry L; Baaré, William F C; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    © 2016, The Author(s). Most humans show a strong preference to use their right hand, but strong preference for the right hand does not necessarily imply a strong right–left asymmetry in manual proficiency (i.e., dexterity). Here we tested the hypothesis that intra-individual asymmetry of manual proficiency would be reflected in microstructural differences between the right and left corticospinal tract (CST) in a cohort of 52 right-handed typically-developing adolescents (11–16 years). Partici...

  1. Microstructural asymmetry of the corticospinal tracts predicts right-left differences in circle drawing skill in right-handed adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angstmann, Steffen; Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Skimminge, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Most humans show a strong preference to use their right hand, but strong preference for the right hand does not necessarily imply a strong right-left asymmetry in manual proficiency (i.e., dexterity). Here we tested the hypothesis that intra-individual asymmetry of manual proficiency would...... be reflected in microstructural differences between the right and left corticospinal tract (CST) in a cohort of 52 right-handed typically-developing adolescents (11-16 years). Participants were asked to fluently draw superimposed circles with their right dominant and left non-dominant hand. Temporal regularity...... of circle drawing movements was assessed for each hand using a digitizing tablet. Although all participants were right-handed, there was substantial inter-individual variation regarding the relative right-hand advantage for fluent circle drawing. All subjects underwent whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging...

  2. Is Remodelling of Corticospinal Tract Terminations Originating in the Intact Hemisphere Associated with Recovery following Transient Ischaemic Stroke in the Rat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J Mitchell

    Full Text Available Following large strokes that encompass the cerebral cortex, it has been suggested that the corticospinal tract originating from the non-ischaemic hemisphere reorganises its pattern of terminal arborisation within the spinal cord to compensate for loss of function. However many strokes in humans predominantly affect subcortical structures with minimal involvement of the cerebral cortex. The aim of the present study was to determine whether remodelling of corticospinal terminals arising from the non-ischaemic hemisphere was associated with spontaneous recovery in rats with subcortical infarcts. Rats were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery and 28 days later, when animals exhibited functional recovery, cholera toxin b subunit was injected into the contralesional, intact forelimb motor cortex in order to anterogradely label terminals within cervical spinal cord segments. Infarcts were limited to subcortical structures and resulted in partial loss of corticospinal tract axons from the ischaemic hemisphere. Quantitative analysis revealed there was no significant difference in the numbers of terminals on the contralesional side of the spinal grey matter between ischaemic and sham rats. The results indicate that significant remodelling of the corticospinal tract from the non-ischaemic hemisphere is not associated with functional recovery in animals with subcortical infarcts.

  3. The association of motor imagery and kinesthetic illusion prolongs the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on corticospinal tract excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Fuminari; Shibata, Eriko; Hayami, Tatsuya; Nagahata, Keita; Aoyama, Toshiyuki

    2016-04-15

    A kinesthetic illusion induced by a visual stimulus (KI) can produce vivid kinesthetic perception. During KI, corticospinal tract excitability increases and results in the activation of cerebral networks. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is emerging as an alternative potential therapeutic modality for a variety of neurological and psychiatric conditions, such that identifying factors that enhance the magnitude and duration of tDCS effects is currently a topic of great scientific interest. This study aimed to establish whether the combination of tDCS with KI and sensory-motor imagery (MI) induces larger and longer-lasting effects on the excitability of corticomotor pathways in healthy Japanese subjects. A total of 21 healthy male volunteers participated in this study. Four interventions were investigated in the first experiment: (1) anodal tDCS alone (tDCSa), (2) anodal tDCS with visually evoked kinesthetic illusion (tDCSa + KI), (3) anodal tDCS with motor imagery (tDCSa + MI), and (4) anodal tDCS with kinesthetic illusion and motor imagery (tDCSa + KIMI). In the second experiment, we added a sham tDCS intervention with kinesthetic illusion and motor imagery (sham + KIMI) as a control for the tDCSa + KIMI condition. Direct currents were applied to the right primary motor cortex. Corticospinal excitability was examined using transcranial magnetic stimulation of the area associated with the left first dorsal interosseous. In the first experiment, corticomotor excitability was sustained for at least 30 min following tDCSa + KIMI (p < 0.01). The effect of tDCSa + KIMI on corticomotor excitability was greater and longer-lasting than that achieved in all other conditions. In the second experiment, significant effects were not achieved following sham + KIMI. Our results suggest that tDCSa + KIMI has a greater therapeutic potential than tDCS alone for inducing higher excitability of the corticospinal tract. The observed

  4. Microstructural changes of the corticospinal tract in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: a comparison of diffusion tensor and diffusional kurtosis imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hori, Masaaki; Aoki, Shigeki; Fukunaga, Issei; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Takaaki, Hattori; Miyajima, Masakazu

    2013-01-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the usefulness of diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) for assessing microstructural changes in the compressed corticospinal tract (CST) among patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). Eleven patients with iNPH (mean age: 73.6 years, range: 65-84), who underwent 3-T magnetic resonance imaging, including DKI before surgery, were recruited. Six age-matched, healthy subjects (mean age: 69.8 years, range: 60-75) served as the control group. DKI and diffusion tensor imaging parameters were calculated and compared between the iNPH and the control groups using tract-specific analysis of the CST at the level of the lateral ventricle. Mean diffusional kurtosis (DK) and axial diffusion kurtosis were significantly lower in iNPH patients. However, apparent diffusion coefficient, fractional anisotropy, and axial eigenvalue (λ 1 ) were significantly higher in the iNPH group than in the control group. The mechanical pressure caused by ventricular enlargement in iNPH patients might induce formation of well-aligned fiber tracts and increased fiber density in the CST, resulting in decreased DK. DKI is able to depict both the altered microstructure and water molecule movement within neural axons and intra- or extracellular space. In addition, the investigated DKI parameters provide different information about white matter relative to conventional diffusional metrics for iNPH. (orig.)

  5. Microstructural changes of the corticospinal tract in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: a comparison of diffusion tensor and diffusional kurtosis imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hori, Masaaki; Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Fukunaga, Issei [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Health Science, Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Arakawa, Tokyo (Japan); Masutani, Yoshitaka [The University of Tokyo, Division of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Takaaki, Hattori [Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Department of Neurology and Neurological Science, Graduate School, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Miyajima, Masakazu [Juntendo University, Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    The goals of this study were to examine the usefulness of diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) for assessing microstructural changes in the compressed corticospinal tract (CST) among patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). Eleven patients with iNPH (mean age: 73.6 years, range: 65-84), who underwent 3-T magnetic resonance imaging, including DKI before surgery, were recruited. Six age-matched, healthy subjects (mean age: 69.8 years, range: 60-75) served as the control group. DKI and diffusion tensor imaging parameters were calculated and compared between the iNPH and the control groups using tract-specific analysis of the CST at the level of the lateral ventricle. Mean diffusional kurtosis (DK) and axial diffusion kurtosis were significantly lower in iNPH patients. However, apparent diffusion coefficient, fractional anisotropy, and axial eigenvalue ({lambda} {sub 1}) were significantly higher in the iNPH group than in the control group. The mechanical pressure caused by ventricular enlargement in iNPH patients might induce formation of well-aligned fiber tracts and increased fiber density in the CST, resulting in decreased DK. DKI is able to depict both the altered microstructure and water molecule movement within neural axons and intra- or extracellular space. In addition, the investigated DKI parameters provide different information about white matter relative to conventional diffusional metrics for iNPH. (orig.)

  6. Tractography of the corticospinal tracts in infants with focal perinatal injury: comparison with normal controls and to motor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roze, Elise; Harris, Polly A.; Ball, Gareth; Braga, Rodrigo M.; Allsop, Joanna M.; Counsell, Serena J.; Elorza, Leire Zubiaurre; Merchant, Nazakat; Arichi, Tomoki; Edwards, A.D.; Cowan, Frances M.; Porter, Emma; Rutherford, Mary A.

    2012-01-01

    Our aims were to (1) assess the corticospinal tracts (CSTs) in infants with focal injury and healthy term controls using probabilistic tractography and (2) to correlate the conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and tractography findings in infants with focal injury with their later motor function. We studied 20 infants with focal lesions and 23 controls using MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Tract volume, fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity (RD) of the CSTs were determined. Asymmetry indices (AIs) were calculated by comparing ipsilateral to contralateral CSTs. Motor outcome was assessed using a standardized neurological examination. Conventional MRI was able to predict normal motor development (n = 9) or hemiplegia (n = 6). In children who developed a mild motor asymmetry (n = 5), conventional MRI predicted a hemiplegia in two and normal motor development in three infants. The AIs for tract volume, FA, ADC and RD showed a significant difference between controls and infants who developed a hemiplegia, and RD also showed a significant difference in AI between controls and infants who developed a mild asymmetry. Conventional MRI was able to predict subsequent normal motor development or hemiplegia following focal injury in newborn infants. Measures of RD obtained from diffusion tractography may offer additional information for predicting a subsequent asymmetry in motor function. (orig.)

  7. Symmetrical Location Characteristics of Corticospinal Tract Associated With Hand Movement in the Human Brain: A Probabilistic Diffusion Tensor Tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Do-Wan; Han, Bong-Soo

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the symmetrical characteristics of corticospinal tract (CST) related with hand movement in bilateral hemispheres using probabilistic fiber tracking method. Seventeen subjects were participated in this study. Fiber tracking was performed with 2 regions of interest, hand activated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results and pontomedullary junction in each cerebral hemisphere. Each subject's extracted fiber tract was normalized with a brain template. To measure the symmetrical distributions of the CST related with hand movement, the laterality and anteriority indices were defined in upper corona radiata (CR), lower CR, and posterior limb of internal capsule. The measured laterality and anteriority indices between the hemispheres in each different brain location showed no significant differences with P the measured indices among 3 different brain locations in each cerebral hemisphere with P the hand CST had symmetric structures in bilateral hemispheres. The probabilistic fiber tracking with fMRI approach demonstrated that the hand CST can be successfully extracted regardless of crossing fiber problem. Our analytical approaches and results seem to be helpful for providing the database of CST somatotopy to neurologists and clinical researches.

  8. Corticospinal tract integrity and lesion volume play different roles in chronic hemiparesis and its improvement through motor practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterr, Annette; Dean, Phil J A; Szameitat, Andre J; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Shen, Shan

    2014-05-01

    Initial evidence suggests that the integrity of the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST) after stroke is strongly related to motor function in the chronic state but not the treatment gain induced by motor rehabilitation. We examined the association of motor status and treatment benefit by testing patients with a wide range of severity of hemiparesis of the left and right upper extremity. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed in 22 patients beyond 12 months after onset of stroke with severe to moderate hemiparesis. Motor function was tested before and after 2 weeks of modified constraint-induced movement therapy. CST integrity, but not lesion volume, correlated with the motor ability measures of the Wolf Motor Function Test and the Motor Activity Log. No differences were found between left and right hemiparesis. Motor performance improved significantly with the treatment regime, and did so equally for patients with left and right arm paresis. However, treatment benefit was not associated with either CST integrity or lesion volume. CST integrity correlated best in this small trial with chronic long-term status but not treatment-induced improvements. The CST may play a different role in the mechanisms mediating long-term outcome compared to those underlying practice-induced gains after a chronic plateau in motor function.

  9. Effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on motor representations in the motor cortex and corticospinal tract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Ken; Ikutomo, Masako; Tamaki, Toru; Shimo, Satoshi; Niwa, Masatoshi

    2018-02-01

    Motor disorders in patients with diabetes are associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, which can lead to symptoms such as lower extremity weakness. However, it is unclear whether central motor system disorders can disrupt motor function in patients with diabetes. In a streptozotocin-induced rat model of type 1 diabetes, we used intracortical microstimulation to evaluate motor representations in the motor cortex, recorded antidromic motor cortex responses to spinal cord stimulation to evaluate the function of corticospinal tract (CST) axons, and used retrograde labeling to evaluate morphological alterations of CST neurons. The diabetic rats exhibited size reductions in the hindlimb area at 4 weeks and in trunk and forelimb areas after 13 weeks, with the hindlimb and trunk area reductions being the most severe. Other areas were unaffected. Additionally, we observed reduced antidromic responses in CST neurons with axons projecting to lumbar spinal segments (CST-L) but not in those with axons projecting to cervical segments (CST-C). This was consistent with the observation that retrograde-labeled CST-L neurons were decreased in number following tracer injection into the spinal cord in diabetic animals but that CST-C neurons were preserved. These results show that diabetes disrupts the CST system components controlling hindlimb and trunk movement. This disruption may contribute to lower extremity weakness in patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Potential Biomarker in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Can Assessment of Brain Iron Deposition with SWI and Corticospinal Tract Degeneration with DTI Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheelakumari, R; Madhusoodanan, M; Radhakrishnan, A; Ranjith, G; Thomas, B

    2016-02-01

    Iron-mediated oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This study aimed to assess iron deposition qualitatively and quantitatively by using SWI and microstructural changes in the corticospinal tract by using DTI in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Seventeen patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 15 age- and sex-matched controls underwent brain MR imaging with SWI and DTI. SWI was analyzed for both signal-intensity scoring and quantitative estimation of iron deposition in the anterior and posterior banks of the motor and sensory cortices and deep gray nuclei. The diffusion measurements along the corticospinal tract at the level of pons and medulla were obtained by ROI analysis. Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showed reduced signal-intensity grades in the posterior bank of the motor cortex bilaterally. Quantitative analysis confirmed significantly higher iron content in the posterior bank of the motor cortex in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In contrast, no significant differences were noted for the anterior bank of the motor cortex, anterior and posterior banks of the sensory cortex, and deep nuclei. Receiver operating characteristic comparison showed a cutoff of 35μg Fe/g of tissue with an area under the curve of 0.78 (P = .008) for the posterior bank of the motor cortex in discriminating patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from controls. Fractional anisotropy was lower in the pyramidal tracts of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at the pons and medulla on either side, along with higher directionally averaged mean diffusivity values. The combination of SWI and DTI revealed an area under the curve of 0.784 for differentiating patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from controls. Measurements of motor cortex iron deposition and diffusion tensor parameters of the corticospinal tract may be useful biomarkers for the diagnosis of clinically suspected

  11. Novel diffusion tensor imaging technique reveals developmental streamline volume changes in the corticospinal tract associated with leg motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamson, David O; Juhász, Csaba; Chugani, Harry T; Jeong, Jeong-Won

    2015-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has expanded our knowledge of corticospinal tract (CST) anatomy and development. However, previous developmental DTI studies assessed the CST as a whole, overlooking potential differences in development of its components related to control of the upper and lower extremities. The present cross-sectional study investigated age-related changes, side and gender differences in streamline volume of the leg- and hand-related segments of the CST in children. DTI data of 31 children (1-14 years; mean age: 6±4 years; 17 girls) with normal conventional MRI were analyzed. Leg- and hand-related CST streamline volumes were quantified separately, using a recently validated novel tractography approach. CST streamline volumes on both sides were compared between genders and correlated with age. Higher absolute streamline volumes were found in the left leg-related CST compared to the right (p=0.001) without a gender effect (p=0.4), whereas no differences were found in the absolute hand-related CST volumes (p>0.4). CST leg-related streamline volumes, normalized to hemispheric white matter volumes, declined with age in the right hemisphere only (R=-.51; p=0.004). Absolute leg-related CST streamline volumes showed similar, but slightly weaker correlations. Hand-related absolute or normalized CST streamline volumes showed no age-related variations on either side. These results suggest differential development of CST segments controlling hand vs. leg movements. Asymmetric volume changes in the lower limb motor pathway may be secondary to gradually strengthening left hemispheric dominance and is consistent with previous data suggesting that footedness is a better predictor of hemispheric lateralization than handedness. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Microstructural asymmetry of the corticospinal tracts predicts right-left differences in circle drawing skill in right-handed adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstmann, Steffen; Madsen, Kathrine Skak; Skimminge, Arnold; Jernigan, Terry L; Baaré, William F C; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-12-01

    Most humans show a strong preference to use their right hand, but strong preference for the right hand does not necessarily imply a strong right-left asymmetry in manual proficiency (i.e., dexterity). Here we tested the hypothesis that intra-individual asymmetry of manual proficiency would be reflected in microstructural differences between the right and left corticospinal tract (CST) in a cohort of 52 right-handed typically-developing adolescents (11-16 years). Participants were asked to fluently draw superimposed circles with their right dominant and left non-dominant hand. Temporal regularity of circle drawing movements was assessed for each hand using a digitizing tablet. Although all participants were right-handed, there was substantial inter-individual variation regarding the relative right-hand advantage for fluent circle drawing. All subjects underwent whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging at 3 Tesla. The right and left CST were defined as regions-of-interest and mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity values were calculated for right and left CST. On average, mean FA values were higher in the left CST relative to right CST. The degree of right-left FA asymmetry showed a linear relationship with right-left asymmetry in fluent circle drawing after correction for age and gender. The higher the mean FA values were in the left dominant CST relative to the right non-dominant CST, the stronger was the relative right-hand advantage for regular circle drawing. These findings show that right-left differences in manual proficiency are highly variable in right-handed adolescents and that this variation is associated with a right-left microstructural asymmetry of the CST.

  13. Motor cortex and spinal cord neuromodulation promote corticospinal tract axonal outgrowth and motor recovery after cervical contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareen, N; Shinozaki, M; Ryan, D; Alexander, H; Amer, A; Truong, D Q; Khadka, N; Sarkar, A; Naeem, S; Bikson, M; Martin, J H

    2017-11-01

    Cervical injuries are the most common form of SCI. In this study, we used a neuromodulatory approach to promote skilled movement recovery and repair of the corticospinal tract (CST) after a moderately severe C4 midline contusion in adult rats. We used bilateral epidural intermittent theta burst (iTBS) electrical stimulation of motor cortex to promote CST axonal sprouting and cathodal trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) to enhance spinal cord activation to motor cortex stimulation after injury. We used Finite Element Method (FEM) modeling to direct tsDCS to the cervical enlargement. Combined iTBS-tsDCS was delivered for 30min daily for 10days. We compared the effect of stimulation on performance in the horizontal ladder and the Irvine Beattie and Bresnahan forepaw manipulation tasks and CST axonal sprouting in injury-only and injury+stimulation animals. The contusion eliminated the dorsal CST in all animals. tsDCS significantly enhanced motor cortex evoked responses after C4 injury. Using this combined spinal-M1 neuromodulatory approach, we found significant recovery of skilled locomotion and forepaw manipulation skills compared with injury-only controls. The spared CST axons caudal to the lesion in both animal groups derived mostly from lateral CST axons that populated the contralateral intermediate zone. Stimulation enhanced injury-dependent CST axonal outgrowth below and above the level of the injury. This dual neuromodulatory approach produced partial recovery of skilled motor behaviors that normally require integration of posture, upper limb sensory information, and intent for performance. We propose that the motor systems use these new CST projections to control movements better after injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tensor and non-tensor tractography for the assessment of the corticospinal tract of children with motor disorders: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanou, Maria-Ioanna; Lumsden, Daniel E; Ashmore, Jonathan; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Charles-Edwards, Geoffrey

    2016-10-01

    Non-invasive measures of corticospinal tract (CST) integrity may help to guide clinical interventions, particularly in children and young people (CAYP) with motor disorders. We compared diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics extracted from the CST generated by tensor and non-tensor based tractography algorithms. For a group of 25 CAYP undergoing clinical evaluation, the CST was reconstructed using (1) deterministic tensor-based tractography algorithm, (2) probabilistic tensor-based, and (3) constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD)-derived tractography algorithms. Choice of tractography algorithm significantly altered the results of tracking. Larger tracts were consistently defined with CSD, with differences in FA but not MD values for tracts to the pre- or post-central gyrus. Differences between deterministic and probabilistic tensor-based algorithms were minimal. Non-tensor reconstructed tracts appeared to be more anatomically representative. Examining metrics along the tract, difference in FA values appeared to be greatest in voxels with predominantly single-fibre orientations. Less pronounced differences were seen outwith of these regions. With an increasing interest in the applications of tractography analysis at all stages of movement disorder surgery, it is important that clinicians remain alert to the consequences of choice of tractography algorithm on subsequently generated tracts, including differences in volumes, anatomical reconstruction, and DTI metrics, the latter of which will have global as well as more regional effects. Tract-wide analysis of DTI based metrics is of limited utility, and a more segmental approach to analysis may be appropriate, particularly if disruption to a focal region of a white matter pathway is anticipated.

  15. Right lower limb apraxia in a patient with left supplementary motor area infarction: intactness of the corticospinal tract confirmed by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Cheol Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported a 50-year-old female patient with left supplementary motor area infarction who presented right lower limb apraxia and investigated the possible causes using transcranial magnetic stimulation. The patient was able to walk and climb stairs spontaneously without any assistance at 3 weeks after onset. However, she was unable to intentionally move her right lower limb although she understood what she supposed to do. The motor evoked potential evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation from the right lower limb was within the normal range, indicating that the corticospinal tract innervating the right lower limb was uninjured. Thus, we thought that her motor dysfunction was not induced by motor weakness, and confirmed her symptoms as apraxia. In addition, these results also suggest that transcranial magnetic stimulation is helpful for diagnosing apraxia.

  16. Intramuscular Neurotrophin-3 normalizes low threshold spinal reflexes, reduces spasms and improves mobility after bilateral corticospinal tract injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathe, Claudia; Hutson, Thomas Haynes; McMahon, Stephen Brendan; Moon, Lawrence David Falcon

    2016-10-19

    Brain and spinal injury reduce mobility and often impair sensorimotor processing in the spinal cord leading to spasticity. Here, we establish that complete transection of corticospinal pathways in the pyramids impairs locomotion and leads to increased spasms and excessive mono- and polysynaptic low threshold spinal reflexes in rats. Treatment of affected forelimb muscles with an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) encoding human Neurotrophin-3 at a clinically-feasible time-point after injury reduced spasticity. Neurotrophin-3 normalized the short latency Hoffmann reflex to a treated hand muscle as well as low threshold polysynaptic spinal reflexes involving afferents from other treated muscles. Neurotrophin-3 also enhanced locomotor recovery. Furthermore, the balance of inhibitory and excitatory boutons in the spinal cord and the level of an ion co-transporter in motor neuron membranes required for normal reflexes were normalized. Our findings pave the way for Neurotrophin-3 as a therapy that treats the underlying causes of spasticity and not only its symptoms.

  17. Diffusion tensor imaging for long-term follow-up of corticospinal tract degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, S.; Ehrenreich, H. [Max-Planck-Institute for Experimental Medicine, Georg-August-University, Hermann-Rein-Strasse 3, 37075, Goettingen (Germany); Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, Georg-August-University, Goettingen (Germany); Finsterbusch, J.; Frahm, J. [Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH, Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Georg-August-University, Goettingen (Germany); Weishaupt, J.H. [Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, Georg-August-University, Goettingen (Germany); Khorram-Sefat, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August-University, Goettingen (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a predominantly clinical and electromyographic diagnosis. Conventional MRI reveals atrophy of the motor system, particularly the pyramidal tract, in the advanced stages but does not provide a sensitive measure of disease progression. Three patients with different principal symptoms of ALS, i.e., with predominant involvement of the upper (UMN) or lower (UMN) motor neurons, or bulbar disease, respectively, underwent serial clinical examination including lung function tests, conventional MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). MRI demonstrated changes in of the pyramidal tract without measurable variation on follow-up. The patient with UMN involvement showed remarkable progressive loss of diffusion anisotropy in the pyramidal tract. DTI might be useful, together with clinical follow-up, as an objective morphological marker in therapeutic trials. (orig.)

  18. Therapeutic effects of anti-gravity treadmill (AlterG) training on reflex hyper-excitability, corticospinal tract activities, and muscle stiffness in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvin, Sh; Taghiloo, A; Irani, A; Mirbagheri, M Mehdi

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to study therapeutic effects of antigravity treadmill (AlterG) training on reflex hyper-excitability, muscle stiffness, and corticospinal tract (CST) function in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Three children received AlterG training 3 days per week for 8 weeks as experimental group. Each session lasted 45 minutes. One child as control group received typical occupational therapy for the same amount of time. We evaluated hyper-excitability of lower limb muscles by H-reflex response. We quantified muscle stiffness by sonoelastography images of the affected muscles. We quantified CST activity by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We performed the evaluations before and after training for both groups. H response latency and maximum M-wave amplitude were improved in experimental group after training compared to control group. Two children of experimental group had TMS response. Major parameters of TMS (i.e. peak-to-peak amplitude of motor evoked potential (MEP), latency of MEP, cortical silent period, and intensity of pulse) improved for both of them. Three parameters of texture analysis of sonoelastography images were improved for experimental group (i.e. contrast, entropy, and shear wave velocity). These findings indicate that AlterG training can improve reflexes, muscle stiffness, and CST activity in children with spastic hemiplegic CP and can be considered as a therapeutic tool to improve neuromuscular abnormalities occurring secondary to CP.

  19. Integration of BOLD-fMRI and DTI into radiation treatment planning for high-grade gliomas located near the primary motor cortexes and corticospinal tracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Minglei; Ma, Hui; Wang, Xiaodong; Guo, Yanhong; Xia, Xinshe; Xia, Hechun; Guo, Yulin; Huang, Xueying; He, Hong; Jia, Xiaoxiong; Xie, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of integrating the blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data into radiation treatment planning for high-grade gliomas located near the primary motor cortexes (PMCs) and corticospinal tracts (CSTs). A total of 20 patients with high-grade gliomas adjacent to PMCs and CSTs between 2012 and 2014 were recruited. The bilateral PMCs and CSTs were located in the normal regions without any overlapping with target volume of the lesions. BOLD-fMRI, DTI and conventional MRI were performed on patients (Karnofsky performance score ≥ 70) before radical radiotherapy treatment. Four different imaging studies were conducted in each patient: a planning computed tomography (CT), an anatomical MRI, a DTI and a BOLD-fMRI. For each case, three treatment plans (3DCRT, IMRT and IMRT-PMC&CST) were developed by 3 different physicists using the Pinnacle planning system. Our study has shown that there was no significant difference between the 3DCRT and IMRT plans in terms of dose homogeneity, but IMRT displayed better planning target volume (PTV) dose conformity. In addition, we have found that the Dmax and Dmean to the ipsilateral and contralateral PMC and CST regions were considerably decreased in IMRT-PMC&CST group (p < 0.001). In conclusion, integration of BOLD-fMRI and DTI into radiation treatment planning is feasible and beneficial. With the assistance of the above-described techniques, the bilateral PMCs and CSTs adjacent to the target volume could be clearly marked as OARs and spared during treatment

  20. Variable laterality of corticospinal tract axons that regenerate after spinal cord injury as a result of PTEN deletion or knock-down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenberg, Rafer; Zukor, Katherine; Liu, Kai; He, Zhigang; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Corticospinal tract (CST) axons from one hemisphere normally extend and terminate predominantly in the contralateral spinal cord. We previously showed that deleting PTEN in the sensorimotor cortex enables CST axons to regenerate after spinal cord injury and that some regenerating axons extend along the “wrong” side. Here, we characterize the degree of specificity of regrowth in terms of laterality. PTEN was selectively deleted via cortical AAV-Cre injections in neonatal PTEN-floxed mice. As adults, mice received dorsal hemisection injuries at T12 or complete crush injuries at T9. CST axons from one hemisphere were traced by unilateral BDA injections in PTEN-deleted mice with spinal cord injury and in non-injured PTEN-floxed mice that had not received AAV-Cre. In non-injured mice, 97.9 ± 0.7% of BDA-labeled axons in white matter and 88.5 ± 1.0% of BDA-labeled axons in grey matter were contralateral to the cortex of origin. In contrast, laterality of CST axons that extended past a lesion due to PTEN deletion varied across animals. In some cases, regenerated axons extended predominantly on the ipsilateral side, in other cases, axons extended predominantly contralaterally, and in others, axons were similar in numbers on both sides. Similar results were seen in analyses of cases from previous studies using shRNA-mediated PTEN knock-down. These results indicate that CST axons that extend past a lesion due to PTEN deletion or knock-down do not maintain the contralateral rule of the non-injured CST, highlighting one aspect for how resultant circuitry from regenerating axons may differ from that of the uninjured CST. PMID:26878190

  1. The Impact of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Fiber Tracking of the Corticospinal Tract Based on Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Surgery of Motor-Eloquent Brain Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Giovanni; Conti, Alfredo; Scibilia, Antonino; Cardali, Salvatore Massimiliano; Esposito, Felice; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; La Torre, Domenico; Sindorio, Carmela; Abbritti, Rosaria Viola; Germanò, Antonino; Tomasello, Francesco

    2017-11-29

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) enables preoperative mapping of the motor cortex (M1). The combination of nTMS with diffusion tensor imaging fiber tracking (DTI-FT) of the corticospinal tract (CST) has been described; however, its impact on surgery of motor-eloquent lesions has not been addressed. To analyze the impact of nTMS-based mapping on surgery of motor-eloquent lesions. In this retrospective case-control study, we reviewed the data of patients operated for suspected motor-eloquent lesions between 2012 and 2015. The patients underwent nTMS mapping of M1 and, from 2014, nTMS-based DTI-FT of the CST. The impact on the preoperative risk/benefit analysis, surgical strategy, craniotomy size, extent of resection (EOR), and outcome were compared with a control group. We included 35 patients who underwent nTMS mapping of M1 (group A), 35 patients who also underwent nTMS-based DTI-FT of the CST (group B), and a control group composed of 35 patients treated without nTMS (group C). The patients in groups A and B received smaller craniotomies (P = .01; P = .001), had less postoperative seizures (P = .02), and a better postoperative motor performance (P = .04) and Karnofsky Performance Status (P = .009) than the controls. Group B exhibited an improved risk/benefit analysis (P = .006), an increased EOR of nTMS-negative lesions in absence of preoperative motor deficits (P = .01), and less motor and Karnofsky Performance Status worsening in case of preoperative motor deficits (P = .02, P = .03) than group A. nTMS-based mapping enables a tailored surgical approach for motor-eloquent lesions. It may improve the risk/benefit analysis, EOR and outcome, particularly when nTMS-based DTI-FT is performed. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  2. Corticospinal contribution to arm muscle activity during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2010-01-01

    inhibitory interneurones, the suppression is in all likelihood caused by removal of a corticospinal contribution to the ongoing EMG activity. The data thus suggest that the motor cortex makes an active contribution, through the corticospinal tract, to the ongoing EMG activity in arm muscles during walking....

  3. Upper urinary tract damage caused by ketamine snorting—A report of nine cases

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang-Ying Lee; Yu-Chao Hsu; Chao-Yu Hsu; Eric Chieh-Lung Chou; Ching-Chia Li; Yung-Shun Juan; Mei-Yu Jang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The toxicity of ketamine to genitourinary system not only involved in lower urinary tract, which include urinary frequency, urgency, suprapubic pain, dysuria and hematuria, but also upper urinary tracts. However, the reports of ketmaine-induced upper urinary tract damage were rare. Materials and methods: Herein, we reported nine ketamine abusers presented with moderate flank pain with hydronephrosis and lower urinary tract symptoms from three medical centers located around Taiwa...

  4. Is hemiplegic cerebral palsy equivalent to amblyopia of the corticospinal system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Janet A; Smith, Martin; Dabydeen, Lyvia; Clowry, Gavin J; Petacchi, Eliza; Battini, Roberta; Guzzetta, Andrea; Cioni, Giovanni

    2007-11-01

    Subjects with severe hemiplegic cerebral palsy have increased ipsilateral corticospinal projections from their noninfarcted cortex. We investigated whether their severe impairment might, in part, be caused by activity-dependent, competitive displacement of surviving contralateral corticospinal projections from the affected cortex by more active ipsilateral corticospinal projections from the nonaffected cortex, thereby compounding the impairment. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) characterized corticospinal tract development from each hemisphere over the first 2 years in 32 healthy children, 14 children with unilateral stroke, and 25 with bilateral lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging and anatomic studies compared corticospinal tract growth in 13 patients with perinatal stroke with 46 healthy subjects. Infants with unilateral lesions initially had responses after TMS of the affected cortex, which became progressively more abnormal, and seven were eventually lost. There was associated hypertrophy of the ipsilateral corticospinal axons projecting from the noninfarcted cortex. Magnetic resonance imaging and anatomic studies demonstrated hypertrophy of the corticospinal tract from the noninfarcted hemisphere. TMS findings soon after the stroke did not predict impairment; subsequent loss of responses and hypertrophy of ipsilateral corticospinal axons from the noninfarcted cortex predicted severe impairment at 2 years. Infants with bilateral lesions maintained responses to TMS from both hemispheres with a normal pattern of development. Rather than representing "reparative plasticity," increased ipsilateral projections from the noninfarcted cortex compound disability by competitively displacing surviving contralateral corticospinal projections from the infarcted cortex. This may provide a pathophysiological explanation for why signs of hemiplegic cerebral palsy appear late and progress over the first 2 years of life.

  5. High EDSS can predict risk for upper urinary tract damage in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineichen, Benjamin V; Schneider, Marc P; Hlavica, Martin; Hagenbuch, Niels; Linnebank, Michael; Kessler, Thomas M

    2018-04-01

    Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) is very common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and it might jeopardize renal function and thereby increase mortality. Although there are well-known urodynamic risk factors for upper urinary tract damage, no clinical prediction parameters are available. We aimed to assess clinical parameters potentially predicting urodynamic risk factors for upper urinary tract damage. A consecutive series of 141 patients with MS referred from neurologists for primary neuro-urological work-up including urodynamics were prospectively evaluated. Clinical parameters taken into account were age, sex, duration, and clinical course of MS and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Multivariate modeling revealed EDSS as a clinical parameter significantly associated with urodynamic risk factors for upper urinary tract damage (odds ratio = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.71, p = 0.02). Using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, an EDSS of 5.0 as cutoff showed a sensitivity of 86%-87% and a specificity of 52% for at least one urodynamic risk factor for upper urinary tract damage. High EDSS is significantly associated with urodynamic risk factors for upper urinary tract damage and allows a risk-dependent stratification in daily neurological clinical practice to identify MS patients requiring further neuro-urological assessment and treatment.

  6. Effects of lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation on expression of growth-associated genes by corticospinal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieberman AR

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation around cell bodies of primary sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells enhances expression of neuronal growth-associated genes and stimulates axonal regeneration. We have asked if inflammation would have similar effects on corticospinal neurons, which normally show little response to spinal cord injury. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS was applied onto the pial surface of the motor cortex of adult rats with or without concomitant injury of the corticospinal tract at C4. Inflammation around corticospinal tract cell bodies in the motor cortex was assessed by immunohistochemistry for OX42 (a microglia and macrophage marker. Expression of growth-associated genes c-jun, ATF3, SCG10 and GAP-43 was investigated by immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridisation. Results Application of LPS induced a gradient of inflammation through the full depth of the motor cortex and promoted c-Jun and SCG10 expression for up to 2 weeks, and GAP-43 upregulation for 3 days by many corticospinal neurons, but had very limited effects on neuronal ATF3 expression. However, many glial cells in the subcortical white matter upregulated ATF3. LPS did not promote sprouting of anterogradely labelled corticospinal axons, which did not grow into or beyond a cervical lesion site. Conclusion Inflammation produced by topical application of LPS promoted increased expression of some growth-associated genes in the cell bodies of corticospinal neurons, but was insufficient to promote regeneration of the corticospinal tract.

  7. Innate immunity and the sensing of infection, damage and danger in the female genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Iain Martin; Owens, Siân-Eleri; Turner, Matthew Lloyd

    2017-02-01

    Tissue homeostasis in the female genital tract is challenged by infection, damage, and even physiological events during reproductive cycles. We propose that the evolutionarily ancient system of innate immunity is sufficient to sense and respond to danger in the non-pregnant female genital tract. Innate immunity produces a rapidly inducible, non-specific response when cells sense danger. Here we provide a primer on innate immunity and discuss what is known about how danger signals are sensed in the endometrium and ovary, the impact of inflammatory responses on reproduction, and how endocrinology and innate immunity are integrated. Endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, and ovarian granulosa cells express pattern recognition receptors, similar to cells of the innate immune system. These pattern recognition receptors, such as the Toll-like receptors, bind pathogen-associated or damage-associated molecular patterns. Activation of pattern recognition receptors leads to inflammation, recruitment of immune cells from the peripheral circulation, and phagocytosis. Although the inflammatory response helps maintain or restore endometrial health, there may also be negative consequences for fertility, including perturbation of oocyte competence. The intensity of the inflammatory response reflects the balance between the level of danger and the systems that regulate innate immunity, including the endocrine environment. Understanding innate immunity is important because disease and inappropriate inflammatory responses in the endometrium or ovary cause infertility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Urinary tract infection in small children: the evolution of renal damage over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerkersson, Svante; Jodal, Ulf; Sixt, Rune; Stokland, Eira; Hansson, Sverker

    2017-10-01

    Our objective was to analyze the evolution of kidney damage over time in small children with urinary tract infection (UTI) and factors associated with progression of renal damage. From a cohort of 1003 children UTI, a retrospective analysis of 103 children was done. Children were selected because of renal damage at index 99m Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy at least 3 months after UTI, and a late DMSA scan was performed after at least 2 years. Damage was classified as progression when there was a decline in differential renal function (DRF) by ≥4%, as regression when there was complete or partial resolution of uptake defects. Of 103 children, 20 showed progression, 20 regression, and 63 remained unchanged. There were no differences between groups regarding gender or age. In the progression group, 16/20 (80%) children had vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) grade III-V and 13 (65%) had recurrent UTI. In multivariable regression analysis, both VUR grade III-V and recurrent UTI were associated with progression. In the regression group, 16/20 (80%) had no VUR or grade I-II, and two (10%) had recurrent UTI. Most small children with febrile UTI do not develop renal damage and if they do the majority remain unchanged or regress over time. However, up to one-fifth of children with renal damage diagnosed after UTI are at risk of renal deterioration. These children are characterized by the presence of VUR grades III-V and recurrent febrile UTI and may benefit from follow-up.

  9. Corticospinal MRI tractography in space-occupying brain lesions by diffusion tensor and kurtosis imaging methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leote, Joao [epartment of Neurosurgery, Hospital Garcia de Orta, Almada (Portugal); Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon, Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, Rita; Cerqueira, Luis; Ferreira, Hugo Alexandre [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-05-18

    Recently, DKI-based tractography has been developed, showing improved crossing-fiber resolution in comparison to deterministic DTI-based tractography in healthy subjects. In this work, DTI and DKI-based tractography methods were compared regarding the assessment of the corticospinal tract in patients presenting space-occupying brain lesions near cortical motor areas. Nine patients (4 males) aged 23 to 62 years old, with space-occupying brain lesions (e.g. tumors) were studied for pre-surgical planning using a 1.5T MRI scanner and a 12-channel head coil. In 5 patients diffusion data was acquired along 64 directions and in 4 patients along 32 directions both with b-values 0, 1000 and 2000 s/mm2. Corticospinal tracts were estimated using deterministic DTI and DKI methods and also using probabilistic DTI. The superior cerebellar peduncles and the motor cortical areas, ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesions, were used as seed regions-of-interest for fiber tracking. Tracts courses and volumes were documented and compared between methods. Results showed that it was possible to estimate fiber tracts using deterministic DTI and DKI methods in 8/9 patients, and using the probabilistic DTI method in all patients. Overall, it was observed that DKI-based tractography showed more voluminous fiber tracts than when using deterministic DTI. The DKI method also showed curvilinear fibers mainly above lesions margins, which were not visible with deterministic DTI in 5 patients. Similar tracts were observed when using probabilistic DTI in 3 of those patients. Results suggest that the DKI method contribute with additional information about the corticospinal tract course in comparison with the DTI method, especially with subcortical lesions and near lesions’ margins. Therefore, this study suggests that DKI-based tractography could be useful in MRI and hybrid PET-MRI pre-surgical planning protocols for improved corticospinal tract evaluation.

  10. Reproducibility of corticospinal diffusion tensor tractography in normal subjects and hemiparetic stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chao-Chun; Tsai, Miao-Yu; Lo, Yu-Chien; Liu, Yi-Jui; Tsai, Po-Pang; Wu, Chiao-Ying; Lin, Chia-Wei; Shen, Wu-Chung; Chung, Hsiao-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The reproducibility of corticospinal diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) for a guideline is important before longitudinal monitoring of the therapy effects in stroke patients. This study aimed to establish the reproducibility of corticospinal DTT indices in healthy subjects and chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. Materials and methods: Written informed consents were obtained from 10 healthy subjects (mean age 25.8 ± 6.8 years), who underwent two scans in one session plus the third scan one week later, and from 15 patients (mean age 47.5 ± 9.1 years, 6–60 months after the onset of stroke, NIHSS scores between 9 and 20) who were scanned thrice on separate days within one month. Diffusion-tensor imaging was performed at 3 T with 25 diffusion directions. Corticospinal tracts were reconstructed using fiber assignment by continuous tracking without and with motion/eddy-current corrections. Intra- and inter-rater as well as intra- and inter-session variations of the DTT derived indices (fiber number, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA)) were assessed. Results: Intra-session and inter-session coefficients of variations (CVs) are small for FA (1.13–2.09%) and ADC (0.45–1.64%), but much larger for fiber number (8.05–22.4%). Inter-session CVs in the stroke side of patients (22.4%) are higher than those in the normal sides (18.0%) and in the normal subjects (14.7%). Motion/eddy-current correction improved inter-session reproducibility only for the fiber number of the infarcted corticospinal tract (CV reduced from 22.4% to 14.1%). Conclusion: The fiber number derived from corticospinal DTT shows substantially lower precision than ADC and FA, with infarcted tracts showing lower reproducibility than the healthy tissues

  11. Physical activity modulates corticospinal excitability of the lower limb in young and old adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanlouei, Hamidollah; Sundberg, Christopher W; Smith, Ashleigh E; Kuplic, Andrew; Hunter, Sandra K

    2017-08-01

    Aging is associated with reduced neuromuscular function, which may be due in part to altered corticospinal excitability. Regular physical activity (PA) may ameliorate these age-related declines, but the influence of PA on corticospinal excitability is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of age, sex, and PA on corticospinal excitability by comparing the stimulus-response curves of motor evoked potentials (MEP) in 28 young (22.4 ± 2.2 yr; 14 women and 14 men) and 50 old adults (70.2 ± 6.1 yr; 22 women and 28 men) who varied in activity levels. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to elicit MEPs in the active vastus lateralis muscle (10% maximal voluntary contraction) with 5% increments in stimulator intensity until the maximum MEP amplitude. Stimulus-response curves of MEP amplitudes were fit with a four-parameter sigmoidal curve and the maximal slope calculated (slope max ). Habitual PA was assessed with tri-axial accelerometry and participants categorized into either those meeting the recommended PA guidelines for optimal health benefits (>10,000 steps/day, high-PA; n = 21) or those not meeting the guidelines ( 0.05), suggesting that habitual PA influenced the excitability of the corticospinal tract projecting to the lower limb similarly in both young and old adults. These findings provide evidence that achieving the recommended PA guidelines for optimal health may mediate its effects on the nervous system by decreasing corticospinal excitability. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to determine whether achieving the recommended 10,000 steps/day for optimal health influenced the excitability of the corticospinal tract projecting to the knee extensor muscles. Irrespective of age and sex, individuals who achieved >10,000 steps/day had lower corticospinal excitability than those who performed Physical activity involving >10,000 steps/day may mediate its effects on the nervous system by decreasing

  12. Repair of accurate radiation damage and development and consequence of chronic radiation damage of the gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehlert, W; Brendlein, F [Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Experimentelle Pathologie

    1976-01-01

    The first part of the essay deals with structural, proliferation kinetic, and functional considerations important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiolesions and their repair. Then acute radiolesions of the vesophagus, the gastric mucosa and the mucosa of the small intestine and the colon as well as its repair are discussed with reference to experiments on rats. Another chapter deals with the histo- and pathogenesis of chronic radiolesions and the development of radiolesions in the capillary system. Late radiolesions in the vesophagus and phrenic ampulla, in the glandular stomach, duodenum and jejunum, colon and capillary and vessel system in the gastro-intestinal tract of rats are discussed in detail. Finally the importance of chronic radiolesions in the gastro-intestinal tract for civil protection is shown. It is required to protect persons with primary radiolesions from infections during the following time and to assure cell regeneration by suitable nutrition.

  13. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction of the corticospinal system as a reference for CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhmann, C. [Department of Neuroanatomy, Hannover Medical School (Germany)]|[University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kretschmann, H.J. [Department of Neuroanatomy, Hannover Medical School (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical computer-graphics model of the corticospinal system acquired from equidistant serial anatomical slices of six intracranially-fixed human brains. This model is part of a neuroanatomical reference system (NeuRef) which enables 3D visualization of the brain and shows the relationship of its components such as anatomical structures, functional fibre tracts and arteries. Sections through the models can be matched with corresponding CT or MR images. This allows the probable localisation of corticospinal fibres on CT or MRI. (orig.) (orig.) With 18 figs., 3 tabs., 40 refs.

  14. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction of the corticospinal system as a reference for CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhmann, C.; Kretschmann, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical computer-graphics model of the corticospinal system acquired from equidistant serial anatomical slices of six intracranially-fixed human brains. This model is part of a neuroanatomical reference system (NeuRef) which enables 3D visualization of the brain and shows the relationship of its components such as anatomical structures, functional fibre tracts and arteries. Sections through the models can be matched with corresponding CT or MR images. This allows the probable localisation of corticospinal fibres on CT or MRI. (orig.) (orig.)

  15. Tract-Specific Diffusion Tensor Imaging Reveals Laterality of Neurological Symptoms in Patients with Cervical Compression Myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Satoshi; Koda, Masao; Saito, Junya; Takahashi, Sho; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Iijima, Yasushi; Masuda, Yoshitada; Matsumoto, Koji; Kojima, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Obata, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Masashi; Furuya, Takeo

    2016-12-01

    Patients with cervical compression myelopathy (CCM) generally present bilateral neurological symptoms in their extremities. However, a substantial portion of patients with CCM exhibit laterality of neurological symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between intrinsic structural damage and laterality of symptoms using spinal cord diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the corticospinal tract. We enrolled 10 healthy volunteers and 40 patients with CCM in this study. We evaluated motor function using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor score for left and right extremities. For DTI acquisitions, a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging system with diffusion-weighted spin-echo sequence was used. Regions-of-interest in the lateral column tracts were determined. We determined the correlations between fractional anisotropy (FA) and ASIA motor scores. An FA asymmetry index was calculated using left and right regions-of-interest. Four patients exhibited laterality of symptoms in their extremities, for which left and right ASIA scores correlated moderately with FA in the left and right lateral columns, respectively (left: ρ = 0.64, P laterality of symptoms. Using tract-specific DTI, we demonstrated that microstructural damages in the left and right corticospinal tracts correlated with corresponding neurological symptoms in the ipsilateral side and the FA asymmetry index could indicate laterality in neurological symptoms of patients with CCM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Virulence Factors in Development of Urinary Tract Infection and Kidney Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Justyna; Sokolova, Olga; Bozko, Przemyslaw

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is a causative agent in the vast majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs), including cystitis and pyelonephritis, and infectious complications, which may result in acute renal failure in healthy individuals as well as in renal transplant patients. UPEC expresses a multitude of virulence factors to break the inertia of the mucosal barrier. In response to the breach by UPEC into the normally sterile urinary tract, host inflammatory responses are triggered leading to cytokine production, neutrophil influx, and the exfoliation of infected bladder epithelial cells. Several signaling pathways activated during UPEC infection, including the pathways known to activate the innate immune response, interact with calcium-dependent signaling pathways. Some UPEC isolates, however, might possess strategies to delay or suppress the activation of components of the innate host response in the urinary tract. Studies published in the recent past provide new information regarding how virulence factors of uropathogenic E. coli are involved in activation of the innate host response. Despite numerous host defense mechanisms, UPEC can persist within the urinary tract and may serve as a reservoir for recurrent infections and serious complications. Presentation of the molecular details of these events is essential for development of successful strategies for prevention of human UTIs and urological complications associated with UTIs. PMID:22506110

  17. Corticospinal excitability of the ankle extensor muscles is enhanced in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Sakiko; Obata, Hiroki; Endoh, Takashi; Kuno-Mizumura, Mayumi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2014-09-01

    We tested the corticospinal excitability of the soleus muscle in ballet dancers to clarify whether the presumed long-term repetition of the specific plantarflexion results in changes of excitability in this neural pathway. We compared motor evoked potentials of the soleus muscle at rest and during isometric contraction of the plantar flexors in dancers and non-dancers. The amplitudes of motor evoked potentials elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation during contraction were examined against the background electromyographic activity. A regression line was calculated for each subject. Results showed that the slope of the regression line is significantly greater in the dancer group than in the control group, suggesting that the corticospinal tract of ballet dancers has adapted to long-term repetition of plantarflexion in daily ballet training.

  18. Corticobulbar tract changes as predictors of dysarthria in childhood brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liégeois, Frédérique; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Pigdon, Lauren; Connelly, Alan; Morgan, Angela T

    2013-03-05

    To identify corticobulbar tract changes that may predict chronic dysarthria in young people who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in childhood using diffusion MRI tractography. We collected diffusion-weighted MRI data from 49 participants. We compared 17 young people (mean age 17 years, 10 months; on average 8 years postinjury) with chronic dysarthria who sustained a TBI in childhood (range 3-16 years) with 2 control groups matched for age and sex: 1 group of young people who sustained a traumatic injury but had no subsequent dysarthria (n = 15), and 1 group of typically developing individuals (n = 17). We performed tractography from spherical seed regions within the precentral gyrus white matter to track: 1) the hand-related corticospinal tract; 2) the dorsal corticobulbar tract, thought to correspond to the lips/larynx motor representation; and 3) the ventral corticobulbar tract, corresponding to the tongue representation. Despite widespread white matter damage, radial (perpendicular) diffusivity within the left dorsal corticobulbar tract was the best predictor of the presence of dysarthria after TBI. Diffusion metrics in this tract also predicted speech and oromotor performance across the whole group of TBI participants, with additional significant contributions from ventral speech tract volume in the right hemisphere. An intact left dorsal corticobulbar tract seems crucial to the normal execution of speech long term after acquired injury. Examining the speech-related motor pathways using diffusion-weighted MRI tractography offers a promising prognostic tool for people with acquired, developmental, or degenerative neurologic conditions likely to affect speech.

