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Sample records for cortical surface maps

  1. Regional quantitative analysis of cortical surface maps of FDG PET images

    CERN Document Server

    Protas, H D; Hayashi, K M; Chin Lung, Yu; Bergsneider, M; Sung Cheng, Huang

    2006-01-01

    Cortical surface maps are advantageous for visualizing the 3D profile of cortical gray matter development and atrophy, and for integrating structural and functional images. In addition, cortical surface maps for PET data, when analyzed in conjunction with structural MRI data allow us to investigate, and correct for, partial volume effects. Here we compared quantitative regional PET values based on a 3D cortical surface modeling approach with values obtained directly from the 3D FDG PET images in various atlas-defined regions of interest (ROIs; temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes). FDG PET and 3D MR (SPGR) images were obtained and aligned to ICBM space for 15 normal subjects. Each image was further elastically warped in 2D parameter space of the cortical surface, to align major cortical sulci. For each point within a 15 mm distance of the cortex, the value of the PET intensity was averaged to give a cortical surface map of FDG uptake. The average PET values on the cortical surface map were calcula...

  2. Direct cortical mapping via solving partial differential equations on implicit surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M; Dinov, Ivo; Osher, Stanley; Toga, Arthur W

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for cortical mapping that computes a direct map between two cortical surfaces while satisfying constraints on sulcal landmark curves. By computing the map directly, we can avoid conventional intermediate parameterizations and help simplify the cortical mapping process. The direct map in our method is formulated as the minimizer of a flexible variational energy under landmark constraints. The energy can include both a harmonic term to ensure smoothness of the map and general data terms for the matching of geometric features. Starting from a properly designed initial map, we compute the map iteratively by solving a partial differential equation (PDE) defined on the source cortical surface. For numerical implementation, a set of adaptive numerical schemes are developed to extend the technique of solving PDEs on implicit surfaces such that landmark constraints are enforced. In our experiments, we show the flexibility of the direct mapping approach by computing smooth maps following landmark constraints from two different energies. We also quantitatively compare the metric preserving property of the direct mapping method with a parametric mapping method on a group of 30 subjects. Finally, we demonstrate the direct mapping method in the brain mapping applications of atlas construction and variability analysis.

  3. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Gyral Shape and Cortical Surface Asymmetries in Schizophrenia: Gender Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narr, Katherine L.; Thompson, Paul M.; Sharma, Tonmoy; Moussai, Jacob; Zoumalan, Chris; Rayman, Janice; Toga, Arthur W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective People with schizophrenia exhibit abnormalities in brain structure, often in the left hemisphere. Disturbed structural lateralization is controversial, however, and effects appear mediated by gender. The authors mapped differences between schizophrenic and normal subjects in gyral asymmetries, complexity, and variability across the entire cortex. Method Asymmetry and shape profiles for 25 schizophrenic patients (15 men) and 28 demographically similar normal subjects (15 men) were obtained for 38 gyral regions, including the sylvian fissure and temporal and postcentral gyri, by using magnetic resonance data and a novel surface-based mesh-modeling approach. Cortical complexity was examined for sex and diagnosis effects in lobar regions. Intragroup variability was quantified and visualized to assess regional group abnormalities at the cortical surface. Results The patients showed greater variability in frontal areas than the comparison subjects. They also had significant deviations in gyral complexity asymmetry in the superior frontal cortex. In temporoparietal regions, significant gyral asymmetries were present in both groups. Sex differences were apparent in superior temporal gyral measures, and cortical complexity in inferior frontal regions was significantly greater in men. Conclusions Cortical variability and complexity show regional abnormalities in the frontal cortex potentially specific to schizophrenia. The results indicate highly significant temporoparietal gyral asymmetries in both diagnostic groups, contrary to reports of less lateralization in schizophrenia. Substantially larger study groups are necessary to isolate smaller deviations in surface asymmetries, if present in schizophrenia, suggesting their diagnostic value is minimal. PMID:11156807

  4. Automatic sulcal line extraction on cortical surfaces using geodesic path density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Troter, A; Auzias, G; Coulon, O

    2012-07-16

    We present here a method that is designed to automatically extract sulcal lines on the mesh of any cortical surface. The method is based on the definition of a new function, the Geodesic Path Density Map (GPDM), within each sulcal basin (i.e. regions with a negative mean curvature). GPDM indicates at each vertex the likelihood that a shortest path between any two points of the basins boundary goes through that vertex. If the distance used to compute shortest path is anisotropic and constrained by a geometric information such as the depth, the GPDM indicates the likelihood that a vertex belongs to the sulcal line in the basin. An automatic GPDM adaptive thresholding procedure is proposed and sulcal lines are then defined. The process has been validated on a set of 25 subjects by comparing results to the manual segmentation from an expert and showed an average error below 2mm. It is also compared to our previous reference method in the context of inter-subject cortical surface registration and shows an significant improvement in performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mapping cortico-striatal connectivity onto the cortical surface: a new tractography-based approach to study Huntington disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Marrakchi-Kacem

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is associated with early and severe damage to the basal ganglia and particularly the striatum. We investigated cortico-striatal connectivity modifications occurring in HD patients using a novel approach which focuses on the projection of the connectivity profile of the basal ganglia onto the cortex. This approach consists in computing, for each subcortical structure, surface connectivity measures representing its strength of connections to the cortex and comparing these measures across groups. In this study, we focused on Huntington disease as an application of this new approach. First, surface cortico-striatal connectivity measures of a group of healthy subjects were averaged in order to infer the "normal" connectivity profile of the striatum to the cortex. Second, a statistical analysis was performed from the surface connectivity measures of healthy subjects and HD patients in order to detect the cortical gyri presenting altered cortico-striatal connectivity in HD. Lastly, percentage differences of connectivity between healthy subjects and patients were inferred, for each nucleus of the striatum, from the connectivity measures of the cortical gyri presenting a significant connectivity difference between the two groups. These percentage differences characterize the axonal disruptions between the striatum and the cortex occurring in HD. We found selective region-specific degeneration of cortical connections predominating for associative and primary sensorimotor connections and with relative preservation of limbic connections. Our method can be used to infer novel connectivity-based markers of HD pathological process.

  6. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features.

  7. Workbench surface editor of brain cortical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Douglas E.; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Serra, Luis

    1996-04-01

    We have developed a 3D reach-in tool to manually reconstruct 3D cortical surface patches from 2D brain atlas images. The first application of our cortex editor is building 3D functional maps, specifically Brodmann's areas. This tool may also be useful in clinical practice to adjust incorrectly mapped atlas regions due to the deforming effect of lesions. The cortex editor allows a domain expert to control the correlation of control points across slices. Correct correlation has been difficult for 3D reconstruction algorithms because the atlas slices are far apart and because of the complex topology of the cortex which differs so much from slice to slice. Also, higher precision of the resulting surfaces is demanded since these define 3D brain atlas features upon which future stereotactic surgery may be based. The cortex editor described in this paper provides a tool suitable for a domain expert to use in defining the 3D surface of a Brodmann's area.

  8. Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton on cortical surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y; Thompson, P M; Dinov, I; Toga, A W

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to construct graphical representations of cortical folding patterns by computing skeletons on triangulated cortical surfaces. In our approach, a cortical surface is first partitioned into sulcal and gyral regions via the solution of a variational problem using graph cuts, which can guarantee global optimality. After that, we extend the method of Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton [1] to subsets of triangulated surfaces, together with a geometrically intuitive pruning process that can trade off between skeleton complexity and the completeness of representing folding patterns. Compared with previous work that uses skeletons of 3-D volumes to represent sulcal patterns, the skeletons on cortical surfaces can be easily decomposed into branches and provide a simpler way to construct graphical representations of cortical morphometry. In our experiments, we demonstrate our method on two different cortical surface models, its ability of capturing major sulcal patterns and its application to compute skeletons of gyral regions.

  9. Cortical cartography reveals political and physical maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, David W; Gaillard, William Davis; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Meador, Kimford J; Ojemann, Jeffrey G

    2014-05-01

    Advances in functional imaging have provided noninvasive techniques to probe brain organization of multiple constructs including language and memory. Because of high overall rates of agreements with older techniques, including Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping (CSM), some have proposed that those approaches should be largely abandoned because of their invasiveness, and replaced with noninvasive functional imaging methods. High overall agreement, however, is based largely on concordant language lateralization in series dominated by cases of typical cerebral dominance. Advocating a universal switch from Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) ignores the differences in specific expertise across epilepsy centers, many of which often have greater skill with one approach rather than the other, and that Wada, CSM, fMRI, and MEG protocols vary across institutions resulting in different outcomes and reliability. Specific patient characteristics also affect whether Wada or CSM might influence surgical management, making it difficult to accept broad recommendations against currently useful clinical tools. Although the development of noninvasive techniques has diminished the frequency of more invasive approaches, advocating their use to replace Wada testing and CSM across all epilepsy surgery programs without consideration of the different skills, protocols, and expertise at any given center site is ill-advised. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Object recognition by artificial cortical maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebe, Alessio; Domenella, Rosaria Grazia

    2007-09-01

    Object recognition is one of the most important functions of the human visual system, yet one of the least understood, this despite the fact that vision is certainly the most studied function of the brain. We understand relatively well how several processes in the cortical visual areas that support recognition capabilities take place, such as orientation discrimination and color constancy. This paper proposes a model of the development of object recognition capability, based on two main theoretical principles. The first is that recognition does not imply any sort of geometrical reconstruction, it is instead fully driven by the two dimensional view captured by the retina. The second assumption is that all the processing functions involved in recognition are not genetically determined or hardwired in neural circuits, but are the result of interactions between epigenetic influences and basic neural plasticity mechanisms. The model is organized in modules roughly related to the main visual biological areas, and is implemented mainly using the LISSOM architecture, a recent neural self-organizing map model that simulates the effects of intercortical lateral connections. This paper shows how recognition capabilities, similar to those found in brain ventral visual areas, can develop spontaneously by exposure to natural images in an artificial cortical model.

  11. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ewan; Andronikou, Savvas; Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade

    2016-09-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties.

  12. Quantitative Architectural Analysis: A New Approach to Cortical Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Axel; Morosan, Patricia; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Results from functional imaging studies are often still interpreted using the classical architectonic brain maps of Brodmann and his successors. One obvious weakness in traditional, architectural mapping is the subjective nature of localizing borders between cortical areas by means of a purely visual, microscopical examination of histological…

  13. Quantitative Architectural Analysis: A New Approach to Cortical Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Axel; Morosan, Patricia; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Results from functional imaging studies are often still interpreted using the classical architectonic brain maps of Brodmann and his successors. One obvious weakness in traditional, architectural mapping is the subjective nature of localizing borders between cortical areas by means of a purely visual, microscopical examination of histological…

  14. Conformal mapping via metric optimization with application for cortical label fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yonggang; Lai, Rongjie; Toga, Arthur W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we develop a novel approach for computing conformal maps between anatomical surfaces with the ability of aligning anatomical features and achieving greatly reduced metric distortion. In contrast to conventional approaches that focused on conformal maps to the sphere or plane, our method computes the conformal map between surfaces in the embedding space formed the intrinsically defined Laplace-Beltrami (LB) eigenfunctions. Utilizing the power of LB eigenfunctions as informative descriptors of global geometry, the conformal maps computed by our method can effectively align anatomical features on cortical surfaces. By computing such feature-aware conformal maps to a group-wisely optimal atlas surface, which is also computed with metric optimization in the LB embedding space, we develop a fully automated system for cortical labeling with the fusion of labels on a large number of atlas surfaces. In our experiments, we build our system with 40 labeled surfaces and demonstrate its excellent performance with leave-one-out cross validation. We also applied the automated labeling system to cortical surfaces reconstructed from MR scans of 50 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 50 normal controls (NC) to illustrate its robustness and effectiveness in clinical data analysis.

  15. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging for cortical mapping in epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajos, Rudolf Kozák; Tóth, Vivien; Barsi, Péter; Rudas, Gábor

    2011-09-30

    It is not only the total curative resection of pathological tissue or the minimization of symptoms to be considered in epilepsy surgery or other neurosurgical procedures, it is equally desirable to maintain the best possible quality of life. Cortical mapping methods can help achieve this goal by delineating eloquent areas, i.e. brain regions that are vital for providing an acceptable quality of life, albeit not prone to compensatory reorganization. These areas include among others the Broca and Wernicke regions for speech, the primary motor, sensory and visual cortices. Functional MRI gained importance in the last decade as a non-invasive clinical cortical mapping technique. This method is capable of localizing cortical areas selectively activated by a given task condition. Thus, selecting appropriate tasks can help mapping eloquent brain regions. Using functional MRI provides information that is complementary to other mapping methods. Moreover, it can replace invasive methods such as the Wada test. Here, we explain the background of functional MRI, compare it to other clinical mapping methods, explain the intricacies of paradigm selection, and show the limitations of the technique while also pointing out alternative uses.

  16. Learning-Based Topological Correction for Infant Cortical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shijie; Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Meng, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Reconstruction of topologically correct and accurate cortical surfaces from infant MR images is of great importance in neuroimaging mapping of early brain development. However, due to rapid growth and ongoing myelination, infant MR images exhibit extremely low tissue contrast and dynamic appearance patterns, thus leading to much more topological errors (holes and handles) in the cortical surfaces derived from tissue segmentation results, in comparison to adult MR images which typically have good tissue contrast. Existing methods for topological correction either rely on the minimal correction criteria, or ad hoc rules based on image intensity priori, thus often resulting in erroneous correction and large anatomical errors in reconstructed infant cortical surfaces. To address these issues, we propose to correct topological errors by learning information from the anatomical references, i.e., manually corrected images. Specifically, in our method, we first locate candidate voxels of topologically defected regions by using a topology-preserving level set method. Then, by leveraging rich information of the corresponding patches from reference images, we build region-specific dictionaries from the anatomical references and infer the correct labels of candidate voxels using sparse representation. Notably, we further integrate these two steps into an iterative framework to enable gradual correction of large topological errors, which are frequently occurred in infant images and cannot be completely corrected using one-shot sparse representation. Extensive experiments on infant cortical surfaces demonstrate that our method not only effectively corrects the topological defects, but also leads to better anatomical consistency, compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

  17. Mapping the motor and sensory cortices: a historical look and a current case study in sensorimotor localization and direct cortical motor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Justin

    2012-03-01

    The utilization of cortical mapping during craniotomies for epilepsy and brain tumor resection is extremely important. Cortical mapping can guide the surgical team intraoperatively with regards to the layout of important anatomical structures and their function to prevent post-operative deficits. Electroneurophysiological methods employed include sensorimotor localization recorded directly from the surface of the brain when stimulated from a peripheral nerve and direct cortical stimulation (DCS) of the motor cortex to elicit a distal muscle response. This paper presents a case, in which a paradigm of neurophysiological modalities is utilized to assist the surgeon in creating a topographic map of the motor cortex and with localizing the sensory and motor cortices, in addition to a historical review of functional localization.

  18. Construction of 4D high-definition cortical surface atlases of infants: Methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-10-01

    In neuroimaging, cortical surface atlases play a fundamental role for spatial normalization, analysis, visualization, and comparison of results across individuals and different studies. However, existing cortical surface atlases created for adults are not suitable for infant brains during the first two postnatal years, which is the most dynamic period of postnatal structural and functional development of the highly-folded cerebral cortex. Therefore, spatiotemporal cortical surface atlases for infant brains are highly desired yet still lacking for accurate mapping of early dynamic brain development. To bridge this significant gap, leveraging our infant-dedicated computational pipeline for cortical surface-based analysis and the unique longitudinal infant MRI dataset acquired in our research center, in this paper, we construct the first spatiotemporal (4D) high-definition cortical surface atlases for the dynamic developing infant cortical structures at seven time points, including 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months of age, based on 202 serial MRI scans from 35 healthy infants. For this purpose, we develop a novel method to ensure the longitudinal consistency and unbiasedness to any specific subject and age in our 4D infant cortical surface atlases. Specifically, we first compute the within-subject mean cortical folding by unbiased groupwise registration of longitudinal cortical surfaces of each infant. Then we establish longitudinally-consistent and unbiased inter-subject cortical correspondences by groupwise registration of the geometric features of within-subject mean cortical folding across all infants. Our 4D surface atlases capture both longitudinally-consistent dynamic mean shape changes and the individual variability of cortical folding during early brain development. Experimental results on two independent infant MRI datasets show that using our 4D infant cortical surface atlases as templates leads to significantly improved accuracy for spatial normalization

  19. Consistent Reconstruction of Cortical Surfaces from Longitudinal Brain MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gang; Nie, Jingxin; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and consistent reconstruction of cortical surfaces from longitudinal human brain MR images is of great importance in studying subtle morphological changes of the cerebral cortex. This paper presents a new deformable surface method for consistent and accurate reconstruction of inner, central and outer cortical surfaces from longitudinal MR images. Specifically, the cortical surfaces of the group-mean image of all aligned longitudinal images of the same subject are first reconstructed ...

  20. Consistent Reconstruction of Cortical Surfaces from Longitudinal Brain MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gang; Nie, Jingxin; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Yaping; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and consistent reconstruction of cortical surfaces from longitudinal human brain MR images is of great importance in studying longitudinal subtle change of the cerebral cortex. This paper presents a novel deformable surface method for consistent and accurate reconstruction of inner, central and outer cortical surfaces from longitudinal brain MR images. Specifically, the cortical surfaces of the group-mean image of all aligned longitudinal images of the same subject are first reconstr...

  1. Surface Mapping using Quadcopter

    OpenAIRE

    Haugen, Kenneth Eide

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the use of unmanned aerial vehicles to perform ice managementin the Arctic Ocean by gathering information about and physically control the iceenvironment. Such a system is needed for safety reasons as marine operations aremoving further north. In order to gather information about the ice environment, aUAV will be used for surface mapping. The quadcopter Parrot AR. Drone 2.0 will be used as a testbed for implementing proposed strategies for guidance, navigation and control ...

  2. Automatic intraoperative fiducial-less patient registration using cortical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Olson, Jonathan D.; Ji, Songbai; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2017-03-01

    In image-guided neurosurgery, patient registration is typically performed in the operating room (OR) at the beginning of the procedure to establish the patient-to-image transformation. The accuracy and efficiency of patient registration are crucial as they are associated with surgical outcome, workflow, and healthcare costs. In this paper, we present an automatic fiducial-less patient registration (FLR) by directly registering cortical surface acquired from intraoperative stereovision (iSV) with preoperative MR (pMR) images without incorporating any prior information, and illustrate the method using one patient example. T1-weighted MR images were acquired prior to surgery and the brain was segmented. After dural opening, an image pair of the exposed cortical surface was acquired using an intraoperative stereovision (iSV) system, and a three-dimensional (3D) texture-encoded profile of the cortical surface was reconstructed. The 3D surface was registered with pMR using a multi-start binary registration method to determine the location and orientation of the iSV patch with respect to the segmented brain. A final transformation was calculated to establish the patient-to-MR relationship. The total computational time was 30 min, and can be significantly improved through code optimization, parallel computing, and/or graphical processing unit (GPU) acceleration. The results show that the iSV texture map aligned well with pMR using the FLR transformation, while misalignment was evident with fiducial-based registration (FBR). The difference between FLR and FBR was calculated at the center of craniotomy and the resulting distance was 4.34 mm. The results presented in this paper suggest potential for clinical application in the future.

  3. Rapid Long-Range Disynaptic Inhibition Explains the Formation of Cortical Orientation Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolík, Ján

    2017-01-01

    Competitive interactions are believed to underlie many types of cortical processing, ranging from memory formation, attention and development of cortical functional organization (e.g., development of orientation maps in primary visual cortex). In the latter case, the competitive interactions happen along the cortical surface, with local populations of neurons reinforcing each other, while competing with those displaced more distally. This specific configuration of lateral interactions is however in stark contrast with the known properties of the anatomical substrate, i.e., excitatory connections (mediating reinforcement) having longer reach than inhibitory ones (mediating competition). No satisfactory biologically plausible resolution of this conflict between anatomical measures, and assumed cortical function has been proposed. Recently a specific pattern of delays between different types of neurons in cat cortex has been discovered, where direct mono-synaptic excitation has approximately the same delay, as the combined delays of the disynaptic inhibitory interactions between excitatory neurons (i.e., the sum of delays from excitatory to inhibitory and from inhibitory to excitatory neurons). Here we show that this specific pattern of delays represents a biologically plausible explanation for how short-range inhibition can support competitive interactions that underlie the development of orientation maps in primary visual cortex. We demonstrate this statement analytically under simplifying conditions, and subsequently show using network simulations that development of orientation maps is preserved when long-range excitation, direct inhibitory to inhibitory interactions, and moderate inequality in the delays between excitatory and inhibitory pathways is added.

  4. SIMULATING CORTICAL MAPS FOR ATTENTION SHIFT IN AUTISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-H. Tan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a pervasive neuro-developmental disorder, primarily encompassing difficulties in the social, language, and communicative domains. Because autism is a spectrum disorder, it affects each individual differently and has varying degrees. There are three core aspects of impairment based upon the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV, namely impairment in socialization, impairment in communication, and restricted repetitive activities or interests. This work describes the experiment aims at expressing autistic traits through the use of self-organizing map. Works related to simulating autism through self-organizing map is limited. This work compare and contrast the difference in attention index for normal learning and marred attention shift learning ability. It was found that the attention index of normal learning is 9 times better marred attention shift for both random and pre-fixed input data. In the marred attention shift context, neurons adapt more towards the mean of both sources combined under marred context while some neurons adapt towards mean of one source under normal context. The normal learning ability produces maps with neurons orienting towards mean values of combined stimuli source. Impairment in learning ability produces similar cortical maps compared to normal learning ability. The major difference is in the attention index.

  5. Cortical language mapping using electrical cortical stimulation for Mandarin-speaking patients with epilepsy: a report of six case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Yu, Tao; Sun, Wei; Ni, Duanyu; Li, Yongjie

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this study was to summarize the results of language cortex mapping using electrical cortical stimulation with modified language tasks for Mandarin-speaking patients with epilepsy. Electrical currents were delivered through implanted subdural electrodes to six Mandarin-speaking patients before epilepsy surgery. The current intensities inducing any language disturbance during comprehension, repetition, and speech tasks were recorded, and individual cortical mapping was completed to guide subsequent resection, with the distance between mapped language sites and resected zones kept at a minimum of 0.5 cm. Language function was reassessed and followed up after surgery. Language cortices were successfully identified in three patients, but demonstrated great variability in distribution. There seemed to be no difference in the intensity threshold that induced language interference. None of the six patients exhibited language deficits postsurgery. Electrical cortical stimulation with modified language tasks is valid for identification of cortices underlying Mandarin processing. The great variability in language cortex distribution enhances the necessity of individual language cortical mapping in epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Theory for the alignment of cortical feature maps during development

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2010-08-23

    We present a developmental model of ocular dominance column formation that takes into account the existence of an array of intrinsically specified cytochrome oxidase blobs. We assume that there is some molecular substrate for the blobs early in development, which generates a spatially periodic modulation of experience-dependent plasticity. We determine the effects of such a modulation on a competitive Hebbian mechanism for the modification of the feedforward afferents from the left and right eyes. We show how alternating left and right eye dominated columns can develop, in which the blobs are aligned with the centers of the ocular dominance columns and receive a greater density of feedforward connections, thus becoming defined extrinsically. More generally, our results suggest that the presence of periodically distributed anatomical markers early in development could provide a mechanism for the alignment of cortical feature maps. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  7. Detection and mapping of delays in early cortical folding derived from in utero MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A.; Kim, Kio; Roosta, Ahmad; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Understanding human brain development in utero and detecting cortical abnormalities related to specific clinical conditions is an important area of research. In this paper, we describe and evaluate methodology for detection and mapping of delays in early cortical folding from population-based studies of fetal brain anatomies imaged in utero. We use a general linear modeling framework to describe spatiotemporal changes in curvature of the developing brain and explore the ability to detect and localize delays in cortical folding in the presence of uncertainty in estimation of the fetal age. We apply permutation testing to examine which regions of the brain surface provide the most statistical power to detect a given folding delay at a given developmental stage. The presented methodology is evaluated using MR scans of fetuses with normal brain development and gestational ages ranging from 20.57 to 27.86 weeks. This period is critical in early cortical folding and the formation of the primary and secondary sulci. Finally, we demonstrate a clinical application of the framework for detection and localization of folding delays in fetuses with isolated mild ventriculomegaly.

  8. Registration of cortical surfaces using sulcal landmarks for group analysis of MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand A; Shattuck, David W; Thompson, Paul M; Leahy, Richard M

    2007-06-01

    We present a method to register individual cortical surfaces to a surface-based brain atlas or canonical template using labeled sulcal curves as landmark constraints. To map one cortex smoothly onto another, we minimize a thin-plate spline energy defined on the surface by solving the associated partial differential equations (PDEs). By using covariant derivatives in solving these PDEs, we compute the bending energy with respect to the intrinsic geometry of the 3D surface rather than evaluating it in the flattened metric of the 2D parameter space. This covariant approach greatly reduces the confounding effects of the surface parameterization on the resulting registration.

  9. Anatomically informed convolution kernels for the projection of fMRI data on the cortical surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operto, Grégory; Bulot, Rémy; Anton, Jean-Luc; Coulon, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    We present here a method that aims at producing representations of functional brain data on the cortical surface from functional MRI volumes. Such representations are required for subsequent cortical-based functional analysis. We propose a projection technique based on the definition, around each node of the grey/white matter interface mesh, of convolution kernels whose shape and distribution rely on the geometry of the local anatomy. For one anatomy, a set of convolution kernels is computed that can be used to project any functional data registered with this anatomy. The method is presented together with experiments on synthetic data and real statistical t-maps.

  10. Mapping the mosaic sequence of primate visual cortical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaki-Carril eMundinano

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditional ‘textbook’ theory suggests that the development and maturation of visual cortical areas occur as a wave from V1. However, more recent evidence would suggest that this is not the case, and the emergence of extrastriate areas occurs in a non-hierarchical fashion. This proposition comes from both physiological and anatomical studies but the actual developmental sequence of extrastriate areas remains unknown. In the current study, we examined the development and maturation of the visual cortex of the marmoset monkey, a New World simian, from embryonic day 130 (15 days prior to birth through to adulthood. Utilizing the well-described expression characteristics of the calcium-binding proteins calbindin and parvalbumin, and nonphosphorylated neurofilament for the pyramidal neurons, we were able to accurately map the sequence of development and maturation of the visual cortex. To this end, we demonstrated that both V1 and middle temporal area (MT emerge first and that MT likely supports dorsal stream development while V1 supports ventral stream development. Furthermore, the emergence of the dorsal stream-associated areas was significantly earlier than ventral stream areas. The difference in the temporal development of the visual streams is likely driven by a teleological requirement for specific visual behavior in early life.

  11. Crowdsourcing for error detection in cortical surface delineations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; Kondermann, Daniel; Andrulis, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    crowdsourcing platform were asked to annotate errors in automatic cortical surface delineations on 100 central, coronal slices of MR images. RESULTS: On average, annotations for 100 images were obtained in less than an hour. When using expert annotations as reference, the crowd on average achieves a sensitivity...

  12. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Ewan [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Andronikou, Savvas [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of Bristol, CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade [University of Bristol, CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties. (orig.)

  13. Effects of polar cortical cytoskeleton and unbalanced cortical surface tension on intercellular bridge thinning during cytokinesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Mei-Wen An; Xiao-Na Li; Fang Yang; Yang Liu

    2011-01-01

    To probe the contributions of polar cortical cytoskeleton and the surface tension of daughter cells to intercellular bridgethinning dynamics during cytokinesis,we applied cytochalasin D (CD) or colchicine (COLC) in a highly localized manner to polar regions of dividing normal rat kidney (NRK) cells.We observed cellular morphological changes and analyzed the intercellular bridge thinning trajectories of dividing cells with different polar cortical characteristics.Global blebbistatin (BS) application was used to obtain cells losing active contractile force groups.Our results show that locally released CD or colchicine at the polar region caused inhibition of cytokinesis before ingression.Similar treatment at phases after ingression allowed completion of cytokinesis but dramatically influenced the trajectories of intercellular bridge thinning.Disturbing single polar cortical actin induced transformation of the intercellular bridge thinning process,and polar cortical tension controlled deformation time of intercellular bridges.Our study provides a feasible framework to induce and analyze the effects of local changes in mechanical properties of cellular components on single cellular cytokinesis.

  14. Projection of fMRI data onto the cortical surface using anatomically-informed convolution kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operto, G; Bulot, R; Anton, J-L; Coulon, O

    2008-01-01

    As surface-based data analysis offer an attractive approach for intersubject matching and comparison, the projection of voxel-based 3D volumes onto the cortical surface is an essential problem. We present here a method that aims at producing representations of functional brain data on the cortical surface from functional MRI volumes. Such representations are for instance required for subsequent cortical-based functional analysis. We propose a projection technique based on the definition, around each node of the gray/white matter interface mesh, of convolution kernels whose shape and distribution rely on the geometry of the local anatomy. For one anatomy, a set of convolution kernels is computed that can be used to project any functional data registered with this anatomy. Therefore resulting in anatomically-informed projections of data onto the cortical surface, this kernel-based approach offers better sensitivity, specificity than other classical methods and robustness to misregistration errors. Influences of mesh and volumes spatial resolutions were also estimated for various projection techniques, using simulated functional maps.

  15. An automated pipeline for cortical surface generation and registration of the cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Ibanez, Luis; Gelas, Arnaud; Yeo, B. T. Thomas; Niethammer, Marc; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Magnotta, Vincent A.

    2011-03-01

    The human cerebral cortex is one of the most complicated structures in the body. It has a highly convoluted structure with much of the cortical sheet buried in sulci. Based on cytoarchitectural and functional imaging studies, it is possible to segment the cerebral cortex into several subregions. While it is only possible to differentiate the true anatomical subregions based on cytoarchitecture, the surface morphometry aligns closely with the underlying cytoarchitecture and provides features that allow the surface of the cortex to be parcellated based on the sulcal and gyral patterns that are readily visible on the MR images. We have developed a fully automated pipeline for the generation and registration of cortical surfaces in the spherical domain. The pipeline initiates with the BRAINS AutoWorkup pipeline. Subsequently, topology correction and surface generation is performed to generate a genus zero surface and mapped to a sphere. Several surface features are then calculated to drive the registration between the atlas surface and other datasets. A spherical diffeomorphic demons algorithm is used to co-register an atlas surface onto a subject surface. A lobar based atlas of the cerebral cortex was created from a manual parcellation of the cortex. The atlas surface was then co-registered to five additional subjects using a spherical diffeomorphic demons algorithm. The labels from the atlas surface were warped on the subject surface and compared to the manual raters. The average Dice overlap index was 0.89 across all regions.

  16. Brain segmentation and the generation of cortical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, M.; Cui, J.; Doolittle, K.; Joshi, S.; Van Essen, D.; Wang, L.; Miller, M. I.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes methods for white matter segmentation in brain images and the generation of cortical surfaces from the segmentations. We have developed a system that allows a user to start with a brain volume, obtained by modalities such as MRI or cryosection, and constructs a complete digital representation of the cortical surface. The methodology consists of three basic components: local parametric modeling and Bayesian segmentation; surface generation and local quadratic coordinate fitting; and surface editing. Segmentations are computed by parametrically fitting known density functions to the histogram of the image using the expectation maximization algorithm [DLR77]. The parametric fits are obtained locally rather than globally over the whole volume to overcome local variations in gray levels. To represent the boundary of the gray and white matter we use triangulated meshes generated using isosurface generation algorithms [GH95]. A complete system of local parametric quadratic charts [JWM+95] is superimposed on the triangulated graph to facilitate smoothing and geodesic curve tracking. Algorithms for surface editing include extraction of the largest closed surface. Results for several macaque brains are presented comparing automated and hand surface generation. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Cortical sulcal atlas construction using a diffeomorphic mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shantanu H; Cabeen, Ryan P; Sun, Bo; Joshi, Anand A; Gutman, Boris; Zamanyan, Alen; Chakrapani, Shruthi; Dinov, Ivo; Woods, Roger P; Toga, Arthur W

    2010-01-01

    We present a geometric approach for constructing shape atlases of sulcal curves on the human cortex. Sulci and gyri are represented as continuous open curves in R3, and their shapes are studied as elements of an infinite-dimensional sphere. This shape manifold has some nice properties--it is equipped with a Riemannian L2 metric on the tangent space and facilitates computational analyses and correspondences between sulcal shapes. Sulcal mapping is achieved by computing geodesics in the quotient space of shapes modulo rigid rotations and reparameterizations. The resulting sulcal shape atlas is shown to preserve important local geometry inherently present in the sample population. This is demonstrated in our experimental results for deep brain sulci, where we integrate the elastic shape model into surface registration framework for a population of 69 healthy young adult subjects.

  18. Intra-operative multi-site stimulation: Expanding methodology for cortical brain mapping of language functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Tal; Gazit, Tomer; Korn, Akiva; Kirschner, Adi; Perry, Daniella; Hendler, Talma; Ram, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Direct cortical stimulation (DCS) is considered the gold-standard for functional cortical mapping during awake surgery for brain tumor resection. DCS is performed by stimulating one local cortical area at a time. We present a feasibility study using an intra-operative technique aimed at improving our ability to map brain functions which rely on activity in distributed cortical regions. Following standard DCS, Multi-Site Stimulation (MSS) was performed in 15 patients by applying simultaneous cortical stimulations at multiple locations. Language functioning was chosen as a case-cognitive domain due to its relatively well-known cortical organization. MSS, performed at sites that did not produce disruption when applied in a single stimulation point, revealed additional language dysfunction in 73% of the patients. Functional regions identified by this technique were presumed to be significant to language circuitry and were spared during surgery. No new neurological deficits were observed in any of the patients following surgery. Though the neuro-electrical effects of MSS need further investigation, this feasibility study may provide a first step towards sophistication of intra-operative cortical mapping.

  19. Cortical Surface Reconstruction via Unified Reeb Analysis of Geometric and Topological Outliers in Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yonggang; Lai, Rongjie

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel system for the automated reconstruction of cortical surfaces from T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. At the core of our system is a unified Reeb analysis framework for the detection and removal of geometric and topological outliers on tissue boundaries. Using intrinsic Reeb analysis, our system can pinpoint the location of spurious branches and topological outliers, and correct them with localized filtering using information from both image intensity distributions and geometric regularity. In this system, we have also developed enhanced tissue classification with Hessian features for improved robustness to image inhomogeneity, and adaptive interpolation to achieve sub-voxel accuracy in reconstructed surfaces. By integrating these novel developments, we have a system that can automatically reconstruct cortical surfaces with improved quality and dramatically reduced computational cost as compared with the popular FreeSurfer software. In our experiments, we demonstrate on 40 simulated MR images and the MR images of 200 subjects from two databases: the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and International Consortium of Brain Mapping (ICBM), the robustness of our method in large scale studies. In comparisons with FreeSurfer, we show that our system is able to generate surfaces that better represent cortical anatomy and produce thickness features with higher statistical power in population studies. PMID:23086519

  20. A Comprehensive Three-Dimensional Cortical Map of Vowel Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharinger, Mathias; Idsardi, William J.; Poe, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian cortex is known to contain various kinds of spatial encoding schemes for sensory information including retinotopic, somatosensory, and tonotopic maps. Tonotopic maps are especially interesting for human speech sound processing because they encode linguistically salient acoustic properties. In this study, we mapped the entire vowel space…

  1. Chronic imaging of cortical sensory map dynamics using a genetically encoded calcium indicator

    OpenAIRE

    Minderer, M; Liu, W.; Sumanovski, L. T.; Kügler, S; Helmchen, F; Margolis, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract  In vivo optical imaging can reveal the dynamics of large-scale cortical activity, but methods for chronic recording are limited. Here we present a technique for long-term investigation of cortical map dynamics using wide-field ratiometric fluorescence imaging of the genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) Yellow Cameleon 3.60. We find that wide-field GECI signals report sensory-evoked activity in anaesthetized mouse somatosensory cortex with high sensitivity and spatiotemporal ...

  2. Chronic imaging of cortical sensory map dynamics using a genetically encoded calcium indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minderer, Matthias; Liu, Wenrui; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Kügler, Sebastian; Helmchen, Fritjof; Margolis, David J

    2012-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging can reveal the dynamics of large-scale cortical activity, but methods for chronic recording are limited. Here we present a technique for long-term investigation of cortical map dynamics using wide-field ratiometric fluorescence imaging of the genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) Yellow Cameleon 3.60. We find that wide-field GECI signals report sensory-evoked activity in anaesthetized mouse somatosensory cortex with high sensitivity and spatiotemporal precision, and furthermore, can be measured repeatedly in separate imaging sessions over multiple weeks. This method opens new possibilities for the longitudinal study of stability and plasticity of cortical sensory representations.

  3. Residual stress around the cortical surface in bovine femoral diaphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satoshi; Tadano, Shigeru

    2010-04-01

    Residual stress in living tissue plays an important role in mechanical strength. We have reported that residual stress exists in the bone tissue of a rabbit's tibiofibula. The purpose of this study is to measure the residual stress around the outer cortical region of bovine femoral diaphysis and to discuss the distribution of the stress. This work proposed the sin(2) psi method of X-ray diffraction to the measurement of residual stresses in bone tissue. In this method, residual stress can be estimated from the variation in the interplanar spacings orientated to a number of directions without the lattice strain in the stress direction. Four-point bending tests of strip specimens taken from bovine femoral diaphysis were carried out during X-ray irradiation in advance. In the proximal, middle, and distal sections of bovine femoral diaphyses, the residual stresses at the cortical surface were measured using characteristic Mo-Kalpha X-rays. The bending tests of strip specimens with X-ray irradiation showed that the method could reliably estimate residual stresses in the bone tissue. The residual stress of the bone axial direction was larger than that of the circumferential direction. The stresses in the middle part of five diaphyses along the bone axial direction were tensile. The maximum stress was 162 MPa at the lateral position and the minimum was 78 MPa at the posterior position. The residual stress in the bone axial direction varies around the circumferential region. In addition, the bone axial distributions of residual stresses were different in the proximal, middle, and distal sections of the individual femur. Furthermore, it was confirmed that residual stress in the bone tissue was released by the cutting out of the specimen. The residual stresses in bone tissue could be measured by this method. The results show that residual stress in the bone axial direction at the cortical surface in bovine femoral diaphysis is tensile and varies around the circumferential

  4. Vesta surface thermal properties map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capria, Maria Teresa; Tosi, F.; De Santis, Maria Cristina; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Frigeri, A.; Zambon, F; Fonte, S.; Palomba, E.; Turrini, D.; Titus, T.N.; Schroder, S.E.; Toplis, M.J.; Liu, J.Y.; Combe, J.-P.; Raymond, C.A.; Russell, C.T.

    2014-01-01

    The first ever regional thermal properties map of Vesta has been derived from the temperatures retrieved by infrared data by the mission Dawn. The low average value of thermal inertia, 30 ± 10 J m−2 s−0.5 K−1, indicates a surface covered by a fine regolith. A range of thermal inertia values suggesting terrains with different physical properties has been determined. The lower thermal inertia of the regions north of the equator suggests that they are covered by an older, more processed surface. A few specific areas have higher than average thermal inertia values, indicative of a more compact material. The highest thermal inertia value has been determined on the Marcia crater, known for its pitted terrain and the presence of hydroxyl in the ejecta. Our results suggest that this type of terrain can be the result of soil compaction following the degassing of a local subsurface reservoir of volatiles.

  5. A new cortical thickness mapping method with application to an in vivo finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Jong-Eun; Eberhardt, Alan W

    2014-01-01

    Finite element modelling of musculoskeletal systems, with geometrical structures constructed from computed tomography (CT) scans, is a useful and powerful tool for biomechanical studies. The use of CT scans from living human subjects, however, is still limited. Accurate reconstruction of thin cortical bone structures from CT scans of living human subjects is especially problematic, due to low CT resolution that results from mandatory low radiation doses and/or involuntary movements of the subject. In this study, a new method for mapping cortical thickness is described. Using the method, cortical thickness measurements of a coxal (pelvis) bone obtained from CT scans of a cadaver were mapped to the coxal geometry as obtained through CT scans of a live human subject, resulting in accurate cortical thickness while maintaining geometric fidelity of the live subject. The mapping procedure includes shape-preserving parameterisation, mesh movement and interpolation of thickness using a search algorithm. The methodology is applicable to modelling of other bones where accurate cortical thickness is needed and for which such data exist.

  6. Cortical mapping with navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation in low-grade glioma surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva WS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson S Paiva1, Erich T Fonoff1, Marco A Marcolin2, Hector N Cabrera1, Manoel J Teixeira11Division of Functional Neurosurgery, Hospital das Clinicas, 2TMS Laboratory of the Psychiatry Institute, Hospital das Clinicas, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a promising method for both investigation and therapeutic treatment of psychiatric and neurologic disorders and, more recently, for brain mapping. This study describes the application of navigated TMS for motor cortex mapping in patients with a brain tumor located close to the precentral gyrus.Materials and methods: In this prospective study, six patients with low-grade gliomas in or near the precentral gyrus underwent TMS, and their motor responses were correlated to locations in the cortex around the lesion, generating a functional map overlaid on three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans of the brain. To determine the accuracy of this new method, we compared TMS mapping with the gold standard mapping with direct cortical electrical stimulation in surgery. The same navigation system and TMS-generated map were used during the surgical resection procedure.Results: The motor cortex could be clearly mapped using both methods. The locations corresponding to the hand and forearm, found during intraoperative mapping, showed a close spatial relationship to the homotopic areas identified by TMS mapping. The mean distance between TMS and direct cortical electrical stimulation (DES was 4.16 ± 1.02 mm (range: 2.56–5.27 mm.Conclusion: Preoperative mapping of the motor cortex with navigated TMS prior to brain tumor resection is a useful presurgical planning tool with good accuracy.Keywords: transcranial magnetic stimulation, cortical mapping, brain tumor, motor cortex

  7. Scanning electron microscopy of human cortical bone failure surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidotti, P; Branca, F P; Stagni, L

    1997-02-01

    Undecalcified samples extracted from human femoral shafts are fractured by bending and the fracture surfaces are examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The investigation is performed on both dry and wet (hydrated with a saline solution) specimens. SEM micrographs show patterns in many respects similar to those observed in fractography studies of laminated fiber-reinforced synthetic composites. In particular, dry and wet samples behave like brittle and ductile matrix laminates, respectively. An analysis carried out on the basis of the mechanisms that dominate the fracture process of laminates shows that a reasonable cortical bone model is that of a laminated composite material whose matrix is composed of extracellular noncollagenous calcified proteins, and the reinforcement is constituted by the calcified collagen fiber system.