  19. The late occurrence of urinary tract damage in patients successfully treated by radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoubek, J.; McGuire, E.J.; Noll, F.; DeLancey, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    Urinary tract complications apparently resulting from radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix can occur as long as 30 years after cessation of such treatment. Patients generally present with urinary incontinence and often are treated by standard operative methods that usually are unsuccessful. Incontinence is related to bladder fibrosis, urethral nonfunction and vesicovaginal fistuLa formation, and may be accompanied by bilateral ureteral obstruction. Of 11 patients with late complications of radiotherapy 4 had upper tract deterioration, 4 had vesicovaginal fistulas, 5 had an incompetent urethra aNd 9 had a fibrotic, noncompliant areflexive bladder. Treatment was aimed at providing adequate low pressure storage capacity and consisted of augmentation cystoplasty in 5 patients, repair of the fistula in 4 and correction of urethral dysfunction in 5. Women who complain of incontinence and/or irritable bladder symptoms with a history of radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma should be evaluated for fistuLa formation, urethral incompetence, and detrusor areflexia and fibrosis before treatment is done

  20. IL-4-secreting eosinophils promote endometrial stromal cell proliferation and prevent Chlamydia-induced upper genital tract damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicetti Miguel, Rodolfo D; Quispe Calla, Nirk E; Dixon, Darlene; Foster, Robert A; Gambotto, Andrea; Pavelko, Stephen D; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Cherpes, Thomas L

    2017-08-15

    Genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections in women typically are asymptomatic and do not cause permanent upper genital tract (UGT) damage. Consistent with this presentation, type 2 innate and T H 2 adaptive immune responses associated with dampened inflammation and tissue repair are elicited in the UGT of Chlamydia -infected women. Primary C. trachomatis infection of mice also causes no genital pathology, but unlike women, does not generate Chlamydia -specific T H 2 immunity. Herein, we explored the significance of type 2 innate immunity for restricting UGT tissue damage in Chlamydia -infected mice, and in initial studies intravaginally infected wild-type, IL-10 -/- , IL-4 -/- , and IL-4Rα -/- mice with low-dose C. trachomatis inoculums. Whereas Chlamydia was comparably cleared in all groups, IL-4 -/- and IL-4Rα -/- mice displayed endometrial damage not seen in wild-type or IL-10 -/- mice. Congruent with the aberrant tissue repair in mice with deficient IL-4 signaling, we found that IL-4Rα and STAT6 signaling mediated IL-4-induced endometrial stromal cell (ESC) proliferation ex vivo, and that genital administration of an IL-4-expressing adenoviral vector greatly increased in vivo ESC proliferation. Studies with IL-4-IRES-eGFP (4get) reporter mice showed eosinophils were the main IL-4-producing endometrial leukocyte (constitutively and during Chlamydia infection), whereas studies with eosinophil-deficient mice identified this innate immune cell as essential for endometrial repair during Chlamydia infection. Together, our studies reveal IL-4-producing eosinophils stimulate ESC proliferation and prevent Chlamydia -induced endometrial damage. Based on these results, it seems possible that the robust type 2 immunity elicited by Chlamydia infection of human genital tissue may analogously promote repair processes that reduce phenotypic disease expression.

  1. Corticospinal signals recorded with MEAs can predict the volitional forearm forces in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yi; Mesut, Sahin; Foulds, Richard A; Adamovich, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    We set out to investigate if volitional components in the descending tracts of the spinal cord white matter can be accessed with multi-electrode array (MEA) recording technique. Rats were trained to press a lever connected to a haptic device with force feedback to receive sugar pellets. A flexible-substrate multi-electrode array was chronically implanted into the dorsal column of the cervical spinal cord. Field potentials and multi-unit activities were recorded from the descending axons of the corticospinal tract while the rat performed a lever pressing task. Forelimb forces, recorded with the sensor attached to the lever, were reconstructed using the hand position data and the neural signals through multiple trials over three weeks. The regression coefficients found from the trial set were cross-validated on the other trials recorded on same day. Approximately 30 trials of at least 2 seconds were required for accurate model estimation. The maximum correlation coefficient between the actual and predicted force was 0.7 in the test set. Positional information and its interaction with neural signals improved the correlation coefficient by 0.1 to 0.15. These results suggest that the volitional information contained in the corticospinal tract can be extracted with multi-channel neural recordings made with parenchymal electrodes.

  2. Impaired corticopontocerebellar tracts underlie pseudobulbar affect in motor neuron disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floeter, Mary Kay; Katipally, Rohan; Kim, Meredith P; Schanz, Olivia; Stephen, Matthew; Danielian, Laura; Wu, Tianxia; Huey, Edward D; Meoded, Avner

    2014-08-12

    The objectives of the study were (1) to determine the prevalence and characteristics of pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in patients with primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in an outpatient clinic population, and (2) to test the hypothesis that damage of inputs to the cerebellum, leading to cerebellar dysmodulation, is associated with PBA. Chart review of all patients with PLS and ALS seen between 2000 and 2013. The examining neurologist documented the presence or absence of PBA in 87 patients. Forty-seven patients also had diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies. Tract-based spatial statistics were used to compare DTI of patients with and without PBA to identify altered white matter tracts associated with PBA. Thirty-one of 50 patients with PLS and 12 of 37 patients with ALS had PBA. Psychiatric/emotional assessment found congruence between mood and affect during episodes, but excessive magnitude of the response. DTI studies of 25 PLS and 22 ALS patient brains showed reduced fractional anisotropy of the corticospinal and callosal white matter tracts in all patients. Patients with PBA additionally had increased mean diffusivity of white matter tracts underlying the frontotemporal cortex, the transverse pontine fibers, and the middle cerebellar peduncle. PBA is common in PLS. Imaging findings showing disruption of corticopontocerebellar pathways support the hypothesis that PBA can be viewed as a "dysmetria" of emotional expression resulting from cerebellar dysmodulation. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Motor Skill Learning and Corticospinal Excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse

    Background Motor skill learning (MSL) is the persistent increase in performance of a skill obtained through practice. This process is associated with changes throughout the central nervous system. One of these is a change in corticospinal excitability (CSE) assessable with Transcranial Magnetic...... a novel visuomotor skill. I hypothesized that changes in CSE accompanying long-term motor practice relate to the process of learning rather than repetitive practice on an acquired skill and investigated this by incrementally increasing task difficulty and thus postponing saturation of learning....... Furthermore, we aimed to investigate the feasibility of applying paired associative stimulation to the investigation of learning-dependent motor cortical plasticity by comparing the transient increase in CSE accompanying motor skill learning to the associative plasticity induced by pairing electrical motor...

  4. Abnormal corticospinal excitability in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapitskaya, Natallia; Gosseries, Olivia; De Pasqua, Victor; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Nielsen, Joergen Feldbaek; de Noordhout, Alain Maertens; Laureys, Steven

    2013-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been frequently used to explore changes in the human motor cortex in different conditions, while the extent of motor cortex reorganization in patients in vegetative state (VS) (now known as unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, UWS) and minimally conscious (MCS) states due to severe brain damage remains largely unknown. It was hypothesized that cortical motor excitability would be decreased and would correlate to the level of consciousness in patients with disorders of consciousness. Corticospinal excitability was assessed in 47 patients (24 VS/UWS and 23 MCS) and 14 healthy controls. The test parameters included maximal peak-to-peak M-wave (Mmax), F-wave persistence, peripheral and central motor conduction times, sensory (SEP) and motor evoked (MEP) potential latencies and amplitudes, resting motor threshold (RMT), stimulus/response curves, and short latency afferent inhibition (SAI). TMS measurements were correlated to the level of consciousness (assessed using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised). On average, the patient group had lower Mmax, lower MEP and SEP amplitudes, higher RMTs, narrower stimulus/response curves, and reduced SAI compared to the healthy controls (P < 0.05). The SAI alterations were correlated to the level of consciousness (P < 0.05). The findings demonstrated the impairment of the cortical inhibitory circuits in patients with disorders of consciousness. Moreover, the significant relationship was found between cortical inhibition and clinical consciousness dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Corticospinal excitability changes following prolonged muscle tendon vibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steyvers, M.; Levin, O.; Baelen, M.G.M. van; Swinnen, S.P.

    2003-01-01

    The present experiment addressed the time course of corticospinal excitability changes following interventional muscle tendon vibration. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation, motor evoked potentials of the flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle were recorded for a period

  6. Profound differences in spontaneous long-term functional recovery after defined spinal tract lesions in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, William T J; Eggers, R.; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Blits, Bas; Hamers, Frank P T; Verhaagen, J.; Boer, Gerard J

    The purpose of this study was to compare spontaneous functional recovery after different spinal motor tract lesions in the rat spinal cord using three methods of analysis, the BBB, the rope test, and the CatWalk. We transected the dorsal corticospinal tract (CSTx) or the rubrospinal tract (RSTx) or

  7. Three-dimensional corticospinal tractography for brain tumor surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Kyousuke

    2009-01-01

    Maximal resection of the intracranial lesion like a brain tumor and concomitant identification of the unresectable region for avoiding the loss of motor and language functions are important before and during the operation. For these purposes, corticospinal tract (CST)-tractography (TG) based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is widely used for nerve fiber tracking but it is conceivably essential to examine if the CST image in problem reflects the actually valid anatomical, functional CST. For the problem, in author's department, the intraoperative local relationship between the lesion and CST is monitored by a neuronavigation (NNA) system combined with CST-TG in case of patients who have the lesion close to CST and, when the resection site approaches CST, its surrounding white matter is electrically stimulated to evoke the myoelectric potential at upper and lower limbs. Here are reported examinations of the reliability of CST-TG by analysis of the positional relation of CST with the electric stimulating point and current value, and of the expansion of the subcortical stimulation current in the white matter. MRI data of such 40 patients as above by 1.5 or 3T machine were obtained with spin-echo/echo planer imaging and subsequent DTI data were processed by authors' VOLUME-ONE/dTV (http://volume-one.org). CST-TG-fused functional NNA was conducted by NNA system where 3D reconstructed image of CST-TG DTI and 3DMRI using digital imaging and communication medicine (DICOM) and the evoked functional myoelectric potential had been combined. This fusion was found useful for rapid decision of the position and timing of the electric stimulation at surgery, and highly reliable as CST-TG. Further, the stimulating threshold in the white matter was found lower than in the cortex. Future progress in imaging technology and separating algorithm of crossing fibers was expected for improved image of more complex central nervous system (CNS) structures. (K.T.)

  8. Functional motor recovery from motoneuron axotomy is compromised in mice with defective corticospinal projections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuetong Ding

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injury (BPI and experimental spinal root avulsion result in loss of motor function in the affected segments. After root avulsion, significant motoneuron function is restored by re-implantation of the avulsed root. How much this functional recovery depends on corticospinal inputs is not known. Here, we studied that question using Celsr3|Emx1 mice, in which the corticospinal tract (CST is genetically absent. In adult mice, we tore off right C5-C7 motor and sensory roots and re-implanted the right C6 roots. Behavioral studies showed impaired recovery of elbow flexion in Celsr3|Emx1 mice compared to controls. Five months after surgery, a reduced number of small axons, and higher G-ratio of inner to outer diameter of myelin sheaths were observed in mutant versus control mice. At early stages post-surgery, mutant mice displayed lower expression of GAP-43 in spinal cord and of myelin basic protein (MBP in peripheral nerves than control animals. After five months, mutant animals had atrophy of the right biceps brachii, with less newly formed neuromuscular junctions (NMJs and reduced peak-to-peak amplitudes in electromyogram (EMG, than controls. However, quite unexpectedly, a higher motoneuron survival rate was found in mutant than in control mice. Thus, following root avulsion/re-implantation, the absence of the CST is probably an important reason to hamper axonal regeneration and remyelination, as well as target re-innervation and formation of new NMJ, resulting in lower functional recovery, while fostering motoneuron survival. These results indicate that manipulation of corticospinal transmission may help improve functional recovery following BPI.

  9. Corticospinal excitability modulation during action observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Luisa; Betti, Sonia; Castiello, Umberto

    2013-12-31

    This study used the transcranial magnetic stimulation/motor evoked potential (TMS/MEP) technique to pinpoint when the automatic tendency to mirror someone else's action becomes anticipatory simulation of a complementary act. TMS was delivered to the left primary motor cortex corresponding to the hand to induce the highest level of MEP activity from the abductor digiti minimi (ADM; the muscle serving little finger abduction) as well as the first dorsal interosseus (FDI; the muscle serving index finger flexion/extension) muscles. A neuronavigation system was used to maintain the position of the TMS coil, and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from the right ADM and FDI muscles. Producing original data with regard to motor resonance, the combined TMS/MEP technique has taken research on the perception-action coupling mechanism a step further. Specifically, it has answered the questions of how and when observing another person's actions produces motor facilitation in an onlooker's corresponding muscles and in what way corticospinal excitability is modulated in social contexts.

  10. Rapid changes in corticospinal excitability during force field adaptation of human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Alain, S; Grey, Michael James

    2012-01-01

    measured changes in motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before, during, and after subjects adapted to a force field applied to the ankle joint during treadmill walking. When the force field assisted dorsiflexion during...... the swing phase of the step cycle, subjects adapted by decreasing TA EMG activity. In contrast, when the force field resisted dorsiflexion, they increased TA EMG activity. After the force field was removed, normal EMG activity gradually returned over the next 5 min of walking. TA MEPs elicited in the early...... be explained by changes in background TA EMG activity. These effects seemed specific to walking, as similar changes in TA MEP were not seen when seated subjects were tested during static dorsiflexion. These observations suggest that the corticospinal tract contributes to the adaptation of walking...

  11. ROLE OF ENTEROSORPTION IN COMPREHENSIVE THERAPY FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES COMBINED DAMAGE TO WITH GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.B. Belan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of acute respiratory infections remains high in childhood. It is impossible to identify etiology most accurately in each particular case. However, according to multiple studies, viruses, their associations with each other and bacteria prevail as causative agents. In addition, it is quite often that a respiratory infection, especially in minor children, is combined with a condition of the gastrointestinal tract. Apart from symptomatic and antiviral therapies in these cases, as the authors of this article demonstrated, it is advisable to use enterosorbents. This tactics results in a decreased level of intoxication, lower intensity and duration of diarrheal syndrome, i.e. more speedy recovery.Key words: acute respiratory infections, condition of gastro tract, intoxication, diarrheal syndrome, treatment, enterosorbents, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:88-90

  12. Vibration-Induced Kinesthetic Illusions and Corticospinal Excitability Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancheva, Kapka; Rollnik, Jens D; Wolf, Werner; Dengler, Reinhard; Kossev, Andon

    2017-01-01

    The authors' aim was to investigate the changes of corticospinal excitability during kinesthetic illusions induced by tendon vibration. Motor-evoked potentials in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded from the vibrated flexor carpi radialis and its antagonist, extensor carpi radialis. The illusions were evoked under vision conditions without feedback for the position of the wrist (open or closed eyes). In these two conditions motor-evoked potential changes during vibration in the antagonist were not identical. This discrepancy may be a result of 2 simultaneously acting, different and opposite influences and the balance between them depends on visual conditions. Thus, the illusion was accompanied by the facilitation of corticospinal excitability in both vibrated muscle and its antagonist.

  13. Mapping genetic influences on the corticospinal motor system in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheeran, B J; Ritter, C; Rothwell, J C

    2009-01-01

    of the contribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and variable number tandem repeats. In humans, the corticospinal motor system is essential to the acquisition of fine manual motor skills which require a finely tuned coordination of activity in distal forelimb muscles. Here we review recent brain mapping......It is becoming increasingly clear that genetic variations account for a certain amount of variance in the acquisition and maintenance of different skills. Until now, several levels of genetic influences were examined, ranging from global heritability estimates down to the analysis...... studies that have begun to explore the influence of functional genetic variation as well as mutations on function and structure of the human corticospinal motor system, and also the clinical implications of these studies. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the primary motor hand area revealed...

  14. Viewing instructions accompanying action observation modulate corticospinal excitability

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    David James Wright

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Action observation interventions may have the potential to contribute to improved motor function in motor (relearning settings by promoting functional activity and plasticity in the motor regions of the brain. Optimal methods for delivering such interventions, however, have yet to be established. This experiment investigated the effect on corticospinal excitability of manipulating the viewing instructions provided to participants (N = 21 prior to action observation. Specifically, motor evoked potential responses measured from the right hand muscles following single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to the left motor cortex were compared when participants were instructed to observe finger-thumb opposition movement sequences: (i passively; (ii with the intent to imitate the observed movement; or (iii whilst simultaneously and actively imagining that they were performing the movement as they observed it. All three action observation viewing instructions facilitated corticospinal excitability to a greater extent than did observation of a static hand. In addition, the extent to which corticospinal excitability was facilitated was greater during combined observation and imagery, compared to passive observation. These findings have important implications for the design of action observation interventions in motor (relearning settings, where instructions that encourage observers to simultaneously imagine themselves performing the observed movement may offer the current optimal method for improving motor function through action observation.

  15. Changes in corticospinal transmission following 8 weeks of ankle joint immobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leukel, Christian; Taube, Wolfgang; Rittweger, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    ) of the primary motor cortex (Hcond). This method allows assessment of transmission in fast (monosynaptic) and slow(er) (polysynaptic) corticospinal pathways. METHODS: 9 subjects underwent 8weeks of unilateral ankle joint immobilization during daytime, 7 subjects served as controls. The measures obtained before...... and after immobilization included stretch- and H-reflexes assessing excitability of the spinal reflex circuitries, TMS recruitment curves estimating overall changes in corticospinal excitability, and Hcond. RESULTS: TMS recruitment curves showed an overall increase in corticospinal excitability following...

  16. Plasminogen deficiency causes reduced corticospinal axonal plasticity and functional recovery after stroke in mice.

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    Zhongwu Liu

    Full Text Available Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA has been implicated in neurite outgrowth and neurological recovery post stroke. tPA converts the zymogen plasminogen (Plg into plasmin. In this study, using plasminogen knockout (Plg-/- mice and their Plg-native littermates (Plg+/+, we investigated the role of Plg in axonal remodeling and neurological recovery after stroke. Plg+/+ and Plg-/- mice (n = 10/group were subjected to permanent intraluminal monofilament middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo. A foot-fault test and a single pellet reaching test were performed prior to and on day 3 after stroke, and weekly thereafter to monitor functional deficit and recovery. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA was injected into the left motor cortex to anterogradely label the corticospinal tract (CST. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after stroke. Neurite outgrowth was also measured in primary cultured cortical neurons harvested from Plg+/+ and Plg-/- embryos. In Plg+/+ mice, the motor functional deficiency after stroke progressively recovered with time. In contrast, recovery in Plg-/- mice was significantly impaired compared to Plg+/+ mice (p0.82, p<0.01. Plg-/- neurons exhibited significantly reduced neurite outgrowth. Our data suggest that plasminogen-dependent proteolysis has a beneficial effect during neurological recovery after stroke, at least in part, by promoting axonal remodeling in the denervated spinal cord.

  17. Patterns of damage in the mature neonatal brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triulzi, Fabio; Parazzini, Cecilia; Righini, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Patterns of damage in the mature neonatal brain can be subdivided into focal, multifocal and diffuse. The main cause of diffuse brain damage in the term newborn is hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). HIE is still the major recognized perinatal cause of neurological morbidity in full-term newborns. MRI offers today the highest sensitivity in detecting acute anoxic injury of the neonatal brain. Conventional acquisition techniques together with modern diffusion techniques can identify typical patterns of HIE injury, even in the early course of the disease. However, even though highly suggestive, these patterns cannot be considered as pathognomonic. Perinatal metabolic disease such as kernicterus and severe hypoglycaemia should be differentiated from classic HIE. Other conditions, such as infections, non-accidental injury and rarer metabolic diseases can be misinterpreted as HIE in their early course when diffuse brain swelling is still the predominant MRI feature. Diffusion techniques can help to differentiate different types of diffuse brain oedema. Typical examples of focal injuries are arterial or venous infarctions. In arterial infarction, diffusion techniques can define more precisely than conventional imaging the extent of focal infarction, even in the hyperacute phase. Moreover, diffusion techniques provide quantitative data of acute corticospinal tract injury, especially at the level of the cerebral peduncles. Venous infarction should be suspected in every case of unexplained cerebral haematoma in the full-term newborn. In the presence of spontaneous bleeding, venous structures should always be evaluated by MR angiography. (orig.)

  18. Patterns of damage in the mature neonatal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triulzi, Fabio; Parazzini, Cecilia; Righini, Andrea [Children' s Hospital ' ' Vittore Buzzi' ' , Departments of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    Patterns of damage in the mature neonatal brain can be subdivided into focal, multifocal and diffuse. The main cause of diffuse brain damage in the term newborn is hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). HIE is still the major recognized perinatal cause of neurological morbidity in full-term newborns. MRI offers today the highest sensitivity in detecting acute anoxic injury of the neonatal brain. Conventional acquisition techniques together with modern diffusion techniques can identify typical patterns of HIE injury, even in the early course of the disease. However, even though highly suggestive, these patterns cannot be considered as pathognomonic. Perinatal metabolic disease such as kernicterus and severe hypoglycaemia should be differentiated from classic HIE. Other conditions, such as infections, non-accidental injury and rarer metabolic diseases can be misinterpreted as HIE in their early course when diffuse brain swelling is still the predominant MRI feature. Diffusion techniques can help to differentiate different types of diffuse brain oedema. Typical examples of focal injuries are arterial or venous infarctions. In arterial infarction, diffusion techniques can define more precisely than conventional imaging the extent of focal infarction, even in the hyperacute phase. Moreover, diffusion techniques provide quantitative data of acute corticospinal tract injury, especially at the level of the cerebral peduncles. Venous infarction should be suspected in every case of unexplained cerebral haematoma in the full-term newborn. In the presence of spontaneous bleeding, venous structures should always be evaluated by MR angiography. (orig.)

  19. Passive listening to preferred motor tempo modulates corticospinal excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Kelly; Wiener, Martin; Thompson, James C

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms are an essential characteristic of our lives, and auditory-motor coupling affects a variety of behaviors. Previous research has shown that the neural regions associated with motor system processing are coupled to perceptual rhythmic and melodic processing such that the perception of rhythmic stimuli can entrain motor system responses. However, the degree to which individual preference modulates the motor system is unknown. Recent work has shown that passively listening to metrically strong rhythms increases corticospinal excitability, as indicated by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Furthermore, this effect is modulated by high-groove music, or music that inspires movement, while neuroimaging evidence suggests that premotor activity increases with tempos occurring within a preferred tempo (PT) category. PT refers to the rate of a hypothetical endogenous oscillator that may be indicated by spontaneous motor tempo (SMT) and preferred perceptual tempo (PPT) measurements. The present study investigated whether listening to a rhythm at an individual's PT preferentially modulates motor system excitability. SMT was obtained in human participants through a tapping task in which subjects were asked to tap a response key at their most comfortable rate. Subjects listened a 10-beat tone sequence at 11 log-spaced tempos and rated their preference for each (PPT). We found that SMT and PPT measurements were correlated, indicating that preferred and produced tempos occurred at a similar rate. Crucially, single-pulse TMS delivered to left M1 during PPT judgments revealed that corticospinal excitability, measured by motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), was modulated by tempos traveling closer to individual PT. However, the specific nature of this modulation differed across individuals, with some exhibiting an increase in excitability around PT and others exhibiting a decrease. These findings suggest that auditory-motor coupling induced by rhythms is preferentially

  20. White matter pathology in ALS and lower motor neuron ALS variants: a diffusion tensor imaging study using tract-based spatial statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudlo, Johannes; Bißbort, Charlotte; Glass, Aenne; Grossmann, Annette; Hauenstein, Karlheinz; Benecke, Reiner; Teipel, Stefan J

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate white-matter microstructural changes within and outside the corticospinal tract in classical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and in lower motor neuron (LMN) ALS variants by means of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We investigated 22 ALS patients and 21 age-matched controls utilizing a whole-brain approach with a 1.5-T scanner for DTI. The patient group was comprised of 15 classical ALS- and seven LMN ALS-variant patients (progressive muscular atrophy, flail arm and flail leg syndrome). Disease severity was measured by the revised version of the functional rating scale. White matter fractional anisotropy (FA) was assessed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and a region of interest (ROI) approach. We found significant FA reductions in motor and extra-motor cerebral fiber tracts in classical ALS and in the LMN ALS-variant patients compared to controls. The voxel-based TBSS results were confirmed by the ROI findings. The white matter damage correlated with the disease severity in the patient group and was found in a similar distribution, but to a lesser extent, among the LMN ALS-variant subgroup. ALS and LMN ALS variants are multisystem degenerations. DTI shows the potential to determine an earlier diagnosis, particularly in LMN ALS variants. The statistically identical findings of white matter lesions in classical ALS and LMN variants as ascertained by DTI further underline that these variants should be regarded as part of the ALS spectrum.

  1. Motor deficits following dorsal corticospinal tract transection in rats: voluntary versus skilled locomotion readouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Bieler

    2018-02-01

    The functional relevance of the dorsal CST in locomotion of rats is not as prominent as compared to in humans and thus challenging the motor execution is mandatory to reliably investigate CST function. A detailed analysis of voluntary walking using the CatWalk XT is not adequate to detect deficits following dorsal CST lesion in rats.

  2. Functional implications of corticospinal tract impairment on gait after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Knudsen, Hanne; Willerslev-Olsen, Maria

    2013-01-01

    elevation with clinical physiotherapy tests.Setting:Cross-sectional study, laboratory and clinical settings.Methods:A total of 24 individuals with SCI (American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale D) were recruited. Maximum toe elevation during the swing phase of treadmill gait was measured...... indicate that maximum toe elevation, which is directly correlated with CST impairment, is functionally relevant as it also correlates with timed clinical tests, LEMS and sensory scores.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 13 August 2013; doi:10.1038/sc.2013.84....

  3. Resolving crossings in the corticospinal tract by two-tensor streamline tractography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qazi, Arish Asif; Radmanesh, Alireza; O'Donnell, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    An inherent drawback of the traditional diffusion tensor model is its limited ability to provide detailed information about multidirectional fiber architecture within a voxel. This leads to erroneous fiber tractography results in locations where fiber bundles cross each other. This may lead to th...

  4. Involvement of the corticospinal tract in the control of human gait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthélemy, Dorothy; Grey, Michael James; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2011-01-01

    to rehabilitation therapy, which will enhance gait ability and recovery in patients with lesions to the central nervous system (CNS). We review evidence for the involvement of the primary motor cortex and the CST during normal and perturbed walking and during gait adaptation. We will also discuss knowledge...

  5. Corticospinal tract degeneration and possible pathogenesis in ALS evaluated by MR diffusion tensor imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Rosenbaum, Sverre; Wiegell, Mette R.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) appears to be a powerful method to investigate the neuronal and axonal fibre distribution in the human brain. Changes in diffusion characteristics of water molecules in the white matter can be estimated as the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC...... significance. ADC was unchanged at the level of the corona radiata. FA was significantly reduced at the lowest level (pons), only tended to be reduced in the internal capsule, but was also unchanged in the corona radiata. CONCLUSIONS: Segmentation of the CST into three regions supports the hypothesis...

  6. Injury of leg somatotopy of corticospinal tract at corona radiata by ventriculoperitoneal shunt: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Younghyeon

    2018-03-01

    A 45-year-old right-handed female patient suffered head trauma after being hit by a truck that ran into a house. The patient lost consciousness for 1 hour and experienced posttraumatic amnesia for 1 month after the accident. She underwent conservative management for a subdural hematoma in the left frontotemporal lobes and intracerebral hematoma in the left frontal lobe. The patient's Glasgow Coma Scale score was 11. She underwent a VP shunt operation, approached through the right posterior parietal area of the brain, at 4 months after onset. Approximately, 6 months after onset, she was admitted to the rehabilitation department of a university hospital. She presented with moderate weakness of the left leg: Medical Research Council scores: hip flexor; 3, knee extensor; 3+, ankle dorsiflexor; 3-. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a leukomalactic lesion in the right posterior corona radiata along the shunt. On 6-month (2 months after the shunt operation) diffusion tensor tractography, the left CST showed partial injury in the posterior portion compared with the right CST. On 6-month transcranial magnetic stimulation study, the motor-evoked potential obtained at the left tibialis anterior muscle revealed lower amplitude than that on the right side. Injury of leg somatotopy of a CST was demonstrated in a patient with leg weakness following a VP shunt operation.

  7. Corticospinal tract degeneration and possible pathogenesis in ALS evaluated by MR diffusion tensor imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Rosenbaum, Sverre; Wiegell, Mette R.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) appears to be a powerful method to investigate the neuronal and axonal fibre distribution in the human brain. Changes in diffusion characteristics of water molecules in the white matter can be estimated as the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC...

  8. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  9. Rehabilitative skilled forelimb training enhances axonal remodeling in the corticospinal pathway but not the brainstem-spinal pathways after photothrombotic stroke in the primary motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Naohiko; Himi, Naoyuki; Maruyama-Nakamura, Emi; Hayashi, Norito; Narita, Kazuhiko; Miyamoto, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Task-specific rehabilitative training is commonly used for chronic stroke patients. Axonal remodeling is believed to be one mechanism underlying rehabilitation-induced functional recovery, and significant roles of the corticospinal pathway have previously been demonstrated. Brainstem-spinal pathways, as well as the corticospinal tract, have been suggested to contribute to skilled motor function and functional recovery after brain injury. However, whether axonal remodeling in the brainstem-spinal pathways is a critical component for rehabilitation-induced functional recovery is not known. In this study, rats were subjected to photothrombotic stroke in the caudal forelimb area of the primary motor cortex and received rehabilitative training with a skilled forelimb reaching task for 4 weeks. After completion of the rehabilitative training, the retrograde tracer Fast blue was injected into the contralesional lower cervical spinal cord. Fast blue-positive cells were counted in 32 brain areas located in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. Rehabilitative training improved motor performance in the skilled forelimb reaching task but not in the cylinder test, ladder walk test, or staircase test, indicating that rehabilitative skilled forelimb training induced task-specific recovery. In the histological analysis, rehabilitative training significantly increased the number of Fast blue-positive neurons in the ipsilesional rostral forelimb area and secondary sensory cortex. However, rehabilitative training did not alter the number of Fast blue-positive neurons in any areas of the brainstem. These results indicate that rehabilitative skilled forelimb training enhances axonal remodeling selectively in the corticospinal pathway, which suggests a critical role of cortical plasticity, rather than brainstem plasticity, in task-specific recovery after subtotal motor cortex destruction.

  10. Characterizing changes in the excitability of corticospinal projections to proximal muscles of the upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Richard G; Nelson, Barry D; Buick, Alison R; Carroll, Timothy J; Kennedy, Niamh C; Cann, Rachel Mac

    2013-09-01

    There has been an explosion of interest in methods of exogenous brain stimulation that induce changes in the excitability of human cerebral cortex. The expectation is that these methods may promote recovery of function following brain injury. To assess their effects on motor output, it is typical to assess the state of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex to muscles of the hand, via electromyographic responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation. If a range of stimulation intensities is employed, the recruitment curves (RCs) obtained can, at least for intrinsic hand muscles, be fitted by a sigmoid function. To establish whether sigmoid fits provide a reliable basis upon which to characterize the input-output properties of the corticospinal pathway for muscles proximal to the hand, and to assess as an alternative the area under the (recruitment) curve (AURC). A comparison of the reliability of these measures, using RCs obtained for muscles that are frequently the targets of rehabilitation. The AURC is an extremely reliable measure of the state of corticospinal projections to hand and forearm muscles, which has both face and concurrent validity. Construct validity is demonstrated by detection of widely distributed (across muscles) changes in corticospinal excitability induced by paired associative stimulation (PAS). The parameters derived from sigmoid fits are unlikely to provide an adequate means to assess the effectiveness of therapeutic regimes. The AURC can be employed to characterize corticospinal projections to a range of muscles, and gauge the efficacy of longitudinal interventions in clinical rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. (Lack of) Corticospinal facilitation in association with hand laterality judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, Lucas; Tremblay, François

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, mental practice strategies have drawn much interest in the field of rehabilitation. One form of mental practice particularly advocated involves judging the laterality of images depicting body parts. Such laterality judgments are thought to rely on implicit motor imagery via mental rotation of one own's limb. In this study, we sought to further characterize the involvement of the primary motor cortex (M1) in hand laterality judgments (HLJ) as performed in the context of an application designed for rehabilitation. To this end, we measured variations in corticospinal excitability in both hemispheres with motor evoked potentials (MEPs) while participants (n = 18, young adults) performed either HLJ or a mental counting task. A third condition (foot observation) provided additional control. We hypothesized that HLJ would lead to a selective MEP facilitation when compared to the other tasks and that this facilitation would be greater on the right than the left hemisphere. Contrary to our predictions, we found no evidence of task effects and hemispheric effects for the HLJ task. Significant task-related MEP facilitation was detected only for the mental counting task. A secondary experiment performed in a subset of participants (n = 6) to further test modulation during HLJ yielded the same results. We interpret the lack of facilitation with HLJ in the light of evidence that participants may rely on alternative strategies when asked to judge laterality when viewing depictions of body parts. The use of visual strategies notably would reduce the need to engage in mental rotation, thus reducing M1 involvement. These results have implications for applications of laterality tasks in the context of the rehabilitation program.

  12. Modulation of Human Corticospinal Excitability by Paired Associative Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Carson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Paired Associative Stimulation (PAS has come to prominence as a potential therapeutic intervention for the treatment of brain injury/disease, and as an experimental method with which to investigate Hebbian principles of neural plasticity in humans. Prototypically, a single electrical stimulus is directed to a peripheral nerve in advance of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS delivered to the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1. Repeated pairing of the stimuli (i.e. association over an extended period may increase or decrease the excitability of corticospinal projections from M1, in manner that depends on the interstimulus interval (ISI. It has been suggested that these effects represent a form of associative long-term potentiation (LTP and depression (LTD that bears resemblance to spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP as it has been elaborated in animal models. With a large body of empirical evidence having emerged since the cardinal features of PAS were first described, and in light of the variations from the original protocols that have been implemented, it is opportune to consider whether the phenomenology of PAS remains consistent with the characteristic features that were initially disclosed. This assessment necessarily has bearing upon interpretation of the effects of PAS in relation to the specific cellular pathways that are putatively engaged, including those that adhere to the rules of STDP. The balance of evidence suggests that the mechanisms that contribute to the LTP- and LTD-type responses to PAS differ depending on the precise nature of the induction protocol that is used. In addition to emphasising the requirement for additional explanatory models, in the present analysis we highlight the key features of the PAS phenomenology that require interpretation.

  13. Local connections of layer 5 GABAergic interneurons to corticospinal neurons

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    Yasuyo H Tanaka

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the local circuit of the cerebral cortex, GABAergic inhibitory interneurons are considered to work in collaboration with excitatory neurons. Although many interneuron subgroups have been described in the cortex, local inhibitory connections of each interneuron subgroup are only partially understood with respect to the functional neuron groups that receive these inhibitory connections. In the present study, we morphologically examined local inhibitory inputs to corticospinal neurons (CSNs in motor areas using transgenic rats in which GABAergic neurons expressed fluorescent protein Venus. By analysis of biocytin-filled axons obtained with whole-cell recording/staining in cortical slices, we classified fast-spiking (FS neurons in layer (L 5 into two types, FS1 and FS2, by their high and low densities of axonal arborization, respectively. We then investigated the connections of FS1, FS2, somatostatin-immunopositive (SOM and other (non-FS/non-SOM interneurons to CSNs that were retrogradely labeled in a Golgi-like manner in motor areas. When close appositions between the axon boutons of the intracellularly labeled interneurons and the somata/dendrites of the retrogradely labeled CSNs were examined electron-microscopically, 74% of these appositions made symmetric synaptic contacts. The axon boutons of single FS1 neurons were 2–4-fold more frequent in appositions to the somata/dendrites of CSNs than those of FS2, SOM and non-FS/non-SOM neurons. Axosomatic appositions were most frequently formed with axon boutons of FS1 and FS2 neurons (approximately 30% and least frequently formed with those of SOM neurons (7%. In contrast, SOM neurons most extensively sent axon boutons to the apical dendrites of CSNs. These results might suggest that motor outputs are controlled differentially by the subgroups of L5 GABAergic interneurons in cortical motor areas. 

  14. Focal Stroke in the Developing Rat Motor Cortex Induces Age- and Experience-Dependent Maladaptive Plasticity of Corticospinal System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Mariangela; Mattiello, Alessandro; Mazziotti, Raffaele; Antonelli, Camilla; Gherardini, Lisa; Guzzetta, Andrea; Berardi, Nicoletta; Cioni, Giovanni; Pizzorusso, Tommaso

    2017-01-01

    Motor system development is characterized by an activity-dependent competition between ipsilateral and contralateral corticospinal tracts (CST). Clinical evidence suggests that age is crucial for developmental stroke outcome, with early lesions inducing a "maladaptive" strengthening of ipsilateral projections from the healthy hemisphere and worse motor impairment. Here, we investigated in developing rats the relation between lesion timing, motor outcome and CST remodeling pattern. We induced a focal ischemia into forelimb motor cortex (fM1) at two distinct pre-weaning ages: P14 and P21. We compared long-term motor outcome with changes in axonal sprouting of contralesional CST at red nucleus and spinal cord level using anterograde tracing. We found that P14 stroke caused a more severe long-term motor impairment than at P21, and induced a strong and aberrant contralesional CST sprouting onto denervated spinal cord and red nucleus. The mistargeted sprouting of CST, and the worse motor outcome of the P14 stroke rats were reversed by an early skilled motor training, underscoring the potential of early activity-dependent plasticity in modulating lesion outcome. Thus, changes in the mechanisms controlling CST plasticity occurring during the third postnatal week are associated with age-dependent regulation of the motor outcome after stroke.

  15. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Urinary tract infections Urinary tract infections > A-Z Health Topics Urinary tract infections (PDF, ... Embed Subscribe To receive Publications email updates Submit Urinary tract infections Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are most often caused ...

  16. MR imaging of central nervous system white matter tract degeneration (Wallerian degeneration)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, M.J.; Johnson, K.A.; Davis, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is readily demonstrated by MR imaging. Twenty-one patients with MR signal abnormalities in various central nervous system (CNS) white matter tracts were evaluated with regard to (1) nature of signal abnormality, (2) MR anatomy of the involved tract, and (3) primary pathology (e.g., infarct, tumor, hemorrhage). Most examples of wallerian degeneration result in a thin, continuous band of long T1, long T2 signal abnormality conforming to the known anatomic pathway of a CNS axonal tract. Old, large cortical infarcts have the greatest propensity to show subsequent white-matter tract degeneration. Corticospinal tract degeneration is the type most readily visualized, often seen extending completely from the cerebral cortex through the medulla

  17. Riesgo de daño renal cicatrizal después de infección del tracto urinario en recién nacidos Risk of cicatricial renal damage after urinary tract infection in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Díaz Alvarez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo se realizó con el objetivo de determinar la prevalencia de daño renal cicatrizal e identificar los factores de riesgo a él contribuyentes en niños recién nacidos con la primera infección del tracto urinario. Se llevó a cabo un estudio analítico de factores de riesgo, caso-control, con regresión logística binominal, en recién nacidos con infección del tracto urinario de localización alta, adquirida en la comunidad, que fueron ingresados consecutivamente en el Hospital Pediátrico Universitario «Juan M. Márquez», entre febrero de 1992 y diciembre de 2004. Se realizó gammagrafía renal con DMSA para identificar cicatrices renales. Las pruebas de chi cuadrado y regresión logística se aplicaron para identificar factores de riesgo independientes. La prevalencia de daño renal cicatrizal fue de 25,4 %. En el modelo de regresión se incluyeron para análisis multivariado los factores de riesgo: ultrasonido prenatal con pielectasia, microorganismo diferente de Escherichia coli, ultrasonido renal posnatal con anomalías, presencia de reflujo vesicoureteral de cualquier grado, reinfección en los primeros 3 meses de vida, sexo masculino, retardo en inicio del tratamiento antibiótico ≥ 4 d, leucocituria ≥ 10 000/mL, respuesta desfavorable al tratamiento inicial y bacteriemia al mismo microorganismo de la infección urinaria. Finalmente solo resultaron significativos (p The present paper was aimed at determining the prevalence of cicatricial renal damage and to identify the risk factors contributing to it in newborns with urinary tract infection for the first time. An analytical case-control study of the risk factors was conducted by binominal logistic regression in newborns with an upper urinary tract infection acquired in the community that were consecutively admitted in “ Juan Manuel Márquez” University Children Hospital from February 1992 to December 2004. A renal scintigraphy with DMSA was performed to

  18. Genetic Variability as a Regulator of TLR4 and NOD Signaling in Response to Bacterial Driven DNA Damage Response (DDR and Inflammation: Focus on the Gastrointestinal (GI Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evagelia Spanou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental role of human Toll-like receptors (TLRs and NOD-like receptors (NLRs, the two most studied pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs, is the protection against pathogens and excessive tissue injury. Recent evidence supports the association between TLR/NLR gene mutations and susceptibility to inflammatory, autoimmune, and malignant diseases. PRRs also interfere with several cellular processes, such as cell growth, apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation, autophagy, angiogenesis, cell motility and migration, and DNA repair mechanisms. We briefly review the impact of TLR4 and NOD1/NOD2 and their genetic variability in the process of inflammation, tumorigenesis and DNA repair, focusing in the gastrointestinal tract. We also review the available data on new therapeutic strategies utilizing TLR/NLR agonists and antagonists for cancer, allergic diseases, viral infections and vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer.

  19. Efficient and reliable characterization of the corticospinal system using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukke, Sahana N; Paine, Rainer W; Chao, Chi-Chao; de Campos, Ana C; Hallett, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method to reliably characterize multiple features of the corticospinal system in a more efficient manner than typically done in transcranial magnetic stimulation studies. Forty transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses of varying intensity were given over the first dorsal interosseous motor hot spot in 10 healthy adults. The first dorsal interosseous motor-evoked potential size was recorded during rest and activation to create recruitment curves. The Boltzmann sigmoidal function was fit to the data, and parameters relating to maximal motor-evoked potential size, curve slope, and stimulus intensity leading to half-maximal motor-evoked potential size were computed from the curve fit. Good to excellent test-retest reliability was found for all corticospinal parameters at rest and during activation with 40 transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses. Through the use of curve fitting, important features of the corticospinal system can be determined with fewer stimuli than typically used for the same information. Determining the recruitment curve provides a basis to understand the state of the corticospinal system and select subject-specific parameters for transcranial magnetic stimulation testing quickly and without unnecessary exposure to magnetic stimulation. This method can be useful in individuals who have difficulty in maintaining stillness, including children and patients with motor disorders.

  20. Modulation of Corticospinal Excitability Depends on the Pattern of Mechanical Tactile Stimulation

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    Sho Kojima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of different patterns of mechanical tactile stimulation (MS on corticospinal excitability by measuring the motor-evoked potential (MEP. This was a single-blind study that included nineteen healthy subjects. MS was applied for 20 min to the right index finger. MS intervention was defined as simple, lateral, rubbing, vertical, or random. Simple intervention stimulated the entire finger pad at the same time. Lateral intervention stimulated with moving between left and right on the finger pad. Rubbing intervention stimulated with moving the stimulus probe, fixed by protrusion pins. Vertical intervention stimulated with moving in the forward and backward directions on the finger pad. Random intervention stimulated to finger pad with either row protrudes. MEPs were measured in the first dorsal interosseous muscle to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left motor cortex before, immediately after, and 5–20 min after intervention. Following simple intervention, MEP amplitudes were significantly smaller than preintervention, indicating depression of corticospinal excitability. Following lateral, rubbing, and vertical intervention, MEP amplitudes were significantly larger than preintervention, indicating facilitation of corticospinal excitability. The modulation of corticospinal excitability depends on MS patterns. These results contribute to knowledge regarding the use of MS as a neurorehabilitation tool to neurological disorder.

  1. Modulation of Corticospinal Excitability Depends on the Pattern of Mechanical Tactile Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Sho; Onishi, Hideaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kotan, Shinichi; Sasaki, Ryoki; Nakagawa, Masaki; Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the effects of different patterns of mechanical tactile stimulation (MS) on corticospinal excitability by measuring the motor-evoked potential (MEP). This was a single-blind study that included nineteen healthy subjects. MS was applied for 20 min to the right index finger. MS intervention was defined as simple, lateral, rubbing, vertical, or random. Simple intervention stimulated the entire finger pad at the same time. Lateral intervention stimulated with moving between left and right on the finger pad. Rubbing intervention stimulated with moving the stimulus probe, fixed by protrusion pins. Vertical intervention stimulated with moving in the forward and backward directions on the finger pad. Random intervention stimulated to finger pad with either row protrudes. MEPs were measured in the first dorsal interosseous muscle to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left motor cortex before, immediately after, and 5-20 min after intervention. Following simple intervention, MEP amplitudes were significantly smaller than preintervention, indicating depression of corticospinal excitability. Following lateral, rubbing, and vertical intervention, MEP amplitudes were significantly larger than preintervention, indicating facilitation of corticospinal excitability. The modulation of corticospinal excitability depends on MS patterns. These results contribute to knowledge regarding the use of MS as a neurorehabilitation tool to neurological disorder.

  2. The nature of corticospinal paths driving human motoneurones during voluntary contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butler, Jane E; Larsen, Thomas S; Gandevia, Simon C

    2007-01-01

    The properties of the human motor cortex can be studied non-invasively using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Stimulation at high intensity excites corticospinal cells with fast conducting axons that make direct connections to motoneurones of human upper limb muscles, while low...

  3. White Matter Damage Relates to Oxygen Saturation in Children With Sickle Cell Anemia Without Silent Cerebral Infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawadler, Jamie M; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clayden, Jonathan D; Hollocks, Matthew J; Seymour, Emma L; Edey, Rosanna; Telfer, Paul; Robins, Andrew; Wilkey, Olu; Barker, Simon; Cox, Tim C S; Clark, Chris A

    2015-07-01

    Sickle cell anemia is associated with compromised oxygen-carrying capability of hemoglobin and a high incidence of overt and silent stroke. However, in children with no evidence of cerebral infarction, there are changes in brain morphometry relative to healthy controls, which may be related to chronic anemia and oxygen desaturation. A whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics analysis was carried out in 25 children with sickle cell anemia with no evidence of abnormality on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (13 male, age range: 8-18 years) and 14 age- and race-matched controls (7 male, age range: 10-19 years) to determine the extent of white matter injury. The hypotheses that white matter damage is related to daytime peripheral oxygen saturation and steady-state hemoglobin were tested. Fractional anisotropy was found to be significantly lower in patients in the subcortical white matter (corticospinal tract and cerebellum), whereas mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were higher in patients in widespread areas. There was a significant negative relationship between radial diffusivity and oxygen saturation (Plevel negative relationship between radial diffusivity and hemoglobin (Pcell anemia, and provides for the first time direct evidence of a relationship between brain microstructure and markers of disease severity (eg, peripheral oxygen saturation and steady-state hemoglobin). This study suggests that diffusion tensor imaging metrics may serve as a biomarker for future trials of reducing hypoxic exposure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. [Lower urinary tract dysfunction and neuropathological findings of the neural circuits controlling micturition in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with L106V mutation in the SOD1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hineno, Akiyo; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Nakamura, Akinori; Shimojima, Yoshio; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    We report lower urinary tract dysfunction and neuropathological findings of the neural circuits controlling micturition in the patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis having L106V mutation in the SOD1 gene. Ten of 20 patients showed lower urinary tract dysfunction and 5 patients developed within 1 year after the onset of weakness. In 8 patients with an artificial respirator, 6 patients showed lower urinary tract dysfunction. Lower urinary tract dysfunction and respiratory failure requiring an artificial respirator occurred simultaneously in 3 patients. Neuronal loss and gliosis were observed in the neural circuits controlling micturition, such as frontal lobe, thalamus, hypothalamus, striatum, periaqueductal gray, ascending spinal tract, lateral corticospinal tract, intermediolateral nucleus and Onufrowicz' nucleus. Lower urinary tract dysfunction, especially storage symptoms, developed about 1 year after the onset of weakness, and the dysfunction occurred simultaneously with artificial respirator use in the patients.

  5. Plasticity in One Hemisphere, Control From Two: Adaptation in Descending Motor Pathways After Unilateral Corticospinal Injury in Neonatal Rats

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    Tong-Chun Wen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available After injury to the corticospinal tract (CST in early development there is large-scale adaptation of descending motor pathways. Some studies suggest the uninjured hemisphere controls the impaired forelimb, while others suggest that the injured hemisphere does; these pathways have never been compared directly. We tested the contribution of each motor cortex to the recovery forelimb function after neonatal injury of the CST. We cut the left pyramid (pyramidotomy of postnatal day 7 rats, which caused a measurable impairment of the right forelimb. We used pharmacological inactivation of each motor cortex to test its contribution to a skilled reach and supination task. Rats with neonatal pyramidotomy were further impaired by inactivation of motor cortex in both the injured and the uninjured hemispheres, while the forelimb of uninjured rats was impaired only from the contralateral motor cortex. Thus, inactivation demonstrated motor control from each motor cortex. In contrast, physiological and anatomical interrogation of these pathways support adaptations only in the uninjured hemisphere. Intracortical microstimulation of motor cortex in the uninjured hemisphere of rats with neonatal pyramidotomy produced responses from both forelimbs, while stimulation of the injured hemisphere did not elicit responses from either forelimb. Both anterograde and retrograde tracers were used to label corticofugal pathways. There was no increased plasticity from the injured hemisphere, either from cortex to the red nucleus or the red nucleus to the spinal cord. In contrast, there were very strong CST connections to both halves of the spinal cord from the uninjured motor cortex. Retrograde tracing produced maps of each forelimb within the uninjured hemisphere, and these were partly segregated. This suggests that the uninjured hemisphere may encode separate control of the unimpaired and the impaired forelimbs of rats with neonatal pyramidotomy.

  6. Plasticity in One Hemisphere, Control From Two: Adaptation in Descending Motor Pathways After Unilateral Corticospinal Injury in Neonatal Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tong-Chun; Lall, Sophia; Pagnotta, Corey; Markward, James; Gupta, Disha; Ratnadurai-Giridharan, Shivakeshavan; Bucci, Jacqueline; Greenwald, Lucy; Klugman, Madelyne; Hill, N Jeremy; Carmel, Jason B

    2018-01-01

    After injury to the corticospinal tract (CST) in early development there is large-scale adaptation of descending motor pathways. Some studies suggest the uninjured hemisphere controls the impaired forelimb, while others suggest that the injured hemisphere does; these pathways have never been compared directly. We tested the contribution of each motor cortex to the recovery forelimb function after neonatal injury of the CST. We cut the left pyramid (pyramidotomy) of postnatal day 7 rats, which caused a measurable impairment of the right forelimb. We used pharmacological inactivation of each motor cortex to test its contribution to a skilled reach and supination task. Rats with neonatal pyramidotomy were further impaired by inactivation of motor cortex in both the injured and the uninjured hemispheres, while the forelimb of uninjured rats was impaired only from the contralateral motor cortex. Thus, inactivation demonstrated motor control from each motor cortex. In contrast, physiological and anatomical interrogation of these pathways support adaptations only in the uninjured hemisphere. Intracortical microstimulation of motor cortex in the uninjured hemisphere of rats with neonatal pyramidotomy produced responses from both forelimbs, while stimulation of the injured hemisphere did not elicit responses from either forelimb. Both anterograde and retrograde tracers were used to label corticofugal pathways. There was no increased plasticity from the injured hemisphere, either from cortex to the red nucleus or the red nucleus to the spinal cord. In contrast, there were very strong CST connections to both halves of the spinal cord from the uninjured motor cortex. Retrograde tracing produced maps of each forelimb within the uninjured hemisphere, and these were partly segregated. This suggests that the uninjured hemisphere may encode separate control of the unimpaired and the impaired forelimbs of rats with neonatal pyramidotomy.