  8. Disruption of Transient Serotonin Accumulation by Non-Serotonin-Producing Neurons Impairs Cortical Map Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms that alter serotonin transporter SERT expression and functionality increase the risks for autism and psychiatric traits. Here, we investigate how SERT controls serotonin signaling in developing CNS in mice. SERT is transiently expressed in specific sets of glutamatergic neurons and uptakes extrasynaptic serotonin during perinatal CNS development. We show that SERT expression in glutamatergic thalamocortical axons (TCAs dictates sensory map architecture. Knockout of SERT in TCAs causes lasting alterations in TCA patterning, spatial organizations of cortical neurons, and dendritic arborization in sensory cortex. Pharmacological reduction of serotonin synthesis during the first postnatal week rescues sensory maps in SERTGluΔ mice. Furthermore, knockdown of SERT expression in serotonin-producing neurons does not impair barrel maps. We propose that spatiotemporal SERT expression in non-serotonin-producing neurons represents a determinant in early life genetic programming of cortical circuits. Perturbing this SERT function could be involved in the origin of sensory and cognitive deficits associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  9. Resistor mesh model of a spherical head: part 2: a review of applications to cortical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, N; Morucci, J P; Franceries, X; Celsis, P; Rigaud, B

    2005-11-01

    A resistor mesh model (RMM) has been validated with reference to the analytical model by consideration of a set of four dipoles close to the cortex. The application of the RMM to scalp potential interpolation was detailed in Part 1. Using the RMM and the same four dipoles, the different methods of cortical mapping were compared and have shown the potentiality of this RMM for obtaining current and potential cortical distributions. The lead-field matrices are well-adapted tools, but the use of a square matrix of high dimension does not permit the inverse solution to be improved in the presence of noise, as a regularisation technique is necessary with noisy data. With the RMM, the transfer matrix and the cortical imaging technique proved to be easy to implement. Further development of the RMM will include application to more realistic head models with more accurate conductivities.

  10. Language mapping in multilingual patients: Electrocorticography and cortical stimulation during naming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenzie C Cervenka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Multilingual patients pose a unique challenge when planning epilepsy surgery near language cortex because the cortical representations of each language may be distinct. These distinctions may not be evident with routine electrocortical stimulation mapping (ESM. Electrocorticography (ECoG has recently been used to detect task-related spectral perturbations associated with functional brain activation. We hypothesized that using broadband high gamma augmentation (HGA, 60-150 Hertz as an index of cortical activation, ECoG would complement ESM in discriminating the cortical representations of first (L1 and second (L2 languages. We studied four adult patients for whom English was a second language, in whom subdural electrodes (a total of 358 were implanted to guide epilepsy surgery. Patients underwent ECoG recordings and electrocortical stimulation mapping (ESM while performing the same visual object naming task in L1 and L2. In three of four patients, ECoG found sites activated during naming in one language but not the other. These language-specific sites were not identified using ESM. In addition, ECoG HGA was observed at more sites during L2 versus L1 naming in two patients, suggesting that L2 processing required additional cortical resources compared to L1 processing in these individuals. Post-operative language deficits were identified in three patients (one in L2 only. These deficits were predicted by ECoG spectral mapping but not by ESM. These results suggest that pre-surgical mapping should include evaluation of all utilized languages to avoid post-operative functional deficits. Finally, this study suggests that ECoG spectral mapping may potentially complement the results of ESM of language.

  11. Adaptive training of cortical feature maps for a robot sensorimotor controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Samantha V; Wennekers, Thomas; Denham, Sue; Culverhouse, Phil F

    2013-08-01

    This work investigates self-organising cortical feature maps (SOFMs) based upon the Kohonen Self-Organising Map (SOM) but implemented with spiking neural networks. In future work, the feature maps are intended as the basis for a sensorimotor controller for an autonomous humanoid robot. Traditional SOM methods require some modifications to be useful for autonomous robotic applications. Ideally the map training process should be self-regulating and not require predefined training files or the usual SOM parameter reduction schedules. It would also be desirable if the organised map had some flexibility to accommodate new information whilst preserving previous learnt patterns. Here methods are described which have been used to develop a cortical motor map training system which goes some way towards addressing these issues. The work is presented under the general term 'Adaptive Plasticity' and the main contribution is the development of a 'plasticity resource' (PR) which is modelled as a global parameter which expresses the rate of map development and is related directly to learning on the afferent (input) connections. The PR is used to control map training in place of a traditional learning rate parameter. In conjunction with the PR, random generation of inputs from a set of exemplar patterns is used rather than predefined datasets and enables maps to be trained without deciding in advance how much data is required. An added benefit of the PR is that, unlike a traditional learning rate, it can increase as well as decrease in response to the demands of the input and so allows the map to accommodate new information when the inputs are changed during training.

  12. Quantifying cortical surface harmonic deformation with stereovision during open cranial neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Cortical surface harmonic motion during open cranial neurosurgery is well observed in image-guided neurosurgery. Recently, we quantified cortical surface deformation noninvasively with synchronized blood pressure pulsation (BPP) from a sequence of stereo image pairs using optical flow motion tracking. With three subjects, we found the average cortical surface displacement can reach more than 1 mm and in-plane principal strains of up to 7% relative to the first image pair. In addition, the temporal changes in deformation and strain were in concert with BPP and patient respiration [1]. However, because deformation was essentially computed relative to an arbitrary reference, comparing cortical surface deformation at different times was not possible. In this study, we extend the technique developed earlier by establishing a more reliable reference profile of the cortical surface for each sequence of stereo image acquisitions. Specifically, fast Fourier transform (FFT) was applied to the dynamic cortical surface deformation, and the fundamental frequencies corresponding to patient respiration and BPP were identified, which were used to determine the number of image acquisitions for use in averaging cortical surface images. This technique is important because it potentially allows in vivo characterization of soft tissue biomechanical properties using intraoperative stereovision and motion tracking.

  13. Can we predict subject-specific dynamic cortical thickness maps during infancy from birth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yu; Li, Gang; Rekik, Islem; Zhang, Han; Gao, Yaozong; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the early dynamic development of the human cerebral cortex remains a challenging problem. Cortical thickness, as one of the most important morphological attributes of the cerebral cortex, is a sensitive indicator for both normal neurodevelopment and neuropsychiatric disorders, but its early postnatal development remains largely unexplored. In this study, we investigate a key question in neurodevelopmental science: can we predict the future dynamic development of cortical thickness map in an individual infant based on its available MRI data at birth? If this is possible, we might be able to better model and understand the early brain development and also early detect abnormal brain development during infancy. To this end, we develop a novel learning-based method, called Dynamically-Assembled Regression Forest (DARF), to predict the development of the cortical thickness map during the first postnatal year, based on neonatal MRI features. We applied our method to 15 healthy infants and predicted their cortical thickness maps at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age, with respectively mean absolute errors of 0.209 mm, 0.332 mm, 0.340 mm, and 0.321 mm. Moreover, we found that the prediction precision is region-specific, with high precision in the unimodal cortex and relatively low precision in the high-order association cortex, which may be associated with their differential developmental patterns. Additional experiments also suggest that using more early time points for prediction can further significantly improve the prediction accuracy. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2865-2874, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Geometric Representation Of Visual Data In The Cortex Of Primates: Computer Reconstruction And Modeling Of Neo-Cortical Map And Column Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Eric

    1988-08-01

    Much of vertebrate midbrain and mammalian cortex is dedicated to two-dimensional "maps" in which two or more stimulus parameters are encoded by the position of neural activation in the map. Moreover, there are a large number of such maps which interact in an unknown fashion to yield a unified perception of the world. Our research program is based on studying the structure and function of brain maps. In the present paper, we review a recently constructed system of computer aided neuro-anatomy which allows high resolution texture mapped models of cortical surfaces in two and three dimensions to be displayed and manipulated. At the same time, this work demonstrates some of the basic geometric patterns of architecture of the primate brain, such as columnar and topographic mapping.

  15. Characterization of Cortical Networks and Corticocortical Functional Connectivity Mediating Arbitrary Visuomotor Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovelli, Andrea; Chicharro, Daniel; Badier, Jean-Michel; Wang, Huifang; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-09-16

    Adaptive behaviors are built on the arbitrary linkage of sensory inputs to actions and goals. Although the sensorimotor and associative frontostriatal circuits are known to mediate arbitrary visuomotor mappings, the underlying corticocortico dynamics remain elusive. Here, we take a novel approach exploiting gamma-band neural activity to study the human cortical networks and corticocortical functional connectivity mediating arbitrary visuomotor mapping. Single-trial gamma-power time courses were estimated for all Brodmann areas by combing magnetoencephalographic and MRI data with spectral analysis and beam-forming techniques. Linear correlation and Granger causality analyses were performed to investigate functional connectivity between cortical regions. The performance of visuomotor associations was characterized by an increase in gamma-power and functional connectivity over the sensorimotor and frontoparietal network, in addition to medial prefrontal areas. The superior parietal area played a driving role in the network, exerting Granger causality on the dorsal premotor area. Premotor areas acted as relay from parietal to medial prefrontal cortices, which played a receiving role in the network. Link community analysis further revealed that visuomotor mappings reflect the coordination of multiple subnetworks with strong overlap over motor and frontoparietal areas. We put forward an associative account of the underlying cognitive processes and corticocortical functional connectivity. Overall, our approach and results provide novel perspectives toward a better understanding of how distributed brain activity coordinates adaptive behaviors. In everyday life, most of our behaviors are based on the arbitrary linkage of sensory information to actions and goals, such as stopping at a red traffic light. Despite their automaticity, such behaviors rely on the activity of a large brain network and elusive interareal functional connectivity. We take a novel approach exploiting

  16. Mapping the cortical representation of speech sounds in a syllable repetition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Christopher J; Bohland, Jason W

    2016-11-01

    Speech repetition relies on a series of distributed cortical representations and functional pathways. A speaker must map auditory representations of incoming sounds onto learned speech items, maintain an accurate representation of those items in short-term memory, interface that representation with the motor output system, and fluently articulate the target sequence. A "dorsal stream" consisting of posterior temporal, inferior parietal and premotor regions is thought to mediate auditory-motor representations and transformations, but the nature and activation of these representations for different portions of speech repetition tasks remains unclear. Here we mapped the correlates of phonetic and/or phonological information related to the specific phonemes and syllables that were heard, remembered, and produced using a series of cortical searchlight multi-voxel pattern analyses trained on estimates of BOLD responses from individual trials. Based on responses linked to input events (auditory syllable presentation), predictive vowel-level information was found in the left inferior frontal sulcus, while syllable prediction revealed significant clusters in the left ventral premotor cortex and central sulcus and the left mid superior temporal sulcus. Responses linked to output events (the GO signal cueing overt production) revealed strong clusters of vowel-related information bilaterally in the mid to posterior superior temporal sulcus. For the prediction of onset and coda consonants, input-linked responses yielded distributed clusters in the superior temporal cortices, which were further informative for classifiers trained on output-linked responses. Output-linked responses in the Rolandic cortex made strong predictions for the syllables and consonants produced, but their predictive power was reduced for vowels. The results of this study provide a systematic survey of how cortical response patterns covary with the identity of speech sounds, which will help to constrain

  17. Active Free Surface Density Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelen, S.

    2016-10-01

    Percolation problems were occupied to many physical problems after their establishment in 1957 by Broadbent and Hammersley. They can be used to solve complex systems such as bone remodeling. Volume fraction method was adopted to set some algorithms in the literature. However, different rate of osteoporosis could be observed for different microstructures which have the same mass density, mechanical stimuli, hormonal stimuli and nutrition. Thus it was emphasized that the bone might have identical porosity with different specific surfaces. Active free surface density of bone refers the used total area for its effective free surface. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a mathematical approach which can be called as “active free surface density maps” for different surface patterns and derive their formulations. Active free surface density ratios were calculated for different Archimedean lattice models according to Helmholtz free energy and they were compared with their site and bond percolation thresholds from the background studies to derive their potential probability for bone remodeling.

  18. Modulation of spike timing by sensory deprivation during induction of cortical map plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikel, Tansu; Szostak, Vanessa A; Feldman, Daniel E

    2004-05-01

    Deprivation-induced plasticity of sensory cortical maps involves long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) of cortical synapses, but how sensory deprivation triggers LTP and LTD in vivo is unknown. Here we tested whether spike timing-dependent forms of LTP and LTD are involved in this process. We measured spike trains from neurons in layer 4 (L4) and layers 2 and 3 (L2/3) of rat somatosensory cortex before and after acute whisker deprivation, a manipulation that induces whisker map plasticity involving LTD at L4-to-L2/3 (L4-L2/3) synapses. Whisker deprivation caused an immediate reversal of firing order for most L4 and L2/3 neurons and a substantial decorrelation of spike trains, changes known to drive timing-dependent LTD at L4-L2/3 synapses in vitro. In contrast, spike rate changed only modestly. Thus, whisker deprivation is likely to drive map plasticity by spike timing-dependent mechanisms.

  19. Cortical thickness mapping to identify focal osteoporosis in patients with hip fracture.

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    Kenneth E S Poole

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individuals with osteoporosis are predisposed to hip fracture during trips, stumbles or falls, but half of all hip fractures occur in those without generalised osteoporosis. By analysing ordinary clinical CT scans using a novel cortical thickness mapping technique, we discovered patches of markedly thinner bone at fracture-prone regions in the femurs of women with acute hip fracture compared with controls. METHODS: We analysed CT scans from 75 female volunteers with acute fracture and 75 age- and sex-matched controls. We classified the fracture location as femoral neck or trochanteric before creating bone thickness maps of the outer 'cortical' shell of the intact contra-lateral hip. After registration of each bone to an average femur shape and statistical parametric mapping, we were able to visualise and quantify statistically significant foci of thinner cortical bone associated with each fracture type, assuming good symmetry of bone structure between the intact and fractured hip. The technique allowed us to pinpoint systematic differences and display the results on a 3D average femur shape model. FINDINGS: The cortex was generally thinner in femoral neck fracture cases than controls. More striking were several discrete patches of statistically significant thinner bone of up to 30%, which coincided with common sites of fracture initiation (femoral neck or trochanteric. INTERPRETATION: Femoral neck fracture patients had a thumbnail-sized patch of focal osteoporosis at the upper head-neck junction. This region coincided with a weak part of the femur, prone to both spontaneous 'tensile' fractures of the femoral neck, and as a site of crack initiation when falling sideways. Current hip fracture prevention strategies are based on case finding: they involve clinical risk factor estimation to determine the need for single-plane bone density measurement within a standard region of interest (ROI of the femoral neck. The precise sites of focal

  20. Mapping the fine structure of cortical activity with different micro-ECoG electrode array geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Gkogkidis, C. Alexis; Iljina, Olga; Fiederer, Lukas D. J.; Henle, Christian; Mader, Irina; Kaminsky, Jan; Stieglitz, Thomas; Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Ball, Tonio

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Innovations in micro-electrocorticography (µECoG) electrode array manufacturing now allow for intricate designs with smaller contact diameters and/or pitch (i.e. inter-contact distance) down to the sub-mm range. The aims of the present study were: (i) to investigate whether frequency ranges up to 400 Hz can be reproducibly observed in µECoG recordings and (ii) to examine how differences in topographical substructure between these frequency bands and electrode array geometries can be quantified. We also investigated, for the first time, the influence of blood vessels on signal properties and assessed the influence of cortical vasculature on topographic mapping. Approach. The present study employed two µECoG electrode arrays with different contact diameters and inter-contact distances, which were used to characterize neural activity from the somatosensory cortex of minipigs in a broad frequency range up to 400 Hz. The analysed neural data were recorded in acute experiments under anaesthesia during peripheral electrical stimulation. Main results. We observed that µECoG recordings reliably revealed multi-focal cortical somatosensory response patterns, in which response peaks were often less than 1 cm apart and would thus not have been resolvable with conventional ECoG. The response patterns differed by stimulation site and intensity, they were distinct for different frequency bands, and the results of functional mapping proved independent of cortical vascular. Our analysis of different frequency bands exhibited differences in the number of activation peaks in topographical substructures. Notably, signal strength and signal-to-noise ratios differed between the two electrode arrays, possibly due to their different sensitivity for variations in spatial patterns and signal strengths. Significance. Our findings that the geometry of µECoG electrode arrays can strongly influence their recording performance can help to make informed decisions that maybe

  1. Biharmonic Maps and Laguerre Minimal Surfaces

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    Yusuf Abu Muhanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Laguerre surface is known to be minimal if and only if its corresponding isotropic map is biharmonic. For every Laguerre surface Φ is its associated surface Ψ=1+u2Φ, where u lies in the unit disk. In this paper, the projection of the surface Ψ associated to a Laguerre minimal surface is shown to be biharmonic. A complete characterization of Ψ is obtained under the assumption that the corresponding isotropic map of the Laguerre minimal surface is harmonic. A sufficient and necessary condition is also derived for Ψ to be a graph. Estimates of the Gaussian curvature to the Laguerre minimal surface are obtained, and several illustrative examples are given.

  2. Absorption mapping for characterization of glass surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commandré, M; Roche, P; Borgogno, J P; Albrand, G

    1995-05-01

    The surface quality of bare substrates and preparation procedures take on an important role in optical coating performances. The most commonly used techniques of characterization generally give information about roughness and local defects. A photothermal deflection technique is used for mapping surface absorption of fused-silica and glass substrates. We show that absorption mapping gives specific information on surface contamination of bare substrates. We present experimental results concerning substrates prepared by different cleaning and polishing techniques. We show that highly polished surfaces lead to the lowest values of residual surface absorption. Moreover the cleaning behavior of surfaces of multicomponent glasses and their optical performance in terms of absorption are proved to be different from those of fused silica.

  3. Cortical thickness and surface area in neonates at high risk for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Lyall, Amanda E; Ahn, Mihye; Peng, Ziwen; Zhu, Hongtu; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with subtle abnormal cortical thickness and cortical surface area. However, it is unclear whether these abnormalities exist in neonates associated with genetic risk for schizophrenia. To this end, this preliminary study was conducted to identify possible abnormalities of cortical thickness and surface area in the high-genetic-risk neonates. Structural magnetic resonance images were acquired from offspring of mothers (N = 21) who had schizophrenia (N = 12) or schizoaffective disorder (N = 9), and also matched healthy neonates of mothers who were free of psychiatric illness (N = 26). Neonatal cortical surfaces were reconstructed and parcellated as regions of interest (ROIs), and cortical thickness for each vertex was computed as the shortest distance between the inner and outer surfaces. Comparisons were made for the average cortical thickness and total surface area in each of 68 cortical ROIs. After false discovery rate (FDR) correction, it was found that the female high-genetic-risk neonates had significantly thinner cortical thickness in the right lateral occipital cortex than the female control neonates. Before FDR correction, the high-genetic-risk neonates had significantly thinner cortex in the left transverse temporal gyrus, left banks of superior temporal sulcus, left lingual gyrus, right paracentral cortex, right posterior cingulate cortex, right temporal pole, and right lateral occipital cortex, compared with the control neonates. Before FDR correction, in comparison with control neonates, male high-risk neonates had significantly thicker cortex in the left frontal pole, left cuneus cortex, and left lateral occipital cortex; while female high-risk neonates had significantly thinner cortex in the bilateral paracentral, bilateral lateral occipital, left transverse temporal, left pars opercularis, right cuneus, and right posterior cingulate cortices. The high-risk neonates also had significantly

  4. Echo-acoustic flow dynamically modifies the cortical map of target range in bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartenstein, Sophia K.; Gerstenberg, Nadine; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert; Firzlaff, Uwe

    2014-08-01

    Echolocating bats use the delay between their sonar emissions and the reflected echoes to measure target range, a crucial parameter for avoiding collisions or capturing prey. In many bat species, target range is represented as an orderly organized map of echo delay in the auditory cortex. Here we show that the map of target range in bats is dynamically modified by the continuously changing flow of acoustic information perceived during flight (‘echo-acoustic flow’). Combining dynamic acoustic stimulation in virtual space with extracellular recordings, we found that neurons in the auditory cortex of the bat Phyllostomus discolor encode echo-acoustic flow information on the geometric relation between targets and the bat’s flight trajectory, rather than echo delay per se. Specifically, the cortical representation of close-range targets is enlarged when the lateral passing distance of the target decreases. This flow-dependent enlargement of target representation may trigger adaptive behaviours such as vocal control or flight manoeuvres.

  5. Neural network models for spatial data mining, map production, and cortical direction selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Olga

    A family of ARTMAP neural networks for incremental supervised learning has been developed over the last decade. The Sensor Exploitation Group of MIT Lincoln Laboratory (LL) has incorporated an early version of this network as the recognition engine of a hierarchical system for fusion and data mining of multiple registered geospatial images. The LL system has been successfully fielded, but it is limited to target vs. non-target identifications and does not produce whole maps. This dissertation expands the capabilities of the LL system so that it learns to identify arbitrarily many target classes at once and can thus produce a whole map. This new spatial data mining system is designed particularly to cope with the highly skewed class distributions of typical mapping problems. Specification of a consistent procedure and a benchmark testbed has permitted the evaluation of candidate recognition networks as well as pre- and post-processing and feature extraction options. The resulting default ARTMAP network and mapping methodology set a standard for a variety of related mapping problems and application domains. The second part of the dissertation investigates the development of cortical direction selectivity. The possible role of visual experience and oculomotor behavior in the maturation of cells in the primary visual cortex is studied. The responses of neurons in the thalamus and cortex of the cat are modeled when natural scenes are scanned by several types of eye movements. Inspired by the Hebbian-like synaptic plasticity, which is based upon correlations between cell activations, the second-order statistical structure of thalamo-cortical activity is examined. In the simulations, patterns of neural activity that lead to a correct refinement of cell responses are observed during visual fixation, when small ocular movements occur, but are not observed in the presence of large saccades. Simulations also replicate experiments in which kittens are reared under stroboscopic

  6. Structural asymmetry of the human cerebral cortex: Regional and between-subject variability of surface area, cortical thickness, and local gyrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Christine; Vazquez, David; Felton, Adam; McDowell, Alessandra

    2016-12-01

    Structural asymmetry varies across individuals, brain regions, and metrics of cortical organization. The current study investigated regional differences in asymmetry of cortical surface area, thickness, and local gyrification, and the extent of between-subject variability in these metrics, in a sample of healthy young adults (N=200). Between-subject variability in cortical structure may provide a means to assess the extent of biological flexibility or constraint of brain regions, and we explored the potential influence of this variability on the phenotypic expression of structural asymmetry. The findings demonstrate that structural asymmetries are nearly ubiquitous across the cortex, with differing regional organization for the three cortical metrics. This implies that there are multiple, only partially overlapping, maps of structural asymmetry. The results further indicate that the degree of asymmetry of a brain region can be predicted by the extent of the region's between-subject variability. These findings provide evidence that reduced biological constraint promotes the expression of strong structural asymmetry.

  7. Interhemispheric transfalcine approach and awake cortical mapping for resection of peri-atrial gliomas associated with the central lobule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahdi; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2015-02-01

    Medial posterior frontal and parietal gliomas extending to the peri-atrial region are difficult to reach surgically because of the working angle required to expose the lateral aspect of the tumor and the proximity of the tumor to the sensorimotor lobule; retraction of the sensorimotor cortex may lead to morbidity. The interhemispheric transfalcine approach is favorable and safe for resection of medial hemispheric tumors adjacent to the falx cerebri, but the literature on this approach is scarce. Awake cortical mapping using this operative route for tumors associated with the sensorimotor cortex has not been previously reported to our knowledge. We present the first case of a right medial posterior frontoparietal oligoastrocytoma that was resected through the interhemispheric transfalcine approach using awake cortical and subcortical mapping. Through a contralateral frontoparietal craniotomy, we excised a section of the falx and exposed the contralateral medial hemisphere. Cortical stimulation allowed localization of the supplementary motor cortex, and suprathreshold stimulation mapping excluded the primary motor cortex corresponding to the leg area. Gross total tumor resection was accomplished without any intraoperative or postoperative deficits. Awake cortical mapping using the contralateral transfalcine approach allows a "cross-court" operative route to map functional cortices and resect peri-atrial low-grade gliomas. This technique can minimize the otherwise necessary retraction on the ipsilateral hemisphere through an ipsilateral craniotomy.

  8. Conformal mapping on Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    The subject matter loosely called ""Riemann surface theory"" has been the starting point for the development of topology, functional analysis, modern algebra, and any one of a dozen recent branches of mathematics; it is one of the most valuable bodies of knowledge within mathematics for a student to learn.Professor Cohn's lucid and insightful book presents an ideal coverage of the subject in five pans. Part I is a review of complex analysis analytic behavior, the Riemann sphere, geometric constructions, and presents (as a review) a microcosm of the course. The Riemann manifold is introduced in

  9. Cortical Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Grey-matter abnormalities at the cortical surface and regional brain size were mapped by high-resolution MRI and surface-based, computational image analytical techniques in a group of 27 children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and 46 controls, matched by age and sex, at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  10. Direct motor evoked potentials and cortical mapping using the NIM® nerve monitoring system: A technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Suparna; Haji, Faizal; Hebb, Matthew; Chui, Jason

    2017-04-01

    Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) are commonly used to prevent neurological injury when operating in close proximity to the motor cortex or corticospinal pathway. We report a novel application of the NIM® nerve monitoring system (Medtronic@ NIM response 3.0) for intraoperative direct cortical (dc)-MEPs monitoring. A 69-year-old female patient presented with a 4month history of progressive left hemiparesis resulting from a large right sided posterior frontal meningioma that abutted and compressed the motor cortex. Motor cortical mapping and MEPs were indicated. The patient was anesthetized and maintained on total intravenous anesthetics. Compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of the right upper limb were monitored using the NIM system. After a craniotomy was performed, we first used the Ojemann stimulator (monopolar) for dc-stimulation and then switched to use the monopolar nerve stimulator probe of the NIM system. The CMAP response was successfully elicited using the NIM stimulating probe (pulse width=250s, train frequency=7pulses/s, current=20mA). A gross total resection of the tumor was achieved with intermittent cortical mapping of MEPs. There were no intraoperative complications and the patient's motor function was preserved after the surgery. In this case, we reported the successful use of the NIM nerve monitoring system to elicit dc-MEPs under general anesthesia. The advantages of using this system include a simple set up and application, neurosurgeon familiarity, wide availability and lower cost. dc-MEPs can be achieved using the NIM system. We conclude that the NIM nerve monitoring system is a feasible alternative to standard neurophysiological monitoring systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mapping the spatio-temporal structure of motor cortical LFP and spiking activities during reach-to-grasp movements

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    Alexa eRiehle

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Grasping an object involves shaping the hand and fingers in relation to the object's physical properties. Following object contact, it also requires a fine adjustment of grasp forces for secure manipulation. Earlier studies suggest that the control of hand shaping and grasp force involve partially segregated motor cortical networks. However, it is still unclear how information originating from these networks is processed and integrated. We addressed this issue by analyzing massively parallel signals from population measures (local field potentials, LFPs and single neuron spiking activities recorded simultaneously during a delayed reach-to-grasp task, by using a 100 electrode array chronically implanted in monkey motor cortex. Motor cortical LFPs exhibit a large multi-component movement-related potential (MRP around movement onset. Here, we show that the peak amplitude of each MRP component and its latency with respect to movement onset vary along the cortical surface covered by the array. Using a comparative mapping approach, we suggest that the spatio-temporal structure of the MRP reflects the complex physical properties of the reach-to-grasp movement. In addition, we explored how the spatio-temporal structure of the MRP relates to two other measures of neuronal activity: the temporal profile of single neuron spiking activity at each electrode site and the somatosensory receptive field properties of single neuron activities. We observe that the spatial representations of LFP and spiking activities overlap extensively and relate to the spatial distribution of proximal and distal representations of the upper limb. Altogether, these data show that, in motor cortex, a precise spatio-temporal pattern of activation is involved for the control of reach-to-grasp movements and provide some new insight about the functional organization of motor cortex during reaching and object manipulation.

  12. Mapping the spatio-temporal structure of motor cortical LFP and spiking activities during reach-to-grasp movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Alexa; Wirtssohn, Sarah; Grün, Sonja; Brochier, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Grasping an object involves shaping the hand and fingers in relation to the object's physical properties. Following object contact, it also requires a fine adjustment of grasp forces for secure manipulation. Earlier studies suggest that the control of hand shaping and grasp force involve partially segregated motor cortical networks. However, it is still unclear how information originating from these networks is processed and integrated. We addressed this issue by analyzing massively parallel signals from population measures (local field potentials, LFPs) and single neuron spiking activities recorded simultaneously during a delayed reach-to-grasp task, by using a 100-electrode array chronically implanted in monkey motor cortex. Motor cortical LFPs exhibit a large multi-component movement-related potential (MRP) around movement onset. Here, we show that the peak amplitude of each MRP component and its latency with respect to movement onset vary along the cortical surface covered by the array. Using a comparative mapping approach, we suggest that the spatio-temporal structure of the MRP reflects the complex physical properties of the reach-to-grasp movement. In addition, we explored how the spatio-temporal structure of the MRP relates to two other measures of neuronal activity: the temporal profile of single neuron spiking activity at each electrode site and the somatosensory receptive field properties of single neuron activities. We observe that the spatial representations of LFP and spiking activities overlap extensively and relate to the spatial distribution of proximal and distal representations of the upper limb. Altogether, these data show that, in motor cortex, a precise spatio-temporal pattern of activation is involved for the control of reach-to-grasp movements and provide some new insight about the functional organization of motor cortex during reaching and object manipulation.

  13. Prediction for human intelligence using morphometric characteristics of cortical surface: partial least square analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J-J; Yoon, U; Yun, H J; Im, K; Choi, Y Y; Lee, K H; Park, H; Hough, M G; Lee, J-M

    2013-08-29

    A number of imaging studies have reported neuroanatomical correlates of human intelligence with various morphological characteristics of the cerebral cortex. However, it is not yet clear whether these morphological properties of the cerebral cortex account for human intelligence. We assumed that the complex structure of the cerebral cortex could be explained effectively considering cortical thickness, surface area, sulcal depth and absolute mean curvature together. In 78 young healthy adults (age range: 17-27, male/female: 39/39), we used the full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and the cortical measurements calculated in native space from each subject to determine how much combining various cortical measures explained human intelligence. Since each cortical measure is thought to be not independent but highly inter-related, we applied partial least square (PLS) regression, which is one of the most promising multivariate analysis approaches, to overcome multicollinearity among cortical measures. Our results showed that 30% of FSIQ was explained by the first latent variable extracted from PLS regression analysis. Although it is difficult to relate the first derived latent variable with specific anatomy, we found that cortical thickness measures had a substantial impact on the PLS model supporting the most significant factor accounting for FSIQ. Our results presented here strongly suggest that the new predictor combining different morphometric properties of complex cortical structure is well suited for predicting human intelligence. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Regional brain differences in cortical thickness, surface area and subcortical volume in individuals with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, Shashwath A; Pryweller, Jennifer R; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by increased non-social anxiety, sensitivity to sounds and hypersociability. Previous studies have reported contradictory findings with regard to regional brain variation in WS, relying on only one type of morphological measure (usually volume) in each study. The present study aims to contribute to this body of literature and perhaps elucidate some of these discrepancies by examining concurrent measures of cortical thickness, surface area and subcortical volume between WS subjects and typically-developing (TD) controls. High resolution MRI scans were obtained on 31 WS subjects and 50 typically developing control subjects. We derived quantitative regional estimates of cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and subcortical volume using FreeSurfer software. We evaluated between-group ROI differences while controlling for total intracranial volume. In post-hoc exploratory analyses within the WS group, we tested for correlations between regional brain variation and Beck Anxiety Inventory scores. Consistent with our hypothesis, we detected complex patterns of between-group cortical variation, which included lower surface area in combination with greater thickness in the following cortical regions: post central gyrus, cuneus, lateral orbitofrontal cortex and lingual gyrus. Additional cortical regions showed between-group differences in one (but not both) morphological measures. Subcortical volume was lower in the basal ganglia and the hippocampus in WS versus TD controls. Exploratory correlations revealed that anxiety scores were negatively correlated with gray matter surface area in insula, OFC, rostral middle frontal, superior temporal and lingual gyrus. Our results were consistent with previous reports showing structural alterations in regions supporting the socio-affective and visuospatial impairments in WS. However, we also were able to effectively capture novel and complex

  15. Regional brain differences in cortical thickness, surface area and subcortical volume in individuals with Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashwath A Meda

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a rare genetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by increased non-social anxiety, sensitivity to sounds and hypersociability. Previous studies have reported contradictory findings with regard to regional brain variation in WS, relying on only one type of morphological measure (usually volume in each study. The present study aims to contribute to this body of literature and perhaps elucidate some of these discrepancies by examining concurrent measures of cortical thickness, surface area and subcortical volume between WS subjects and typically-developing (TD controls. High resolution MRI scans were obtained on 31 WS subjects and 50 typically developing control subjects. We derived quantitative regional estimates of cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and subcortical volume using FreeSurfer software. We evaluated between-group ROI differences while controlling for total intracranial volume. In post-hoc exploratory analyses within the WS group, we tested for correlations between regional brain variation and Beck Anxiety Inventory scores. Consistent with our hypothesis, we detected complex patterns of between-group cortical variation, which included lower surface area in combination with greater thickness in the following cortical regions: post central gyrus, cuneus, lateral orbitofrontal cortex and lingual gyrus. Additional cortical regions showed between-group differences in one (but not both morphological measures. Subcortical volume was lower in the basal ganglia and the hippocampus in WS versus TD controls. Exploratory correlations revealed that anxiety scores were negatively correlated with gray matter surface area in insula, OFC, rostral middle frontal, superior temporal and lingual gyrus. Our results were consistent with previous reports showing structural alterations in regions supporting the socio-affective and visuospatial impairments in WS. However, we also were able to effectively capture novel and

  16. Age of language acquisition and cortical language organization in multilingual patients undergoing awake brain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Coello, Alejandro; Havas, Viktória; Juncadella, Montserrat; Sierpowska, Joanna; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Gabarrós, Andreu

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Most knowledge regarding the anatomical organization of multilingualism is based on aphasiology and functional imaging studies. However, the results have still to be validated by the gold standard approach, namely electrical stimulation mapping (ESM) during awake neurosurgical procedures. In this ESM study the authors describe language representation in a highly specific group of 13 multilingual individuals, focusing on how age of acquisition may influence the cortical organization of language. METHODS Thirteen patients who had a high degree of proficiency in multiple languages and were harboring lesions within the dominant, left hemisphere underwent ESM while being operated on under awake conditions. Demographic and language data were recorded in relation to age of language acquisition (for native languages and early- and late-acquired languages), neuropsychological pre- and postoperative language testing, the number and location of language sites, and overlapping distribution in terms of language acquisition time. Lesion growth patterns and histopathological characteristics, location, and size were also recorded. The distribution of language sites was analyzed with respect to age of acquisition and overlap. RESULTS The functional language-related sites were distributed in the frontal (55%), temporal (29%), and parietal lobes (16%). The total number of native language sites was 47. Early-acquired languages (including native languages) were represented in 97 sites (55 overlapped) and late-acquired languages in 70 sites (45 overlapped). The overlapping distribution was 20% for early-early, 71% for early-late, and 9% for late-late. The average lesion size (maximum diameter) was 3.3 cm. There were 5 fast-growing and 7 slow-growing lesions. CONCLUSIONS Cortical language distribution in multilingual patients is not homogeneous, and it is influenced by age of acquisition. Early-acquired languages have a greater cortical representation than languages acquired

  17. Dynamic Development of Regional Cortical Thickness and Surface Area in Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, Amanda E; Shi, Feng; Geng, Xiujuan; Woolson, Sandra; Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Hamer, Robert M; Shen, Dinggang; Gilmore, John H

    2015-08-01

    Cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA) are altered in many neuropsychiatric disorders and are correlated with cognitive functioning. Little is known about how these components of cortical gray matter develop in the first years of life. We studied the longitudinal development of regional CT and SA expansion in healthy infants from birth to 2 years. CT and SA have distinct and heterogeneous patterns of development that are exceptionally dynamic; overall CT increases by an average of 36.1%, while cortical SA increases 114.6%. By age 2, CT is on average 97% of adult values, compared with SA, which is 69%. This suggests that early identification, prevention, and intervention strategies for neuropsychiatric illness need to be targeted to this period of rapid postnatal brain development, and that SA expansion is the principal driving factor in cortical volume after 2 years of age.

  18. Predicting Hip Fracture Type With Cortical Bone Mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treece, Graham M; Gee, Andrew H; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K; Cawthon, Peggy M; Black, Dennis M; Poole, Kenneth E S

    2015-11-01

    Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual-energy X-ray (DXA)-based methods have shown limited improvement. Fracture types have distinct relationships to predictors, but few studies have subdivided fracture into types, because this necessitates regional measurements and more fracture cases. This work makes use of cortical bone mapping (CBM) to accurately assess, with no prior anatomical presumptions, the distribution of properties related to fracture type. CBM uses QCT data to measure the cortical and trabecular properties, accurate even for thin cortices below the imaging resolution. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study is a predictive case-cohort study of men over 65 years old: we analyze 99 fracture cases (44 trochanteric and 55 femoral neck) compared to a cohort of 308, randomly selected from 5994. To our knowledge, this is the largest QCT-based predictive hip fracture study to date, and the first to incorporate CBM analysis into fracture prediction. We show that both cortical mass surface density and endocortical trabecular BMD are significantly different in fracture cases versus cohort, in regions appropriate to fracture type. We incorporate these regions into predictive models using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios, and logistic regression to estimate area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Adding CBM to DXA-based BMD leads to a small but significant (p fracture, with AUC increasing from 0.78 to 0.79, assessed using leave-one-out cross-validation. For specific fracture types, the improvement is more significant (p fractures and 0.76 to 0.82 for femoral neck fractures. In contrast, adding DXA-based BMD to a CBM-based predictive model does not result in any significant improvement. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research published by

  19. ERK is involved in the reorganization of somatosensory cortical maps in adult rats submitted to hindlimb unloading.

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    Erwan Dupont

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor restriction by a 14-day period of hindlimb unloading (HU in the adult rat induces a reorganization of topographic maps and receptive fields. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Interest was turned towards a possible implication of intracellular MAPK signaling pathway since Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 is known to play a significant role in the control of synaptic plasticity. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying cortical plasticity in adult rats submitted to a sensorimotor restriction, we analyzed the time-course of ERK1/2 activation by immunoblot and of cortical reorganization by electrophysiological recordings, on rats submitted to hindlimb unloading over four weeks. Immunohistochemistry analysis provided evidence that ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in layer III neurons of the somatosensory cortex. This increase was transient, and parallel to the changes in hindpaw cortical map area (layer IV. By contrast, receptive fields were progressively enlarged from 7 to 28 days of hindlimb unloading. To determine whether ERK1/2 was involved in cortical remapping, we administered a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD-98059 through osmotic mini-pump in rats hindlimb unloaded for 14 days. Results demonstrate that focal inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway prevents cortical reorganization, but had no effect on receptive fields. These results suggest that ERK1/2 plays a role in the induction of cortical plasticity during hindlimb unloading.

  20. Mapping cortical areas associated with Chinese word processing using functiona l magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马林; 唐一源; 王岩; 李德军; 翁旭初; 张武田; 庄建程; 胡小平

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To identify the cortical areas engaged during Chinese word processing using func tional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and to examine the reliability and repr oducibility of fMRI for localization of functional areas in the human brain.Methods FMRI data were collected on 8 young, right-handed, native Chinese speakers duri ng performance of Chinese synonym and homophone judgment tasks on two different clinical MRI systems (1.5 T GE Signa Horizon and 1.5 T Siemens Vision). A cro ss correlation analysis was used to statistically generate the activation map.Results Broca's area, Wernicke's area, bilateral extrastriate, and ventral tempo ral cortex were significantly activated during both the synonym and homophone activities. There was essentially no difference between results acquired on two different MRI systems.Conclusions FMRI can be used for localizing cortical areas critical to Chinese language proc essing in the human brain. The results are reliable and well reproducible acros s different clinical MRI systems.

  1. Mapping cortical thickness of the patients with unilateral end-stage open angle glaucoma on planar cerebral cortex maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bogorodzki

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To estimate and compare cerebral cortex thickness in patients with unilateral end-stage glaucoma with that of age-matched individuals with unaffected vision. METHODS: 14 patients with unilateral end-stage primary open angle glaucoma (POAG and 12 age-matched control individuals with no problems with vision were selected for the study based on detailed ophthalmic examination. For each participant 3D high-resolution structural brain T1-weighted magnetization prepared MR images were acquired on a 3.0 T scanner. Brain cortex thickness was estimated using the FreeSurfer image analysis environment. After warping of subjects' cortical surfaces to FreeSurfer common space, differences between POAG and control groups were inferred at the group analysis level with the General Linear Model. RESULTS: The analysis performed revealed local thinning in the visual cortex areas in the POAG group. Statistically significant differences form 600 mm2 clusters located in the Brodmann area BA19 in the left and right hemisphere. CONCLUSION: Unilateral vision loss due to end-stage neuropathy from POAG is associated with significant thinning of cortical areas employed in vision.

  2. A time and place for language comprehension : mapping the N400 and the P600 to a minimal cortical network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Harm; Hoeks, John C. J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new functional-anatomical mapping of the N400 and the P600 to a minimal cortical network for language comprehension. Our work is an example of a recent research strategy in cognitive neuroscience, where researchers attempt to align data regarding the nature and time-course of cognitive

  3. Arm movement maps evoked by cortical magnetic stimulation in a robotic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Lush, L M; Judkins, T N; Wittenberg, G F

    2010-02-03

    Many neurological diseases result in a severe inability to reach for which there is no proven therapy. Promising new interventions to address reaching rehabilitation using robotic training devices are currently under investigation in clinical trials but the neural mechanisms that underlie these interventions are not understood. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may be used to probe such mechanisms quickly and non-invasively, by mapping muscle and movement representations in the primary motor cortex (M1). Here we investigate movement maps in healthy young subjects at rest using TMS in the robotic environment, with the goal of determining the range of TMS accessible movements, as a starting point for the study of cortical plasticity in combination with robotic therapy. We systematically stimulated the left motor cortex of 14 normal volunteers while the right hand and forearm rested in the cradle of a two degree-of-freedom planar rehabilitation robot (IMT). Maps were created by applying 10 stimuli at each of nine locations (3x3 cm(2) grid) centered on the M1 movement hotspot for each subject, defined as the stimulation location that elicited robot cradle movements of the greatest distance. TMS-evoked movement kinematics were measured by the robotic encoders and ranged in magnitude from 0 to 3 cm. Movement maps varied by subject and by location within a subject. However, movements were very consistent within a single stimulation location for a given subject. Movement vectors remained relatively constant (limited to arm movements in the robotic reaching trainer, and thus may provide a real-time, non-invasive platform for neurophysiology based evaluation and therapy in motor rehabilitation settings. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Cortical surface-based analysis reduces bias and variance in kinetic modeling of brain PET data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Douglas N; Svarer, Claus; Fisher, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    intersubject variance than when volume smoothing was used. This translates into more than 4 times fewer subjects needed in a group analysis to achieve similarly powered statistical tests. Surface-based smoothing has less bias and variance because it respects cortical geometry by smoothing the PET data only...