  7. On Task: Considerations and Future Directions for Studies of Corticospinal Excitability in Exercise Neuroscience and Related Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmar, Jayne M

    2018-04-27

    Over the last few decades, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has emerged as a conventional laboratory technique in human neurophysiological research. Exercise neuroscientists have used TMS to study central nervous system contributions to fatigue, training, and performance in health, injury, and disease. In such studies, corticospinal excitability is often assessed at rest or during simple isometric tasks with the implication that the results may be extrapolated to more functional and complex movement outside of the laboratory. However, the neural mechanisms that influence corticospinal excitability are both state- and task-dependent. Furthermore, there are many sites of modulation along the pathway from the motor cortex to the muscle; a fact that is somewhat obscured by the all-encompassing and poorly-defined term "corticospinal excitability." Therefore, the tasks we use to assess corticospinal excitability and the conclusions that we draw from such a global measure of the motor pathway must be taken into consideration. The overall objective of this review is to highlight the task-dependent nature of corticospinal excitability and the tools used to assess modulation at cortical and spinal sites of modulation. By weighing the advantages and constraints of conventional approaches to studying corticospinal excitability, and considering some new and novel approaches, we will continue to advance our understanding of the neural control of movement during exercise.

  8. Secondary damage in the spinal cord after motor cortex injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weishaupt, Nina; Silasi, Gergely; Colbourne, Frederick; Fouad, Karim

    2010-08-01

    When neurons within the motor cortex are fatally injured, their axons, many of which project into the spinal cord, undergo wallerian degeneration. Pathological processes occurring downstream of the cortical damage have not been extensively studied. We created a focal forelimb motor cortex injury in rats and found that axons from cell bodies located in the hindlimb motor cortex (spared by the cortical injury) become secondarily damaged in the spinal cord. To assess axonal degeneration in the spinal cord, we quantified silver staining in the corticospinal tract (CST) at 1 week and 4 weeks after the injury. We found a significant increase in silver deposition at the thoracic spinal cord level at 4 weeks compared to 1 week post-injury. At both time points, no degenerating neurons could be found in the hindlimb motor cortex. In a separate experiment, we showed that direct injury of neurons within the hindlimb motor cortex caused marked silver deposition in the thoracic CST at 1 week post-injury, and declined thereafter. Therefore, delayed axonal degeneration in the thoracic spinal cord after a focal forelimb motor cortex injury is indicative of secondary damage at the spinal cord level. Furthermore, immunolabeling of spinal cord sections showed that a local inflammatory response dominated by partially activated Iba-1-positive microglia is mounted in the CST, a viable mechanism to cause the observed secondary degeneration of fibers. In conclusion, we demonstrate that following motor cortex injury, wallerian degeneration of axons in the spinal cord leads to secondary damage, which is likely mediated by inflammatory processes.

  9. Corticospinal excitability changes to anodal tDCS elucidated with NIRS-EEG joint-imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jindal, Utkarsh; Sood, Mehak; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate corticospinal excitability. We used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) - electroencephalography (EEG) joint-imaging during and after anodal tDCS to measure changes in mean cerebral haemoglobin oxygen saturation (rSO2) along...... with changes in the log-transformed mean-power of EEG within 0.5 Hz - 11.25 Hz. In two separate studies, we investigated local post-tDCS alterations from baseline at the site of anodal tDCS using NIRS-EEG/tDCS joint-imaging as well as local post-tDCS alterations in motor evoked potentials (MEP...... that the innovative technologies for portable NIRS-EEG neuroimaging may be leveraged to objectively quantify the progress (e.g., corticospinal excitability alterations) and dose tDCS intervention as an adjuvant treatment during neurorehabilitation....

  10. Progressive practice promotes motor learning and repeated transient increases in corticospinal excitability across multiple days

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse; Madsen, Mads Alexander Just; Bojsen-Møller, Emil

    2018-01-01

    Background: A session of motor skill learning is accompanied by transient increases in corticospinal excitability (CSE), which are thought to reflect acute changes in neuronal connectivity associated with improvements in sensorimotor performance. Factors influencing changes in excitability...... and motor skill with continued practice remain however to be elucidated. Objective/Hypothesis: Here we investigate the hypothesis that progressive motor practice during consecutive days can induce repeated transient increases in corticospinal excitability and promote motor skill learning. Methods: Changes...... in motor performance and CSE were assessed during 4 consecutive days of skill learning and 8 days after the last practice session. CSE was assessed as area under recruitment curves (RC) using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Two groups of participants (n = 12) practiced a visuomotor tracking...

  11. Urinary Tract Infections in Children : EAU/ESPU Guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Raimund; Dogan, Hasan S.; Hoebeke, Piet; Kocvara, Radim; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Radmayr, Christian; Tekgul, Serdar

    Context: In 30% of children with urinary tract anomalies, urinary tract infection (UTI) can be the first sign. Failure to identify patients at risk can result in damage to the upper urinary tract. Objective: To provide recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children presenting

  12. Upper extremity rehabilitation of stroke: Facilitation of corticospinal excitability using virtual mirror paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Youn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several experimental studies in stroke patients suggest that mirror therapy and various virtual reality programs facilitate motor rehabilitation. However, the underlying mechanisms for these therapeutic effects have not been previously described. Objectives We attempted to delineate the changes in corticospinal excitability when individuals were asked to exercise their upper extremity using a real mirror and virtual mirror. Moreover, we attempted to delineate the role of visual modulation within the virtual environment that affected corticospinal excitability in healthy subjects and stroke patients. Methods A total of 18 healthy subjects and 18 hemiplegic patients were enrolled into the study. Motor evoked potential (MEPs from transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded in the flexor carpi radialis of the non-dominant or affected upper extremity using three different conditions: (A relaxation; (B real mirror; and (C virtual mirror. Moreover, we compared the MEPs from the virtual mirror paradigm using continuous visual feedback or intermittent visual feedback. Results The rates of amplitude increment and latency decrement of MEPs in both groups were higher during the virtual mirror task than during the real mirror. In healthy subjects and stroke patients, the virtual mirror task with intermittent visual feedback significantly facilitated corticospinal excitability of MEPs compared with continuous visual feedback. Conclusion Corticospinal excitability was facilitated to a greater extent in the virtual mirror paradigm than in the real mirror and in intermittent visual feedback than in the continuous visual feedback, in both groups. This provides neurophysiological evidence supporting the application of the virtual mirror paradigm using various visual modulation technologies to upper extremity rehabilitation in stroke patients.

  13. Task-dependent changes of corticospinal excitability during observation and motor imagery of balance tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouthon, A; Ruffieux, J; Wälchli, M; Keller, M; Taube, W

    2015-09-10

    Non-physical balance training has demonstrated to be efficient to improve postural control in young people. However, little is known about the potential to increase corticospinal excitability by mental simulation in lower leg muscles. Mental simulation of isolated, voluntary contractions of limb muscles increase corticospinal excitability but more automated tasks like walking seem to have no or only minor effects on motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). This may be related to the way of performing the mental simulation or the task itself. Therefore, the present study aimed to clarify how corticospinal excitability is modulated during AO+MI, MI and action observation (AO) of balance tasks. For this purpose, MEPs and H-reflexes were elicited during three different mental simulations (a) AO+MI, (b) MI and (c) passive AO. For each condition, two balance tasks were evaluated: (1) quiet upright stance (static) and (2) compensating a medio-lateral perturbation while standing on a free-swinging platform (dynamic). AO+MI resulted in the largest facilitation of MEPs followed by MI and passive AO. MEP facilitation was significantly larger in the dynamic perturbation than in the static standing task. Interestingly, passive observation resulted in hardly any facilitation independent of the task. H-reflex amplitudes were not modulated. The current results demonstrate that corticospinal excitability during mental simulation of balance tasks is influenced by both the type of mental simulation and the task difficulty. As H-reflexes and background EMG were not modulated, it may be argued that changes in excitability of the primary motor cortex were responsible for the MEP modulation. From a functional point of view, our findings suggest best training/rehabilitation effects when combining MI with AO during challenging postural tasks. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Different corticospinal control between discrete and rhythmic movement of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yumeno; Jono, Yasutomo; Hatanaka, Ryota; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Tani, Keisuke; Chujo, Yuta; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement. The H-reflex was evoked at an intensity eliciting a small M-wave and MEPs were elicited at an intensity of 1.2 times the motor threshold of the soleus MEPs. Only trials in which background EMG level, ankle angle, and ankle velocity were similar among the movement conditions were included for data analysis. In addition, only trials with a similar M-wave were included for data analysis in the experiment evoking H-reflexes. Results showed that H reflex and MEP amplitudes in the soleus muscle during discrete movement were not significantly different from those during rhythmic movement. MEP amplitude in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement was significantly larger than that during the initial cycle of the rhythmic movement or during discrete movement. Higher corticospinal excitability in the tibialis anterior muscle during the later cycles of rhythmic movement may reflect changes in corticospinal control from the initial cycle to the later cycles of rhythmic movement.

  15. Corticospinal and Spinal Excitabilities Are Modulated during Motor Imagery Associated with Somatosensory Electrical Nerve Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Traverse

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery (MI, the mental simulation of an action, influences the cortical, corticospinal, and spinal levels, despite the lack of somatosensory afferent feedbacks. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of MI associated with somatosensory stimulation (SS on the corticospinal and spinal excitabilities. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation and peripheral nerve stimulation to induce motor-evoked potentials (MEP and H-reflexes, respectively, in soleus and medialis gastrocnemius (MG muscles of the right leg. Twelve participants performed three tasks: (1 MI of submaximal plantar flexion, (2 SS at 65 Hz on the posterior tibial nerve with an intensity below the motor threshold, and (3 MI + SS. MEP and H-reflex amplitudes were recorded before, during, and after the tasks. Our results confirmed that MI increased corticospinal excitability in a time-specific manner. We found that MI+SS tended to potentiate MEP amplitude of the MG muscle compared to MI alone. We confirmed that SS decreased spinal excitability, and this decrease was partially compensated when combined with MI, especially for the MG muscle. The increase of CSE could be explained by a modulation of the spinal inhibitions induced by SS, depending on the amount of afferent feedbacks.

  16. Probing changes in corticospinal excitability following theta burst stimulation of the human primary motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsworthy, Mitchell R; Vallence, Ann-Maree; Hodyl, Nicolette A; Semmler, John G; Pitcher, Julia B; Ridding, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the intensity of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) used to probe changes in corticospinal excitability influences the measured plasticity response to theta burst stimulation (TBS) of the human primary motor cortex. Motor evoked potential (MEP) input/output (I/O) curves were recorded before and following continuous TBS (cTBS) (Experiment 1; n=18) and intermittent TBS (iTBS) (Experiment 2; n=18). The magnitude and consistency of MEP depression induced by cTBS was greatest when probed using stimulus intensities at or above 150% of resting motor threshold (RMT). In contrast, facilitation of MEPs following iTBS was strongest and most consistent at 110% of RMT. The plasticity response to both cTBS and iTBS is influenced by the stimulus intensity used to probe the induced changes in corticospinal excitability. The results highlight the importance of the test stimulus intensity used to assess TBS-induced changes in corticospinal excitability when interpreting neuroplasticity data, and suggest that a number of test intensities may be required to reliably probe the plasticity response. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Experimental Hand Pain on Training-Induced Changes in Motor Performance and Corticospinal Excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Mavromatis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pain influences plasticity within the sensorimotor system and the aim of this study was to assess the effect of pain on changes in motor performance and corticospinal excitability during training for a novel motor task. A total of 30 subjects were allocated to one of two groups (Pain, NoPain and performed ten training blocks of a visually-guided isometric pinch task. Each block consisted of 15 force sequences, and subjects modulated the force applied to a transducer in order to reach one of five target forces. Pain was induced by applying capsaicin cream to the thumb. Motor performance was assessed by a skill index that measured shifts in the speed–accuracy trade-off function. Neurophysiological measures were taken from the first dorsal interosseous using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Overall, the Pain group performed better throughout the training (p = 0.03, but both groups showed similar improvements across training blocks (p < 0.001, and there was no significant interaction. Corticospinal excitability in the NoPain group increased halfway through the training, but this was not observed in the Pain group (Time × Group interaction; p = 0.01. These results suggest that, even when pain does not negatively impact on the acquisition of a novel motor task, it can affect training-related changes in corticospinal excitability.

  18. gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolandas Vaicekauskas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Accurate diagnosis of subepithelial lesions (SELs in the gastrointestinal tract depends on a variety of methods: endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and different types of biopsy. Making an error-free diagnosis is vital for the subsequent application of an appropriate treatment. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of deep biopsy via the endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD technique for SELs in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Material and methods: It was a case series study. Deep biopsy via the ESD technique was completed in 38 patients between November 2012 and October 2014. Thirty-eight SELs in the upper gastrointestinal tract of varying size (very small ≤ 1 cm, small 1–2 cm and large ≥ 2 cm by means of the ESD technique after an incision with an electrosurgical knife of the overlying layers and revealing a small part of the lesion were biopsied under direct endoscopic view. Results: Deep biopsy via the ESD technique was diagnostic in 28 of 38 patients (73.3%; 95% CI: 59.7–89.7%. The diagnostic yield for SELs with a clear endophytic shape increased to 91.3%. An evident endophytic appearance of a subepithelial lesion, the mean number of biopsied samples (6.65 ±1.36 and the total size in length of all samples per case (19.88 ±8.07 mm were the main criteria influencing the positiveness of deep biopsy in the diagnostic group compared to the nondiagnostic one (p = 0.001; p = 0.025; p = 0.008. Conclusions : Deep biopsy via the ESD technique is an effective and safe method for the diagnosis of SELs especially with a clear endophytic appearance in a large number of biopsied samples.

  19. Digestive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.F.G. da

    1976-01-01

    Scintiscanning of salivary glands with (sup 99m)Tc is commented. The uses of triolein - and oleic acid labelled with 131 I, 125 I or 82 Br are discussed in the study of fat absorption, as well as 14 C and 191 Y. The use of 57 Co as a radiotracer in the intestinal absorption of vitamin B 12 is analysed. Orientation is given about 51 Cr - albumin clearance in the study of plasmatic protein loss by digestive tract. The radiotracers 131 I, 125 I and 51 Cr are pointed out in the investigation of immunoglobulins. Consideration is given to the quantification of digestive bleedings by the use of 51 Cr [pt

  20. Combined motor cortex and spinal cord neuromodulation promotes corticospinal system functional and structural plasticity and motor function after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weiguo; Amer, Alzahraa; Ryan, Daniel; Martin, John H

    2016-03-01

    An important strategy for promoting voluntary movements after motor system injury is to harness activity-dependent corticospinal tract (CST) plasticity. We combine forelimb motor cortex (M1) activation with co-activation of its cervical spinal targets in rats to promote CST sprouting and skilled limb movement after pyramidal tract lesion (PTX). We used a two-step experimental design in which we first established the optimal combined stimulation protocol in intact rats and then used the optimal protocol in injured animals to promote CST repair and motor recovery. M1 was activated epidurally using an electrical analog of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS). The cervical spinal cord was co-activated by trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) that was targeted to the cervical enlargement, simulated from finite element method. In intact rats, forelimb motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were strongly facilitated during iTBS and for 10 min after cessation of stimulation. Cathodal, not anodal, tsDCS alone facilitated MEPs and also produced a facilitatory aftereffect that peaked at 10 min. Combined iTBS and cathodal tsDCS (c-tsDCS) produced further MEP enhancement during stimulation, but without further aftereffect enhancement. Correlations between forelimb M1 local field potentials and forelimb electromyogram (EMG) during locomotion increased after electrical iTBS alone and further increased with combined stimulation (iTBS+c-tsDCS). This optimized combined stimulation was then used to promote function after PTX because it enhanced functional connections between M1 and spinal circuits and greater M1 engagement in muscle contraction than either stimulation alone. Daily application of combined M1 iTBS on the intact side and c-tsDCS after PTX (10 days, 27 min/day) significantly restored skilled movements during horizontal ladder walking. Stimulation produced a 5.4-fold increase in spared ipsilateral CST terminations. Combined neuromodulation achieves optimal motor

  1. Differential modulation of corticospinal excitability by different current densities of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andisheh Bastani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have been developed in recent years. TDCS-induced corticospinal excitability changes depend on two important factors current intensity and stimulation duration. Despite clinical success with existing tDCS parameters, optimal protocols are still not entirely set. OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: The current study aimed to investigate the effects of four different anodal tDCS (a-tDCS current densities on corticospinal excitability. METHODS: Four current intensities of 0.3, 0.7, 1.4 and 2 mA resulting in current densities (CDs of 0.013, 0.029, 0.058 and 0.083 mA/cm(2 were applied on twelve right-handed (mean age 34.5±10.32 yrs healthy individuals in different sessions at least 48 hours apart. a-tDCS was applied continuously for 10 minute, with constant active and reference electrode sizes of 24 and 35 cm(2 respectively. The corticospinal excitability of the extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR was measured before and immediately after the intervention and at 10, 20 and 30 minutes thereafter. RESULTS: Post hoc comparisons showed significant differences in corticospinal excitability changes for CDs of 0.013 mA/cm(2 and 0.029 mA/cm(2 (P = 0.003. There were no significant differences between excitability changes for the 0.013 mA/cm(2 and 0.058 mA/cm(2 (P = 0.080 or 0.013 mA/cm(2 and 0.083 mA/cm(2 (P = 0.484 conditions. CONCLUSION: This study found that a-tDCS with a current density of 0.013 mA/cm(2 induces significantly larger corticospinal excitability changes than CDs of 0.029 mA/cm(2. The implication is that might help to avoid applying unwanted amount of current to the cortical areas.

  2. The Effect of Velocity of Joint Mobilization on Corticospinal Excitability in Individuals With a History of Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Beth E; Piraino, Andrew; Lee, Ya-Yun; Smith, Jo Armour; Johnson, Sean; Davenport, Todd E; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Joint mobilization and manipulation decrease pain and improve patient function. Yet, the processes underlying these changes are not well understood. Measures of corticospinal excitability provide insight into potential mechanisms mediated by the central nervous system. Objectives To investigate the differential effects of joint mobilization and manipulation at the talocrural joint on corticospinal excitability in individuals with resolved symptoms following ankle sprain. Methods Twenty-seven participants with a history of ankle sprain were randomly assigned to the control, joint mobilization, or thrust manipulation group. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) and cortical silent period (CSP) of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were obtained with transcranial magnetic stimulation at rest and during active contraction of the tibialis anterior. The slopes of MEP/CSP input/output curves and the maximal MEP/CSP values were calculated to indicate corticospinal excitability. Behavioral measures, including ankle dorsiflexion and dynamic balance, were evaluated. Results A repeated-measures analysis of variance of the MEP slope showed a significant group-by-time interaction for the tibialis anterior at rest (P = .002) and during active contraction (P = .042). After intervention, the thrust manipulation group had an increase in corticospinal excitability, while the corticospinal excitability decreased in the mobilization group. The thrust manipulation group, but not other groups, also demonstrated a significant increase in the maximal MEP amplitude of the tibialis anterior after intervention. Conclusion The findings suggest that joint manipulation and mobilization have different effects on corticospinal excitability. The increased corticospinal excitability following thrust manipulation may provide a window for physical therapists to optimize muscle recruitment and subsequently movement. The trial was registered at

  3. Dynamic modulation of corticospinal excitability and short-latency afferent inhibition during onset and maintenance phase of selective finger movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Joo; Panyakaew, Pattamon; Thirugnanasambandam, Nivethida; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-06-01

    During highly selective finger movement, corticospinal excitability is reduced in surrounding muscles at the onset of movement but this phenomenon has not been demonstrated during maintenance of movement. Sensorimotor integration may play an important role in selective movement. We sought to investigate how corticospinal excitability and short-latency afferent inhibition changes in active and surrounding muscles during onset and maintenance of selective finger movement. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and paired peripheral stimulation, input-output recruitment curve and short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) were measured in the first dorsal interosseus and abductor digiti minimi muscles during selective index finger flexion. Motor surround inhibition was present only at the onset phase, but not at the maintenance phase of movement. SAI was reduced at onset but not at the maintenance phase of movement in both active and surrounding muscles. Our study showed dynamic changes in corticospinal excitability and sensorimotor modulation for active and surrounding muscles in different movement states. SAI does not appear to contribute to motor surround inhibition at the movement onset phase. Also, there seems to be different inhibitory circuit(s) other than SAI for the movement maintenance phase in order to delineate the motor output selectively when corticospinal excitability is increased in both active and surrounding muscles. This study enhances our knowledge of dynamic changes in corticospinal excitability and sensorimotor interaction in different movement states to understand normal and disordered movements. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Do not resonate with actions: sentence polarity modulates cortico-spinal excitability during action-related sentence reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tullio Liuzza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Theories of embodied language suggest that the motor system is differentially called into action when processing motor-related versus abstract content words or sentences. It has been recently shown that processing negative polarity action-related sentences modulates neural activity of premotor and motor cortices. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We sought to determine whether reading negative polarity sentences brought about differential modulation of cortico-spinal motor excitability depending on processing hand-action related or abstract sentences. Facilitatory paired-pulses Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (pp-TMS was applied to the primary motor representation of the right-hand and the recorded amplitude of induced motor-evoked potentials (MEP was used to index M1 activity during passive reading of either hand-action related or abstract content sentences presented in both negative and affirmative polarity. Results showed that the cortico-spinal excitability was affected by sentence polarity only in the hand-action related condition. Indeed, in keeping with previous TMS studies, reading positive polarity, hand action-related sentences suppressed cortico-spinal reactivity. This effect was absent when reading hand action-related negative polarity sentences. Moreover, no modulation of cortico-spinal reactivity was associated with either negative or positive polarity abstract sentences. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that grammatical cues prompting motor negation reduce the cortico-spinal suppression associated with affirmative action sentences reading and thus suggest that motor simulative processes underlying the embodiment may involve even syntactic features of language.

  5. Urinary Tract Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related to the urinary tract health of women: Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) and Urinary Incontinence (UI). For information on a range of urinary tract health issues for women, men, and children, visit the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information ...

  6. Repetitive activation of the corticospinal tract by means of rTMS may reduce the efficiency of corticomotoneuronal synapses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taube, Wolfgang; Leukel, Christian; Schubert, Martin

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is extensively used to study cognitive and motor function in humans and might be of value in the treatment of various disorders. For a better understanding of the effects of rTMS and its more efficient application it is crucial to identify......-conditioning by testing interstimulus intervals (ISIs) from -9 to 0 ms (for instance “ISI -3 ms” indicated that the H-reflex was elicited 3 ms before the supraspinal stimulus). The amplitude of the short-latency facilitation was expressed as percentage of the unconditioned control H-reflex and compared before and after...... is the synapses of the corticomotoneuronal neurones on the spinal motoneurones. Perez et al. (2005). Exp Brain Res 162, 202-212. Speer et al. (2003). Biol Psychiatry 54, 818-825....

  7. Anatomic location and somatotopic arrangement of the corticospinal tract at the cerebral peduncle in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, H G; Hong, J H; Jang, S H

    2011-12-01

    Little is known about the detailed anatomic location and somatotopic arrangement at the CP. Using DTT with FSL tools, we conducted an investigation of the anatomic location and somatotopic arrangement of the CST at the CP in the human brain. We recruited 43 healthy volunteers for this study. DTI was obtained by using 1.5T, and CSTs for the hand and leg were obtained by using the FSL tool. The somatotopic location of the CST was evaluated as the highest probabilistic location at the upper and lower midbrain. The posterior boundary was determined as the line between the interpeduncular fossa and the lateral sulcus; we then drew a rectangle on the basis of the boundary of the CP. In the mediolateral direction, the highest probabilistic locations for the hand and leg were an average of 60.46% and 69.98% from the medial boundary at the upper midbrain level and 53.44% and 62.76% at the lower midbrain level, respectively. As for the anteroposterior direction, the highest probabilistic locations for the hand and leg were an average of 28.26% and 32.03% from the anterior boundary at the upper midbrain level and 30.19% and 33.59% at the lower midbrain level, respectively. We found that the hand somatotopy for the CST is located at the middle portion of the CP and the leg somatotopy is located lateral to the hand somatotopy.

  8. Frontoparietal Tracts Linked to Lateralized Hand Preference and Manual Specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Henrietta; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Beyh, Ahmad; Zappalà, Giuseppe; Leslie, Anoushka; Simmons, Andrew; Murphy, Declan G; Catani, Marco

    2018-04-21

    Humans show a preference for using the right hand over the left for tasks and activities of everyday life. While experimental work in non-human primates has identified the neural systems responsible for reaching and grasping, the neural basis of lateralized motor behavior in humans remains elusive. The advent of diffusion imaging tractography for studying connectional anatomy in the living human brain provides the possibility of understanding the relationship between hemispheric asymmetry, hand preference, and manual specialization. In this study, diffusion tractography was used to demonstrate an interaction between hand preference and the asymmetry of frontoparietal tracts, specifically the dorsal branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus, responsible for visuospatial integration and motor planning. This is in contrast to the corticospinal tract and the superior cerebellar peduncle, for which asymmetry was not related to hand preference. Asymmetry of the dorsal frontoparietal tract was also highly correlated with the degree of lateralization in tasks requiring visuospatial integration and fine motor control. These results suggest a common anatomical substrate for hand preference and lateralized manual specialization in frontoparietal tracts important for visuomotor processing.

  9. Motor Simulation without Motor Expertise: Enhanced Corticospinal Excitability in Visually Experienced Dance Spectators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jola, Corinne; Abedian-Amiri, Ali; Kuppuswamy, Annapoorna; Pollick, Frank E.; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène

    2012-01-01

    The human “mirror-system” is suggested to play a crucial role in action observation and execution, and is characterized by activity in the premotor and parietal cortices during the passive observation of movements. The previous motor experience of the observer has been shown to enhance the activity in this network. Yet visual experience could also have a determinant influence when watching more complex actions, as in dance performances. Here we tested the impact visual experience has on motor simulation when watching dance, by measuring changes in corticospinal excitability. We also tested the effects of empathic abilities. To fully match the participants' long-term visual experience with the present experimental setting, we used three live solo dance performances: ballet, Indian dance, and non-dance. Participants were either frequent dance spectators of ballet or Indian dance, or “novices” who never watched dance. None of the spectators had been physically trained in these dance styles. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to measure corticospinal excitability by means of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in both the hand and the arm, because the hand is specifically used in Indian dance and the arm is frequently engaged in ballet dance movements. We observed that frequent ballet spectators showed larger MEP amplitudes in the arm muscles when watching ballet compared to when they watched other performances. We also found that the higher Indian dance spectators scored on the fantasy subscale of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, the larger their MEPs were in the arms when watching Indian dance. Our results show that even without physical training, corticospinal excitability can be enhanced as a function of either visual experience or the tendency to imaginatively transpose oneself into fictional characters. We suggest that spectators covertly simulate the movements for which they have acquired visual experience, and that empathic abilities heighten

  10. Different corticospinal control between discrete and rhythmic movement of the ankle

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Yumeno; Jono, Yasutomo; Hatanaka, Ryota; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Tani, Keisuke; Chujo, Yuta; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated differences in corticospinal and spinal control between discrete and rhythmic ankle movements. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles and soleus H-reflex were elicited in the middle of the plantar flexion phase during discrete ankle movement or in the initial or later cycles of rhythmic ankle movement. The H-reflex was evoked at an intensity eliciting a small M-wave and MEPs were elicited at an intensity of 1.2 times the motor threshold of t...

  11. Changes in corticospinal drive to spinal motoneurones following tablet-based practice of manual dexterity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lisbeth Højkjær; Jensen, Thor; Christensen, Mark Schram

    2016-01-01

    ) between EEG-EMG and EMG-EMG activity. Following motor practice performance improved significantly and a significant increase in EEG-EMGAPB and EMGAPB-EMGFDI coherence in the beta band (15-30 Hz) was observed. No changes were observed after the control session. Our results show that tablet-based motor...... practice is associated with changes in the common corticospinal drive to spinal motoneurons involved in manual dexterity. Tablet-based motor practice may be a motivating training tool for stroke patients who struggle with loss of dexterity....

  12. The corticospinal responses of metronome-paced, but not self-paced strength training are similar to motor skill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Michael; Rantalainen, Timo; Teo, Wei-Peng; Kidgell, Dawson

    2017-12-01

    The corticospinal responses to skill training may be different to strength training, depending on how the strength training is performed. It was hypothesised that the corticospinal responses would not be different following skill training and metronome-paced strength training (MPST), but would differ when compared with self-paced strength training (SPST). Corticospinal excitability, short-interval intra-cortical inhibition (SICI) and strength and tracking error were measured at baseline and 2 and 4 weeks. Participants (n = 44) were randomly allocated to visuomotor tracking, MPST, SPST or a control group. MPST increased strength by 7 and 18%, whilst SPST increased strength by 12 and 26% following 2 and 4 weeks of strength training. There were no changes in strength following skill training. Skill training reduced tracking error by 47 and 58% at 2 and 4 weeks. There were no changes in tracking error following SPST; however, tracking error reduced by 24% following 4 weeks of MPST. Corticospinal excitability increased by 40% following MPST and by 29% following skill training. There was no change in corticospinal excitability following 4 weeks of SPST. Importantly, the magnitude of change between skill training and MPST was not different. SICI decreased by 41 and 61% following 2 and 4 weeks of MPST, whilst SICI decreased by 41 and 33% following 2 and 4 weeks of skill training. Again, SPST had no effect on SICI at 2 and 4 weeks. There was no difference in the magnitude of SICI reduction between skill training and MPST. This study adds new knowledge regarding the corticospinal responses to skill and MPST, showing they are similar but different when compared with SPST.

  13. The gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else M.; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has always been and remains a major source of interest in terms of both its function, and its malfunction. Our current knowledge of age-related changes in this system, as well as drug-food interactions, however, remains relatively limited. Paradoxically, the GIT......-related GIT damage and dysfunction. New and novel aspects of drug delivery and drug-dietary supplement interactions are discusses and much needed areas of focus in terms of drug GIT testing are identified....... is not one of the core battery of tests that pharmaceutical companies are obliged to investigate as part of drug development. This review aims to cover the basics of GIT function before highlighting aspects of relevance for safety pharmacology in terms of age, cancerogenesis, and noth drug and diet...

  14. Probing the corticospinal link between the motor cortex and motoneurones: some neglected aspects of human motor cortical function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nicolas Caesar; Butler, Jane E.; Taylor, Janet L.

    2010-01-01

    of the discharge of motor units have revealed that the rapidly conducting corticospinal axons (stimulated at higher intensities) contribute to drive motoneurones in normal voluntary contractions. There are also major non-linearities generated at a spinal level in the relation between corticospinal output...... magnetic stimulation of the human motor cortex have highlighted the capacity of the cortex to modify its apparent excitability in response to altered afferent inputs, training and various pathologies. Studies using cortical stimulation at 'very low' intensities which elicit only short-latency suppression...

  15. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.D.; Pointon, R.C.S.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, radiotherapy is of only minor use in the management of adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract, for a number of reasons. First, an exploratory laparotomy is generally needed for diagnosis, and if possible the tumour is resected or by-passed. Second, radiotherapy planning in the upper abdomen is complicated by the proximity of small bowel, kidneys, and spinal cord. Third, it has been assumed that these tumours cause death largely as a result of distant metastases, so that local radiotherapy, even if effective, would contribute little to survival. The continued interest in radiotherapy for this group of tumours arises out of the poor survival rates following surgery, which have not changed for many years, and the morbidity associated with their resection. It was hoped that the addition of cytotoxic agents to radical surgery would improve survival rates in carcinoma of the stomach and intraperitoneal colon. Despite a large number of well-organised prospective trials, using a variety of cytotoxic drugs, there is so far no evidence that the addition of chemotherapy to radical surgery improves survival for either tumour site. The authors are therefore faced with a group of tumours which are not only common, but commonly fatal and many surgeons would accept that a new approach using modern radiotherapy techniques may well be justified. There is evidence that this movement is already taking place for carcinoma of the rectum, and the indications for radiotherapy in this condition will be dealt with below. Before considering these it is worth dwelling briefly on recent changes in surgical and radiological practices which, if they fulfil expectations, might allow radiotherapy to be used for carcinoma of the colon, stomach, and pancreas as it is now used for rectal cancer

  16. White matter tracts associated with set-shifting in healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Michele E; McDonald, Carrie R; Hagler, Donald J; Gharapetian, Lusineh; Kuperman, Joshua M; Koyama, Alain K; Dale, Anders M; McEvoy, Linda K

    2009-11-01

    Attentional set-shifting ability, commonly assessed with the Trail Making Test (TMT), decreases with increasing age in adults. Since set-shifting performance relies on activity in widespread brain regions, deterioration of the white matter tracts that connect these regions may underlie the age-related decrease in performance. We used an automated fiber tracking method to investigate the relationship between white matter integrity in several cortical association tracts and TMT performance in a sample of 24 healthy adults, 21-80 years. Diffusion tensor images were used to compute average fractional anisotropy (FA) for five cortical association tracts, the corpus callosum (CC), and the corticospinal tract (CST), which served as a control. Results showed that advancing age was associated with declines in set-shifting performance and with decreased FA in the CC and in association tracts that connect frontal cortex to more posterior brain regions, including the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), uncinate fasciculus (UF), and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). Declines in average FA in these tracts, and in average FA of the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), were associated with increased time to completion on the set-shifting subtask of the TMT but not with the simple sequencing subtask. FA values in these tracts were strong mediators of the effect of age on set-shifting performance. Automated tractography methods can enhance our understanding of the fiber systems involved in performance of specific cognitive tasks and of the functional consequences of age-related changes in those systems.

  17. The facilitatory effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation on corticospinal excitability are enhanced by nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayne, Orlando B C; Teo, James T H; Greenwood, Richard J; Rothwell, John C

    2009-08-01

    Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) is increasingly widely used as a means of facilitating corticospinal excitability in the human primary motor cortex. This form of facilitatory plasticity within the stimulated cortex may occur by induction of long term potentiation (LTP). In animal models, agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been shown to modulate or induce LTP; we thus sought to test whether nicotine may modulate the effects of iTBS on corticospinal excitability in humans. A double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design study was conducted with 10 healthy subjects. iTBS was delivered 60min after subjects took either 4mg nicotine or placebo lozenges, and motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were then recorded for 40min after the end of stimulation. In the placebo arm, iTBS produced an increase in the amplitudes of MEPs which lasted for 5min. In the nicotine arm, iTBS produced a more pronounced facilitation of MEPs that was still present at 40min. In a control experiment, nicotine alone had no effect on MEP amplitudes when given in the absence of iTBS. These data indicate that the effects of iTBS can be enhanced and prolonged by nicotine. These results are consistent with animal models demonstrating nicotinic modulation of facilitatory plasticity, and will be of interest to investigators seeking to enhance artificially induced changes in cortical excitability.

  18. Higher-order power harmonics of pulsed electrical stimulation modulates corticospinal contribution of peripheral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiun-Fan; Bikson, Marom; Chou, Li-Wei; Shan, Chunlei; Khadka, Niranjan; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-03-03

    It is well established that electrical-stimulation frequency is crucial to determining the scale of induced neuromodulation, particularly when attempting to modulate corticospinal excitability. However, the modulatory effects of stimulation frequency are not only determined by its absolute value but also by other parameters such as power at harmonics. The stimulus pulse shape further influences parameters such as excitation threshold and fiber selectivity. The explicit role of the power in these harmonics in determining the outcome of stimulation has not previously been analyzed. In this study, we adopted an animal model of peripheral electrical stimulation that includes an amplitude-adapted pulse train which induces force enhancements with a corticospinal contribution. We report that the electrical-stimulation-induced force enhancements were correlated with the amplitude of stimulation power harmonics during the amplitude-adapted pulse train. In an exploratory analysis, different levels of correlation were observed between force enhancement and power harmonics of 20-80 Hz (r = 0.4247, p = 0.0243), 100-180 Hz (r = 0.5894, p = 0.0001), 200-280 Hz (r = 0.7002, p harmonics. This is a pilot, but important first demonstration that power at high order harmonics in the frequency spectrum of electrical stimulation pulses may contribute to neuromodulation, thus warrant explicit attention in therapy design and analysis.

  19. Decreased corticospinal excitability after the illusion of missing part of the arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina eKilteni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies on body ownership illusions have shown that under certain multimodal conditions, healthy people can experience artificial body-parts as if they were part of their own body, with direct physiological consequences for the real limb that gets ‘substituted’. In this study we wanted to assess (a whether healthy people can experience ‘missing’ a body-part through illusory ownership of an amputated virtual body, and (b whether this would cause corticospinal excitability changes in muscles associated with the ‘missing’ body-part. Forty right-handed participants saw a virtual body from a first person perspective but for half of them the virtual body was missing a part of its right arm. Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied before and after the experiment to left and right motor cortices. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI and the extensor digitorum communis (EDC of each hand. We found that the stronger the illusion of amputation and arm ownership, the more the reduction of MEP amplitudes of the EDC muscle for the contralateral sensorimotor cortex. In contrast, no association was found for the EDC amplitudes in the ipsilateral cortex and for the FDI amplitudes in both contralateral and ipsilateral cortices. Our study provides evidence that a short-term illusory perception of missing a body-part can trigger inhibitory effects on corticospinal pathways and importantly in the absence of any limb deafferentation or disuse.

  20. Neural computational modeling reveals a major role of corticospinal gating of central oscillations in the generation of essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-en Qu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential tremor, also referred to as familial tremor, is an autosomal dominant genetic disease and the most common movement disorder. It typically involves a postural and motor tremor of the hands, head or other part of the body. Essential tremor is driven by a central oscillation signal in the brain. However, the corticospinal mechanisms involved in the generation of essential tremor are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we used a neural computational model that includes both monosynaptic and multisynaptic corticospinal pathways interacting with a propriospinal neuronal network. A virtual arm model is driven by the central oscillation signal to simulate tremor activity behavior. Cortical descending commands are classified as alpha or gamma through monosynaptic or multisynaptic corticospinal pathways, which converge respectively on alpha or gamma motoneurons in the spinal cord. Several scenarios are evaluated based on the central oscillation signal passing down to the spinal motoneurons via each descending pathway. The simulated behaviors are compared with clinical essential tremor characteristics to identify the corticospinal pathways responsible for transmitting the central oscillation signal. A propriospinal neuron with strong cortical inhibition performs a gating function in the generation of essential tremor. Our results indicate that the propriospinal neuronal network is essential for relaying the central oscillation signal and the production of essential tremor.

  1. Neural computational modeling reveals a major role of corticospinal gating of central oscillations in the generation of essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hong-En; Niu, Chuanxin M; Li, Si; Hao, Man-Zhao; Hu, Zi-Xiang; Xie, Qing; Lan, Ning

    2017-12-01

    Essential tremor, also referred to as familial tremor, is an autosomal dominant genetic disease and the most common movement disorder. It typically involves a postural and motor tremor of the hands, head or other part of the body. Essential tremor is driven by a central oscillation signal in the brain. However, the corticospinal mechanisms involved in the generation of essential tremor are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we used a neural computational model that includes both monosynaptic and multisynaptic corticospinal pathways interacting with a propriospinal neuronal network. A virtual arm model is driven by the central oscillation signal to simulate tremor activity behavior. Cortical descending commands are classified as alpha or gamma through monosynaptic or multisynaptic corticospinal pathways, which converge respectively on alpha or gamma motoneurons in the spinal cord. Several scenarios are evaluated based on the central oscillation signal passing down to the spinal motoneurons via each descending pathway. The simulated behaviors are compared with clinical essential tremor characteristics to identify the corticospinal pathways responsible for transmitting the central oscillation signal. A propriospinal neuron with strong cortical inhibition performs a gating function in the generation of essential tremor. Our results indicate that the propriospinal neuronal network is essential for relaying the central oscillation signal and the production of essential tremor.

  2. Effect of Cutaneous Heat Pain on Corticospinal Excitability of the Tibialis Anterior at Rest and during Submaximal Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Billot

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that pain can interfere with motor control. The neural mechanisms underlying these effects remain largely unknown. At the upper limb, mounting evidence suggests that pain-induced reduction in corticospinal excitability is involved. No equivalent data is currently available at the lower limb. The present study therefore examined the effect of thermal pain on the corticospinal drive to tibialis anterior (TA at rest and during an isometric submaximal dorsiflexion. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to induce motor-evoked potentials (MEPs in the TA at rest and during contraction in the presence or absence of cutaneous heat pain induced by a thermode positioned above the TA (51°C during 1 s. With similar pain ratings between conditions (3.9/10 at rest and 3.6/10 during contraction, results indicate significant decreases in MEP amplitude during both rest (−9% and active conditions (−13% (main effect of pain, p=0.02. These results therefore suggest that cutaneous heat pain can reduce corticospinal excitability in the TA muscle and that such reduction in corticospinal excitability could contribute to the interference of pain on motor control/motor learning.

  3. Enhanced Corticospinal Excitability and Volitional Drive in Response to Shortening and Lengthening Strength Training and Changes Following Detraining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tallent, Jamie; Goodall, Stuart; Gibbon, Karl C.; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Howatson, Glyn

    2017-01-01

    There is a limited understanding of the neurological adaptations responsible for changes in strength following shortening and lengthening resistance training and subsequent detraining. The aim of the study was to investigate differences in corticospinal and spinal responses to resistance training of

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging of Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy: a tract-based spatial statistics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Worker

    Full Text Available Although often clinically indistinguishable in the early stages, Parkinson's disease (PD, Multiple System Atrophy (MSA and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP have distinct neuropathological changes. The aim of the current study was to identify white matter tract neurodegeneration characteristic of each of the three syndromes. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS was used to perform a whole-brain automated analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data to compare differences in fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD between the three clinical groups and healthy control subjects. Further analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between these putative indices of white matter microstructure and clinical measures of disease severity and symptoms. In PSP, relative to controls, changes in DTI indices consistent with white matter tract degeneration were identified in the corpus callosum, corona radiata, corticospinal tract, superior longitudinal fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, superior cerebellar peduncle, medial lemniscus, retrolenticular and anterior limb of the internal capsule, cerebral peduncle and external capsule bilaterally, as well as the left posterior limb of the internal capsule and the right posterior thalamic radiation. MSA patients also displayed differences in the body of the corpus callosum corticospinal tract, cerebellar peduncle, medial lemniscus, anterior and superior corona radiata, posterior limb of the internal capsule external capsule and cerebral peduncle bilaterally, as well as the left anterior limb of the internal capsule and the left anterior thalamic radiation. No significant white matter abnormalities were observed in the PD group. Across groups, MD correlated positively with disease severity in all major white matter tracts. These results show widespread changes in white matter tracts in both PSP and MSA patients, even at a mid-point in the disease process, which are not found in patients

  5. Intensity dependent effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on corticospinal excitability in chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lynda M; Edwards, Dylan J; Ruffini, Giulio; Labar, Douglas; Stampas, Argyrios; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Cortes, Mar

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) intensity on corticospinal excitability and affected muscle activation in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Single-blind, randomized, sham-controlled, crossover study. Medical research institute and rehabilitation hospital. Volunteers (N = 9) with chronic SCI and motor dysfunction in wrist extensor muscles. Three single session exposures to 20 minutes of a-tDCS (anode over the extensor carpi radialis [ECR] muscle representation on the left primary motor cortex, cathode over the right supraorbital area) using 1 mA, 2 mA, or sham stimulation, delivered at rest, with at least 1 week between sessions. Corticospinal excitability was assessed with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from the ECR muscle using surface electromyography after transcranial magnetic stimulation. Changes in spinal excitability, sensory threshold, and muscle strength were also investigated. Mean MEP amplitude significantly increased by approximately 40% immediately after 2mA a-tDCS (pre: 0.36 ± 0.1 mV; post: 0.47 ± 0.11 mV; P = .001), but not with 1 mA or sham. Maximal voluntary contraction measures remained unaltered across all conditions. Sensory threshold significantly decreased over time after 1mA (P = .002) and 2mA (P = .039) a-tDCS and did not change with sham. F-wave persistence showed a nonsignificant trend for increase (pre: 32% ± 12%; post: 41% ± 10%; follow-up: 46% ± 12%) after 2 mA stimulation. No adverse effects were reported with any of the experimental conditions. The a-tDCS can transiently raise corticospinal excitability to affected muscles in patients with chronic SCI after 2 mA stimulation. Sensory perception can improve with both 1 and 2 mA stimulation. This study gives support to the safe and effective use of a-tDCS using small electrodes in patients with SCI and highlights the importance of stimulation intensity. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  6. Qualified Census Tracts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — A Qualified Census Tract (QCT) is any census tract (or equivalent geographic area defined by the Census Bureau) in which at least 50% of households have an income...

  7. Real-time changes in corticospinal excitability related to motor imagery of a force control task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatemoto, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Junko; Numata, Atsuki

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate real-time excitability changes in corticospinal pathways related to motor imagery in a changing force control task, using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods Ten healthy volunteers learnt to control the contractile force of isometric right wrist dorsiflexion...... in order to track an on-screen sine wave form. Participants performed the trained task 40 times with actual muscle contraction in order to construct the motor image. They were then instructed to execute the task without actual muscle contraction, but by imagining contraction of the right wrist...... in dorsiflexion. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs), induced by TMS in the right extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR) and flexor carpi radialis muscle (FCR), were measured during motor imagery. MEPs were induced at five time points: prior to imagery, during the gradual generation of the imaged wrist dorsiflexion...

  8. Corticospinal inhibition of transmission in propriospinal-like neurones during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Caroline; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique

    2008-01-01

    It is crucial for human walking that muscles acting at different joints are optimally coordinated in relation to each other. This is ensured by interaction between spinal neuronal networks, sensory feedback and supraspinal control. Here we investigated the cortical control of spinal excitation from...... ankle dorsiflexor afferents to quadriceps motoneurones mediated by propriospinal-like interneurones. During walking and tonic contraction of ankle dorsiflexors and knee extensors while standing [at matched electromyography (EMG) levels], the effect of common peroneal nerve (CPN) stimulation...... was enhanced during walking, and when CPN stimulation was combined with FN or TMS, the resulting H-reflexes and MEPs were inhibited. The CPQ-reflex was also depressed when CPN stimulation was combined with subthreshold TMS. The peripheral (in CPN and FN) and corticospinal volleys may activate inhibitory non...

  9. Real-time changes in corticospinal excitability related to motor imagery of a force control task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatemoto, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Junko; Numata, Atsuki; Osawa, Ryuji; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Tanabe, Shigeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Otaka, Yohei; Sugawara, Kenichi

    2017-09-29

    To investigate real-time excitability changes in corticospinal pathways related to motor imagery in a changing force control task, using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Ten healthy volunteers learnt to control the contractile force of isometric right wrist dorsiflexion in order to track an on-screen sine wave form. Participants performed the trained task 40 times with actual muscle contraction in order to construct the motor image. They were then instructed to execute the task without actual muscle contraction, but by imagining contraction of the right wrist in dorsiflexion. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs), induced by TMS in the right extensor carpi radialis muscle (ECR) and flexor carpi radialis muscle (FCR), were measured during motor imagery. MEPs were induced at five time points: prior to imagery, during the gradual generation of the imaged wrist dorsiflexion (Increasing phase), the peak value of the sine wave, during the gradual reduction (Decreasing phase), and after completion of the task. The MEP ratio, as the ratio of imaged MEPs to resting-state, was compared between pre- and post-training at each time point. In the ECR muscle, the MEP ratio significantly increased during the Increasing phase and at the peak force of dorsiflexion imagery after training. Moreover, the MEP ratio was significantly greater in the Increasing phase than in the Decreasing phase. In the FCR, there were no significant consistent changes. Corticospinal excitability during motor imagery in an isometric contraction task was modulated in relation to the phase of force control after image construction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Towards assessing corticospinal excitability bilaterally: Validation of a double-coil TMS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Julien; Derosiere, Gerard; Vassiliadis, Pierre; Quemener, Louise; Wilde, Ysaline de; Duque, Julie

    2018-01-01

    For several decades, Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to monitor corticospinal excitability (CSE) changes in various contexts. Habitually, single-coil TMS is applied over one primary motor cortex (M1), eliciting motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in a contralateral limb muscle, usually a hand effector. However, in many situations, it would be useful to obtain MEPs in both hands simultaneously, to track CSE bilaterally. Such an approach requires stimulating both M1 concurrently while avoiding interference between the two descending stimuli. We examined MEPs obtained at rest using a double-coil TMS approach where the two M1 are stimulated with a 1ms inter-pulse interval (double-coil 1ms ). MEPs were acquired using double-coil 1ms (MEP double ) or single-coil (MEP single ) TMS, at five different intensities of stimulation (100, 115, 130, 145 or 160% of the resting motor threshold, rMT). Given the 1ms inter-pulse interval in double-coil 1ms trials, MEP double were either evoked by a 1st (MEP double-1 ) or a 2nd (MEP double-2 ) TMS pulse. All MEP TYPE (MEP TYPE =MEP single , MEP double-1 and MEP double-2 ) were equivalent, regardless of the hand within which they were elicited, the intensity of stimulation or the pulse order. This method allows one to observe state-related CSE changes for the two hands simultaneously on a trial-by-trial basis. These results infer the absence of any neural interactions between the two cortico-spinal volleys with double-coil 1ms TMS. Hence, this technique can be reliably used to assess CSE bilaterally, opening new research perspectives for scientists interested in physiological markers of activity in the motor output system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Kidneys and Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Kidneys and Urinary Tract KidsHealth / For Teens / Kidneys and Urinary Tract What's ... a sign of diabetes . What the Kidneys and Urinary Tract Do Although the two kidneys work together to ...

  12. Genital and Urinary Tract Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conditions > Genital and urinary tract defects Genital and urinary tract defects E-mail to a friend Please fill ... and extra fluids. What problems can genital and urinary tract defects cause? Genital and urinary tract defects affect ...

  13. Daño renal cortical en niños con primera infección del tracto urinario alto Cortical renal damage in children with a first infection of the high urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulio Antonio Amaya Sorto

    2012-03-01

    .Introduction: between the 5 and the 22 % of children suffering acute pyelonephritis will develop a renal scar. Objective: to describe the clinical-epidemiological features of the cortical renal damage in children with a first infection of high urinary tract. Methods: a longitudinal, prospective and observational study was conducted on the cicatricial renal damage admitted in the Nephrology services of the "William Soler" University Children Hospital from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009. Fifty patients were diagnosed and 38 fulfilled the inclusion criteria to study. Patients had a mean age of 18 months and underwent renal ultrasound during the acute phase of disease and static renal scintigraphy between 6 and 12 months after the acute picture, to specify exactly the cortical renal injury. In cases of renal scar, lack or decrease of the radioactive drug capture (99mTc-DMSA authors carried out miction uretrocystography to specify exactly the presence of vesicoureteral reflux. Results: twenty six patients (73.7 % are females, 17 (44.7 % aged under 6 months, 17 (44.7 % have between 6 and 36 months and 4 (10.6 % > 3 years old. The urinary infection was atypical in 23 (60.5 % and as a isolated germ the Escherichia coli in 33 (86.8 %. Ultrasound of acute phase demonstrated a renal pelvis dilation in 3 (7.9 % and renal asymmetry in 1 (2.6 %. In 2 patients (5.2 % there was renal scar and in 11 (28.4 % an decreased function of the renal cortex. The miction uretrocystography demonstrated the presence of grade III vesicoureteral reflux in a girl, who also had a renal scar. There was not relation between the onset of symptoms, the onset of therapeutics and the cortical injury. Conclusions: the risk factors to develop a post-pyelonephritis renal scar were: female sex, be aged under 3 and grade III vesicoureteral reflux.