  5. Synapse-Centric Mapping of Cortical Models to the SpiNNaker Neuromorphic Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, James C; Furber, Steve B

    2016-01-01

    While the adult human brain has approximately 8.8 × 10(10) neurons, this number is dwarfed by its 1 × 10(15) synapses. From the point of view of neuromorphic engineering and neural simulation in general this makes the simulation of these synapses a particularly complex problem. SpiNNaker is a digital, neuromorphic architecture designed for simulating large-scale spiking neural networks at speeds close to biological real-time. Current solutions for simulating spiking neural networks on SpiNNaker are heavily inspired by work on distributed high-performance computing. However, while SpiNNaker shares many characteristics with such distributed systems, its component nodes have much more limited resources and, as the system lacks global synchronization, the computation performed on each node must complete within a fixed time step. We first analyze the performance of the current SpiNNaker neural simulation software and identify several problems that occur when it is used to simulate networks of the type often used to model the cortex which contain large numbers of sparsely connected synapses. We then present a new, more flexible approach for mapping the simulation of such networks to SpiNNaker which solves many of these problems. Finally we analyze the performance of our new approach using both benchmarks, designed to represent cortical connectivity, and larger, functional cortical models. In a benchmark network where neurons receive input from 8000 STDP synapses, our new approach allows 4× more neurons to be simulated on each SpiNNaker core than has been previously possible. We also demonstrate that the largest plastic neural network previously simulated on neuromorphic hardware can be run in real time using our new approach: double the speed that was previously achieved. Additionally this network contains two types of plastic synapse which previously had to be trained separately but, using our new approach, can be trained simultaneously.

  6. Synapse-centric mapping of cortical models to the SpiNNaker neuromorphic architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Courtney Knight

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While the adult human brain has approximately 8.8x10^10 neurons, this number is dwarfed by its 1x10^15 synapses. From the point of view of neuromorphic engineering and neural simulation in general this makes the simulation of these synapses a particularly complex problem. SpiNNaker is a digital, neuromorphic architecture designed for simulating large-scale spiking neural networks at speeds close to biological real-time. Current solutions for simulating spiking neural networks on SpiNNaker are heavily inspired by work on distributed high-performance computing. However, while SpiNNaker shares many characteristics with such distributed systems, its component nodes have much more limited resources and, as the system lacks global synchronization, the computation performed on each node must complete within a fixed time step. We first analyze the performance of the current SpiNNaker neural simulation software and identify several problems that occur when it is used to simulate networks of the type often used to model the cortex which contain large numbers of sparsely connected synapses. We then present a new, more flexible approach for mapping the simulation of such networks to SpiNNaker which solves many of these problems. Finally we analyze the performance of our new approach using both benchmarks, designed to represent cortical connectivity, and larger, functional cortical models. In a benchmark network where neurons receive input from 8000 STDP synapses, our new approach allows more neurons to be simulated on each SpiNNaker core than has been previously possible. We also demonstrate that the largest plastic neural network previously simulated on neuromorphic hardware can be run in real time using our new approach: double the speed that was previously achieved. Additionally this network contains two types of plastic synapse which previously had to be trained separately but, using our new approach, can be trained simultaneously.

  7. Alternative Stimulation Intensities for Mapping Cortical Motor Area with Navigated TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallioniemi, Elisa; Julkunen, Petro

    2016-05-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is becoming a popular tool in pre-operative mapping of functional motor areas. The stimulation intensities used in the mapping are commonly suprathreshold intensities with respect to the patient's resting motor threshold (rMT). There is no consensus on which suprathreshold intensity should be used nor on the optimal criteria for selecting the appropriate stimulation intensity (SI). In this study, the left motor cortices of 12 right-handed volunteers (8 males, age 24-61 years) were mapped using motor evoked potentials with an SI of 110 and 120 % of rMT and with an upper threshold (UT) estimated by the Mills-Nithi algorithm. The UT was significantly lower than 120 % of rMT (p rMT (p = 0.112). The representation sizes followed a similar trend, i.e. areas computed based on UT (5.9 cm(2)) and 110 % of rMT (5.0 cm(2)) being smaller than that of 120 % of rMT (8.8 cm(2)) (p ≤ 0.001). There was no difference in representation sizes between 110 % of rMT and UT. The variance in representation size was found to be significantly lower with UT compared to 120 % of rMT (p = 0.048, uncorrected), while there was no difference between 110 % of rMT and UT or 120 % of rMT. Indications of lowest inter-individual variation in representation size were observed with UT; this is possibly due to the fact that it takes into account the individual input-output characteristics of the motor cortex. Therefore, the UT seems to be a good option for SI in motor mapping applications to outline functional motor areas with nTMS and it could potentially reduce the inter-individual variation caused by the selection of SI in motor mapping in pre-surgical applications and radiosurgery planning.

  8. Superresolution improves MRI cortical segmentation with FACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Manjón, José V.; Coupé, Pierrick

    Brain cortical surface extraction from MRI has applications for measurement of gray matter (GM) atrophy, functional mapping, source localization and preoperative neurosurgical planning. Accurate cortex segmentation requires high resolution morphological images and several methods for extracting...

  9. Surface charge mapping with a nanopipette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kim; Kinnear, Sophie L; Perry, David; Momotenko, Dmitry; Unwin, Patrick R

    2014-10-01

    Nanopipettes are emerging as simple but powerful tools for probing chemistry at the nanoscale. In this contribution the use of nanopipettes for simultaneous surface charge mapping and topographical imaging is demonstrated, using a scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) format. When a nanopipette is positioned close to a surface in electrolyte solution, the direct ion current (DC), driven by an applied bias between a quasi-reference counter electrode (QRCE) in the nanopipette and a second QRCE in the bulk solution, is sensitive to surface charge. The charge sensitivity arises because the diffuse double layers at the nanopipette and the surface interact, creating a perm-selective region which becomes increasingly significant at low ionic strengths (10 mM 1:1 aqueous electrolyte herein). This leads to a polarity-dependent ion current and surface-induced rectification as the bias is varied. Using distance-modulated SICM, which induces an alternating ion current component (AC) by periodically modulating the distance between the nanopipette and the surface, the effect of surface charge on the DC and AC is explored and rationalized. The impact of surface charge on the AC phase (with respect to the driving sinusoidal signal) is highlighted in particular; this quantity shows a shift that is highly sensitive to interfacial charge and provides the basis for visualizing charge simultaneously with topography. The studies herein highlight the use of nanopipettes for functional imaging with applications from cell biology to materials characterization where understanding surface charge is of key importance. They also provide a framework for the design of SICM experiments, which may be convoluted by topographical and surface charge effects, especially for small nanopipettes.

  10. Dawn Maps the Surface Composition of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, T.; Palmer, E.; Reedy, R.; Sykes, M.; Yingst, R.; McSween, H.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Capaccinoni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Filacchione, G.; Magni, G.; Ammannito, E.; Carraro, F.; Coradini, A.; Fonte, S.; Noschese, R.; Tosi, F.; Blewett, D.; Denevi, B.; Lawrence, D.; Buratti, B.; Raymond, C. A.; Combe, J. P.; McCord, T.; Forni, O.

    2011-01-01

    By 7-October-2011, the Dawn mission will have completed Survey orbit and commenced high altitude mapping of 4-Vesta. We present a preliminary analysis of data acquired by Dawn's Framing Camera (FC) and the Visual and InfraRed Spectrometer (VIR) to map mineralogy and surface temperature, and to detect and quantify surficial OH. The radiometric calibration of VIR and FC is described. Background counting data acquired by GRaND are used to determine elemental detection limits from measurements at low altitude, which will commence in November. Geochemical models used in the interpretation of the data are described. Thermal properties, mineral-, and geochemical-data are combined to provide constraints on Vesta s formation and thermal evolution, the delivery of exogenic materials, space weathering processes, and the origin of the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites.

  11. Reproducibility of brain-cognition relationships using three cortical surface-based protocols: An exhaustive analysis based on cortical thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Kenia; Madsen, Sarah K; Joshi, Anand A; Joshi, Shantanu H; Román, Francisco J; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Burgaleta, Miguel; Karama, Sherif; Janssen, Joost; Marinetto, Eugenio; Desco, Manuel; Thompson, Paul M; Colom, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    People differ in their cognitive functioning. This variability has been exhaustively examined at the behavioral, neural and genetic level to uncover the mechanisms by which some individuals are more cognitively efficient than others. Studies investigating the neural underpinnings of interindividual differences in cognition aim to establish a reliable nexus between functional/structural properties of a given brain network and higher order cognitive performance. However, these studies have produced inconsistent results, which might be partly attributed to methodological variations. In the current study, 82 healthy young participants underwent MRI scanning and completed a comprehensive cognitive battery including measurements of fluid, crystallized, and spatial intelligence, along with working memory capacity/executive updating, controlled attention, and processing speed. The cognitive scores were obtained by confirmatory factor analyses. T1 -weighted images were processed using three different surface-based morphometry (SBM) pipelines, varying in their degree of user intervention, for obtaining measures of cortical thickness (CT) across the brain surface. Distribution and variability of CT and CT-cognition relationships were systematically compared across pipelines and between two cognitively/demographically matched samples to overcome potential sources of variability affecting the reproducibility of findings. We demonstrated that estimation of CT was not consistent across methods. In addition, among SBM methods, there was considerable variation in the spatial pattern of CT-cognition relationships. Finally, within each SBM method, results did not replicate in matched subsamples.

  12. Automatic extraction of sulcal lines on cortical surfaces based on anisotropic geodesic distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Joon-Kyung; Im, Kiho; Yoo, Sang Wook; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L; Lee, Jong-Min

    2010-01-01

    Analyzing cortical sulci is important for studying cortical morphology and brain functions. Although sulcal lines on cortical surfaces can be defined in various ways, it is critical in a neuroimaging study to define a sulcal line along the valley of a cortical surface with a high curvature within a sulcus. To extract the sulcal lines automatically, we present a new geometric algorithm based on the computation of anisotropic skeletons of sulcal regions. Because anisotropic skeletons are highly adaptive to the anisotropic nature of the surface shape, the resulting sulcal lines lie accurately on the valleys of the sulcal areas. Our sulcal lines remain unchanged under local shape variabilities in different human brains. Through experiments, we show that the errors of the sulcal lines for both synthetic data and real cortical surfaces were nearly as constant as the function of random noise. By measuring the changes in sulcal shape in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, we further investigated the effectiveness of the accuracy of our sulcal lines using a large sample of MRI data. This study involved 70 normal controls (n [men/women]: 29/41, age [mean+/-SD]: 71.7+/-4.9 years), and 100 AD subjects (37/63, 72.3+/-5.5). We observe significantly lower absolute average mean curvature and shallower sulcal depth in AD subjects, where the group difference becomes more significant if we measure the quantities along the sulcal lines rather than over the entire sulcal area. The most remarkable difference in the AD patients was the average sulcal depth (control: 11.70 and AD: 11.34).

  13. Estimation of neural dynamics from MEG/EEG cortical current density maps: application to the reconstruction of large-scale cortical synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Olivier; Garnero, Line; Cosmelli, Diego; Varela, Francisco J

    2002-09-01

    There is a growing interest in elucidating the role of specific patterns of neural dynamics--such as transient synchronization between distant cell assemblies--in brain functions. Magnetoencephalography (MEG)/electroencephalography (EEG) recordings consist in the spatial integration of the activity from large and multiple remotely located populations of neurons. Massive diffusive effects and poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) preclude the proper estimation of indices related to cortical dynamics from nonaveraged MEG/EEG surface recordings. Source localization from MEG/EEG surface recordings with its excellent time resolution could contribute to a better understanding of the working brain. We propose a robust and original approach to the MEG/EEG distributed inverse problem to better estimate neural dynamics of cortical sources. For this, the surrogate data method is introduced in the MEG/EEG inverse problem framework. We apply this approach on nonaveraged data with poor SNR using the minimum norm estimator and find source localization results weakly sensitive to noise. Surrogates allow the reduction of the source space in order to reconstruct MEG/EEG data with reduced biases in both source localization and time-series dynamics. Monte Carlo simulations and results obtained from real MEG data indicate it is possible to estimate non invasively an important part of cortical source locations and dynamic and, therefore, to reveal brain functional networks.

  14. LOGISMOS-B for primates: primate cortical surface reconstruction and thickness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Sanchez, Mar; Shi, Yundi; Sonka, Milan

    2015-03-01

    Cortical thickness and surface area are important morphological measures with implications for many psychiatric and neurological conditions. Automated segmentation and reconstruction of the cortical surface from 3D MRI scans is challenging due to the variable anatomy of the cortex and its highly complex geometry. While many methods exist for this task in the context of the human brain, these methods are typically not readily applicable to the primate brain. We propose an innovative approach based on our recently proposed human cortical reconstruction algorithm, LOGISMOS-B, and the Laplace-based thickness measurement method. Quantitative evaluation of our approach was performed based on a dataset of T1- and T2-weighted MRI scans from 12-month-old macaques where labeling by our anatomical experts was used as independent standard. In this dataset, LOGISMOS-B has an average signed surface error of 0.01 +/- 0.03mm and an unsigned surface error of 0.42 +/- 0.03mm over the whole brain. Excluding the rather problematic temporal pole region further improves unsigned surface distance to 0.34 +/- 0.03mm. This high level of accuracy reached by our algorithm even in this challenging developmental dataset illustrates its robustness and its potential for primate brain studies.

  15. Mapping synaptic pathology within cerebral cortical circuits in subjects with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sweet

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Converging lines of evidence indicate that schizophrenia is characterized by impairments of synaptic machinery within cerebral cortical circuits. Efforts to localize these alterations in brain tissue from subjects with schizophrenia have frequently been limited to the quantification of structures that are non-selectively identified (e.g. dendritic spines labeled in Golgi preparations, axon boutons labeled with synaptophysin, or to quantification of proteins using methods unable to resolve relevant cellular compartments. Multiple label fluorescence confocal microscopy represents a means to circumvent many of these limitations, by concurrently extracting information regarding the number, morphology, and relative protein content of synaptic structures. An important adaptation required for studies of human disease is coupling this approach to stereologic methods for systematic random sampling of relevant brain regions. In this review article we consider the application of multiple label fluorescence confocal microscopy to the mapping of synaptic alterations in subjects with schizophrenia and describe the application of a novel, readily automated, iterative intensity/morphological segmentation algorithm for the extraction of information regarding synaptic structure number, size, and relative protein level from tissue sections obtained using unbiased stereological principles of sampling. In this context, we provide examples of the examination of pre- and post-synaptic structures within excitatory and inhibitory circuits of the cerebral cortex.

  16. Cortical mapping by functional magnetic resonance imaging in patients with brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majos, Agata; Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Goraj, Bozena [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Radiology, Lodz (Poland); Tybor, Krzysztof [Medical University of Lodz, Department of Neurosurgery, Lodz (Poland)

    2005-06-01

    The aim of our study was to establish the effectiveness of the functional MRI (fMRI) technique in comparison with intraoperative cortical stimulation (ICS) in planning cortex-saving neurosurgical interventions. The combination of sensory and motor stimulation during fMRI experiments was used to improve the exactness of central sulcus localization. The study subjects were 30 volunteers and 33 patients with brain tumors in the rolandic area. Detailed topographical relations of activated areas in fMRI and intraoperative techniques were compared. The agreement in the location defined by the two methods for motor centers was found to be 84%; for sensory centers it was 83%. When both kinds of activation are taken into account this agreement increases to 98%. A significant relation was found between fMRI and ICS for the agreement of the distance both for motor and sensory centers (p=0.0021-0.0024). Also a strong dependence was found between the agreement of the location and the agreement of the distance for both kinds of stimulation. The spatial correlation between fMRI and ICS methods for the sensorimotor cortex is very high. fMRI combining functional and structural information is very helpful for preoperative neurosurgical planning. The sensitivity of the fMRI technique in brain mapping increases when using both motor and sensory paradigms in the same patient. (orig.)

  17. The threshold of cortical electrical stimulation for mapping sensory and motor functional areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guojun, Zhang; Duanyu, Ni; Fu, Paul; Lixin, Cai; Tao, Yu; Wei, Du; Liang, Qiao; Zhiwei, Ren

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the threshold of cortical electrical stimulation (CES) for functional brain mapping during surgery for the treatment of rolandic epilepsy. A total of 21 patients with rolandic epilepsy who underwent surgical treatment at the Beijing Institute of Functional Neurosurgery between October 2006 and March 2008 were included in this study. Their clinical data were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The thresholds of CES for motor response, sensory response, and after discharge production along with other threshold-related factors were investigated. The thresholds (mean ± standard deviation) for motor response, sensory response, and after discharge production were 3.48 ± 0.87, 3.86 ± 1.31, and 4.84 ± 1.38 mA, respectively. The threshold for after discharge production was significantly higher than those of both the motor and sensory response (both pthreshold of after discharge production and disease duration. Using the CES parameters at a stimulation frequency of 50 Hz and a pulse width of 0.2 ms, the threshold of sensory and motor responses were similar, and the threshold of after discharge production was higher than that of sensory and motor response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Untangling perceptual memory: hysteresis and adaptation map into separate cortical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiedrzik, Caspar M; Ruff, Christian C; Lazar, Andreea; Leitner, Frauke C; Singer, Wolf; Melloni, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Perception is an active inferential process in which prior knowledge is combined with sensory input, the result of which determines the contents of awareness. Accordingly, previous experience is known to help the brain "decide" what to perceive. However, a critical aspect that has not been addressed is that previous experience can exert 2 opposing effects on perception: An attractive effect, sensitizing the brain to perceive the same again (hysteresis), or a repulsive effect, making it more likely to perceive something else (adaptation). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to elucidate how the brain entertains these 2 opposing processes, and what determines the direction of such experience-dependent perceptual effects. We found that although affecting our perception concurrently, hysteresis and adaptation map into distinct cortical networks: a widespread network of higher-order visual and fronto-parietal areas was involved in perceptual stabilization, while adaptation was confined to early visual areas. This areal and hierarchical segregation may explain how the brain maintains the balance between exploiting redundancies and staying sensitive to new information. We provide a Bayesian model that accounts for the coexistence of hysteresis and adaptation by separating their causes into 2 distinct terms: Hysteresis alters the prior, whereas adaptation changes the sensory evidence (the likelihood function).

  19. Mapping the Speech Code: Cortical Responses Linking the Perception and Production of Vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerman, William L; Meyer, Antje S; McQueen, James M

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic realization of speech is constrained by the physical mechanisms by which it is produced. Yet for speech perception, the degree to which listeners utilize experience derived from speech production has long been debated. In the present study, we examined how sensorimotor adaptation during production may affect perception, and how this relationship may be reflected in early vs. late electrophysiological responses. Participants first performed a baseline speech production task, followed by a vowel categorization task during which EEG responses were recorded. In a subsequent speech production task, half the participants received shifted auditory feedback, leading most to alter their articulations. This was followed by a second, post-training vowel categorization task. We compared changes in vowel production to both behavioral and electrophysiological changes in vowel perception. No differences in phonetic categorization were observed between groups receiving altered or unaltered feedback. However, exploratory analyses revealed correlations between vocal motor behavior and phonetic categorization. EEG analyses revealed correlations between vocal motor behavior and cortical responses in both early and late time windows. These results suggest that participants' recent production behavior influenced subsequent vowel perception. We suggest that the change in perception can be best characterized as a mapping of acoustics onto articulation.

  20. Differential tinnitus-related neuroplastic alterations of cortical thickness and surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Martin; Neff, Patrick; Liem, Franziskus; Kleinjung, Tobias; Weidt, Steffi; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Structural neuroimaging techniques have been used to identify cortical and subcortical regions constituting the neuroarchitecture of tinnitus. One recent investigation used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to analyze a sample of tinnitus patients (TI, n = 257) (Schecklmann et al., 2013). A negative relationship between individual distress and cortical volume (CV) in bilateral auditory regions was observed. However, CV has meanwhile been identified as a neuroanatomical measurement that confounds genetically distinct neuroanatomical traits, namely cortical thickness (CT) and cortical surface area (CSA). We performed a re-analysis of the identical sample using the automated FreeSurfer surface-based morphometry (SBM) approach (Fischl, 2012). First, we replicated the negative correlation between tinnitus distress and bilateral supratemporal gray matter volume. Second, we observed a negative correlation for CSA in the left periauditory cortex and anterior insula. Furthermore, we noted a positive correlation between tinnitus duration and CT in the left periauditory cortex as well as a negative correlation in the subcallosal anterior cingulate, a region collated to the serotonergic circuit and germane to inhibitory functions. In short, the results elucidate differential neuroanatomical alterations of CSA and CT for the two independent tinnitus-related psychological traits distress and duration. Beyond this, the study provides further evidence for the distinction and specific susceptibility of CSA and CT within the context of neuroplasticity of the human brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-07-19

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation.

  2. Imprinting of idiosyncratic experience in cortical sensory maps: neural substrates of representational remodeling and correlative perceptual changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Christian

    2008-09-01

    Over the past 30 years, extensive research has been conducted in the field of cortical plasticity, under the impetus of seminal studies showing that the mature brain retains a capacity to reorganize the morphological and functional architecture of its neural circuits in order to adapt to environmental changes and mediate functional recovery following injury. Much effort has been focused on determining how idiosyncratic experience translates into molecular, structural and physiological changes in the sensory and motor representations embedded within cortical networks. The wealth of data generated by a broad spectrum of experimental manipulations has allowed unprecedented progress in our understanding of the physiological processes and neuroplasticity mechanisms underlying cortical representational remodeling. The objective of the present review is to put various facets of cortical map plasticity into perspective so as to examine possible links between changes occurring at multiple scales of the neural organization of the mature brain. The main focus is on neural substrates that mediate the instructive influence of experience and behavioral context on cortical reorganization, and perceptual correlates of representational remodeling.

  3. Retinotopic maps, spatial tuning, and locations of human visual areas in surface coordinates characterized with multifocal and blocked FMRI designs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Henriksson

    Full Text Available The localization of visual areas in the human cortex is typically based on mapping the retinotopic organization with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The most common approach is to encode the response phase for a slowly moving visual stimulus and to present the result on an individual's reconstructed cortical surface. The main aims of this study were to develop complementary general linear model (GLM-based retinotopic mapping methods and to characterize the inter-individual variability of the visual area positions on the cortical surface. We studied 15 subjects with two methods: a 24-region multifocal checkerboard stimulus and a blocked presentation of object stimuli at different visual field locations. The retinotopic maps were based on weighted averaging of the GLM parameter estimates for the stimulus regions. In addition to localizing visual areas, both methods could be used to localize multiple retinotopic regions-of-interest. The two methods yielded consistent retinotopic maps in the visual areas V1, V2, V3, hV4, and V3AB. In the higher-level areas IPS0, VO1, LO1, LO2, TO1, and TO2, retinotopy could only be mapped with the blocked stimulus presentation. The gradual widening of spatial tuning and an increase in the responses to stimuli in the ipsilateral visual field along the hierarchy of visual areas likely reflected the increase in the average receptive field size. Finally, after registration to Freesurfer's surface-based atlas of the human cerebral cortex, we calculated the mean and variability of the visual area positions in the spherical surface-based coordinate system and generated probability maps of the visual areas on the average cortical surface. The inter-individual variability in the area locations decreased when the midpoints were calculated along the spherical cortical surface compared with volumetric coordinates. These results can facilitate both analysis of individual functional anatomy and comparisons of visual

  4. Surface temperature maps for II Peg during 1999-2002

    CERN Document Server

    Lindborg, M; Tuominen, I; Hackman, T; Ilyin, I; Piskunov, N

    2009-01-01

    The active RS CVn star II Peg has been spectroscopically monitored for almost 18 years with the SOFIN spectrograph at NOT, La Palma, Spain. In this paper we present five new surface temperature maps of the object for the years 1999 (two maps), 2001 (one map) and 2002 (two maps).

  5. Detection of epileptogenic cortical malformations with surface-based MRI morphometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Thesen

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the detection of structural abnormalities in patients with epilepsy. However, many focal abnormalities remain undetected in routine visual inspection. Here we use an automated, surface-based method for quantifying morphometric features related to epileptogenic cortical malformations to detect abnormal cortical thickness and blurred gray-white matter boundaries. Using MRI morphometry at 3T with surface-based spherical averaging techniques that precisely align anatomical structures between individual brains, we compared single patients with known lesions to a large normal control group to detect clusters of abnormal cortical thickness, gray-white matter contrast, local gyrification, sulcal depth, jacobian distance and curvature. To assess the effects of threshold and smoothing on detection sensitivity and specificity, we systematically varied these parameters with different thresholds and smoothing levels. To test the effectiveness of the technique to detect lesions of epileptogenic character, we compared the detected structural abnormalities to expert-tracings, intracranial EEG, pathology and surgical outcome in a homogeneous patient sample. With optimal parameters and by combining thickness and GWC, the surface-based detection method identified 92% of cortical lesions (sensitivity with few false positives (96% specificity, successfully discriminating patients from controls 94% of the time. The detected structural abnormalities were related to the seizure onset zones, abnormal histology and positive outcome in all surgical patients. However, the method failed to adequately describe lesion extent in most cases. Automated surface-based MRI morphometry, if used with optimized parameters, may be a valuable additional clinical tool to improve the detection of subtle or previously occult malformations and therefore could improve identification of patients with intractable focal epilepsy who may benefit from

  6. The Crossing Number of Two-Maps on Orientable Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Xiang WU; Han REN; Tu XU

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we discuss the crossing numbers of two one-vertex maps on orientable surfaces.By using a reductive method,we give the crossing number of two one-vertex maps with one face on an orientable surface and the crossing number of a one-vertex map with one face and a one-vertex map with two faces on an orientable surface.This provides a lower bound for the crossing number of two general maps on an orientable surface.

  7. Atlas-free surface reconstruction of the cortical grey-white interface in infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Leroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The segmentation of the cortical interface between grey and white matter in magnetic resonance images (MRI is highly challenging during the first post-natal year. First, the heterogeneous brain maturation creates important intensity fluctuations across regions. Second, the cortical ribbon is highly folded creating complex shapes. Finally, the low tissue contrast and partial volume effects hamper cortex edge detection in parts of the brain. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We present an atlas-free method for segmenting the grey-white matter interface of infant brains in T2-weighted (T2w images. We used a broad characterization of tissue using features based not only on local contrast but also on geometric properties. Furthermore, inaccuracies in localization were reduced by the convergence of two evolving surfaces located on each side of the inner cortical surface. Our method has been applied to eleven brains of one- to four-month-old infants. Both quantitative validations against manual segmentations and sulcal landmarks demonstrated good performance for infants younger than two months old. Inaccuracies in surface reconstruction increased with age in specific brain regions where the tissue contrast decreased with maturation, such as in the central region. CONCLUSIONS: We presented a new segmentation method which achieved good to very good performance at the grey-white matter interface depending on the infant age. This method should reduce manual intervention and could be applied to pathological brains since it does not require any brain atlas.

  8. Cortical Thickness, Surface Area and Subcortical Volume Differentially Contribute to Cognitive Heterogeneity in Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels J H M Gerrits

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is often associated with cognitive deficits, although their severity varies considerably between patients. Recently, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM to show that individual differences in gray matter (GM volume relate to cognitive heterogeneity in PD. VBM does, however, not differentiate between cortical thickness (CTh and surface area (SA, which might be independently affected in PD. We therefore re-analyzed our cohort using the surface-based method FreeSurfer, and investigated (i CTh, SA, and (subcortical GM volume differences between 93 PD patients and 45 matched controls, and (ii the relation between these structural measures and cognitive performance on six neuropsychological tasks within the PD group. We found cortical thinning in PD patients in the left pericalcarine gyrus, extending to cuneus, precuneus and lingual areas and left inferior parietal cortex, bilateral rostral middle frontal cortex, and right cuneus, and increased cortical surface area in the left pars triangularis. Within the PD group, we found negative correlations between (i CTh of occipital areas and performance on a verbal memory task, (ii SA and volume of the frontal cortex and visuospatial memory performance, and, (iii volume of the right thalamus and scores on two verbal fluency tasks. Our primary findings illustrate that i CTh and SA are differentially affected in PD, and ii VBM and FreeSurfer yield non-overlapping results in an identical dataset. We argue that this discrepancy is due to technical differences and the subtlety of the PD-related structural changes.

  9. Visual cortical mechanisms of perceptual grouping: interacting layers, networks, columns, and maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, W D; Grossberg, S; Mingolla, E

    2000-07-01

    The visual cortex has a laminar organization whose circuits form functional columns in cortical maps. How this laminar architecture supports visual percepts is not well understood. A neural model proposes how the laminar circuits of V1 and V2 generate perceptual groupings that maintain sensitivity to the contrasts and spatial organization of scenic cues. The model can decisively choose which groupings cohere and survive, even while balanced excitatory and inhibitory interactions preserve contrast-sensitive measures of local boundary likelihood or strength. In the model, excitatory inputs from lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) activate layers 4 and 6 of V1. Layer 6 activates an on-center off-surround network of inputs to layer 4. Together these layer 4 inputs preserve analog sensitivity to LGN input contrasts. Layer 4 cells excite pyramidal cells in layer 2/3, which activate monosynaptic long-range horizontal excitatory connections between layer 2/3 pyramidal cells, and short-range disynaptic inhibitory connections mediated by smooth stellate cells. These interactions support inward perceptual grouping between two or more boundary inducers, but not outward grouping from a single inducer. These boundary signals feed back to layer 4 via the layer 6-to-4 on-center off-surround network. This folded feedback joins cells in different layers into functional columns while selecting winning groupings. Layer 6 in V1 also sends top-down signals to LGN using an on-center off-surround network, which suppresses LGN cells that do not receive feedback, while selecting, enhancing, and synchronizing activity of those that do. The model is used to simulate psychophysical and neurophysiological data about perceptual grouping, including various Gestalt grouping laws.

  10. Automated sulcal depth measurement on cortical surface reflecting geometrical properties of sulci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk Jin Yun

    Full Text Available Sulcal depth that is one of the quantitative measures of cerebral cortex has been widely used as an important marker for brain morphological studies. Several studies have employed Euclidean (EUD or geodesic (GED algorithms to measure sulcal depth, which have limitations that ignore sulcal geometry in highly convoluted regions and result in under or overestimated depth. In this study, we proposed an automated measurement for sulcal depth on cortical surface reflecting geometrical properties of sulci, which named the adaptive distance transform (ADT. We first defined the volume region of cerebrospinal fluid between the 3D convex hull and the cortical surface, and constructed local coordinates for that restricted region. Dijkstra's algorithm was then used to compute the shortest paths from the convex hull to the vertices of the cortical surface based on the local coordinates, which may be the most proper approach for defining sulcal depth. We applied our algorithm to both a clinical dataset including patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD and 25 normal controls and a simulated dataset whose shape was similar to a single sulcus. The mean sulcal depth in the mild AD group was significantly lower than controls (p = 0.007, normal [mean±SD]: 7.29±0.23 mm, AD: 7.11±0.29 and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was relatively high, showing the value of 0.818. Results from clinical dataset that were consistent with former studies using EUD or GED demonstrated that ADT was sensitive to cortical atrophy. The robustness against inter-individual variability of ADT was highlighted through simulation dataset. ADT showed a low and constant normalized difference between the depth of the simulated data and the calculated depth, whereas EUD and GED had high and variable differences. We suggest that ADT is more robust than EUD or GED and might be a useful alternative algorithm for measuring sulcal depth.

  11. Cortical thickness, surface area and volume measures in Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Worker

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, Multiple System Atrophy (MSA and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP are neurodegenerative diseases that can be difficult to distinguish clinically. The objective of the current study was to use surface-based analysis techniques to assess cortical thickness, surface area and grey matter volume to identify unique morphological patterns of cortical atrophy in PD, MSA and PSP and to relate these patterns of change to disease duration and clinical features.High resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI volumes were acquired from 14 PD patients, 18 MSA, 14 PSP and 19 healthy control participants. Cortical thickness, surface area and volume analyses were carried out using the automated surface-based analysis package FreeSurfer (version 5.1.0. Measures of disease severity and duration were assessed for correlation with cortical morphometric changes in each clinical group.Results show that in PSP, widespread cortical thinning and volume loss occurs within the frontal lobe, particularly the superior frontal gyrus. In addition, PSP patients also displayed increased surface area in the pericalcarine. In comparison, PD and MSA did not display significant changes in cortical morphology.These results demonstrate that patients with clinically established PSP exhibit distinct patterns of cortical atrophy, particularly affecting the frontal lobe. These results could be used in the future to develop a useful clinical application of MRI to distinguish PSP patients from PD and MSA patients.

  12. Motor area localization using fMRI-constrained cortical current density reconstruction of movement-related cortical potentials, a comparison with fMRI and TMS mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuggi, Alberto; Filippi, Massimo; Chieffo, Raffaella; Agosta, Federica; Rocca, Maria A; González-Rosa, Javier J; Cursi, Marco; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2010-01-13

    The localization of human hand primary motor area (M1) has been the object of several studies during the last decades. EEG source analysis, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are non-invasive methods for localizing M1 with good accuracy compared to direct electrocorticography (ECoG) results. EEG sources were reconstructed with Cortical Current Density (CCD) method, allowing to evaluate simultaneous and distributed patterns of activation and to increase accuracy by constraining on information derived from fMRI (fMRI-CCD). The aim of this study was to compare the M1 contribution of movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP) with TMS and fMRI results and to test the effect of constraints strength, algorithm norm and localization methods over CCD reconstruction. Seven right-handed healthy subjects underwent 64-channel EEG recording of MRCP to right thumb movement, focal TMS mapping of the right abductor pollicis brevis muscle and fMRI during right hand movement. We found fMRI activations, EEG sources and TMS mapping corresponding to the anatomical landmark of the hand area in all subjects with fMRI and TMS center-of-gravity and in almost all subjects using fMRI-CCD with moderate constraint. A significant improvement was found using fMRI-CCD compared to CCD alone. This study confirms the usefulness of multimodal integration of fMRI, EEG and TMS in localizing M1 and the possibility to increase EEG spatial resolution using fMRI information.

  13. Learning strategy refinement reverses early sensory cortical map expansion but not behavior: Support for a theory of directed cortical substrates of learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Gabriel A; Bieszczad, Kasia M; Weinberger, Norman M

    2015-12-01

    Primary sensory cortical fields develop highly specific associative representational plasticity, notably enlarged area of representation of reinforced signal stimuli within their topographic maps. However, overtraining subjects after they have solved an instrumental task can reduce or eliminate the expansion while the successful behavior remains. As the development of this plasticity depends on the learning strategy used to solve a task, we asked whether the loss of expansion is due to the strategy used during overtraining. Adult male rats were trained in a three-tone auditory discrimination task to bar-press to the CS+ for water reward and refrain from doing so during the CS- tones and silent intertrial intervals; errors were punished by a flashing light and time-out penalty. Groups acquired this task to a criterion within seven training sessions by relying on a strategy that was "bar-press from tone-onset-to-error signal" ("TOTE"). Three groups then received different levels of overtraining: Group ST, none; Group RT, one week; Group OT, three weeks. Post-training mapping of their primary auditory fields (A1) showed that Groups ST and RT had developed significantly expanded representational areas, specifically restricted to the frequency band of the CS+ tone. In contrast, the A1 of Group OT was no different from naïve controls. Analysis of learning strategy revealed this group had shifted strategy to a refinement of TOTE in which they self-terminated bar-presses before making an error ("iTOTE"). Across all animals, the greater the use of iTOTE, the smaller was the representation of the CS+ in A1. Thus, the loss of cortical expansion is attributable to a shift or refinement in strategy. This reversal of expansion was considered in light of a novel theoretical framework (CONCERTO) highlighting four basic principles of brain function that resolve anomalous findings and explaining why even a minor change in strategy would involve concomitant shifts of involved brain

  14. LEARNING STRATEGY REFINEMENT REVERSES EARLY SENSORY CORTICAL MAP EXPANSION BUT NOT BEHAVIOR: SUPPORT FOR A THEORY OF DIRECTED CORTICAL SUBSTRATES OF LEARNING AND MEMORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Gabriel A.; Bieszczad, Kasia M.; Weinberger, Norman M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary sensory cortical fields develop highly specific associative representational plasticity, notably enlarged area of representation of reinforced signal stimuli within their topographic maps. However, overtraining subjects after they have solved an instrumental task can reduce or eliminate the expansion while the successful behavior remains. As the development of this plasticity depends on the learning strategy used to solve a task, we asked whether the loss of expansion is due to the strategy used during overtraining. Adult male rats were trained in a three-tone auditory discrimination task to bar-press to the CS+ for water reward and refrain from doing so during the CS− tones and silent intertrial intervals; errors were punished by a flashing light and time-out penalty. Groups acquired this task to a criterion within seven training sessions by relying on a strategy that was “bar-press from tone-onset-to-error signal” (“TOTE”). Three groups then received different levels of overtraining: Group ST, none; Group RT, one week; Group OT, three weeks. Post-training mapping of their primary auditory fields (A1) showed that Groups ST and RT had developed significantly expanded representational areas, specifically restricted to the frequency band of the CS+ tone. In contrast, the A1 of Group OT was no different from naïve controls. Analysis of learning strategy revealed this group had shifted strategy to a refinement of TOTE in which they self-terminated bar-presses before making an error (“iTOTE”). Across all animals, the greater the use of iTOTE, the smaller was the representation of the CS+ in A1. Thus, the loss of cortical expansion is attributable to a shift or refinement in strategy. This reversal of expansion was considered in light of a novel theoretical framework (CONCERTO) highlighting four basic principles of brain function that resolve anomalous findings and explaining why even a minor change in strategy would involve concomitant shifts of

  15. Use of roughness maps in visualisation of surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2005-01-01

    In this study we will present a new method to describe surface roughness. This method builds a roughness map of the studied area. The roughness map can give information of localised roughness. The test surfaces used in the evaluation of the method were tablets, which were made of lactose monohydr...... of the heterogeneity of surface roughness of various materials....

  16. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Chen, Albert; Kuiken, Todd; Carmona, Carolina; Dewald, Julius

    2015-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR). As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via the newly re-innervated muscles. Correspondingly, recent study results have shown that motor representations for the missing limb move closer to their original locations following TR. Besides regaining motor control signals, TR also restores the sensation in the re-innervated skin areas. We therefore hypothesize that TR causes analogous cortical sensory remapping that may return closer to their original locations. In order to test this hypothesis, cortical activity in response to sensory-level electrical stimulation in different parts of the arm was studied longitudinally in one amputated individual before and up to 2 years after TR. Our results showed that 1) before TR, the cortical response to sensory electrical stimulation in the residual limb showed a diffuse bilateral pattern without a clear focus in either the time or spatial domain; and 2) 2 years after TR, the sensory map of the reinnervated median nerve reorganized, showing predominant activity over the contralateral S1 hand area as well as moderate activity over the ipsilateral S1. Therefore, this work provides new evidence for long-term sensory cortical plasticity in the human brain after TR.

  17. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR. As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via the newly re-innervated muscles. Correspondingly, recent study results have shown that motor representations for the missing limb move closer to their original locations following TR. Besides regaining motor control signals, TR also restores the sensation in the re-innervated skin areas. We therefore hypothesize that TR causes analogous cortical sensory remapping that may return closer to their original locations. In order to test this hypothesis, cortical activity in response to sensory-level electrical stimulation in different parts of the arm was studied longitudinally in one amputated individual before and up to 2 years after TR. Our results showed that 1 before TR, the cortical response to sensory electrical stimulation in the residual limb showed a diffuse bilateral pattern without a clear focus in either the time or spatial domain; and 2 2 years after TR, the sensory map of the reinnervated median nerve reorganized, showing predominant activity over the contralateral S1 hand area as well as moderate activity over the ipsilateral S1. Therefore, this work provides new evidence for long-term sensory cortical plasticity in the human brain after TR.

  18. Results on the spatial resolution of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for cortical language mapping during object naming in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Tussis, Lorena; Ille, Sebastian; Maurer, Stefanie; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-10-24

    The spatial resolution of repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for language mapping is largely unknown. Thus, to determine a minimum spatial resolution of rTMS for language mapping, we evaluated the mapping sessions derived from 19 healthy volunteers for cortical hotspots of no-response errors. Then, the distances between hotspots (stimulation points with a high error rate) and adjacent mapping points (stimulation points with low error rates) were evaluated. Mean distance values of 13.8 ± 6.4 mm (from hotspots to ventral points, range 0.7-30.7 mm), 10.8 ± 4.8 mm (from hotspots to dorsal points, range 2.0-26.5 mm), 16.6 ± 4.8 mm (from hotspots to apical points, range 0.9-27.5 mm), and 13.8 ± 4.3 mm (from hotspots to caudal points, range 2.0-24.2 mm) were measured. According to the results, the minimum spatial resolution of rTMS should principally allow for the identification of a particular gyrus, and according to the literature, it is in good accordance with the spatial resolution of direct cortical stimulation (DCS). Since measurement was performed between hotspots and adjacent mapping points and not on a finer-grained basis, we only refer to a minimum spatial resolution. Furthermore, refinement of our results within the scope of a prospective study combining rTMS and DCS for resolution measurement during language mapping should be the next step.

  19. Photoelectric scanner makes detailed work function maps of metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasor, N. S.

    1966-01-01

    Photoelectric scanning device maps the work function of a metal surface by scanning it with a light spot and measuring the resulting photocurrent. The device is capable of use over a range of surface temperatures.

  20. Registering cortical surfaces based on whole-brain structural connectivity and continuous connectivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Boris; Leonardo, Cassandra; Jahanshad, Neda; Hibar, Derrek; Eschenburg, Kristian; Nir, Talia; Villalon, Julio; Thompson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework for registering cortical surfaces based on tractography-informed structural connectivity. We define connectivity as a continuous kernel on the product space of the cortex, and develop a method for estimating this kernel from tractography fiber models. Next, we formulate the kernel registration problem, and present a means to non-linearly register two brains' continuous connectivity profiles. We apply theoretical results from operator theory to develop an algorithm for decomposing the connectome into its shared and individual components. Lastly, we extend two discrete connectivity measures to the continuous case, and apply our framework to 98 Alzheimer's patients and controls. Our measures show significant differences between the two groups.

  1. Cortical surface alignment in multi-subject spatiotemporal independent EEG source imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Arthur C; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Chien, Vincent S C; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Makeig, Scott

    2014-02-15

    Brain responses to stimulus presentations may vary widely across subjects in both time course and spatial origins. Multi-subject EEG source imaging studies that apply Independent Component Analysis (ICA) to data concatenated across subjects have overlooked the fact that projections to the scalp sensors from functionally equivalent cortical sources vary from subject to subject. This study demonstrates an approach to spatiotemporal independent component decomposition and alignment that spatially co-registers the MR-derived cortical topographies of individual subjects to a well-defined, shared spherical topology (Fischl et al., 1999). Its efficacy for identifying functionally equivalent EEG sources in multi-subject analysis is demonstrated by analyzing EEG and behavioral data from a stop-signal paradigm using two source-imaging approaches, both based on individual subject independent source decompositions. The first, two-stage approach uses temporal infomax ICA to separate each subject's data into temporally independent components (ICs), then estimates the source density distribution of each IC process from its scalp map and clusters similar sources across subjects (Makeig et al., 2002). The second approach, Electromagnetic Spatiotemporal Independent Component Analysis (EMSICA), combines ICA decomposition and source current density estimation of the artifact-rejected data into a single spatiotemporal ICA decomposition for each subject (Tsai et al., 2006), concurrently identifying both the spatial source distribution of each cortical source and its event-related dynamics. Applied to the stop-signal task data, both approaches gave IC clusters that separately accounted for EEG processes expected in stop-signal tasks, including pre/postcentral mu rhythms, anterior-cingulate theta rhythm, and right-inferior frontal responses, the EMSICA clusters exhibiting more tightly correlated source areas and time-frequency features.

  2. Machine Learning Tools for Geomorphic Mapping of Planetary Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.; Vilalta, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Geomorphic auto-mapping of planetary surfaces is a challenging problem. Here we have described how machine learning techniques, such as clustering or classification, can be utilized to automate the process of geomorphic mapping for exploratory and exploitation purposes. Relatively coarse resolution of planetary topographic data limits the number of features that can be used in the learning process and makes planetary auto-mapping more challenging than terrestrial auto-mapping. With this cavea...

  3. IgLON cell adhesion molecules are shed from the cell surface of cortical neurons to promote neuronal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ricardo; Ferraro, Gino B; Fournier, Alyson E

    2015-02-13

    Matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases are members of the zinc endopeptidases, which cleave components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell surface proteins resulting in degradation or release of biologically active fragments. Surface ectodomain shedding affects numerous biological processes, including survival, axon outgrowth, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the role of metalloproteinases in regulating cortical neurite growth. We found that treatment of mature cortical neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors or with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 reduced neurite outgrowth. Through mass spectrometry, we characterized the metalloproteinase-sensitive cell surface proteome of mature cortical neurons. Members of the IgLON family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neural cell adhesion molecules were identified and validated as proteins that were shed from the surface of mature cortical neurons in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner. Introduction of two members of the IgLON family, neurotrimin and NEGR1, in early embryonic neurons was sufficient to confer sensitivity to metalloproteinase inhibitors in neurite outgrowth assays. Outgrowth experiments on immobilized IgLON proteins revealed a role for all IgLON family members in promoting neurite extension from cortical neurons. Together, our findings support a role for metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of IgLON family members in regulating neurite outgrowth from mature cortical neurons.

  4. IgLON Cell Adhesion Molecules Are Shed from the Cell Surface of Cortical Neurons to Promote Neuronal Growth*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ricardo; Ferraro, Gino B.; Fournier, Alyson E.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases are members of the zinc endopeptidases, which cleave components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell surface proteins resulting in degradation or release of biologically active fragments. Surface ectodomain shedding affects numerous biological processes, including survival, axon outgrowth, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the role of metalloproteinases in regulating cortical neurite growth. We found that treatment of mature cortical neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors or with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 reduced neurite outgrowth. Through mass spectrometry, we characterized the metalloproteinase-sensitive cell surface proteome of mature cortical neurons. Members of the IgLON family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neural cell adhesion molecules were identified and validated as proteins that were shed from the surface of mature cortical neurons in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner. Introduction of two members of the IgLON family, neurotrimin and NEGR1, in early embryonic neurons was sufficient to confer sensitivity to metalloproteinase inhibitors in neurite outgrowth assays. Outgrowth experiments on immobilized IgLON proteins revealed a role for all IgLON family members in promoting neurite extension from cortical neurons. Together, our findings support a role for metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of IgLON family members in regulating neurite outgrowth from mature cortical neurons. PMID:25538237

  5. Reproducibility of crop surface maps extracted from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) derived digital surface maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Stephen D.; McCabe, Matthew F.; Al-Mashhawari, Samir K.; Rosas, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Crop height measured from UAVs fitted with commercially available RGB cameras provide an affordable alternative to retrieve field scale high resolution estimates. The study presents an assessment of between flight reproducibility of Crop Surface Maps (CSM) extracted from Digital Surface Maps (DSM) generated by Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithms. Flights were conducted over a centre pivot irrigation system covered with an alfalfa crop. An important step in calculating the absolute crop height from the UAV derived DSM is determining the height of the underlying terrain. Here we use automatic thresholding techniques applied to RGB vegetation index maps to classify vegetated and soil pixels. From interpolation of classified soil pixels, a terrain map is calculated and subtracted from the DSM. The influence of three different thresholding techniques on CSMs are investigated. Median Alfalfa crop heights determined with the different thresholding methods varied from 18cm for K means thresholding to 13cm for Otsu thresholding methods. Otsu thresholding also gave the smallest range of crop heights and K means thresholding the largest. Reproducibility of median crop heights between flight surveys was 4-6cm for all thresholding techniques. For the flight conducted later in the afternoon shadowing caused soil pixels to be classified as vegetation in key locations around the domain, leading to lower crop height estimates. The range of crop heights was similar for both flights using K means thresholding (35-36cm), local minimum thresholding depended on whether raw or normalised RGB intensities were used to calculate vegetation indices (30-35cm), while Otsu thresholding had a smaller range of heights and varied most between flights (26-30cm). This study showed that crop heights from multiple survey flights are comparable, however, they were dependent on the thresholding method applied to classify soil pixels and the time of day the flight was conducted.

  6. Reproducibility of crop surface maps extracted from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) derived digital surface maps

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen D.

    2016-10-25

    Crop height measured from UAVs fitted with commercially available RGB cameras provide an affordable alternative to retrieve field scale high resolution estimates. The study presents an assessment of between flight reproducibility of Crop Surface Maps (CSM) extracted from Digital Surface Maps (DSM) generated by Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithms. Flights were conducted over a centre pivot irrigation system covered with an alfalfa crop. An important step in calculating the absolute crop height from the UAV derived DSM is determining the height of the underlying terrain. Here we use automatic thresholding techniques applied to RGB vegetation index maps to classify vegetated and soil pixels. From interpolation of classified soil pixels, a terrain map is calculated and subtracted from the DSM. The influence of three different thresholding techniques on CSMs are investigated. Median Alfalfa crop heights determined with the different thresholding methods varied from 18cm for K means thresholding to 13cm for Otsu thresholding methods. Otsu thresholding also gave the smallest range of crop heights and K means thresholding the largest. Reproducibility of median crop heights between flight surveys was 4-6cm for all thresholding techniques. For the flight conducted later in the afternoon shadowing caused soil pixels to be classified as vegetation in key locations around the domain, leading to lower crop height estimates. The range of crop heights was similar for both flights using K means thresholding (35-36cm), local minimum thresholding depended on whether raw or normalised RGB intensities were used to calculate vegetation indices (30-35cm), while Otsu thresholding had a smaller range of heights and varied most between flights (26-30cm). This study showed that crop heights from multiple survey flights are comparable, however, they were dependent on the thresholding method applied to classify soil pixels and the time of day the flight was conducted.

  7. A network of topographic numerosity maps in human association cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, Ben M.; Dumoulin, Serge O.

    2017-01-01

    Sensory and motor cortices each contain multiple topographic maps with the structure of sensory organs (such as the retina or cochlea) mapped onto the cortical surface. These sensory maps are hierarchically organized. For example, visual field maps contain neurons that represent increasingly large

  8. A network of topographic numerosity maps in human association cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, Ben M.; Dumoulin, Serge O.

    2017-01-01

    Sensory and motor cortices each contain multiple topographic maps with the structure of sensory organs (such as the retina or cochlea) mapped onto the cortical surface. These sensory maps are hierarchically organized. For example, visual field maps contain neurons that represent increasingly large p

  9. Differentiation of motor cortical representation of hand muscles by navigated mapping of optimal TMS current directions in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shahid; Perez, Jennifer M; Horvath, Jared C; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-08-01

    The precision of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to map the human primary motor cortex may be effected by the direction of TMS-induced current in the brain as determined by the orientation of the stimulation coil. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of current directionality on motor output mapping using navigated brain stimulation. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal coil orientation (and, thus, induced brain current) to activate hand musculature representations relative to each subject's unique neuroanatomical landmarks. The authors studied motor output maps for the first dorsal interosseous, abductor pollicis brevis, and abductor digiti minimi muscles in 10 normal volunteers. Monopolar current pulses were delivered through a figure-of-eight-shaped TMS coil, and motor evoked potentials were recorded using electromyography. At each targeted brain region, the authors systematically rotated the TMS coil to determine the direction of induced current in the brain for induction of the largest motor evoked potentials. These optimal current directions were expressed as an angle relative to each subject's central sulcus. Consistency of the optimal current direction was assessed by repeating the entire mapping procedure on two different occasions across subjects. The authors demonstrate that systematic optimization of current direction as guided by MRI-based neuronavigation improves the resolution of cortical output motor mapping with TMS.

  10. Brain cortical thickness and surface area correlates of neurocognitive performance in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartberg, C B; Sundet, K; Rimol, L M; Haukvik, U K; Lange, E H; Nesvåg, R; Dale, A M; Melle, I; Andreassen, O A; Agartz, I

    2011-11-01

    Relationships between cortical brain structure and neurocognitive functioning have been reported in schizophrenia, but findings are inconclusive, and only a few studies in bipolar disorder have addressed this issue. This is the first study to directly compare relationships between cortical thickness and surface area with neurocognitive functioning in patients with schizophrenia (n = 117) and bipolar disorder (n = 121) and healthy controls (n = 192). MRI scans were obtained, and regional cortical thickness and surface area measurements were analyzed for relationships with test scores from 6 neurocognitive domains. In the combined sample, cortical thickness in the right rostral anterior cingulate was inversely related to working memory, and cortical surface area in four frontal and temporal regions were positively related to neurocognitive functioning. A positive relationship between left transverse temporal thickness and processing speed was specific to schizophrenia. A negative relationship between right temporal pole thickness and working memory was specific to bipolar disorder. In conclusion, significant cortical structure/function relationships were found in a large sample of healthy controls and patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. The differences that were found between schizophrenia and bipolar may indicate differential relationship patterns in the two disorders, which may be of relevance for understanding the underlying pathophysiology.

  11. Two-dimensional map of direction selectivity in cortical visual area MT of Cebus monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIA CINIRA M. DIOGO

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied the spatial organization of direction of motion in visual area MT of the Cebus apella monkey. We used arrays of 6 (700 µm apart parallel electrodes in penetrations tangential to the cortical layers to record multi-unit responses to moving bars, at 200 µm steps. We determined the direction selectivity at each recording site. The data from single penetrations showed cyclic and gradual changes in the direction selectivity of clusters of cells, intermixed with abrupt 180º discontinuities along the electrode track. In order to obtain maps of direction of motion selectivity, we examined the spatial distribution of direction of motion in MT and we applied a method to determine the location of the centers of radial arrangements of direction selectivity. This tangential organization is characterized by slow continuous changes in direction of motion, interrupted by discontinuities. The changes in direction selectivity are organized radially in a pinwheel fashion and in slabs of linear variation. The pinwheel arrangements have 800-1400 µm in diameter. The size of the radial arrangement is comparable to the point image size in area MT at each eccentricity.Estudamos a organização espacial da seletividade ao sentido do movimento na área visual MT do macaco Cebus apella. Utilizamos um arranjo de 6 eletródios paralelos (separados por 700µm em penetrações tangenciais às camadas corticais para registrar, a cada 200µm, a atividade multi-unitária em resposta a barras em movimento. Determinamos a seletividade ao sentido de movimento em cada sítio de registro. Os dados captados por um único eletródio mostraram uma mudança cíclica e gradual na seletividade ao sentido de movimento dos grupos de neurônios registrados ao longo da trajetória do eletródio, interrompida por mudanças abruptas de 180º ocasionando descontinuidades na seletividade ao sentido do movimento. Para obter mapas de seletividade ao sentido do movimento, examinamos a

  12. Mapping of cortical language function by functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation in 40 healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Ille, Sebastian; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is considered to be the standard method regarding non-invasive language mapping. However, repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) gains increasing importance with respect to that purpose. However, comparisons between both methods are sparse. We performed fMRI and rTMS language mapping of the left hemisphere in 40 healthy, right-handed subjects in combination with the tasks that are most commonly used in the neurosurgical context (fMRI: word-generation = WGEN task; rTMS: object-naming = ON task). Different rTMS error rate thresholds (ERTs) were calculated, and Cohen's kappa coefficient and the cortical parcellation system (CPS) were used for systematic comparison of the two techniques. Overall, mean kappa coefficients were low, revealing no distinct agreement. We found the highest agreement for both techniques when using the 2-out-of-3 rule (CPS region defined as language positive in terms of rTMS if at least 2 out of 3 stimulations led to a naming error). However, kappa for this threshold was only 0.24 (kappa of <0, 0.01-0.20, 0.21-0.40, 0.41-0.60, 0.61-0.80 and 0.81-0.99 indicate less than chance, slight, fair, moderate, substantial and almost perfect agreement, respectively). Because of the inherent differences in the underlying physiology of fMRI and rTMS, the different tasks used and the impossibility of verifying the results via direct cortical stimulation (DCS) in the population of healthy volunteers, one must exercise caution in drawing conclusions about the relative usefulness of each technique for language mapping. Nevertheless, this study yields valuable insights into these two mapping techniques for the most common language tasks currently used in neurosurgical practice.

  13. Cortical and subcortical mapping of language areas: correlation of functional MRI and tractography in a 3T scanner with intraoperative cortical and subcortical stimulation in patients with brain tumors located in eloquent areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez de la Peña, M; Gil Robles, S; Recio Rodríguez, M; Ruiz Ocaña, C; Martínez de Vega, V

    2013-01-01

    To describe the detection of cortical areas and subcortical pathways involved in language observed in MRI activation studies and tractography in a 3T MRI scanner and to correlate the findings of these functional studies with direct intraoperative cortical and subcortical stimulation. We present a series of 14 patients with focal brain tumors adjacent to eloquent brain areas. All patients underwent neuropsychological evaluation before and after surgery. All patients underwent MRI examination including structural sequences, perfusion imaging, spectroscopy, functional imaging to determine activation of motor and language areas, and 3D tractography. All patients underwent cortical mapping through cortical and subcortical stimulation during the operation to resect the tumor. Postoperative follow-up studies were done 24 hours after surgery. The correlation of motor function and of the corticospinal tract determined by functional MRI and tractography with intraoperative mapping of cortical and subcortical motor areas was complete. The eloquent brain areas of language expression and reception were strongly correlated with intraoperative cortical mapping in all but two cases (a high grade infiltrating glioma and a low grade glioma located in the frontal lobe). 3D tractography identified the arcuate fasciculus, the lateral part of the superior longitudinal fasciculus, the subcallosal fasciculus, the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and the optic radiations, which made it possible to mark the limits of the resection. The correlation with the subcortical mapping of the anatomic arrangement of the fasciculi with respect to the lesions was complete. The best treatment for brain tumors is maximum resection without associated deficits, so high quality functional studies are necessary for preoperative planning. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. GROUND SURFACE VISUALIZATION USING RED RELIEF IMAGE MAP FOR A VARIETY OF MAP SCALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chiba

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There are many methods to express topographical features of ground surface. In which, contour map has been the traditional method and along with development of digital data, surface model such as shaded relief map has been using for ground surface expression. Recently, data acquisition has been developed very much quick, demanding more advanced visualization method to express ground surface so as to effectively use the high quality data. In this study, the authors using the Red Relief Image Map (RRIM, Chiba et al., 2008 to express ground surface visualization for a variety of map scales. The authors used 30 m mesh data of SRTM to show the topographical features of western Mongolian and micro-topographical features of ground surface in tectonically active regions of Japan. The results show that, compared to traditional and other similar methods, the RRIM can express ground surface more precisely and 3-dimensionally, suggested its advanced usage for many fields of topographical visualization.

  15. Ground Surface Visualization Using Red Relief Image Map for a Variety of Map Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, T.; Hasi, B.

    2016-06-01

    There are many methods to express topographical features of ground surface. In which, contour map has been the traditional method and along with development of digital data, surface model such as shaded relief map has been using for ground surface expression. Recently, data acquisition has been developed very much quick, demanding more advanced visualization method to express ground surface so as to effectively use the high quality data. In this study, the authors using the Red Relief Image Map (RRIM, Chiba et al., 2008) to express ground surface visualization for a variety of map scales. The authors used 30 m mesh data of SRTM to show the topographical features of western Mongolian and micro-topographical features of ground surface in tectonically active regions of Japan. The results show that, compared to traditional and other similar methods, the RRIM can express ground surface more precisely and 3-dimensionally, suggested its advanced usage for many fields of topographical visualization.

  16. Two-dimensional map of direction selectivity in cortical visual area MT of Cebus monkey

    OpenAIRE

    ANTONIA CINIRA M. DIOGO; Soares, Juliana G. M.; Albright, Thomas D.; RICARDO GATTASS

    2002-01-01

    We studied the spatial organization of direction of motion in visual area MT of the Cebus apella monkey. We used arrays of 6 (700 µm apart) parallel electrodes in penetrations tangential to the cortical layers to record multi-unit responses to moving bars, at 200 µm steps. We determined the direction selectivity at each recording site. The data from single penetrations showed cyclic and gradual changes in the direction selectivity of clusters of cells, intermixed with abrupt 180º discontinuit...

  17. Three-dimensional mapping of cortical bone thickness in subjects with different vertical facial dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mais Medhat Sadek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine differences in cortical bone thickness among subjects with different vertical facial dimensions using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Methods From 114 pre-treatment CBCT scans, 48 scans were selected to be included in the study. CBCT-synthesized lateral cephalograms were used to categorize subjects into three groups based on their vertical skeletal pattern. Cortical bone thickness (CBT at two vertical levels (4 and 7 mm from the alveolar crest were measured in the entire tooth-bearing region in the maxilla and mandible. Results Significant group differences were detected with high-angle subjects having significantly narrower inter-radicular CBT at some sites as compared to average- and low-angle subjects. Conclusions Inter-radicular cortical bone is thinner in high-angle than in average- or low-angle subjects in few selected sites at the vertical height in which mini-implants are commonly inserted for orthodontic anchorage.

  18. Mapping the Relationship between Cortical Convolution and Intelligence: Effects of Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luders, Eileen; Narr, Katherine L.; Bilder, Robert M.; Szeszko, Philip R.; Gurbani, Mala N.; Hamilton, Liberty; Gaser, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The pronounced convolution of the human cortex may be a morphological substrate that supports some of our species’ most distinctive cognitive abilities. Therefore, individual intelligence within humans might be modulated by the degree of folding in certain cortical regions. We applied advanced methods to analyze cortical convolution at high spatial resolution and correlated those measurements with intelligence quotients. Within a large sample of healthy adult subjects (n = 65), we detected the most prominent correlations in the left medial hemisphere. More specifically, intelligence scores were positively associated with the degree of folding in the temporo-occipital lobe, particularly in the outermost section of the posterior cingulate gyrus (retrosplenial areas). Thus, this region might be an important contributor toward individual intelligence, either via modulating pathways to (pre)frontal regions or by serving as a location for the convergence of information. Prominent gender differences within the right frontal cortex were observed; females showed uncorrected significant positive correlations and males showed a nonsignificant trend toward negative correlations. It is possible that formerly described gender differences in regional convolution are associated with differences in the underlying architecture. This might lead to the development of sexually dimorphic information processing strategies and affect the relationship between intelligence and cortical convolution. PMID:18089578

  19. Cortical mapping of mismatch negativity with deviance detection property in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyo Isoguchi Shiramatsu

    Full Text Available Mismatch Negativity (MMN is an N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA-mediated, negative deflection in human auditory evoked potentials in response to a cognitively discriminable change. MMN-like responses have been extensively investigated in animal models, but the existence of MMN equivalent is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to investigate how closely the putative MMN (MMNp in rats exhibited the comparable properties of human MMN. We used a surface microelectrode array with a grid of 10 × 7 recording sites within an area of 4.5 × 3.0 mm to densely map evoked potentials in the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats under the oddball paradigm. Firstly, like human MMN, deviant stimuli elicited negative deflections in auditory evoked potentials following the positive middle-latency response, termed P1. Secondly, MMNp exhibited deviance-detecting property, which could not be explained by simple stimulus specific adaptation (SSA. Thirdly, this MMNp occurred focally in the auditory cortex, including both the core and belt regions, while P1 activation focus was obtained in the core region, indicating that both P1 and MMNp are generated in the auditory cortex, yet the sources of these signals do not completely overlap. Fourthly, MMNp significantly decreased after the application of AP5 (D-(--2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, an antagonist at NMDA receptors. In stark contrast, AP5 affected neither P1 amplitude nor SSA of P1. These results provide compelling evidence that the MMNp we have examined in rats is functionally comparable to human MMN. The present work will stimulate translational research into MMN, which may help bridge the gap between electroencephalography (EEG/magnetoencephalography (MEG studies in humans and electrophysiological studies in animals.

  20. Uniformly Exponential Growth and Mapping Class Groups of Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, J. W.; Aramayona, J.; Shackleton, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    We show that the mapping class group (as well as closely related groups) of an orientable surface with finitely generated fundamental group has uniformly exponential growth. We further demonstrate the uniformly non-amenability of many of these groups.

  1. Protein-surface interaction maps for ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Alexander S; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-04-05

    In this paper, protein-surface interaction maps were generated by performing coarse-grained protein-surface calculations. This approach allowed for the rapid determination of the protein-surface interaction energies at a range of orientations and distances. Interaction maps of lysozyme indicated that there was a contiguous series of orientations corresponding to several adjacent preferred binding regions on the protein surface. Examination of these orientations provided insight into the residues involved in surface interactions, which qualitatively agreed with the retention data for single-site mutants. Interaction maps of lysozyme single-site mutants were also generated and provided significant insight into why these variants exhibited significant differences in their chromatographic behavior. This approach was also employed to study the binding behavior of CspB and related mutants. The results indicated that, in addition to describing general trends in the data, these maps provided significant insight into retention data of the single-site mutants. In particular, subtle retention trends observed with the K12 and K13 mutants were well-described using this interaction map approach. Finally, the number of interaction points with energies stronger than -2 kcal/mol was shown to be able to semi-quantitatively predict the behavior of most of the mutants. This rapid approach for calculating protein-surface interaction maps is expected to facilitate future method development for separating closely related protein variants in ion-exchange systems.

  2. Mapping cortical haemodynamics during neonatal seizures using diffuse optical tomography: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsimrat Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures in the newborn brain represent a major challenge to neonatal medicine. Neonatal seizures are poorly classified, under-diagnosed, difficult to treat and are associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Video-EEG is the current gold-standard approach for seizure detection and monitoring. Interpreting neonatal EEG requires expertise and the impact of seizures on the developing brain remains poorly understood. In this case study we present the first ever images of the haemodynamic impact of seizures on the human infant brain, obtained using simultaneous diffuse optical tomography (DOT and video-EEG with whole-scalp coverage. Seven discrete periods of ictal electrographic activity were observed during a 60 minute recording of an infant with hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy. The resulting DOT images show a remarkably consistent, high-amplitude, biphasic pattern of changes in cortical blood volume and oxygenation in response to each electrographic event. While there is spatial variation across the cortex, the dominant haemodynamic response to seizure activity consists of an initial increase in cortical blood volume prior to a large and extended decrease typically lasting several minutes. This case study demonstrates the wealth of physiologically and clinically relevant information that DOT–EEG techniques can yield. The consistency and scale of the haemodynamic responses observed here also suggest that DOT–EEG has the potential to provide improved detection of neonatal seizures.

  3. Mapping surface disturbance from wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, James E.

    2013-04-01

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing segments of the electricity market and this trend will likely continue as countries strive to reduce CO2 production while meeting growing energy demands. One impact of wind facilities is surface disturbance, including roads, that lead to habitat loss and fragmentation. Numerous studies of wind power utilize estimates of surface disturbance for GIS-based modeling or basic calculations of the land area required to generate energy using wind. However published estimates of the land use required for a MW of electricity from wind facilities vary by more than 10 times (0.83 to 250 MW/Km2). We report results from a geospatial analysis of 39 wind facilities in the United States that we fully digitized using high resolution photo-imagery. The selected sites and analyses were designed to elucidate the effects of turbine size, topography, and land use on the area requirements of wind facilities. The results indicate point estimates of average surface disturbance/MW have wide levels of variation, explained primarily by Landcover and Topography. Wind facilities in agricultural landscapes had smaller surface disturbance/ha than facilities in forests and shrublands, and facilities in relatively flat topography had smaller surface disturbance/ha than facilities on hills, ridges, or mesas. Land use, topography, and turbine size all influenced turbine spacing. The statistical models suggest we can predict geographic locations where new wind facilities could be placed with minimized surface disturbance.

  4. Pseudo-periodic maps and degeneration of Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The first part of the book studies pseudo-periodic maps of a closed surface of genus greater than or equal to two. This class of homeomorphisms was originally introduced by J. Nielsen in 1944 as an extension of periodic maps. In this book, the conjugacy classes of the (chiral) pseudo-periodic mapping classes are completely classified, and Nielsen’s incomplete classification is corrected. The second part applies the results of the first part to the topology of degeneration of Riemann surfaces. It is shown that the set of topological types of all the singular fibers appearing in one-parameter holomorphic families of Riemann surfaces is in a bijective correspondence with the set of conjugacy classes of the pseudo-periodic maps of negative twists. The correspondence is given by the topological monodromy.

  5. Mapping auditory core, lateral belt, and parabelt cortices in the human superior temporal gyrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweet, Robert A; Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Lewis, David A

    2005-01-01

    the location of the lateral belt and parabelt with respect to gross anatomical landmarks. Architectonic criteria for the core, lateral belt, and parabelt were readily adapted from monkey to human. Additionally, we found evidence for an architectonic subdivision within the parabelt, present in both species......The goal of the present study was to determine whether the architectonic criteria used to identify the core, lateral belt, and parabelt auditory cortices in macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) could be used to identify homologous regions in humans (Homo sapiens). Current evidence indicates...... that auditory cortex in humans, as in monkeys, is located on the superior temporal gyrus (STG), and is functionally and structurally altered in illnesses such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we used serial sets of adjacent sections processed for Nissl substance, acetylcholinesterase...

  6. Formation mechanism of propagated sensation along the meridians, as verified by cortical somatosensory-evoked potential topographic maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinsen Xu; Xiaohua Pan; Shuxia Zheng; Xianglong Hu; Zheyan Sa

    2011-01-01

    The peripheral driver stimulating theory states that as a driver passes along a certain meridian during acupuncture; the driver provokes nerve sense devices along the meridian, resulting in the nerve impulse entering the central nervous system. Accordingly, volunteers have reported propagated sensations along the meridians (PSM). The present study was designed to utilize a cortical somatosensory-evoked potential (CSEP) topographic map for determining whether stimulation expansion occurs in somatosensory area I when sensation was provoked in individuals with obvious PSM. The sensation was blocked by mechanical compression, and the sensation was imitated in individuals without PSM. Results revealed a red, high-potential signal in the representative area of the lower limbs in individuals with obvious PSM symptoms when the Gall Bladder Meridian (GBM) sensation passed to the head and face. This representative area was near the middle line of the CSEP topographic map, and a red, high-potential signal, which jumps over the representative area of the upper limbs, also appeared in the representative face area, which was at the external region of the CSEP topographic map. However, in individuals exhibiting no PSM, only a red high-potential signal appeared in the representative lower limb area. When Hegu (LI 4) was stimulated in individuals without PSM, an obvious evoked response appeared only in the representative upper limb area. However, when Hegu was stimulated in individuals exhibiting PSM, the response area was larger in the representative upper limb area and extended to the representative face area. When Guangming (GB 37) was stimulated in PSM individuals, the face representation response disappeared and was confined to a foot representation of the somatosensory area I when PSM was blocked by mechanical pressure. Results suggested that mechanical compression blocked PSM, and corresponding changes were exhibited in the CSEP topographic map. These results provide

  7. Compositional Mapping of Europa's Surface with SUDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, S.; Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Hand, K. P.; Srama, R.; Postberg, F.; Altobelli, N.; Gruen, E.; Gudipati, M. S.; Schmidt, J.; Zolotov, M. Y.; Tucker, S.; Hoxie, V. C.; Kohnert, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Surface Mass Analyzer (SUDA) measures the composition of ballistic dust particles populating the thin exospheres that were detected around each of the Galilean moons. Since these grains are direct samples from the moons' icy surfaces, unique composition data will be obtained that will help to define and constrain the geological activities on and below the moons' surface. SUDA will make a vital contribution to NASA's mission to Europa and provide key answers to its main scientific questions about the surface composition, habitability, the icy crust, and exchange processes with the deeper interior of the Jovian icy moon Europa. SUDA is a time-of- flight, reflectron-type impact mass spectrometer, optimised for a high mass resolution which only weakly depends on the impact location. The small size, low mass and large sensitive area meet the challenging demands of mission to Europa. A full-size prototype SUDA instrument was built in order to demonstrate its performance through calibration experiments at the dust accelerator at NASA's IMPACT institute at Boulder, CO, with a variety of cosmo-chemically relevant dust analogues. The effective mass resolution of m/Δm of 150-300 is achieved for mass range of interest m = 1-150.

  8. Harmonic Maps and Self-Dual Equations for Immersed Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Parthasarathy, R

    1993-01-01

    The immersion of the string world sheet, regarded as a Riemann surface, in $R^3$ and $R^4$ is described by the generalized Gauss map. When the Gauss map is harmonic or equivalently for surfaces of constant mean curvature, we obtain Hitchin's self-dual equations, by using $SO(3)$ and $SO(4)$ gauge fields constructed in our earlier studies. This complements our earlier result that $h\\surd g\\ =\\ 1$ surfaces exhibit Virasaro symmetry. The self-dual system so obtained is compared with self-dual Chern-Simons system and a generalized Liouville equation involving extrinsic geometry is obtained. The immersion in $R^n, \\ n>4$ is described by the generalized Gauss map. It is shown that when the Gauss map is harmonic, the mean curvature of the immersed surface is constant. $SO(n)$ gauge fields are constructed from the geometry of the surface and expressed in terms of the Gauss map. It is found Hitchin's self- duality relations for the gauge group $SO(2)\\times SO(n-2)$.

  9. Trends and Properties of Human Cerebral Cortex: Correlations with Cortical Myelin Content

    OpenAIRE

    Glasser, Matthew F.; Goyal, Manu S.; Preuss, Todd M; Raichle, Marcus E.; Van Essen, David C.

    2013-01-01

    “In vivo Brodmann mapping” or non-invasive cortical parcellation using MRI, especially by measuring cortical myelination, has recently become a popular research topic, though myeloarchitectonic cortical parcellation in humans previously languished in favor of cytoarchitecture. We review recent in vivo myelin mapping studies and discuss some of the different methods for estimating myelin content. We discuss some ways in which myelin maps may improve surface registration and be useful for cross...

  10. Ray-map migration of transmitted surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-08-25

    Near-surface normal faults can sometimes separate two distinct zones of velocity heterogeneity, where the medium on one side of the fault has a faster velocity than on the other side. Therefore, the slope of surface-wave arrivals in a common-shot gather should abruptly change near the surface projection of the fault. We present ray-map imaging method that migrates transmitted surface waves to the fault plane, and therefore it roughly estimates the orientation, depth, and location of the near-surface fault. The main benefits of this method are that it is computationally inexpensive and robust in the presence of noise.

  11. Surface mineral maps of Afghanistan derived from HyMap imaging spectrometer data, version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a new version of surface mineral maps derived from HyMap imaging spectrometer data collected over Afghanistan in the fall of 2007. This report also describes the processing steps applied to the imaging spectrometer data. The 218 individual flight lines composing the Afghanistan dataset, covering more than 438,000 square kilometers, were georeferenced to a mosaic of orthorectified Landsat images. The HyMap data were converted from radiance to reflectance using a radiative transfer program in combination with ground-calibration sites and a network of cross-cutting calibration flight lines. The U.S. Geological Survey Material Identification and Characterization Algorithm (MICA) was used to generate two thematic maps of surface minerals: a map of iron-bearing minerals and other materials, which have their primary absorption features at the shorter wavelengths of the reflected solar wavelength range, and a map of carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials, which have their primary absorption features at the longer wavelengths of the reflected solar wavelength range. In contrast to the original version, version 2 of these maps is provided at full resolution of 23-meter pixel size. The thematic maps, MICA summary images, and the material fit and depth images are distributed in digital files linked to this report, in a format readable by remote sensing software and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The digital files can be downloaded from http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/787/downloads/.

  12. Velocity Map Imaging the Scattering Plane of Gas Surface Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Hadden, David J; Leng, Joseph G; Greaves, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of gas-surface dynamics studies to resolve the velocity distribution of the scattered species in the 2D sacattering plane has been limited by technical capabilities and only a few different approaches have been explored in recent years. In comparison, gas-phase scattering studies have been transformed by the near ubiquitous use of velocity map imaging. We describe an innovative means of introducing a surface within the electric field of a typical velocity map imaging experiment. The retention of optimum velocity mapping conditions was demonstrated by measurements of iodomethane-d3 photodissociation and SIMION calculations. To demonstrate the systems capabilities the velocity distributions of ammonia molecules scattered from a PTFE surface have been measured for multiple product rotational states.

  13. Learning-based subject-specific estimation of dynamic maps of cortical morphology at missing time points in longitudinal infant studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yu; Li, Gang; Gao, Yaozong; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-11-01

    Longitudinal neuroimaging analysis of the dynamic brain development in infants has received increasing attention recently. Many studies expect a complete longitudinal dataset in order to accurately chart the brain developmental trajectories. However, in practice, a large portion of subjects in longitudinal studies often have missing data at certain time points, due to various reasons such as the absence of scan or poor image quality. To make better use of these incomplete longitudinal data, in this paper, we propose a novel machine learning-based method to estimate the subject-specific, vertex-wise cortical morphological attributes at the missing time points in longitudinal infant studies. Specifically, we develop a customized regression forest, named dynamically assembled regression forest (DARF), as the core regression tool. DARF ensures the spatial smoothness of the estimated maps for vertex-wise cortical morphological attributes and also greatly reduces the computational cost. By employing a pairwise estimation followed by a joint refinement, our method is able to fully exploit the available information from both subjects with complete scans and subjects with missing scans for estimation of the missing cortical attribute maps. The proposed method has been applied to estimating the dynamic cortical thickness maps at missing time points in an incomplete longitudinal infant dataset, which includes 31 healthy infant subjects, each having up to five time points in the first postnatal year. The experimental results indicate that our proposed framework can accurately estimate the subject-specific vertex-wise cortical thickness maps at missing time points, with the average error less than 0.23 mm. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4129-4147, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cortical Connectivity Maps Reveal Anatomically Distinct Areas in the Parietal Cortex of the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eWilber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A central feature of theories of spatial navigation involves the representation of spatial relationships between objects in complex environments. The parietal cortex has long been linked to the processing of spatial visual information and recent evidence from single unit recording in rodents suggests a role for this region in encoding egocentric and world-centered frames. The rat parietal cortex can be subdivided into up to four distinct rostral-caudal and medial-lateral regions, which includes a zone previously characterized as secondary visual cortex. At present, very little is known regarding the relative connectivity of these parietal subdivisions. Thus, we set out to map the connectivity of the entire anterior-posterior and medial-lateral span of this region. To do this we used anterograde and retrograde tracers in conjunction with open source neuronal segmentation and tracer detection tools to generate whole brain connectivity maps of parietal inputs and outputs. Our present results show that inputs to the parietal cortex varied significantly along the medial-lateral, but not the rostral-caudal axis. Specifically, retrosplenial connectivity is greater medially, but connectivity with visual cortex, though generally sparse, is more significant laterally. Finally, based on connection density, the connectivity between parietal cortex and hippocampus is indirect and likely achieved largely via dysgranular retrosplenial cortex. Thus, similar to primates, the parietal cortex of rats exhibits a difference in connectivity along the medial-lateral axis, which may represent functionally distinct areas.

  15. Description and evaluation of a surface runoff susceptibility mapping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadec, Lilly-Rose; Patrice, Pierre; Braud, Isabelle; Chazelle, Blandine; Moulin, Loïc; Dehotin, Judicaël; Hauchard, Emmanuel; Breil, Pascal

    2016-10-01

    Surface runoff is the hydrological process at the origin of phenomena such as soil erosion, floods out of rivers, mudflows, debris flows and can generate major damage. This paper presents a method to create maps of surface runoff susceptibility. The method, called IRIP (Indicator of Intense Pluvial Runoff, French acronym), uses a combination of landscape factors to create three maps representing the susceptibility (1) to generate, (2) to transfer, and (3) to accumulate surface runoff. The method input data are the topography, the land use and the soil type. The method aims to be simple to implement and robust for any type of study area, with no requirement for calibration or specific input format. In a second part, the paper focuses on the evaluation of the surface runoff susceptibility maps. The method is applied in the Lézarde catchment (210 km2, northern France) and the susceptibility maps are evaluated by comparison with two risk regulatory zonings of surface runoff and soil erosion, and two databases of surface runoff impacts on roads and railways. Comparison tests are performed using a standard verification method for dichotomous forecasting along with five verification indicators: accuracy, bias, success ratio, probability of detection, and false alarm ratio. The evaluation shows that the susceptibility map of surface runoff accumulation is able to identify the concentrated surface runoff flows and that the susceptibility map of transfer is able to identify areas that are susceptible to soil erosion. Concerning the ability of the IRIP method to detect sections of the transportation network susceptible to be impacted by surface runoff, the evaluation tests show promising probabilities of detection (73-90%) but also high false alarm ratios (77-92%). However, a qualitative analysis of the local configuration of the infrastructure shows that taking into account the transportation network vulnerability can explain numerous false alarms. This paper shows that the

  16. Mapping sea-surface roughness using microwave radiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    Microwave radiometry data (1.55 cm) taken by aircraft over the Salton Sea have been corrected for viewing angle and atmospheric effects, rectified, and mapped. No fetch-limited conditions are observed along the upwind shore despite a 15 m/sec wind, which indicates that the radiometer is sensitive to the short wavelength surface roughness but not to the longer wavelengths. The brightness temperature field can be represented as a nearly linear function of the surface wind speed.

  17. Impairment of preoperative language mapping by lesion location: a functional magnetic resonance imaging, navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation, and direct cortical stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Maurer, Stefanie; Tanigawa, Noriko; Obermueller, Thomas; Negwer, Chiara; Droese, Doris; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2015-08-01

    Language mapping by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is increasingly used and has already replaced functional MRI (fMRI) in some institutions for preoperative mapping of neurosurgical patients. Yet some factors affect the concordance of both methods with direct cortical stimulation (DCS), most likely by lesions affecting cortical oxygenation levels. Therefore, the impairment of the accuracy of rTMS and fMRI was analyzed and compared with DCS during awake surgery in patients with intraparenchymal lesions. Language mapping was performed by DCS, rTMS, and fMRI using an object-naming task in 27 patients with left-sided perisylvian lesions, and the induced language errors of each method were assigned to the cortical parcellation system. Subsequently, the receiver operating characteristics were calculated for rTMS and fMRI and compared with DCS as ground truth for regions with (w/) and without (w/o) the lesion in the mapped regions. The w/ subgroup revealed a sensitivity of 100% (w/o 100%), a specificity of 8% (w/o 5%), a positive predictive value of 34% (w/o: 53%), and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% (w/o: 100%) for the comparison of rTMS versus DCS. Findings for the comparison of fMRI versus DCS within the w/ subgroup revealed a sensitivity of 32% (w/o: 62%), a specificity of 88% (w/o: 60%), a positive predictive value of 56% (w/o: 62%), and a NPV of 73% (w/o: 60%). Although strengths and weaknesses exist for both rTMS and fMRI, the results show that rTMS is less affected by a brain lesion than fMRI, especially when performing mapping of language-negative cortical regions based on sensitivity and NPV.

  18. Sea surface temperature mapping using a thermal infrared scanner

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Pandya, R.M.; Mathur, K.M.; Charyulu, R.J.K.; Rao, L.V.G.

    1 metre water column below the sea surface. A thermal infrared scanner developed by the Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad was operated on board R.V. Gaveshani in April/May 1984 for mapping SST over the eastern Arabian Sea. SST values...

  19. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-08-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far been capable of mapping surface charge densities under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we use a scanning nanopipette setup (scanning ion-conductance microscope) combined with a novel algorithm to investigate the surface conductivity near supported lipid bilayers, and we present a new approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity of QSCM by mapping the surface charge density of model cationic, anionic and zwitterionic lipids with results accurately matching theoretical values.

  20. Mapping the surface adsorption forces of nanomaterials in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xin R; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Mathur, Sanjay; Song, Xuefeng; Xiao, Lisong; Oldenberg, Steven J; Fadeel, Bengt; Riviere, Jim E

    2011-11-22

    The biological surface adsorption index (BSAI) is a novel approach to characterize surface adsorption energy of nanomaterials that is the primary force behind nanoparticle aggregation, protein corona formation, and other complex interactions of nanomaterials within biological systems. Five quantitative nanodescriptors were obtained to represent the surface adsorption forces (hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond, polarity/polarizability, and lone-pair electrons) of the nanomaterial interaction with biological components. We have mapped the surface adsorption forces over 16 different nanomaterials. When the five-dimensional information of the nanodescriptors was reduced to two dimensions, the 16 nanomaterials were classified into distinct clusters according their surface adsorption properties. BSAI nanodescriptors are intrinsic properties of nanomaterials useful for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model development. This is the first success in quantitative characterization of the surface adsorption forces of nanomaterials in biological conditions, which could open a quantitative avenue in predictive nanomedicine development, risk assessment, and safety evaluation of nanomaterials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. A map of radon flux at the Australian land surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A time-dependent map of radon-222 flux density at the Australian land surface has been constructed with a spatial resolution of 0.05° and temporal resolution of one month. Radon flux density was calculated from a simple model utilising data from national gamma-ray aerial surveys, modelled soil moisture, and maps of soil properties. The model was calibrated against a large data set of accumulation-chamber measurements, thereby constraining it with experimental data. A notable application of the map is in atmospheric mixing and transport studies which use radon as a tracer, where it is a clear improvement on the common assumption of uniform radon flux density.

  2. A map of radon flux at the Australian land surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A time-dependent map of radon-222 flux density at the Australian land surface has been constructed with a spatial resolution of 0.05° and temporal resolution of one month. Radon flux density was calculated from a simple model utilising data from national gamma-ray aerial surveys; modelled soil moisture, available from 1900 in near real-time; and maps of soil properties. The model was calibrated against a data set of accumulation chamber measurements, thereby constraining it with experimental data. A notable application of the map is in atmospheric mixing and transport studies which use radon as a tracer, where it is a clear improvement on the common assumption of uniform radon flux density.

  3. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  4. Temperature maps measurements on 3D surfaces with infrared thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardone, Gennaro; Ianiro, Andrea [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Aerospace Engineering (DIAS), Naples (Italy); Ioio, Gennaro dello [University of Cambridge, BP Institute for Multiphase Flow, Cambridge, England (United Kingdom); Passaro, Andrea [Alta SpA, Ospedaletto, PI (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    The use of the infrared camera as a temperature transducer in wind tunnel applications is convenient and widespread. Nevertheless, the infrared data are available in the form of 2D images while the observed surfaces are often not planar and the reconstruction of temperature maps over them is a critical task. In this work, after recalling the principles of IR thermography, a methodology to rebuild temperature maps on the surfaces of 3D object is proposed. In particular, an optical calibration is applied to the IR camera by means of a novel target plate with control points. The proposed procedure takes also into account the directional emissivity by estimating the viewing angle. All the needed steps are described and analyzed. The advantages given by the proposed method are shown with an experiment in a hypersonic wind tunnel. (orig.)