  14. Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion detected by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waragai, Masaaki; Iwabuchi, Sadamu

    1993-01-01

    We studied Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion by MRI. A total of 57 patients with palsy following a supratenotorial cerebrovascular lesion were prospectively studied. Wallerian degeneration was detected as a high signal intensity (HSI) in 37 patients between 70 days and 100 days after the onset, but not detected in the remaining 27 patients. Patient with as HSI in all areas of the cerebral peduncle had a large lesion involving the hemisphere. Patient with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion confined to the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. Patient with an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion of parietal lobe or temporal lobe which spares the corticospinal tract originating from the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. These findings suggest that as HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle may reveal Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract, and an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle may show Wallerian degeneration of the corticopontine tract. The functional recovery of paresis was poor in all patients with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle, while it was good in all patients without an HSI in that region. Our data suggested that somatotopical localization of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle may be identified by detecting Wallerian degeneration following a supratentorial lesion, and the functional recovery of patients with paresis could be predicted according to presence or absence of Wallerian degeneration at the center of the cerebral peduncle. (author)

  15. Corticospinal excitability during the processing of handwritten and typed words and non-words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Chelsea L; Spivey, Michael J; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2017-06-09

    A number of studies have suggested that perception of actions is accompanied by motor simulation of those actions. To further explore this proposal, we applied Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the left primary motor cortex during the observation of handwritten and typed language stimuli, including words and non-word consonant clusters. We recorded motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle to measure cortico-spinal excitability during written text perception. We observed a facilitation in MEPs for handwritten stimuli, regardless of whether the stimuli were words or non-words, suggesting potential motor simulation during observation. We did not observe a similar facilitation for the typed stimuli, suggesting that motor simulation was not occurring during observation of typed text. By demonstrating potential simulation of written language text during observation, these findings add to a growing literature suggesting that the motor system plays a strong role in the perception of written language. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Corticospinal Reorganization after Locomotor Training in a Person with Motor Incomplete Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Hajela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity-dependent plasticity as a result of reorganization of neural circuits is a fundamental characteristic of the central nervous system that occurs simultaneously in multiple sites. In this study, we established the effects of subthreshold transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS over the primary motor cortex region on the tibialis anterior (TA long-latency flexion reflex. Neurophysiological tests were conducted before and after robotic gait training in one person with a motor incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI while at rest and during robotic-assisted stepping. The TA flexion reflex was evoked following nonnociceptive sural nerve stimulation and was conditioned by TMS at 0.9 TA motor evoked potential resting threshold at conditioning-test intervals that ranged from 70 to 130 ms. Subthreshold TMS induced a significant facilitation on the TA flexion reflex before training, which was reversed to depression after training with the subject seated at rest. During stepping, corticospinal facilitation of the flexion reflex at early and midstance phases before training was replaced with depression at early and midswing followed by facilitation at late swing after training. These results constitute the first neurophysiologic evidence that locomotor training reorganizes the cortical control of spinal interneuronal circuits that generate patterned motor activity, modifying spinal reflex function, in the chronic lesioned human spinal cord.

  17. Tongue corticospinal modulation during attended verbal stimuli: priming and coarticulation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Jarmolowska, Joanna; Busan, Pierpaolo; Bufalari, Ilaria; Craighero, Laila

    2011-11-01

    Humans perceive continuous speech through interruptions or brief noise bursts cancelling entire phonemes. This robust phenomenon has been classically associated with mechanisms of perceptual restoration. In parallel, recent experimental evidence suggests that the motor system may actively participate in speech perception, even contributing to phoneme discrimination. In the present study we intended to verify if the motor system has a specific role in speech perceptual restoration as well. To this aim we recorded tongue corticospinal excitability during phoneme expectation induced by contextual information. Results showed that phoneme expectation determines an involvement of the individual's motor system specifically implicated in the production of the attended phoneme, exactly as it happens during actual listening of that phoneme, suggesting the presence of a speech imagery-like process. Very interestingly, this motoric phoneme expectation is also modulated by subtle coarticulation cues of which the listener is not consciously aware. Present data indicate that the rehearsal of a specific phoneme requires the contribution of the motor system exactly as it happens during the rehearsal of actions executed by the limbs, and that this process is abolished when an incongruent phonemic cue is presented, as similarly occurs during observation of anomalous hand actions. We propose that altogether these effects indicate that during speech listening an attentional-like mechanism driven by the motor system, based on a feed-forward anticipatory mechanism constantly verifying incoming information, is working allowing perceptual restoration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Area-specific temporal control of corticospinal motor neuron differentiation by COUP-TFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; De Leonibus, Elvira; Jabaudon, Denis; Lodato, Simona; Alfano, Christian; Mele, Andrea; Macklis, Jeffrey D.; Studer, Michèle

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors with gradients of expression in neocortical progenitors give rise to distinct motor and sensory cortical areas by controlling the area-specific differentiation of distinct neuronal subtypes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this area-restricted control are still unclear. Here, we show that COUP-TFI controls the timing of birth and specification of corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) in somatosensory cortex via repression of a CSMN differentiation program. Loss of COUP-TFI function causes an area-specific premature generation of neurons with cardinal features of CSMN, which project to subcerebral structures, including the spinal cord. Concurrently, genuine CSMN differentiate imprecisely and do not project beyond the pons, together resulting in impaired skilled motor function in adult mice with cortical COUP-TFI loss-of-function. Our findings indicate that COUP-TFI exerts critical areal and temporal control over the precise differentiation of CSMN during corticogenesis, thereby enabling the area-specific functional features of motor and sensory areas to arise. PMID:20133588

  19. Do you see what I mean? Corticospinal excitability during observation of culture-specific gestures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Molnar-Szakacs

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available People all over the world use their hands to communicate expressively. Autonomous gestures, also known as emblems, are highly social in nature, and convey conventionalized meaning without accompanying speech. To study the neural bases of cross-cultural social communication, we used single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to measure corticospinal excitability (CSE during observation of culture-specific emblems. Foreign Nicaraguan and familiar American emblems as well as meaningless control gestures were performed by both a Euro-American and a Nicaraguan actor. Euro-American participants demonstrated higher CSE during observation of the American compared to the Nicaraguan actor. This motor resonance phenomenon may reflect ethnic and cultural ingroup familiarity effects. However, participants also demonstrated a nearly significant (p = 0.053 actor by emblem interaction whereby both Nicaraguan and American emblems performed by the American actor elicited similar CSE, whereas Nicaraguan emblems performed by the Nicaraguan actor yielded higher CSE than American emblems. The latter result cannot be interpreted simply as an effect of ethnic ingroup familiarity. Thus, a likely explanation of these findings is that motor resonance is modulated by interacting biological and cultural factors.

  20. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... urinary tract infection, or UTI, you're probably thinking about peeing quite a lot. Why? Because it ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ...

  1. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals ... Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Urinary Tract ...

  2. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ... Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Urinary Tract ...

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation--may be useful as a preoperative screen of motor tract function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Gloria M; Dias, Brennan R; Brown, Judy L; Henry, Christina M; Brooks, David A; Buggie, Ed W

    2013-08-01

    Transcranial motor stimulation with noninvasive cortical surface stimulation, using a high-intensity magnetic field referred to as transcranial magnetic stimulation generally, is considered a nonpainful technique. In contrast, transcranial electric stimulation of the motor tracts typically cannot be done in unanesthesized patients. Intraoperative monitoring of motor tract function with transcranial electric stimulation is considered a standard practice in many institutions for patients during surgical procedures in which there is potential risk of motor tract impairment so that the risk of paraplegia or paraparesis can be reduced. Because transcranial electric stimulation cannot be typically done in the outpatient setting, transcranial magnetic stimulation may be able to provide a well-tolerated method for evaluation of the corticospinal motor tracts before surgery. One hundred fifty-five patients aged 5 to 20 years were evaluated preoperatively with single-stimulation nonrepetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for preoperative assessment. The presence of responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation reliably predicted the presence of responses to transcranial electric stimulation intraoperatively. No complications occurred during the testing, and findings were correlated to the clinical history and used in the setup of the surgical monitoring.

  4. Executive deficits, not processing speed relates to abnormalities in distinct prefrontal tracts in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Lewis D; Bastin, Mark E; Smith, Colin; Bak, Thomas H; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Abrahams, Sharon

    2013-11-01

    Cognitive impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is characterized by deficits on tests of executive function; however, the contribution of abnormal processing speed is unknown. Methods are confounded by tasks that depend on motor speed in patients with physical disability. Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed multi-system cerebral involvement, with evidence of reduced white matter volume and integrity in predominant frontotemporal regions. The current study has two aims. First, to investigate whether cognitive impairments in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are due to executive dysfunction or slowed processing speed using methodology that accommodates motor disability. This is achieved using a dual-task paradigm and tasks that manipulate stimulus presentation times and do not rely on response motor speed. Second, to identify relationships between specific cognitive impairments and the integrity of distinct white matter tracts. Thirty patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 30 age- and education-matched control subjects were administered an experimental dual-task procedure that combined a visual inspection time task and digit recall. In addition, measures of executive function (including letter fluency) and processing speed (visual inspection time and rapid serial letter identification) were administered. Integrity of white matter tracts was determined using region of interest analyses of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging data. Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis did not show impairments on tests of processing speed, but executive deficits were revealed once visual inspection time was combined with digit recall (dual-task) and in letter fluency. In addition to the corticospinal tracts, significant differences in fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity were found between groups in a number of prefrontal and temporal white matter tracts including the anterior cingulate, anterior thalamic radiation

  5. Fatigue-induced change in corticospinal drive to back muscles in elite rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Rick C; Strutton, Paul H; McGregor, Alison H; Davey, Nick J

    2002-09-01

    This study examined post-exercise changes in corticospinal excitability in five 'elite' rowers and six nonrowers. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was delivered to the motor cortex and bilateral electromyographic (EMG) recordings were made from erector spinae (ES) muscles at L3/L4 spinal level and from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of the dominant hand. Each subject completed two exercise protocols on a rowing ergometer: a light exercise protocol at a sub-maximal output for 10 min and an intense exercise protocol at maximum output for 1 min. A trial of ten magnetic stimuli was delivered before each of the protocols and, on finishing exercise, further trials of ten stimuli were delivered every 2 min for a 16 min period. Amplitudes of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in each of the three test muscles were measured before exercise and during the recovery period after exercise. The non-rowers showed a brief facilitation of MEPs in ES 2 min after light and intense exercise that was only present in the elite rowers after intense exercise. In the period 4-16 min after light exercise, the mean (+/- S.E.M.) MEP amplitude (relative to pre-exercise levels) was less depressed in the elite rowers (79.4 +/- 2.1%) than in the non-rowers (60.9 +/- 2.5%) in the left ES but not significantly so in the right ES. MEP amplitudes in FDI were significantly larger in the elite rowers, averaging 119.0 +/- 3.1% pre-exercise levels, compared with 101.2 +/- 5.8% in the non-rowers. Pre-exercise MEP latencies were no different in the two groups. After light exercise MEP latencies became longer in the elite rowers (left ES, 16.1 +/- 0.5 ms; right ES, 16.1 +/- 0.4 ms; dominant FDI, 23.4 +/- 0.2 ms) than in the non-rowers (left ES, 15.0 +/- 0.3 ms; right ES, 15.2 +/- 0.3 ms; dominant FDI, 21.5 +/- 0.2 ms). There were no differences in MEP depression or latency between elite rowers and non-rowers after intense exercise. We conclude that the smaller degree of MEP depression in the

  6. Absence of alsin function leads to corticospinal motor neuron vulnerability via novel disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Mukesh; Jara, Javier H; Sekerkova, Gabriella; Yasvoina, Marina V; Martina, Marco; Özdinler, P Hande

    2016-03-15

    Mutations in the ALS2 gene result in early-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paraplegia and juvenile primary lateral sclerosis, suggesting prominent upper motor neuron involvement. However, the importance of alsin function for corticospinal motor neuron (CSMN) health and stability remains unknown. To date, four separate alsin knockout (Alsin(KO)) mouse models have been generated, and despite hopes of mimicking human pathology, none displayed profound motor function defects. This, however, does not rule out the possibility of neuronal defects within CSMN, which is not easy to detect in these mice. Detailed cellular analysis of CSMN has been hampered due to their limited numbers and the complex and heterogeneous structure of the cerebral cortex. In an effort to visualize CSMN in vivo and to investigate precise aspects of neuronal abnormalities in the absence of alsin function, we generated Alsin(KO)-UeGFP mice, by crossing Alsin(KO) and UCHL1-eGFP mice, a CSMN reporter line. We find that CSMN display vacuolated apical dendrites with increased autophagy, shrinkage of soma size and axonal pathology even in the pons region. Immunocytochemistry coupled with electron microscopy reveal that alsin is important for maintaining cellular cytoarchitecture and integrity of cellular organelles. In its absence, CSMN displays selective defects both in mitochondria and Golgi apparatus. UCHL1-eGFP mice help understand the underlying cellular factors that lead to CSMN vulnerability in diseases, and our findings reveal unique importance of alsin function for CSMN health and stability. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Emergence of gamma motor activity in an artificial neural network model of the corticospinal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Bernard; Maier, Marc A

    2017-02-01

    Muscle spindle discharge during active movement is a function of mechanical and neural parameters. Muscle length changes (and their derivatives) represent its primary mechanical, fusimotor drive its neural component. However, neither the action nor the function of fusimotor and in particular of γ-drive, have been clearly established, since γ-motor activity during voluntary, non-locomotor movements remains largely unknown. Here, using a computational approach, we explored whether γ-drive emerges in an artificial neural network model of the corticospinal system linked to a biomechanical antagonist wrist simulator. The wrist simulator included length-sensitive and γ-drive-dependent type Ia and type II muscle spindle activity. Network activity and connectivity were derived by a gradient descent algorithm to generate reciprocal, known target α-motor unit activity during wrist flexion-extension (F/E) movements. Two tasks were simulated: an alternating F/E task and a slow F/E tracking task. Emergence of γ-motor activity in the alternating F/E network was a function of α-motor unit drive: if muscle afferent (together with supraspinal) input was required for driving α-motor units, then γ-drive emerged in the form of α-γ coactivation, as predicted by empirical studies. In the slow F/E tracking network, γ-drive emerged in the form of α-γ dissociation and provided critical, bidirectional muscle afferent activity to the cortical network, containing known bidirectional target units. The model thus demonstrates the complementary aspects of spindle output and hence γ-drive: i) muscle spindle activity as a driving force of α-motor unit activity, and ii) afferent activity providing continuous sensory information, both of which crucially depend on γ-drive.

  8. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation Alters Corticospinal Output in Patients with Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter J. Fassett

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS is intended primarily to alter corticospinal excitability, creating an attractive opportunity to alter neural output following incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI. This study is the first to assess the effects of iTBS in SCI. Eight individuals with chronic incomplete SCI were studied. Sham or real iTBS was delivered (to each participant over primary motor and somatosensory cortices in separate sessions. Motor-evoked potential (MEP recruitment curves were obtained from the flexor carpi radialis muscle before and after iTBS. Results indicate similar responses for iTBS to both motor and somatosensory cortex and reduced MEPs in 56.25% and increased MEPs in 25% of instances. Sham stimulation exceeded real iTBS effects in the remaining 18.25%. It is our opinion that observing short-term neuroplasticity in corticospinal output in chronic SCI is an important advance and should be tested in future studies as an opportunity to improve function in this population. We emphasize the need to re-consider the importance of the direction of MEP change following a single session of iTBS since the relationship between MEP direction and motor function is unknown and multiple sessions of iTBS may yield very different directional results. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of including sham control in the experimental design. The fundamental point from this pilot research is that a single session of iTBS is often capable of creating short-term change in SCI. Future sham-controlled randomized trials may consider repeat iTBS sessions to promote long-term changes in corticospinal excitability.

  9. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts - A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex (M...... of sinusoidal TMS pulses elicited either a posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP) directed current in M1. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded before and after qTBS to probe changes in cortico-spinal excitability. PA-qTBS at 666 Hz caused a decrease in PA-MEP amplitudes, whereas AP...... in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1....

  10. Recent History of Effector Use Modulates Practice-Dependent Changes in Corticospinal Excitability but Not Motor Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Sara J; Darling, Warren G; Cole, Kelly J

    2016-01-01

    The theory of homeostatic metaplasticity has significant implications for human motor cortical plasticity and motor learning. Previous work has shown that the extent of recent effector use before exogenously-induced plasticity can affect the direction, magnitude and variability of aftereffects. However, the impact of recent effector use on motor learning and practice-dependent plasticity is not known. We hypothesized that reducing effector use for 8 hours via hand/wrist immobilization would facilitate practice-dependent changes in corticospinal excitability and TMS-evoked thumb movement kinematics, while also promoting 24-hour retention of a ballistic motor skill. Subjects participated in a crossover study involving two conditions. During the immobilization condition, subjects wore a splint that restricted motion of the left hand and thumb for 8 hours. While wearing the splint, subjects were instructed to avoid using their left hand as much as possible. During the control condition, subjects did not wear a splint at any time nor were they instructed to avoid hand use. After either an 8 hour period of immobilization or normal hand use, we collected MEP and TMS-evoked thumb movement recruitment curves, and subjects practiced a ballistic motor skill involving rapid thumb extension. After motor practice, MEP and TMS-evoked thumb movement recruitment curves were re-tested. Retention of the motor skill was tested 30 minutes and 24 hours after motor practice. Reduced effector use did not impact pre-practice corticospinal excitability but did facilitate practice-dependent changes in corticospinal excitability, and this enhancement was specific to the trained muscle. In contrast, reducing effector use did not affect practice-dependent changes in TMS-evoked thumb movements nor did it promote acquisition or retention of the skill. Finally, we detected some associations between pre-practice excitability levels, plasticity effects and learning effects, but these did not reach

  11. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and Bowel Why is it important to begin urologic care in infancy and ...

  12. Urinary tract infection - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    UTI - children; Cystitis - children; Bladder infection - children; Kidney infection - children; Pyelonephritis - children ... Craig JC. Long-term antibiotics for preventing recurrent urinary tract infection in children. Cochrane Database Syst Rev . 2011;(3):CD001534. PMID: ...

  13. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major passages and structures of the upper respiratory tract include the nose or nostrils, nasal cavity, mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that ...

  14. Urinary Tract Infections (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections KidsHealth / For Teens / Urinary Tract Infections What's ... especially girls — visit a doctor. What Is a Urinary Tract Infection? A bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI) is ...

  15. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections ( ... Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made ...

  16. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections ( ... Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made ...

  17. Management of radiation injuries of 10 cases of gastrointestinal tracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomida, Takashi; Yano, Takashi; Hidaka, Naoaki; Okada, Yoshikatsu; Iwasaki, Makoto; Goshima, Hiromichi.

    1984-01-01

    Ten cases of delayed radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tracts (consisting of 2 with peptic ulcer, 4 with intestinal obstruction, and 4 with rectal bleeding) are reported. Although conservative therapy or artificial colostomy was undertaken in all cases, satisfactory results were not obtained. In four cases in which subsequent resection of the gastrointestinal tracts was performed, the prognosis was favorable, but various symptoms still continued in the other non-resected cases. Delayed radiation injuries are progressive lesions involving the vasculo-connective tissue, so that cure can not be achieved. Resection of the damaged gastrointestinal tract is recommended, however, this is difficult to do in many cases. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Management of radiation injuries of 10 cases of gastrointestinal tracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomida, Takashi; Yano, Takashi; Hidaka, Naoaki; Okada, Yoshikatsu; Iwasaki, Makoto; Goshima, Hiromichi

    1984-11-01

    Ten cases of delayed radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tracts (consisting of 2 with peptic ulcer, 4 with intestinal obstruction, and 4 with rectal bleeding) are reported. Although conservative therapy or artificial colostomy was undertaken in all cases, satisfactory results were not obtained. In four cases in which subsequent resection of the gastrointestinal tracts was performed, the prognosis was favorable, but various symptoms still continued in the other non-resected cases. Delayed radiation injuries are progressive lesions involving the vasculo-connective tissue, so that cure can not be achieved. Resection of the damaged gastrointestinal tract is recommended, however, this is difficult to do in many cases. (Namekawa, K.).

  19. Intermittent theta-burst stimulation induces correlated changes in cortical and corticospinal excitability in healthy older subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedankien, Tamara; Fried, Peter J; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Shafi, Mouhsin M

    2017-12-01

    We studied the correlation between motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and early TMS-evoked EEG potentials (TEPs) from single-pulse TMS before and after intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation (iTBS) to the left primary motor cortex (M1) in 17 healthy older participants. TMS was targeted to the hand region of M1 using a MRI-guided navigated brain stimulation system and a figure-of-eight biphasic coil. MEPs were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous muscle using surface EMG. TEPs were extracted from a 61-channel EEG recording. Participants received 90 single TMS pulses at 120% of resting motor threshold before and after iTBS. Across all participants, the change in N15-P30 TEP and MEP amplitudes were significantly correlated (r=0.69; piTBS, whereas MEP amplitudes showed a significant increase. Changes in corticospinal reactivity and cortical reactivity induced by iTBS are related. However, the effect of iTBS on TEPs, unlike MEPs, is not straightforward. Our findings help elucidate the relationship between changes in cortical and corticospinal excitability in healthy older individuals. Going forward, TEPs may be used to evaluate the effects of theta-burst stimulation in non-motor brain regions. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pediatric urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blickman, J.G.

    1991-02-06

    Acute urinary tract infection (UTI) is an important cause of morbidity in children and may be complicated by congenital urinary tract abnormalities of a functional or anatomic nature which, predispose to recurrent UTI's that in turn may lead to renal failure and hypertension. Early radiologic and ultrasonographic investigations may reveal these anatomic anomalies in particular because the urinary tract, specifically in children, is not readily accessible to adequate clinical examinations Excretory urography (EU) has been considered as the 'gold standard' of upper urinary tract visualization, while the voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) was thought to be the preferential method of imaging of the lower urinary tract. Recently, major technical advances have altered this commonly accepted diagnostic workup. Although ultrasonography, radio-nuclide scanning and urodynamics have become important contributors to the understanding of pathophysiology of UTI's their value and place in assessment of the sequence of imaging has not been comprehensively studied. This thesis deals about the optimization of the choice and the order of the different imaging techniques used in the evaluation of children, younger than six year with UTI. (author). 243 refs.; 23 figs.; 8 tabs.

  1. Pediatric urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blickman, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Acute urinary tract infection (UTI) is an important cause of morbidity in children and may be complicated by congenital urinary tract abnormalities of a functional or anatomic nature which, predispose to recurrent UTI's that in turn may lead to renal failure and hypertension. Early radiologic and ultrasonographic investigations may reveal these anatomic anomalies in particular because the urinary tract, specifically in children, is not readily accessible to adequate clinical examinations Excretory urography (EU) has been considered as the 'gold standard' of upper urinary tract visualization, while the voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) was thought to be the preferential method of imaging of the lower urinary tract. Recently, major technical advances have altered this commonly accepted diagnostic workup. Although ultrasonography, radio-nuclide scanning and urodynamics have become important contributors to the understanding of pathophysiology of UTI's their value and place in assessment of the sequence of imaging has not been comprehensively studied. This thesis deals about the optimization of the choice and the order of the different imaging techniques used in the evaluation of children, younger than six year with UTI. (author). 243 refs.; 23 figs.; 8 tabs

  2. Leukoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation (LBSL): Assessment of the involved white matter tracts by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, Hassan [Department of Radiology, Benha University (Egypt); Wafaie, Ahmed, E-mail: a_wafaie@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Cairo University (Egypt); Abdelfattah, Sherif [Department of Radiology, Cairo University (Egypt); Farid, Tarek [Pediatric Department, Egyptian National Research Center (Egypt)

    2014-01-15

    Background and purpose: Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation (LBSL) is a recently identified autosomal recessive disorder with early onset of symptoms and slowly progressive pyramidal, cerebellar and dorsal column dysfunction. LBSL is characterized by distinct white matter abnormalities and selective involvement of brainstem and spinal cord tracts. The purpose of this study is to assess the imaging features of the involved white matter tracts in cases of LBSL by MRI. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging features of the selectively involved white matter tracts in sixteen genetically proven cases of leukoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and elevated brain lactate (LBSL). All patients presented with slowly progressive cerebellar sensory ataxia with spasticity and dorsal column dysfunction. MRI of the brain and spine using 1.5 T machine and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) on the abnormal white matter were done to all patients. The MRI and MRS data sets were analyzed according to lesion location, extent, distribution and signal pattern as well as metabolite values and ratios in MRS. Laboratory examinations ruled out classic leukodystrophies. Results: In all cases, MRI showed high signal intensity in T2-weighted and FLAIR images within the cerebral subcortical, periventricular and deep white matter, posterior limbs of internal capsules, centrum semiovale, medulla oblongata, intraparenchymal trajectory of trigeminal nerves and deep cerebellar white matter. In the spine, the signal intensity of the dorsal column and lateral cortico-spinal tracts were altered in all patients. The subcortical U fibers, globi pallidi, thalami, midbrain and transverse pontine fibers were spared in all cases. In 11 cases (68.8%), the signal changes were inhomogeneous and confluent whereas in 5 patients (31.2%), the signal abnormalities were spotty. MRI also showed variable

  3. Leukoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation (LBSL): Assessment of the involved white matter tracts by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, Hassan; Wafaie, Ahmed; Abdelfattah, Sherif; Farid, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Leukoencephalopathy with brain stem and spinal cord involvement and lactate elevation (LBSL) is a recently identified autosomal recessive disorder with early onset of symptoms and slowly progressive pyramidal, cerebellar and dorsal column dysfunction. LBSL is characterized by distinct white matter abnormalities and selective involvement of brainstem and spinal cord tracts. The purpose of this study is to assess the imaging features of the involved white matter tracts in cases of LBSL by MRI. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging features of the selectively involved white matter tracts in sixteen genetically proven cases of leukoencephalopathy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and elevated brain lactate (LBSL). All patients presented with slowly progressive cerebellar sensory ataxia with spasticity and dorsal column dysfunction. MRI of the brain and spine using 1.5 T machine and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) on the abnormal white matter were done to all patients. The MRI and MRS data sets were analyzed according to lesion location, extent, distribution and signal pattern as well as metabolite values and ratios in MRS. Laboratory examinations ruled out classic leukodystrophies. Results: In all cases, MRI showed high signal intensity in T2-weighted and FLAIR images within the cerebral subcortical, periventricular and deep white matter, posterior limbs of internal capsules, centrum semiovale, medulla oblongata, intraparenchymal trajectory of trigeminal nerves and deep cerebellar white matter. In the spine, the signal intensity of the dorsal column and lateral cortico-spinal tracts were altered in all patients. The subcortical U fibers, globi pallidi, thalami, midbrain and transverse pontine fibers were spared in all cases. In 11 cases (68.8%), the signal changes were inhomogeneous and confluent whereas in 5 patients (31.2%), the signal abnormalities were spotty. MRI also showed variable signal

  4. Upper urinary tract tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandrup, Karen L; Nordling, Jørgen; Balslev, Ingegerd

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computed tomography urography (CTU) is used widely in the work-up of patients with symptoms of urinary tract lesions. Preoperative knowledge of whether a tumor is invasive or non-invasive is important for the choice of surgery. So far there are no studies about the distinction...... of invasive and non-invasive tumors in ureter and renal pelvis based on the enhancement measured with Hounsfield Units. PURPOSE: To examine the value of CTU using split-bolus technique to distinguish non-invasive from invasive urothelial carcinomas in the upper urinary tract. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients...... obtained at CTU could distinguish between invasive and non-invasive lesions. No patients had a CTU within the last year before the examination that resulted in surgery. CONCLUSION: A split-bolus CTU cannot distinguish between invasive and non-invasive urothelial tumors in the upper urinary tract...

  5. The association between white-matter tract abnormalities, and neuropsychiatric and cognitive symptoms in retired professional football players with multiple concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multani, Namita; Goswami, Ruma; Khodadadi, Mozhgan; Ebraheem, Ahmed; Davis, Karen D; Tator, Charles H; Wennberg, Richard; Mikulis, David J; Ezerins, Leo; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela

    2016-07-01

    Retired professional athletes, who have suffered repetitive concussions, report symptoms of depression, anxiety, and memory impairment over time. Moreover, recent imaging data suggest chronic white-matter tract deterioration in sport-related concussion. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of repetitive concussions in retired professional football players on white-matter tracts, and relate these changes to neuropsychological function. All subjects (18 retired professional football players and 17 healthy controls) underwent imaging, neuropsychological assessment, and reported on concussion-related symptoms. Whole brain tract-based spatial statistics analysis revealed increased axial diffusivity in the right hemisphere of retired players in the (1) superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), (2) corticospinal tract, and (3) anterior thalamic radiations, suggesting chronic axonal degeneration in these tracts. Moreover, retired players report significantly higher neuropsychiatric and cognitive symptoms than healthy controls, and worsening of these symptoms since their last concussion. Loss of integrity in the right SLF significantly correlated with participants' visual learning ability. In sum, these results suggest that repetitive concussions in retired professional football players are associated with focal white-matter tract abnormalities that could explain some of the neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits experienced by these retired athletes.

  6. The myth of the 'unaffected' side after unilateral stroke: is reorganisation of the non-infarcted corticospinal system to re-establish balance the price for recovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziadio, S; Tomasevic, L; Assenza, G; Tecchio, F; Eyre, J A

    2012-12-01

    Bilateral changes in the hemispheric reorganisation have been observed chronically after unilateral stroke. Our hypotheses were that activity dependent competition between the lesioned and non-lesioned corticospinal systems would result in persisting asymmetry and be associated with poor recovery. Eleven subjects (medium 6.5 years after stroke) were compared to 9 age-matched controls. The power spectral density (PSD) of the sensorimotor electroencephalogram (SM1-EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) and corticomuscular coherence (CMC) were studied during rest and isometric contraction of right or left opponens pollicis (OP). Global recovery was assessed using NIH score. There was bilateral loss of beta frequency activity in the SM1-EEGs and OP-EMGs in strokes compared to controls. There was no difference between strokes and controls in symmetry indices estimated between the two corticospinal systems for SM1-EEG, OP-EMG and CMC. Performance correlated with preservation of beta frequency power in OP-EMG in both hands. Symmetry indices for the SM1-EEG, OP-EMG and CMC correlated with recovery. Significant changes occurred at both cortical and spinomuscular levels after stroke but to the same degree and in the same direction in both the lesioned and non-lesioned corticospinal systems. Global recovery correlated with the degree of symmetry between corticospinal systems at all three levels - cortical and spinomuscular levels and their connectivity (CMC), but not with the absolute degree of abnormality. Re-establishing balance between the corticospinal systems may be important for overall motor function, even if it is achieved at the expense of the non-lesioned system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ... topic for: Kids Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more Partner Message ...

  9. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ... topic for: Kids Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more About Us ...

  10. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an infection somewhere in your urinary tract. Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? ... bladder, your brain tells you it's time to find a bathroom. Once you're ready to pee, ...

  11. 500 Cities: Census Tract Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This census tract shapefile for the 500 Cities project was extracted from the Census 2010 Tiger/Line database and modified to remove portions of census tracts that...

  12. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is ...

  13. White-matter tract abnormalities and antisocial behavior: A systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging studies across development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Waller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisocial behavior (AB, including aggression, violence, and theft, is thought be underpinned by abnormal functioning in networks of the brain critical to emotion processing, behavioral control, and reward-related learning. To better understand the abnormal functioning of these networks, research has begun to investigate the structural connections between brain regions implicated in AB using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, which assesses white-matter tract microstructure. This systematic review integrates findings from 22 studies that examined the relationship between white-matter microstructure and AB across development. In contrast to a prior hypothesis that AB is associated with greater diffusivity specifically in the uncinate fasciculus, findings suggest that adult AB is associated with greater diffusivity across a range of white-matter tracts, including the uncinate fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, cingulum, corticospinal tract, thalamic radiations, and corpus callosum. The pattern of findings among youth studies was inconclusive with both higher and lower diffusivity found across association, commissural, and projection and thalamic tracts.

  14. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) ... How Do I Know if I Have a UTI? You may notice signs of a urinary tract ...

  15. Changes in corticospinal excitability during consolidation predict acute exercise-induced off-line gains in procedural memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostadan, Fatemeh; Centeno, Carla; Daloze, Jean-Felix

    2016-01-01

    A single bout of cardiovascular exercise performed immediately after practicing a motor task improves the long-term retention of the skill through an optimization of memory consolidation. However, the specific brain mechanisms underlying the effects of acute cardiovascular exercise on procedural...... exercise correlated with the magnitude of off-line gains in skill level assessed in a retention test performed 8h after motor practice. A single bout of exercise modulates short-term neuroplasticity mechanisms subserving consolidation processes that predict off-line gains in procedural memory....... memory are poorly understood. We sought to determine if a single bout of exercise modifies corticospinal excitability (CSE) during the early stages of memory consolidation. In addition, we investigated if changes in CSE are associated with exercise-induced off-line gains in procedural memory...

  16. Cognitive Demands during Quiet Standing Elicit Truncal Tremor in Two Frequency Bands: Differential Relations to Tissue Integrity of Corticospinal Tracts and Cortical Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith V Sullivan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to stand quietly is disturbed by degradation of cerebellar systems. Given the complexity of sensorimotor integration invoked to maintain upright posture, the integrity of supratentorial brain structures may also contribute to quiet standing and consequently be vulnerable to interference from cognitive challenges. As cerebellar system disruption is a common concomitant of alcoholism, we examined 46 alcoholics and 43 controls with a force platform to derive physiological indices of quiet standing during cognitive (solving simple, mental arithmetic problems and visual (eyes closed challenges. Also tested were relations between tremor velocity and regional gray matter and white matter tissue quality measured with the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI metric of mean diffusivity (MD, indexing disorganized microstructure. Spectral analysis of sway revealed greater tremor in alcoholic men than alcoholic women or controls. Cognitive dual-tasking elicited excessive tremor in two frequency bands, each related to DTI signs of degradation in separate brain systems: tremor velocity at a low power (2-5 Hz/0-2 Hz correlated with higher MD in the cerebellar hemispheres and superior cingulate bundles, whereas tremor velocity at a higher power (5-7 Hz correlated with higher MD in the motor cortex and internal capsule. These brain sites may represent tremorgenic networks that when disturbed by disease and exacerbated by cognitive dual-tasking contribute to postural instability, putting affected individuals at heightened risk for falling.

  17. Differential involvement of corticospinal tract (CST fibers in UMN-predominant ALS patients with or without CST hyperintensity: A diffusion tensor tractography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswaran Rajagopalan

    2017-01-01

    DTT revealed subcortical loss ('truncation' of virtual motor CST fibers (presumably projecting from the precentral gyrus (PrG in ALS patients but not in controls; in contrast, virtual fibers (presumably projecting to the adjacent postcentral gyrus (PoG were spared. No significant differences in virtual CST fiber length were observed between controls and ALS patients. However, the frequency of CST truncation was significantly higher in the ALS-CST+ subgroup (9 of 21 than in the ALS-CST− subgroup (4 of 24; p = 0.049, suggesting this finding could differentiate these ALS subgroups. Also, because virtual CST truncation occurred only in the ALS patient group and not in the control group (p = 0.018, this DTT finding could prove to be a diagnostic biomarker of ALS. Significantly shorter disease duration and faster disease progression rate were observed in ALS patients with CST fiber truncation than in those without (p  0.05 in any of the ROIs. In addition, comparing FA values between ALS patients with CST truncation and those without in the aforementioned four ROIs, revealed no significant differences in either hemisphere. However, visual evaluation of DTT was able to identify UMN degeneration in patients with ALS, particularly in those with a more aggressive clinical disease course and possibly different pathologic processes.

  18. Urinary Tract and How It Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VUR) The Urinary Tract & How It Works The Urinary Tract & How It Works On this page: What is ... a person produces? Clinical Trials What is the urinary tract and how does it work? The urinary tract ...

  19. The genitourinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currarino, G.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the field of pediatric uroradiology, as in most other aspects of radiology, since the last edition of this text was published in 1978. To a large extent, this progress was due to the remarkable advances in, and an increased application of, ultrasound, computed tomography, and nuclear imaging. In this section, an attempt has been made to incorporate and illustrate some of the applications of these diagnostic modalities to pediatric urology. The subjects discussed in this section include a brief account of the major radiologic procedures used in pediatric urology, followed by a review of the most common congenital and acquired diseases of the urinary tract and of the male and female genital tract, precocious puberty and intersex conditions, and disorders of the adrenal glands and related structures

  20. Radiology illustrated. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-01-01

    Radiology Illustrated: Gastrointestinal Tract is the second of two volumes designed to provide clear and practical guidance on the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. The book presents approximately 300 cases with 1500 carefully selected and categorized illustrations of gastrointestinal tract diseases, along with key text messages and tables that will help the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis., Essential points are summarized at the end of each text message to facilitate rapid review and learning. Additionally, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by case studies of both common and uncommon pathologies that illustrate the roles of the different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Radiology illustrated. Gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ihn (ed.) [Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-02-01

    Radiology Illustrated: Gastrointestinal Tract is the second of two volumes designed to provide clear and practical guidance on the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. The book presents approximately 300 cases with 1500 carefully selected and categorized illustrations of gastrointestinal tract diseases, along with key text messages and tables that will help the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis., Essential points are summarized at the end of each text message to facilitate rapid review and learning. Additionally, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by case studies of both common and uncommon pathologies that illustrate the roles of the different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Managing urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Saadeh, Sermin A.; Mattoo, Tej K.

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in childhood. Presence of pyuria and bacteriuria in an appropriately collected urine sample are diagnostic of UTI. The risk of UTI is increased with an underlying urological abnormality such as vesicoureteral reflux, constipation, and voiding dysfunction. Patients with acute pyelonephritis are at risk of renal scarring and subsequent complications such as hypertension, proteinuria with and without FSGS, pregnancy-related complications and even end-sta...

  3. Female genital tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.P.; Hunter, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with cancers of the cervix uteri, the corpus uteri, the ovary, vulva, and vagina. Radiotherapy has an important place in the management of patients with cancers of the genital tract but the radiotherapist must collaborate closely with surgical colleagues, both gynaecological and urological. Each must appreciate the merits and limitations of surgery and radiation therapy, whether used alone or in combination, with curative intent or in a supportive role

  4. Identification of the Occipito-Pontine Tract Using Diffusion-Tensor Fiber Tracking in Adult-Onset Adrenoleukodystrophy with Topographic Disorientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Uchida

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a severe and progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by the peroxisomal transporter ATP-binding cassette, subfamily D, member 1 gene mutations. The defect of this gene product results in accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids in organs and serum, central demyelination, and peripheral axonopathy. Although there are different magnetic resonance (MR findings which reflect various phenotypes in adrenoleukodystrophy, some cases present with specific symmetrical occipital white-matter lesions. We describe a patient with adult-onset X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy with topographic disorientation, whose brain MR images revealed T2-signal hyperintensity along the occipito-pontine tract and lateral lemnisci, but not in the cortico-spinal tract in the brainstem. The occipito-pontine tract and lateral lemnisci were clearly detected using diffusion-tensor fiber tracking, suggesting that the topographic disorientation of this patient might be related to the occipito-pontine tract. MR tractography can effectively identify the occipito-pontine tract and may help to localize the fibers associated with clinical symptoms.

  5. Progressive and widespread brain damage in ALS: MRI voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Joe; Kato, Shigenori; Kaga, Tomotsugu; Ito, Mizuki; Atsuta, Naoki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Naganawa, Shinji; Sobue, Gen

    2011-01-01

    We investigated 17 patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and voxel-based analysis of diffusion tensor images (DTI) at baseline and after a six-month follow-up. Compared with 17 healthy controls, ALS patients at baseline showed only minimal white matter volume decreases in the inferior frontal gyrus but marked decreases in the gray matter of several regions, especially in the bilateral paracentral lobule of the premotor cortex. DTI revealed reduced fractional anisotropy in the bilateral corticospinal tracts, insula, ventrolateral premotor cortex, and parietal cortex. Increased mean diffusivity was noted bilaterally in the motor cortex, ventrolateral premotor cortex, insula, hippocampal formation, and temporal gyrus. At the six-month follow-up, ALS patients showed widespread volume decreases in gray matter, and DTI abnormalities extended mainly into the bilateral frontal lobes, while volume changes in the white matter remained minimal but more distinct. Our combined VBM and DTI techniques revealed extra-corticospinal tract neuronal degeneration mainly in the frontotemporal lobe of ALS patients. In particular, follow-up examinations in these patients showed that whole-brain DTI changes occurred predominantly in the regions of brain atrophy. These objective analyses can be used to assess the disease condition of the ALS brain.

  6. Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging-Based Assessment of Tract Alterations: An Application to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobri Baldaranov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a technical biomarker for cerebral microstructural alterations in neurodegenerative diseases is under investigation. In this study, a framework for the longitudinal analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI-based mapping was applied to the assessment of predefined white matter tracts in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, as an example for a rapid progressive neurodegenerative disease.Methods: DTI was performed every 3 months in six patients with ALS (mean (M = 7.7; range 3 to 15 scans and in six controls (M = 3; range 2–5 scans with the identical scanning protocol, resulting in a total of 65 longitudinal DTI datasets. Fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, axonal diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD, and the ratio AD/RD were studied to analyze alterations within the corticospinal tract (CST which is a prominently affected tract structure in ALS and the tract correlating with Braak’s neuropathological stage 1. A correlation analysis was performed between progression rates based on DTI metrics and the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALS-FRS-R.Results: Patients with ALS showed an FA and AD/RD decline along the CST, while DTI metrics of controls did not change in longitudinal DTI scans. The FA and AD/RD decrease progression correlated significantly with ALS-FRS-R decrease progression.Conclusion: On the basis of the longitudinal assessment, DTI-based metrics can be considered as a possible noninvasive follow-up marker for disease progression in neurodegeneration. This finding was demonstrated here for ALS as a fast progressing neurodegenerative disease.

  7. Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging-Based Assessment of Tract Alterations: An Application to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldaranov, Dobri; Khomenko, Andrei; Kobor, Ines; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Gorges, Martin; Kassubek, Jan; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective : The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a technical biomarker for cerebral microstructural alterations in neurodegenerative diseases is under investigation. In this study, a framework for the longitudinal analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based mapping was applied to the assessment of predefined white matter tracts in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), as an example for a rapid progressive neurodegenerative disease. Methods : DTI was performed every 3 months in six patients with ALS (mean (M) = 7.7; range 3 to 15 scans) and in six controls ( M = 3; range 2-5 scans) with the identical scanning protocol, resulting in a total of 65 longitudinal DTI datasets. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axonal diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and the ratio AD/RD were studied to analyze alterations within the corticospinal tract (CST) which is a prominently affected tract structure in ALS and the tract correlating with Braak's neuropathological stage 1. A correlation analysis was performed between progression rates based on DTI metrics and the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALS-FRS-R). Results : Patients with ALS showed an FA and AD/RD decline along the CST, while DTI metrics of controls did not change in longitudinal DTI scans. The FA and AD/RD decrease progression correlated significantly with ALS-FRS-R decrease progression. Conclusion : On the basis of the longitudinal assessment, DTI-based metrics can be considered as a possible noninvasive follow-up marker for disease progression in neurodegeneration. This finding was demonstrated here for ALS as a fast progressing neurodegenerative disease.

  8. The role of imaging in adult acute urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, J.A.W.

    1997-01-01

    Imaging is required in only a minority of patients with urinary tract infection. Some patients who present with severe loin pain are imaged because ureteric colic is suspected. If urinary tract infection does not respond normally to antibiotics, imaging is undertaken to check for evidence of renal obstuction or sepsis. Finally, after the acute infection has been treated, imaging is required in some patients to check for factors pre-disposing to renal damage or to relapsing or recurrent infection. This review discusses the appropriate choice of imaging technique to use in each clinical situation and summarises the expected findings. (orig.). With 15 figs., 1 tab

  9. CDBG Activity Funding by Tract

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — All CDBG activities in the categories of acquisition, economic development, housing, public improvements, public services, and other summarized by Census Tract.

  10. Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion detected by MRI; The relationship between Wallerian degeneration at the center of the cerebral peduncle and functional recovery of paresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waragai, Masaaki; Iwabuchi, Sadamu (Nanasawa Rehabilitation Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    We studied Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion by MRI. A total of 57 patients with palsy following a supratenotorial cerebrovascular lesion were prospectively studied. Wallerian degeneration was detected as a high signal intensity (HSI) in 37 patients between 70 days and 100 days after the onset, but not detected in the remaining 27 patients. Patient with as HSI in all areas of the cerebral peduncle had a large lesion involving the hemisphere. Patient with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion confined to the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. Patient with an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion of parietal lobe or temporal lobe which spares the corticospinal tract originating from the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. These findings suggest that as HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle may reveal Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract, and an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle may show Wallerian degeneration of the corticopontine tract. The functional recovery of paresis was poor in all patients with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle, while it was good in all patients without an HSI in that region. Our data suggested that somatotopical localization of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle may be identified by detecting Wallerian degeneration following a supratentorial lesion, and the functional recovery of patients with paresis could be predicted according to presence or absence of Wallerian degeneration at the center of the cerebral peduncle. (author).

  11. Urinary tract trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.E. (Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-09-01

    From a practical point of view, a woman who has blunt injury to the pelvic area with hematuria from the lower urinary tract, has a contused or ruptured bladder. In a man, such a situation calls for retrograde urethrography to determine if the injury is in the urethra or the bladder because the two organs are investigated differently. In both sexes, such injuries are usually associated with pelvic fractures. Massive bladder displacement and severe hemorrhage should alert one to the need for pelvic angiography to find and embolize the bleeding site within the first 24 hours after injury. For blunt trauma to the upper urinary tract an intravenous urogram with tomography is still the main examination. However, a normal intravenous urogram does not exclude serious injury. Therefore, if signs or symptoms persist, a computerized tomographic (CT) examination should be performed if available. Otherwise, a radionuclide study is advisable. Non-excretion on intravenous urography with tomography calls for selective renal arteriography to delineate the etiology. There can be serious renal trauma in the absence of hematuria, which may occur with renal pedicle injury or avulsion of the ureter. Minor forniceal ruptures may occasionally mask severe posterior renal lacerations.

  12. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  13. Reconstruction of white matter fibre tracts using diffusion kurtosis tensor imaging at 1.5T: Pre-surgical planning in patients with gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leote, Joao; Nunes, Rita G; Cerqueira, Luis; Loução, Ricardo; Ferreira, Hugo A

    2018-01-01

    Tractography studies for pre-surgical planning of primary brain tumors is typically done using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which cannot resolve crossing, kissing or highly angulated fibres. Tractography based on the estimation of the diffusion kurtosis (DK) tensor was recently demonstrated to enable tackling these limitations. However, its use in the clinical context at low 1.5T field has not yet been reported. To evaluate if the estimation of whole-brain tractography using the DK tensor is feasible for pre-surgical investigation of patients with brain tumors at 1.5T. Eight healthy subjects and 3 patients with brain tumors were scanned at 1.5T using a 12-channel head coil. Diffusion-weighted images were acquired with repetition/echo times of 5800/107 ms, 82 × 82 resolution, 3 × 3 × 3 mm 3 voxel size, b-values of 0, 1000, 2000 s/mm 2 and 64 gradient sensitising directions. Whole-brain tractography was estimated using the DK tensor and corticospinal tracts (CST) were isolated using regions-of-interest placed at the cerebral peduncles and motor gyrus. Tract size, DK metrics and CST deviation index (highest curvature point) were compared between healthy subjects and patients. Tract sizes did not differ between groups. The CST deviation index was significantly higher in patients compared to healthy subjects. Fractional anisotropy was significantly lower in patients, with higher mean kurtosis asymmetry index at the highest curvature point in patients. Corticospinal fibre bundles estimated using DK tensor in a 1.5T scanner presented similar properties in patients with brain gliomas as those reported in the literature using DTI-based tractography.

  14. The pulse duration of electrical stimulation influences H-reflexes but not corticospinal excitability for tibialis anterior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Alyssa R; Lou, Jenny W H; Collins, David F

    2014-10-01

    The afferent volley generated by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) influences corticospinal (CS) excitability and frequent NMES sessions can strengthen CS pathways, resulting in long-term improvements in function. This afferent volley can be altered by manipulating NMES parameters. Presently, we manipulated one such parameter, pulse duration, during NMES over the common peroneal nerve and assessed the influence on H-reflexes and CS excitability. We hypothesized that compared with shorter pulse durations, longer pulses would (i) shift the H-reflex recruitment curve to the left, relative to the M-wave curve; and (ii) increase CS excitability more. Using 3 pulse durations (50, 200, 1000 μs), M-wave and H-reflex recruitment curves were collected and, in separate experiments, CS excitability was assessed by comparing motor evoked potentials elicited before and after 30 min of NMES. Despite finding a leftward shift in the H-reflex recruitment curve when using the 1000 μs pulse duration, consistent with a larger afferent volley for a given efferent volley, the increases in CS excitability were not influenced by pulse duration. Hence, although manipulating pulse duration can alter the relative recruitment of afferents and efferents in the common peroneal nerve, under the present experimental conditions it is ineffective for maximizing CS excitability for rehabilitation.

  15. The effect of music on corticospinal excitability is related to the perceived emotion: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Fabio; Banfi, Chiara; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Fiori, Elisa; Innocenti, Iglis; Rossi, Simone; Zaccara, Gaetano; Viggiano, Maria Pia; Cincotta, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and neuroimaging studies suggest a functional link between the emotion-related brain areas and the motor system. It is not well understood, however, whether the motor cortex activity is modulated by specific emotions experienced during music listening. In 23 healthy volunteers, we recorded the motor evoked potentials (MEP) following TMS to investigate the corticospinal excitability while subjects listened to music pieces evoking different emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, and displeasure), an emotionally neutral piece, and a control stimulus (musical scale). Quality and intensity of emotions were previously rated in an additional group of 30 healthy subjects. Fear-related music significantly increased the MEP size compared to the neutral piece and the control stimulus. This effect was not seen with music inducing other emotional experiences and was not related to changes in autonomic variables (respiration rate, heart rate). Current data indicate that also in a musical context, the excitability of the corticomotoneuronal system is related to the emotion expressed by the listened piece. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Corticospinal activation of internal oblique muscles has a strong ipsilateral component and can be lateralised in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutton, Paul H; Beith, Iain D; Theodorou, Sophie; Catley, Maria; McGregor, Alison H; Davey, Nick J

    2004-10-01

    Trunk muscles receive corticospinal innervation ipsilaterally and contralaterally and here we investigate the degree of ipsilateral innervation and any cortical asymmetry in pairs of trunk muscles and proximal and distal limb muscles. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied to left and right motor cortices in turn and bilateral electromyographic (EMG) recordings were made from internal oblique (IO; lower abdominal), deltoid (D; shoulder) and first dorsal interosseus (1DI; hand) muscles during voluntary contraction in ten healthy subjects. We used a 7-cm figure-of-eight stimulating coil located 2 cm lateral and 2 cm anterior to the vertex over either cortex. Incidence of ipsilateral motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was 85% in IO, 40% in D and 35% in 1DI. Mean (+/- S.E.M.) ipsilateral MEP latencies were longer ( Pmuscle (IO: n=16; D: n=8; 1DI: n=7 ratios). Mean values for these ratios were 0.70+/-0.20 (IO), 0.14+/-0.05 (D) and 0.08+/-0.02 (1DI), revealing stronger ipsilateral drive to IO. Comparisons of the sizes of these ratios revealed a bias towards one cortex or the other (four subjects right; three subjects left). The predominant cortex showed a mean ratio of 1.21+/-0.38 compared with 0.26+/-0.06 in the other cortex ( Pmuscles and also shows hemispheric asymmetry.

  17. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys two ureters (say: ... Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more ... & Terms of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web ...

  18. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? ...

  19. Intestinal tract diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    Roentgenoanatomy and physiology of the small intestine are described. Indications for radiological examinations and their possibilities in the diagnosis of the small intestine diseases are considered.Congenital anomalies and failures in the small intestine development, clinical indications and diagnosis methods for the detection of different aetiology enteritis are described. Characteristics of primary malabsorption due to congenital or acquired inferiority of the small intestine, is provided. Radiological picture of intestinal allergies is described. Clinical, morphological, radiological pictures of Crohn's disease are considered in detail. Special attention is paid to the frequency of primary and secondary tuberculosis of intestinal tract. The description of clinical indications and frequency of benign and malignant tumours of the small intestine, methods for their diagnosis are given. Radiological pictures of parasitogenic and rare diseases of the small intestine are presented. Changes in the small intestine as a result of its reaction to pathological processes, developing in other organs and systems of the organism, are described

  20. The urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornbury, J.R.; Weiss, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Introduction of new methods and enhancement of traditional radiologic methods have greatly influenced the use of imaging to diagnose and treat patients who have urinary tract disease. In the past, plain films of the abdomen and excretory urography were the starting point in the diagnostic imaging process. Today, either computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography may be requested initially. Choosing the appropriate method has become more complex because of the variety that confronts the physician. If physicians think critically about the selection of patients before requesting an imaging examination, they can improve their use of such examinations. First, the physician must hypothesize a differential diagnosis. Particularly important is the action of linking the use of the diagnostic test to the choice of treatment. The following paragraphs present the most frequently used (or most useful) examinations for the specific diagnostic problem situations that are discussed subsequently

  1. Tract-specific analysis of white matter pathways in healthy subjects: a pilot study using diffusion tensor MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasmin, Hasina; Abe, Osamu; Nakata, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Naoto; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Goto, Masami; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    To date, very scant data is available regarding normal diffusion properties of white matter (WM) fibers. The present study aimed to initiate the establishment of a database of normal diffusion tensor metrics of cerebral WM fibers, including the uncinate fasciculus (UF), posterior cingulum (PC), fornix, and corticospinal tract (CST) for healthy adults using tract-specific analysis by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). We also attempted to clarify whether age and laterality exerted any effects on this study group. DTT of WM fibers were generated for 100 healthy subjects, then mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of the tracts were measured. Pearson correlation analysis was used to evaluate age relationships. Paired t testing was used to compare hemispheric asymmetry. Interobserver correlation tests were also performed. Our results showed FA values for UF (right, 0.42 {+-} 0.03; left, 0.40{+-}0.03), PC (0.51 {+-} 0.06, 0.52 {+-} 0.06), fornix (0.37 {+-} 0.06, 0.38 {+-} 0.06), CST (0.70 {+-} 0.06, 0.69 {+-} 0.07), and MD values for UF (0.81 {+-} 0.03, 0.82 {+-} 0.04), PC (0.72 {+-} 0.03, 0.72 {+-} 0.04), fornix (1.86 {+-} 0.32, 1.94 {+-} 0.37), and CST (0.72 {+-} 0.03, 0.74 {+-} 0.04). We identified a significant positive correlation between age and MD in the right UF and bilateral fornices, and a negative correlation between age and FA in bilateral fornices. Hemispheric asymmetry was observed in FA of UF (right > left) and MD of CST (left > right). The results constitute a normative dataset for diffusion parameters of four WM tracts that can be used to identify, characterize, and establish the significance of changes in diseases affecting specific tracts. (orig.)

  2. Urinary tract infections in children: EAU/ESPU guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Raimund; Dogan, Hasan S; Hoebeke, Piet; Kočvara, Radim; Nijman, Rien J M; Radmayr, Christian; Tekgül, Serdar

    2015-03-01

    In 30% of children with urinary tract anomalies, urinary tract infection (UTI) can be the first sign. Failure to identify patients at risk can result in damage to the upper urinary tract. To provide recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children presenting with UTI. The recommendations were developed after a review of the literature and a search of PubMed and Embase. A consensus decision was adopted when evidence was low. UTIs are classified according to site, episode, symptoms, and complicating factors. For acute treatment, site and severity are the most important. Urine sampling by suprapubic aspiration or catheterisation has a low contamination rate and confirms UTI. Using a plastic bag to collect urine, a UTI can only be excluded if the dipstick is negative for both leukocyte esterase and nitrite or microscopic analysis is negative for both pyuria and bacteriuria. A clean voided midstream urine sample after cleaning the external genitalia has good diagnostic accuracy in toilet-trained children. In children with febrile UTI, antibiotic treatment should be initiated as soon as possible to eradicate infection, prevent bacteraemia, improve outcome, and reduce the likelihood of renal involvement. Ultrasound of the urinary tract is advised to exclude obstructive uropathy. Depending on sex, age, and clinical presentation, vesicoureteral reflux should be excluded. Antibacterial prophylaxis is beneficial. In toilet-trained children, bladder and bowel dysfunction needs to be excluded. The level of evidence is high for the diagnosis of UTI and treatment in children but not for imaging to identify patients at risk for upper urinary tract damage. In these guidelines, we looked at the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children with urinary tract infection. There are strong recommendations on diagnosis and treatment; we also advise exclusion of obstructive uropathy within 24h and later vesicoureteral reflux, if indicated. Copyright © 2014 European

  3. RENAL DAMAGE WITH MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Kolina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between renal damage and malignant neoplasms is one of the most actual problems of the medicine of internal diseases. Very often, exactly availability of renal damage determines the forecast of cancer patients. The range of renal pathologies associated with tumors is unusually wide: from the mechanical effect of the tumor or metastases on the kidneys and/or the urinary tract and paraneoplastic manifestations in the form of nephritis or amyloidosis to nephropathies induced with drugs or tumor lysis, etc. Thrombotic complications that develop as a result of exposure to tumor effects, side effects of certain drugs or irradiation also play an important role in the development of the kidney damage. The most frequent variants of renal damage observed in the practice of medical internists (therapists, urologists, surgeons, etc., as well as methods of diagnosis and treatment approaches are described in the article. Timely and successful prevention and treatment of tumor-associated nephropathies give hope for retaining renal functions, therefore, a higher life standard after completion of anti-tumor therapy. Even a shortterm episode of acute renal damage suffered by a cancer patient must be accompanied with relevant examination and treatment. In the caseof transformation of acute renal damage into the chronic kidney disease, such patients need systematic and weighted renoprotective therapy and correct dosing of nephrotoxic drugs.

  4. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  5. Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotter, R.; Riccabona, M.

    2005-01-01

    Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract as well as vesicoureteral reflux involved in the disease complex of urinary tract infection/permanent renal parenchymal damage can be considered predisposing or risk factors. Two main forms can be distinguished, i.e., unstable bladder and dysfunctional voiding, while transitional forms between the two exist. Functional disorders of the lower urinary tract obstruct spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux. They are found in about 50% of cases in all children with urinary tract infection and are associated with an increased risk of developing renal parenchymal scars. They are observed during the newborn period up to school age. In the first few months of life, particularly boys with bilateral high-grade reflux and congenital renal parenchymal damage are affected. At later ages girls are also affected, but in this age group bladder instability predominates. Incontinence as the leading clinical symptom appears in approximately 70% of all cases and is closely correlated with chronic constipation. Imaging procedures in addition to urodynamic methods are of decisive importance for diagnosis and treatment, but noninvasive approaches such as sonography should be given preference. (orig.) [de

  6. Obstetrical outcome in women with urinary tract infections in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebäck, Carin; Hansson, Sverker; Martinell, Jeanette; Milsom, Ian; Sandberg, Torsten; Jodal, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) during childhood can result in permanent renal damage, with possible implications for future pregnancies. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate pregnancy outcomes in women followed after their first UTI in childhood. A cohort of 72 parous women was followed from their first UTI in childhood up to a median age of 41 years. Clinical data were obtained from antenatal and hospital records. Renal damage was evaluated by a (99m) Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scan. Pregnancy blood pressure (BP), complications and UTIs were compared between women with and without renal damage. All women completed the investigations, 48 with and 24 without renal damage. No woman, irrespective of presence or absence of renal damage, was diagnosed with hypertension before the first pregnancy. Pregnancy-related hypertension was diagnosed in 10 of 151 pregnancies, all in women with renal damage. Preeclampsia occurred in four women. Women with renal damage had significantly higher systolic BP measured at the last antenatal visit of their first pregnancy, compared with women without renal damage (p = 0.005). During subsequent pregnancies both systolic and diastolic BP were significantly higher in women with than without renal damage (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). In this population-based follow-up study we found a large proportion of women with renal damage after UTI in childhood. Women with renal damage had significantly higher BP during pregnancy compared with women without renal damage. Pregnancy-related hypertension was recorded only in women with renal damage. However, pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia, were few. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broseta Rico, Enrique; Jiménez Cruz, Juan Fernando

    2002-11-01

    To review the topic of urinary tract infections (UTI) during pregnancy and menopause. UTI during pregnancy and menopause have great relevance in the field of urologic infections; during pregnancy because of the particularities involved in its diagnosis and treatment and potential consequences to the fetus and mother; menopausal UTI because this group of women is numerous and represents a growing section of the general population pyramid, due to the aging of population in developed countries associated with longer life expectancies and grater demand for quality of life. We performed a bibliographic review combined with our personal experience. During pregnancy there are several functional and anatomical changes that condition not only a higher risk of UTI, but also an additional treatment difficulty due to antimicrobial pharmacokinetics alterations and potential damage to the fetus. Despite efforts to find an easy, fast and reliable test for bacteriuria detection, urine culture continues to be the first diagnostic test for its detection and follow up during pregnancy. Penicillin derivates and cephalosporins continue to be the first choice because their lack of adverse effects on either fetus or mother. Alternative options like phosphomicin and aztreonam although they show low toxicity there is need for more studies supporting their suitability for the treatment of pregnancy UTIs. Menopausal female UTI have their different features from those in younger women. Hormonal alterations derived from gonadal atrophy associate functional changes in the vaginal ecosystem, making it prone to enterobacteriaceae colonization as a first step up to the urinary tract. This associated with genitourinary tract anatomical alterations inherent t aging make UTI extraordinary prevalent in this growing segment of population. Treatment lines focus on hormonal alteration correction and proper antimicrobial prophylaxis and vaccines in a close future. UTIs during pregnancy and menopause have

  8. Effects of radiation on the human gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.M.; Collins, J.T.; Donowitz, M.; Farman, J.; Sheahan, D.G.; Spiro, H.M.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation therapy directed at the abdomen may damage the digestive tract, the type and extent of injury depending on the dose of the radiation and the radiation sensitivity of the gut. Characteristic early changes are manifest in the mucosa of the gut: for later ulceration, changes in the collagen tissues and particularly in the vascular channels occur. This paper describes and characterizes injuries to the esophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon. It emphasizes the importance of recognizing radiation-induced damage to the gut which may occur early or late after radiation

  9. Tort Damages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.T. Visscher (Louis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: In this Chapter, I provide an overview of Law and Economics literature regarding tort damages. Where necessary, attention is also spent to rules of tort liability. Both types of rules provide behavioral incentives to both injurers and victims, with respect to their level of

  10. TRP channel functions in the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoyun; Yu, Mingran; Liu, Yingzhe; Yu, Shaoyong

    2016-05-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are predominantly distributed in both somatic and visceral sensory nervous systems and play a crucial role in sensory transduction. As the largest visceral organ system, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract frequently accommodates external inputs, which stimulate sensory nerves to initiate and coordinate sensory and motor functions in order to digest and absorb nutrients. Meanwhile, the sensory nerves in the GI tract are also able to detect potential tissue damage by responding to noxious irritants. This nocifensive function is mediated through specific ion channels and receptors expressed in a subpopulation of spinal and vagal afferent nerve called nociceptor. In the last 18 years, our understanding of TRP channel expression and function in GI sensory nervous system has been continuously improved. In this review, we focus on the expressions and functions of TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8 in primary extrinsic afferent nerves innervated in the esophagus, stomach, intestine, and colon and briefly discuss their potential roles in relevant GI disorders.

  11. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... urinary tract infection, or UTI, you're probably thinking about peeing quite a lot. Why? Because it ... you have a bladder infection, your doctor will order some medicine for you to take to kill ...

  12. URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN ADULTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Infection of the urinary tract (UTI) is frequently encountered in clinical practice — in the USA these ... Asymptomatic UTI is identified when organisms can be isolated in appropriate numbers .... Pregnancy ... men, so pre-treatment urine culture is.

  13. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Illnesses & Injuries Relax & Unwind People, Places & Things That Help Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for ... ll never want to have one again! To help keep those bacteria out of your urinary tract, ...

  14. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract Troubles Girls are more likely than boys to get a UTI. That's because their urethras are much shorter than boys' urethras. The shorter urethra means bacteria can get ...

  15. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... when you do, phew! Your pee smells bad. These things happen because bacteria have caused an infection ... tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys two ureters (say: YUR- ...

  16. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Ahhh! That feels better. Urinary Tract Troubles Girls are more likely than boys to get a ... away properly, they stay on your skin. In girls, this means they can grow near the opening ...

  17. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & ... KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary ...

  18. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

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    Full Text Available ... five to six times a day but never think twice about? Answer: Pee! But if you have ... urinary tract infection, or UTI, you're probably thinking about peeing quite a lot. Why? Because it ...

  19. Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Taskesen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI are frequent conditions in children. Untreated urinary tract infections can lead to serious kidney problems that could threaten the life of the child. Therefore, early detection and treatment of urinary tract infection is important. In older children, urinary tract infections may cause obvious symptoms such as stomach ache and disuria. In infants and young children, UTIs may be harder to detect because of less specific symptoms. Recurrences are common in children with urinary abnormalities such as neurogenic bladder, vesicourethral reflux or those with very poor toilet and hygiene habits. This article reviews the diagnostic approach and presents the current data related to the roles of radiologic imaging, surgical correction and antibiotic prophylaxis of UTIs in children. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(2.000: 57-69

  20. Urinary tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedberry-Ross, Sherry; Pohl, Hans G

    2008-03-01

    Urinary tract infections can be a significant source of morbidity in the pediatric population. The mainstay of evaluating urinary tract infections in children has been physical examination, urinalysis and culture, and renal and bladder sonography and contrast cystography. However, novel clinical paradigms now consider the importance of various risk factors, such as bacterial virulence and antibiotic-resistance patterns, elimination disorders, and the role of innate immunity and inflammation in determining the likelihood of renal cortical scarring.

  1. [Urinary tract infections in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michno, Mikolaj; Sydor, Antoni

    Review of urinary tract infections in adults including etiology, pathogenesis, classification and the most important therapeutic recommendations. Urinary tract infections are still a common clinical problem occurring more often in sexually active women, pregnancy, elderly , after catherization of a urinary bladder and urological surgery as well as in the co-existence of diabetes or nephrolithiasis. Due to the anatomical differences, women suffer more often than men. The main etiological factor is Escherichia coli, even though it plays a lesser role in the complicated infections, than in non-complicated ones. Apart from that, the infections may also be caused by atypical microbes, viruses and fungi. Relapses as well as reinfections are typical features of urinary tract infections and in some cases prolonged infections can spread from lower to upper urinary tract contributing to pyelonephritis, urosepsis or even death. These long-term infections can progress in a hidden, insidious, oligosymptomatic or asymptomatic manner leading to irreversible, progressive deterioration of renal function. They can also mask other diseases such as tuberculosis or neoplasms of the urinary tract, which leads to the delayed diagnosis and treatment. Diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections is a complex problem, often requiring specialized procedures as well as hospitalization. The choice of a therapy is determined by the type of infection, general condition, age and coexisting diseases. Rapid diagnosis and implementation of proper pharmacotherapy may shorten the time of treatment and hospitalization, preventing serious complications and reinfections.

  2. Image Registration to Compensate for EPI Distortion in Patients with Brain Tumors: An Evaluation of Tract-Specific Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albi, Angela; Meola, Antonio; Zhang, Fan; Kahali, Pegah; Rigolo, Laura; Tax, Chantal M W; Ciris, Pelin Aksit; Essayed, Walid I; Unadkat, Prashin; Norton, Isaiah; Rathi, Yogesh; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Golby, Alexandra J; O'Donnell, Lauren J

    2018-03-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) provides preoperative maps of neurosurgical patients' white matter tracts, but these maps suffer from echo-planar imaging (EPI) distortions caused by magnetic field inhomogeneities. In clinical neurosurgical planning, these distortions are generally not corrected and thus contribute to the uncertainty of fiber tracking. Multiple image processing pipelines have been proposed for image-registration-based EPI distortion correction in healthy subjects. In this article, we perform the first comparison of such pipelines in neurosurgical patient data. Five pipelines were tested in a retrospective clinical dMRI dataset of 9 patients with brain tumors. Pipelines differed in the choice of fixed and moving images and the similarity metric for image registration. Distortions were measured in two important tracts for neurosurgery, the arcuate fasciculus and corticospinal tracts. Significant differences in distortion estimates were found across processing pipelines. The most successful pipeline used dMRI baseline and T2-weighted images as inputs for distortion correction. This pipeline gave the most consistent distortion estimates across image resolutions and brain hemispheres. Quantitative results of mean tract distortions on the order of 1-2 mm are in line with other recent studies, supporting the potential need for distortion correction in neurosurgical planning. Novel results include significantly higher distortion estimates in the tumor hemisphere and greater effect of image resolution choice on results in the tumor hemisphere. Overall, this study demonstrates possible pitfalls and indicates that care should be taken when implementing EPI distortion correction in clinical settings. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  3. Survey of risk factors urinary tract infection

    OpenAIRE

    A Dehghani; M zahedi; M moezzi; M dafei; H Falahzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Women are very susceptible to urinary tract infections and pregnancy raises the risk of urinary tract infection. In general, little information on the risk factors of urinary tract infection in pregnancy is underway. Urinary tract infection in pregnancy is an important risk factor for pregnancy dire consequences. The purpose of this study is to find risk factors associated with urinary tract infection in pregnant women. Methods: The study was observational and retrospective ...

  4. Pattern of Corticospinal Projections Defined by Brain Mapping During Resective Epilepsy Surgery in a Patient with Congenital Hemiparesis and Intractable Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen-Ya; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Chen, Chien; Chiu, Jan-Wei; Chou, Chen-Liang; Yang, Tsui-Fen

    2017-11-01

    Congenital or early-onset brain structural lesions often cause contralateral hemiparesis, cognitive deficits, developmental delays, and seizures. Seizure is the most debilitating condition, as it greatly impairs quality of life in both the affected individuals and their caregivers and prevents them from active social participation. A 34-year-old man with hemiparesis and early-onset seizures since childhood owing to a congenital brain lesion developed intractable seizures in the last 2 years and was subsequently admitted for resective epileptic surgery. During the operation, we employed an innovative intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring technique. In contrast to routine application for transcranial stimulation, we recorded compound muscle action potentials over the bilateral limb muscles simultaneously, instead of over the contralateral muscles only, to determine the patterns of the corticospinal projections. Transcranial stimulation over the bilateral hemispheres was applied before craniotomy, and direct cortical stimulation over the lesioned hemisphere was applied after craniotomy. By integrating both approaches, we could first identify the pattern of corticospinal projections before craniotomy and then accurately define the noneloquent area, which guided the resection to successfully accomplish the surgical goal. This technique is simple because no patient participation is required. We believe that it has the potential to replace conventional preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation in resective epilepsy surgery, particularly for young patients. Not only can it improve the safety of surgical procedures, but also it can help predict functional outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of the lower urinary tract and its functional disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A normal development of lower urinary tract function control evolves from involuntary bladder empting (incontinence during infancy to daytime urinary continence, and finally a successful day and night continence that is generally achieved by the 5th to 7th year of age. This gradual process primarily depends on the progressive maturation of the neural control of the lower urinary tract, but it is also influenced by behavioral training that evolves through social support. Functional voiding disorders (bladder dysfunction are common problems during childhood. They are present in 5-15 % of general pediatric population, and in one-fifth of school-age children or in over one-third of patients of the pediatric urologist or nephrologist. More than half of children with bladder dysfunction have vesicoureteral reflux, and more than two-thirds have recurrent urinary tract infections. There is also a frequent association of bladder dysfunction with constipation and encopresis (dysfunctional elimination syndrome. Bladder dysfunction may cause a permanent damage to the upper urinary tract and kidneys. In addition, urinary incontinence, as the most common manifestation of bladder dysfunction can be the cause of major stress in schoolage children and have a negative effect on the child’s feeling of self-esteem. Thus, a timely detection and treatment of this group of disorders in children is highly significant.

  6. Respiratory tract infection during Hajj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzeer Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infection during Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca is a common illness, and it is responsible for most of the hospital admissions. Influenza virus is the leading cause of upper respiratory tract infection during Hajj, and pneumonia can be serious. Taking into account the close contacts among the pilgrims, as well as the crowding, the potential for transmission of M. tuberculosis is expected to be high. These pilgrims can be a source for spreading infection on their return home. Although vaccination program for influenza is implemented, its efficacy is uncertain in this religious season. Future studies should concentrate on prevention and mitigation of these infections.

  7. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  8. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  9. GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT OF CLARIAS GARIEPINUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    one hundred and ninety nine (199) were infested fish samples from gills and gastrointestinal tract .... Body cavity of fish were dissected using a pair of scissors and different portion of the gut (Oesophagus, stomach, intestine and rectum) were isolated and kept in .... Arme, C. and Wakey, M. (1970): The physiology of fishes.

  10. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, A; Levancini, M

    2001-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are very common during pregnancy. Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen isolated from pregnant women. Ampicillin should not be used because of its high resistance to Escherichia coli. Pyelonephritis can cause morbidity and can be life-threatening to both mother and fetus. Second and third-generation cephalosporins are recommended for treatment, administered initially intravenously during hospitalization. Cultures and the study of virulence factors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli are recommended for the adequate management of pyelonephritis. The lower genital tract infection associated with pyelonephritis is responsible for the failure of antibiotic treatment. Asymptomatic bacteriuria can evolve into cystitis or pyelonephritis. All pregnant women should be routinely screened for bacteriuria using urine culture, and should be treated with nitrofurantoin, sulfixosazole or first-generation cephalosporins. Recurrent urinary infection should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics. Pregnant women who develop urinary tract infections with group B streptococcal infection should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics during labour to prevent neonatal sepsis. Preterm delivery is frequent. Evidence suggests that infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of preterm labour. Experimental models in pregnant mice support the theory that Escherichia coli propagated by the transplacental route, involving bacterial adhesins, induces preterm delivery, but this has not been demonstrated in humans. Ascending lower genital tract infections are the most probable cause of preterm delivery, but this remains to be proved.

  11. Urinary tract infections in women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections in women, with ... Acute cystitis refers to symptomatic infection of the bladder in the lower ... lungs in a patient with pneumonia.4. Risk factors ... use of antimicrobial agents for community-acquired UTIs has resulted in the emergence of antimicrobial resistance.

  12. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For ... Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  13. Imaging of the Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... day urinary urgency—the inability to delay urination urinary incontinence—the accidental loss of urine blockage of urine ... can use several different imaging techniques depending on factors such as the ... urinary tract symptoms. Conventional Radiology X-ray machines have ...

  14. Gas in the urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, F.J.; Peka, J. de la; Perez, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Sahagun, E.

    1996-01-01

    The causes of gas in the urinary tract and the radiologic procedures employed to detect it are reviewed. The value of each in determining the diagnosis and extension of the pathological process is discussed. The characteristic images of this disorder as represented by the different techniques, are presented. (Author) 18 refs,

  15. Treatment ofurinary tract infection inchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Zwolińska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection is the most frequent bacterial infection in children. Its prevalence in the population younger than 14 years of age has been estimated at 5–10%. Its high recurrence, especially in patients with risk factors, poses a significant problem. The risk factors most common in the group of children ≤3 years are congenital defects blocking the flow of urine to the bladder, whereas in older children they most typically include a tendency for constipation and dysfunction of the lower urinary tract. The clinical picture is variable and depends on the child’s age, immunity status, pathogen virulence and localisation of infection. The mildest form of urinary tract infection is asymptomatic bacteriuria, whereas more severe presentations include acute pyelonephritis, acute focal bacterial nephritis and urosepsis. Prognosis is usually good, but under certain circumstances hypertension, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease may develop. Therefore, early introduced appropriate treatment is essential. According to the Polish Society for Paediatric Nephrology guidelines, asymptomatic bacteriuria does not warrant treatment, whereas febrile patients (>38°C under 24 months old with a suspicion for urinary tract infection must be promptly administered antibiotic therapy, after a urine specimen has been obtained for culture. For many years, urinary tract infection has remained a topic of controversy in terms of therapy duration and administration route. Inpatient treatment of children under 3 months of age is an accepted rule. Acute pyelonephritis necessitates a longer therapy, lasting from 7 to 10 days, whereas the duration of treatment of lower urinary tract infection has been cut down to 3 up to 5 days. Routine prophylactic antimicrobial therapy is not recommended following the initial urinary tract infection episode, yet should be considered in special circumstances. Alternative

  16. Changes in the Excitability of Neocortical Neurons in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Are Not Specific to Corticospinal Neurons and Are Modulated by Advancing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhyun; Hughes, Ethan G; Shetty, Ashwin S; Arlotta, Paola; Goff, Loyal A; Bergles, Dwight E; Brown, Solange P

    2017-09-13

    Cell type-specific changes in neuronal excitability have been proposed to contribute to the selective degeneration of corticospinal neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to neocortical hyperexcitability, a prominent feature of both inherited and sporadic variants of the disease, but the mechanisms underlying selective loss of specific cell types in ALS are not known. We analyzed the physiological properties of distinct classes of cortical neurons in the motor cortex of hSOD1 G93A mice of both sexes and found that they all exhibit increases in intrinsic excitability that depend on disease stage. Targeted recordings and in vivo calcium imaging further revealed that neurons adapt their functional properties to normalize cortical excitability as the disease progresses. Although different neuron classes all exhibited increases in intrinsic excitability, transcriptional profiling indicated that the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes are cell type specific. The increases in excitability in both excitatory and inhibitory cortical neurons show that selective dysfunction of neuronal cell types cannot account for the specific vulnerability of corticospinal motor neurons in ALS. Furthermore, the stage-dependent alterations in neuronal function highlight the ability of cortical circuits to adapt as disease progresses. These findings show that both disease stage and cell type must be considered when developing therapeutic strategies for treating ALS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It is not known why certain classes of neurons preferentially die in different neurodegenerative diseases. It has been proposed that the enhanced excitability of affected neurons is a major contributor to their selective loss. We show using a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease in which corticospinal neurons exhibit selective vulnerability, that changes in excitability are not restricted to this neuronal class and that excitability does not increase

  17. Dosimetry of the respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, M.

    1996-01-01

    A new dosimetric model of the human respiratory tract has been recently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, in ICRP Publication 66. This model was intended to update the previous lung model of the Task Group on Lung Dynamics that was adopted by ICRP in Publication 30. With this aim, extensive reviews of the available knowledge were made for anatomy and physiology of the respiratory tract and for deposition, clearance and biological effects of inhaled radionuclides. Finally, expanded dosimetry requirements resulted in a widely different approach from the former model. The main features of the new model are the followings: instead of calculating the average dose to the total mass of blood filled lung, the model takes account of differences in radiosensitivity of the venous respiratory tract tissues. It applies not only to adult workers but also to all members of the population, and provides reference values for children aged 3 months, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years, and adults. Deposition modelling of airborne gases and aerosols associates age dependent breathing rates, airway dimensions and physical activity, to particle size, density and chemical form of inhaled material. Clearance results of competition between mechanical transport clearance and absorption to blood. At each step of the calculation, adjustment guidance is provided to account for use of exact values of particle sizes and specific dissolution rates of inhaled material in order to calculate their own parameter of retention in the airways, and to assess accurately doses to the respiratory tract. Possible influence of smoking, of respiratory tract diseases and of eventual exposure to airborne toxicants is also addressed. (author)

  18. Damaged Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  19. Structural damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.E.; Bruhn, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Virtually all structures show some signs of distress due to deterioration of the building components, to changed loads, or to changed support conditions. Changed support conditions result from ground movements. In mining regions many cases of structural distress are attributed to mining without considering alternative causes. This is particularly true of coal mining since it occurs under extensive areas. Coal mining is estimated to have already undermined more than eight million acres and may eventually undermine 40 million acres in the United States. Other nonmetal and metal underground mines impact much smaller areas. Although it is sometimes difficult, even with careful study, to identify the actual cause of damage, persons responsible for underground coal mining should at least be aware of possible causes of building stress other than mine subsidence. This paper presents information on distress to structures and briefly reviews a number of causes of ground movements other than subsidence: Mass movements, dissolution, erosion, frost action, shrinking and swelling, yield into excavations and compressibility

  20. Radiation damage prediction system using damage function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Mori, Seiji

    1979-01-01

    The irradiation damage analysis system using a damage function was investigated. This irradiation damage analysis system consists of the following three processes, the unfolding of a damage function, the calculation of the neutron flux spectrum of the object of damage analysis and the estimation of irradiation effect of the object of damage analysis. The damage function is calculated by applying the SAND-2 code. The ANISN and DOT3, 5 codes are used to calculate neutron flux. The neutron radiation and the allowable time of reactor operation can be estimated based on these calculations of the damage function and neutron flux. The flow diagram of the process of analyzing irradiation damage by a damage function and the flow diagram of SAND-2 code are presented, and the analytical code for estimating damage, which is determined with a damage function and a neutron spectrum, is explained. The application of the irradiation damage analysis system using a damage function was carried out to the core support structure of a fast breeder reactor for the damage estimation and the uncertainty evaluation. The fundamental analytical conditions and the analytical model for this work are presented, then the irradiation data for SUS304, the initial estimated values of a damage function, the error analysis for a damage function and the analytical results are explained concerning the computation of a damage function for 10% total elongation. Concerning the damage estimation of FBR core support structure, the standard and lower limiting values of damage, the permissible neutron flux and the allowable years of reactor operation are presented and were evaluated. (Nakai, Y.)

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging study of early white matter integrity in HIV-infected patients: A tract-based spatial statistics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruili Li

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Multiple cerebral white matter fiber tracts are damaged in HIV-infected patients without cognitive impairment. Quantitative analysis of DTI using TBSS is valuable in evaluating changes of HIV-associated white matter microstructures.

  2. Intrahepatic biliary tract adenocarcinoma. Review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encalada, Edmundo; Engracia, Ruth; Calle, Carlos; Rivera, Tania; Marengo, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    A seven years old patient, with a biliary tract tumoration, diagnosed by computerized tomography and eco, which had practice an exploratory laparotomy, finding an intrahepatic tumor at the left hepatic tract level, with a pathological diagnosis of papillary adenocarcinoma moderately differentiated the biliary tract. The surgery is the main treatment, auxiliary treatments with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (The author)

  3. Kidneys and Urinary Tract (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Kidneys and Urinary Tract KidsHealth / For Parents / Kidneys and Urinary Tract What's ... Los riñones y las vías urinarias Kidneys and Urinary Tract Basics Our bodies produce several kinds of wastes, ...

  4. Systemic Embolization from an Unusual Intracardiac Mass in the Left Ventricular Outflow Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelechukwu U. Okoro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis can affect any endocardial surface; in the vast majority of cases, the cardiac valves are involved. It is exceedingly rare to develop infective endocarditis on the endocardium of the left ventricular outflow tract due to the high velocity of blood that traverses this area. Herein, we present a rare case of left ventricular outflow tract endocarditis that likely occurred secondary to damage to the aortic valve leaflets (from healed prior aortic valve endocarditis causing a high velocity aortic valve regurgitant jet that impinged upon the interventricular septum which damaged the endocardium and resulted in a fibrotic “jet lesion.” This fibrous jet lesion served as a nidus for bacterial proliferation and vegetation formation. The high shear stress (due to high blood flow velocity through the left ventricular outflow tract likely promoted the multiple embolic events observed in this case. Our patient was successfully treated with aortic valve replacement, vegetation resection, and antibiotics.

  5. Long-term progressive motor skill training enhances corticospinal excitability for the ipsilateral hemisphere and motor performance of the untrained hand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse; Larsen, Malte Nejst; Grey, Michael James

    2017-01-01

    It is well-established that unilateral motor practice can lead to increased performance in the opposite non-trained hand. Here, we test the hypothesis that progressively increasing task difficulty during long-term skill training with the dominant right hand increase performance and corticomotor...... and accuracy to individual proficiency promotes motor skill learning and drives the iM1-CSE resulting in enhanced performance of the non-trained hand. The results underline the importance of increasing task difficulty progressively and individually in skill learning and rehabilitation training. This article...... excitability of the left non-trained hand. Subjects practiced a visuomotor tracking task engaging right digit V for 6 weeks with either progressively increasing task difficulty (PT) or no progression (NPT). Corticospinal excitability(CSE) was evaluated from the resting motor threshold(rMT) and recruitment...

  6. Long-term progressive motor skill training enhances corticospinal excitability for the ipsilateral hemisphere and motor performance of the untrained hand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse; Larsen, Malte Nejst; Grey, Michael James

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that unilateral motor practice can lead to increased performance in the opposite non-trained hand. Here, we test the hypothesis that progressively increasing task difficulty during long-term skill training with the dominant right hand increase performance and corticomotor...... demands for timing and accuracy to individual proficiency promotes motor skill learning and drives the iM1-CSE resulting in enhanced performance of the non-trained hand. The results underline the importance of increasing task difficulty progressively and individually in skill learning and rehabilitation...... excitability of the left non-trained hand. Subjects practiced a visuomotor tracking task engaging right digit V for 6 weeks with either progressively increasing task difficulty (PT) or no progression (NPT). Corticospinal excitability (CSE) was evaluated from the resting motor threshold (rMT) and recruitment...

  7. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráiz, Miguel Angel; Hernández, Antonio; Asenjo, Eloy; Herráiz, Ignacio

    2005-12-01

    Urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB), acute cystitis (AC) and acute pyelonephritis (AP), are favored by the morphological and functional changes involved in pregnancy. AB increases the risk of preterm labor, low birth weight and AP. AB should be detected by uroculture (other methods are not sufficiently effective) and treated early. Approximately 80% of cases are caused by Escherichia coli. The risks and effectiveness of the distinct antibiotic regimens should be evaluated: fosfomycin trometamol in monotherapy or as short course therapy is safe and effective for the treatment of AB and AC. AP is the most frequent cause of hospital admission for medical reasons in pregnant women and can lead to complications in 10% of cases, putting the lives of the mother and fetus at risk. Currently outpatient treatment of AP is recommended in selected cases. Adequate follow-up of pregnant women with urinary tract infections is required due to frequent recurrence.

  8. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea. PMID:27090537

  9. Urinary tract infections during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jennifer; Briggs, Gerald G; McKeown, Anna; Bustillo, Gerardo

    2004-10-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of urinary tract infections (UTIs) during pregnancy. All aspects of UTIs, including epidemiology, pathogenesis, resistance, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, were reviewed. MEDLINE (1966-August 2003) and Cochrane Library searches were performed using the key search terms urinary tract infection, pyelonephritis, cystitis, asymptomatic bacteriuria, and resistance. All article abstracts were evaluated for relevance. Only articles pertaining to pregnancy were included. The majority of published literature were review articles; the number of original clinical studies was limited. UTIs are the most common bacterial infections during pregnancy. They are characterized by the presence of significant bacteria anywhere along the urinary tract. Pyelonephritis is the most common severe bacterial infection that can lead to perinatal and maternal complications including premature delivery, infants with low birth weight, fetal mortality, preeclampsia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and transient renal insufficiency. Enterobacteriaceae account for 90% of UTIs. The common antibiotics used are nitrofurantoin, cefazolin, cephalexin, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin. Therapeutic management of UTIs in pregnancy requires proper diagnostic workup and thorough understanding of antimicrobial agents to optimize maternal outcome, ensure safety to the fetus, and prevent complications that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in both the fetus and the mother.

  10. URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Margieva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The issues of diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections and their role in development of renal injury are being actively discussed by scientists and practicing pediatricians. The article presents the most recent data on etiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of this disease. It provides recommendations on diagnosis and management of patients depending on their age. The article presents a discussion of antibacterial therapy course duration and indications for anti-relapse treatment. The study demonstrates that intravenous antibacterial therapy must be launched immediately in neonates in the event of pyretic fever; empirical antibacterial therapy must be launched immediately in older children after diagnosis of the urinary tract infection has been confirmed; subsequently, treatment ought to be corrected depending on the results of a bacteriological trial, sensitivity to antibiotics and effectiveness of the prescribed antibiotic. Along with normalization of urination rhythm and water intake schedule, antibacterial preventive therapy might be considered, if effective, in the event of recurrent nature of the urinary tract infection. 

  11. The whole brain diffusion tensor imaging study on acute phase of the posttraumatic stress disorder resulting from the single-prolonged stress based on tract based spatial statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Yibin; Liu Kang; Zhe Xia; Mu Yunfeng; Yin Hong; Huan Yi; Yang Xiaobin; Du Ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of the brain white matter microstructure at the acute stage of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) resulting from a single-prolonged stress. Methods: DTI scans were performed on 17 survivors buried more than 190 h in Shanxi Wangjialing mine disaster and 17 cases of normal controls using Siemens 3.0 T MR. The differences of the FA values measured from the whole brain DTI between the two groups were analyzed based on tract based spatial statistics (TBSS). FA data were statistically compared between the two groups based on nonparametric random permutation test (RPT), and the brain areas of the PTSD patients with abnormal FA were defined. Results: Compared with control group, FA values in the PTSD (at acute stage) group decreased in genu, rostral body of corpus callosum, and increased in the left thalamic and corticospinal tract region of bilateral corona radiata and the posterior limb of the left internal capsule, the left cerebral peduncle. The differences were statistically significant (P < 0.01 TFCE-corrected). Conclusions: TBSS is a comprehensive and accurate method for evaluating the changes of whole brain DTI in PTSD cases. The fiber structural abnormalities in the genu, rostral body of bilateral corpus callosum, anterior radiation of left thalamic may be due to stress. TBSS can provide a more objective basis for the early diagnosis and intervention of PTSD. (authors)

  12. URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sivalingam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections frequently affect pregnant mothers. This problem causes significant morbidity and healthcare expenditure. Three common clinical manifestations of UTIs in pregnancy are: asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis and acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli remains the most frequent organism isolated in UTIs. All pregnant mothers should be screened for UTIs in pregnancy and antibiotics should be commenced without delay. Urine culture and sensitivity is the gold standard in diagnosing UTIs. Without treatment, asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is associated with preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, maternal hypertension, pre-eclampsia and anaemia. Acute pyelonephritis can lead to maternal sepsis. Recurrent UTIs in pregnancy require prophylactic antibiotic treatment.

  13. CFD heat transfer simulation of the human upper respiratory tract for oronasal breathing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Farahmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries due to inhalation of hot gas are commonly encountered when dealing with fire and combustible material, which is harmful and threatens human life. In the literature, various studies have been conducted to investigate heat and mass transfer characteristics in the human respiratory tract (HRT. This study focuses on assessing the injury taking place in the upper human respiratory tract and identifying acute tissue damage, based on level of exposure. A three-dimensional heat transfer simulation is performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software to study the temperature profile through the upper HRT consisting of the nasal cavity, oral cavity, trachea, and the first two generations of bronchi. The model developed is for the simultaneous oronasal breathing during the inspiration phase with a high volumetric flow rate of 90 liters/minute and the inspired air temperature of 100 degrees Celsius. The geometric model depicting the upper HRT is generated based on the data available and literature cited. The results of the simulation give the temperature distribution along the center and the surface tissue of the respiratory tract. This temperature distribution will help to assess the level of damage induced in the upper respiratory tract and appropriate treatment for the damage. A comparison of nasal breathing, oral breathing, and oronasal breathing is performed. Temperature distribution can be utilized in the design of the respirator systems where inlet temperature is regulated favoring the human body conditions.

  14. Probiotics prophylaxis in pyelonephritis infants with normal urinary tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Joo; Cha, Jihae; Lee, Jung Won

    2016-11-01

    Pyelonephritis in infants is considered as a major factor for the formation of renal scar. To prevent recurrent pyelonephritis and renal damage, prophylaxis is extremely important. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of probiotic and antibiotic prophylaxis or no-prophylaxis in infants with pyelonephritis and normal urinary tract. Altogether 191 infants, who were diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis, proven to have normal urinary tracts and followed up for 6 months on prophylaxis, were retrospectively evaluated. According to the types of prophylaxis, the infants were divided into three groups [probiotics (Lactobacillus species), antibiotics (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, TMP/SMX), and noprophylaxis]. The incidence of recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) during 6 months after the development of pyelonephritis, main causative uropathogens, and its antimicrobial sensitivities were compared. The incidence of recurrent UTI in the probiotic group was 8.2%, which was significantly lower than 20.6% in the no-prophylaxis group (P=0.035) and was not significantly different from 10.0% of the antibiotic group (P=0.532). The significant difference between the probiotic and no-prophylaxis groups was seen only in male infants (P=0.032). The main causative organism of recurrent UTI was Escherichia coli (E.coli), which was not different among the three groups (P=0.305). The resistance rate of E. coli to TMP/SMX was 100% in the antibiotic group, which was significantly higher than 25.0% in the probiotic group and 41.7% in the no-prophylaxis group (P=0.008). Probiotic prophylaxis was more effective in infants with pyelonephritis and normal urinary tract than in those with no-prophylaxis. It could be used as a natural alternative to antibiotic prophylaxis.

  15. White matter tract integrity and developmental outcome in newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, An N; Evangelou, Iordanis; Fatemi, Ali; Vezina, Gilbert; Mccarter, Robert; Glass, Penny; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether corpus callosum (CC) and corticospinal tract (CST) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures relate to developmental outcome in encephalopathic newborn infants after therapeutic hypothermia. Encephalopathic newborn infants enrolled in a longitudinal study underwent DTI after hypothermia. Parametric maps were generated for fractional anisotropy, mean, radial, and axial diffusivity. CC and CST were segmented by DTI-based tractography. Multiple regression models were used to examine the association of DTI measures with Bayley-II Mental (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) at 15 months and 21 months of age. Fifty-two infants (males n=32, females n=20) underwent DTI at median age of 8 days. Two were excluded because of poor magnetic resonance imaging quality. Outcomes were assessed in 42/50 (84%) children at 15 months and 35/50 (70%) at 21 months. Lower CC and CST fractional anisotropy were associated with lower MDI and PDI respectively, even after controlling for gestational age, birth weight, sex, and socio-economic status. There was also a direct relationship between CC axial diffusivity and MDI, while CST radial diffusivity was inversely related to PDI. In encephalopathic newborn infants, impaired microstructural organization of the CC and CST predicts poorer cognitive and motor performance respectively. Tractography provides a reliable method for early assessment of perinatal brain injury. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Overview of the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) Full Scale Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin; Littell, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) full-scale tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility in 2013 and 2014. Two CH-46E airframes were impacted at 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocities onto soft soil, which represents a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. TRACT 1 provided a baseline set of responses, while TRACT 2 included retrofits with composite subfloors and other crash system improvements based on TRACT 1. For TRACT 2, a total of 18 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATD) responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and activation of emergency locator transmitters and crash sensors. Combinations of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 ATDs were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. The structural response of the airframe was assessed based on accelerometers located throughout the airframe and using three-dimensional photogrammetric techniques. Analysis of the photogrammetric data indicated regions of maximum deflection and permanent deformation. The response of TRACT 2 was noticeably different in the horizontal direction due to changes in the cabin configuration and soil surface, with higher acceleration and damage occurring in the cabin. Loads from ATDs in energy absorbing seats and restraints were within injury limits. Severe injury was likely for ATDs in forward facing passenger seats.

  17. Biliary tract duplication cyst with gastric heterotopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumbach, K.; Baker, D.H.; Weigert, J.; Altman, R.P.

    1988-05-01

    Cystic duplications of the biliary tract are rare anomalies, easily mistaken for choledochal cysts. Surgical drainage is the preferred therapy for choledochal cyst, but cystic duplication necessitates surgical excision as duplications may contain heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to peptic ulceration of the biliary tract. We report a case of biliary tract duplication cyst containing heterotopic alimentary mucosa which had initially been diagnosed and surgically treated as a choledochal cyst.

  18. Biliary tract duplication cyst with gastric heterotopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grumbach, K.; Baker, D.H.; Weigert, J.; Altman, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Cystic duplications of the biliary tract are rare anomalies, easily mistaken for choledochal cysts. Surgical drainage is the preferred therapy for choledochal cyst, but cystic duplication necessitates surgical excision as duplications may contain heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to peptic ulceration of the biliary tract. We report a case of biliary tract duplication cyst containing heterotopic alimentary mucosa which had initially been diagnosed and surgically treated as a choledochal cyst. (orig.)

  19. Study of females genital tract microflora diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Vertelytė, Justina

    2016-01-01

    Study of females genital tract microflora diversity SUMMARY Study of female genital tract microflora diversity Authors of Master’s degree scientific research work: Justina Vertelytė Head of Master’s degree scientific research work: dr Silvija Kiverytė Vilnius, 2016 The aim of research work was to investigate and analyze the composition of the microflora of the female genital tract using the methods of microbiological smear, vaginal wet mount and PCR. The objectives of the work were to evaluat...

  20. A clinical study on localized renal damage from percutaneous nephroureterolithotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Yutaka; Orikasa, Seiichi

    1988-01-01

    To study the localized renal damage from percutaneous nephroureterolithotomy (PNL), 3 divided DMSA renal scintigraphy in 41 renal units and dynamic CT in 17 renal units were performed. 1) Localized renal damages corresponding to the nephrostomy tract estimated by 3 divided DMSA renal scintigraphy were almost recovered by 6 months after PNL in most cases. But in 17 of the 41 renal units (41 %), the postoperative renal scintigram showed low uptake or cold area at the nephrostomy tract. 2) In several cases which showed cold area in postoperative renal scintigram, dynamic CT showed linear or diffuse low density area with sclerotic cortical deformity at the posterior wall of the kidney. These results indicate that an anatomically proper site of the puncture and a smaller nephrostomy size are mandatory to minimize localized renal damage from PNL. (author)

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging of the optic tracts in multiple sclerosis: association with retinal thinning and visual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Smith, Seth A; Ozturk, Arzu; Farrell, Sheena K; Calabresi, Peter A; Reich, Daniel S

    2011-04-01

    Visual disability is common in multiple sclerosis, but its relationship to abnormalities of the optic tracts remains unknown. Because they are only rarely affected by lesions, the optic tracts may represent a good model for assessing the imaging properties of normal-appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis. Whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging was performed on 34 individuals with multiple sclerosis and 26 healthy volunteers. The optic tracts were reconstructed by tractography, and tract-specific diffusion indices were quantified. In the multiple-sclerosis group, peripapillary retinal nerve-fiber-layer thickness and total macular volume were measured by optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity at 100%, 2.5%, and 1.25% contrast was examined. After adjusting for age and sex, optic-tract mean and perpendicular diffusivity were higher (P=.002) in multiple sclerosis. Lower optic-tract fractional anisotropy was correlated with retinal nerve-fiber-layer thinning (r=.51, P=.003) and total-macular-volume reduction (r=.59, P=.002). However, optic-tract diffusion indices were not specifically correlated with visual acuity or with their counterparts in the optic radiation. Optic-tract diffusion abnormalities are associated with retinal damage, suggesting that both may be related to optic-nerve injury, but do not appear to contribute strongly to visual disability in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  2. Air pollution and brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Azzarelli, Biagio; Acuna, Hilda; Garcia, Raquel; Gambling, Todd M; Osnaya, Norma; Monroy, Sylvia; DEL Tizapantzi, Maria Rosario; Carson, Johnny L; Villarreal-Calderon, Anna; Rewcastle, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures of air pollutants produces inflammation in the upper and lower respiratory tract. Because the nasal cavity is a common portal of entry, respiratory and olfactory epithelia are vulnerable targets for toxicological damage. This study has evaluated, by light and electron microscopy and immunohistochemical expression of nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kappaB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the olfactory and respiratory nasal mucosae, olfactory bulb, and cortical and subcortical structures from 32 healthy mongrel canine residents in Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), a highly polluted urban region. Findings were compared to those in 8 dogs from Tlaxcala, a less polluted, control city. In SWMMC dogs, expression of nuclear neuronal NF-kappaB and iNOS in cortical endothelial cells occurred at ages 2 and 4 weeks; subsequent damage included alterations of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), degenerating cortical neurons, apoptotic glial white matter cells, deposition of apolipoprotein E (apoE)-positive lipid droplets in smooth muscle cells and pericytes, nonneuritic plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles. Persistent pulmonary inflammation and deteriorating olfactory and respiratory barriers may play a role in the neuropathology observed in the brains of these highly exposed canines. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's may begin early in life with air pollutants playing a crucial role.