  5. BDNF stimulation of protein synthesis in cortical neurons requires the MAP kinase-interacting kinase MNK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genheden, Maja; Kenney, Justin W; Johnston, Harvey E; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D; Proud, Christopher G

    2015-01-21

    Although the MAP kinase-interacting kinases (MNKs) have been known for >15 years, their roles in the regulation of protein synthesis have remained obscure. Here, we explore the involvement of the MNKs in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-stimulated protein synthesis in cortical neurons from mice. Using a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches, we show that BDNF-induced upregulation of protein synthesis requires MEK/ERK signaling and the downstream kinase, MNK1, which phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E. Translation initiation is mediated by the interaction of eIF4E with the m(7)GTP cap of mRNA and with eIF4G. The latter interaction is inhibited by the interactions of eIF4E with partner proteins, such as CYFIP1, which acts as a translational repressor. We find that BDNF induces the release of CYFIP1 from eIF4E, and that this depends on MNK1. Finally, using a novel combination of BONCAT and SILAC, we identify a subset of proteins whose synthesis is upregulated by BDNF signaling via MNK1 in neurons. Interestingly, this subset of MNK1-sensitive proteins is enriched for functions involved in neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Additionally, we find significant overlap between our subset of proteins whose synthesis is regulated by MNK1 and those encoded by known FMRP-binding mRNAs. Together, our data implicate MNK1 as a key component of BDNF-mediated translational regulation in neurons.

  6. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Wind Gust (knots)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS surface wind gust forecasts from the National Digital Forecast Database...

  7. nowCOAST's Map Service for Surface Weather and Ocean Observations (Time Enabled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-enabled map service provides maps depicting the latest surface weather and marine weather observations at observing sites using...

  8. Electrical mapping of microtubular structures by surface potential microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2009-09-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are important cytoskeletal polymers that play an essential role in cell division and transport in all eukaryotes and information processing in neurons. MTs are highly charged polyelectrolytes, composed of hollow cylindrical arrangements of αβ-tubulin dimers. To date, there is little information about electrical properties of MTs. Here, we deposited and dried MTs onto a gold-plated surface to image their topology by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and determined their electrical mapping with surface potential microscopy (SPM). We found a strong linear correlation between the magnitude of relative surface potential and MT parameters, including diameter and height. AFM images confirmed the cylindrical topology of microtubular structures, and the presence of topological discontinuities along their surface, which may contribute to their unique electrical properties.

  9. Mapping of an Approximate Neutral Density Surface with Ungridded Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A neutral density surface is a logical study frame for water-mass mixing since water parcels spread along such a surface without doing work against buoyancy restoring force. Mesoscale eddies are believed to stir and subsequently mix predominantly along such surfaces. Because of the nonlinear nature of the equation of state of seawater, the process of accurately mapping a neutral density surface necessarily involves lateral computation from one conductivity, temperature and depth (CTD) cast to the next in a logical sequence. By contrast, the depth of a potential density surface on any CTD cast is found solely from the data on this cast. The lateral calculation procedure causes a significant inconvenience. In a previous paper by present author published in this journal (You,2006), the mapping of neutral density surfaces with regularly gridded data such as Levitus data has been introduced. In this note, I present a new method to find the depth of a neutral density surface from a cast without having to specify an integration path in space.An appropriate reference point is required that is on the neutral density surface and thereafter the neutral density surface can be determined by using the CTD casts in any order. This method is only approximate and the likely errors can be estimated by plotting a scatter diagram of all the pressures and potential temperatures on the neutral density surfaces. The method assumes that the variations of potential temperature and pressure (with respect to the values at the reference point) on the neutral density surface are proportional.It is important to select the most appropriate reference point in order to approximately satisfy this assumption, and in practice this is found by inspecting the θ-p plot of data on the surface. This may require that the algorithm be used twice. When the straight lines on the θ-p plot, drawn from the reference point to other points on the neutral density surface, enclose an area that is external to the

  10. Does Degree of Gyrification Underlie the Phenotypic and Genetic Associations between Cortical Surface Area and Cognitive Ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Anna R.; Hagler, Donald J.; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Neale, Michael C.; Eyler, Lisa T.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Franz, Carol E.; Jak, Amy; Lyons, Michael J.; Rinker, Daniel A.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Dale, Anders M.; Kremen, William S.

    2015-01-01

    The phenotypic and genetic relationship between global cortical size and general cognitive ability (GCA) appears to be driven by surface area (SA) and not cortical thickness (CT). Gyrification (cortical folding) is an important property of the cortex that helps to increase SA within a finite space, and may also improve connectivity by reducing distance between regions. Hence, gyrification may be what underlies the SA-GCA relationship. In previous phenotypic studies, a 3-dimensional gyrification index (3DGI) has been positively associated with cognitive ability and negatively associated with mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, and psychiatric disorders affecting cognition. However, the differential genetic associations of 3DGI and SA with GCA are still unclear. We examined the heritability of 3DGI, and the phenotypic, genetic, and environmental associations of 3DGI with SA and GCA in a large sample of adult male twins (N = 512). Nearly 85% of the variance in 3DGI was due to genes, and 3DGI had a strong phenotypic and genetic association with SA. Both 3DGI and total SA had positive phenotypic correlations with GCA. However, the SA-GCA correlation remained significant after controlling for 3DGI, but not the other way around. There was also significant genetic covariance between SA and GCA, but not between 3DGI and GCA. Thus, despite the phenotypic and genetic associations between 3DGI and SA, our results do not support the hypothesis that gyrification underlies the association between SA and GCA. PMID:25433211

  11. A surface based approach for cortical thickness comparison between PiB+ and PiB- healthy control subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doré, Vincent; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen; Acosta, Oscar; Chetelat, Gael; Szoeke, Cassandra; Ellis, Kathryn A.; Martins, Ralph N.; Villemagne, Victor; Masters, Colin L.; Ames, David; Rowe, Christopher C.; Salvado, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    β-amyloid has been shown to play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vivo β-amyloid imaging using [11C]Pittsburgh compound Β (PiB) positron emission tomography has made it possible to analyze the relationship between β-amyloid deposition and different pathological markers involved in AD. PiB allows us to stratify the population between subjects which are likely to have prodromal AD, and those who don't. The comparison of the cortical thickness in these different groups is important to better understanding and detect the first symptoms of the disease which may lead to an earlier therapeutic care to reduce neurone loss. Several techniques have been developed to compare the cortical volume and/or thickness between AD and HC groups. However due to the noise introduced by the cortical thickness estimation and by the registration, these methods do not allow to unveil any major different when comparing prodromal AD groups with healthy control subjects group. To improve our understanding of where initial Alzheimer neurodegeneration occurs in the cortex we have developed a surface based technique, and have applied it to the discrimination between PIB-positive and PiB-negative HCs. We first identify the regions where AD patients show high cortical atrophy by using an AD/PiB- HC vertex-wise T-test. In each of these discriminating regions, comparison between PiB+ HC, PiB- HC and AD are performed. We found some significant differences between the two HC groups in the hippocampus and in the temporal lobe for both hemisphere and in the precuneus and occipital regions only for the left hemisphere.

  12. Anomia produced by direct cortical stimulation of the pre-supplementary motor area in a patient undergoing preoperative language mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Verena Eveline; Peraud, Aurelia; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-06-01

    There is sparse data on the analysis of supplementary motor area in language function using direct cortical stimulation of the supplementary motor area. Here, we report a patient who experienced isolated anomia during stimulation of the anterior supplementary motor area and discuss the role of the supplementary motor area in speech production. The role of the pre-supplementary motor· area in word selection, observed in fMRI studies, can be confirmed by direct cortical stimulation.

  13. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far...... approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity...... been capable of mapping surface charge densities under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we use a scanning nanopipette setup (scanning ion-conductance microscope) combined with a novel algorithm to investigate the surface conductivity near supported lipid bilayers, and we present a new...

  14. WEIERSTRASS REPRESENTATION FOR SURFACES WITH PRESCRIBED NORMAL GAUSS MAP AND GAUSS CURVATURE IN H3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI SHUGUO

    2004-01-01

    The author obtains a Weierstrass representation for surfaces with prescribed normal Gauss map and Gauss curvature in H3. A differential equation about the hyperbolic Gauss map is also obtained, which characterizes the relation among the hyperbolic Gauss map, the normal Gauss map and Gauss curvature. The author discusses the harmonicity of the normal Gauss map and the hyperbolic Gauss map from surface with constant Gauss curvature in H3 to S2 with certain altered conformal metric.Finally, the author considers the surface whose normal Gauss map is conformal and derives a completely nonlinear differential equation of second order which graph must satisfy.

  15. Mapping of plume deposits and surface composition on Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, T. A.; Scipioni, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Clark, R. N.,; Hand, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    A major result of the Cassini mission was the discovery that the small mid-sized moon Enceladus is presently geological active[Dougherty et al., 2006; Porco et al., 2006; Spencer et al., 2006; Hansen et al., 2008]. This activity results in plumes of water vapor and ice emanating from a series of fractures ("Tiger Stripes") at the moon's South Pole. Some fraction of plume material escapes the moon's gravity and populates the E-ring as well as ultimately providing a source of fresh plasma in the Saturnian magnetosphere [Pontius and Hill, 2006; Kempf et al., 2010]. However, a significant portion of plume material is redeposited on Enceladus and thus provides a source of surface contaminants. By studying the near-infrared spectral signatures of these contaminants we may put new constraints on the composition of the plumes and, ultimately, their source, which is currently believed to be Enceladus's global sub-surface ocean [Iess et al., 2014]. Here we present preliminary results from our analysis of observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) [Brown et al., 2005] onboard Cassini and mapping of plume deposits across the surface of Enceladus. We have investigated the global variation of the water ice Fresnel peak at 3.1 μm, which may be used as an indicator of ice crystallinity [Hansen & McCord, 2004; Jaumann et al., 2008; Newman et al., 2008]. We have also investigated the slope of the 1.11-2.25 μm spectral region, which serves as an indicator of water ice grain size for small grains (< 100 μm) as well as the presence of contaminants [e.g. Filacchione et al., 2010]. Finally, we have identified and mapped an absorption feature centered at 3.25 μm that may be related to organic contaminants, represented by the band depth of the fundamental C-H stretch [e.g. Cruikshank et al., 2014; Scipioni et al., 2014].

  16. Explorations in topology map coloring, surfaces and knots

    CERN Document Server

    Gay, David

    2013-01-01

    Explorations in Topology, Second Edition, provides students a rich experience with low-dimensional topology (map coloring, surfaces, and knots), enhances their geometrical and topological intuition, empowers them with new approaches to solving problems, and provides them with experiences that will help them make sense of future, more formal topology courses. The book's innovative story-line style models the problem-solving process, presents the development of concepts in a natural way, and engages students in meaningful encounters with the material. The updated end-of-chapter investigation

  17. On the Optimization of the Geodesic Active Fields (GAF) for Image Registration: Application to multi-scale registration of cortical maps on the sphere

    OpenAIRE

    Ciller Ruiz, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] This work presents an analysis and optimization, both in terms of optimal parameters and speed, of the novel geodesic active fields framework for surface image registration on the sphere, presented by Zosso, Dominique in his PhD thesis at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. The relevance of surface registration to medical imaging is that there is a lot of anatomical information in the form of collected surface points, giving information about the cortical folding pattern. H...

  18. The alterations of cortical volume, thickness, surface and density in the intermediate sporadic Parkinson's disease from the Han population of Mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Deng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many symptoms of sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD can’t be completely explained by the lesion of simple typical extrapyramidal circuit between striatum and substantia nigra. Therefore, we investigated the alteration of cortical volume, thickness, surface and density in the intermediate sPD from the Han population of Mainland China in order to find the new pathological brain regions associated with the complex clinical manifestations of sPD. The cortical volume, thickness, surface and density were examined using the voxel-based cortical morphometry and corticometry on magnetic resonance image (MRI in 67 intermediate sPD and 35 controls, the multiple adjusted comparisons analysis of all MRI data were employed to assess the relationships between the cortical morphometric alteration in the specific brain regions and sPD. Results showed that a significantly shrunk volume, thinned thickness and enlarged or reduced surface of cortex in some specific brain regions were closely associated with sPD, but all cortical densities were not different. The majority of morphometric alteration of hemisphere cortex was symmetric, but that in the left hemisphere was more significant. The cortical morphometric alterations in the frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital and limbic lobe, cerebellum, caudate and thalamus were closely related to the clinical neural dysfunction (Clinical manifestations of sPD. Our data indicated that the deficits of extensive brain regions involved in the development of sPD, resulted in a series of correspondent complex clinical manifestations in the disease.

  19. Association of common genetic variants in GPCPD1 with scaling of visual cortical surface area in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Trygve E; Roddey, J Cooper; Djurovic, Srdjan; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Casey, B J; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M; Gruen, Jeffrey R; Jernigan, Terry L; Kaufmann, Walter E; Kenet, Tal; Kennedy, David N; Kuperman, Joshua M; Murray, Sarah S; Sowell, Elizabeth R; Rimol, Lars M; Mattingsdal, Morten; Melle, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Schork, Nicholas J; Dale, Anders M; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q; Toga, Arthur W; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C; Saykin, Andrew J; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Montine, Tom; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Harvey, Danielle; Kornak, John; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Cairns, Nigel J; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J Q; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M Y; Korecka, Magdalena; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L; Lord, Joanne L; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S; Bell, Karen L; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R; Coleman, R Edward; Arnold, Steven E; Karlawish, Jason H; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M; Porsteinsson, Anton P; Goldstein, Bonnie S; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M; Ismail, M Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James J; Cellar, Janet S; Burns, Jeffrey M; Anderson, Heather S; Swerdlow, Russell H; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H S; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H; Carson, Richard E; MacAvoy, Martha G; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Ging-Yuek; Hsiung, Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Potkin, Steven G; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B; Schwartz, Eben S; Sink, Kaycee M; Williamson, Jeff D; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabether; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Jernigan, Terry; McCabe, Connor; Grant, Ellen; Ernst, Thomas; Kuperman, Josh; Chung, Yoon; Murray, Sarah; Bloss, Cinnamon; Darst, Burcu; Pritchett, Lexi; Saito, Ashley; Amaral, David; DiNino, Mishaela; Eyngorina, Bella; Sowell, Elizabeth; Houston, Suzanne; Soderberg, Lindsay; Kaufmann, Walter; van Zijl, Peter; Rizzo-Busack, Hilda; Javid, Mohsin; Mehta, Natasha; Ruberry, Erika; Powers, Alisa; Rosen, Bruce; Gebhard, Nitzah; Manigan, Holly; Frazier, Jean; Kennedy, David; Yakutis, Lauren; Hill, Michael; Gruen, Jeffrey; Bosson-Heenan, Joan; Carlson, Heatherly

    2012-03-06

    Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (P(combined) = 3.2 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 × 10(-9)) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5' UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception.

  20. SMOS sea surface salinity maps of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Martinez, Justino; Portabella, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Salinity and temperature gradients drive the thermohaline circulation of the oceans, and play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The strong and direct interactions between the ocean and the cryosphere (primarily through sea ice and ice shelves) is also a key ingredient of the thermohaline circulation. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, launched in 2009, has the objective measuring soil moisture over the continents and sea surface salinity over the oceans. Although the mission was originally conceived for hydrological and oceanographic studies [1], SMOS is also making inroads in the cryospheric monitoring. SMOS carries an innovative L-band (1.4 GHz, or 21-cm wavelength), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but a more frequent one at the poles. Although the SMOS radiometer operating frequency offers almost the maximum sensitivity of the brightness temperature (TB) to sea surface salinity (SSS) variations, this is rather low, , i.e.,: 90% of ocean SSS values span a range of brightness temperatures of only 5K at L-band. This sensitivity is particularly low in cold waters. This implies that the SSS retrieval requires high radiometric performance. Since the SMOS launch, SSS Level 3 maps have been distributed by several expert laboratories including the Barcelona Expert Centre (BEC). However, since the TB sensitivity to SSS decreases with decreasing sea surface temperature (SST), large retrieval errors had been reported when retrieving salinity values at latitudes above 50⁰N. Two new processing algorithms, recently developed at BEC, have led to a considerable improvement of the SMOS data, allowing for the first time to derive SSS maps in cold waters. The first one is to empirically characterize and correct the systematic biases with six

  1. Raman mapping of intact biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Julie K.; Heighton, Lynne; Xu, Yunfeng; Nou, Xiangwu; Schmidt, Walter F.

    2016-05-01

    Many issues occur when microbial bacteria contaminates human food or water; it can be dangerous to the public. Determining how the microbial are growing, it can help experts determine how to prevent the outbreaks. Biofilms are a tightly group of microbial cells that grow on living surfaces or surrounding themselves. Though biofilms are not necessarily uniform; when there are more than one type of microbial bacteria that are grown, Raman mapping is performed to determine the growth patterns. Depending on the type of microbial bacteria, they can grow in various patterns such as symmetrical or scattered on the surface. The biofilms need to be intact in order to preclude and potentially figuring out the relative intensity of different components in a biofilm mixture. In addition, it is important to determine whether one biofilms is a substrate for another biofilm to be detected. For example, it is possible if layer B appears above layer A, but layer A doesn't appear above layer B. In this case, three types of biofilms that are grown includes Listeria(L), Ralstonia(R), and a mixture of the two (LR). Since microbe deposits on metal surfaces are quite suitable, biofilms were grown on stainless steel surface slides. Each slide was viewed under a Raman Microscope at 100X and using a 532nm laser to provide great results and sharp peaks. The mapping of the laser helps determine how the bacteria growth, at which intensity the bacteria appeared in order to identify specific microbes to signature markers on biofilms.

  2. Compositional Mapping of the Surfaces of Europa and Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Eberhard; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.; Postberg, F.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Trieloff, M.

    2010-10-01

    The determination of the global surface compositions of Europa and Ganymede is a prime objective of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). Classical methods to analyze surfaces of airless planetary objects are IR and gamma ray spectroscopy, and neutron backscatter measurements. Here we present a complementary method to analyze dust particles as samples of planetary objects from which they were released. All airless moons and planets are exposed to the ambient meteoroid bombardment that erodes the surface and generates ejecta particles. The Galileo dust detector (Krueger et al., Icarus, 164, 170, 2003) discovered tenuous ejecta clouds around all Galilean satellites. In-situ mass spectroscopic analysis of these dust particles impacting onto a detector of an orbiting spacecraft reveals their composition. Depending on the altitude from which the dust measurements are taken, the position of origin on the surface can be determined with at least corresponding resolution. Since the detection rates are on the order of thousands per day, spatially resolved maps of the surface composition can be obtained. This `dust spectrometer’ approach provides key chemical and isotopic constraints for varying provinces on the surfaces, leading to better understanding of the body's geological evolution. Traces of mineral or organic components in an ice matrix can be identified and quantified even at low impact speeds >1 km/s. Compositional measurements by the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer of ice grains emitted from Enceladus probed the deep interior of this satellite (Postberg et al., Nature, 459, 1098, 2009). New instrumentation has been developed that meet or exceeded the capabilities in sensitivity and mass resolution of all previous dust analyzers. The deployment of such dust analyzers on the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) missions will provide unprecedented information on the surface compositions of these satellites and their potential activity.

  3. Surface Towed CSEM Systems for Shallow Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, J.; Constable, S.; Kannberg, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a low-power, surface towed electric dipole-dipole system suitable for mapping seafloor geology in shallow water and deployable from small boats. The transmitter is capable of up to 50 amps output using 12 VDC from a 110/240 VAC power supply, and can generate an arbitrary GPS stabilized ternary waveform. Transmitter antennas are typically 50 to 100 m long. Receivers are built around the standard Scripps seafloor electrode, amplifier, and logging systems but housed in floating PVC cases and equipped with GPS timing and positioning, pitch/roll/heading sensors, and accelerometers. Receiver dipoles are 1.5 m long rigid booms held 1 m below the surface. As with the Scripps deep-towed Vulcan system, rigid antennas are used to avoid noise associated with flexible antennas moving across Earth's magnetic field. The tow cable is a simple floating rope up to 1000 m long. Water depth and conductivity are sampled continuously in order to provide constraints for apparent resistivity calculations and inversion, and moored seafloor recorders can be used to extend transmitter/receiver offsets. The entire system can be air freighted and transported in one utility vehicle. We will present results from a study to map permafrost in shallow water off Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

  4. CosmoQuest: A software platform for surface feature mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Pamela

    2016-07-01

    While many tools exist for allowing individuals to mark features in images, it has previously been unwieldy to get entire teams collaboratively mapping out surface features, and to statistically compare each team members contributions. Our CSB software was initially developed to facilitate crowd-sourcing projects, including CosmoQuest's "Moon Mappers" project. Statistically study of its results (Robbins et al 2014) has shown that professionals using this software get results that are as good as those they get using other commonly used software packages. This has lead to an expansion of the software to facilitate professional science use of the software. In order to allow the greatest use of CSB, and to facilitate better science collaboration, CosmoQuest now allows teams to create private projects. Basic features include: using their own data sets, allowing multiple team members to annotate the images, performing basic statistics on the resulting data, downloading all results in either .sql or .csv formats. In this presentation, we will overview how best to use CSB to improve your own science collaboration. Current applications include surface science and transient object identification, and published results include both crater maps and the discovery of KBOs.

  5. Cortical motor hand area. Validation of functional magnetic resonance imaging by intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping; Das motorische Handareal. Nichtinvasiver Nachweis mittels fMRT und operative Validierung mit kortikaler Stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousry, T. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Schmid, U.D. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Schmidt, D. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Heiss, D. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Innenstadt, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Jassoy, A. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Innenstadt, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Eisner, W. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Reulen, H.J. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Reiser, M. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1995-04-01

    In this study, activation of cortical sites by specific motor tasks (opening and closing of the hand) was examined by fMRI utilizing the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) technique. fMRI was employed in five volunteers and in six patients with tumors in the vicinity of the central region. In the patients, the fMRI data and intraoperative cortical mapping were compared. Our results indicate good correlation of these two methods and that there are no significant differences in the localization of the motor hand area. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) ermoeglicht die nichtinvasive Lokalisation bestimmter Hirnfunktionen mit hoher raeumlicher Aufloesung. Um zu ueberpruefen, ob die mittels fMRT dargestellten Signalintensitaetsaenderungen wirklich dem Repraesentationsareal einer definierten Funktion entspricht, verglichen wir bei einem Patientenkollektiv die Resultate der fMRT mit den Ergebnissen der intraoperativen motorischen Kortexstimulation. Es zeigte sich, dass Lokalisation und Ausdehnung des von uns untersuchten motorischen Handareals bei beiden Methoden uebereinstimmte. Unsere Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die kortikale Repraesentation des motorischen Handareals durch fMRT mit hoher raeumlicher Aufloesung und nichtinvasiv lokalisiert werden kann. (orig.)

  6. Cortical and white matter mapping in the visual system-more than meets the eye: on the importance of functional imaging to understand visual system pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Noa; Levin, Netta

    2014-01-01

    Information transmission within the visual system is highly organized with the ultimate goal of accomplishing higher-order, complex visuo-spatial and object identity processing. Perception is dependent on the intactness of the entire system and damage at each stage-in the eye itself, the visual pathways, or within cortical processing-might result in perception disturbance. Herein we will review several examples of lesions along the visual system, from the retina, via the optic nerve and chiasm and through the occipital cortex. We will address their clinical manifestation and their cortical substrate. The latter will be studied via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), enabling cortical, and white matter mapping of the human brain. In contrast to traditional signal recording, these procedures enable simultaneous evaluation of the entire brain network engaged when subjects undertake a particular task or evaluate the entirety of associated white matter pathways. These examples provided will highlight the importance of using advanced imaging methods to better understand visual pathologies. We will argue that clinical manifestation cannot always be explained solely by structural damage and a functional view is required to understand the clinical symptom. In such cases we recommend using advanced imaging methods to better understand the neurological basis of visual phenomena.

  7. Cortical and white matter mapping in the visual system- more than meets theeye: on the importance of functional imaging to understand visual systempathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa eRaz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Information transmission within the visual system is highly organized with the ultimate goal of accomplishing higher-order, complex visuo-spatial and object identity processing. Perception is dependent on the intactness of the entire system and damage at each stage – in the eye itself, the visual pathways, or within cortical processing - might result in perception disturbance.Herein we will review several examples of lesions along the visual system, from the retina, via the optic nerve and chiasm and through the occipital cortex. We will address their clinical manifestation and their cortical substrate. The latter will be studied via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, enabling cortical and white matter mapping of the human brain. In contrast to traditional signal recording, these procedures enable simultaneous evaluation of the entire brain network engaged when subjects undertake a particular task or evaluate the entirety of associated white matter pathways.These examples provided will highlight the importance of using advanced imaging methods to better understand visual pathologies. We will argue that clinical manifestation cannot always be explained solely by structural damage and a functional view is required to understand the clinical symptom. In such cases we recommend using advanced imaging methods to better understand the neurological basis of visual phenomena.

  8. Mapping cardiac surface mechanics with structured light imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughner, Jacob I; Zhang, Song; Li, Hao; Shao, Connie C; Efimov, Igor R

    2012-09-15

    Cardiovascular disease often manifests as a combination of pathological electrical and structural heart remodeling. The relationship between mechanics and electrophysiology is crucial to our understanding of mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and the treatment of cardiac disease. While several technologies exist for describing whole heart electrophysiology, studies of cardiac mechanics are often limited to rhythmic patterns or small sections of tissue. Here, we present a comprehensive system based on ultrafast three-dimensional (3-D) structured light imaging to map surface dynamics of whole heart cardiac motion. Additionally, we introduce a novel nonrigid motion-tracking algorithm based on an isometry-maximizing optimization framework that forms correspondences between consecutive 3-D frames without the use of any fiducial markers. By combining our 3-D imaging system with nonrigid surface registration, we are able to measure cardiac surface mechanics at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. In conclusion, we demonstrate accurate cardiac deformation at over 200,000 surface points of a rabbit heart recorded at 200 frames/s and validate our results on highly contrasting heart motions during normal sinus rhythm, ventricular pacing, and ventricular fibrillation.

  9. Global permittivity mapping of the Martian surface from SHARAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, Luigi; Mège, Daniel; Gurgurewicz, Joanna; Orosei, Roberto; Alberti, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    SHARAD is a subsurface sounding radar aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, capable of detecting dielectric discontinuities in the subsurface caused by compositional and/or structural changes. Echoes coming from the surface contain information on geometric properties at metre scale and on the permittivity of the upper layers of the Martian crust. A model has been developed to estimate the effect of surface roughness on echo power, depending on statistical parameters such as RMS height and topothesy. Such model is based on the assumption that topography can be characterized as a self-affine fractal, and its use allows the estimation of the dielectric properties of the first few metres of the Martian soil. A permittivity map of the surface of Mars is obtained, covering several large regions across the planet surface. The most significant correspondence with geology is observed at the dichotomy boundary, with high dielectric constant on the highlands side (7 to over 10) and lower on the lowlands side (3 to 7). Other geological correlations are discussed.

  10. Rapid Mapping of Surface Rupture from the South Napa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, C. C.; Morelan, A. E., III; Oskin, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid documentation (3D data collection technique known as Structure from Motion (SfM), used in conjunction with traditional field reconnaissance, enabled us to rapidly locate and document surface ruptures from the Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake. On the morning of the event, our field team used information available on social media to identify locations with potential surface rupture. Preliminary observations of surface rupture (measurements and geo-tagged photographs) were texted to the office-based team member who created digital maps of the rupture trace and shared them online via Twitter in near-real time. We documented many ephemeral features (such as offset roads, curbs, and driveways) along the rupture trace within 12 hours of the event, before these features were destroyed by road and infrastructure repair. We were able to return to most sites again within several days, allowing us to document continuing slip and create time-series datasets of offset features. After the collection and re-collection of data at selected sites, we made detailed measurements remotely using 3D models constructed with SfM. The ability to quantitatively project features into the fault plane using these models allows for accurate measurements of small features often difficult to observe and quantify in the field. Traditionally, even preliminary maps of rupture extent and offset magnitudes are not available for several days after an event because office-based processing and compilation is required. Because we were able to compile our data in real time, we distributed our results while they were still valuable for ongoing scientific response. Our work helped other science teams efficiently target fieldwork and instrument deployment; for example, one geodetic survey team used our surface rupture map to adjust their field deployment plans in an effort to capture rapidly-decaying postseismic movement. With social media and rapid, inexpensive data collection methods like SfM in mind

  11. Different temporal structure for form versus surface cortical color systems--evidence from chromatic non-linear VEP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Crewther

    Full Text Available Physiological studies of color processing have typically measured responses to spatially varying chromatic stimuli such as gratings, while psychophysical studies of color include color naming, color and light, as well as spatial and temporal chromatic sensitivities. This raises the question of whether we have one or several cortical color processing systems. Here we show from non-linear analysis of human visual evoked potentials (VEP the presence of distinct and independent temporal signatures for form and surface color processing. Surface color stimuli produced most power in the second order Wiener kernel, indicative of a slowly recovering neural system, while chromatic form stimulation produced most power in the first order kernel (showing rapid recovery. We find end-spectral saturation-dependent signals, easily separable from achromatic signals for surface color stimuli. However physiological responses to form color stimuli, though varying somewhat with saturation, showed similar waveform components. Lastly, the spectral dependence of surface and form color VEP was different, with the surface color responses almost vanishing with yellow-grey isoluminant stimulation whereas the form color VEP shows robust recordable signals across all hues. Thus, surface and form colored stimuli engage different neural systems within cortex, pointing to the need to establish their relative contributions under the diverse chromatic stimulus conditions used in the literature.

  12. Different temporal structure for form versus surface cortical color systems--evidence from chromatic non-linear VEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewther, David P; Crewther, Sheila G

    2010-12-20

    Physiological studies of color processing have typically measured responses to spatially varying chromatic stimuli such as gratings, while psychophysical studies of color include color naming, color and light, as well as spatial and temporal chromatic sensitivities. This raises the question of whether we have one or several cortical color processing systems. Here we show from non-linear analysis of human visual evoked potentials (VEP) the presence of distinct and independent temporal signatures for form and surface color processing. Surface color stimuli produced most power in the second order Wiener kernel, indicative of a slowly recovering neural system, while chromatic form stimulation produced most power in the first order kernel (showing rapid recovery). We find end-spectral saturation-dependent signals, easily separable from achromatic signals for surface color stimuli. However physiological responses to form color stimuli, though varying somewhat with saturation, showed similar waveform components. Lastly, the spectral dependence of surface and form color VEP was different, with the surface color responses almost vanishing with yellow-grey isoluminant stimulation whereas the form color VEP shows robust recordable signals across all hues. Thus, surface and form colored stimuli engage different neural systems within cortex, pointing to the need to establish their relative contributions under the diverse chromatic stimulus conditions used in the literature.

  13. Independent measurement of femoral cortical thickness and cortical bone density using clinical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treece, G M; Gee, A H

    2015-02-01

    The local structure of the proximal femoral cortex is of interest since both fracture risk, and the effects of various interventions aimed at reducing that risk, are associated with cortical properties focused in particular regions rather than dispersed over the whole bone. Much of the femoral cortex is less than 3mm thick, appearing so blurred in clinical CT that its actual density is not apparent in the data, and neither thresholding nor full-width half-maximum techniques are capable of determining its width. Our previous work on cortical bone mapping showed how to produce more accurate estimates of cortical thickness by assuming a fixed value of the cortical density for each hip. However, although cortical density varies much less over the proximal femur than thickness, what little variation there is leads to errors in thickness measurement. In this paper, we develop the cortical bone mapping technique by exploiting local estimates of imaging blur to correct the global density estimate, thus providing a local density estimate as well as more accurate estimates of thickness. We also consider measurement of cortical mass surface density and the density of trabecular bone immediately adjacent to the cortex. Performance is assessed with ex vivo clinical QCT scans of proximal femurs, with true values derived from high resolution HRpQCT scans of the same bones. We demonstrate superior estimation of thickness than is possible with alternative techniques (accuracy 0.12 ± 0.39 mm for cortices in the range 1-3mm), and that local cortical density estimation is feasible for densities >800 mg/cm(3).

  14. Photoinduced surface voltage mapping study for large perovskite single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liu, Yucheng; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhou [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Liu, Shengzhong, E-mail: liusz@snnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, iChEM, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2016-05-02

    Using a series of illumination sources, including white light (tungsten-halogen lamp), 445-nm, 532-nm, 635-nm, and 730-nm lasers, the surface photovoltage (SPV) images were mapped for centimeter-sized CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbX{sub 3} (X = Cl, Br, I) perovskite single crystals using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The significant SPV signals were observed to be wavelength-dependent. We attribute the appreciable SPV to the built-in electric field in the space charge region. This study shines light into the understanding of photoinduced charge generation and separation processes at nanoscale to help advance the development of perovskite solar cells, optoelectronics, laser, photodetector, and light-emitting diode (LED).

  15. Surface towed electromagnetic system for mapping of subsea Arctic permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Dallas; Kannberg, Peter; Constable, Steven

    2017-02-01

    Sea level has risen globally since the late Pleistocene, resulting in permafrost-bearing coastal zones in the Arctic being submerged and subjected to temperature induced degradation. Knowing the extent of permafrost and how it changes over time is important for climate change predictions and for planning engineering activities in the Arctic environment. We developed a controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method to obtain information on the depth, thickness, and lateral extent of marine permafrost. To operate in shallow water we used a surface towed electric dipole-dipole CSEM system suitable for deployment from small boats. This system was used to map permafrost on the Arctic shelf offshore Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. Our results show significant lateral variability in the presence of permafrost, with the thickest layers associated with a large river outflow where freshwater influx seems to have a preserving effect on relict subsea permafrost.

  16. Photoinduced surface voltage mapping study for large perovskite single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liu, Yucheng; Gao, Fei; Yang, Zhou; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2016-05-01

    Using a series of illumination sources, including white light (tungsten-halogen lamp), 445-nm, 532-nm, 635-nm, and 730-nm lasers, the surface photovoltage (SPV) images were mapped for centimeter-sized CH3NH3PbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) perovskite single crystals using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The significant SPV signals were observed to be wavelength-dependent. We attribute the appreciable SPV to the built-in electric field in the space charge region. This study shines light into the understanding of photoinduced charge generation and separation processes at nanoscale to help advance the development of perovskite solar cells, optoelectronics, laser, photodetector, and light-emitting diode (LED).

  17. Cortical cartography and Caret software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Essen, David C

    2012-08-15

    Caret software is widely used for analyzing and visualizing many types of fMRI data, often in conjunction with experimental data from other modalities. This article places Caret's development in a historical context that spans three decades of brain mapping--from the early days of manually generated flat maps to the nascent field of human connectomics. It also highlights some of Caret's distinctive capabilities. This includes the ease of visualizing data on surfaces and/or volumes and on atlases as well as individual subjects. Caret can display many types of experimental data using various combinations of overlays (e.g., fMRI activation maps, cortical parcellations, areal boundaries), and it has other features that facilitate the analysis and visualization of complex neuroimaging datasets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recording human electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals for neuroscientific research and real-time functional cortical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, N Jeremy; Gupta, Disha; Brunner, Peter; Gunduz, Aysegul; Adamo, Matthew A; Ritaccio, Anthony; Schalk, Gerwin

    2012-06-26

    nearby critical brain areas (i.e., eloquent cortex) where resection could result in long-term functional deficits. To implant electrodes, a craniotomy is performed to open the skull. Then, electrode grids and/or strips are placed on the cortex, usually beneath the dura. A typical grid has a set of 8 x 8 platinum-iridium electrodes of 4 mm diameter (2.3 mm exposed surface) embedded in silicon with an inter-electrode distance of 1cm. A strip typically contains 4 or 6 such electrodes in a single line. The locations for these grids/strips are planned by a team of neurologists and neurosurgeons, and are based on previous EEG monitoring, on a structural MRI of the patient's brain, and on relevant factors of the patient's history. Continuous recording over a period of 5-12 days serves to localize epileptic foci, and electrical stimulation via the implanted electrodes allows clinicians to map eloquent cortex. At the end of the monitoring period, explantation of the electrodes and therapeutic resection are performed together in one procedure. In addition to its primary clinical purpose, invasive monitoring also provides a unique opportunity to acquire human ECoG data for neuroscientific research. The decision to include a prospective patient in the research is based on the planned location of their electrodes, on the patient's performance scores on neuropsychological assessments, and on their informed consent, which is predicated on their understanding that participation in research is optional and is not related to their treatment. As with all research involving human subjects, the research protocol must be approved by the hospital's institutional review board. The decision to perform individual experimental tasks is made day-by-day, and is contingent on the patient's endurance and willingness to participate. Some or all of the experiments may be prevented by problems with the clinical state of the patient, such as post-operative facial swelling, temporary aphasia, frequent

  19. Revised potentiometric-surface map, Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ervin, E.M.; Luckey, R.R.; Burkhardt, D.J.

    1994-12-01

    The revised potentiometric-surface map presented in this report updates earlier maps of the Yucca Mountain area using mainly 1988 average water levels. Because of refinements in the corrections to the water-level measurements, these water levels have increased accuracy and precision over older values. The small-gradient area to the southeast of Yucca Mountain is contoured with a 0.25-meter interval and ranges in water-level altitude from 728.5 to 73 1.0 meters. Other areas with different water levels, to the north and west of Yucca Mountain, are illustrated with shaded patterns. The potentiometric surface can be divided into three regions: (1) A small-gradient area to the southeast of Yucca Mountain, which may be explained by flow through high-transmissivity rocks or low ground-water flux through the area; (2) A moderate-gradient area, on the western side of Yucca Mountain, where the water-level altitude ranges from 775 to 780 meters, and appears to be impeded by the Solitario Canyon Fault and a splay of that fault; and (3) A large-gradient area, to the north-northeast of Yucca Mountain, where water level altitude ranges from 738 to 1,035 meters, possibly as a result of a semi-perched groundwater system. Water levels from wells at Yucca Mountain were examined for yearly trends using linear least-squares regression. Data from five wells exhibited trends which were statistically significant, but some of those may be a result of slow equilibration of the water level from drilling in less permeable rocks. Adjustments for temperature and density changes in the deep wells with long fluid columns were attempted, but some of the adjusted data did not fit the surrounding data and, thus, were not used.

  20. Revised potentiometric-surface map, Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, E.M.; Luckey, R.R.; Burkhardt, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The revised potentiometric-surface map presented in this report updates earlier maps of the Yucca Mountain area using mainly 1988 average water levels. Because of refinements in the corrections to the water-level measurements, these water levels have increased accuracy and precision over older values. The small-gradient area to the southeast of Yucca Mountain is contoured with a 0.25-meter interval and ranges in water-level altitude from 728.5 to 731.0 meters. Other areas with different water levels, to the north and west of Yucca Mountain, are illustrated with shaded patterns. The potentiometric surface can be divided into three regions: 1) A small-gradient area to the southeast of Yucca Mountain, which may be explained by flow through high-transmissivity rocks or low ground-water flux through the area; 2) A moderate-gradient area, on the western side of Yucca Mountain, where the water-level altitude ranges from 775 to 780 meters, and appears to be impeded by the Solitario Canyon Fault and a splay of that fault; and 3) A large-gradient area, to the north-northeast of Yucca Mountain, where water level altitude ranges from 738 to 1,035 meters, possibly as a result of a semi-perched groundwater system. Water levels from wells at Yucca Mountain were examined for yearly trends (1986-89) using linear least-squares regression. Data from five wells exhibited trends which were statistically significant, but some of those may be a result of slow equilibration of the water level from drilling in less permeable rocks. Adjustments for temperature and density changes in the deep wells with long fluid columns were attempted, but some of the adjusted data did not fit the surrounding data and, thus, were not used.

  1. Comparison of grey matter volume and thickness for analysing cortical changes in chronic schizophrenia: a matter of surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast, and curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Li; Herold, Christina J; Zöllner, Frank; Salat, David H; Lässer, Marc M; Schmid, Lena A; Fellhauer, Iven; Thomann, Philipp A; Essig, Marco; Schad, Lothar R; Erickson, Kirk I; Schröder, Johannes

    2015-02-28

    Grey matter volume and cortical thickness are the two most widely used measures for detecting grey matter morphometric changes in various diseases such as schizophrenia. However, these two measures only share partial overlapping regions in identifying morphometric changes. Few studies have investigated the contributions of the potential factors to the differences of grey matter volume and cortical thickness. To investigate this question, 3T magnetic resonance images from 22 patients with schizophrenia and 20 well-matched healthy controls were chosen for analyses. Grey matter volume and cortical thickness were measured by VBM and Freesurfer. Grey matter volume results were then rendered onto the surface template of Freesurfer to compare the differences from cortical thickness in anatomical locations. Discrepancy regions of the grey matter volume and thickness where grey matter volume significantly decreased but without corresponding evidence of cortical thinning involved the rostral middle frontal, precentral, lateral occipital and superior frontal gyri. Subsequent region-of-interest analysis demonstrated that changes in surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast and curvature accounted for the discrepancies. Our results suggest that the differences between grey matter volume and thickness could be jointly driven by surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast and curvature.

  2. Quantitative map of multiple auditory cortical regions with a stereotaxic fine-scale atlas of the mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroaki Tsukano; Masao Horie; Ryuichi Hishida; Kuniyuki Takahashi; Hirohide Takebayashi; Katsuei Shibuki

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging studies have recently revealed the presence of multiple auditory cortical regions in the mouse brain. We have previously demonstrated, using flavoprotein fluorescence imaging, at least six regions in the mouse auditory cortex, including the anterior auditory field (AAF), primary auditory cortex (AI), the secondary auditory field (AII), dorsoanterior field (DA), dorsomedial field (DM), and dorsoposterior field (DP). While multiple regions in the visual cortex and somatosensory ...

  3. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Yao; Albert Chen; Todd Kuiken; Carolina Carmona; Julius Dewald

    2015-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR). As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via th...