  3. Optimal factors of diffusion tensor imaging predicting cortico spinal tract injury in patients with brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Zhi Gang; Niu, Chen; Zhang, Qiu Li; Zhang, Ming [Dept. of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Qian, Yu Cheng [Dept. of Medical Imaging, School of Medicine, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang (China)

    2017-09-15

    To identify the optimal factors in diffusion tensor imaging for predicting corticospinal tract (CST) injury caused by brain tumors. This prospective study included 33 patients with motor weakness and 64 patients with normal motor function. The movement of the CST, minimum distance between the CST and the tumor, and relative fractional anisotropy (rFA) of the CST on diffusion tensor imaging, were compared between patients with motor weakness and normal function. Logistic regression analysis was used to obtain the optimal factor predicting motor weakness. In patients with motor weakness, the displacement (8.44 ± 6.64 mm) of the CST (p = 0.009), minimum distance (3.98 ± 7.49 mm) between the CST and tumor (p < 0.001), and rFA (0.83 ± 0.11) of the CST (p < 0.001) were significantly different from those of the normal group (4.64 ± 6.65 mm, 14.87 ± 12.04 mm, and 0.98 ± 0.05, respectively) (p = 0.009, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). The frequencies of patients with the CST passing through the tumor (6%, p = 0.002), CST close to the tumor (23%, p < 0.001), CST close to a malignant tumor (high grade glioma, metastasis, or lymphoma) (19%, p < 0.001), and CST passing through infiltrating edema (19%, p < 0.001) in the motor weakness group, were significantly different from those of the patients with normal motor function (0, 8, 1, and 10%, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that decreased rFA and CST close to a malignant tumor were effective variables related to motor weakness. Decreased fractional anisotropy, combined with closeness of a malignant tumor to the CST, is the optimal factor in predicting CST injury caused by a brain tumor.

  4. Damage analysis: damage function development and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, R.L.; Odette, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    The derivation and application of damage functions, including recent developments for the U.S. LMFBR and CTR programs, is reviewed. A primary application of damage functions is in predicting component life expectancies; i.e., the fluence required in a service spectrum to attain a specified design property change. An important part of the analysis is the estimation of the uncertainty in such fluence limit predictions. The status of standardizing the procedures for the derivation and application of damage functions is discussed. Improvements in several areas of damage function development are needed before standardization can be completed. These include increasing the quantity and quality of the data used in the analysis, determining the limitations of the analysis due to the presence of multiple damage mechanisms, and finally, testing of damage function predictions against data obtained from material surveillance programs in operating thermal and fast reactors. 23 references. (auth)

  5. Central Motor Conduction Studies and Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Children with Severe Primary and Secondary Dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Verity; Mills, Kerry; Siddiqui, Ata; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Dystonia in childhood has many causes. Imaging may suggest corticospinal tract dysfunction with or without coexistent basal ganglia damage. There are very few published neurophysiological studies on children with dystonia; one previous study has focused on primary dystonia. We investigated central motor conduction in 62 children (34 males, 28…

  6. Long-Term Outcomes of Renal Transplant in Recipients With Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rebekah S; Courtney, Aisling E; Ko, Dicken S C; Maxwell, Alexander P; McDaid, James

    2018-01-02

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction can lead to chronic kidney disease, which, despite surgical intervention, will progress to end-stage renal disease, requiring dialysis. Urologic pathology may damage a transplanted kidney, limiting patient and graft survival. Although smaller studies have suggested that urinary tract dysfunction does not affect graft or patient survival, this is not universally accepted. Northern Ireland has historically had the highest incidence of neural tube defects in Europe, giving rich local experience in caring for patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction. Here, we analyzed outcomes of renal transplant recipients with lower urinary tract dysfunction versus control recipients. We identified 3 groups of kidney transplant recipients treated between 2001 and 2010; those in group 1 had end-stage renal disease due to lower urinary tract dysfunction with prior intervention (urologic surgery, long-term catheter, or intermittent self-catheterization), group 2 had end-stage renal disease secondary to lower urinary tract dysfunction without intervention, and group 3 had end-stage renal disease due to polycystic kidney disease (chosen as a relatively healthy control cohort without comorbid burden of other causes of end-stage renal disease such as diabetes). The primary outcome measured, graft survival, was death censored, with graft loss defined as requirement for renal replacement therapy or retransplant. Secondary outcomes included patient survival and graft function. In 150 study patients (16 patients in group 1, 64 in group 2, and 70 in group 3), 5-year death-censored graft survival was 93.75%, 90.6%, and 92.9%, respectively, with no significant differences in graft failure among groups (Cox proportional hazards model). Five-year patient survival was 100%, 100%, and 94.3%, respectively. Individuals with a history of lower urinary tract dysfunction had graft and patient survival rates similar to the control group. When appropriately treated, lower

  7. Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Klijn, Aart J.; Vijverberg, Marianne A. W.

    2012-01-01

    Up to 10% of school-age children suffer from recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and/or urinary incontinence. Lower urinary tract problems are, together with asthma, the most important chronic disease of the pediatric age group. Diagnosis must discriminate among those children with functional

  8. Odontogenic sinus tracts: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutzky-Goldberg, Iris; Tsesis, Igor; Slutzky, Hagay; Heling, Ilana

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence,location, and distribution of sinus tracts in patients referred for endodontic consultation. This cohort study included 1,119 subjects referred for endodontic consultation, 108 of whom presented with sinus tracts. Following clinical and radiographic examination, the diameter of the rarifying osteitis lesion on the radiograph was measured and the path and origin of the sinus tracts determined. Signs and symptoms, tooth site,buccal/lingual location, and diameter were recorded. Data were statistically analyzed using Pearson chi-square test. Sinus tracts originated mainly from maxillary teeth (63.1%); only 38.9% originated from mandibular teeth. Chronic periapical abscess was the most prevalent diagnosed origin (71.0%). Broken restorations were highly associated with the presence of sinus tracts (53.0%). The most frequent site of orifices was buccal(82.4%), followed by lingual or palatal (12.0%). Orifices on the lingual aspect of the gingiva were observed in mandibularmolars. There was an 86.8% correlation between the occurrence of an apically located sinus tract and apical rarifying osteitis(P<.01). Sinus tract in the lingual or palatal aspect of the gingiva is relatively common. Practitioners should look for signs of sinus tract during routine examination

  9. Peptide Hormones in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasi...

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals and the gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frier, M. [Radiopharmacy Unit, Dept. of Medical Physics, Queens Medical Centre, Univ. Hospital Nottingham (United Kingdom); Perkins, A.C. [Radiopharmacy Unit, Dept. of Medical Physics, Queens Medical Centre, Univ. Hospital Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    1994-11-01

    A review is presented of the design of radiolabelled test meals for the evaluation of gastrointestinal function, including oesophageal transit, gastro-oesophageal reflux, gastric emptying, enterogastric reflux and transit through the whole bowel. Descriptions of different systems are presented, together with validations of the procedures used. Published methods for assessment of oesophageal transit show a marked degree of consistency, whereas gastric emptying studies employ a wide range of both liquid and solid test meals. Recommendations are made concerning the optimal system for investigation of each part of the gastrointestinal tract, but whichever system is adopted, it is important to employ some validation procedures, and to establish normal ranges in the population under study. (orig.)

  11. Malignant tumors of gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    International histological classification and classification according to TNM systems, domestic clinical classification according to stages of carcinoma of stomach, large intestine and rectum are presented. Diagnosis of tumoral processes of the given localizations should be based on complex application of diagnostic methods: clinical, ultrasonic, radiological and others. Surgical method and variants of surgical method with preoperative radiotherapy play a leading role in treatment of mentioned tumors. Combined method of treatment-surgical intervention with postoperation intravenous injection of colloid 198 Au - is applied for preventing propagation of stomach cancer metastases. Advisability of combining operations with radiological and antitumoral medicamentous therapy is shown. Reliable results of treatment of malignant tumors of gastrointestinal tract are presented

  12. Urinary tract infection in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, L.; Janko, V.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in children which can be a source of significant morbidity. For as yet unknown reasons a minority of UTIs in children progress to renal scarring, hypertension and renal insufficiency. Clinical presentation of UTI in children may be nonspecific, and the appropriateness of certain diagnostic tests remains controversial. The diagnostic work-up should be tailored to uncover functional and structural abnormalities such as dysfunctional voiding, vesicoureteral reflux and obstructive uropathy. A more aggressive work-up is recommended for patients at greater risk for pyelonephritis and renal scarring, including infants less than one year of age. Early sequential (intravenous treatment followed by oral antibiotics) antibacterial therapy is recommended to prevent renal scarring. Routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not recommended, it may be used in patients with higher grade reflux, obstructive uropathy or recurring UTI who are at greater risk for subsequent infections and complications. (author)

  13. Metastases of the digestive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caramella, E.; Bruneton, J.N.; Roux, P.; Aubanel, D.; Lecomte, P.

    1983-01-01

    In addition to personal observations of 77 patients with one or more metastatic sites in the gastrointestinal tract, the authors reviewed over 1000 similar cases in the literature. The general radiologic aspects of each location (oesophagus, stomach, intestine, colon/rectum) are discussed. The pathophysiology of this type of metastasis explains the radiologic images obtained during barium transit examinations. The lymphatic type of spread observed in the oesophageal region in connection with carcinoma of the breast is the origin of stenosis of the middle third. The haematogenous type of diffusion encountered during melanomas creates intramural or intraluminal radiologic images. Two means of spread can be observed in the stomach. Haematogenous spread can result in frequently multiple and ulcerated nodular submucosal lesions from melanomas and bronchogenic carcinomas; it can also cause a more or less stenotic invasive image, especially in connection with carcinoma of the breast. Dissemination by means of the mesenteric reflections, and in particular around the gastrocolic ligament, explains the spread of a carcinoma of the transverse colon towards the stomach. The most frequent secondary sites in the gastrointestinal tract occur in the small intestine, the majority of these metastases being caused by pelvic tumours. Whether occurring in the small intestine or the colon, the patophysiology is similar: direct invasion by a non-contiguous primary carcinoma along the fascias and mesenteric attachments (more rarely by lymphatic permeation), dissemination by the peritoneal fluid or haematogenuous spread. In the first two types of dissemination cited, the image encountered is often hard to differentiate from radiation-induced lesions. (orig.)

  14. Does ipsilateral corticospinal excitability play a decisive role in the cross-education effect caused by unilateral resistance training? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer-Poveda, D; Romero-Arenas, S; Hortobagyi, T; Márquez, G

    2018-01-02

    Unilateral resistance training has been shown to improve muscle strength in both the trained and the untrained limb. One of the most widely accepted theories is that this improved performance is due to nervous system adaptations, specifically in the primary motor cortex. According to this hypothesis, increased corticospinal excitability (CSE), measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation, is one of the main adaptations observed following prolonged periods of training. The principal aim of this review is to determine the degree of adaptation of CSE and its possible functional association with increased strength in the untrained limb. We performed a systematic literature review of studies published between January 1970 and December 2016, extracted from Medline (via PubMed), Ovid, Web of Science, and Science Direct online databases. The search terms were as follows: (transcranial magnetic stimulation OR excitability) AND (strength training OR resistance training OR force) AND (cross transfer OR contralateral limb OR cross education). A total of 10 articles were found. Results regarding increased CSE were inconsistent. Although the possibility that the methodology had a role in this inconsistency cannot be ruled out, the results appear to suggest that there may not be a functional association between increases in muscle strength and in CSE. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Stöckel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group or the vertex (SHAM group. Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning.

  16. Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, Tino; Summers, Jeffery J; Hinder, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE) and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group) or the vertex (SHAM group). Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning.

  17. Evaluation and management of children with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero Tinoco, Gustavo Adolfo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Voiding dysfunction is a disorder of the bladder filling or emptying in children without neurological or anatomical disorders. Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS are a frequent reason for consulting the pediatrician, nephrologist or pediatric urologist, and even the neurologist and child psychologist. It is considered a relatively benign disease that sometimes generates disinterest among doctors and families, leading to late consultation and inadequate interpretation of symptoms. Urgency, incontinence, enuresis, post-void dribbling, urinary tract infections, recurrent vulvovaginitis and constipation in children without neurological disease should lead to consider the possibility of voiding dysfunction, in order to recognize it timely, restore the quality of life, prevent urinary tract infection and the irreversible kidney damage secondary to delayed diagnosis. Current recommendations emphasize on a less invasive approach, conservative treatment, management of constipation and bladder retraining. This article discusses the correct assessment, diagnosis and management of children with LUTS.

  18. Survey of risk factors urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dehghani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Women are very susceptible to urinary tract infections and pregnancy raises the risk of urinary tract infection. In general, little information on the risk factors of urinary tract infection in pregnancy is underway. Urinary tract infection in pregnancy is an important risk factor for pregnancy dire consequences. The purpose of this study is to find risk factors associated with urinary tract infection in pregnant women. Methods: The study was observational and retrospective analysis was carried on in the winter of which 310 pregnant women participated in 11 health centers in Shahrekord. Of these 155 cases (patients and 155 controls (healthy that were matched for age Information required from the health records of pregnant women and complete Czech list of researcher whose validity was confirmed by experts were gathered. Information needed by pregnant women health records and complete list researcher was collected. Czech list contains a number of possible risk factors for illness and demographic characteristics of the study participants was Statistical analysis software spss version 16 by using chi square tests and logistic regression and t analysis was performed. Results: Among the variables vomiting (p = 0/00 a history of urinary tract infection in a previous pregnancy (P =.001, CI = 1.508-4.408, OR = 2.578 abortion own history (P =.014, CI = 1.165 -3.847, OR = 2.117, respectively, the most important risk factors for urinary tract infection in pregnant women were determined. Conclusion: Prevention and treatment of vomiting in pregnancy prevention of urinary tract infections during pregnancy. Prevention of abortion can play an important role in the prevention of urinary tract infection and its complications in pregnancy. The study also revealed a number of factors can have an impact on urinary tract infection in pregnancy that has not been enough attention and it is necessary that more attention be placed on health programs and

  19. Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection - UTI) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Urinary Tract & How It Works Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection—UTI) in Adults View or Print All ... Bladder infections are the most common type of urinary tract infection (UTI), but any part of your urinary ...

  20. Radiation damage of nonmetallic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goland, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    A review of data and information on radiation damage in nonmetallic solids is presented. Discussions are included on defects in nonmetals, radiation damage processes in nonmetals, electronic damage processes, physical damage processes, atomic displacement, photochemical damage processes, and ion implantation

  1. Scalp acupuncture plus low-frequency rTMS promotes repair of brain white matter tracts in stroke patients: A DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Zhang, Jingna; Qiu, Mingguo; Wang, Chunrong; Xiang, Yun; Wang, Hui; Xie, Jingwen; Liu, Shu; Wu, Jing

    2018-01-01

    To study the clinical effects of scalp acupuncture plus low frequency rTMS in hemiplegic stroke patients. A total of 28 hemiplegic stroke patients were recruited and randomly assigned to the experimental group (scalp acupuncture + low frequency rTMS + routine rehabilitation treatment) or the control group (scalp acupuncture + routine rehabilitation treatment). All patients received a diffusion tensor imaging examination on the day of admission and on the fourteenth day. Compared with pre-treatment, the upper limb motor function score and ability of daily life score increased significantly in the two groups, and motor function improvement was much greater in the experimental group. Fractional anisotropy values significantly increased in white matter tracts, such as the corticospinal tract, forceps minor, superior longitudinal fasciculus and uncinate fasciculus in the two groups. Compared with pre-treatment, the fractional anisotropy values increased and mean diffusion values decreased synchronously in the forceps minor, left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, left inferior longitudinal fasciculus, left superior longitudinal fasciculus and left uncinate fasciculus in the experimental group. Before and after treatment, there were no significant differences in the changes of fractional anisotropy values between the two groups, but the changes of the mean diffusion values in the experimental group were much greater than those in the control group in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus and the left uncinate fasciculus (plow frequency rTMS can promote white matter tracts repair better than scalp acupuncture alone; the motor function improvement of the hemiplegic upper limb may be closely related to the rehabilitation of the forceps minor; the combination of scalp acupuncture and low frequency rTMS is expected to provide a more optimal rehabilitation protocol for stroke hemiplegic patients.

  2. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  3. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Geraldo; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Cavalli, Ricardo Carvalho

    2008-02-01

    Several factors cause urinary tract infection (UTI) to be a relevant complication of the gestational period, aggravating both the maternal and perinatal prognosis. For many years, pregnancy has been considered to be a factor predisposing to all forms of UTI. Today, it is known that pregnancy, as an isolated event, is not responsible for a higher incidence of UTI, but that the anatomical and physiological changes imposed on the urinary tract by pregnancy predispose women with asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) to become pregnant women with symptomatic UTI. AB affects 2 to 10% of all pregnant women and approximately 30% of these will develop pyelonephritis if not properly treated. However, a difficult-to-understand resistance against the identification of AB during this period is observed among prenatalists. The diagnosis of UTI is microbiological and it is based on two urine cultures presenting more than 10(5) colonies/mL urine of the same germ. Treatment is facilitated by the fact that it is based on an antibiogram, with no scientific foundation for the notion that a pre-established therapeutic scheme is an adequate measure. For the treatment of pyelonephritis, it is not possible to wait for the result of culture and previous knowledge of the resistance profile of the antibacterial agents available for the treatment of pregnant women would be the best measure. Another important variable is the use of an intravenous bactericidal antibiotic during the acute phase, with the possibility of oral administration at home after clinical improvement of the patient. At our hospital, the drug that best satisfies all of these requirements is cefuroxime, administered for 10-14 days. Third-generation cephalosporins do not exist in the oral form, all of them involving the inconvenience of parenteral administration. In view of their side effects, aminoglycosides are considered to be inadequate for administration to pregnant women. The inconsistent insinuation of contraindication of

  4. Prevalence of urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Batavia, Jason P; Ahn, Jennifer J; Fast, Angela M; Combs, Andrew J; Glassberg, Kenneth I

    2013-10-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction is a common pediatric urological problem that is often associated with urinary tract infection. We determined the prevalence of a urinary tract infection history in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction and its association, if any, with gender, bowel dysfunction, vesicoureteral reflux and specific lower urinary tract conditions. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of children diagnosed with and treated for lower urinary tract dysfunction, noting a history of urinary tract infection with or without fever, gender, bowel dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux in association with specific lower urinary tract conditions. Of the 257 boys and 366 girls with a mean age of 9.1 years 207 (33%) had a urinary tract infection history, including 88 with at least 1 febrile infection. A total of 64 patients underwent voiding cystourethrogram/videourodynamics, which revealed reflux in 44 (69%). In 119 of the 207 patients all infections were afebrile and 18 underwent voiding cystourethrogram/videourodynamics, which revealed reflux in 5 (28%). A urinary tract infection history was noted in 53% of girls but only 5% of boys (p infection history than patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder or primary bladder neck dysfunction (each p urinary tract dysfunction have a much higher urinary tract infection incidence than males. This association was most often noted for lower urinary tract conditions in which urinary stasis occurs, including detrusor underutilization disorder and dysfunctional voiding. Reflux was found in most girls with a history of febrile infections. Since reflux was identified in more than a quarter of girls with only afebrile infections who were evaluated for reflux, it may be reasonable to perform voiding cystourethrogram or videourodynamics in some of them to identify reflux. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Urinary Tract Infection and Bacteriuria in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Alexander P; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2015-11-01

    Bacteriuria during pregnancy may be classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria, infections of the lower urinary tract (cystitis), or infections of the upper urinary tract (pyelonephritis). Lower tract bacteriuria is associated with an increased risk of developing pyelonephritis in pregnancy, which is itself associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Pregnant women should be screened for the presence of bacteriuria early in pregnancy. All bacteriuria in pregnancy should be treated, and antimicrobial choice in pregnancy should reflect safety for both the mother and the fetus. After treatment of bacteriuria, patients should be followed closely due to risk of recurrent bacteriuria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Frailty and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskind, Anne M

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of both frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms, including urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, underactive bladder, and benign prostatic hyperplasia, increases with age. However, our understanding of the relationship between frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms, both in terms of pathophysiology and in terms of the evaluation and management of such symptoms, is greatly lacking. This brief review will summarize definitions and measurement tools associated with frailty and will also review the existing state of the literature on frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms in older individuals.

  7. Diagnosis of liver, biliary tract and gastrointestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburano, Tamio

    1981-01-01

    The role of RI imaging in the diagnosis of lesions of the liver, biliary tracts and gastrointestinal tracts are reviewed, and representative cases are shown. Liver scintigraphy was of value for the diagnosis of lesions limitted to the liver such as primary and metastatic liver cancer and inflammatory liver diseases. However, RI methods were less useful in the diagnosis of lesions of the biliary tracts and stomach. RI scintigraphy was more sensitive than angiography in the detection of Meckel's deverticulum, Ballet's esophagus, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (Tsunoda, M.)

  8. Granular cells Tumor in the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano LL, Rodrigo; Gaitan B, Maria H; Juliao E, Fabian

    2005-01-01

    Granular cells tumors are ubiquitous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract, are rare and asymptomatic and they are generally an incidental discovery at gastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. In the gastrointestinal tract they are more frequently located in the esophagus, right colon and rectum, stomach, appendix, small intestine or biliopancreatic tract. This article describes three patients with four tumors of granular cells in rectum, esophagus (2 lesions) and appendix. It becomes special emphasis in their neural origin, their benign behavior that justifies the endoscopic resections or limited surgical excisions and the necessity of a pursuit for the possibility, although little, of malignant transformation

  9. RECOMMENDATIONS ON DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Margiyeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Given very high prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI in the setting of renal pathology in children, timely disease identification, adequate antibacterial treatment and, if necessary, anti relapse therapy are of extreme importance. It is known that recurrent UTI is a risk factor of renal damage progression and development of renal failure. The given clinical recommendations on UTI diagnosis and management are based on the evidence-based approach. This helps to optimize work of pediatricians and pediatric nephrologists.

  10. Specific selection for virulent urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli strains during catheter-associated biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrieres, Lionel; Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2007-01-01

    microorganisms can attach. Urinary tract infectious (UTI) Escherichia coli range in pathogenicity and the damage they cause - from benign asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) strains, which inflict no or few problems to the host, to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains, which are virulent and often cause severe...... for and promote biofilm formation of the most virulent group of UTI E. coli strains, hardly a desirable situation for the catheterized patient....

  11. Foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Kefeli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ingested foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract are a common event which can cause serious morbidity and mortality in the children and adult population. For this reason, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for preventing these life threatening complications. In this study, we aimed to analyze the characteristics of the patients with upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies that were treated in our department. Methods: Patients diagnosed with upper gastrointestinal foreign bodies who were admitted to our hospital between February 2010 and August2013 were evaluated retrospectively. The data regarding their age, gender, clinical profile, type and localization of the esophageal foreign body, performed endoscopic procedure and initial symptoms of the patients were noted and analyzed statistically. Results: Thirty-eight patients with a diagnosis of gastrointestinal foreign body were included in this study. Of these patients, 21 were male and 17 were female. The youngest patient was 17 years old and the oldest patient was 79 years old. Most of the foreign bodies (%55.3 detected in the stomach. Food waste and metallic objects in 21 and 16 patients respectively. The most common complaint was dysphagia (%50. After endoscopic intervention three of the patients were directed to surgery. Conclusion: Early recognition and treatment of gastrointestinal foreign bodies is important as their complications are life threatening. The best method of removal of foreign bodies is controversial. Early management with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most efficient and safe treatment method in current conditions.

  12. Immunoscintigraphy of gastrointestinal tract carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladenov, B.; Peshev, N.

    1995-01-01

    The results of labelled monoclonal antibodies (MoA) immunoscintigraphy in malignant tumors involving the gastrointestinal tract are presented. The obtained data have an essential practical bearing on the early diagnosis and radical treatment undertaken. Immunoscintigraphy is performed with Imacis-I ( 131 I, monoclonal antibody, 19-9 F(ab') 2 anti-CEA F(ab') 2 ) obtained from the CIS company, and Jodomab-R-2( 131 I, anti-CEA monoclonal antibody F(ab') 2 ) of the Sorin Biomedica Company, inserted at activity ranging from 11 to 185 MBq. Scanning by a planar gamma-camera is performed at 72 hours. A total of twenty-four patients are examined: 14 preoperatively (with gastric cancer - 2, pancreatic cancer - 1 and location of the neoplasm in different segments of the colon - 11), and ten postoperatively. Positive results are obtained in twenty-two (92 per cent) of the total number of patients under study. In twelve (86 per cent) of those examined preoperatively intensive accumulation of labelled autoantibodies in the cancer area is documented with a negative result recorded in two cases only. Metastases are found in two patients operated on, while in the remainder the results are negative and consistent with those of the other methods of examination. 13 refs., 4 figs. (author)

  13. The significance of ultrasonography in urinary tract infection in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwang Sul; Jeon, Woo Ki; Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Jeong Sook; Jeon, Jong Dong; Han, Chang Yul; Song, Moon Kab

    1990-01-01

    Urinary tract infection(UTI) is one of the major bacterial disease of children that causes morbidity and inconvenience to many patients were related to recurrent vesicoureteral reflux. Radiological examinations of the 72 patients of urinary tract infection(UTI) who were visited to Seoul Paik Hospital from Jan 1st 1986 to Jul 30th 1989, were analysed in this study. US was used as an initial study in all patients who showed acute stage of UTI and followed by IVP, VCUG, 99m Tc-DMSA scan for veslcoureteral reflex or renal scarring. If US showed obstructing lesion, no further study was performed. The resulted were as follows: 1. US is valuable as a screening procedure during the first UTI in congenital abnormalities and in particular obstructive lesions that require surgery. 2. A normal US in a child older than 5 or 6 years is meaningful as an investigation in the group of the first documented UTI uncomplicated. 3. Vesicoureteral reflex, a major factor leading to parenchymal damage in young children can not be detected reliably by US. If the US is suggestive of vesicoureteral reflex, this should be confirmed by VCUG and 99m Tc-DMSA scan for renal scarring. If the US is normal or equivocal in recurrent infection and unexplained persistent clinical findings, this should be followed by VCUG and 9 9mTc-DMSA scan

  14. Modern imaging technology for childhood urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, M.; Fotter, R.

    2005-01-01

    Imaging in childhood urinary tract infection (UTI) is still a matter of debate. There are established guidelines, however new knowledge and the changed medical environment have enhanced this ongoing discussion. These new insights have impacted therapy and consequently the imaging algorithm. Modern imaging methods - particularly MRI and modern ultrasound (US) - are less invasive with a lower radiation burden. Additionally, it has been shown that VUR is a poor predictor for renal scarring out, which affects long-term results. Furthermore, the majority of UT malformations is depicted by prenatal US. The most crucial aspect of improving long-term outcome appears to be the early and reliable depiction of UTI and effective treatment to prevent renal scarring. This review tries to present this new knowledge and to discuss the potential of modern imaging. Recent changes in imaging algorithms are highlighted and an outcome-oriented algorithm that addresses these recent developments is proposed, without lightly abandoning established standards. It consists of an orienting US and - for depiction of renal involvement - amplitude coded color Doppler sonography or renal static scintigraphy (considered the gold standard, particularly for evaluating scars); in future MRI may play a role. Based on this concept, only patients with renal damage as well as patients with complex urinary tract malformations or intractable recurrent UTI may have to undergo VCUG. (orig.) [de

  15. Urinary tract infections in women: etiology and treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minardi D

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Daniele Minardi, Gianluca d'Anzeo, Daniele Cantoro, Alessandro Conti, Giovanni MuzzonigroDepartment of Clinical and Specialist Sciences, Urology, Polytechnic University of the Marche Medical School and United Hospitals, Ancona, ItalyAbstract: Urinary tract infections (UTI are common among the female population. It has been calculated that about one-third of adult women have experienced an episode of symptomatic cystitis at least once. It is also common for these episodes to recur. If predisposing factors are not identified and removed, UTI can lead to more serious consequences, in particular kidney damage and renal failure. The aim of this review was to analyze the factors more commonly correlated with UTI in women, and to see what possible solutions are currently used in general practice and specialized areas, as well as those still under investigation. A good understanding of the possible pathogenic factors contributing to the development of UTI and its recurrence will help the general practitioner to interview the patient, search for causes that would otherwise remain undiscovered, and to identify the correct therapeutic strategy.Keywords: urinary tract infection, women, etiology, diagnosis, treatment

  16. Subtotal obstruction of the male reproductive tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, F.H.; Dohle, G.R.; Roijen, J.H. van; Vreeburg, J.T.M.; Weber, R.F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Bilateral obstruction of the male reproductive tract is suspected in men with azoospermia, normal testicular volume and normal FSH. A testicular biopsy is required to differentiate between an obstruction and a testicular insufficiency. Unilateral or subtotal bilateral obstructions and epididymal

  17. Nuclear medicine in the nephrourinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jofre M, M.Josefina; Sierralta C, Paulina

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear medicine images play an important role in the evaluation of urinary tract pathologies. Radionuclide imaging studies (DMSA scan, DTPA/MAG3 renography, radionuclide cistography) are reviewed, analyzing their indications (au)

  18. urinary tract infections amongst pregnant women attending

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) constitutes a major health problem in pregnant women due to their relatively short urethra, which ... the urine samples of pregnant women prior to treatment. ... Of 500 asymptomatic pregnant women screened, 433.

  19. Real-Time Vocal Tract Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Benkrid

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available To date, most speech synthesis techniques have relied upon the representation of the vocal tract by some form of filter, a typical example being linear predictive coding (LPC. This paper describes the development of a physiologically realistic model of the vocal tract using the well-established technique of transmission line modelling (TLM. This technique is based on the principle of wave scattering at transmission line segment boundaries and may be used in one, two, or three dimensions. This work uses this technique to model the vocal tract using a one-dimensional transmission line. A six-port scattering node is applied in the region separating the pharyngeal, oral, and the nasal parts of the vocal tract.

  20. Management of Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in paediatrics. ... Ceftriaxone, ampicillin, cefotaxime and gentamycin are the recommended parenteral antibiotics, ... and/or oral medication) and hydration status (in the case of.

  1. Radiological examination of the urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudmundsen, T.E.; Vinje, B.; Bloerstad, Oe.; Pedersen, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    Procedures for imaging the urinary tract have been recorded in six Norwegian hospitals for the last 24 years. For three of the hospitals, data were collected from 1965 to 1989, and for the other three from 1966, 1971 and 1975, respectively. There was a significant reduction in the number of intravenous pyelograms, voiding cystograms, and renal angiograms, but the number of retrograde pyelograms and plain radiographs of the urinary tract remained constant. Computed tomography of the urinary tract increased during the first years, but after the introduction of ultrasonography, the number of computed tomograms decreased. Ultrasonographic examinations of the urinary tract are still rapidly increasing, and seem to have replaced some of the other imaging techniques. The present results should be taken into consideration when planning the health care for the future. (au)

  2. Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) Activities by Tract

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The data being displayed are census tract level counts of NSP-funded activities and is derived from an extract of HUD's Community Planning and Development’s (CPD)...

  3. Health effects of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasimova, K; Azizova, F; Mehdieva, K.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : A summary of the nature of radiactive contamination would be incomplete without some mention of the human health effects relatied to radioactivity and radioactive materials. Several excellent reviews at the variety of levels of detail have been written and should be consulted by the reader. Internal exposures of alpha and beta particles are important for ingested and inhaled radionuclides. Dosimetry models are used to estimate the dose from internally deposited radioactive particles. As mentioned above weighting parameters that take into account the radiation type, the biological half-life and the tissue or organ at risk are used to convert the physically absorbed dose in units of gray (or red) to the biologically significant committed equivalent dose and effective dose, measured in units of Sv (or rem). There is considerable controversy over the shape of the dose-response curve at the chronic low dose levels important for enviromental contamination. Proposed models include linear models, non-linear models and threshold models. Because risks at low dose must be extrapolated from available date at high doses, the shape of the dose-response curve has important implications for the environmental regulations used to protect the general public. The health effect of radiation damage depends on a combination of events of on the cellular, tissue and systemic levels. These lead to mutations and cellular of the irradiated parent cell. The dose level at which significant damage occurs depends on the cell type. Cells that reproduce rapidily, such as those found in bone marrow or the gastrointestinal tract, will be more sensitive to radiation than those that are longer lived, such as striated muscle or nerve cells. The effects of high radiation doses on an organ depends on the various cell types it contains

  4. Endometrioid carcinoma of the upper urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Jagdeesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report a second case of endometrioid carcinoma of the upper urinary tract presenting 17 years after hysterectomy for high grade adenocarcinoma of ovary. A 51-year-old nullipara presented to us with a complaint of hematuria. After complete work up, she underwent right radical nephro-ureterectomy with bladder cuff excision. The histology showed endometrioid carcinoma of upper urinary tract without any evidence of endometriosis.

  5. [Mechanisms of urinary tract sterility maintenance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okrągła, Emilia; Szychowska, Katarzyna; Wolska, Lidia

    2014-06-02

    Physiologically, urine and the urinary tract are maintained sterile because of physical and chemical properties of urine and the innate immune system's action. The urinary tract is constantly exposed to the invasion of microorganisms from the exterior environment, also because of the anatomical placement of the urethra, in the vicinity of the rectum. Particularly vulnerable to urinary tract infections (UTI) are women (an additional risk factor is pregnancy), but also the elderly and children. The main pathogens causing UTI are bacteria; in 70-95% of cases it is the bacterium Escherichia coli. Infections caused by viruses and fungi are less common and are associated with decreased immunity, pharmacotherapy, or some diseases. Bacteria have evolved a number of factors that facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract: the cover and cell membrane antigens O and K1, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), fimbriae, pile and cilia. On the other hand, the human organism has evolved mechanisms to hinder colonization of the urinary tract: mechanisms arising from the anatomical structure of the urinary tract, the physicochemical properties of the urine and the activity of the innate immune system, also known as non-specific, which isolates and destroys pathogens using immunological processes, and the mechanisms for release of antimicrobial substances such as Tamm-Horsfall protein, mucopolysaccharides, immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, lactoferrin, lipocalin, neutrophils, cytokines and antimicrobial peptides. This review aims to analyze the state of knowledge on the mechanisms to maintain the sterility of the urinary tract used by the human organism and bacterial virulence factors to facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract.

  6. Mechanisms of urinary tract sterility maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Okrągła

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically, urine and the urinary tract are maintained sterile because of physical and chemical properties of urine and the innate immune system’s action. The urinary tract is constantly exposed to the invasion of microorganisms from the exterior environment, also because of the anatomical placement of the urethra, in the vicinity of the rectum. Particularly vulnerable to urinary tract infections (UTI are women (an additional risk factor is pregnancy, but also the elderly and children. The main pathogens causing UTI are bacteria; in 70-95% of cases it is the bacterium Escherichia coli. Infections caused by viruses and fungi are less common and are associated with decreased immunity, pharmacotherapy, or some diseases. Bacteria have evolved a number of factors that facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract: the cover and cell membrane antigens O and K1, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, fimbriae, pile and cilia. On the other hand, the human organism has evolved mechanisms to hinder colonization of the urinary tract: mechanisms arising from the anatomical structure of the urinary tract, the physicochemical properties of the urine and the activity of the innate immune system, also known as non-specific, which isolates and destroys pathogens using immunological processes, and the mechanisms for release of antimicrobial substances such as Tamm-Horsfall protein, mucopolysaccharides, immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, lactoferrin, lipocalin, neutrophils, cytokines and antimicrobial peptides. This review aims to analyze the state of knowledge on the mechanisms to maintain the sterility of the urinary tract used by the human organism and bacterial virulence factors to facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract.

  7. Correlation between white matter damage and gray matter lesions in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-mei Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We observed the characteristics of white matter fibers and gray matter in multiple sclerosis patients, to identify changes in diffusion tensor imaging fractional anisotropy values following white matter fiber injury. We analyzed the correlation between fractional anisotropy values and changes in whole-brain gray matter volume. The participants included 20 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 20 healthy volunteers as controls. All subjects underwent head magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Our results revealed that fractional anisotropy values decreased and gray matter volumes were reduced in the genu and splenium of corpus callosum, left anterior thalamic radiation, hippocampus, uncinate fasciculus, right corticospinal tract, bilateral cingulate gyri, and inferior longitudinal fasciculus in multiple sclerosis patients. Gray matter volumes were significantly different between the two groups in the right frontal lobe (superior frontal, middle frontal, precentral, and orbital gyri, right parietal lobe (postcentral and inferior parietal gyri, right temporal lobe (caudate nucleus, right occipital lobe (middle occipital gyrus, right insula, right parahippocampal gyrus, and left cingulate gyrus. The voxel sizes of atrophic gray matter positively correlated with fractional anisotropy values in white matter association fibers in the patient group. These findings suggest that white matter fiber bundles are extensively injured in multiple sclerosis patients. The main areas of gray matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis are the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, caudate nucleus, parahippocampal gyrus, and cingulate gyrus. Gray matter atrophy is strongly associated with white matter injury in multiple sclerosis patients, particularly with injury to association fibers.

  8. Urinary tract infection pattern in adult women followed from childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebäck, Carin; Hansson, Sverker; Martinell, Jeanette; Sandberg, Torsten; Jodal, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of urinary tract infection (UTI) and bladder function in women who had experienced recurrent UTI in childhood, with and without consequent renal damage, and followed for three to four decades. A population-based cohort of women who had been followed from the first UTI in childhood and previously studied at a median age of 27 years was studied at a median age of 41 years. Renal damage was evaluated by (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scan. Clinical data were collected on the pattern of recurrent UTIs and bladder function. A total of 86 women were investigated, of whom 58 had suffered renal damage and 28 were without. Febrile UTI in adulthood had occurred in 22 patients, once in 15 women and twice or more in seven women. There was a change in the infection pattern over time, evident already in childhood, that was characterized by a decrease in UTI frequency and a shift from febrile to non-febrile infections. A significant association was found between renal damage and febrile UTI (p = 0.046), and between abnormal bladder function and recurrent non-febrile UTI (p = 0.002). There was no relationship between persisting vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and proneness to either symptomatic UTI (p = 0.99) or febrile UTI in adulthood (p = 0.14). Among this study cohort there was a continuously decreasing rate of febrile UTI in adulthood. Persisting VUR was not related to UTI in adulthood. Abnormal bladder function was related to non-febrile UTI but not to febrile UTI.

  9. The nature of immune responses to urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Soman N.; Miao, Yuxuan

    2016-01-01

    The urinary tract is constantly exposed to microorganisms that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, but generally the urinary tract resists infection by gut microorganisms. This resistance to infection is mainly ascribed to the versatility of the innate immune defences in the urinary tract as the adaptive immune responses are limited, particularly when only the lower urinary tract is infected. In recent years, as the strengths and weaknesses of the immune system of the urinary tract have emerged and as the virulence attributes of uropathogens are recognized, several potentially effective and unconventional strategies to contain or prevent urinary tract infections have emerged. PMID:26388331

  10. Endoluminal pharmacologic stimulation of the upper urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Jørn Skibsted

    2013-05-01

    The experiments performed in this PhD thesis were conducted at the Institute of Experimental Surgery, Skejby Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark and at the Laboratory of Animal Science, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. The thesis is based on 3 peer review articles published in international journals and a review. Diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopic upper urinary tract procedures are usually characterised as minimal invasive procedures and associated with a low complication rate. Most often fever or pain are seen and sometimes septicaemia. However, mucosa lesion or even ureteric ruptures are known complications. Research has suggested that high renal pelvic pressures generated during these procedures, might contribute to per-/postoperative complications seen, and even possible renal parenchymal damage. Nevertheless, local administration (endoluminal) of a relaxant drug has not previously been tried in order to lower renal pelvic pressure. The purposes of this thesis were to examine the effect of local administration (endoluminal) of the nonspecific β-adrenergic agonist ISOproterenol (ISO) on: 1) The normal pressure flow relation in porcine ureter, 2) The effect of endoluminal ISO perfusion during flexible ureterorenoscopy, 3) The pressure flow relation during semirigid ureterorenoscopy and 4) The cardiovascular system. Among other receptor-types β-adrenergic receptor are located in the upper urinary tract and the activation thereof mediates smooth muscle relaxation. We have shown - in an animal experimental model - that ISO added to the irrigation fluid had significant impact on the renal pelvic pressures generated during upper urinary tract endoscopy. ISO significantly and dose dependently reduced the normal pressure flow relations by approximately 80% without concomitant cardiovascular side effects or measurable plasma levels of ISO. During flexible ureterorenoscopy 0.1 µg/ml ISO added to the irrigation fluid significantly reduced renal pelvic pressure during

  11. Technical report: urinary tract infections in febrile infants and young children. The Urinary Tract Subcommittee of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, S M

    1999-04-01

    The Urinary Tract Subcommittee of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Quality Improvement has analyzed alternative strategies for the diagnosis and management of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children. The target population is limited to children between 2 months and 2 years of age who are examined because of fever without an obvious cause. Diagnosis and management of UTI in this group are especially challenging for these three reasons: 1) the manifestation of UTI tends to be nonspecific, and cases may be missed easily; 2) clean voided midstream urine specimens rarely can be obtained, leaving only urine collection methods that are invasive (transurethral catheterization or bladder tap) or result in nonspecific test results (bag urine); and 3) a substantial number of infants with UTI also may have structural or functional abnormalities of the urinary tract that put them at risk for ongoing renal damage, hypertension, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). To examine alternative management strategies for UTI in infants, a conceptual model of the steps in diagnosis and management of UTI was developed. The model was expanded into a decision tree. Probabilities for branch points in the decision tree were obtained by review of the literature on childhood UTI. Data were extracted on standardized forms. Cost data were obtained by literature review and from hospital billing data. The data were collated into evidence tables. Analysis of the decision tree was used to produce risk tables and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for alternative strategies. Based on the results of this analysis and, when necessary, consensus opinion, the Committee developed recommendations for the management of UTI in this population. This document provides the evidence the Subcommittee used in the development of its recommendations. The Subcommittee agreed that the objective of the practice parameter would be to minimize the risk of chronic renal damage within reasonable economic

  12. White matter tract network disruption explains reduced conscientiousness in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Tom A; Dwyer, Michael G; Kuceyeski, Amy; Choudhery, Sanjeevani; Carolus, Keith; Li, Xian; Mallory, Matthew; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Jakimovski, Dejan; Ramasamy, Deepa; Zivadinov, Robert; Benedict, Ralph H B

    2018-05-08

    Quantifying white matter (WM) tract disruption in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) provides a novel means for investigating the relationship between defective network connectivity and clinical markers. PwMS exhibit perturbations in personality, where decreased Conscientiousness is particularly prominent. This trait deficit influences disease trajectory and functional outcomes such as work capacity. We aimed to identify patterns of WM tract disruption related to decreased Conscientiousness in PwMS. Personality assessment and brain MRI were obtained in 133 PwMS and 49 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Lesion maps were applied to determine the severity of WM tract disruption between pairs of gray matter regions. Next, the Network-Based-Statistics tool was applied to identify structural networks whose disruption negatively correlates with Conscientiousness. Finally, to determine whether these networks explain unique variance above conventional MRI measures and cognition, regression models were applied controlling for age, sex, brain volume, T2-lesion volume, and cognition. Relative to HCs, PwMS exhibited lower Conscientiousness and slowed cognitive processing speed (p = .025, p = .006). Lower Conscientiousness in PwMS was significantly associated with WM tract disruption between frontal, frontal-parietal, and frontal-cingulate pathways in the left (p = .02) and right (p = .01) hemisphere. The mean disruption of these pathways explained unique additive variance in Conscientiousness, after accounting for conventional MRI markers of pathology and cognition (ΔR 2  = .049, p = .029). Damage to WM tracts between frontal, frontal-parietal, and frontal-cingulate cortical regions is significantly correlated with reduced Conscientiousness in PwMS. Tract disruption within these networks explains decreased Conscientiousness observed in PwMS as compared with HCs. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and dysfunction of the female lower urinary tract: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Cécile A; Tunitsky-Bitton, Elena; Muffly, Tyler; Barber, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    The 2 major functions of the lower urinary tract are the storage and emptying of urine. These processes are controlled by complex neurophysiologic mechanisms and are subject to injury and disease. When there is disruption of the neurologic control centers, dysfunction of the lower urinary tract may occur. This is sometimes referred to as the "neurogenic bladder." The manifestation of dysfunction depends on the level of injury and severity of disruption. Patients with lesions above the spinal cord often have detrusor overactivity with no disruption in detrusor-sphincter coordination. Patients with well-defined suprasacral spinal cord injuries usually present with intact reflex detrusor activity but have detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, whereas injuries to or below the sacral spinal cord usually lead to persistent detrusor areflexia. A complete gynecologic, urologic, and neurologic examination should be performed when evaluating patients with neurologic lower urinary tract dysfunction. In addition, urodynamic studies and neurophysiologic testing can be used in certain circumstances to help establish diagnosis or to achieve better understanding of a patient's vesicourethral functioning. In the management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, the primary goal is improvement of a patient's quality of life. Second to this is the prevention of chronic damage to the bladder and kidneys, which can lead to worsening impairment and symptoms. Treatment is often multifactorial, including behavioral modifications, bladder training programs, and pharmacotherapy. Surgical procedures are often a last resort option for management. An understanding of the basic neurophysiologic mechanisms of the lower urinary tract can guide providers in their evaluation and treatment of patients who present with lower urinary tract disorders. As neurologic diseases progress, voiding function often changes or worsens, necessitating a good understanding of the underlying physiology in question.

  14. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  15. Congenital anomalies of the urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Hans G; Belman, A Barry

    2014-01-01

    The upper urinary tract forms as a consequence of the reciprocal inductive signals between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. A clue to the timing of events leading to an abnormality of the upper urinary tract can be the presence also of associated anomalies of internal genitalia since separation of these systems occurs at about the 10th week of gestation. Prenatal sonography has facilitated the detection of urological abnormalities presenting with hydronephrosis. Hydronephrosis suggests obstruction, but by itself cannot be equated with it. Instead, further radiographic imaging is required to delineate anatomy and function. Now, moreover, non-surgical management of CAKUT should be considered whenever possible. Despite the widespread use of prenatal screening sonography that usually identifies the majority of congenital anomalies of the urinary tract, many children still present with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Regardless of the etiology for the presentation, the goal of management is preservation of renal function through mitigation of the risk for recurrent UTI and/or obstruction. In the past many children underwent surgical repair aimed at normalization of the appearance of the urinary tract. Today, management has evolved such that in most cases surgical reconstruction is performed only after a period of observation - with or without urinary prophylaxis. The opinions presented in this section are not espoused by all pediatric urologists but represent instead the practice that has evolved at Children's National Medical Center (Washington DC) based significantly on information obtained by nuclear renography, in addition to sonography and contrast cystography.

  16. Pathogenesis and Laboratory Diagnosis of Childhood Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jharna Mandal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common infections of childhood. The clinical presentations are mostly non-specific or mild. As any episode of UTI can potentially damage the kidneys, timely diagnosis and treatment are necessary to prevent renal damage. Incidence of UTI varies depending on the age, gender, and race of the child. UTIs in children are commonly caused by bacteria, though viruses, fungi, and parasites are also occasionally involved. The pathogenesis of UTI is complex where several host and pathogen factors influence the course of the disease and its outcome. Urine culture is still considered the gold standard method for the diagnosis of UTI. The means of obtaining urine samples from children for culture involves urethral catheterisation and suprapubic aspiration. The conventional methods of antibiotic susceptibility testing are labour intensive and time exhaustive. With the advent of technology, many automated platforms are available which are rapid, involve less volume of the culture or the sample, and have high accuracy.

  17. Radiation damage to mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    This document contains newspaper cuttings and correspondence with various ministries in Hessen on the subject of radiation damage to mushrooms from the Odenwald area. The reader is given, amongst other things, detailed information on radiation damage to different types of mushroom in 1986. (MG) [de

  18. Animal damage to birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    James S. Jordan; Francis M. Rushmore

    1969-01-01

    A relatively few animal species are responsible for most of the reported damage to the birches. White-tailed deer, yellow-bellied sapsuckers, porcupines, moose, and hares are the major animals involved. We will review reports of damage, discuss the underlying causes, and describe possible methods of control. For example, heavy deer browsing that eliminates birch...

  19. Animal damage management handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh C. Black

    1994-01-01

    This handbook treats animal damage management (ADM) in the West in relation to forest, range, and recreation resources; predator management is not addressed. It provides a comprehensive reference of safe, effective, and practical methods for managing animal damage on National Forest System lands. Supporting information is included in references after each chapter and...

  20. Nuclear damage - civil liability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoes, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is made of the civil liability for nuclear damage since there is a need to adjust the existing rules to the new situations created. The conventions that set up the new disciplining rules not considered in the common law for the liability of nuclear damage are also mentioned. (A.L.) [pt

  1. DNA damage and autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  2. Zika Virus in the Male Reproductive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesel Stassen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses are resurging across the globe. Zika virus (ZIKV has caused significant concern in recent years because it can lead to congenital malformations in babies and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. Unlike other arboviruses, ZIKV can be sexually transmitted and may persist in the male reproductive tract. There is limited information regarding the impact of ZIKV on male reproductive health and fertility. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie persistent ZIKV infections in men is critical to developing effective vaccines and therapies. Mouse and macaque models have begun to unravel the pathogenesis of ZIKV infection in the male reproductive tract, with the testes and prostate gland implicated as potential reservoirs for persistent ZIKV infection. Here, we summarize current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of ZIKV in the male reproductive tract, the development of animal models to study ZIKV infection at this site, and prospects for vaccines and therapeutics against persistent ZIKV infection.

  3. Interventional studies of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.; Gross, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine studies of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract provide a means whereby physiologic and pathophysiologic features can be observed from a unique and noninvasive perspective. While nuclear medicine studies by their very nature lack the high spatial resolution of the radiographic approach, the data derived are readily quantitated and presented in numerical fashion to provide functional and dynamic information in which the influences of interventions may be observed. This chapter outlines the scope of such interventions in studies of the upper GI tract with emphasis on examinations for gastroesophageal reflux and gastric emptying. The interactions of nutrients, physical maneuvers of pharmacologic agents on nuclear medicine studies of the upper GI tract may be intentional to render a test more sensitive or to evaluate the effect of therapy, or may represent an unintentional side effect that must be taken into account if misinterpretation is to be avoided

  4. New ICRP human respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The new ICRP dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract is based on the premise that the large differences in radiation sensitivity of respiratory tract tissues, and the wide range of doses they receive argue for calculating specific tissue doses rather than average lung doses. The model is also directly applicable to the worldwide population of both workers and the public. The requirement to describe intake, and deposition, clearance and dosimetry in each respiratory tract region, for a wide range of subjects at various levels of exercise necessarily means that the model is more complex than that of ICRP Publication 30. The widespread use of powerful personal computers, and the availability of user-friendly software to implement the model, however, will make it widely and readily accessible when the report is published. (Author)

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary tract infection in pedeatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Richard; Sapin, Jeanne; De Parscau, Loïc; Pougnet, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in children are most often lung infections or meningitis. Urinary tract infections are much rarer. We present the case of a urinary tract infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The clinical picture was classical. The urine culture showed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine (10 4 UFC/mL; with 2 × 10 4 leucocytes/mL). The literature mentions a few cases of such infections. In some studies, the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine of children is less than 1%. Those children mostly present abnormalities of urinary tract. In our case, urinary ultrasound scan have shown the presence of an ectopic kidney in this child. The discussion between the clinician and the biologist has contributed to the discovery of this renal anomaly.

  6. The effects of anodal-tDCS on corticospinal excitability enhancement and its after-effects: conventional versus unihemispheric concurrent dual-site stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita eVaseghi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous researchers have approved the ability of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS of the primary motor cortex (M1 to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE. The primary aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of concurrent stimulation of M1 and a functionally connected cortical site of M1 on CSE modulation. This new technique is called unihemispheric concurrent dual-site a-tDCS (a-tDCSUHCDS. The secondary aim was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of this new approach in healthy individuals. In a randomized crossover study, 12 healthy right-handed volunteers received a-tDCS under five conditions: a-tDCS of M1, a-tDCSUHCDS of M1– dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, a-tDCSUHCDS of M1– primary sensory cortex (S1, a-tDCSUHCDS of M1– primary visual cortex (V1, and sham a-tDCSUHCDS. Peak-to-peak amplitude of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS induced MEPs, short-interval intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation were assessed before and four times after each condition. A-tDCSUHCDS conditions induced larger MEPs than conventional a-tDCS. The level of M1 CSE was significantly higher following a-tDCSUHCDS of M1-DLPFC than other a-tDCSUHCDS conditions (P < 0.001, and lasted for over 24 hours. The paired-pulse TMS results after a-tDCS of M1-DLPFC showed significant facilitatory increase and inhibitory change. A-tDCSUHCDS of M1-DLPFC increases M1 CSE twofold that of conventional a-tDCS. A-tDCSUHCDS of M1-DLPFC enhances the activity of glutamergic mechanisms for at least 24 hours. Such long-lasting M1 CSE enhancement induced by a-tDCSUHCDS of M1-DLPFC could be a valuable finding in clinical scenarios such as learning, motor performance, or pain management.The present study has been registered on the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial at http://www.anzctr.org.au/ with registry number of ACTRN12614000817640.

  7. A Double-Coil TMS Method to Assess Corticospinal Excitability Changes at a Near-Simultaneous Time in the Two Hands during Movement Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Emmanuelle; Quoilin, Caroline; Petitjean, Charlotte; Duque, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many previous transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have investigated corticospinal excitability changes occurring when choosing which hand to use for an action, one of the most frequent decision people make in daily life. So far, these studies have applied single-pulse TMS eliciting motor-evoked potential (MEP) in one hand when this hand is either selected or non-selected. Using such method, hand choices were shown to entail the operation of two inhibitory mechanisms, suppressing MEPs in the targeted hand either when it is non-selected (competition resolution, CR) or selected (impulse control, IC). However, an important limitation of this “Single-Coil” method is that MEPs are elicited in selected and non-selected conditions during separate trials and thus those two settings may not be completely comparable. Moreover, a more important problem is that MEPs are computed in relation to the movement of different hands. The goal of the present study was to test a “Double-Coil” method to evaluate IC and CR preceding the same hand responses by applying Double-Coil TMS over the two primary motor cortices (M1) at a near-simultaneous time (1 ms inter-pulse interval). Methods: MEPs were obtained in the left (MEPLEFT) and right (MEPRIGHT) hands while subjects chose between left and right hand key-presses in blocks using a Single-Coil or a Double-Coil method; in the latter blocks, TMS was either applied over left M1 first (TMSLRM1 group, n = 12) or right M1 first (TMSRLM1 group, n = 12). Results: MEPLEFT were suppressed preceding both left (IC) and right (CR) hand responses whereas MEPRIGHT were only suppressed preceding left (CR) but not right (IC) hand responses. This result was observed regardless of whether Single-Coil or Double-Coil TMS was applied in the two subject groups. However, in the TMSLRM1 group, the MEP suppression was attenuated in Double-Coil compared to Single-Coil blocks for both IC and CR, when probed with MEPLEFT (elicited by

  8. Does transcranial electrical stimulation enhance corticospinal excitability of the motor cortex in healthy individuals? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayaka, Thusharika; Zoghi, Maryam; Farrell, Michael; Egan, Gary F; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2017-08-01

    Numerous studies have explored the effects of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) - including anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS), cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (c-tDCS), transcranial alternative current stimulation (tACS), transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) and transcranial pulsed current stimulation (tPCS) - on corticospinal excitability (CSE) in healthy populations. However, the efficacy of these techniques and their optimal parameters for producing robust results has not been studied. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to consolidate current knowledge about the effects of various parameters of a-tDCS, c-tDCS, tACS, tRNS and tPCS on the CSE of the primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy people. Leading electronic databases were searched for relevant studies published between January 1990 and February 2017; 126 articles were identified, and their results were extracted and analysed using RevMan software. The meta-analysis showed that a-tDCS application on the dominant side significantly increases CSE (P < 0.01) and that the efficacy of a-tDCS is dependent on current density and duration of application. Similar results were obtained for stimulation of M1 on the non-dominant side (P = 0.003). The effects of a-tDCS reduce significantly after 24 h (P = 0.006). Meta-analysis also revealed significant reduction in CSE following c-tDCS (P < 0.001) and significant increases after tRNS (P = 0.03) and tPCS (P = 0.01). However, tACS effects on CSE were only significant when the stimulation frequency was ≥140 Hz. This review provides evidence that tES has substantial effects on CSE in healthy individuals for a range of stimulus parameters. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. eGFP expression under the Uchl1 promoter labels corticospinal motor neurons and a subpopulation of degeneration resistant spinal motor neurons in ALS mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasvoina, Marina V.

    Current understanding of basic cellular and molecular mechanisms for motor neuron vulnerability during motor neuron disease initiation and progression is incomplete. The complex cytoarchitecture and cellular heterogeneity of the cortex and spinal cord greatly impedes our ability to visualize, isolate, and study specific neuron populations in both healthy and diseased states. We generated a novel reporter line, the Uchl1-eGFP mouse, in which cortical and spinal components of motor neuron circuitry are genetically labeled with eGFP under the Uchl1 promoter. A series of cellular and anatomical analyses combined with retrograde labeling, molecular marker expression, and electrophysiology were employed to determine identity of eGFP expressing cells in the motor cortex and the spinal cord of novel Uchl1-eGFP reporter mice. We conclude that eGFP is expressed in corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) in the motor cortex and a subset of S-type alpha and gamma spinal motor neurons (SMN) in the spinal cord. hSOD1G93A and Alsin-/- mice, mouse models for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), were bred to Uchl1-eGFP reporter mouse line to investigate the pathophysiology and underlying mechanisms of CSMN degeneration in vivo. Evidence suggests early and progressive degeneration of CSMN and SMN in the hSOD1G93A transgenic mice. We show an early increase of autophagosome formation in the apical dendrites of vulnerable CSMN in hSOD1G93A-UeGFP mice, which is localized to the apical dendrites. In addition, labeling S-type alpha and gamma SMN in the hSOD1G93A-UeGFP mice provide a unique opportunity to study basis of their resistance to degeneration. Mice lacking alsin show moderate clinical phenotype and mild CSMN axon degeneration in the spinal cord, which suggests vulnerability of CSMN. Therefore, we investigated the CSMN cellular and axon defects in aged Alsin-/- mice bred to Uchl1-eGFP reporter mouse line. We show that while CSMN are preserved and lack signs of degeneration, CSMN axons

  10. VIRAL ETIOLOGY OF RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Ibishev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recurrent urinary tract infection is an actual problem of modern urology.Objective. Complex investigation of urinary tract infections including viral etiology for chronic recurrent cystitis in womenMaterials and methods. The study included 31 women with recurrent infection of urinary tract. Inclusion criteria were the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms caused by infection, severe recurrent course, the lack of anatomical and functional disorders of the urinary tract, the absence of bacterial pathogens during the study, taking into account the culture of aerobic and anaerobic culturing techniques.Results. The analysis of the clinical manifestations, the dominant in the study group were pain and urgency to urinate at 100% and 90% of women surveyed, respectively, and less frequent urination were recorded in 16.1% of patients. In general clinical examination of urine in all cases identified leukocyturia and 90% of the hematuria. By using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR in midstream urine of all examined was verified 10 types of human papilloma virus (HPV with the predominance of 16 and 18 types . Considering the presence of recurrent infectious and inflammatory processes of the urinary tract, cystoscopy with bladder biopsy was performed for all patients. When histomorphological biopsies of all patients surveyed noted the presence of the specific characteristics of HPV: papillary hyperplasia with squamous koilocytosis, pale cytoplasm and shrunken kernels. When analyzing the results of PCR biopsy data corresponded with the results of PCR in midstream urine in all biopsies was detected HPV.Conclusions. Human papillomavirus infection may be involved in the development of viral cystitis. In the etiological structure of viral cystitis, both highly oncogenic and low oncogenic HPV types can act.

  11. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Andrew D. [Horticultural Sciences Department and; Henry, Christopher S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, email:; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Fiehn, Oliver [Genome Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, email:; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie [Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, email: ,

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  12. Lower tract neoplasm: Update of imaging evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Robert; Kawashima, Akira

    2017-12-01

    Cancers of the lower urinary tract can arise from the bladder, urachus or urethra. Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) is the most common of these. The presentation of bladder, urachal and urethral cancers can differ but many result in hematuria as an initial indication. The diagnosis and staging of these cancers often necessitate radiologic imaging often in the form of cross-section CT urography or MR urography. The following article reviews the specific nature of lower tract cancers and their imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacher, Jean-Nicolas [University of Rouen, Quant-IF Laboratory, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rouen (France); Rouen University Hospital Charles Nicolle, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); UFR Medecine Pharmacie de Rouen, Laboratoire Quant-If, Rouen (France); Hitzel, Anne; Vera, Pierre [University of Rouen, Quant-IF Laboratory, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rouen (France); CRLCC Henri Becquerel, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rouen (France); Avni, Fred E. [Free University of Brussels, Department of Radiology, Erasmus Hospital, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-07-01

    This article is focused on the controversial topic of imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection. A review of the recent literature illustrates the complementary roles of ultrasound, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. The authors stress the key role of ultrasound which has recently been debated. The commonly associated vesicoureteric reflux has to be classified as congenital or secondary due to voiding dysfunction. A series of frequently asked questions are addressed in a second section. The proposed answers are not the product of a consensus but should rather be considered as proposals to enrich the ongoing debate concerning the evaluation of urinary tract infection in children. (orig.)

  14. Imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Hitzel, Anne; Vera, Pierre; Avni, Fred E.

    2005-01-01

    This article is focused on the controversial topic of imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection. A review of the recent literature illustrates the complementary roles of ultrasound, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. The authors stress the key role of ultrasound which has recently been debated. The commonly associated vesicoureteric reflux has to be classified as congenital or secondary due to voiding dysfunction. A series of frequently asked questions are addressed in a second section. The proposed answers are not the product of a consensus but should rather be considered as proposals to enrich the ongoing debate concerning the evaluation of urinary tract infection in children. (orig.)

  15. Imaging of the urinary tract in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslaksen, A.; Hunskaar, S.; Hoeisaeter, P.Aa.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses the indications for imaging of the urinary tract from the general practitioners' point of view. Urography should be used in the control of patients with previous attacks of ureteral colic, in patients presenting macroscopic hematuria and as a preoperative investigation prior to extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Ultrasound should be chosen in patients with microscopic hematuria and non-specific abdominal pain. Computerized tomography should be used in cases with non-specific findings using urography and ultrasound. There are no indications for imaging in women with recurrent urinary tract infection, in men with benign prostatic hypertrophy and in the evaluation of hypertension. 14 refs., 5 tabs

  16. DNA damage and polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jeremy; Poon, Randy Y C

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that polyploidization triggers chromosomal instability and contributes to tumorigenesis. DNA damage is increasingly being recognized for its roles in promoting polyploidization. Although elegant mechanisms known as the DNA damage checkpoints are responsible for halting the cell cycle after DNA damage, agents that uncouple the checkpoints can induce unscheduled entry into mitosis. Likewise, defects of the checkpoints in several disorders permit mitotic entry even in the presence of DNA damage. Forcing cells with damaged DNA into mitosis causes severe chromosome segregation defects, including lagging chromosomes, chromosomal fragments and chromosomal bridges. The presence of these lesions in the cleavage plane is believed to abort cytokinesis. It is postulated that if cytokinesis failure is coupled with defects of the p53-dependent postmitotic checkpoint pathway, cells can enter S phase and become polyploids. Progress in the past several years has unraveled some of the underlying principles of these pathways and underscored the important role of DNA damage in polyploidization. Furthermore, polyploidization per se may also be an important determinant of sensitivity to DNA damage, thereby may offer an opportunity for novel therapies.

  17. Visualization of white matter tracts using a non-diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging method: does intravenous gadolinium injection four hours prior to the examination affect the visualization of white matter tracts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yamazaki

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Visualization of white matter (WM-tracts such as the corticospinal tract (CST, medial lemniscus (ML, and superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP using delayed enhanced (DE-heavily T2-weighted three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (hT2w-3D-FLAIR imaging has recently been reported. In that report, all patients were clinically suspected of having Ménière's disease, because DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR imaging of the inner ear has been reported to separately visualize perilymph and endolymph fluid and can identify the presence of endolymphatic hydrops. Therefore, the previous report could not rule out the possible effect of delayed enhancement. From this perspective, the purpose of this study was to elucidate if the use of gadolinium affects the visualization of WM-tracts on hT2w-3D-FLAIR. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The records of nine patients with suspected Ménière's disease who underwent plain (P and DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR by 3-Tesla were retrospectively analyzed. The regions of interest were set on the CST, ML, and SCP, and on contiguous brain parenchyma: The thalamus (Th, pontine parenchyma (PP, and cerebellar parenchyma (CP, respectively. The signal intensity ratio between each WM-tract and the relevant contiguous brain parenchyma was calculated for both P- and DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR images, and statistically compared using paired t-tests. RESULTS: The CST/Th signal intensity ratio was 3.75±0.67 on P-hT2w-3D-FLAIR and 3.62±0.50 on DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR (p = 0.24. The ML/PP signal intensity ratio was 2.19±0.59 on P-hT2w-3D-FLAIR and 2.08±0.53 on DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR (p = 0.25. The SCP/CP signal intensity ratio was 4.08±0.91 on P-hT2w-3D-FLAIR and 4.04±0.96 on DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR (p = 0.43. There were no significant differences in the signal intensity ratios between P- and DE-hT2w-3D-FLAIR images. CONCLUSIONS: The use of gadolinium is not necessary for visualization of WM-tracts using hT2w-3D-FLAIR, and P-hT2w-3D-FLAIR without gadolinium may

  18. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, E.K.; Jones, B.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters and five case studies. Some of the chapter titles are: CT of the Stomach; CT and Other Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Evaluation of Crohn's Disease; Periotoneal Metastasis; CT and MRI Correlation of the Gastrointestinal Tract; CT of Acute Gastrointestinal Abnormlities; and CT of Colorectal Cancer

  19. Urinary Tract Infection in Children: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Hamid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common paediatric infections. By the time children are 5 years old, about 8% of girls and about 1-2% of boys have had at least one episode of UTI. UTIs are caused mainly by colonic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, followed by Klebsiella and Proteus. However, any organism that gains access to the urinary tract system may cause infection, including fungi (Candida species and viruses. In some instances, UTI results in recognition of an important underlying structural abnormality of the urinary tract. The febrile infant or child with clinically significant bacteriuria and no other site of infection to explain the fever, even in the absence of systemic symptoms has UTI. Signs and symptoms of UTIs vary depending on the child's age and on which part of the urinary tract is infected. The diagnosis of UTI is based on routine microscopic examination and culture of a properly collected urine specimen. Imaging studies are done in selected patients to identify anatomic abnormalities. Most cases of uncomplicated UTI respond readily to outpatient antibiotic treatment without further sequelae. All patients should have close follow-up to evaluate response to antibiotics and to prevent the development of long term complication.

  20. Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in children. The management and laboratory diagnosis of these infections pose unique challenges that are not encountered in adults. Important factors, such as specimen collection, urinalysis interpretation, culture thresholds, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, require special consideration in children and will be discussed in detail in the following review. PMID:27053673

  1. [Fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragkoudakis, Emmanouil; Realdi, Giuseppe; Dore, Maria Pina

    2005-06-01

    In immunocompetent subjects fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon. Candida esophagitis remains the single most common fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts or in H. pylori- infected patients who receive antibiotic therapy. Enteric fungal infections are uncommon even in HIV-infected patients. Antifungal agents such as amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole, and the various formulations of itraconazole are effective for most cases.

  2. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection among pregnant women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A good proportion of pregnant women patronize traditional birth homes in Nigeria for ante-natal care. This study aimed at determining the prevalence, risk factors, and susceptibility profile of etiologic agents of urinary tract infection among ante-natal attendees in a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria.

  3. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Junji; Okusaka, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important

  4. Medical Prescription Pitfalls of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this evaluation was to identify pitfalls in medical prescriptions of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in government healthcare facilities in Zambia. Design: This was a cross sectional and government healthcare facilities were conveniently sampled. Main outcome measures: Rate of compliance to ...

  5. Bifidobacteria in the digestive tract of bumblebees

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Killer, Jiří; Kopečný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Rada, V.; Dubá, S.; Marounek, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2010), s. 165-170 ISSN 1075-9964 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD525/08/H060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Bifidobacteria * Bumblebee * Digestive tract Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 2.448, year: 2010

  6. Febrile urinary tract infections: pyelonephritis and urosepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Holleman, Frits; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Complicated infections of the urinary tract (UTI) including pyelonephritis and urosepsis are also called febrile UTI. This review describes insights from the literature on this topic since July 2014. Recent studies regarding risk factors and consequences of febrile UTI confirmed existing knowledge.

  7. Renal Impairment in 79 Pediatric Patients (158 Renal Units) With Repeated Urinary Tract Infection in Relation to Vesicoureteric Reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, H.; Amin, A.; El-Haddad, Sh.; Moustafa, B.; Wageeh, Sh.; Soliman, N.

    1998-01-01

    Seventy nine patients with repeated urinary tract infection were evaluated for detection of vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR) by direct (DRC) and indirect (IRC) radionuclide cystography as well as assessment of renal scarring using 99 mTc-DMSA. Positive VUR was evident in 38 patients (59 renal units), 50%, patients had history of recurrent urinary tract infection. Patients kidneys were divided into 2 groups: group A with normal if kidneys (74 renal units), but still they have high grade VUR in 20 renal units (20.6%.Group B with scarred kidneys (84 renal Units) with high grade VUR in 36 renal units (42.9%) with significant difference between both groups (P 99 mTc-DMSA with VUR assessment are essential in pediatric patients with urinary tract infection for detection of high grade VUR which may contribute to renal scarring and damage

  8. LSD and Genetic Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  9. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  10. EMBRYOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF СONGENITAL ANOMALIES OF THE KIDNEY AND URINARY TRACT (CAKUT: REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Vasilyev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, urologists and nephrologists abnormalities called structural and / or functional abnormalities of the urinary and reproductive systems, caused by disturbance of embryonic development. A significant increase in the number of birth defects may be due to the fact that in embryogenesis kidney is the target organ for exposure to various damaging factors in nature, among which a special place is occupied by medication and physical status of the mother. Violation of prenatal development of the kidneys can often be combined with defects of the lower urinary tract. This condition is often called CAKUT in the development of the role played by the combination of gene mutations. In this article, we describe the majority of congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract. Significant improvement in antenatal diagnosis of malformations also contributed to the increase in this indicator. Understanding the embryology urinary organs allows to diagnose disorders in the mother-placenta-fetus system.

  11. A rational approach to imaging the upper urinary tract in children with pyelonephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, M.V.; Glass, J.; Uttley, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    At least seven techniques of imaging the urinary tract are commonly used for the investigation of children in whom infection is suspected or proven, namely Excretion Urography (EU), Micturating Cysto-Urethrography (MCU), Isotope Renography (IR), Indirect Radionucleide Voiding Cysto-Urethrography (IRVC), Renal Scintigraphy (RS), Direct Radionucleide Voiding Cysto-Urethrography (DRVC) and Ultrasonography (US). There is at the present time no single investigation which is clearly suitable for use as a stand-alone screening test for predicting risk of progressive renal damage in children with upper tract infections. Radioisotope renography, associated with indirect radionuclide voiding cysto-urethrography, and supplemented by ultrasound may be the combination of tests which give the maximum information for the lowest radiation dose

  12. Lactic acid alleviates stress: good for female genital tract homeostasis, bad for protection against malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkin, Steven S

    2018-05-01

    Women are unique from all other mammals in that lactic acid is present at high levels in the vagina during their reproductive years. This dominance may have evolved in response to the unique human lifestyle and a need to optimally protect pregnant women and their fetuses from endogenous and exogenous insults. Lactic acid in the female genital tract inactivates potentially pathogenic bacteria and viruses, maximizes survival of vaginal epithelial cells, and inhibits inflammation that may be damaging to the developing fetus and maintenance of the pregnancy. In an analogous manner, lactic acid production facilitates survival of malignantly transformed cells, inhibits activation of immune cells, and prevents the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in response to tumor-specific antigens. Thus, the same stress-reducing properties of lactic acid that promote lower genital tract health facilitate malignant transformation and progression.

  13. Worldwide survey of damage from swallowing multiple magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestreich, Alan E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Radiology Department 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2009-02-15

    It is increasingly recognized that in children swallowed multiple magnets cause considerable damage to the gastrointestinal tract. To emphasize that complications from swallowed magnets are extensive worldwide and throughout childhood. The author surveyed radiologists and researched cases of magnet swallowing in the literature and documented age and gender, numbers of magnets, nature of the magnets, reasons for swallowing, and clinical course. A total of 128 instances of magnet swallowing were identified, one fatal. Cases from 21 countries were found. Magnet swallowing occurred throughout childhood, with most children older than 3 years of age. Numbers of swallowed magnets ranged up to 100. Twelve children were known to be autistic. Many reasons were given for swallowing magnets, and a wide range of gastrointestinal damage was encountered. Considerable delay before seeking medical assistance was frequent, as was delay before obtaining radiographs or US imaging. Damage from swallowing multiple magnets is a considerable worldwide problem. More educational and preventative measures are needed. (orig.)

  14. Worldwide survey of damage from swallowing multiple magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestreich, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that in children swallowed multiple magnets cause considerable damage to the gastrointestinal tract. To emphasize that complications from swallowed magnets are extensive worldwide and throughout childhood. The author surveyed radiologists and researched cases of magnet swallowing in the literature and documented age and gender, numbers of magnets, nature of the magnets, reasons for swallowing, and clinical course. A total of 128 instances of magnet swallowing were identified, one fatal. Cases from 21 countries were found. Magnet swallowing occurred throughout childhood, with most children older than 3 years of age. Numbers of swallowed magnets ranged up to 100. Twelve children were known to be autistic. Many reasons were given for swallowing magnets, and a wide range of gastrointestinal damage was encountered. Considerable delay before seeking medical assistance was frequent, as was delay before obtaining radiographs or US imaging. Damage from swallowing multiple magnets is a considerable worldwide problem. More educational and preventative measures are needed. (orig.)

  15. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of community-acquired UTI organisms to amoxycillin and co-trimoxazole was .... Treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection in non-pregnant women. Postgrad ... Single-dose antibiotic treatment for symptomatic uri- nary tract infections in ...

  16. Evaluation of Screening Methods for the Detection of Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2000-05-30

    screening testsfor urinary tract infection was donefrom March 20 to May 30, 2000. A cross sectional study ... the diagnosis of urinary tract infection on the basis of pyuria alone. The minimum number of ..... infection Complicating. Pregnancy J.

  17. urinary tract infections in symptomatic pregnant women attending

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    bacterial infections in the elderly but also the most common and ... For pregnant women, urinary tract infection is the most common ... causing arthropathy in children. Urinary tract ... resistance in our environment, resistance such as β-. Urinary ...

  18. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of organisms causing urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of organisms causing urinary tract infection in ... out on bacterial isolates from the urine of febrile children with sickle cell anemia ... of childhood urinary tract infections (UTI) in this environment are resistant to ...

  19. Antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of organisms causing urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... Objective: The knowledge of antimicrobial sensitivity pattern of common etiological ... of childhood urinary tract infections (UTI) in this environment are resistant to most ... causing urinary tract infection in children with sickle.

  20. Childhood urinary tract infection in Benin City: pathogens and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Childhood urinary tract infection in Benin City: pathogens and antimicrobial ... of bacterial isolates implicated in urinary tract infection (UTI) amongst children was ... There is also an emerging resistance of common pathogens to azithromycin ...

  1. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Gravas, Stavros; Fitzpatrick, John M.

    2008-01-01

    During the past decade, increasing numbers of minimally invasive treatments for managing male lower urinary tract symptoms caused by urinary tract obstruction have been positioned. On one hand, transurethral needle ablation and transurethral microwave thermotherapy bridge the gap between medical

  2. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions KidsHealth / For Parents / Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions What's in this article? ...

  3. Urinary tract infection in women - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most urinary tract infections (UTIs) are caused by bacteria that enter the urethra and travel to the bladder. ... BATHING AND HYGIENE To prevent future urinary tract infections, ... believe make infections more likely. Change your pad each time ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infection in Febrile Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Nigeria. Children with this disease have increased tendency to develop frequent and severe infections especially of the urinary tract, bones and lungs. The prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) has however not been reported in this part ...

  5. Diabetes and Risk of Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, and Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W.; Mor, Anil

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...... increase for hospitalization with pneumonia associated with diabetes. The increase of risk for tuberculosis is of similar magnitude in highly developed countries, and possibly higher in low-income countries. Poor glycemic control and long diabetes duration predict higher risk for both pneumonia...... and tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk...

  6. Radiological diagnostics in oncology. Vol. 2. Gasterointestinal tract, urogenital tract, retroperitoneum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layer, G.

    2008-01-01

    The radiological diagnostics is of main importance for identification, status classification, therapy planning and control and aftertreatment of tumor diseases; therefore there is a need for appropriate requirements dependent on the specific case. The volume contains the following contributions: oesophasus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, small intestine carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, liver carcinoma, gall bladder and biliary tract carcinoma, exocrine pancreas carcinoma, kidney and urinary tract carcinomas, testicular carcinoma, prostate carcinoma, malign tumor in the adrenal gland, uterus carcinoma, uterine carcinoma

  7. 36 CFR 254.42 - Valuation of tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Valuation of tracts. 254.42 Section 254.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS Conveyance of Small Tracts § 254.42 Valuation of tracts. (a) Approximately equal value shall be...

  8. Childhood Midline Tract Carcinoma Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood midline tract carcinoma occurs in the respiratory tract or other places along the center line of the body. It is sometimes caused by a change in the NUT gene (NUT midline carcinoma). Get information about childhood midline tract carcinoma, including symptoms, tests, and multimodality treatment in this expert-reviewed summary.

  9. The microbiota of the respiratory tract : Gatekeeper to respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, Wing Ho; De Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A.A.; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts

  10. [Genes in the development of female genital tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Na; Zhu, Lan; Lang, Jing-he

    2013-12-01

    Female genital tract, which includes oviduct, uterus, and vagina, is critical for female reproduction. In recent years, animal experiments using knockout mice and genetic studies on patients with female genital malformations have contributed substantially to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms in the female genital tract development. Here we review genes that are involved in various stages of female genital tract formation and development.

  11. Urinary tract infections in symptomatic pregnant women attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Several notable human pathogens cause urinary tract infections. Several factors are known to predispose an individual to developing urinary tract infections; one of the factors is pregnancy. Therefore, this research set out to determine the bacteriologic profile of urinary tract infection and the susceptibility pattern ...

  12. Coal transportation road damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtraw, D.; Harrison, K.; Pawlowski, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Heavy trucks are primarily responsible for pavement damage to the nation's highways. In this paper we evaluate the pavement damage caused by coal trucks. We analyze the chief source of pavement damage (vehicle weight per axle, not total vehicle weight) and the chief cost involved (the periodic overlay that is required when a road's surface becomes worn). This analysis is presented in two stages. In the first section we present a synopsis of current economic theory including simple versions of the formulas that can be: used to calculate costs of pavement wear. In the second section we apply this theory to a specific example proximate to the reference environment for the Fuel Cycle Study in New Mexico in order to provide a numerical measure of the magnitude of the costs

  13. Natural resource damage assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddelmeyer, J.

    1991-01-01

    The assessment and collection of natural resource damages from petroleum and chemical companies unfortunate enough to have injured publicly owned natural resources is perhaps the most rapidly expanding area of environmental liability. The idea of recovering for injury to publicly owned natural resources is an extension of traditional common law tort concepts under which a person who negligently injures another or his property is called upon to compensate the injured party. Normally, once liability has been established, it is a fairly straightforward matter to calculate the various elements of loss, such as the cost to repair or replace damaged property, or medical expenses, and lost income. More difficult questions, such as the amount to be awarded for pain and suffering or emotional distress, are left to the jury, although courts limit the circumstances in which the jury is permitted to award such damages

  14. Upper urinary tract damage caused by ketamine snorting—A report of nine cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Ying Lee

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, currently there is no standard therapy for ketamine-induced nephropathy, we therefore supplied a therapeutic choice for those ketamine abuser combined with hydronephrosis and/or acute kidney injury.

  15. Recurrent branchial sinus tract with aberrant extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, J P

    2004-01-01

    Second branchial cysts are the commonest lesions among congenital lateral neck anomalies. Good knowledge of anatomy and embryology are necessary for proper treatment. Surgical treatment involves resection of all branchial remnants, which extend laterally in the neck, medial to the sternocleidomastoid muscle with cranial extension to the pharynx and ipsilateral tonsillar fosa. However, infections and previous surgery can distort anatomy, making the approach to branchial anomalies more difficult. We present a case of a 17-year-old patient who presented with a second branchial tract anomaly with an aberrant extension to the midline and part of the contralateral neck. Previous surgical interventions and chronic infections may have been the primary cause for this aberrant tract. All head and neck surgeons should bear in mind that aberrant presentations may exist when reoperating on chronic branchial cysts fistulas.

  16. Rationale diagnostic approach to biliary tract imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, H.; Huppertz, A.; Ruell, T.; Zillinger, C.; Ehrenberg, C.; Roesch, T.

    1998-01-01

    Since the introduction of MR cholangiography (MRC) diagnostic imaging of the biliary tract has been significantly improved. While percutaneous ultrasonography is still the primary examination, computed tomography (CT), conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as the direct imaging modalities of the biliary tract - iv cholangiography, endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiography (ERC), and percutaneous-transhepatic-cholangiography (PTC) are in use. This article discusses the clinical value of the different diagnostic techniques for the various biliary pathologies with special attention to recent developments in MRC techniques. An algorithm is presented offering a rational approach to biliary disorders. With further technical improvement shifts from ERC(P) to MRC(P) for biliary imaging could be envisioned, ERCP further concentrating on its role as a minimal invasive treatment option. (orig.) [de

  17. Radiodiagnosis of tumours of gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Yu.N.; Antonovich, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    Systematic description of X-ray picture of tumours of gastrointestinal tract organs is given. The possibilities of contemporary methods of X-ray examination in their revealing are shown. Clinical and X-ray trend of tumour diagnosis is underlined. The basic and accessory symptoms are analyzed from which X-ray semiotics of tumours is turned out. The expressiveness of X-ray symptoms is shown in relation to morphological forms and localization of the tumours. Much attention is given to radiodiagnosis of early tumours of stomach. Differential diagnosis of tumours with non-tumoural diseases is given. X-ray semiotics of lesions of gastrointestinal tract organs in malignant diseases of blood system is presented [ru

  18. Urinary tract infection in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Mora, Natalia; Pachón Díaz, Jerónimo; Cordero Matía, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    Infectious complications remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality among transplant recipients. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complication in kidney transplant recipients with a reported incidence from 25% to 75%, varies widely likely due to differences in definition, diagnostic criteria, study design, and length of observation. We sought reviews the incidence and importance of urinary tract infection on graft survival, the microbiology with special emphasis on multidrug resistant microorganisms, the therapeutic management of UTI and the prophylaxis of recurrent UTI among solid organ transplant recipients, highlighting the need for prospective clinical trials to unify the clinical management in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. Carcinoids tumors of the digestive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, S.M.R. de; Prais, M.; Matushita, J.P.K.; Matushita, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Eighteen cases of carcinoid tumors in the digestive tract have been analyzed. They have been selected at Hospital dos Servidores do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, taking into account patients, age and sex, lesions' location and size, clinical manifestations, presence of metastases as well as a classical carcinoid syndrome establisment. Carcinoid tumors come from the digestive tract 'argenta fim'' cells, the ones which produce endocrines. Such endocrines are responsible for a great number of clinical manifestations. The classical syndrome is directly related to the presence of hepatic metastases. The authors propose to correlate what has been found with descriptions in medical literature emphasizing the radiographic aspects which have been observed. A frequent ''apendicular'' location and the difficulty of giving a precise diagnosis before surgery is also emphasized. (author) [pt

  20. Imaging in childhood urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccabona, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common query in pediatric radiology. Imaging for and after UTI is still a heavily debated topic with different approaches, as thorough evidence to decide upon a definite algorithm is scarce. This review article tries to address the clinical rational of the various approaches (general imaging, top-down or bottom-up, selected and individualized imaging concepts…), describes the available imaging modalities and the respective findings in imaging children with UTI, and proposes an imaging algorithm for the work-up of children during and after UTI discussing the "pros and cons" of the different attitudes. In summary, imaging by US is generally considered for all infants and children with a febrile or complicated (upper) UTI, particularly without previously known urinary tract anatomy. The further work-up (searching for renal scarring and assessment of vesico-ureteric reflux) is then decided according to these initial findings as well as the clinical presentation, course, and scenario.

  1. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megibow, A.J.; Balthazar, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    New generation CT scans combined with high-detail barium studies have now allowed radiologists to see and gain a more complete understanding of the wall and surrounding structures of the gastrointestinal tract. The editors state that their intent is to ''present in a comprehensive volume an up-to-date evaluation o the role, significance, indications, and limitations of computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract.'' There is an initial chapter on CT scanning techniques and the use of oral contrast agents. Chapters follow on Ct of the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, small bowel, and colon. The chapters start with a description of the anatomic structures and then cover in detail common pathologic conditions that affect the organ. Indications for examinations are also included in many chapters. There are final chapters on percutaneous drainage of abscesses and fluid collections and on radiologic-patholoic correlation of some of the more common entities

  2. Management of urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgman, D E

    1994-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent complications of pregnancy. When the lower UTIs of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis are not eradicated, the subsequent risk of the development of pyelonephritis is increased. The associated decreased maternal morbidity and fetal prematurity are the goals of a screening and treatment program for pregnant women. This clinical article presents information on the etiology, incidence, diagnosis, and management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis. Nursing implications regarding teaching are included.

  3. Chlamydia and Male Lower Urinary Tract Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Suk; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Of the chlamydia species that can cause infections in humans, C. trachomatis is responsible for lower urinary tract diseases in men and women. C. trachomatis infections are prevalent worldwide, but current research is focused on females, with the burden of disease and infertility sequelae considered to be a predominantly female problem. However, a role for this pathogen in the development of male urethritis, epididymitis, and orchitis is widely accepted. Also, it can cause complications such ...

  4. Diagnosis of pediatric urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Daw Tsai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is the second common infection in children. The diagnosis of UTI in infants and children can be difficult. Good history taking and physical examination are corner stones of good care of UTI. In addition, this article reviewed current evident on the methods of urine specimen collection and various diagnostic criteria to reach the diagnosis of UTI. Asian Guideline for UTI in children is highlighted to increase consensus of the diagnosis of UTI.

  5. Diagnosis of pediatric urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Jeng-Daw Tsai; Chun-Chen Lin; Stephan S. Yang

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the second common infection in children. The diagnosis of UTI in infants and children can be difficult. Good history taking and physical examination are corner stones of good care of UTI. In addition, this article reviewed current evident on the methods of urine specimen collection and various diagnostic criteria to reach the diagnosis of UTI. Asian Guideline for UTI in children is highlighted to increase consensus of the diagnosis of UTI.

  6. AxTract: Toward microstructure informed tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Gabriel; Daducci, Alessandro; Petit, Laurent; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Whittingstall, Kevin; Deriche, Rachid; Wassermann, Demian; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2017-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tractography has become the tool of choice to probe the human brain's white matter in vivo. However, tractography algorithms produce a large number of erroneous streamlines (false positives), largely due to complex ambiguous tissue configurations. Moreover, the relationship between the resulting streamlines and the underlying white matter microstructure characteristics remains poorly understood. In this work, we introduce a new approach to simultaneously reconstruct white matter fascicles and characterize the apparent distribution of axon diameters within fascicles. To achieve this, our method, AxTract, takes full advantage of the recent development DW-MRI microstructure acquisition, modeling, and reconstruction techniques. This enables AxTract to separate parallel fascicles with different microstructure characteristics, hence reducing ambiguities in areas of complex tissue configuration. We report a decrease in the incidence of erroneous streamlines compared to the conventional deterministic tractography algorithms on simulated data. We also report an average increase in streamline density over 15 known fascicles of the 34 healthy subjects. Our results suggest that microstructure information improves tractography in crossing areas of the white matter. Moreover, AxTract provides additional microstructure information along the fascicle that can be studied alongside other streamline-based indices. Overall, AxTract provides the means to distinguish and follow white matter fascicles using their microstructure characteristics, bringing new insights into the white matter organization. This is a step forward in microstructure informed tractography, paving the way to a new generation of algorithms able to deal with intricate configurations of white matter fibers and providing quantitative brain connectivity analysis. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5485-5500, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Acute Korsakoff syndrome following mammillothalamic tract infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Takeda, Norio; Inoue, Akira; Ibuchi, Yasuo; Kumagai, Takashi; Sugai, Tsutomu; Takeda, Ken-ichiro; Ueda, Kaoru

    2004-01-01

    There are limited case reports of structural lesions causing Korsakoff syndrome. This report describes acute Korsakoff syndrome following localized, bilateral infarction of the mammillothalamic tracts (MTTs). Axial T2-weighted imaging revealed the lesions at the lateral wall level of the third ventricle and diffusion-weighted imaging confirmed that the left lesion was new and the right old. Korsakoff syndrome persisted 6 months after the onset. This case suggests that bilateral MTT dysfunction can lead to Korsakoff syndrome.

  9. Acute respiratory tract obstruction in children

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Zahoor

    1999-01-01

    35 cases of acute respiratory tract obstruction in paediatric age group who needed surgical intervention in the form of bronchoscopy, tracheostomy or both are reviewed here. All these patients were seen and managed at National Iranian Oil company Hospital Ummeidiya Khouzestan Iran, from April 1985 to April 1988. The results obtained with a review of use of instruments is described. Most of the patients presented with foreign body inhalations, some due to allergic oedema and one case had laryn...

  10. Pancreatic cancer seeding of percutaneous needle tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Zhou, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year old African-American female presents with biliary ductal dilatation due to an obstructive pancreatic head mass. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram performed and biliary drainage catheter placement for decompression of the biliary system. The patient had a Whipple procedure performed several months later. On follow up CT imaging, there was interval development and enlargement of a subcutaneous lesion by the right oblique muscles. Biopsy of this lesion revealed pancreatic adenocarcinoma from percutaneous seeding of the transhepatic needle tract.

  11. Clinical implications of the microbiome in urinary tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to outline and evaluate the most recent literature on the role of the microbiome in urinary tract diseases. High throughput molecular DNA sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes enabled the analysis of complex microbial communities inhabiting the human urinary tract. Several recent studies have identified bacterial taxa of the urinary microbiome to impact urinary tract diseases including interstitial cystitis, urgency urinary incontinence or calcium oxalate stone formation. Furthermore, treatment of urinary tract infections by antibiotics globally impacts community profiles of the intestinal microbiota and might indirectly influence human health. Alternative treatment options like application of probiotics for the treatment of urinary tract infections are currently under investigation. The urinary microbiome and its relationship to urinary tract diseases is currently under comprehensive investigation. Further studies are needed to shed light on the role of commensal microbiota for urinary tract infections.

  12. Assessment of infective urinary tract disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixt, R.; Stokland, E.

    1998-01-01

    Urinary tracts infection (UTI) is common in children, particularly in the youngest age groups. There is a risk for progressive deterioration of renal function in these children if aggravating factors such as gross reflux and/or outflow obstruction of the urinary tract are present. In this review the pros and cons of available scintigrafic and radiological imaging techniques for the work-up of these children are presented. Ultrasound can be used in the acute phase to exclude obstruction but can not reliably show transient or permanent parenchymal lesions. The presence of reflux can be established with X-ray or direct nuclide cystography. The X-ray technique gives good morphological information and has a grading system with prognostic relevance. Both techniques are invasive and great care must be taken to keep the radiation burden down with the X-ray technique. Indirect nuclide cystography following a renographic study is non-invasive but has a lower sensitivity than direct techniques. More experience is needed with the indirect technique to evaluate the consequences of its apparently low sensitivity. Urography has a limited place in the acute work-up of urinary tract infection but can be used to look for renal scarring 1-2 years after an acute pyelonephritis. The 99m Tc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan can be used during the acute UTI to show pyelonephritic lesions with good accuracy and/or during the follow-up after six months to show permanent lesions. The acute DMSA scan can be omitted

  13. Conservative treatment of perforated upper gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naoi, Daishi; Sano, Wataru; Nakata, Yasuyuki; Yano, Kentaro; Suzuki, Takeshi; Chiku, Tsuyoshi; Tashiro, Tsuguhiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to clarify the validity of indication criteria of the conservative treatment for perforated upper gastrointestinal tract, a retrospective study was carried out. We enrolled 28 patients with perforation of the gastrointestinal tract who were determined to receive conservative treatment at the time of hospitalization from January 2000 to December 2007. When the following criteria were satisfied, we treated the patients by the conservative treatment after informed consent was gained from them and their families: stable condition of vital signs; peritoneal signs localized in the upper abdomen; and no or slight fluid collection at the Douglas' pouch determined by computed tomography. Patients who showed changes for the worse of peritonitis or increased fluid collection during follow-up were promptly converted to surgery. Six patients were converted to surgery, but all of them were discharged very much improved. We compared patient's data of the conservative treatment group and the converted surgery group at the time of consultation. All data were not statistically different between two groups. If all criteria are satisfied, it seemed that we can start conservative treatment for perforated gastrointestinal tract with careful observation and the system of prompt conversion to operation for patients who showed changes for the worse of peritonitis or increased fluid collection. (author)

  14. [COMPLICATED URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN THE ELDERLY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćosić, I; Ćosić, V

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections involving lower (cystitis, prostatitis) or upper (pyelonephritis, renal abscess, perinephric abscess) urinary tract. Differentiation of complicated and uncomplicated UTI is usually based on the presence of structural or functional urinary tract abnormalities, which can increase the risk of treatment failure and development of serious complications. Factors that increase the risk are foreign bodies, stones, obstruction, neurogenic bladder, kidney transplantation, immunosuppression, and pregnancy. Complicated UTI includes a spectrum of conditions that increase the risk of treatment failure, as well as of serious complications such as bacteremia and sepsis, perinephric abscess, renal impairment and emphysematous pyelonephritis. To avoid the potentially devastating outcomes, appropriate diagnostic procedures, antibiotic and surgical treatment, and appropriate follow-up are required. The incidence of complicated UTI will grow in the future due to general aging of the population, increasing incidence of diabetes, and ever growing number of immunocompromised and immunosuppressed patients. It is of key importance to recognize complicated UTI on time, and treat it wisely and aggressively to reduce duration of the disease and the risk of antibiotic resistance.

  15. Antimicrobial Stewardship and Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian M. Abbo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections are the most common bacterial infections encountered in ambulatory and long-term care settings in the United States. Urine samples are the largest single category of specimens received by most microbiology laboratories and many such cultures are collected from patients who have no or questionable urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, antimicrobials are often prescribed inappropriately in such patients. Antimicrobial use, whether appropriate or inappropriate, is associated with the selection for antimicrobial-resistant organisms colonizing or infecting the urinary tract. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant organisms are associated with higher rates of treatment failures, prolonged hospitalizations, increased costs and mortality. Antimicrobial stewardship consists of avoidance of antimicrobials when appropriate and, when antimicrobials are indicated, use of strategies to optimize the selection, dosing, route of administration, duration and timing of antimicrobial therapy to maximize clinical cure while limiting the unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity and selection of resistant microorganisms. This article reviews successful antimicrobial stewardship strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections.

  16. No. 250-Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Annette; Larochelle, Annick

    2017-10-01

    To provide an update of the definition, epidemiology, clinical presentation, investigation, treatment, and prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, post-coital antibiotic prophylaxis, and acute self-treatment are all efficient alternatives to prevent recurrent urinary tract infection. Vaginal estrogen and cranberry juice can also be effective prophylaxis alternatives. A search of PubMed and The Cochrane Library for articles published in English identified the most relevant literature. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date restrictions. This update is the consensus of the Sub-Committee on Urogynaecology of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Recommendations were made according to the guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Recurrent urinary tract infections need careful investigation and can be efficiently treated and prevented. Different prophylaxis options can be selected according to each patient's characteristics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  18. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  19. New markers of urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masajtis-Zagajewska, Anna; Nowicki, Michal

    2017-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection independent of age. It is also one of the most common causes of hospitalizations for infections among elderly people and the most common indication for antibiotic prescriptions in primary care. Both diagnostics and management of lower and upper urinary tract infections provide challenges in clinical practice due to their high prevalence and recurrence, and worldwide increase of antibiotic resistance. The clinical symptoms of UTI are often uncharacteristic or asymptomatic. The accurate diagnosis and early treatment are crucial due to risk of septicaemia and long-term consequences. Currently the diagnosis of urinary tract infection is based on the presence of clinical symptoms in combination with the results of nitrite strip test indicating the presence of bacteria in urine and semi-quantitative measurement of white blood cells count in urine. Although urine culture is the gold standard in UTI diagnostics it is both time-consuming and costly. Searching for novel biomarkers of UTI has attracted much attention in recent years. The article reviews several promising serum and urine biomarkers of UTI such as leukocyte esterase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, interleukins, elastase alpha (1)-proteinase inhibitor, lactofferin, secretory immunoglobulin A, heparin-binding protein, xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase, soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1, α-1 microglobulin (α1Mg) and tetrazolium nitroblue test (TNB). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaino, C; Farrugia, G; Beyder, A

    2017-01-01

    Sensation of mechanical forces is critical for normal function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and abnormalities in mechanosensation are linked to GI pathologies. In the GI tract there are several mechanosensitive cell types-epithelial enterochromaffin cells, intrinsic and extrinsic enteric neurons, smooth muscle cells and interstitial cells of Cajal. These cells use mechanosensitive ion channels that respond to mechanical forces by altering transmembrane ionic currents in a process called mechanoelectrical coupling. Several mechanosensitive ionic conductances have been identified in the mechanosensory GI cells, ranging from mechanosensitive voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels to the mechanogated ion channels, such as the two-pore domain potassium channels K2P (TREK-1) and nonselective cation channels from the transient receptor potential family. The recently discovered Piezo channels are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to cellular mechanosensitivity. Piezo1 and Piezo2 are nonselective cationic ion channels that are directly activated by mechanical forces and have well-defined biophysical and pharmacologic properties. The role of Piezo channels in the GI epithelium is currently under investigation and their role in the smooth muscle syncytium and enteric neurons is still not known. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge on mechanosensitive ion channels in the GI tract, with a focus on the known and potential functions of the Piezo channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium and is well known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls'-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition, which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis.

  2. Gastrointestinal tract sonography in fetuses and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Alain; Baud, Catherine; Ferran, Jean Louis; Saguintaah, Magali; Veyrac, Corinne [Hopital Arnaud de Villeneuve, 34 - Montpellier (France). Service de Radiologie Pediatrique

    2008-07-01

    Sonography of the gastrointestinal tract in fetuses, neonates and children entails no known biological risk, permits serial scanning and can provide information unobtainable with any other imaging modality. In experienced hands it can be used as the initial imaging technique in a number of gastrointestinal diseases and conditions. This book provides a comprehensive account of the current state of the art regarding sonography in this context. An introductory chapter compares the merits of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal gastrointestinal tract. Subsequent chapters focus on the technique, pitfalls and findings in a wide variety of applications, including antropyloric diseases, bowel obstruction, bowel wall thickening, colitis, appendicitis, some types of intussusception, abdominal wall and umbilical abnormalities, intraperitoneal tumors, and trauma. In each case the sonographic morphology is considered in depth with the aid of high-quality illustrations. A concluding chapter comprises a quiz based on 15 case reports. Gastrointestinal Tract Sonography in Fetuses and Children will be of value to all with an interest in this field. (orig.)

  3. Recurrent urinary tract infections in females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsin, R.; Siddiqui, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated Urinary tract infections are common in adult women across the entire age spectrum, with mean annual incidence of 15% and 10% in those aged 15-39 and 40-79 years, respectively. Urinary tract infection (UTI), with its diverse clinical syndromes and affected host groups, remains one of the most common but widely misunderstood and challenging infectious diseases encountered in clinical practice. Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) present a significant problem for women and a challenge for the doctors who care for them. The diagnosis of uncomplicated UTI can be achieved best by a thorough assessment of patient symptoms with or without the addition of a urine dipstick test. Treatment should be based on the most recent guidelines, taking into account resistance patterns in the local community. The patient who suffers from recurrent UTIs can be treated safely and effectively with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, post-coital therapy, or self-initiated treatment. This review article covers the latest trends in the management of recurrent UTI among women. Further research is needed regarding rapid diagnosis of UTI, accurate presumptive identification of patients with resistant pathogens, and development of new antimicrobials for drug-resistant UTI. (author)

  4. MRI Texture Analysis Reveals Deep Gray Nuclei Damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque, Milena; Anjos, Lara G V; Maia Tavares de Andrade, Helen; de Oliveira, Márcia S; Castellano, Gabriela; Junqueira Ribeiro de Rezende, Thiago; Nucci, Anamarli; França Junior, Marcondes Cavalcante

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by extensive corticospinal damage, but extrapyramidal involvement is suggested in pathological studies. Texture analysis (TA) is an image processing technique that evaluates the distribution of gray levels between pixels in a given region of interest (ROI). It provides quantitative data and has been employed in several neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we used TA to investigate possible deep gray nuclei (DGN) abnormalities in a cohort of ALS patients. Thirty-two ALS patients and 32 healthy controls underwent MRI in a 3T scanner. The T1 volumetric sequence was used for DGN segmentation and extraction of 11 texture parameters using the MaZda software. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney non-parametric test, with a significance level set at α = 0.025 (FDR-corrected) for TA. Patients had significantly higher values for the parameter correlation (CO) in both thalami and in the right caudate nucleus compared to healthy controls. Also, the parameter Inverse Difference Moment or Homogeneity (IDM) presented significantly smaller values in the ALS group in both thalami. TA of T1 weighted images revealed DGN alterations in patients with ALS, namely in the thalami and caudate nuclei. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  5. Pediatric febrile urinary tract infections: the current state of play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hewitt Ian K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studies undertaken in recent years have improved our understanding regarding the consequences and management of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs, which are amongst the most common serious bacterial infections in childhood, with renal scarring a frequent outcome. In the past pyelonephritic scarring of the kidney, often associated with vesico-ureteral reflux (reflux nephropathy was considered a frequent cause of chronic renal insufficiency in children. Increasing recognition as a consequence of improved antenatal ultrasound, that the majority of these children had congenital renal hypo-dysplasia, has resulted in a number of studies examining treatment strategies and outcomes following UTI. In recent years there is a developing consensus regarding the need for a less aggressive therapeutic approach with oral as opposed to intravenous antibiotics, and less invasive investigations, cystourethrography in particular, following an uncomplicated first febrile UTI. There does remain a concern that with this newer approach we may be missing a small subgroup of children more prone to develop severe kidney damage as a consequence of pyelonephritis, and in whom some form of intervention may prove beneficial. These concerns have meant that development of a universally accepted diagnostic protocol remains elusive.