  4. Quantifying the spatial variability in critical zone architecture through surface mapping and near-surface geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBiase, R.; Del Vecchio, J.; Mount, G.; Hayes, J. L.; Comas, X.; Guo, L.; Lin, H.; Zarif, F.; Forsythe, B.; Brantley, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The composition and structure of Earth's surface and shallow subsurface control the flux of water, solutes, and sediment from hillslopes into rivers. Additionally, bedrock weathering profiles and the stratigraphy of soil and colluvium preserve a record of past surface processes. However, landscapes often exhibit heterogeneity in critical zone architecture that is difficult to capture with remote sensing and costly to characterize through direct measurement in soil pits or drill cores. Here we present results from a multifaceted approach to quantifying spatial variability in critical zone architecture using airborne lidar topography, surface mapping, and a suite of geophysical surveys. We focus on Garner Run, a first order sandstone catchment in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory situated in the valley and ridge province of central Pennsylvania, 80 km southwest of the last glacial maximum ice limit. Results from lidar topographic analysis and detailed mapping of surface cover (e.g., soil versus boulder-mantled) reveal a pattern of relict periglacial landforms and deposits that vary depending on slope position and aspect. Additionally, a drill core taken from an unchanneled valley at the head of Garner Run indicates at least 9 meters of alternating sand- and boulder-rich colluvial fill sourced from adjacent hillslopes, indicating the potential preservation of multiple cycles of periglacial climate conditions. Through the use of shallow geophysical techniques, including cross-valley transects of seismic refraction, multiple frequency ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), we image spatial patterns in subsurface architecture at a range of scales (10-1,000 m), and high spatial resolution (cm). Notably, despite challenging environmental conditions, there is agreement among diverse subsurface methods in highlighting aspect-dependent controls on weathering zone thickness that furthermore can be directly connected to

  5. Quantitative comparison of cortical surface reconstructions from MP2RAGE and multi-echo MPRAGE data at 3 and 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Kyoko; Polimeni, Jonathan R; van der Kouwe, André J W; Reuter, Martin; Kober, Tobias; Benner, Thomas; Fischl, Bruce; Wald, Lawrence L

    2014-04-15

    The Magnetization-Prepared 2 Rapid Acquisition Gradient Echo (MP2RAGE) method achieves spatially uniform contrast across the entire brain between gray matter and surrounding white matter tissue and cerebrospinal fluid by rapidly acquiring data at two points during an inversion recovery, and then combining the two volumes so as to cancel out sources of intensity and contrast bias, making it useful for neuroimaging studies at ultrahigh field strengths (≥7T). To quantify the effectiveness of the MP2RAGE method for quantitative morphometric neuroimaging, we performed tissue segmentation and cerebral cortical surface reconstruction of the MP2RAGE data and compared the results with those generated from conventional multi-echo MPRAGE (MEMPRAGE) data across a group of healthy subjects. To do so, we developed a preprocessing scheme for the MP2RAGE image data to allow for automatic cortical segmentation and surface reconstruction using FreeSurfer and analysis methods to compare the positioning of the surface meshes. Using image volumes with 1mm isotropic voxels we found a scan-rescan reproducibility of cortical thickness estimates to be 0.15 mm (or 6%) for the MEMPRAGE data and a slightly lower reproducibility of 0.19 mm (or 8%) for the MP2RAGE data. We also found that the thickness estimates were systematically smaller in the MP2RAGE data, and that both the interior and exterior cortical boundaries estimated from the MP2RAGE data were consistently positioned within the corresponding boundaries estimated from the MEMPRAGE data. Therefore several measureable differences exist in the appearance of cortical gray matter and its effect on automatic segmentation methods that must be considered when choosing an acquisition or segmentation method for studies requiring cortical surface reconstructions. We propose potential extensions to the MP2RAGE method that may help to reduce or eliminate these discrepancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. COUNTING ROOTED NEAR-4-REGULAR EULERIAN MAPS ON SOME SURFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenHan; LiuYanpei

    1999-01-01

    In this article the rooted planar near-4-regular Eulerian trails are enumerated and an explicit formula for such maps is presented. Further, the rooted near-4-regular Eulerian maps on the torus are counted in an exact way.

  7. ENSO signature in the SMOS sea surface salinity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabrera, J.; Umbert, M.; Hoareau, N.; Turiel, A.; Font, J.

    2012-12-01

    Until recently, the role of salinity observations in the operational simulation and prediction of ENSO was neglected because of the historical lack of observations and because leading intermediate coupled models had significant predictive skill without directly accounting for salinity effects. In Ballabrera-Poy et al., (2002), the potential role of sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on the statistical predictions of ENSO was investigated. It was shown that, although SSS observations would play little role in statistical nowcasts of ENSO, they would provide a significant role in the 6-12 month predictions. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer opportunity mission was launched on November 2, 2009, becoming the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring SSS from space with the help of MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis), a novel two-dimensional interferometer operating at L-band (1.4 GHz). Although the L-band frequency is the optimal for ocean salinity measurements, the retrieval of SSS information requires special care because of the low sensitivity of the brightness temperature to SSS: from 0.2-0.8 K per salinity unit. Maps of 10-day averages of SSS in 1x1 degree boxes are distributed by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre on Radiometric Calibration and Ocean Salinity (SMOS-BEC, http://www.smos-bec.icm.csic.es). These maps are derived from the SMOS reprocessing campaign released to the SMOS user community in March 2011, and span the period from January 2010 through December 2011. The current accuracy of these SSS maps ranges from 0.2-0.4, depending on the ocean region being considered (Umbert et al., 2012). During the period of the reprocessing campaign, the equatorial Pacific has been in a quasi-continuous La Niña state. During the cold phases of ENSO, positive anomalies of SSS are expected with a largest anomalous values in the western warm-fresh pool. The anomalies

  8. Characterization of interictal epileptiform discharges with time-resolved cortical current maps using the helmholtz-hodge decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Jeremy D; Khan, Sheraz; Li, Zhimin; Castillo, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Source estimates performed using a single equivalent current dipole (ECD) model for interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) which appear unifocal have proven highly accurate in neocortical epilepsies, falling within millimeters of that demonstrated by electrocorticography. Despite this success, the single ECD solution is limited, best describing sources which are temporally stable. Adapted from the field of optics, optical flow analysis of distributed source models of MEG or EEG data has been proposed as a means to estimate the current motion field of cortical activity, or "cortical flow." The motion field so defined can be used to identify dynamic features of interest such as patterns of directional flow, current sources, and sinks. The Helmholtz-Hodge Decomposition (HHD) is a technique frequently applied in fluid dynamics to separate a flow pattern into three components: (1) a non-rotational scalar potential U describing sinks and sources, (2) a non-diverging scalar potential A accounting for vortices, and (3) an harmonic vector field H. As IEDs seem likely to represent periods of highly correlated directional flow of cortical currents, the U component of the HHD suggests itself as a way to characterize spikes in terms of current sources and sinks. In a series of patients with refractory epilepsy who were studied with magnetoencephalography as part of their evaluation for possible resective surgery, spike localization with ECD was compared to HHD applied to an optical flow analysis of the same spike. Reasonable anatomic correlation between the two techniques was seen in the majority of patients, suggesting that this method may offer an additional means of characterization of epileptic discharges.

  9. Laser-scanning astrocyte mapping reveals increased glutamate-responsive domain size and disrupted maturation of glutamate uptake following neonatal cortical freeze-lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortiz eArmbruster

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytic uptake of glutamate shapes extracellular neurotransmitter dynamics, receptor activation, and synaptogenesis. During development, glutamate transport becomes more robust. How neonatal brain insult affects the functional maturation of glutamate transport remains unanswered. Neonatal brain insult can lead to developmental delays, cognitive losses, and epilepsy; the disruption of glutamate transport is known to cause changes in synaptogenesis, receptor activation, and seizure. Using the neonatal freeze-lesion (FL model, we have investigated how insult affects the maturation of astrocytic glutamate transport. As lesioning occurs on the day of birth, a time when astrocytes are still functionally immature, this model is ideal for identifying changes in astrocyte maturation following insult. Reactive astrocytosis, astrocyte proliferation, and in vitro hyperexcitability are known to occur in this model. To probe astrocyte glutamate transport with better spatial precision we have developed a novel technique, Laser Scanning Astrocyte Mapping (LSAM, which combines glutamate transport current (TC recording from astrocytes with laser scanning glutamate photolysis. LSAM allows us to identify the area from which a single astrocyte can transport glutamate and to quantify spatial heterogeneity in the rate of glutamate clearance kinetics within that domain. Using LSAM, we report that cortical astrocytes have an increased glutamate-responsive area following FL and that TCs have faster decay times in distal, as compared to proximal processes. Furthermore, the developmental shift from GLAST- to GLT-1-dominated clearance is disrupted following FL. These findings introduce a novel method to probe astrocyte glutamate uptake and show that neonatal cortical FL disrupts the functional maturation of cortical astrocytes.

  10. Time-coherent expansion of MEG/EEG cortical sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Olivier; Garnero, Line

    2002-11-01

    In this study we estimated the spatial extent of cortical areas of time-coherent activity using the inverse problem in magneto/electroencephalography (MEEG). The model discussed here uses classical regularization tools in order to force the inverse solution to be piecewise coherent. First, the cortex was seeded by focal dipolar sources. Then, a time-coherent expansion (TCE) onto the cortical surface was performed in order to obtain surface source models composed of patches with uniform current density. Patches represent extended cortical regions with one single time course per active area. Results obtained from synthetic data show that using the TCE method is relevant even with a low signal-to-noise ratio, although the final estimation is often slightly biased. We applied the TCE method to evoked magnetic fields obtained after electrical stimulation of fingers in order to estimate the somatotopic cortical maps of the primary somatosensory cortex.

  11. Adhesion and growth of electrically-active cortical neurons on polyethyleimine patterns microprinted on PEO-PPO-PEO triblockcopolymer-coated hydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardij, T.G.; Boogaart, van den M.A.F.; Rutten, W.L.C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the adhesion and growth of dissociated cortical neurons on chemically patterned surfaces over a time period of 30 days. The presence of neurons was demonstrated by measurement of spontaneous bioelectrical activity on a micropatterned multielectrode array. Chemical patterns were

  12. Cancer Risk Map for the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss calculations of the median and 95th percentile cancer risks on the surface of Mars for different solar conditions. The NASA Space Radiation Cancer Risk 2010 model is used to estimate gender and age specific cancer incidence and mortality risks for astronauts exploring Mars. Organ specific fluence spectra and doses for large solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic rays (GCR) at various levels of solar activity are simulated using the HZETRN/QMSFRG computer code, and the 2010 version of the Badhwar and O Neill GCR model. The NASA JSC propensity model of SPE fluence and occurrence is used to consider upper bounds on SPE fluence for increasing mission lengths. In the transport of particles through the Mars atmosphere, a vertical distribution of Mars atmospheric thickness is calculated from the temperature and pressure data of Mars Global Surveyor, and the directional cosine distribution is implemented to describe the spherically distributed atmospheric distance along the slant path at each elevation on Mars. The resultant directional shielding by Mars atmosphere at each elevation is coupled with vehicle and body shielding for organ dose estimates. Astronaut cancer risks are mapped on the global topography of Mars, which was measured by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter. Variation of cancer risk on the surface of Mars is due to a 16-km elevation range, and the large difference is obtained between the Tharsis Montes (Ascraeus, Pavonis, and Arsia) and the Hellas impact basin. Cancer incidence risks are found to be about 2-fold higher than mortality risks with a disproportionate increase in skin and thyroid cancers for all astronauts and breast cancer risk for female astronauts. The number of safe days on Mars to be below radiation limits at the 95th percent confidence level is reported for several Mission design scenarios.

  13. On the totally ramified value number of the Gauss map of minimal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kawakami, Yu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we define the totally ramified value number (TRVN) of the Gauss map of a complete minimal surface, and prove that there exist algebraic minimal surfaces that have the TRVN equal to $2.5$.

  14. Lunar Flashlight: Mapping Lunar Surface Volatiles Using a Cubesat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B. A.; Hayne, P. O.; Banazadeh, P.; Baker, J. D.; Staehle, R. L.; Paine, C..; Paige, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Water ice and other volatiles may be located in the Moon's polar regions, with sufficient quantities for in situ extraction and utilization by future human and robotic missions. Evidence from orbiting spacecraft and the LCROSS impactor suggests the presence of surface and/or nearsurface volatiles, including water ice. These deposits are of interest to human exploration to understand their potential for use by astronauts. Understanding the composition, quantity, distribution, and form of water/H species and other volatiles associated with lunar cold traps is identified as a NASA Strategic Knowledge Gap (SKG) for Human Exploration. These polar volatile deposits could also reveal important information about the delivery of water to the Earth- Moon system, so are of scientific interest. The scientific exploration of the lunar polar regions was one of the key recommendations of the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. In order to address NASA's SKGs, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program selected three lowcost 6-U CubeSat missions for launch as secondary payloads on the first test flight (EM1) of the Space Launch System (SLS) scheduled for 2017. The Lunar Flashlight mission was selected as one of these missions, specifically to address the SKG associated with lunar volatiles. Development of the Lunar Flashlight CubeSat concept leverages JPL's Interplanetary Nano- Spacecraft Pathfinder In Relevant Environment (INSPIRE) mission, MSFC's intimate knowledge of the Space Launch System and EM-1 mission, small business development of solar sail and electric propulsion hardware, and JPL experience with specialized miniature sensors. The goal of Lunar Flashlight is to determine the presence or absence of exposed water ice and its physical state, and map its concentration at the kilometer scale within the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. After being ejected in cislunar space by SLS, Lunar Flashlight deploys its solar panels and solar sail and maneuvers

  15. Simultaneous Localization and Mapping for Planetary Surface Mobility Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC and Carnegie Mellon University have formed a partnership to commercially develop localization and mapping technologies for planetary rovers....

  16. Automated, highly reproducible, wide-field, light-based cortical mapping method using a commercial stereo microscope and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Su; Liu, Ya-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Min; Liu, Ke-Fei; Zhang, Ding-Hong; Li, Yi-Ding; Yu, Ai-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Jia-Yi; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong; Zeng, Shao-Qun

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a more flexible optogenetics-based mapping system attached on a stereo microscope, which offers automatic light stimulation to individual regions of interest in the cortex that expresses light-activated channelrhodopsin-2 in vivo. Combining simultaneous recording of electromyography from specific forelimb muscles, we demonstrate that this system offers much better efficiency and precision in mapping distinct domains for controlling limb muscles in the mouse motor cortex. Furthermore, the compact and modular design of the system also yields a simple and flexible implementation to different commercial stereo microscopes, and thus could be widely used among laboratories. PMID:27699114

  17. The telencephalon of the Göttingen minipig, cytoarchitecture and cortical surface anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarkam, Carsten Reides; GLUD, AN; Orlowski, Dariusz;

    2016-01-01

    × 36 mm (length, width, height) and weighs around 69 g. The telencephalic part of the Göttingen minipig cerebrum covers a large surface area, which can be divided into a neocortical gyrencephalic part located dorsal to the rhinal fissure, and a ventral subrhinal part dominated by olfactory, amygdaloid...... subcortical structure of the minipig telencephalon is dominated by a prominent ventricular system and large basal ganglia, wherein the putamen and the caudate nucleus posterior and dorsally are separated into two entities by the internal capsule, whereas both structures ventrally fuse into a large accumbens...

  18. High-Resolution fMRI of Auditory Cortical Map Changes in Unilateral Hearing Loss and Tinnitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghazaleh, Naghmeh; Van der Zwaag, W.; Clarke, Stephanie; Ville, Dimitri Van De; Maire, Raphael; Saenz, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of hearing loss and tinnitus observe pathological neural activity in the tonotopic frequency maps of the primary auditory cortex. Here, we applied ultra high-field fMRI at 7 T to test whether human patients with unilateral hearing loss and tinnitus also show altered functional activity

  19. Mapping the Agulhas Current from space: an assessment of ASAR surface current velocities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rouault, MJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available surface current velocities for oceanographic research are assessed. ASAR surface current velocities are compared to surface drifter data and merged altimetry observations. Maps of sea surface temperature are used to establish the ASAR’s capacity to capture...

  20. Preliminary Correlation Map of Geomorphic Surfaces in North-Central Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2005-08-01

    This correlation map (scale = 1:12,000) presents the results of a mapping initiative that was part of the comprehensive site characterization required to operate the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility located in northern Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Eight primary map units are recognized for Quaternary surfaces: remnants of six alluvial fan or terrace surfaces, one unit that includes colluvial aprons associated with hill slopes, and one unit for anthropogenically disturbed surfaces. This surficial geology map provides fundamental data on natural processes for reconstruction of the Quaternary history of northern Frenchman Flat, which in turn will aid in the understanding of the natural processes that act to develop the landscape, and the time-frames involved in landscape development. The mapping was conducted using color and color-infrared aerial photographs and field verification of map unit composition and boundaries. Criteria for defining the map unit composition of geomorphic surface units are based on relative geomorphic position, landform morphology, and degree of preservation of surface morphology. The bedrock units identified on this map were derived from previous published mapping efforts and are included for completeness.

  1. Surface height map estimation from a single image using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Zhong, Guoqiang; Qi, Lin; Dong, Junyu; Pham, Tuan D.; Mao, Jianzhou

    2017-02-01

    Surface height map estimation is an important task in high-resolution 3D reconstruction. This task differs from general scene depth estimation in the fact that surface height maps contain more high frequency information or fine details. Existing methods based on radar or other equipments can be used for large-scale scene depth recovery, but might fail in small-scale surface height map estimation. Although some methods are available for surface height reconstruction based on multiple images, e.g. photometric stereo, height map estimation directly from a single image is still a challenging issue. In this paper, we present a novel method based on convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for estimating the height map from a single image, without any equipments or extra prior knowledge of the image contents. Experimental results based on procedural and real texture datasets show the proposed algorithm is effective and reliable.

  2. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Forecasts of Daily Max Surface Air Temperature (deg. F) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS daily maximum surface air temperature forecasts from the National Digital...

  3. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Forecasts of Daily Min Surface Air Temperature (deg. F) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS daily minimum surface air temperature forecasts from the National Digital...

  4. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Wind Velocity Barb (knots) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS surface wind velocity forecasts from the National Digital Forecast Database...

  5. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Wind Speed (knots) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS surface wind speed forecasts from the National Digital Forecast Database...

  6. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NDFD Gridded Forecasts of Surface Relative Humidity (%) (Time Offsets)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-offsets map service provides maps depicting the NWS Surface Relative Humidity forecasts from the National Digital Forecast...

  7. Cortical and Subcortical Structural Plasticity Associated with the Glioma Volumes in Patients with Cerebral Gliomas Revealed by Surface-Based Morphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Postlesional plasticity has been identified in patients with cerebral gliomas by inducing a large functional reshaping of brain networks. Although numerous non-invasive functional neuroimaging methods have extensively investigated the mechanisms of this functional redistribution in patients with cerebral gliomas, little effort has been made to investigate the structural plasticity of cortical and subcortical structures associated with the glioma volume. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the contralateral cortical and subcortical structures are able to actively reorganize by themselves in these patients. The compensation mechanism following contralateral cortical and subcortical structural plasticity is considered. We adopted the surface-based morphometry to investigate the difference of cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM volumes in a cohort of 14 healthy controls and 13 patients with left-hemisphere cerebral gliomas [including 1 patients with World Health Organization (WHO I, 8 WHO II, and 4 WHO III]. The glioma volume ranges from 5.1633 to 208.165 cm2. Compared to healthy controls, we found significantly increased GM volume of the right cuneus and the left thalamus, as well as a trend toward enlargement in the right globus pallidus in patients with cerebral gliomas. Moreover, the GM volumes of these regions were positively correlated with the glioma volumes of the patients. These results provide evidence of cortical and subcortical enlargement, suggesting the usefulness of surface-based morphometry to investigate the structural plasticity. Moreover, the structural plasticity might be acted as the compensation mechanism to better fulfill its functions in patients with cerebral gliomas as the gliomas get larger.

  8. [Cortical blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokron, S

    2014-02-01

    Cortical blindness refers to a visual loss induced by a bilateral occipital lesion. The very strong cooperation between psychophysics, cognitive psychology, neurophysiology and neuropsychology these latter twenty years as well as recent progress in cerebral imagery have led to a better understanding of neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness. It thus becomes possible now to propose an earlier diagnosis of cortical blindness as well as new perspectives for rehabilitation in children as well as in adults. On the other hand, studying complex neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness is a way to infer normal functioning of the visual system.

  9. Model-Based Analysis and Optimization of the Mapping of Cortical Sources in the Spontaneous Scalp EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Sazonov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mapping of brain sources into the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG depends on volume conduction properties of the head and on an electrode montage involving a reference. Mathematically, this source mapping (SM is fully determined by an observation function (OF matrix. This paper analyses the OF-matrix for a generation model for the desynchronized spontaneous EEG. The model involves a four-shell spherical volume conductor containing dipolar sources that are mutually uncorrelated so as to reflect the desynchronized EEG. The reference is optimized in order to minimize the impact in the SM of the sources located distant from the electrodes. The resulting reference is called the localized reference (LR. The OF-matrix is analyzed in terms of the relative power contribution of the sources and the cross-channel correlation coefficient for five existing references as well as for the LR. It is found that the Hjorth Laplacian reference is a fair approximation of the LR, and thus is close to optimum for practical intents and purposes. The other references have a significantly poorer performance. Furthermore, the OF-matrix is analyzed for limits to the spatial resolution for the EEG. These are estimated to be around 2 cm.

  10. Birth Weight and Adult IQ, but Not Anxious-Depressive Psychopathology, Are Associated with Cortical Surface Area: A Study in Twins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Córdova-Palomera

    Full Text Available Previous research suggests that low birth weight (BW induces reduced brain cortical surface area (SA which would persist until at least early adulthood. Moreover, low BW has been linked to psychiatric disorders such as depression and psychological distress, and to altered neurocognitive profiles.We present novel findings obtained by analysing high-resolution structural MRI scans of 48 twins; specifically, we aimed: i to test the BW-SA association in a middle-aged adult sample; and ii to assess whether either depression/anxiety disorders or intellectual quotient (IQ influence the BW-SA link, using a monozygotic (MZ twin design to separate environmental and genetic effects.Both lower BW and decreased IQ were associated with smaller total and regional cortical SA in adulthood. Within a twin pair, lower BW was related to smaller total cortical and regional SA. In contrast, MZ twin differences in SA were not related to differences in either IQ or depression/anxiety disorders.The present study supports findings indicating that i BW has a long-lasting effect on cortical SA, where some familial and environmental influences alter both foetal growth and brain morphology; ii uniquely environmental factors affecting BW also alter SA; iii higher IQ correlates with larger SA; and iv these effects are not modified by internalizing psychopathology.

  11. Birth Weight and Adult IQ, but Not Anxious-Depressive Psychopathology, Are Associated with Cortical Surface Area: A Study in Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Palomera, Aldo; Fatjó-Vilas, Mar; Falcón, Carles; Bargalló, Nuria; Alemany, Silvia; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Nenadic, Igor; Fañanás, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests that low birth weight (BW) induces reduced brain cortical surface area (SA) which would persist until at least early adulthood. Moreover, low BW has been linked to psychiatric disorders such as depression and psychological distress, and to altered neurocognitive profiles. Aims We present novel findings obtained by analysing high-resolution structural MRI scans of 48 twins; specifically, we aimed: i) to test the BW-SA association in a middle-aged adult sample; and ii) to assess whether either depression/anxiety disorders or intellectual quotient (IQ) influence the BW-SA link, using a monozygotic (MZ) twin design to separate environmental and genetic effects. Results Both lower BW and decreased IQ were associated with smaller total and regional cortical SA in adulthood. Within a twin pair, lower BW was related to smaller total cortical and regional SA. In contrast, MZ twin differences in SA were not related to differences in either IQ or depression/anxiety disorders. Conclusion The present study supports findings indicating that i) BW has a long-lasting effect on cortical SA, where some familial and environmental influences alter both foetal growth and brain morphology; ii) uniquely environmental factors affecting BW also alter SA; iii) higher IQ correlates with larger SA; and iv) these effects are not modified by internalizing psychopathology. PMID:26086820

  12. The geometric Cauchy problem for surfaces with Lorentzian harmonic Gauss maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Svensson, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The geometric Cauchy problem for a class of surfaces in a pseudo-Riemannian manifold of dimension 3 is to find the surface which contains a given curve with a prescribed tangent bundle along the curve. We consider this problem for constant negative Gauss curvature surfaces (pseudospherical surfaces...... representation for surfaces associated with Lorentzian harmonic maps (1-1 wave maps) into symmetric spaces, developed since the 1990's. Explicit formulae for the potentials in terms of the prescribed data are given, and some applications are considered....

  13. Evolution of cortical neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Mannan, Omar; Cheung, Amanda F P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2008-03-18

    The neurons of the mammalian neocortex are organised into six layers. By contrast, the reptilian and avian dorsal cortices only have three layers which are thought to be equivalent to layers I, V and VI of mammals. Increased repertoire of mammalian higher cognitive functions is likely a result of an expanded cortical surface area. The majority of cortical cell proliferation in mammals occurs in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ), with a small number of scattered divisions outside the germinal zone. Comparative developmental studies suggest that the appearance of SVZ coincides with the laminar expansion of the cortex to six layers, as well as the tangential expansion of the cortical sheet seen within mammals. In spite of great variation and further compartmentalisation in the mitotic compartments, the number of neurons in an arbitrary cortical column appears to be remarkably constant within mammals. The current challenge is to understand how the emergence and elaboration of the SVZ has contributed to increased cortical cell diversity, tangential expansion and gyrus formation of the mammalian neocortex. This review discusses neurogenic processes that are believed to underlie these major changes in cortical dimensions in vertebrates.

  14. Mapping the dynamics of cortical neuroplasticity of skilled motor learning using micro X-ray fluorescence and histofluorescence imaging of zinc in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaverdashvili, Mariam; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2017-02-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging (XFI) of zinc (Zn) has been recently implemented to understand the efficiency of various therapeutic interventions targeting post-stroke neuroprotection and neuroplasticity. However, it is uncertain if micro XFI can resolve neuroplasticity-induced changes. Thus, we explored if learning-associated behavioral changes would be accompanied by changes in cortical Zn concentration measured by XFI in healthy adult rats. Proficiency in a skilled reach-to-eat task during early and late stages of motor learning served as a functional measure of neuroplasticity. c-Fos protein and vesicular Zn expression were employed as indirect neuronal measures of brain plasticity. A total Zn map (20×20×30μm(3) resolution) generated by micro XFI failed to reflect increases in either c-Fos or vesicular Zn in the motor cortex contralateral to the trained forelimb or improved proficiency in the skilled reaching task. Remarkably, vesicular Zn increased in the late stage of motor learning along with a concurrent decrease in the number of c-fos-ip neurons relative to the early stage of motor learning. This inverse dynamics of c-fos and vesicular Zn level as the motor skill advances suggest that a qualitatively different neural population, comprised of fewer active but more efficiently connected neurons, supports a skilled action in the late versus early stage of motor learning. The lack of sensitivity of the XFI-generated Zn map to visualize the plasticity-associated changes in vesicular Zn suggests that the Zn level measured by micro XFI should not be used as a surrogate marker of neuroplasticity in response to the acquisition of skilled motor actions. Nanoscopic XFI could be explored in future as a means of imaging these subtle physiological changes.

  15. Development and aging of superficial white matter myelin from young adulthood to old age: Mapping by vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minjie; Kumar, Anand; Yang, Shaolin

    2016-05-01

    Superficial white matter (SWM) lies immediately beneath cortical gray matter and consists primarily of short association fibers. The characteristics of SWM and its development and aging were seldom examined in the literature and warrant further investigation. Magnetization transfer imaging is sensitive to myelin changes in the white matter. Using an innovative multimodal imaging analysis approach, vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS), the current study vertexwise mapped age-related changes of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in SWM from young adulthood to old age (30-85 years, N = 66). Results demonstrated regionally selective and temporally heterochronologic changes of SWM MTR with age, including (1) inverted U-shaped trajectories of SWM MTR in the rostral middle frontal, medial temporal, and temporoparietal regions, suggesting continuing myelination and protracted maturation till age 40-50 years and accelerating demyelination at age 60 and beyond, (2) linear decline of SWM MTR in the middle and superior temporal, and pericalcarine areas, indicating early maturation and less acceleration in age-related degeneration, and (3) no significant changes of SWM MTR in the primary motor, somatosensory and auditory regions, suggesting resistance to age-related deterioration. We did not observe similar patterns of changes in cortical thickness in our sample, suggesting the observed SWM MTR changes are not due to cortical atrophy. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1759-1769, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Ketogenic diet restores aberrant cortical motor maps and excitation-to-inhibition imbalance in the BTBR mouse model of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jacklyn; Rho, Jong M; Teskey, G Campbell

    2016-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an increasingly prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in sociability and communication, and restricted and/or repetitive motor behaviors. Amongst the diverse hypotheses regarding the pathophysiology of ASD, one possibility is that there is increased neuronal excitation, leading to alterations in sensory processing, functional integration and behavior. Meanwhile, the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD), traditionally used in the treatment of medically intractable epilepsy, has already been shown to reduce autistic behaviors in both humans and in rodent models of ASD. While the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear, we hypothesized that this dietary approach might shift the balance of excitation and inhibition towards more normal levels of inhibition. Using high-resolution intracortical microstimulation, we investigated basal sensorimotor excitation/inhibition in the BTBR T+Itpr(tf)/J (BTBR) mouse model of ASD and tested whether the KD restores the balance of excitation/inhibition. We found that BTBR mice had lower movement thresholds and larger motor maps indicative of higher excitation/inhibition compared to C57BL/6J (B6) controls, and that the KD reversed both these abnormalities. Collectively, our results afford a greater understanding of cortical excitation/inhibition balance in ASD and may help expedite the development of therapeutic approaches aimed at improving functional outcomes in this disorder.

  17. Protein kinase D stabilizes aldosterone-induced ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in M1 renal cortical collecting duct cells to promote cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEneaney, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone elicits transcriptional responses in target tissues and also rapidly stimulates the activation of protein kinase signalling cascades independently of de novo protein synthesis. Here we investigated aldosterone-induced cell proliferation and extra-cellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1\\/2) mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling in the M1 cortical collecting duct cell line (M1-CCD). Aldosterone promoted the proliferative growth of M1-CCD cells, an effect that was protein kinase D1 (PKD1), PKCdelta and ERK1\\/2-dependent. Aldosterone induced the rapid activation of ERK1\\/2 with peaks of activation at 2 and 10 to 30 min after hormone treatment followed by sustained activation lasting beyond 120 min. M1-CCD cells suppressed in PKD1 expression exhibited only the early, transient peaks in ERK1\\/2 activation without the sustained phase. Aldosterone stimulated the physical association of PKD1 with ERK1\\/2 within 2 min of treatment. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist RU28318 inhibited the early and late phases of aldosterone-induced ERK1\\/2 activation, and also aldosterone-induced proliferative cell growth. Aldosterone induced the sub-cellular redistribution of ERK1\\/2 to the nuclei at 2 min and to cytoplasmic sites, proximal to the nuclei after 30 min. This sub-cellular distribution of ERK1\\/2 was inhibited in cells suppressed in the expression of PKD1.

  18. Surface Geophysical Measurements for Locating and Mapping Ice-Wedges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Tomaskovicova, Sonia; Larsen, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    With the presently observed trend of permafrost warming and degradation, the development and availability of effective tools to locate and map ice-rich soils and massive ground ice is of increasing importance. This paper presents a geophysical study of an area with polygonal landforms in order...... to test the applicability of DC electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to identifying and mapping ice-wedge occurrences. The site is located in Central West Greenland, and the ice-wedges are found in a permafrozen peat soil with an active layer of about 30 cm. ERT...... and GPR measurements give a coherent interpretation of possible ice-wedge locations, and active layer probing show a tendency for larger thaw depth in the major trench systems consistent with a significant temperature (at 10 cm depth) increase in these trenches identified by thermal profiling. Three...

  19. Calibration and Industrial Application of Instrument for Surface Mapping based on AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kofod, Niels; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the calibration and application of an integrated system for topographic characterisation of fine surfaces on large workpieces. The system, consisting of an atomic force microscope mounted on a coordinate measuring machine, was especially designed for surface mapping, i.......e., measurement and tiling of adjacent areas. A calibration procedure was proposed involving a glass artefact featuring chromium lines with different pitch distances, giving the possibility to identify the exact position of single surface areas. The calibrated system was used to surface map a hip joint prosthesis...

  20. Technical note: Evaluation of three machine learning models for surface ocean CO2 mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jiye; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Saigusa, Nobuko; Shirai, Tomoko; Nakaoka, Shin-ichiro; Tan, Zheng-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Reconstructing surface ocean CO2 from scarce measurements plays an important role in estimating oceanic CO2 uptake. There are varying degrees of differences among the 14 models included in the Surface Ocean CO2 Mapping (SOCOM) inter-comparison initiative, in which five models used neural networks. This investigation evaluates two neural networks used in SOCOM, self-organizing maps and feedforward neural networks, and introduces a machine learning model called a support vector machine for ocean CO2 mapping. The technique note provides a practical guide to selecting the models.

  1. An atlas of the smaller maps in orientable and nonorientable surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, David

    2000-01-01

    Maps are beguilingly simple structures with deep and ubiquitous properties. They arise in an essential way in many areas of mathematics and mathematical physics, but require considerable time and computational effort to generate. Few collected drawings are available for reference, and little has been written, in book form, about their enumerative aspects. An Atlas of the Smaller Maps in Orientable and Nonorientable Surfaces is the first book to provide complete collections of maps along with their vertex and face partitions, number of rootings, and an index number for cross referencing. It provides an explanation of axiomatization and encoding, and serves as an introduction to maps as a combinatorial structure. The Atlas lists the maps first by genus and number of edges, and gives the embeddings of all graphs with at most five edges in orientable surfaces, thus presenting the genus distribution for each graph. Exemplifying the use of the Atlas, the authors explore two substantial conjectures with origins in ...

  2. Surface Emissivity Maps for Satellite Retrieval of the Longwave Radiation Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shashi K.; Wilber, Anne C.; Kratz, David P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the procedure used to produce global surface emissivity maps for the broadband LW, the 8-12 micrometer window, and 12 narrow LW bands. For a detailed description of the methodology and the input data, the reader is referred to Wilber et al. (1999). These maps are based on a time-independent surface type map published by the IGBP, and laboratory measurements of spectral reflectances of surface materials. These maps represent a first attempt to characterize emissivity based on surface types, and many improvements to the methodology presented here are already underway. Effects of viewing zenith angle and sea state on the emissivity of ocean surface (Smith et al. 1996, Wu and Smith 1997, Masuda et al. 1988) will be taken into account. Measurements form ASTER and MODIS will be incorporated as they become available. Seasonal variation of emissivity based on changes in the characteristics of vegetation will be considered, and the variability of emissivity of barren land areas will be accounted for with the use of Zobler World Soil Maps (Zobler 1986). The current maps have been made available to the scientific community from the web site: http://tanalo.larc.nasa.gov:8080/surf_htmls/ SARB_surf.html

  3. Cortical volumes and atrophy rates in FTD-3 CHMP2B mutation carriers and related non-carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon F; Østergaard, Lasse R; Rodell, Anders B;

    2008-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia constitutes the third most prevalent neurodegenerative disease with dementia. We compared cortical structural changes in nine presymptomatic CHMP2B frontotemporal dementia mutation positive individuals with seven mutation negative family members. Using serial MRI scans...... with a mean interval of 16 months and surface based cortical segmentation we measured cortical thickness and volume, and quantified atrophy rates. Cortical thickness and atrophy rates were averaged within major lobes and focal effects were determined by parametric statistical maps. The volumetric atrophy...... rates in the presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers were statistically significant, though of a lower magnitude than those previously reported in patients of other types of frontotemporal dementia. Cortical thickness measurements revealed cortical thinning in mutation carriers bilaterally...

  4. Microscopic Calculation of IBM Parameters by Potential Energy Surface Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Bentley, I

    2011-01-01

    A coherent state technique is used to generate an Interacting Boson Model (IBM) Hamiltonian energy surface that simulates a mean field energy surface. The method presented here has some significant advantages over previous work. Specifically, that this can be a completely predictive requiring no a priori knowledge of the IBM parameters. The technique allows for the prediction of the low lying energy spectra and electromagnetic transition rates which are of astrophysical interest. Results and comparison with experiment are included for krypton, molybdenum, palladium, cadmium, gadolinium, dysprosium and erbium nuclei.

  5. Mapping impervious surface type and sub-pixel abundance using hyperion hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, J.A.; Gomez, R.

    2005-01-01

    Impervious surfaces have been identified as an important and quantifiable indicator of environmental degradation in urban settings. A number of research efforts have been directed at mapping impervious surface type using multispectral imagery. To date, however, no studies have compared equivalent techniques using multispectral and hyperspectral imagery to that end. In this study, data from NASA's 220-channel Hyperion instrument were used to: a) delineate three types of impervious surface, and b) map sub-pixel percent abundance for a study site near Washington, D.C., USA. The results were compared with the results of similar methods using same-spatial-resolution Landsat ETM+ data for mapping impervious surface type, and with the results of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Land Cover Data (NLCD) 2001 impervious surface data layer, which is derived from Landsat and high-resolution Ikonos data. The accuracy of discriminating impervious surface type using Hyperion data was assessed at 88% versus Landsat at 59%. The sub-pixel percent impervious map corresponded well with the NLCD 2001; impervious surface in the study area was calculated at 29.3% for NLCD 2001 and 28.4% for the Hyperion-derived layer. The results suggest that fairly simple techniques using hyperspectral data are effective for quantifying impervious surface type, and that high-spectral- resolution imagery may be a good alternative to high-spatial-resolution data.

  6. Calibration and Industrial Application of Instrument for Surface Mapping based on AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kofod, Niels; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the calibration and application of an integrated system for topographic characterisation of fine surfaces on large workpieces. The system, consisting of an atomic force microscope mounted on a coordinate measuring machine, was especially designed for surface mapping, i.e., mea...

  7. Techniques for Down-Sampling a Measured Surface Height Map for Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    This software allows one to down-sample a measured surface map for model validation, not only without introducing any re-sampling errors, but also eliminating the existing measurement noise and measurement errors. The software tool of the current two new techniques can be used in all optical model validation processes involving large space optical surfaces

  8. Trends and properties of human cerebral cortex: correlations with cortical myelin content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Matthew F; Goyal, Manu S; Preuss, Todd M; Raichle, Marcus E; Van Essen, David C

    2014-06-01

    "In vivo Brodmann mapping" or non-invasive cortical parcellation using MRI, especially by measuring cortical myelination, has recently become a popular research topic, though myeloarchitectonic cortical parcellation in humans previously languished in favor of cytoarchitecture. We review recent in vivo myelin mapping studies and discuss some of the different methods for estimating myelin content. We discuss some ways in which myelin maps may improve surface registration and be useful for cross-modal and cross-species comparisons, including some preliminary cross-species results. Next, we consider neurobiological aspects of why some parts of cortex are more myelinated than others. Myelin content is inversely correlated with intracortical circuit complexity - in general, more myelin content means simpler and perhaps less dynamic intracortical circuits. Using existing PET data and functional network parcellations, we examine metabolic differences in the differently myelinated cortical functional networks. Lightly myelinated cognitive association networks tend to have higher aerobic glycolysis than heavily myelinated early sensory-motor ones, perhaps reflecting greater ongoing dynamic anabolic cortical processes. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that intracortical myelination may stabilize intracortical circuits and inhibit synaptic plasticity. Finally, we discuss the future of the in vivo myeloarchitectural field and cortical parcellation--"in vivo Brodmann mapping"--in general.

  9. Analysis of Temperature Maps of Selected Dawn Data Over the Surface of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Sunshine, J. M.; McCord, T. B.; Li, Y.-Y.; Titus, T. N.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Toplis, M. J.; Forni, O.; Sykes, M. V.

    2012-01-01

    The thermal behavior of areas of unusual albedo at the surface of Vesta can be related to physical properties that may provide some information about the origin of those materials. Dawn s Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) [1] hyperspectral cubes can be used to retrieve surface temperatures. Due to instrumental constraints, high accuracy is obtained only if temperatures are greater than 180 K. Bright and dark surface materials on Vesta are currently investigated by the Dawn team [e.g., 2 and 3 respectively]. Here we present temperature maps of several local-scale features that were observed by Dawn under different illumination conditions and different local solar times.

  10. Mapping physicochemical surface modifications of flame-treated polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Farris

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate how the surface morphology of polypropylene (PP is influenced by the surface activation mediated by a flame obtained using a mixture of air and propane under fuel-lean (equivalence ratio φ = 0.98 conditions. Morphological changes observed on flamed samples with smooth (S, medium (M, and high (H degree of surface roughness were attributed to the combined effect of a chemical mechanism (agglomeration and ordering of partially oxidized intermediate-molecular-weight material with a physical mechanism (flattening of the original roughness by the flame’s high temperature. After two treatments, the different behavior of the samples in terms of wettability was totally reset, which made an impressive surface energy of ~43 mJ•m–2 possible, which is typical of more hydrophilic polymers (e.g., polyethylene terephthalate – PET. In particular, the polar component was increased from 1.21, 0.08, and 0.32 mJ•m–2 (untreated samples to 10.95, 11.20, and 11.17 mJ•m–2 for the flamed samples S, M, and H, respectively, an increase attributed to the insertion of polar functional groups (hydroxyl and carbonyl on the C–C backbone, as demonstrated by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results.

  11. Mapping the body surface temperature of cattle by infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Marcia Saladini Vieira; da Silva, Suelen Corrêa; Salles, Fernando André; Roma, Luiz Carlos; El Faro, Lenira; Bustos Mac Lean, Priscilla Ayleen; Lins de Oliveira, Celso Eduardo; Martello, Luciane Silva

    2016-12-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) is an alternative non-invasive method that has been studied as a tool for identifying many physiological and pathological processes related to changes in body temperature. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the body surface temperature of Jersey dairy cattle in a thermoneutral environment in order to contribute to the determination of a body surface temperature pattern for animals of this breed in a situation of thermal comfort. Twenty-four Jersey heifers were used over a period of 35 days at APTA Brazil. Measurements were performed on all animals, starting with the physiological parameters. Body surface temperature was measured by IRT collecting images in different body regions: left and right eye area, right and left eye, caudal left foreleg, cranial left foreleg, right and left flank, and forehead. High correlations were observed between temperature and humidity index (THI) and right flank, left flank and forehead temperatures (0.85, 0.81, and 0.81, respectively). The IRT variables that exhibited the five highest correlation coefficients in principal component 1 were, in decreasing order: forehead (0.90), right flank (0.87), left flank (0.84), marker 1 caudal left foreleg (0.83), marker 2 caudal left foreleg (0.74). The THI showed a high correlation coefficient (0.88) and moderate to low correlations were observed for the physiological variables rectal temperature (0.43), and respiratory frequency (0.42). The thermal profile obtained indicates a surface temperature pattern for each region studied in a situation of thermal comfort and may contribute to studies investigating body surface temperature. Among the body regions studied, IRT forehead temperature showed the highest association with rectal temperature, and forehead and right and left flank temperatures are strongly associated with THI and may be adopted in future studies on thermoregulation and body heat production.

  12. Towards Mapping the Ocean Surface Topography at 1 km Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Rodriquez, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    We propose to apply the technique of synthetic aperture radar interferometry to the measurement of ocean surface topography at spatial resolution approaching 1 km. The measurement will have wide ranging applications in oceanography, hydrology, and marine geophysics. The oceanographic and related societal applications are briefly discussed in the paper. To meet the requirements for oceanographic applications, the instrument must be flown in an orbit with proper sampling of ocean tides.

  13. Alterations in Cortical Thickness and White Matter Integrity in Mild-to-Moderate Communicating Hydrocephalic School-Aged Children Measured by Whole-Brain Cortical Thickness Mapping and DTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xinjian; Bai, Guanghui; Fu, Yuchuan; Mao, Chuanwan; Wu, Aiqin

    2017-01-01

    Follow-up observation is required for mild-to-moderate hydrocephalic patients because of the potential damage to brain. However, effects of mild-to-moderate hydrocephalus on gray and white matter remain unclear in vivo. Using structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), current study compared the cortical thickness and white matter integrity between children with mild-to-moderate communicating hydrocephalus and healthy controls. The relationships between cortical changes and intelligence quota were also examined in patients. We found that cortical thickness in the left middle temporal and left rostral middle frontal gyrus was significantly lower in the hydrocephalus group compared with that of controls. Fractional anisotropy in the right corpus callosum body was significantly lower in the hydrocephalus group compared with that of controls. In addition, there was no association of cortical thinning or white matter fractional anisotropy with intelligence quota in either group. Thus, our findings provide clues to that mild-to-moderate hydrocephalus could lead to structural brain deficits especially in the middle temporal and middle frontal gyrus prior to the behavior changes.

  14. On the Gauss Map of Surfaces of Revolution with Lightlike Axis in Minkowski 3-Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghao Jin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By studying the Gauss map G and Laplace operator Δh of the second fundamental form h, we will classify surfaces of revolution with a lightlike axis in 3-dimensional Minkowski space and also obtain the surface of Enneper of the 2nd kind, the surface of Enneper of the 3rd kind, the de Sitter pseudosphere, and the hyperbolic pseudosphere that satisfy condition ΔhG=ΛG, Λ being a 3×3 real matrix.

  15. Mapping visual cortex in monkeys and humans using surface-based atlases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Essen, D. C.; Lewis, J. W.; Drury, H. A.; Hadjikhani, N.; Tootell, R. B.; Bakircioglu, M.; Miller, M. I.

    2001-01-01

    We have used surface-based atlases of the cerebral cortex to analyze the functional organization of visual cortex in humans and macaque monkeys. The macaque atlas contains multiple partitioning schemes for visual cortex, including a probabilistic atlas of visual areas derived from a recent architectonic study, plus summary schemes that reflect a combination of physiological and anatomical evidence. The human atlas includes a probabilistic map of eight topographically organized visual areas recently mapped using functional MRI. To facilitate comparisons between species, we used surface-based warping to bring functional and geographic landmarks on the macaque map into register with corresponding landmarks on the human map. The results suggest that extrastriate visual cortex outside the known topographically organized areas is dramatically expanded in human compared to macaque cortex, particularly in the parietal lobe.

  16. Performance verification of Surface Mapping Instrument developed at CGM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    covering applications in micro-technology and in surface metrology. The paper addresses the description of the stitching procedure, its validation, and a more comprehensive metrological evaluation of the AFM-CMM instrument performance. Experimental validation of the method was performed by the use of...... of the instrument was the development of stitching software. Successful stitching of AFM scans is demonstrated in this report. Single data files in the millimetre range can be obtained, which are entirely based on AFM probing. High definition of nanostructures can therefore be combined with a measuring range...

  17. Performance verification of Surface Mapping Instrument developed at CGM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    covering applications in micro-technology and in surface metrology. The paper addresses the description of the stitching procedure, its validation, and a more comprehensive metrological evaluation of the AFM-CMM instrument performance. Experimental validation of the method was performed by the use of......: • A synthetic image featuring a 2D pattern for testing the stitching code performance • An optical standard containing several line patterns, for testing the whole measuring system (AFM-CMM-software) Quantitative analysis was based on: • Dimensional parameters based on the cross correlation function; these were...

  18. Harmonic Maps into Conic Surfaces With Cone Angles Less Than $2\\pi$

    CERN Document Server

    Gell-Redman, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    We prove the existence and uniqueness of harmonic maps in degree one homotopy classes of closed, orientable surfaces of positive genus, when the target has conic points with cone angles less than $2\\pi$. For a cone point $p$ of cone angle less than $\\pi$ we show that one can minimize with respect to the condition that a fixed point $q$ in the domain maps to $p$.

  19. Building a dense surface map incrementally from semi-dense point cloud and RGB images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-shan LI; Rong XIONG; Shoudong HUANG; Yi-ming HUANG

    2015-01-01

    Building and using maps is a fundamental issue for bionic robots in fi eld applications. A dense surface map, which offers rich visual and geometric information, is an ideal representation of the environment for indoor/outdoor localization, navigation, and recognition tasks of these robots. Since most bionic robots can use only small light-weight laser scanners and cameras to acquire semi-dense point cloud and RGB images, we propose a method to generate a consistent and dense surface map from this kind of semi-dense point cloud and RGB images. The method contains two main steps: (1) generate a dense surface for every single scan of point cloud and its corresponding image(s) and (2) incrementally fuse the dense surface of a new scan into the whole map. In step (1) edge-aware resampling is realized by segmenting the scan of a point cloud in advance and resampling each sub-cloud separately. Noise within the scan is reduced and a dense surface is generated. In step (2) the average surface is estimated probabilistically and the non-coincidence of different scans is eliminated. Experiments demonstrate that our method works well in both indoor and outdoor semi-structured environments where there are regularly shaped ob jects.

  20. Note: Velocity map imaging the scattering plane of gas surface collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, D. J.; Messider, T. M.; Leng, J. G.; Greaves, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    The ability of gas-surface dynamics studies to resolve the velocity distribution of the scattered species in the 2D scattering plane has been limited by technical capabilities and only a few different approaches have been explored in recent years. In comparison, gas-phase scattering studies have been transformed by the near ubiquitous use of velocity map imaging. We describe an innovative means of introducing a dielectric surface within the electric field of a typical velocity map imaging experiment. The retention of optimum velocity mapping conditions was validated by measurements of iodomethane-d3 photodissociation and SIMION calculations. To demonstrate the system's capabilities, the velocity distributions of ammonia molecules scattered from a polytetrafluoroethylene surface have been measured for multiple product rotational states.

  1. Mapping 2000 2010 Impervious Surface Change in India Using Global Land Survey Landsat Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Panshi; Huang, Chengquan; Brown De Colstoun, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and monitoring the environmental impacts of global urbanization requires better urban datasets. Continuous field impervious surface change (ISC) mapping using Landsat data is an effective way to quantify spatiotemporal dynamics of urbanization. It is well acknowledged that Landsat-based estimation of impervious surface is subject to seasonal and phenological variations. The overall goal of this paper is to map 200-02010 ISC for India using Global Land Survey datasets and training data only available for 2010. To this end, a method was developed that could transfer the regression tree model developed for mapping 2010 impervious surface to 2000 using an iterative training and prediction (ITP) approach An independent validation dataset was also developed using Google Earth imagery. Based on the reference ISC from the validation dataset, the RMSE of predicted ISC was estimated to be 18.4%. At 95% confidence, the total estimated ISC for India between 2000 and 2010 is 2274.62 +/- 7.84 sq km.

  2. Reliability and statistical power analysis of cortical and subcortical FreeSurfer metrics in a large sample of healthy elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Franziskus; Mérillat, Susan; Bezzola, Ladina; Hirsiger, Sarah; Philipp, Michel; Madhyastha, Tara; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-03-01

    FreeSurfer is a tool to quantify cortical and subcortical brain anatomy automatically and noninvasively. Previous studies have reported reliability and statistical power analyses in relatively small samples or only selected one aspect of brain anatomy. Here, we investigated reliability and statistical power of cortical thickness, surface area, volume, and the volume of subcortical structures in a large sample (N=189) of healthy elderly subjects (64+ years). Reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient) of cortical and subcortical parameters is generally high (cortical: ICCs>0.87, subcortical: ICCs>0.95). Surface-based smoothing increases reliability of cortical thickness maps, while it decreases reliability of cortical surface area and volume. Nevertheless, statistical power of all measures benefits from smoothing. When aiming to detect a 10% difference between groups, the number of subjects required to test effects with sufficient power over the entire cortex varies between cortical measures (cortical thickness: N=39, surface area: N=21, volume: N=81; 10mm smoothing, power=0.8, α=0.05). For subcortical regions this number is between 16 and 76 subjects, depending on the region. We also demonstrate the advantage of within-subject designs over between-subject designs. Furthermore, we publicly provide a tool that allows researchers to perform a priori power analysis and sensitivity analysis to help evaluate previously published studies and to design future studies with sufficient statistical power.

  3. Comparison of geostatistical kriging algorithms for intertidal surface sediment facies mapping with grain size data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, No-Wook; Jang, Dong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the predictive performance of different geostatistical kriging algorithms for intertidal surface sediment facies mapping using grain size data. Indicator kriging, which maps facies types from conditional probabilities of predefined facies types, is first considered. In the second approach, grain size fractions are first predicted using cokriging and the facies types are then mapped. As grain size fractions are compositional data, their characteristics should be considered during spatial prediction. For efficient prediction of compositional data, additive log-ratio transformation is applied before cokriging analysis. The predictive performance of cokriging of the transformed variables is compared with that of cokriging of raw fractions in terms of both prediction errors of fractions and facies mapping accuracy. From a case study of the Baramarae tidal flat, Korea, the mapping method based on cokriging of log-ratio transformation of fractions outperformed the one based on cokriging of untransformed fractions in the prediction of fractions and produced the best facies mapping accuracy. Indicator kriging that could not account for the variation of fractions within each facies type showed the worst mapping accuracy. These case study results indicate that the proper processing of grain size fractions as compositional data is important for reliable facies mapping.

  4. Comparison of Geostatistical Kriging Algorithms for Intertidal Surface Sediment Facies Mapping with Grain Size Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    No-Wook Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the predictive performance of different geostatistical kriging algorithms for intertidal surface sediment facies mapping using grain size data. Indicator kriging, which maps facies types from conditional probabilities of predefined facies types, is first considered. In the second approach, grain size fractions are first predicted using cokriging and the facies types are then mapped. As grain size fractions are compositional data, their characteristics should be considered during spatial prediction. For efficient prediction of compositional data, additive log-ratio transformation is applied before cokriging analysis. The predictive performance of cokriging of the transformed variables is compared with that of cokriging of raw fractions in terms of both prediction errors of fractions and facies mapping accuracy. From a case study of the Baramarae tidal flat, Korea, the mapping method based on cokriging of log-ratio transformation of fractions outperformed the one based on cokriging of untransformed fractions in the prediction of fractions and produced the best facies mapping accuracy. Indicator kriging that could not account for the variation of fractions within each facies type showed the worst mapping accuracy. These case study results indicate that the proper processing of grain size fractions as compositional data is important for reliable facies mapping.

  5. The Gauss Map of Complete Minimal Surfaces with Finite Total Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEDRO A. HINOJOSA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we are concerned with the image of the normal Gauss map of a minimal surface immersed in ℝ3 with finite total curvature. We give a different proof of the following theorem of R. Osserman: The normal Gauss map of a minimal surface immersed in ℝ3 with finite total curvature, which is not a plane, omits at most three points of2 Moreover, under an additional hypothesis on the type of ends, we prove that this number is exactly 2.

  6. Surface Water and Flood Extent Mapping, Monitoring, and Modeling Products and Services for the SERVIR Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    SERVIR is a joint NASA - US Agency for International Development (USAID) project to improve environmental decision-making using Earth observations and geospatial technologies. A common need identified among SERVIR regions has been improved information for disaster risk reduction and in specific surface water and flood extent mapping, monitoring and forecasting. Of the 70 SERVIR products (active, complete, and in development), 4 are related to surface water and flood extent mapping, monitoring or forecasting. Visit http://www.servircatalog.net for more product details.

  7. Mapping of electrical potentials from the chest surface - preprocessing and visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Chudacek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present current research activity in the area of computer supported ECG processing. Analysis of heart electric field based on standard 12lead system is at present the most frequently used method of heart diseasediagnostics. However body surface potential mapping (BSPM that measures electric potentials from several tens to hundreds of electrodes placed on thorax surface has in certain cases higher diagnostic value given by data collection in areas that are inaccessible for standard 12lead ECG. For preprocessing, wavelet transform is used; it allows detect significant values on the ECG signal. Several types of maps, namely immediate potential, integral, isochronous, and differential.

  8. Mapping Urban Impervious Surface by Fusing Optical and SAR Data at the Decision Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfeng Shao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of impervious surfaces results in a series of environmental issues, such as the decrease of vegetated areas and the aggravation of the urban heat island effects. The mapping of impervious surface and its spatial distributions is of significance for the ecological study of urban environment. Currently, the integration of optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR data has shown advantages in accurately characterizing impervious surface. However, the fusion mainly occurs at the pixel and feature levels which are subject to influences of data noises and feature selections, respectively. In this paper, an innovative and effective method was developed to extract urban impervious surface by synergistically utilizing optical and SAR images at the decision level. The objective of this paper was to obtain an accurate urban impervious surface map based on the random forest classifier and the evidence theory and to provide a detailed uncertainty analysis accompanying the fused impervious surface maps. In this study, both the GaoFen (GF-1 and Sentinel-1A imagery were first used as independent data sources for mapping urban impervious surfaces. Then additional spectral features and texture features were extracted and integrated with the original GF-1 and Sentinel-1A images in generating impervious surfaces. Finally, based on the Dempster-Shafer (D-S theory, impervious surfaces were produced by fusing the previously estimated impervious surfaces from different datasets at the decision level. Results showed that impervious surfaces estimated from the combined use of original images and features yielded a higher accuracy than those from the original optical or SAR data. Further validations suggested that optical data was better than SAR data in separating impervious surfaces from non-impervious surfaces. The fused impervious surfaces at the decision level had a higher overall accuracy than those produced independently by optical or SAR data. It

  9. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding either 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β-events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α-events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β-events lie upstream of α-events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify inter-mitotic times for β-events on a per-cell basis in post-natal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereological studies. PMID:25668568

  10. Adhesion mapping of chemically modified and poly(ethylene oxide)-grafted glass surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Jogikalmath, G.; Stuart, J.K.; Pungor, A.; Hlady, V.

    1999-01-01

    Two-dimensional mapping of the adhesion pull-off forces was used to study the origin of surface heterogeneity in the grafted poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) layer. The variance of the pull-off forces measured over the μm-sized regions after each chemical step of modifying glass surfaces was taken to be a measure of the surface chemical heterogeneity. The attachment of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy silane (GPS) to glass decreased the pull-off forces relative to the clean glass and made the surface mo...

  11. Cortico-Cortical Receptive Field Estimates in Human Visual Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen V Haak

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Human visual cortex comprises many visual areas that contain a map of the visual field (Wandell et al 2007, Neuron 56, 366–383. These visual field maps can be identified readily in individual subjects with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during experimental sessions that last less than an hour (Wandell and Winawer 2011, Vis Res 718–737. Hence, visual field mapping with fMRI has been, and still is, a heavily used technique to examine the organisation of both normal and abnormal human visual cortex (Haak et al 2011, ACNR, 11(3, 20–21. However, visual field mapping cannot reveal every aspect of human visual cortex organisation. For example, the information processed within a visual field map arrives from somewhere and is sent to somewhere, and visual field mapping does not derive these input/output relationships. Here, we describe a new, model-based analysis for estimating the dependence between signals in distinct cortical regions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. Just as a stimulus-referred receptive field predicts the neural response as a function of the stimulus contrast, the neural-referred receptive field predicts the neural response as a function of responses elsewhere in the nervous system. When applied to two cortical regions, this function can be called the cortico-cortical receptive field (CCRF. We model the CCRF as a Gaussian-weighted region on the cortical surface and apply the model to data from both stimulus-driven and resting-state experimental conditions in visual cortex.

  12. Self-similarity Based Editing of 3D Surface Textures Using Height and Albedo Maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Junyu; REN Jing; CHEN Guojiang

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an inexpensive method for self-similarity based editing of real-world 3D surface textures by using height and albedo maps. Unlike self-similarity based 2D texture editing approaches which only make changes to pixel color or intensity values, this technique also allows surface geometry and reflectance of the captured 3D surface textures to be edited and relit using illumination conditions and viewing angles that differ from those of the original. A single editing operation at a given location affects all similar areas and produces changes on all images of the sample rendered under different conditions. Since surface height and albedo maps can be used to describe seabed topography and geologic features, which play important roles in many oceanic processes, the proposed method can be effectively employed in applications regarding visualization and simulation of oceanic phenomena.

  13. Mapping lipid and detergent molecules at the surface of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Richard J; Gardiner, Alastair T; Roszak, Aleksander W; Stončius, Sigitas; Kočovský, Pavel; Isaacs, Neil W

    2011-06-01

    Electron-density maps for the crystal structures of membrane proteins often show features suggesting binding of lipids and/or detergent molecules on the hydrophobic surface, but usually it is difficult to identify the bound molecules. In our studies, heavy-atom-labelled phospholipids and detergents have been used to unequivocally identify these binding sites at the surfaces of test membrane proteins, the reaction centres from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Blastochloris viridis. The generality of this method is discussed in the present article.

  14. Mapping extent and change in surface mines within the United States for 2001 to 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulard, Christopher E.; Acevedo, William; Stehman, Stephen V.; Parker, Owen P.

    2016-01-01

    A complete, spatially explicit dataset illustrating the 21st century mining footprint for the conterminous United States does not exist. To address this need, we developed a semi-automated procedure to map the country's mining footprint (30-m pixel) and establish a baseline to monitor changes in mine extent over time. The process uses mine seed points derived from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS), and USGS National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) and recodes patches of barren land that meet a “distance to seed” requirement and a patch area requirement before mapping a pixel as mining. Seed points derived from EIA coal points, an edited MRDS point file, and 1992 NLCD mine points were used in three separate efforts using different distance and patch area parameters for each. The three products were then merged to create a 2001 map of moderate-to-large mines in the United States, which was subsequently manually edited to reduce omission and commission errors. This process was replicated using NLCD 2006 barren pixels as a base layer to create a 2006 mine map and a 2001–2006 mine change map focusing on areas with surface mine expansion. In 2001, 8,324 km2 of surface mines were mapped. The footprint increased to 9,181 km2 in 2006, representing a 10·3% increase over 5 years. These methods exhibit merit as a timely approach to generate wall-to-wall, spatially explicit maps representing the recent extent of a wide range of surface mining activities across the country. 

  15. Validation of infarct size and location from the ECG by inverse body surface mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Arnold Dijk; J.W. Van Dam (Jan Willem); N.H.J.J. van der Putten (Niek); A.C. Maan (Arie); M.J.J. De Jongste (Mike)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes the incorporation of body surface mapping algorithms to detect the position and size of acute myocardial infarctions using standard 12 lead ECG recording. The results are compared with the results from cardiac MRI scan analysis. In case patient specific volume

  16. Mapping impervious surfaces using object-oriented classification in a semiarid urban region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapping the expansion of impervious surfaces in urbanizing areas is important for monitoring and understanding the hydrologic impacts of land development. The most common approach using spectral vegetation indices, however, is difficult in arid and semiarid environments where vegetation is sparse an...

  17. Surface Emissivity Maps for Use in Satellite Retrievals of Longwave Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Kratz, David P.; Gupta, Shashi K.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate accounting of surface emissivity is essential for the retrievals of surface temperature from remote sensing measurements, and for the computations of longwave (LW) radiation budget of the Earth?s surface. Past studies of the above topics assumed that emissivity for all surface types, and across the entire LW spectrum is equal to unity. There is strong evidence, however, that emissivity of many surface materials is significantly lower than unity, and varies considerably across the LW spectrum. We have developed global maps of surface emissivity for the broadband LW region, the thermal infrared window region (8-12 micron), and 12 narrow LW spectral bands. The 17 surface types defined by the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP) were adopted as such, and an additional (18th) surface type was introduced to represent tundra-like surfaces. Laboratory measurements of spectral reflectances of 10 different surface materials were converted to corresponding emissivities. The 10 surface materials were then associated with 18 surface types. Emissivities for the 18 surface types were first computed for each of the 12 narrow spectral bands. Emissivities for the broadband and the window region were then constituted from the spectral band values by weighting them with Planck function energy distribution.

  18. Application of cortical mapping in the surgical treatment of brain tumors in language areas%皮层功能制图在语言功能区脑肿瘤手术治疗中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马辉; 黄伟; 孙胜玉; 夏鹤春; 孙晓川

    2012-01-01

    目的 利用皮层功能制图进行语言功能区定位,实现语言功能区保护下肿瘤的最大程度切除.方法 对16例语言功能区脑肿瘤患者,利用血氧依赖功能磁共振(BOLD-fMRI)技术和(或)术中唤醒麻醉下皮层直接电刺激( ECS)定位技术进行脑功能制图;对所获皮层功能制图资料进行个体化评估,术中辅助保护语言功能区,在神经导航指引下切除肿瘤.结果 本组肿瘤病变全切除10例,次全切除3例,大部分切除3例.术后语言功能明显改善6例,无变化6例,短暂性感觉性失语2例,语言功能明显障碍2例.结论 BOLD-f MRI结合术中唤醒麻醉下ECS皮层功能制图定位语言功能区,可在保护语言功能的同时最大程度地切除肿瘤组织,提高患者术后生活质量.%Objective To study ihe methods of cortical mapping, preoperative localization of language areas with Bold-fMRI and(or) inlraoperative electrical cortical stimulation of language areas with awaken surgery, assist to remove brain tumors in functional areas of language. Methods Cortical mapping data from such as oxygen dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) technology, using the block design and reciting task to activate broca area and paragraph comprehension task to activate wemicke area, calculated cerebral laterality index (LI) to determine the dominant hemisphere; using of the electrical cortical stimulation (ECS) to localizale language areas under awake anesthesia in patients with surgery. The data combined with neuronavigation assist microscopic remove braim tomors in the language areas. Results Functional cortical mapping was used for localizate broca or wemicke area of 16 cases, image acquisition satisfied in 16 cases. Intraoperative awake and electrical stimulation of language areas in 4 cases. Lesion total resection in 10 cases, subtotal resection in 3 cases, partial resection in 3 cases. Language function improved significantly after surgery in 6

  19. Active and Passive Remote Sensing Data Time Series for Flood Detection and Surface Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioresita, Filsa; Puissant, Anne; Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    As a consequence of environmental changes surface waters are undergoing changes in time and space. A better knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of surface waters resources becomes essential to support sustainable policies and development activities. Especially because surface waters, are not only a vital sweet water resource, but can also pose hazards to human settlements and infrastructures through flooding. Floods are a highly frequent disaster in the world and can caused huge material losses. Detecting and mapping their spatial distribution is fundamental to ascertain damages and for relief efforts. Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an effective way to monitor surface waters bodies over large areas since it provides excellent temporal coverage and, all-weather day-and-night imaging capabilities. However, emergent vegetation, trees, wind or flow turbulence can increase radar back-scatter returns and pose problems for the delineation of inundated areas. In such areas, passive remote sensing data can be used to identify vegetated areas and support the interpretation of SAR data. The availability of new Earth Observation products, for example Sentinel-1 (active) and Sentinel-2 (passive) imageries, with both high spatial and temporal resolution, have the potential to facilitate flood detection and monitoring of surface waters changes which are very dynamic in space and time. In this context, the research consists of two parts. In the first part, the objective is to propose generic and reproducible methodologies for the analysis of Sentinel-1 time series data for floods detection and surface waters mapping. The processing chain comprises a series of pre-processing steps and the statistical modeling of the pixel value distribution to produce probabilistic maps for the presence of surface waters. Images pre-processing for all Sentinel-1 images comprise the reduction SAR effect like orbit errors, speckle noise, and geometric effects. A modified

  20. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  1. Longitudinal quantitative MRI assessment of cortical damage in multiple sclerosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracien, René-Maxime; Reitz, Sarah C; Hof, Stephanie-Michelle; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Droby, Amgad; Wahl, Mathias; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Groppa, Sergiu; Deichmann, Ralf; Klein, Johannes C

    2017-02-27

    Quantitative MRI (qMRI) allows assessing cortical pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) on a microstructural level, where cortical damage has been shown to prolong T1 -relaxation time and increase proton density (PD) compared to controls. However, the evolution of these changes in MS over time has not been investigated so far. In this pilot study we used an advanced method for the longitudinal assessment of cortical tissue change in MS patients with qMRI in comparison to cortical atrophy, as derived from conventional MRI. Twelve patients with relapsing-remitting MS underwent 3T T1 /PD-mapping at two timepoints with a mean interval of 12 months. The respective cortical T1 /PD-values were extracted from the middle of the cortical layer and the cortical thickness was measured for surface-based identification of clusters with increasing/decreasing values. Statistical analysis showed clusters with increasing PD- and T1 -values over time (annualized rate for T1 /PD increase in these clusters: 3.4 ± 2.56% for T1 , P = 0.0007; 2.3 ± 2.59% for PD, P = 0.01). Changes are heterogeneous across the cortex and different patterns of longitudinal PD and T1 increase emerged. Analysis of the cortical thickness yielded only one small cluster indicating a decrease of cortical thickness. Changes of cortical tissue composition in MS seem to be reflected by a spatially inhomogeneous, multifocal increase of the PD values, indicating replacement of neural tissue by water, and of the T1 -relaxation time, a surrogate of demyelination, axonal loss, and gliosis. qMRI changes were more prominent than cortical atrophy, showing the potential of qMRI techniques to quantify microstructural alterations that remain undetected by conventional MRI. 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Impervious Surface Area Mapping using Landsat Imagery: Applications to Hydrology and Land Use Change Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.; Goetz, S. J.; Mazzacato, M. E.; Jantz, C.; Wright, R.

    2002-12-01

    Impervious surfaces include rooftops, roads, parking lots and other areas that are impermeable to moisture. As the amount of built environment around urban areas has increased, it has been widely recognized that more impervious surface area (ISA) results in greater volume and intensity of stream flow, which can degrade stream health and require expensive modifications to flood control structures. Other effects include increased urban "heat island" influences and changes in local weather. If impervious areas could be accurately mapped using satellite imagery, it would provide valuable input to many applications, from hydrologic modeling to land use planning. We have developed a method to map subpixel ISA with Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery and classification - regression tree algorithms. This approach provides highly accurate (90+ percent) maps of ISA, but also permits estimation of the proportion of each cell occupied by impervious materials (between 0-100 percent). We report on a recently completed a map of ISA for the entire 163,000 km2 Chesapeake Bay watershed, a region of highly altered land cover and rapid land use change. We also report on the mapping of change patterns, indicated by ISA changes between 1986 - 2001, in an 18,000 km2 area centered on Baltimore - Washington, D.C. We review the methods, issues, technical challenges, results, accuracy, and advantages of this approach, and provide an overview of various applications for which the products are currently being used.

  3. Mapping surface soil moisture over the Gourma mesoscale site (Mali by using ENVISAT ASAR data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Baup

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The potentialities of ENVISAT ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar multi-angle data for mapping surface soil moisture (SSM in Sahelian rangelands are investigated at medium scale (30 000 km2. The Wide Swath data are selected to take advantage of their high temporal repetitivity (about 8 days at the considered scale associated to a moderate spatial resolution (150 m. In the continuity of previous studies conducted at a local scale in the same region, SSM maps are here processed over the whole AMMA Gourma mesoscale site at 1 km resolution scale. Overall, the generated maps are found to be in good agreement with field data, EPSAT-SG (Estimation des Pluies par SATellite – Second Generation rainfall estimates and ERS (European Remote Sensing Wind Scatterometer (WSC SSM products. The present study shows that the spatial pattern of SSM can be realistically estimated at a kilometric scale. The resulting SSM maps are expected to provide valuable information for initialisation of land surface models and the estimation of the spatial distribution of radiative fluxes. Particularly, SSM maps could help to desaggregate low-resolution products such as those derived from WSC data.

  4. A triangulation-invariant method for anisotropic geodesic map computation on surface meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sang Wook; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Sung, Min-Hyuk; Shin, Sung Yo; Cohen, Elaine

    2012-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of computing the geodesic distance map from a given set of source vertices to all other vertices on a surface mesh using an anisotropic distance metric. Formulating this problem as an equivalent control theoretic problem with Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman partial differential equations, we present a framework for computing an anisotropic geodesic map using a curvature-based speed function. An ordered upwind method (OUM)-based solver for these equations is available for unstructured planar meshes. We adopt this OUM-based solver for surface meshes and present a triangulation-invariant method for the solver. Our basic idea is to explore proximity among the vertices on a surface while locally following the characteristic direction at each vertex. We also propose two speed functions based on classical curvature tensors and show that the resulting anisotropic geodesic maps reflect surface geometry well through several experiments, including isocontour generation, offset curve computation, medial axis extraction, and ridge/valley curve extraction. Our approach facilitates surface analysis and processing by defining speed functions in an application-dependent manner.

  5. Generalized potentiometric-surface map of the High Plains aquifer in Wyoming, 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Charles; Pettijohn, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A potentiometric-surface map shows the general configuration of the water surface for the High Plains Aquifer, which is composed of Oligocene age and younger rocks in southeastern Wyoming. The potentiometric contours are shown at 100-foot intervals on a map at a scale of 1:250,000. The High Plains Aquifer in Wyoming underlies an area of 8,190 square miles and geologically consists of the White River Formation of Oligocene age, the Arikaree Formation of early Miocene age, the Ogallala Formation of late Miocene age, and alluvial deposits of Quaternary age. The altitude of the potentiometric surface declines from about 7 ,100 feet in southwestern Laramie County to about 4,100 feet in eastern Goshen County. Typically, the slope is between 20 and 30 feet per mile; the general direction of flow is eastward. (USGS)

  6. Atmospheric corrosion mapping of copper surfaces from diffuse light scattering measurements by an optoelectronic sensor system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marimuthu PAULVANNA NAYAKI; Arunachalam P. KABILAN

    2009-01-01

    A novel light scattering technique for mapping metal surface corrosion is presented and its results on copper exposed to atmosphere are reported. The front end of the instrument is made up of a sensor module comprising a thin beam light emitting diode (LED) illuminating a small spot on the metal surface, and a matched pair of photodetectors, one for capturing the reflected light and the other for sampling the scattered light. The analog photocurrent signals are digitized and processed online by a personal computer (PC) to determine the corrosion factor defined in terms of the two current values. By scanning the sample surface using the light beam and by computing the corrosion factor values simultaneously, a three dimensional graph and a two dimensional contour map are generated in the PC using Matlab tools. The values of the corrosion factor measured in different durations of exposure to atmosphere, which obey a bilogarithmic law, testify to the validity of our mathematical model.

  7. Surface vector mapping of magnetic anomalies over the Moon using Kaguya and Lunar Prospector observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    We have provided preliminary global maps of three components of the lunar magnetic anomaly on the surface applying the surface vector mapping (SVM) method. The data used in the present study consist of about 5 million observations of the lunar magnetic field at 10-45 km altitudes by Kaguya and Lunar Prospector. The lunar magnetic anomalies were mapped at 0.2° equi-distance points on the surface by the SVM method, showing the highest intensity of 718 nT in the Crisium antipodal region. Overall features on the SVM maps indicate that elongating magnetic anomalies are likely to be dominant on the Moon except for the young large basins with the impact demagnetization. Remarkable demagnetization features suggested by previous studies are also recognized at Hertzsprung and Kolorev craters on the farside. These features indicate that demagnetized areas extend to about 1-2 radii of the basins/craters. There are well-isolated central magnetic anomalies at four craters: Leibnitz, Aitken, Jules Verne, and Grimaldi craters. Their magnetic poles through the dipole source approximation suggest occurrence of the polar wander prior to 3.3-3.5 Ga. When compared with high-albedo markings at several magnetic anomalies such as the Reiner Gamma anomalies, three-dimensional structures of the magnetic field on/near the surface are well correlated with high-albedo areas. These results indicate that the global SVM maps are useful for the study of the lunar magnetic anomalies in comparison with various geological and geophysical data.

  8. The multifractal structure of satellite sea surface temperature maps can be used to obtain global maps of streamlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Turiel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays Earth observation satellites provide information about many relevant variables of the ocean-climate system, such as temperature, moisture, aerosols, etc. However, to retrieve the velocity field, which is the most relevant dynamical variable, is still a technological challenge, specially in the case of oceans. New processing techniques, emerged from the theory of turbulent flows, have come to assist us in this task. In this paper, we show that multifractal techniques applied to new Sea Surface Temperature satellite products opens the way to build maps of ocean currents with unprecedented accuracy. With the application of singularity analysis, we show that global ocean circulation patterns can be retrieved in a daily basis. We compare these results with high-quality altimetry-derived geostrophic velocities, finding a quite good correspondence of the observed patterns both qualitatively and quantitatively. The implications of this findings from the perspective both of theory and of operational applications are discussed.

  9. Na(+)/H(+) exchange regulatory factor 1 is required for ROMK1 K(+) channel expression in the surface membrane of cultured M-1 cortical collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Mayanagi, Taira; Sobue, Kenji; Kubokawa, Manabu

    2017-07-22

    The ROMK1 K(+) channel, a member of the ROMK channel family, is the major candidate for the K(+) secretion pathway in the renal cortical collecting duct (CCD). ROMK1 possesses a PDZ domain-binding motif at its C-terminus that is considered a modulator of ROMK1 expression via interaction with Na(+)/H(+) exchange regulatory factor (NHERF) 1 and NHERF2 scaffold protein. Although NHERF1 is a potential binding partner of the ROMK1 K(+) channel, the interaction between NHERF1 and K(+) channel activity remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we knocked down NHERF1 in cultured M-1 cells derived from mouse CCD and investigated the surface expression and K(+) channel current in these cells after exogenous transfection with EGFP-ROMK1. NHERF1 knockdown resulted in reduced surface expression of ROMK1 as indicated by a cell biotinylation assay. Using the patch-clamp technique, we further found that the number of active channels per patched membrane and the Ba(2+)-sensitive whole-cell K(+) current were decreased in the knockdown cells, suggesting that reduced K(+) current was accompanied by decreased surface expression of ROMK1 in the NHERF1 knockdown cells. Our results provide evidence that NHERF1 mediates K(+) current activity through acceleration of the surface expression of ROMK1 K(+) channels in M-1 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness for jet engine components are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. Phosphor thermometry offers several advantages for mapping temperatures of air film cooled surfaces. While infrared thermography has been typically applied to study air film cooling effectiveness, temperature accuracy depends on knowing surface emissivity (which may change) and correcting for effects of reflected radiation. Because decay time-based full-field phosphor thermometry is relatively immune to these effects, it can be applied advantageously to temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces. In this presentation, an overview will be given of efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center to perform temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and the strengths and limitations of this method for studying air film cooling effectiveness are discussed.

  11. Reactivity mapping with electrochemical gradients for monitoring reactivity at surfaces in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbenborg, Sven O; Nicosia, Carlo; Chen, Pengkun; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2013-01-01

    Studying and controlling reactions at surfaces is of great fundamental and applied interest in, among others, biology, electronics and catalysis. Because reaction kinetics is different at surfaces compared with solution, frequently, solution-characterization techniques cannot be used. Here we report solution gradients, prepared by electrochemical means, for controlling and monitoring reactivity at surfaces in space and time. As a proof of principle, electrochemically derived gradients of a reaction parameter (pH) and of a catalyst (Cu(I)) have been employed to make surface gradients on the micron scale and to study the kinetics of the (surface-confined) imine hydrolysis and the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, respectively. For both systems, the kinetic data were spatially visualized in a two-dimensional reactivity map. In the case of the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, the reaction order (2) was deduced from it.

  12. Surface identification from multiband LADAR reflectance with varied incidence angle via database mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiang, Chona; Jin, Xuemin; Levine, Robert Y

    2015-02-10

    Incident angle dependencies of LADAR reflection depend on bulk material reflectivity and surface texture properties that can be exploited for surface identification. In this paper, surface identification via multiband LADAR reflected radiance is assessed using the nonconventional exploitation factors data system database. A statistics-based dimension reduction algorithm, stochastic neighborhood embedding (t-SNE), is used to separate the data clouds resulting from the monostatic LADAR reflected radiance and corresponding band ratios. The application of t-SNE to multiband reflected radiance effectively separates the data clouds, making surface identification via multiband LADAR reflectance possible in the presence of unknown incident angle dependencies and uncertainties. It is demonstrated that, for both the multiband monostatic reflected radiance and band ratios, the application of t-SNE mapping yields a significant improvement in surface identification from measurements with unknown or varied incident angles.

  13. High throughput functional epitope mapping: revisiting phage display platform to scan target antigen surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Gertrudis; Tundidor, Yaima; Infante, Yanelys Cabrera

    2014-01-01

    Antibody engineering must be accompanied by mapping strategies focused on identifying the epitope recognized by each antibody to define its unique functional identity. High throughput fine specificity determination remains technically challenging. We review recent experiences aimed at revisiting the oldest and most extended display technology to develop a robust epitope mapping platform, based on the ability to manipulate target-derived molecules (ranging from the whole native antigen to antigen domains and smaller fragments) on filamentous phages. Single, multiple and combinatorial mutagenesis allowed comprehensive scanning of phage-displayed antigen surface that resulted in the identification of clusters of residues contributing to epitope formation. Functional pictures of the epitope(s) were thus delineated in the natural context. Successful mapping of antibodies against interleukin-2, epidermal growth factor and its receptor, and vascular endothelial growth factor showed the versatility of these procedures, which combine the accuracy of site-directed mutagenesis with the high throughput potential of phage display.

  14. MAPs/bFGF-PLGA microsphere composite-coated titanium surfaces promote increased adhesion and proliferation of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Wu, Guofeng; Bai, Shizhu; Feng, Zhihong; Dong, Yan; Zhou, Jian; Qin, Haiyan; Zhao, Yimin

    2014-06-01

    Infection and epithelial downgrowth are two major problems with maxillofacial transcutaneous implants, and both are mainly due to lack of stable closure of soft tissues at transcutaneous sites. Fibroblasts have been shown to play a key role in the formation of biological seals. In this work, titanium (Ti) model surfaces were coated with mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) utilizing its unique adhesion ability on diverse inorganic and organic surfaces in wet environments. Prepared basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres can be easily synthesized and combined onto MAPs-coated Ti surfaces, due to the negative surface charges of microspheres in aqueous solution, which is in contrast to the positive charges of MAPs. Titanium model surfaces were divided into three groups. Group A: MAPs/bFGF-PLGA microspheres composite-coated Ti surfaces. Group B: MAPs-coated Ti surfaces. Group C: uncoated Ti surfaces. The effects of coated Ti surfaces on adhesion of fibroblasts, cytoskeletal organization, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM)-related gene expressions were examined. The results revealed increased adhesion (P composite-coated Ti surfaces had the ability to increase fibroblast functionality. In addition, MAPs/bFGF-PLGA microsphere composite-coated Ti surfaces should be studied further as a method of promoting formation of stable biological seals around transcutaneous sites.

  15. Estimating and Mapping Urban Impervious Surfaces: Reflection on Spectral, Spatial, and Temporal Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Q.

    2007-12-01

    Impervious surface is a key indicator of urban environmental quality and urbanization degree. Therefore, estimation and mapping of impervious surfaces in urban areas has attracted more and more attention recently by using remote sensing digital images. In this paper, satellite images with various spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions are employed to examine the effects of these remote sensing data characteristics on mapping accuracy of urban impervious surfaces. The study area was the city proper of Indianapolis (Marion County), Indiana, United States. Linear spectral mixture analysis was applied to generate high albedo, low albedo, vegetation, and soil fraction images (endmembers) from the satellite images, and impervious surfaces were then estimated by adding high albedo and low albedo fraction images. A comparison of EO-1 ALI (multispectral) and Hyperion (hyperspectral) images indicates that the Hyperion image was more effective in discerning low albedo surface materials, especially the spectral bands in the mid-infrared region. Linear spectral mixing modeling was found more useful for medium spatial resolution images, such as Landsat TM/ETM+ and ASTER images, due to the existence of a large amount of mixed pixels in the urban areas. The model, however, may not be suitable for high spatial resolution images, such as IKONOS images, because of less influence from the mixing pixel. The shadow problem in the high spatial resolution images, caused by tall buildings and large tree crowns, is a challenge in impervious surface extraction. Alternative image processing algorithms such as decision tree classifier may be more appropriate to achieve high mapping accuracy. For mid-latitude cities, seasonal vegetation phenology has a significant effect on the spectral response of terrestrial features, and therefore, image analysis must take into account of this environmental characteristic. Three ASTER images, acquired on April 5, 2004, June 16, 2001, and October 3, 2000

  16. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) thermal surface water mapping and its correlation to LANDSAT. [Lake Anna, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvocoresses, A. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Graphics are presented which show HCMM mapped water-surface temperature in Lake Anna, a 13,000 dendrically-shaped lake which provides cooling for a nuclear power plant in Virginia. The HCMM digital data, produced by NASA were processed by NOAA/NESS into image and line-printer form. A LANDSAT image of the lake illustrates the relationship between MSS band 7 data and the HCMM data as processed by the NASA image processing facility which transforms the data to the same distortion-free hotline oblique Mercator projection. Spatial correlation of the two images is relatively simple by either digital or analog means and the HCMM image has a potential accuracy approaching the 80 m of the original LANDSAT data. While it is difficult to get readings that are not diluted by radiation from cooler adjacent land areas in narrow portions of the lake, digital data indicated by the line-printer display five different temperatures for open-water areas. Where the water surface response was not diluted by land areas, the temperature difference recorded by HCMM corresponds to in situ readings with rsme on the order of 1 C.

  17. Mapping of the cumulative β-ray dose on the ground surface surrounding the Fukushima area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Satoru; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi; Nguyen, Thanh T.; Hayashi, Gohei; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    A large amount of the fission products released by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident on 11 March 2011 was deposited in a wide area from Tohoku to northern Kanto. A map of the estimated cumulative β-ray dose (70 μm dose equivalent) on the soil surface for one year after the FDNPP accident has been prepared using previously reported calculation methods and the 2-km mesh survey data by MEXT. From this map of estimated dose, areas with a high cumulative β-ray dose on the soil surface for one year after the FDNPP accident were found to be located in the Akogi-Teshichiro to Akogi-Kunugidaira region in Namie Town, and in the southern Futaba Town to the northern Tomioka Town region. The highest estimated cumulative β-ray dose was 710 mSv for one year at Akogi-Teshichiro, Namie Town. PMID:26519736

  18. Potentiometric surface map of the Magothy aquifer in southern Maryland, September, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Stephen E.; Andreasen, David C.; Wheeler, Judith C.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a map showing the potentiometric surface of the Magothy aquifer in the Magothy Formation of Upper Cretaceous age in Southern Maryland during September 2002. The map is based on water-level measurements in 79 wells. The highest measured water level was 83 feet above sea level near the northern boundary and outcrop area of the aquifer in the north-central part of Anne Arundel County. The potentiometric surface declined towards the south and east. Local gradients were directed toward the centers of two cones of depression that developed in response to pumping. These cones of depression were centered around well fields in the Waldorf area and at the Chalk Point power plant. Measured ground-water levels were as low as 81 feet below sea level in the Waldorf area and 75 feet below sea level at Chalk Point.

  19. Design of vector quantizer for image compression using self-organizing feature map and surface fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, Arijit; Pal, Nikhil R; Chanda, Bhabatosh

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new scheme of designing a vector quantizer for image compression. First, a set of codevectors is generated using the self-organizing feature map algorithm. Then, the set of blocks associated with each code vector is modeled by a cubic surface for better perceptual fidelity of the reconstructed images. Mean-removed vectors from a set of training images is used for the construction of a generic codebook. Further, Huffman coding of the indices generated by the encoder and the difference-coded mean values of the blocks are used to achieve better compression ratio. We proposed two indices for quantitative assessment of the psychovisual quality (blocking effect) of the reconstructed image. Our experiments on several training and test images demonstrate that the proposed scheme can produce reconstructed images of good quality while achieving compression at low bit rates. Index Terms-Cubic surface fitting, generic codebook, image compression, self-organizing feature map, vector quantization.