  6. Update on the approach of urinary tract infection in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Oliveira, Eduardo Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection in childhood. UTI may be the sentinel event for underlying renal abnormality. There are still many controversies regarding proper management of UTI. In this review article, the authors discuss recent recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, prophylaxis, and imaging of UTI in childhood based on evidence, and when this is lacking, based on expert consensus. Data were obtained after a review of the literature and a search of Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, and Scielo. In the first year of life, UTIs are more common in boys (3.7%) than in girls (2%). Signs and symptoms of UTI are very nonspecific, especially in neonates and during childhood; in many cases, fever is the only symptom. Clinical history and physical examination may suggest UTI, but confirmation should be made by urine culture, which must be performed before any antimicrobial agent is given. During childhood, the proper collection of urine is essential to avoid false-positive results. Prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment is important to prevent long-term renal scarring. Febrile infants with UTIs should undergo renal and bladder ultrasonography. Intravenous antibacterial agents are recommended for neonates and young infants. The authors also advise exclusion of obstructive uropathies as soon as possible and later vesicoureteral reflux, if indicated. Prophylaxis should be considered for cases of high susceptibility to UTI and high risk of renal damage. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. The Vocal Tract Organ: A New Musical Instrument Using 3-D Printed Vocal Tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David M

    2017-10-27

    The advent and now increasingly widespread availability of 3-D printers is transforming our understanding of the natural world by enabling observations to be made in a tangible manner. This paper describes the use of 3-D printed models of the vocal tract for different vowels that are used to create an acoustic output when stimulated with an appropriate sound source in a new musical instrument: the Vocal Tract Organ. The shape of each printed vocal tract is recovered from magnetic resonance imaging. It sits atop a loudspeaker to which is provided an acoustic L-F model larynx input signal that is controlled by the notes played on a musical instrument digital interface device such as a keyboard. The larynx input is subject to vibrato with extent and frequency adjustable as desired within the ranges usually found for human singing. Polyphonic inputs for choral singing textures can be applied via a single loudspeaker and vocal tract, invoking the approximation of linearity in the voice production system, thereby making multiple vowel stops a possibility while keeping the complexity of the instrument in reasonable check. The Vocal Tract Organ offers a much more human and natural sounding result than the traditional Vox Humana stops found in larger pipe organs, offering the possibility of enhancing pipe organs of the future as well as becoming the basis for a "multi-vowel" chamber organ in its own right. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. mapDamage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ginolhac, Aurélien; Rasmussen, Morten; Gilbert, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Ancient DNA extracts consist of a mixture of contaminant DNA molecules, most often originating from environmental microbes, and endogenous fragments exhibiting substantial levels of DNA damage. The latter introduce specific nucleotide misincorporations and DNA fragmentation signatures in sequenci...... of the SAMtools suite and R environment and has been validated on both GNU/Linux and MacOSX operating systems....

  9. Core damage risk indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to show a method for the fast recalculation of the PSA. To avoid the information loose, it is necessary to simplify the PSA models, or at least reorganize them. The method, introduced in this document, require that preparation, so we try to show, how to do that. This document is an introduction. This is the starting point of the work related to the development of the risk indicators. In the future, with the application of this method, we are going to show an everyday use of the PSA results to produce the indicators of the core damage risk. There are two different indicators of the plant safety performance, related to the core damage risk. The first is the core damage frequency indicator (CDFI), and the second is the core damage probability indicator (CDPI). Of course, we cannot describe all of the possible ways to use these indicators, rather we will try to introduce the requirements to establish such an indicator system and the calculation process

  10. Risk of nuclear damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzl, K.

    1997-01-01

    Following the opening and words of welcome by Mr. Fritz Unterpertinger (unit director at the Austrian Federal Ministry for the Environment, Youth and Family; BMUJF) Mrs Helga Kromp-Kolb (professor at the Institute for Meteorology and Physics of the University of Natural Resources Science Vienna) illustrated the risks of nuclear damage in Europe by means of a nuclear risk map. She explained that even from a scientific or technical point of view the assessment of risks arising from nuclear power stations was fraught with great uncertainties. Estimates about in how far MCAs (maximum credible accident) could still be controlled by safety systems vary widely and so do assessments of the probability of a core melt. But there is wide agreement in all risk assessments conducted so far that MCAs might occur within a - from a human point of view - conceivable number of years. In this connection one has to bear in mind that the occurrence of such a major accident - whatever its probability may be - could entail immense damage and the question arises whether or not it is at all justifiable to expose the general public to such a risk. Klaus Rennings (Centre for European Economic Research, Mannheim, Germany) dealt with the economic aspects of nuclear risk assessment. He explained that there are already a number of studies available aiming to assess the risk of damage resulting from a core melt accident in economic terms. As to the probability of occurrence estimates vary widely between one incident in 3,333 and 250,000 year of reactor operation. It is assumed, however, that a nuclear accident involving a core melt in Germany would probably exceed the damage caused by the Chernobyl accident. The following speakers addressed the legal aspects of risks associated with nuclear installations. Mrs Monika Gimpel-Hinteregger (professor at the Institute for Civil Law in Graz) gave an overview on the applicable Austrian law concerning third party liability in the field of nuclear energy

  11. TU-CD-BRB-05: Radiation Damage Signature of White Matter Fiber Bundles Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, T; Chapman, C; Lawrence, T; Cao, Y [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Tsien, C [Washington University at St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated and scalable approach and identify temporal, spatial and dosimetric patterns of radiation damage of white matter (WM) fibers following partial brain irradiation. Methods: An automated and scalable approach was developed to extract DTI features of 22 major WM fibers from 33 patients with low-grade/benign tumors treated by radiation therapy (RT). DTI scans of the patients were performed pre-RT, 3- and 6-week during RT, and 1, 6 and 18 months after RT. The automated tractography analysis was applied to 198 datasets as: (1) intra-subject registration of longitudinal DTI, (2) spatial normalization of individual-patient DTI to the Johns Hopkins WM Atlas, (3) automatic fiber tracking regulated by the WM Atlas, and (4) segmentation of WM into 22 major tract profiles. Longitudinal percentage changes in fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean, axial and radial diffusivity (MD/AD/RD) of each tract from pre-RT were quantified and correlated to 95%, 90% and 80% percentiles of doses and mean doses received by the tract. Heatmaps were used to identify clusters of significant correlation and reveal temporal, spatial and dosimetric signatures of WM damage. A multivariate linear regression was further carried out to determine influence of clinical factors. Results: Of 22 tracts, AD/MD changes in 12 tracts had significant correlation with doses, especially at 6 and 18 months post-RT, indicating progressive radiation damage after RT. Most interestingly, the DTI-index changes in the elongated tracts were associated with received maximum doses, suggesting a serial-structure behavior; while short association fibers were affected by mean doses, indicating a parallel-structure response. Conclusion: Using an automated DTI-tractography analysis of whole brain WM fibers, we reveal complex radiation damage patterns of WM fibers. Damage in WM fibers that play an important role in the neural network could be associated with late neurocognitive function declines

  12. Oxidatively damaged DNA in animals exposed to particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Jantzen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    on optimal methods. The majority of studies have used single intracavitary administration or inhalation with dose rates exceeding the pulmonary overload threshold, resulting in cytotoxicity and inflammation. It is unclear whether this is relevant for the much lower human exposure levels. Still...... not be equivocally determined. Roles of cytotoxicity or inflammation for oxidatively induced DNA damage could not be documented or refuted. Studies on exposure to particles in the gastrointestinal tract showed consistently increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine in the liver. Collectively, there is evidence...

  13. Diffusion tensor tract-specific analysis of the uncinate fasciculus in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kanako; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Watadani, Takeyuki; Nakata, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Mariko; Abe, Osamu; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo, Tokyo (Japan); Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo, Tokyo (Japan); Iwata, Nobue K.; Terao, Yasuo; Tsuji, Shoji [University of Tokyo, Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    The uncinate fasciculus (UF) consists of core fibers connecting the frontal and temporal lobes and is considered to be related to cognitive/behavioral function. Using diffusion tensor tractography, we quantitatively evaluated changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the UF by tract-specific analysis to evaluate the damage of the UF in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We obtained diffusion tensor images of 15 patients with ALS and 9 age-matched volunteers. Patients with ALS showed significantly lower mean FA (P = 0.029) compared with controls. No significant difference was seen in mean ADC. The results suggest that damage of the UF in patients with ALS can be quantitatively evaluated with FA. (orig.)

  14. Uncomplicated duplex kidney and DMSA scintigraphy in children with urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokland, Eira [The Sahlgrenska Academy at Goeteborg University, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Goeteborg (Sweden); The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Jodal, Ulf; Swerkersson, Svante; Hansson, Sverker [The Sahlgrenska Academy at Goeteborg University, Department of Paediatrics, Goeteborg (Sweden); Sixt, Rune [The Sahlgrenska Academy at Goeteborg University, Department of Paediatric Clinical Physiology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2007-08-15

    Renal duplication is the most common malformation of the urinary tract and is frequently seen among children with urinary tract infection (UTI). To evaluate problems in the interpretation of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy and to establish the range of relative function in uncomplicated unilateral duplication. Retrospective analysis of 303 children less than 2 years of age with first time non-obstructive urinary tract infection investigated by both urography and DMSA scintigraphy. At DMSA scintigraphy, renal lesions and/or relative function below 45% was considered abnormal. Urography was used as reference for the diagnosis of duplication. Duplex kidneys were found in 22 of 303 patients (7%). Of the 16 children with unilateral duplication, 10 had bilaterally undamaged kidneys with a range of relative function varying between 51% and 57% in the duplex kidney. In two of the children with unilateral duplication the imaging results were discordant. There was risk of underdiagnosis as well as overdiagnosis of renal damage at scintigraphy. Although it is important to be aware of this risk, the rate of misinterpretation was low. A range of 51% to 57% can be used as the limit for normality of the relative function of a unilateral duplex kidney. (orig.)

  15. Pattern Recognition via the Toll-Like Receptor System in the Human Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaei Nasu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mucosal surface of the female genital tract is a complex biosystem, which provides a barrier against the outside world and participates in both innate and acquired immune defense systems. This mucosal compartment has adapted to a dynamic, non-sterile environment challenged by a variety of antigenic/inflammatory stimuli associated with sexual intercourse and endogenous vaginal microbiota. Rapid innate immune defenses against microbial infection usually involve the recognition of invading pathogens by specific pattern-recognition receptors recently attributed to the family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. TLRs recognize conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs synthesized by microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses as well as endogenous ligands associated with cell damage. Members of the TLR family, which includes 10 human TLRs identified to date, recognize distinct PAMPs produced by various bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. The available literature regarding the innate immune system of the female genital tract during human reproductive processes was reviewed in order to identify studies specifically related to the expression and function of TLRs under normal as well as pathological conditions. Increased understanding of these molecules may provide insight into site-specific immunoregulatory mechanisms in the female reproductive tract.

  16. Uncomplicated duplex kidney and DMSA scintigraphy in children with urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokland, Eira; Jodal, Ulf; Swerkersson, Svante; Hansson, Sverker; Sixt, Rune

    2007-01-01

    Renal duplication is the most common malformation of the urinary tract and is frequently seen among children with urinary tract infection (UTI). To evaluate problems in the interpretation of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy and to establish the range of relative function in uncomplicated unilateral duplication. Retrospective analysis of 303 children less than 2 years of age with first time non-obstructive urinary tract infection investigated by both urography and DMSA scintigraphy. At DMSA scintigraphy, renal lesions and/or relative function below 45% was considered abnormal. Urography was used as reference for the diagnosis of duplication. Duplex kidneys were found in 22 of 303 patients (7%). Of the 16 children with unilateral duplication, 10 had bilaterally undamaged kidneys with a range of relative function varying between 51% and 57% in the duplex kidney. In two of the children with unilateral duplication the imaging results were discordant. There was risk of underdiagnosis as well as overdiagnosis of renal damage at scintigraphy. Although it is important to be aware of this risk, the rate of misinterpretation was low. A range of 51% to 57% can be used as the limit for normality of the relative function of a unilateral duplex kidney. (orig.)

  17. Tracting the neural basis of music: Deficient structural connectivity underlying acquired amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, Aleksi J; Ripollés, Pablo; Särkämö, Teppo; Leo, Vera; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Saunavaara, Jani; Parkkola, Riitta; Soinila, Seppo

    2017-12-01

    Acquired amusia provides a unique opportunity to investigate the fundamental neural architectures of musical processing due to the transition from a functioning to defective music processing system. Yet, the white matter (WM) deficits in amusia remain systematically unexplored. To evaluate which WM structures form the neural basis for acquired amusia and its recovery, we studied 42 stroke patients longitudinally at acute, 3-month, and 6-month post-stroke stages using DTI [tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and deterministic tractography (DT)] and the Scale and Rhythm subtests of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA). Non-recovered amusia was associated with structural damage and subsequent degeneration in multiple WM tracts including the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), arcuate fasciculus (AF), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), uncinate fasciculus (UF), and frontal aslant tract (FAT), as well as in the corpus callosum (CC) and its posterior part (tapetum). In a linear regression analysis, the volume of the right IFOF was the main predictor of MBEA performance across time. Overall, our results provide a comprehensive picture of the large-scale deficits in intra- and interhemispheric structural connectivity underlying amusia, and conversely highlight which pathways are crucial for normal music perception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Histopatology of the reproductive tract of Nellore pubertal heifers with genital ureaplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REGIANI PÔRTO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In order to study and characterize the lesions in the reproductive tract of Nellore heifers naturally infected with Ureaplasma diversum and presenting granular vulvovaginitis syndrome (GVS, fragments of uterine tube, uterus, cervix, vagina and vulva of 20 animals were evaluated. The macroscopic lesions of the vulvovaginal mucosa were classified in scores of “1” mild, until “4”, severe inflammation and pustular or necrotic lesions. The histopathological evaluation was performed using scores of “1” to “4”, according to the inflammatory alterations. The fragments with severe microscopic lesions (3 and 4 were from the uterine tubes and uterus, which showed leukocytes infiltration and destruction and/or necrosis of epithelium. Alterations in the lower reproductive tract fragments were mild, but characteristics of acute inflammatory processes. The histopathological findings of the reproductive tract of females naturally infected with Ureaplasma diversum are consistent with injuries that compromise the environment from the local where spermatozoa acquires ability to fertilize an oocyte until those where the oocyte is fertilized. Therefore, animals with GVS should be identified early in the herd, because, besides the reduction in the fertility rates caused by tissue damages, they can contribute to disseminate the microorganism. Key words: bovine, tissue evaluation, reproduction, Ureaplasma diversum.

  19. Case Report Duplication Of Gastrointestinal Tract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    duplication (Fig 3). A tragic event occurred intra-operatively when ... Brain damage persisted and all modalities of treatment were terminated upon confirmation of brain death. ... compression, epithelial recanalization, and vascular accidents (6) ...

  20. The Genetics of Urinary Tract Infections and the Innate Defense of the Kidney and Urinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambite, Ines; Rydstrom, Gustav; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Hains, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The urinary tract is a sterile organ system. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and often serious infections. Research has focused on uropathogen, environment, and host factors leading to UTI pathogenesis. A growing body of evidence exists implicating genetic factors that can contribute to UTI risks. In this review, we highlight genetic variations in aspects of the innate immune system critical to the host response to uropathogens. This overview includes genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor molecules, chemokines/cytokines, and neutrophil activation. We also comprehensively cover murine knockout models of UTI, genetic variations involved in renal scarring as a result of ascending UTIs, and asymptomatic bacteriuria. PMID:27617139

  1. Immunoassay of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparro, F.P.; Santella, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The direct photomodification of DNA by ultraviolet light or the photo-induced addition of exogenous compounds to DNA components results in alterations of DNA structure ranging from subtle to profound. There are two consequences of these conformational changes. First, cells in which the DNA has been damaged are capable of executing repair steps. Second, the DNA which is usually of very low immunogenicity now becomes highly antigenic. This latter property has allowed the production of a series of monoclonal antibodies that recognize photo-induced DNA damage. Monoclonal antibodies have been generated that recognize the 4',5'-monoadduct and the crosslink of 8-methoxypsoralen in DNA. In addition, another antibody has been prepared which recognizes the furan-side monoadduct of 6,4,4'-trimethylangelicin in DNA. These monoclonal antibodies have been characterized as to sensitivity and specificity using non-competitive and competitive enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA). (author)

  2. Neutron induced radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1977-01-01

    We derive a general expression for the number of displaced atoms of type j caused by a primary knock-on of type i. The Kinchin-Pease model is used, but considerably generalised to allow for realistic atomic potentials. Two cases are considered in detail: the single particle problem causing a cascade and the neutron initiated problem which leads to multiple subcascades. Numerical results have been obtained for a variety of scattering laws. An important conclusion is that neutron initiated damage is much more severe than atom-initiated damage and leads to the number of displaced atoms being a factor of (A+1) 2 /4A larger than the single primary knock-on theory predicts. A is the ratio of the atomic mass to the neutron mass. The importance of this result to the theory of neutron sputtering is explained. (orig.) [de

  3. Immunoassay of DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparro, F P; Santella, R M

    1988-09-01

    The direct photomodification of DNA by ultraviolet light or the photo-induced addition of exogenous compounds to DNA components results in alterations of DNA structure ranging from subtle to profound. There are two consequences of these conformational changes. First, cells in which the DNA has been damaged are capable of executing repair steps. Second, the DNA which is usually of very low immunogenicity now becomes highly antigenic. This latter property has allowed the production of a series of monoclonal antibodies that recognize photo-induced DNA damage. Monoclonal antibodies have been generated that recognize the 4',5'-monoadduct and the crosslink of 8-methoxypsoralen in DNA. In addition, another antibody has been prepared which recognizes the furan-side monoadduct of 6,4,4'-trimethylangelicin in DNA. These monoclonal antibodies have been characterized as to sensitivity and specificity using non-competitive and competitive enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA).

  4. Radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, V.

    1978-01-01

    A number of experiments are described with the purpose to obtain a better insight in the chemical nature and the biological significance of radiation-induced damage in DNA, with some emphasis on the significance of alkali-labile sites. It is shown that not only reactions of OH radicals but also of H radicals introduce breaks and other inactivating damage in single-standed phiX174 DNA. It is found that phosphate buffer is very suitable for the study of the reactions of H radicals with DNA, as the H 2 PO 4 - ions convert the hydrated electrons into H radicals. The hydrated electron, which does react with DNA, does not cause a detectable inactivation. (Auth.)

  5. Assessment of infective urinary tract disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sixt, R.; Stokland, E. [Goteborg, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital/Ostra (Sweden). Dept. of Pediatric Clinical Physiology and Dept. of Pediatric Radiology

    1998-06-01

    Urinary tracts infection (UTI) is common in children, particularly in the youngest age groups. There is a risk for progressive deterioration of renal function in these children if aggravating factors such as gross reflux and/or outflow obstruction of the urinary tract are present. In this review the pros and cons of available scintigrafic and radiological imaging techniques for the work-up of these children are presented. Ultrasound can be used in the acute phase to exclude obstruction but can not reliably show transient or permanent parenchymal lesions. The presence of reflux can be established with X-ray or direct nuclide cystography. The X-ray technique gives good morphological information and has a grading system with prognostic relevance. Both techniques are invasive and great care must be taken to keep the radiation burden down with the X-ray technique. Indirect nuclide cystography following a renographic study is non-invasive but has a lower sensitivity than direct techniques. More experience is needed with the indirect technique to evaluate the consequences of its apparently low sensitivity. Urography has a limited place in the acute work-up of urinary tract infection but can be used to look for renal scarring 1-2 years after an acute pyelonephritis. The {sup 99m}Tc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan can be used during the acute UTI to show pyelonephritic lesions with good accuracy and/or during the follow-up after six months to show permanent lesions. The acute DMSA scan can be omitted.

  6. Genital tract malign ancies in postmenopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khursheed, F.; Jatoi, N.; Das, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The most common malignancy in women is breast carcinoma. The next common cancer is genital tract malignancies which constitute 14% of cancers in women. Objective of this study was to determine the type and frequency of genital tract malignancy in postmenopausal women and to find the age distribution of genital tract malignancies. Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics ad Gynaecology Unit-II at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro. All postmenopausal women, admitted in the unit due to various pathologies (abdominal masses, bleeding P/V etc.) from January 2005 to December 2007 were included in the study. Clinical evaluation and investigations were done on all patients. Those women who had benign diseases were excluded from the study. Malignancy was confirmed from histopathology report of biopsy specimen. These women were divided into 3 age groups: group I 70 years. Results: Out of 265 postmenopausal women admitted in ward during the study period, malignancy was confirmed in 68 cases (25.66%). The type of malignancy was cervical carcinoma (41, 60.28%), ovarian carcinoma (11, 16.17%), endometrial carcinoma (8, 11.76%), vulval carcinoma (5, 7.35%) vaginal carcinoma (2, 2.94%), and leiomyosarcoma of uterus (1, 1.47%). Increased frequency of cervical and endometrial carcinomas were seen in Group-I cases, while vulval carcinoma was seen more commonly in Group-II cases ( p =0.004). Conclusion: A very high frequency of cervical carcinoma was seen in our patients. There is need for more public awareness to integrate routine Gynae-Pap screening. (author)

  7. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  8. Cavitation damage of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.I.; Marinin, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation of ceramic material damage under the effect of cavitation field on their surface, formed in water under the face of exponential concentrator, connected with ultrasonic generator UZY-3-0.4. Amplitude of vibrations of concentrator face (30+-2)x10 -6 m, frequency-21 kHz. It was established that ceramics resistance to cavitation effect correlated with the product of critical of stress intensity factor and material hardness

  9. Nondestructive damage detection and evaluation technique for seismically damaged structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yukio; Unjoh, Shigeki; Kondoh, Masuo; Ohsumi, Michio

    1999-02-01

    The development of quantitative damage detection and evaluation technique, and damage detection technique for invisible damages of structures are required according to the lessons from the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake. In this study, two quantitative damage sensing techniques for highway bridge structures are proposed. One method is to measure the change of vibration characteristics of the bridge structure. According to the damage detection test for damaged bridge column by shaking table test, this method can successfully detect the vibration characteristic change caused by damage progress due to increment excitations. The other method is to use self-diagnosis intelligent materials. According to the reinforced concrete beam specimen test, the second method can detect the damage by rupture of intelligent sensors, such as optical fiber or carbon fiber reinforced plastic rod.

  10. Urinary Tract Infections in the Older Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2016-08-01

    Urinary infection is the most common bacterial infection in elderly populations. The high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in both men and women is benign and should not be treated. A diagnosis of symptomatic infection for elderly residents of long-term care facilities without catheters requires localizing genitourinary findings. Symptomatic urinary infection is overdiagnosed in elderly bacteriuric persons with nonlocalizing clinical presentations, with substantial inappropriate antimicrobial use. Residents with chronic indwelling catheters experience increased morbidity from urinary tract infection. Antimicrobial therapy is selected based on clinical presentation, patient tolerance, and urine culture results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomechanical Remodeling of the Diabetic Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    several years, several studies demonstrated that experimental diabetes induces GI morphological and biomechanical remodeling. Following the development of diabetes, the GI wall becomes thicker and the stiffness of the GI wall increases in a time-dependent manner. It is well known that mechanosensitive...... the biomechanical environment of the mechanosensitive nerve endings, therefore, the structure as well as the tension, stress and strain distribution in the GI wall is important for the sensory and motor function. Biomechanical remodeling of diabetic GI tract including alterations of residual strain and increase...

  12. Upper respiratory tract infections in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Clifton L; Diehl, Jason J

    2007-07-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) represent the most common acute illnesses in the general population and account for the leading acute diagnoses in the outpatient setting. Given the athlete's expectation to return to activity as soon as possible, the sports medicine physician should be able to accurately diagnose and aggressively treat these illnesses. This article discusses the common pathogens, diagnosis, treatment options, and return-to-play decisions for URTIs, with a focus on the common cold, sinusitis, pharyngitis, and infectious mononucleosis in the athlete.

  13. The Vaginal Microbiota and Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Ann E

    2016-12-01

    The vagina is a key anatomical site in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in women, serving as a potential reservoir for infecting bacteria and a site at which interventions may decrease the risk of UTI. The vaginal microbiota is a dynamic and often critical factor in this pathogenic interplay, because changes in the characteristics of the vaginal microbiota resulting in the loss of normally protective Lactobacillus spp. increase the risk of UTI. These alterations may result from the influence of estrogen deficiency, antimicrobial therapy, contraceptives, or other causes. Interventions to reduce adverse effects on the vaginal microbiota and/or to restore protective lactobacilli may reduce the risks of UTI.

  14. Fungal Urinary Tract Infection in Burn Patients‎

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suad Yousuf Aldorkee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infection is the most common hospital-acquired infection. Fungal species are unusual causes of urinary tract infection in healthy individuals, but common in the hospital setting or among patients with predisposing diseases and structural abnormalities of the kidney and collecting system. Burn patients are susceptible to nosocomial infections owing to the immunocompromising effects of burn injury, cutaneous and respiratory tract injury, prolonged intensive care unit stays and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Objective: The study population includes adult patients of both genders who presented with different percentages of body burns. Urine sample was collected from each patient at the time of admission and weekly thereafter for 6 weeks and sent for general urine examination and urine culture to test for the possibility of fungal growth. Those who found to develop fungal UTI by urine culture during their hospitalization and had no infection at the time of admission were selected as subjects for our study. Results: 28 (18.6% patients had positive fungal culture during their hospitalization, 11 of them were males and 17 were females, the most common age of presentation was 41-50 years and the mean age ± SD was (44.4 ± 10.7 years. The most common isolated fungi were Candida albicans (64.3%, followed by Candida glabrata (21.4% and Candida tropicalis (7.1%. The majority of patients developed infection within the 2nd and 3rd weeks of hospitalization, however, those who presented with total body surface area burned > 40% developed an earlier infection within the 1st week. Female gender, urethral catheterization and diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with higher risk of infection as the P values were 0.03, 0.005 and 0.004 respectively. Conclusion: Fungal urinary tract infection occurred in 18.6% of burn patients. The most common causative fungi are candida species. Advanced age, female gender, high percentage of

  15. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lisa K; Hunstad, David A

    2016-11-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Malignancies of gastrointestinal tract in geriatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystricky, B.

    2017-01-01

    Incidence of gastrointestinal cancer rises with age. In spite of this fact, older patients are underrepresented in clinical trials. We need to take into account several variables prior to selection of therapy in these patients. These are physiologic aging processes, comorbidities, functional and cognitive status. There are several assessment tools in geriatric population – the most used is comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). A close cooperation with geriatrician is useful before starting cancer treatment. This article reviews treatment algorithms in selected malignancies of GI tract in geriatric patients. (author)

  18. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lisa K.; Hunstad, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. PMID:27692880

  19. Fetal Urinary Tract Anomalies: Review of Pathophysiology, Imaging, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileto, Achille; Itani, Malak; Katz, Douglas S; Siebert, Joseph R; Dighe, Manjiri K; Dubinsky, Theodore J; Moshiri, Mariam

    2018-05-01

    Common fetal anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract encompass a complex spectrum of abnormalities that can be detected prenatally by ultrasound. Common fetal anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract can affect amniotic fluid volume production with the development of oligohydramnios or anhydramnios, resulting in fetal pulmonary hypoplasia and, potentially, abnormal development of other fetal structures. We provide an overview of common fetal anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract with an emphasis on sonographic patterns as well as pathologic and postnatal correlation, along with brief recommendations for postnatal management. Of note, we render an updated classification of fetal abnormalities of the kidneys and urinary tract based on the presence or absence of associated urinary tract dilation. In addition, we review the 2014 classification of urinary tract dilation based on the Linthicum multidisciplinary consensus panel.

  20. Postpartum urinary tract infection by mode of delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Tina Djernis; Krebs, Lone; Loekkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between postpartum urinary tract infection and intended mode of delivery as well as actual mode of delivery. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: All live births in Denmark between 2004 and 2010 (n=450 856). Births were classified...... was postpartum urinary tract infection (n=16 295) within 30 days post partum, defined as either a diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the National Patient Registry or redemption of urinary tract infection-specific antibiotics recorded in the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. RESULTS: We found that 4.......6% of women with intended caesarean delivery and 3.5% of women with intended vaginal delivery were treated for postpartum urinary tract infection.Women with intended caesarean delivery had a significantly increased risk of postpartum urinary tract infection compared with women with intended vaginal delivery...

  1. Ketamine-associated lower urinary tract destruction: a new radiological challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, K., E-mail: k.mason@doctors.org.u [Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Cottrell, A.M. [North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Corrigan, A.G. [Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Gillatt, D.A.; Mitchelmore, A.E. [North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Aim: Ketamine is a short-acting dissociative anaesthetic whose hallucinogenic side effects have led to an increase in its illicit use amongst club and party goers. There is a general misconception amongst users that it is a safe drug with few long term side effects, however ketamine abuse is associated with severe urinary tract dysfunction. Presenting symptoms include urinary frequency, nocturia, dysuria, haematuria and incontinence. Materials and methods: We describe the radiological findings found in a series of 23 patients, all with a history of ketamine abuse, who presented with severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Imaging techniques used included ultrasonography (US), intravenous urography (IVU), and computed tomography (CT). These examinations were reviewed to identify common imaging findings. All patients with positive imaging findings had also undergone cystoscopy and bladder wall biopsies, which confirmed the diagnosis. The patients in this series have consented to the use of their data in the ongoing research into ketamine-induced bladder pathology. Results: Ultrasound demonstrated small bladder volume and wall thickening. CT revealed marked, generalized bladder wall thickening, mucosal enhancement, and perivesical inflammation. Ureteric wall thickening and enhancement were also observed. In advanced cases ureteric narrowing and strictures were identified using both CT and IVU. Correlation of clinical history, radiological and pathological findings was performed to confirm the diagnosis. Conclusion: This case series illustrates the harmful effects of ketamine on the urinary tract and the associated radiological findings. Delayed diagnosis can result in irreversible renal tract damage requiring surgical intervention. It is important that radiologists are aware of this emerging clinical entity as early diagnosis and treatment are essential for successful management.

  2. Long-term, low-dose prophylaxis against urinary tract infections in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandström, Per; Hansson, Sverker

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) affects about 2 % of boys and 8 % of girls during the first 6 years of life with Escherichia coli as the predominant pathogen. Symptomatic UTI causes discomfort and distress, and carries a risk of inducing renal damage. The strong correlation between febrile UTI, dilating vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), and renal scarring led to the introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis for children with VUR to reduce the rate of UTI recurrence. It became common practice to use prophylaxis for children with VUR and other urinary tract abnormalities. This policy has been challenged because of a lack of scientific support. Now, randomized controlled studies are available that compare prophylaxis to no treatment or placebo. They show that children with normal urinary tracts or non-dilating VUR do not benefit from prophylaxis. Dilating VUR may still be an indication for prophylaxis in young children. After the first year of life, boys have very few recurrences and do not benefit from prophylaxis. Girls with dilating VUR, on the other hand, are more prone to recurrences and benefit from prophylaxis. There has been a decline in the use of prophylaxis due to questioning of its efficacy, increasing bacterial resistance, and a propensity to low adherence to medication. Alternative measures to reduce UTI recurrences should be emphasized. However, in selected patients carefully followed, prophylaxis can protect from recurrent UTI and long-term sequelae. 1. There is a strong correlation between UTI, VUR, and renal scarring. 2. Children with normal urinary tracts or non-dilating VUR do not benefit from prophylaxis. 3. Young children, mainly girls, with dilating VUR are at risk of recurrent UTI and acquired renal scarring and seem to gain from antibiotic prophylaxis. 4. Increasing bacterial resistance and low adherence with prescribed medication is a major obstacle to successful antibiotic prophylaxis.

  3. Drug and Vaccine Development for the Treatment and Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Valerie P.; Hannan, Thomas J.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans, affecting millions of people every year. UTI cause significant morbidity in women throughout their lifespan, in infant boys, in older men, in individuals with underlying urinary tract abnormalities, and in those that require long-term urethral catheterization, such as patients with spinal cord injuries or incapacitated individuals living in nursing homes. Serious sequelae include frequent recurrences, pyelonephritis with sepsis, renal damage in young children, pre-term birth, and complications of frequent antimicrobial use including high-level antibiotic resistance and Clostridium difficile colitis. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) cause the vast majority of UTI, but less common pathogens such as Enterococcus faecalis and other enterococci frequently take advantage of an abnormal or catheterized urinary tract to cause opportunistic infections. While antibiotic therapy has historically been very successful in controlling UTI, the high rate of recurrence remains a major problem, and many individuals suffer from chronically recurring UTI, requiring long-term prophylactic antibiotic regimens to prevent recurrent UTI. Furthermore, the global emergence of multi-drug resistant UPEC in the past ten years spotlights the need for alternative therapeutic and preventative strategies to combat UTI, including anti-infective drug therapies and vaccines. In this chapter, we review recent advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis, with an emphasis on the identification of promising drug and vaccine targets. We then discuss the development of new UTI drugs and vaccines, highlighting the challenges these approaches face and the need for a greater understanding of urinary tract mucosal immunity. PMID:26999391

  4. Cross-sectional imaging of complicated urinary infections affecting the lower tract and male genital organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tonolini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complicated urinary tract infections (C-UTIs are those associated with structural or functional genitourinary abnormalities or with conditions that impair the host defence mechanisms, leading to an increased risk of acquiring infection or failing therapy. C-UTIs occur in patients with risk factors such as neurogenic dysfunction, bladder outlet obstruction, obstructive uropathy, bladder catheterisation, urologic instrumentation or indwelling stent, urinary tract post-surgical modifications, chemotherapy- or radiation-induced damage, renal impairment, diabetes and immunodeficiency. Multidetector CT and MRI allow comprehensive investigation of C-UTIs and systemic infection from an unknown source. Based upon personal experience at a tertiary care hospital focused on the treatment of infectious illnesses, this pictorial essay reviews with examples the clinical features and cross-sectional imaging findings of C-UTIs affecting the lower urinary tract and male genital organs. The disorders presented include acute infectious cystitis, bladder mural abscesses, infections of the prostate and seminal vesicles, acute urethritis and related perineal abscesses, funiculitis, epididymo-orchitis and scrotal abscesses. Emphasis is placed on the possible differential diagnoses of lower C-UTIs. The aim is to provide radiologists greater familiarity with these potentially severe disorders which frequently require intensive in-hospital antibiotic therapy, percutaneous drainage or surgery. Teaching Points • Complicated urinary tract infections occur in patients with structural or functional risk factors. • CT and MRI comprehensively investigate complicated urinary infections and sepsis from unknown sources. • Infections of the urinary bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, urethra and scrotum are presented. • Emphasis is placed on differential diagnoses of complicated lower urogenital infections. • Unsuspected urinary infections may be detected on CT

  5. Upper and Lower Urinary Tract Outcomes in Adult Myelomeningocele Patients: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenboer, Paul W.; Bosch, J. L. H. Ruud; van Asbeck, Floris W. A.; de Kort, Laetitia M. O.

    2012-01-01

    Background The introduction of sophisticated treatment of bladder dysfunction and hydrocephalus allows the majority of SB patients to survive into adulthood. However, no systematic review on urological outcome in adult SB patients is available and no follow-up schemes exist. Objectives To systematically summarize the evidence on outcome of urinary tract functioning in adult SB patients. Methods A literature search in PubMed and Embase databases was done. Only papers published in the last 25 years describing patients with open SB with a mean age >18 years were included. We focused on finding differences in the treatment strategies, e.g., clean intermittent catheterization and antimuscarinic drugs versus early urinary diversion, with regard to long-term renal and bladder outcomes. Results A total of 13 articles and 5 meeting abstracts on urinary tract status of adult SB patients were found describing a total of 1564 patients with a mean age of 26.1 years (range 3–74 years, with a few patients incontinence. Renal function was studied in 1128 adult patients. In 290/1128 (25.7%; range 3–81.8%) patients some degree of renal damage was found and end-stage renal disease was seen in 12/958 (1.3%) patients. Detrusor-sphincter dyssynergy and detrusor-overactivity acted as adverse prognostic factors for the development of renal damage. Conclusions These findings should outline follow-up schedules for SB patients, which do not yet exist. Since renal and bladder deterioration continues beyond adolescence, follow-up of these individuals is needed. We recommend standardization in reporting the outcome of urinary tract function in adult SB patients. PMID:23119003

  6. Cranberry in prevention of urinary tract Infections in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda-Machado Pablo Andrés

    2011-01-01

    The urinary infection tract is the most common infectious complication in pregnancy.The aim was to conduct a literature review of the evidence on effectiveness, safetyand cost effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing urinary tract infection inpregnancy. Studies suggest a potential protective effect of cranberry products againsturinary tract infection in pregnancy and there is no documented evidence of danger orcontraindication in pregnancy or lactation. The cost effectiveness of cran...

  7. Acoustic vocal tract model of one-year-old children

    OpenAIRE

    Vojnović, Milan; Bogavac, Ivana; Dobrijević, Ljiljana

    2014-01-01

    The physical shape of vocal tract and its formant (resonant) frequencies are directly related. The study of this functional connectivity is essential in speech therapy practice with children. Most of the perceived children’s speech anomalies can be explained on a physical level: malfunctioning movement of articulation organs. The current problem is that there is no enough data on the anatomical shape of children’s vocal tract to create its acoustic model. Classical techniques for vocal tract...

  8. Acute ingestion dosimetry using the ICRP 30 gastrointestinal tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassels, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the gastrointestinal (GI) tract model used for dosimetry as outlined in ICRP30, to allow quick calculations of effective dose equivalents for acute radionuclide ingestion. A computer program has been developed to emulate the GI tract model. The program and associated data files are structured so that the GI tract model parameters can be varied, while the file structure and algorithm for the GI tract model should require minimal modification to allow the same theories that apply in this model to be used for other dosimetric models

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections across age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Christine M; Lowder, Jerry L

    2018-01-02

    Urinary tract infections are the most common outpatient infections, but predicting the probability of urinary tract infections through symptoms and test results can be complex. The most diagnostic symptoms of urinary tract infections include change in frequency, dysuria, urgency, and presence or absence of vaginal discharge, but urinary tract infections may present differently in older women. Dipstick urinalysis is popular for its availability and usefulness, but results must be interpreted in context of the patient's pretest probability based on symptoms and characteristics. In patients with a high probability of urinary tract infection based on symptoms, negative dipstick urinalysis does not rule out urinary tract infection. Nitrites are likely more sensitive and specific than other dipstick components for urinary tract infection, particularly in the elderly. Positive dipstick testing is likely specific for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy, but urine culture is still the test of choice. Microscopic urinalysis is likely comparable to dipstick urinalysis as a screening test. Bacteriuria is more specific and sensitive than pyuria for detecting urinary tract infection, even in older women and during pregnancy. Pyuria is commonly found in the absence of infection, particularly in older adults with lower urinary tract symptoms such as incontinence. Positive testing may increase the probability of urinary tract infection, but initiation of treatment should take into account risk of urinary tract infection based on symptoms as well. In cases in which the probability of urinary tract infection is moderate or unclear, urine culture should be performed. Urine culture is the gold standard for detection of urinary tract infection. However, asymptomatic bacteriuria is common, particularly in older women, and should not be treated with antibiotics. Conversely, in symptomatic women, even growth as low as 10 2 colony-forming unit/mL could reflect infection. Resistance is

  10. A prospective study of urinary tract infection during pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, I.; Bessell, E.M.; Sokal, M.

    1989-01-01

    The frequency of urinary tract infection before and during pelvic radiotherapy was studied prospectively in 172 patients who were not catherised and had not had instrumentation for at least 4 weeks prior to radiotherapy. The incidence of urinary tract infection prior to radiotherapy was 17% and a further 17% of patients develped a urinary tract infection during radiotherapy. Mid-stream specimens of urine (MSU) should be examined for infection on a weekly basis during pelvic radiotherapy not only to identify this additional 17% of patients but also to detect those patients who have persistent urinary tract infection in spite of treatment with appropriate antibiotics. (author). 6 refs.; 1 fig.; 4 tabs

  11. Military Robotics and Collateral Damage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kott, Robert Douglass ;Alexander

    2004-01-01

    .... Such concepts raise important questions in terms of their impact on collateral damage. In a broader context, western warfare in general places a continuously growing emphasis on issues of collateral damage...

  12. In vitro activity of vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry) on urinary tract pathogens in uncomplicated urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhari, S.; Tariq, S.; Alam, M.A.; Chiragh, S.; Wazir, M.S.; Suleman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection in the community, mainly caused by Escherichia coli (E coli). Due to its high incidence and recurrence, problems are faced in the treatment with antibiotics. Cranberry being herbal remedy have long been the focus of interest for their beneficial effects in preventing urinary tract infections. This study was conducted to analyse in vitro activity of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) on uropathogenic E coli in uncomplicated urinary tract infections. Method: In this laboratory based single group experimental study, anti-bacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate on urinary tract E coli was investigated, in vitro. Ninety-six culture positive cases of different uropathogens were identified. Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate at different concentrations was prepared in distilled water and put in wells punched in nutrient agar. E coli isolates were inoculated on the plates and incubated at 37 Degree C for 24 hours. A citric acid solution of the same pH as that of Vaccinium macrocarpon was used and put in a well on the same plate to exclude the effect of pH. Results: A total of 35 isolates of E coli were identified out of 96 culture positive specimens of urine and found sensitive to Vaccinium macrocarpon (p<0.000). Results revealed that Vaccinium macrocarpon has antibacterial effect against E coli. Furthermore the antibacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon has dose response relationship. Acidic nature of Vaccinium macrocarpon due to its pH is not contributory towards its antibacterial effect. Conclusion: Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate may be used in urinary tract infection caused by E coli. (author)

  13. Subtotal obstruction of the male reproductive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohle, G R; van Roijen, J H; Pierik, F H; Vreeburg, J T M; Weber, R F A

    2003-03-01

    Bilateral obstruction of the male reproductive tract is suspected in men with azoospermia, normal testicular volume and normal FSH. A testicular biopsy is required to differentiate between an obstruction and a testicular insufficiency. Unilateral or subtotal bilateral obstructions and epididymal dysfunction may cause severe oligozoospermia in men with a normal spermatogenesis. However, information on spermatogenesis in oligozoospermic men is lacking, since testicular biopsy is not routinely performed. Men with a sperm concentration of scoring method. A testicular biopsy was performed in 78 men with severe oligozoospermia. The medical history showed male accessory gland infection in 12.8%, previous hernia repair in 14.1% and a history of cryptorchidism in 12.8%. A normal or slightly disturbed spermatogenesis (Johnsen score >8) was present in 39/78 (50%) of the men. Hernia repair occurred more often in men with normal spermatogenesis. A varicocele was predominantly seen in men with a disturbed spermatogenesis. FSH was significantly lower ( Preproductive tract is a frequent cause of severe oligozoospermia in men with a normal testicular volume and a normal FSH. In other cases, an epididymal dysfunction might explain the oligozoospermia in men with a normal testicular biopsy score.

  14. Radionuclide imaging of the lower genitourinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, P.A.; Pjura, G.A.; Kin, E.E.; Brown, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    The major use of radionuclide cystography is in the management of children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Reflux is common, occurring in one-third to one-half of children with urinary tract infection. The significance of VUR lies in its associated symptoms and consequences, which include impaired renal growth and function, vague ill health, renal pain, and more importantly the development of reflux nephropathy, a significant cause of end-stage renal disease and hypertension in children. Although reflux may resolve spontaneously, particularly milder degrees of reflux, the age at which this may occur is unpredictable and repeated follow-up cystography over a number of years may be necessary. Therefore, it is important to minimize radiation to the child while providing accurate diagnostic information. This paper discusses how the technique of radionuclide cystography compares favorably with routine contrast voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) in these respects, and in addition can provide quantitative information not obtained by radiographic techniques. Other indications may include screening siblings of patients known to have reflux, follow-up of antireflux surgery and occasionally screening for reflux in children who have had urinary tract infection

  15. Biofabrication and biomaterials for urinary tract reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsawy MM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Moustafa M Elsawy,1–3 Achala de Mel1 1Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, Royal Free Hospital, NHS Trust, University College London (UCL, 2Division of Reconstructive Urology, University College London Hospitals (uclh, London, UK; 3Urology Department, School of Medicine, Alexandria, University, Alexandria, EgyptAbstract: Reconstructive urologists are constantly facing diverse and complex pathologies that require structural and functional restoration of urinary organs. There is always a demand for a biocompatible material to repair or substitute the urinary tract instead of using patient’s autologous tissues with its associated morbidity. Biomimetic approaches are tissue-engineering tactics aiming to tailor the material physical and biological properties to behave physiologically similar to the urinary system. This review highlights the different strategies to mimic urinary tissues including modifications in structure, surface chemistry, and cellular response of a range of biological and synthetic materials. The article also outlines the measures to minimize infectious complications, which might lead to graft failure. Relevant experimental and preclinical studies are discussed, as well as promising biomimetic approaches such as three-dimensional bioprinting. Keywords: reconstruction, biofunctionalization, tissue engineering, urinary tract

  16. Oncologic imaging of the genitourinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClennan, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Malignant neoplasms of the genitourinary (GU) tract account for a significant number of cancer-related deaths in man. For example, prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in adult males. Early diagnosis and treatment can have a profound effect on patient prognosis and survival. This paper examines the large body of information related to primary tumors of the kidney, bladder, and prostate, and their pattern of spread. Tumor oncology is discussed and related to the utility of available techniques, such as CT, MR imaging, and US. Imaging strategies are discussed that stress consideration of therapeutic efficacy and patient outcome. Current tumor staging and classification is presented and the various imaging strategies keyed to detection, definition, and treatment options for GU tract tumors. The strengths and limitations of modern imaging techniques are reviewed. An optimal approach to effective workup is developed with regard to availability, evolving technology, and cost efficacy. The controversies and conflicts in imaging and treatment options are explored while constructing a step-by-step approach that is both flexible and pragmatic for the clinician and radiologist faced daily with oncologic management choices

  17. Multiscale Systems Modeling of Male Reproductive Tract ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reproductive tract is a complex, integrated organ system with diverse embryology and unique sensitivity to prenatal environmental exposures that disrupt morphoregulatory processes and endocrine signaling. U.S. EPA’s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB) was used to profile the bioactivity of 54 chemicals with male developmental consequences across ~800 molecular and cellular features [Leung et al., accepted manuscript]. The in vitro bioactivity on molecular targets could be condensed into 156 gene annotations in a bipartite network. These results highlighted the role of estrogen and androgen signaling pathways in male reproductive tract development, and importantly, broadened the list of molecular targets to include GPCRs, cytochrome-P450s, vascular remodeling proteins, and retinoic acid signaling. A multicellular agent-based model was used to simulate the complex interactions between morphoregulatory, endocrine, and environmental influences during genital tubercle (GT) development. Spatially dynamic signals (e.g., SHH, FGF10, and androgen) were implemented in the model to address differential adhesion, cell motility, proliferation, and apoptosis. Urethral tube closure was an emergent feature of the model that was linked to gender-specific rates of ventral mesenchymal proliferation and urethral plate endodermal apoptosis, both under control of androgen signaling [Leung et al., manuscript in preparation]. A systemic parameter sweep w

  18. Lymphoma and metastases in the urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneton, J.N.; Drouillard, J.

    1989-01-01

    Kidneys lymphomas are mainly secondary and represent the most frequent localizations in the urinary tract (68%). The appearance most frequently observed with computed tomography (CT) as well as ultrasound is that of multinodular involvement or, less frequently, of contiguous involvement from retroperitoneal adenopathy in an isolate nodular or tumoral form or in an infiltrating form. The lesions are most often bilateral and involve the lymph nodes, the liver and/or the spleen, especially when the tumor is a metastasis. Lymphoma in the excreting cavities of the bladder is much less frequent. The frequent stasis does no allow obtaining satisfactory urograms for the exploration of the ureters, so that antegrade or retrograde pyelography is often necessary. The lesions of the bladder are well demonstrated by ultrasound and CT exploration. The metastases of lymphoma in the urinary tract are most frequently located in the kidneys, and represent the most frequent malignant kidney tumors. They are often non recognized clinically since they occur at late stages in cancer evolution. Their usual appearance with ultrasound and CT is that of multiple solid-type tumors. Metastases in the excreting cavities of the bladder are very rare [fr

  19. Kinetics and regional specificity of irinotecan-induced gene expression in the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, Joanne M.; Tsykin, Anna; Stringer, Andrea M.; Logan, Richard M.; Gibson, Rachel J.; Keefe, Dorothy M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity remains a significant and dose-limiting complication of cancer treatment. While the pathophysiology is becoming clearer, considerable gaps in the knowledge remain surrounding the timing and site-specific gene changes which occur in response to insult. As such, this study aimed to assess gene expression profiles in a number of regions along the gastrointestinal tract following treatment with the chemotherapy agent, irinotecan, and correlate them with markers of cell death and tissue damage. Data analysis of microarray results found that genes involved in apoptosis, mitogen activated kinase (MAPK) signalling and inflammation were upregulated within 6 h, while genes involved in cell proliferation, wound healing and blood vessel formation were upregulated at later time points up to 72 h. Cell death was significantly increased at 6 and 24 h, and the stomach showed the lowest severity of overt tissue damage. Real time PCR of MAPK signalling pathway genes found that the jejunum and colon had significantly increased expression in a number of genes at 72 h, where as the stomach was unchanged. These results indicate that overall severity of tissue damage may be determined by precisely timed target gene responses specific to each region. Therapeutic targeting of key gene responses at the appropriate time point may prove to be effective for prevention of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal damage.

  20. Compensatory Motor Control After Stroke: An Alternative Joint Strategy for Object-Dependent Shaping of Hand Posture

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavan, Preeti; Santello, Marco; Gordon, Andrew M.; Krakauer, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient grasping requires planned and accurate coordination of finger movements to approximate the shape of an object before contact. In healthy subjects, hand shaping is known to occur early in reach under predominantly feedforward control. In patients with hemiparesis after stroke, execution of coordinated digit motion during grasping is impaired as a result of damage to the corticospinal tract. The question addressed here is whether patients with hemiparesis are able to compensate for th...