  20. Adhesion mapping of chemically modified and poly(ethylene oxide)-grafted glass surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogikalmath, G.; Stuart, J.K.; Pungor, A.; Hlady, V.

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional mapping of the adhesion pull-off forces was used to study the origin of surface heterogeneity in the grafted poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) layer. The variance of the pull-off forces measured over the μm-sized regions after each chemical step of modifying glass surfaces was taken to be a measure of the surface chemical heterogeneity. The attachment of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy silane (GPS) to glass decreased the pull-off forces relative to the clean glass and made the surface more uniform. The subsequent hydrolysis of the terminal epoxide groups resulted in a larger surface heterogeneity which was modeled by two populations of the terminal hydroxyl groups, each with its own distribution of adhesion forces and force variance. The activation of the hydroxyls with carbonyldiimmidazole (CDI) healed the surface and lowered its adhesion, however, the force variance remained rather large. Finally, the grafting of the α,ω-diamino poly(ethyleneoxide) chains to the CDI-activated glass largely eliminated adhesion except at a few discrete regions. The adhesion on the PEO grafted layer followed the Poisson distribution of the pull-off forces. With the exception of the glass surface, a correlation between the water contact angles and the mean pull-off forces measured with the Si3N4 tip surfaces was found for all modified glass surfaces. PMID:22267896

  1. Mapping Surface Broadband Albedo from Satellite Observations: A Review of Literatures on Algorithms and Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface albedo is one of the key controlling geophysical parameters in the surface energy budget studies, and its temporal and spatial variation is closely related to the global climate change and regional weather system due to the albedo feedback mechanism. As an efficient tool for monitoring the surfaces of the Earth, remote sensing is widely used for deriving long-term surface broadband albedo with various geostationary and polar-orbit satellite platforms in recent decades. Moreover, the algorithms for estimating surface broadband albedo from satellite observations, including narrow-to-broadband conversions, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF angular modeling, direct-estimation algorithm and the algorithms for estimating albedo from geostationary satellite data, are developed and improved. In this paper, we present a comprehensive literature review on algorithms and products for mapping surface broadband albedo with satellite observations and provide a discussion of different algorithms and products in a historical perspective based on citation analysis of the published literature. This paper shows that the observation technologies and accuracy requirement of applications are important, and long-term, global fully-covered (including land, ocean, and sea-ice surfaces, gap-free, surface broadband albedo products with higher spatial and temporal resolution are required for climate change, surface energy budget, and hydrological studies.

  2. VEM on VERITAS - Retrieval of global infrared surface emissivity maps of Venus and expectable retrieval uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, David; Arnold, Gabriele; Haus, Rainer; Helbert, Jörn; Smrekar, Suzanne; Hensley, Scott

    2016-04-01

    Even though Venus is in many respects the most Earth-like planet we know today, its surface composition and geology are not well understood yet. The major obstacle is the extremely dense, hot, and opaque atmosphere that complicates both in situ measurements and infrared remote sensing, the wavelength range of the latter often being the range of choice due to its coverage of many spectral properties diagnostic to the surface material's composition and texture. Thermal emissions of the hot surface depend on surface temperature and on spectral surface emissivity. As this emitted radiation wells upward, it is strongly attenuated through absorption and multiple scattering by the gaseous and particulate components of the dense atmosphere, and it is superimposed by thermal atmospheric emissions. While surface information this way carried to space is completely lost in the scattered sunlight on the dayside, a few narrow atmospheric transparency windows around 1 μm allow the sounding of the surface with nightside measurements. The successfully completed VEX ('Venus Express') mission, although not dedicated to surface science, enabled a first glimpse at much of the southern hemisphere's surface through the nightside spectral transparency windows covered by VIRTIS-M-IR ('Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer, Mapping channel in the IR', 1.0-5.1 μm). Two complementary approaches, a fast semi-empiric technique on the one hand, and a more fundamental but resource-intensive method based on a fully regularized Bayesian multi-spectrum retrieval algorithm in combination with a detailed radiative transfer simulation program on the other hand, were both successfully applied to derive surface emissivity data maps. Both methods suffered from lack of spatial coverage and a small SNR as well as from surface topography maps not sufficiently accurate for the definition of suitable boundary conditions for surface emissivity retrieval. The recently proposed VERITAS mission

  3. Generation of 3-D surface maps in waste storage silos using a structured light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, B. L.; Rowe, J. C.; Dinkins, M. A.; Christensen, B.; Selleck, C.; Jacoboski, D.; Markus, R.

    1992-01-01

    Surface contours inside the large waste storage tanks typical of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex are, in general, highly irregular. In addition to pipes and other pieces of equipment in the tanks, the surfaces may have features such as mounds, fissures, crystalline structures, and mixed solid and liquid forms. Prior to remediation activities, it will be necessary to characterize the waste to determine the most effective remediation approaches. Surface contour data will be required both prior to and during remediation. The use is described of a structured light source to generate 3-D surface contour maps of the interior of waste storage silos at the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, OH. The landscape inside these large waste storage tanks bears a strong resemblance to some of the landscapes that might be encountered during lunar or planetary exploration. Hence, these terrestrial 3-D mapping techniques may be directly applicable to extraterrestrial exploration. In further development, it will be demonstrated that these 3-D data can be used for robotic task planning just as 3-D surface contour data of a satellite could be used to plan maintenance tasks for a space-based servicing robot.

  4. Reconstruction of Sub-Surface Velocities from Satellite Observations Using Iterative Self-Organizing Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this letter a new method based on modified self-organizing maps is presented for the reconstruction of deep ocean current velocities from surface information provided by satellites. This method takes advantage of local correlations in the data-space to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed deep velocities. Unlike previous attempts to reconstruct deep velocities from surface data, our method makes no assumptions regarding the structure of the water column, nor the underlying dynamics of the flow field. Using satellite observations of surface velocity, sea-surface height and sea-surface temperature, as well as observations of the deep current velocity from autonomous Argo floats to train the map, we are able to reconstruct realistic high--resolution velocity fields at a depth of 1000m. Validation reveals extremely promising results, with a speed root mean squared error of ~2.8cm/s, a factor more than a factor of two smaller than competing methods, and direction errors consistently smaller than 30 degrees...

  5. Real-space Mapping of Surface Trap States in CIGSe Nanocrystals using 4D Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Bose, Riya

    2016-05-26

    Surface trap states in semiconductor copper indium gallium selenide nanocrystals (NCs) which serve as undesirable channels for non-radiative carrier recombination, remain a great challenge impeding the development of solar and optoelectronics devices based on these NCs. In order to design efficient passivation techniques to minimize these trap states, a precise knowledge about the charge carrier dynamics on the NCs surface is essential. However, selective mapping of surface traps requires capabilities beyond the reach of conventional laser spectroscopy and static electron microscopy; it can only be accessed by using a one-of-a-kind, second-generation four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscope (4D S-UEM) with sub-picosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolutions. Here, we precisely map the surface charge carrier dynamics of copper indium gallium selenide NCs before and after surface passivation in real space and time using S-UEM. The time-resolved snapshots clearly demonstrate that the density of the trap states is significantly reduced after zinc sulfide (ZnS) shelling. Furthermore, removal of trap states and elongation of carrier lifetime are confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the self-biased photodetector fabricated using the shelled NCs.

  6. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS NCEP Real-Time Global and NASA SPoRT Sea Surface Temperature Analyses (Time Enabled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-enabled map service provides a map depicting the latest daily sea surface temperature analyses from both the NOAA/NWS/NCEP...

  7. Developing Land Surface Type Map with Biome Classification Scheme Using Suomi NPP/JPSS VIIRS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Huang, Chengquan; Zhan, Xiwu; Jin, Huiran

    2016-08-01

    Accurate representation of actual terrestrial surface types at regional to global scales is an important element for a wide range of applications, such as land surface parameterization, modeling of biogeochemical cycles, and carbon cycle studies. In this study, in order to meet the requirement of the retrieval of global leaf area index (LAI) and fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the vegetation (fPAR) and other studies, a global map generated from Suomi National Polar- orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) surface reflectance data in six major biome classes based on their canopy structures, which include: Grass/Cereal Crops, Shrubs, Broadleaf Crops, Savannas, Broadleaf Forests, and Needleleaf Forests, was created. The primary biome classes were converted from an International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) legend global surface type data that was created in previous study, and the separation of two crop types are based on a secondary classification.

  8. Mapping of Surface and Shallow Subsurface Signatures in the CONSERT Data during the Descent of Philae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plettemeier, Dirk; Statz, Christoph; Hahnel, Ronny; Hegler, Sebastian; Kofman, Wlodek; Herique, Alain; Rogez, Yves; Pasquero, Pierre; Zine, Sonia; Ciarletti, Valerie

    2016-04-01

    The primary scientific objective of the Comet Nucleus Sounding Experiment by Radiowave Transmission (CONSERT) aboard Rosetta is the characterization of comet 67P/Chuyurmov-Gerasimenko's deep interior dielectric properties. This was done during the first science sequence (FSS) by means of bi-static radio propagation measurements between the the CONSERT instrument aboard lander Philae launched onto the comet's surface and its counterpart aboard the Rosetta orbiter. In addition to the FSS measurements, CONSERT was operated during the separation and descent of Philae onto the 67P/C-G's surface. The received CONSERT signal during the SDL consists of the direct propagation between Rosetta and Philae and indirect reflections of 67P/C-G's surface. Using the peak power measurements in the dominant direct path between Rosetta and Philae during the descent we were able to reconstruct the lander's attitude and estimate the spin rate of the lander along its descent trajectory. The deployment of the lander legs and CONSERT antennas as well as the orbiter change of attitude in order to orient the science towards the assumed lander position are visible in the measured CONSERT data as well. The information gained on Philae's attitude is used in the estimation of 67P/C-G's surface and near subsurface dielectric properties. Information on the surface of 67P/C-G are contained in the data during roughly the last third of the descent of Philae onto the comet's surface. The surface signatures in the measured data are mapped to the location of origin on 67P/C-G's surface. The results from the mapping process show good spatial diversity along the descent track of Philae necessary for the estimation of the dielectric properties of prominent features in the CONSERT SDL data.

  9. Compositional maps of 67P/CG nucleus surface after perihelion passage by Rosetta/VIRTIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Raponi, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Tosi, F.; Migliorini, Alessandra; Piccioni, G.; Cerroni, P.; Capria, M. T.; Erard, S.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Leyrat, C.; Arnold, G.; Barucci, M. A.; Schmitt, B.; Quirico, E.

    2016-11-01

    Moving after perihelion passage (August 13th 2015), VIRTIS-M the 0.25-5.0 μm imaging spectrometer on board Rosetta has mapped again the north and equatorial regions of 67P/CG's nucleus with the scope to trace color and composition evolution of the surface. With the loss of the IR channel due to the active cryogenic cooler failure occurred in May 2015, VIRTIS-M has observed only with the VIS channel in the 0.25-1.0 μm spectral range. Despite this limitation, the returned data are valuable in performing a comparison of surface properties between pre and post-perihelion times. Approaching perihelion passage, 67P/CG's nucleus has experienced a general brightening due to the removal of the surficial dust layer caused by the more intense gaseous activity with the consequent exposure of a larger fraction of water ice. Coma observations by VIRTIS during pre-perihelion have shown a correlation between the areas of the nucleus where gaseous activity by water ice sublimation is more intense with the surface brightening caused by dust removal. After having applied data calibration and photometric correction, VIRTIS data are projected on the irregularly shaped digital model6 of 67P/CG with the aim to derive visible albedo and colors maps rendered with a spatial resolution of 0.5×0.5 deg in latitude-longitude, corresponding to a sampling of about 15 m/pixel. Dedicated mapping sequences executed at different heliocentric distances, are employed to follow the dynamical evolution of the surface. Direct comparison between compositional maps obtained at the same heliocentric distances along inbound and outbound orbits allows to evidence the changes occurred on the same areas of the surface. In this context, the first VIRTIS-M maps, obtained in August 2014 at heliocentric distance of 3.4 AU along the inbound orbit with a solar phase angle of about 30-45° are compared with the last ones, taken in June 2016 at 3.2 AU from the Sun on the outbound trajectory at solar phases of about

  10. A Near-Infrared and Thermal Imager for Mapping Titan's Surface Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, S.; Hewagma, T.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10% of the solar insolation reaches the surface of Titan through atmospheric spectral windows. We will discuss a filter based imaging system for a future Titan orbiter that will exploit these windows mapping surface features, cloud regions, polar storms. In the near-infrared (NIR), two filters (1.28 micrometer and 1.6 micrometer), strategically positioned between CH1 absorption bands, and InSb linear array pixels will explore the solar reflected radiation. We propose to map the mid, infrared (MIR) region with two filters: 9.76 micrometer and 5.88-to-6.06 micrometers with MCT linear arrays. The first will map MIR thermal emission variations due to surface albedo differences in the atmospheric window between gas phase CH3D and C2H4 opacity sources. The latter spans the crossover spectral region where observed radiation transitions from being dominated by thermal emission to solar reflected light component. The passively cooled linear arrays will be incorporated into the focal plane of a light-weight thin film stretched membrane 10 cm telescope. A rad-hard ASIC together with an FPGA will be used for detector pixel readout and detector linear array selection depending on if the field-of-view (FOV) is looking at the day- or night-side of Titan. The instantaneous FOV corresponds to 3.1, 15.6, and 31.2 mrad for the 1, 5, and 10 micrometer channels, respectively. For a 1500 km orbit, a 5 micrometer channel pixel represents a spatial resolution of 91 m, with a FOV that spans 23 kilometers, and Titan is mapped in a push-broom manner as determined by the orbital path. The system mass and power requirements are estimated to be 6 kg and 5 W, respectively. The package is proposed for a polar orbiter with a lifetime matching two Saturn seasons.

  11. Probing and mapping the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymer surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, Memed, E-mail: memi@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2014-10-01

    Molecular imprinting is an effective technique for preparing recognition sites which act as synthetic receptors on polymeric surfaces. Herein, we synthesized MIP surfaces with specific binding sites for streptavidin and characterized them at nanoscale by using two different atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. While the single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) reveals the unbinding kinetics between streptavidin molecule and binding sites, simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) was employed, for the first time, to directly map the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymers. Streptavidin modified AFM cantilever showed specific unbinding events with an unbinding force around 300 pN and the binding probability was calculated as 35.2% at a given loading rate. In order to prove the specificity of the interaction, free streptavidin molecules were added to AFM liquid cell and the binding probability was significantly decreased to 7.6%. Moreover, the recognition maps show that the smallest recognition site with a diameter of around ∼ 21 nm which corresponds to a single streptavidin molecule binding site. We believe that the potential of combining SMFS and TREC opens new possibilities for the characterization of MIP surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Graphical abstract: Simultaneous Topography and RECognition (TREC) imaging is a novel characterization technique to reveal binding sites on molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Highlights: • Highly specific streptavidin printed polymer surfaces were synthesized. • Unbinding kinetic rate of single streptavidin molecule was studied by SMFS. • The distribution of binding pockets was revealed for the first time by TREC imaging. • TREC showed that the binding pockets formed nano-domains on MIP surface. • SMFS and TREC are powerful AFM techniques for characterization of MIP surfaces.

  12. High-resolution hydraulic parameter maps for surface soils in tropical South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthews, T. R.; Quesada, C. A.; Galbraith, D. R.; Malhi, Y.; Mullins, C. E.; Hodnett, M. G.; Dharssi, I.

    2014-05-01

    Modern land surface model simulations capture soil profile water movement through the use of soil hydraulics sub-models, but good hydraulic parameterisations are often lacking, especially in the tropics. We present much-improved gridded data sets of hydraulic parameters for surface soil for the critical area of tropical South America, describing soil profile water movement across the region to 30 cm depth. Optimal hydraulic parameter values are given for the Brooks and Corey, Campbell, van Genuchten-Mualem and van Genuchten-Burdine soil hydraulic models, which are widely used hydraulic sub-models in land surface models. This has been possible through interpolating soil measurements from several sources through the SOTERLAC soil and terrain data base and using the most recent pedotransfer functions (PTFs) derived for South American soils. All soil parameter data layers are provided at 15 arcsec resolution and available for download, this being 20x higher resolution than the best comparable parameter maps available to date. Specific examples are given of the use of PTFs and the importance highlighted of using PTFs that have been locally parameterised and that are not just based on soil texture. We discuss current developments in soil hydraulic modelling and how high-resolution parameter maps such as these can improve the simulation of vegetation development and productivity in land surface models.

  13. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased visual ...

  14. The multifractal structure of satellite sea surface temperature maps can be used to obtain global maps of streamlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Turiel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays Earth observation satellites provide information about many relevant variables of the ocean-climate system, such as temperature, moisture, aerosols, etc. However, to retrieve the velocity field, which is the most relevant dynamical variable, is still a technological challenge, specially in the case of oceans. New processing techniques, emerged from the theory of turbulent flows, have come to assist us in this task. In this paper, we show that multifractal techniques applied to new Sea Surface Temperature satellite products opens the way to build maps of ocean currents with unprecedented accuracy. With the application of singularity analysis, we show that global ocean circulation patterns can be retrieved in a daily basis. We compare these results with high-quality altimetry-derived geostrophic velocities, finding a quite good correspondence of the observed patterns both qualitatively and quantitatively; and this is done for the first time on a global basis, even for less active areas. The implications of this findings from the perspective both of theory and of operational applications are discussed.

  15. A wafer mapping technique for residual stress in surface micromachined films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, G.; Murray, J.; Smith, S.; Desmulliez, M. P. Y.; Mount, A. R.; Walton, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of MEMS devices employing movable structures is crucially dependant on the mechanical behaviour of the deposited materials. It is therefore important to be able to fully characterize the micromachined films and predict with confidence the mechanical properties of patterned structures. This paper presents a characterization technique that enables the residual stress in MEMS films to be mapped at the wafer level by using microstructures released by surface micromachining. These dedicated MEMS test structures and the associated measurement techniques are used to extract localized information on the strain and Young’s modulus of the film under investigation. The residual stress is then determined by numerically coupling this data with a finite element analysis of the structure. This paper illustrates the measurement routine and demonstrates it with a case study using electrochemically deposited alloys of nickel and iron, particularly prone to develop high levels of residual stress. The results show that the technique enables wafer mapping of film non-uniformities and identifies wafer-to-wafer differences. A comparison between the results obtained from the mapping technique and conventional wafer bow measurements highlights the benefits of using a procedure tailored to films that are non-uniform, patterned and surface-micromachined, as opposed to simple standard stress extraction methods. The presented technique reveals detailed information that is generally unexplored when using conventional stress extraction methods such as wafer bow measurements.

  16. MAPPING OF PLANETARY SURFACE AGE BASED ON CRATER STATISTICS OBTAINED BY AN AUTOMATIC DETECTION ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Salih

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the impact crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD is a well-established approach to the determination of the age of planetary surfaces. Classically, estimation of the CSFD is achieved by manual crater counting and size determination in spacecraft images, which, however, becomes very time-consuming for large surface areas and/or high image resolution. With increasing availability of high-resolution (nearly global image mosaics of planetary surfaces, a variety of automated methods for the detection of craters based on image data and/or topographic data have been developed. In this contribution a template-based crater detection algorithm is used which analyses image data acquired under known illumination conditions. Its results are used to establish the CSFD for the examined area, which is then used to estimate the absolute model age of the surface. The detection threshold of the automatic crater detection algorithm is calibrated based on a region with available manually determined CSFD such that the age inferred from the manual crater counts corresponds to the age inferred from the automatic crater detection results. With this detection threshold, the automatic crater detection algorithm can be applied to a much larger surface region around the calibration area. The proposed age estimation method is demonstrated for a Kaguya Terrain Camera image mosaic of 7.4 m per pixel resolution of the floor region of the lunar crater Tsiolkovsky, which consists of dark and flat mare basalt and has an area of nearly 10,000 km2. The region used for calibration, for which manual crater counts are available, has an area of 100 km2. In order to obtain a spatially resolved age map, CSFDs and surface ages are computed for overlapping quadratic regions of about 4.4 x 4.4 km2 size offset by a step width of 74 m. Our constructed surface age map of the floor of Tsiolkovsky shows age values of typically 3.2-3.3 Ga, while for small regions lower (down to

  17. Mapping of Planetary Surface Age Based on Crater Statistics Obtained by AN Automatic Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, A. L.; Mühlbauer, M.; Grumpe, A.; Pasckert, J. H.; Wöhler, C.; Hiesinger, H.

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of the impact crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) is a well-established approach to the determination of the age of planetary surfaces. Classically, estimation of the CSFD is achieved by manual crater counting and size determination in spacecraft images, which, however, becomes very time-consuming for large surface areas and/or high image resolution. With increasing availability of high-resolution (nearly) global image mosaics of planetary surfaces, a variety of automated methods for the detection of craters based on image data and/or topographic data have been developed. In this contribution a template-based crater detection algorithm is used which analyses image data acquired under known illumination conditions. Its results are used to establish the CSFD for the examined area, which is then used to estimate the absolute model age of the surface. The detection threshold of the automatic crater detection algorithm is calibrated based on a region with available manually determined CSFD such that the age inferred from the manual crater counts corresponds to the age inferred from the automatic crater detection results. With this detection threshold, the automatic crater detection algorithm can be applied to a much larger surface region around the calibration area. The proposed age estimation method is demonstrated for a Kaguya Terrain Camera image mosaic of 7.4 m per pixel resolution of the floor region of the lunar crater Tsiolkovsky, which consists of dark and flat mare basalt and has an area of nearly 10,000 km2. The region used for calibration, for which manual crater counts are available, has an area of 100 km2. In order to obtain a spatially resolved age map, CSFDs and surface ages are computed for overlapping quadratic regions of about 4.4 x 4.4 km2 size offset by a step width of 74 m. Our constructed surface age map of the floor of Tsiolkovsky shows age values of typically 3.2-3.3 Ga, while for small regions lower (down to 2.9 Ga) and higher

  18. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  19. High Resolution Maps of the Moon Surface with AMIE/SMART-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despan, Daniela; Erard, S.; Barucci, A.; Josset, J. L.; Beauvivre, S.; Chevrel, S.; Pinet, P.; Koschny, D.; Almeida, M.; Grieger, B.; Foing, B.; AMIE Team

    2008-09-01

    The Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment (AMIE) on board the ESA lunar mission Smart-1 has performed colour imaging of the lunar surface using various filters in the visible and NIR range. This micro-camera provided high resolution images of selected parts of the lunar surface, including the North and South pole areas. Being give that the SMART-1 mission was in a 300km x 300km orbit with perilune over the South pole, the coverage between the North and the South regions is different. The AMIE images were obtained using a tele-objective with 5.3° x 5.3° field of view and a sensor of 1024 x 1024 pixels. The output images have resolution 45m/pixel at 500km, and are encoded with 10 bits/pixel. The data for the North pole were obtained at a much higher altitude than the South pole data. From the 300 Km pericenter altitude, the same field of view corresponds to a spatial resolution about 27 m/pixel. The high resolution imaging of the Moon surface makes possible detailed analysis of the morphological features and physical characteristics of the lunar surface. In order to construct AMIE data maps, systematic analysis and processing is being carried on using the whole data set. Geometrical analysis of AMIE images relies on the SPICE system: image coordinates are computed to get precise projection at the surface, and illumination angles are computed to analyze the photometric sequences. Using this method, high resolution mosaics were constructed then compared to lower resolution Clementine UV-Vis and NIR images. Maps of both North and South pole were obtained as well as other regions of interest. Eventually, this method will be applied in all areas where AMIE has provided high resolution observations of the surface, typically a factor of 3 higher than the Clementine UV-Vis camera. New results will be presented at the conference.

  20. Application of ESPRIT in Broad Beam HF Ground Wave Radar Sea Surface Current Mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dan-hong; Wu Xiong-bin; Wen Bi-yang; Cheng Feng

    2004-01-01

    HF surface wave radar system OSMAR2000 is a broad-beam sea-state detecting radar. ESPRIT (Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Technique) algorithm is proposed to apply in DOA (direction of arrival) determination of sea echoes. The algorithm of ESPRIT is briefly introduced first. Then discussions are made on the technique for application in the OSMAR2000 framework. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of radial current mapping based on this method. The algorithm manifests significant performance and computational advantages compared with that of MUSIC. Data acquired by OSMAR2000 are processed to give radial current map and the synthesized vector currents are compared with the in-situ measurement with traditional means. The results show the validity of ESPRIT application in DOA determination for broad-beam radar.

  1. Global mapping of the surface of Titan through the haze with VIMS onboard Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Cornet, Thomas; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Sotin, Christophe; Barnes, Jason W.; Brown, Robert H.; Lasue, Jérémie; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2016-10-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini observes the surface of Titan through the atmosphere in seven narrow spectral windows in the infrared at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.68-2.78, and 4.9-5.1 microns. We have produced a global hyperspectral mosaic at 32 pixels per degrees of the complete VIMS data set of Titan between T0 (July 2004) and T120 (June 2016) flybys. We merged all the data cubes sorted by increasing spatial resolution, with the high resolution images on top of the mosaic and the low resolution images used as background. One of the main challenge in producing global spectral composition maps is to remove the seams between individual frames taken throughout the entire mission. These seams are mainly due to the widely varying viewing angles between data acquired during the different Titan flybys. These angles induce significant surface photometric effects and a strongly varying atmospheric (absorption and scattering) contribution, the scattering of the atmosphere being all the more present than the wavelength is short. We have implemented a series of empirical corrections to homogenize the maps, by correcting at first order for photometric and atmospheric scattering effects. Recently, the VIMS' IR wavelength calibration has been observed to be drifting from a total of a few nm toward longer wavelengths, the drift being almost continuously present over the course of the mission. Whereas minor at first order, this drift has implications on the homogeneity of the maps when trying to fit images taken at the beginning of the mission with images taken near the end, in particular when using channels in the narrowest atmospheric spectral windows. A correction scheme has been implemented to account for this subtle effect.

  2. Genus Oblivious Cross Parameterization: Robust Topological Management of Inter-surface Maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, J C; Pascucci, V; Joy, K I

    2007-10-23

    We consider the problem of generating a map between two triangulated meshes, M and M{prime}, with arbitrary and possibly differing genus. This problem has rarely been tackled in its generality. Early schemes considered only topological spheres. Recent algorithms allow inputs with an arbitrary number of tunnels but require M and M{prime} to have equal genus, mapping tunnel to tunnel. Other schemes which allow more general inputs are not guaranteed to work and the authors do not provide a characterization of the input meshes that can be processed successfully. Moreover, the techniques have difficulty dealing with coarse meshes with many tunnels. In this paper we present the first robust approach to build a map between two meshes of arbitrary unequal genus. We also provide a simplified method for setting the initial alignment between M and M{prime}, reducing reliance on landmarks and allowing the user to select 'landmark tunnels' in addition to the standard landmark vertices. After computing the map, we automatically derive a continuous deformation from M to M{prime} using a variational implicit approach to describe the evolution of non-landmark tunnels. Overall, we achieve a cross parameterization scheme that is provably robust in the sense that it can map M to M{prime} without constraints on their relative genus or on the density of the triangulation with respect to the number of tunnels. To demonstrate the practical effectiveness of our scheme we provide a number of examples of inter-surface parameterizations between meshes of different genus and shape.

  3. Algorithm for Automated Mapping of Land Surface Temperature Using LANDSAT 8 Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Avdan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature is an important factor in many areas, such as global climate change, hydrological, geo-/biophysical, and urban land use/land cover. As the latest launched satellite from the LANDSAT family, LANDSAT 8 has opened new possibilities for understanding the events on the Earth with remote sensing. This study presents an algorithm for the automatic mapping of land surface temperature from LANDSAT 8 data. The tool was developed using the LANDSAT 8 thermal infrared sensor Band 10 data. Different methods and formulas were used in the algorithm that successfully retrieves the land surface temperature to help us study the thermal environment of the ground surface. To verify the algorithm, the land surface temperature and the near-air temperature were compared. The results showed that, for the first case, the standard deviation was 2.4°C, and for the second case, it was 2.7°C. For future studies, the tool should be refined with in situ measurements of land surface temperature.

  4. Landing Site Selection and Surface Traverse Planning using the Lunar Mapping & Modeling Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, E.; Chang, G.; Bui, B.; Sadaqathullah, S.; Kim, R.; Dodge, K.; Malhotra, S.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: The Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP), is a web-based Portal and a suite of interactive visualization and analysis tools for users to access mapped lunar data products (including image mosaics, digital elevation models, etc.) from past and current lunar missions (e.g., Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Apollo, etc.), and to perform in-depth analyses to support lunar surface mission planning and system design for future lunar exploration and science missions. It has been widely used by many scientists mission planners, as well as educators and public outreach (e.g., Google Lunar XPRICE teams, RESOLVE project, museums etc.) This year, LMMP was used by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI)'s Lunar Exploration internship program to perform lighting analysis and local hazard assessments, such as, slope, surface roughness and crater/boulder distribution to research landing sites and surface pathfinding and traversal. Our talk will include an overview of LMMP, a demonstration of the tools as well as a summary of the LPI Lunar Exploration summer interns' experience in using those tools.

  5. Digital map and situation surface: a team-oriented multidisplay workspace for network enabled situation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinsipp-Byma, E.; Geisler, Jürgen; Bader, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    System concepts for network enabled image-based ISR (intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance) is the major mission of Fraunhofer IITB's applied research in the area of defence and security solutions. For the TechDemo08 as part of the NATO CNAD POW Defence against terrorism Fraunhofer IITB advanced a new multi display concept to handle the shear amount and high complexity of ISR data acquired by networked, distributed surveillance systems with the objective to support the generation of a common situation picture. Amount and Complexity of ISR data demands an innovative man-machine interface concept for humans to deal with it. The IITB's concept is the Digital Map & Situation Surface. This concept offers to the user a coherent multi display environment combining a horizontal surface for the situation overview from the bird's eye view, an attached vertical display for collateral information and so-called foveatablets as personalized magic lenses in order to obtain high resolved and role-specific information about a focused areaof- interest and to interact with it. In the context of TechDemo08 the Digital Map & Situation Surface served as workspace for team-based situation visualization and analysis. Multiple sea- and landside surveillance components were connected to the system.

  6. Cortical stimulation for central neuropathic pain: 3-D surface MRI for easy determination of the motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herregodts, P; Stadnik, T; De Ridder, F; D'Haens, J

    1995-01-01

    Motor cortex electric stimulation has been reported to be effective for the treatment of central post-stroke pain and trigeminal neuropathic pain. Five patients with pain due to injury of the trigeminal nerve and with abnormalities of facial sensibility, as well as two patients suffering of a post-stroke thalamic pain, were subjected to stimulation applied epidurally on the motor cortex. Quadripolar electrodes were implanted under local anaesthesia and the precise location of the motor cortex was determined on three-dimensional surface MRI the day prior to surgery. In our experience, correct topographic localization of the electrode on the motor cortex seems to be crucial to obtain pain reduction.

  7. Mapping water surface roughness in a shallow, gravel-bed river using hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, B. T.; Legleiter, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid advances in remote sensing are narrowing the gap between the data available for characterizing physical and biological processes in rivers and the information needed to guide river management decisions. The availability and quality of hyperspectral imagery have increased drastically over the past 20 years and hyperspectral data is now used in a number of different capacities that range from classifying riverine environments to measuring river bathymetry. A fundamental challenge in relating the spectral data from images to biophysical processes is the difficulty of isolating individual contributions to the at-sensor radiance, each associated with a different component of the fluvial environment. In this presentation we describe a method for isolating the contribution of light reflected from the water surface, or sun glint, from a hyperspectral image of a shallow gravel-bed river. We show that isolation and removal of sun glint can improve the accuracy of spectrally-based depth retrieval in cases where sun glint dominates the at-sensor radiance. Observed-vs.-predicted R2 values for depth retrieval improved from 0.56 to 0.68 following sun glint removal. In addition to clarifying the signal associated with the water column and bed, isolating sun glint could unlock important hydraulic information contained within the topography of the water surface. We present data from flume and field experiments suggesting that the intensity of sun glint is a function of water surface roughness. In rivers, water surface roughness depends on local flow hydraulics: depth, velocity, and bed material grain size. To explore this relationship, we coupled maps of image-derived sun glint with hydraulic measurements collected with a kayak-borne acoustic Doppler current profiler along 2 km of the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park. Spatial patterns of sun glint are spatially correlated with field observations of near-surface velocity and depth, suggesting that reach scale hydraulics

  8. Mathematical model for biomolecular quantification using large-area surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palla, Mirkó; Bosco, Filippo; Yang, Jaeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on nanostructured platforms is a promising technique for quantitative and highly sensitive detection of biomolecules in the field of analytical biochemistry. Here, we report a mathematical model to predict experimental SERS signal (or hotspot...... in the picomolar concentration regimes. This developed model may be generally used for biomolecular quantification using Raman mapping on SERS substrates with planar geometries, in which the hotspots are approximated as electromagnetic enhancement fields generated by closely spaced dimers. Lastly, we also show...

  9. Functional and anatomical properties of human visual cortical fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouyu; Cate, Anthony D; Herron, Timothy J; Kang, Xiaojian; Yund, E William; Bao, Shanglian; Woods, David L

    2015-04-01

    Human visual cortical fields (VCFs) vary in size and anatomical location across individual subjects. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with retinotopic stimulation to identify VCFs on the cortical surface. We found that aligning and averaging VCF activations across the two hemispheres provided clear delineation of multiple retinotopic fields in visual cortex. The results show that VCFs have consistent locations and extents in different subjects that provide stable and accurate landmarks for functional and anatomical mapping. Interhemispheric comparisons revealed minor differences in polar angle and eccentricity tuning in comparable VCFs in the left and right hemisphere, and somewhat greater intersubject variability in the right than left hemisphere. We then used the functional boundaries to characterize the anatomical properties of VCFs, including fractional anisotropy (FA), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and the ratio of T1W and T2W images and found significant anatomical differences between VCFs and between hemispheres.

  10. Mapping Impervious Surfaces Globally at 30m Resolution Using Global Land Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeColstoun, Eric Brown; Huang, Chengquan; Tan, Bin; Smith, Sarah Elizabeth; Phillips, Jacqueline; Wang, Panshi; Ling, Pui-Yu; Zhan, James; Li, Sike; Taylor, Michael P.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tilton, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Impervious surfaces, mainly artificial structures and roads, cover less than 1% of the world's land surface (1.3% over USA). Regardless of the relatively small coverage, impervious surfaces have a significant impact on the environment. They are the main source of the urban heat island effect, and affect not only the energy balance, but also hydrology and carbon cycling, and both land and aquatic ecosystem services. In the last several decades, the pace of converting natural land surface to impervious surfaces has increased. Quantitatively monitoring the growth of impervious surface expansion and associated urbanization has become a priority topic across both the physical and social sciences. The recent availability of consistent, global scale data sets at 30m resolution such as the Global Land Survey from the Landsat satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to map global impervious cover and urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such a buildings, roads and parking lots. With long term GLS data now available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 time periods, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. In the Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP), we are producing the first global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set. We have processed the GLS 2010 data set to surface reflectance (8500+ TM and ETM+ scenes) and are using a supervised classification method using a regression tree to produce continental scale impervious cover data sets. A very large set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications and is being derived through the interpretation of high spatial resolution (approx. 2 m or less) commercial satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2) available to us through the unclassified

  11. Mapping Impervious Surfaces Globally at 30m Resolution Using Landsat Global Land Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown de Colstoun, E.; Huang, C.; Wolfe, R. E.; Tan, B.; Tilton, J.; Smith, S.; Phillips, J.; Wang, P.; Ling, P.; Zhan, J.; Xu, X.; Taylor, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Impervious surfaces, mainly artificial structures and roads, cover less than 1% of the world's land surface (1.3% over USA). Regardless of the relatively small coverage, impervious surfaces have a significant impact on the environment. They are the main source of the urban heat island effect, and affect not only the energy balance, but also hydrology and carbon cycling, and both land and aquatic ecosystem services. In the last several decades, the pace of converting natural land surface to impervious surfaces has increased. Quantitatively monitoring the growth of impervious surface expansion and associated urbanization has become a priority topic across both the physical and social sciences. The recent availability of consistent, global scale data sets at 30m resolution such as the Global Land Survey from the Landsat satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to map global impervious cover and urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such a buildings, roads and parking lots. With long term GLS data now available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 time periods, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. In the Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP), we are producing the first global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set. We have processed the GLS 2010 data set to surface reflectance (8500+ TM and ETM+ scenes) and are using a supervised classification method using a regression tree to produce continental scale impervious cover data sets. A very large set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications and is being derived through the interpretation of high spatial resolution (~2 m or less) commercial satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2) available to us through the unclassified

  12. AUTOMATIC DETECTION OF SECONDARY CRATERS AND MAPPING OF PLANETARY SURFACE AGE BASED ON LUNAR ORBITAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Salih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ages of planetary surfaces are typically obtained by manually determining the impact crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD in spacecraft imagery, which is a very intricate and time-consuming procedure. In this work, an image-based crater detection algorithm that relies on a generative template matching technique is applied to establish the CSFD of the floor of the lunar farside crater Tsiolkovsky. The automatic detection threshold value is calibrated based on a 100 km² test area for which the CSFD has been determined by manual crater counting in a previous study. This allows for the construction of an age map of the complete crater floor. It is well known that the CSFD may be affected by secondary craters. Hence, our detection results are refined by applying a secondary candidate detection (SCD algorithm relying on Voronoi tessellation of the spatial crater distribution, which searches for clusters of craters. The detected clusters are assumed to result from the presence of secondary craters, which are then removed from the CSFD. We found it favourable to apply the SCD algorithm separately to each diameter bin of the CSFD histogram. In comparison with the original age map, the refined age map obtained after removal of secondary candidates has a more homogeneous appearance and does not exhibit regions of spuriously high age resulting from contamination by secondary craters.

  13. Agriculture pest and disease risk maps considering MSG satellite data and land surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, J. R.; Damásio, C. V.; Sousa, A. M. O.; Bugalho, L.; Pessanha, L.; Quaresma, P.

    2015-06-01

    Pest risk maps for agricultural use are usually constructed from data obtained from in-situ meteorological weather stations, which are relatively sparsely distributed and are often quite expensive to install and difficult to maintain. This leads to the creation of maps with relatively low spatial resolution, which are very much dependent on interpolation methodologies. Considering that agricultural applications typically require a more detailed scale analysis than has traditionally been available, remote sensing technology can offer better monitoring at increasing spatial and temporal resolutions, thereby, improving pest management results and reducing costs. This article uses ground temperature, or land surface temperature (LST), data distributed by EUMETSAT/LSASAF (with a spatial resolution of 3 × 3 km (nadir resolution) and a revisiting time of 15 min) to generate one of the most commonly used parameters in pest modeling and monitoring: "thermal integral over air temperature (accumulated degree-days)". The results show a clear association between the accumulated LST values over a threshold and the accumulated values computed from meteorological stations over the same threshold (specific to a particular tomato pest). The results are very promising and enable the production of risk maps for agricultural pests with a degree of spatial and temporal detail that is difficult to achieve using in-situ meteorological stations.

  14. Automatic Detection of Secondary Craters and Mapping of Planetary Surface Age Based on Lunar Orbital Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, A. L.; Lompart, A.; Grumpe, A.; Wöhler, C.; Hiesinger, H.

    2017-07-01

    Ages of planetary surfaces are typically obtained by manually determining the impact crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) in spacecraft imagery, which is a very intricate and time-consuming procedure. In this work, an image-based crater detection algorithm that relies on a generative template matching technique is applied to establish the CSFD of the floor of the lunar farside crater Tsiolkovsky. The automatic detection threshold value is calibrated based on a 100 km² test area for which the CSFD has been determined by manual crater counting in a previous study. This allows for the construction of an age map of the complete crater floor. It is well known that the CSFD may be affected by secondary craters. Hence, our detection results are refined by applying a secondary candidate detection (SCD) algorithm relying on Voronoi tessellation of the spatial crater distribution, which searches for clusters of craters. The detected clusters are assumed to result from the presence of secondary craters, which are then removed from the CSFD. We found it favourable to apply the SCD algorithm separately to each diameter bin of the CSFD histogram. In comparison with the original age map, the refined age map obtained after removal of secondary candidates has a more homogeneous appearance and does not exhibit regions of spuriously high age resulting from contamination by secondary craters.

  15. Urban ventilation corridors mapping using surface morphology data based GIS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicht, Marzena; Wicht, Andreas; Osińska-Skotak, Katarzyna

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes deriving the most appropriate method for mapping urban ventilation corridors, which, if properly designed, reduce heat stress, air pollution and increase air quality, as well as increase the horizontal wind speed. Urban areas are - in terms of surface texture - recognized as one of the roughest surfaces, which results in wind obstruction and decreased ventilation of densely built up areas. As urban heat islands, private household and traffic emissions or large scale industries occur frequently in many cities, both in temperate and tropical regions. A proper ventilation system has been suggested as an appropriate mitigation mean [1] . Two concepts of morphometric analyses of the urban environment are used on the example of Warsaw, representing a dense, urban environment, located in the temperate zone. The utilized methods include firstly a roughness mapping calculation [2] , which analyses zero plane displacement height (zd) and roughness length (z0) and their distribution for the eight (inter-)cardinal wind directions and secondly a grid-based frontal area index mapping approach [3] , which uses least cost path analysis. Utilizing the advantages and minimizing the disadvantages of those two concepts, we propose a hybrid approach. All concepts are based on a 3D building database obtained from satellite imagery, aided by a cadastral building database. Derived areas (ventilation corridors), that facilitate the ventilation system, should be considered by the local authorities as worth preserving, if not expanding, in order to improve the air quality in the city. The results also include designation of the problematic areas, which greatly obscure the ventilation and might be investigated as to reshape or rebuilt to introduce the air flow in particularly dense areas like city centers. Keywords: roughness mapping; GIS; ventilation corridors; frontal area index Rizwan, A. M., Dennis, L. Y., & Chunho, L. I. U. (2008). A review on the generation

  16. Combining geomorphological mapping and near surface geophysics (GPR and ERT) to study piping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatek-Jakiel, Anita; Kondracka, Marta

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to provide a more comprehensive characterization of piping systems in mountainous areas under a temperate climate using geomorphological mapping and geophysical methods (electrical resistivity tomography - ERT and ground penetrating radar - GPR). The significance of piping in gully formation and hillslope hydrology has been discussed for many years, and most of the studies are based on surface investigations. However, it seems that most surface investigations underestimate this subsurface process. Therefore, our purpose was to estimate the scale of piping activity based on both surface and subsurface investigations. We used geophysical methods to detect the boundary of lateral water movement fostering pipe development and recognize the internal structure of the underlying materials. The survey was carried out in the Bereźnica Wyżna catchment, in the Bieszczady Mountains. (Eastern Carpathians, Poland), where pipes develop in Cambisols at a mean depth of about 0.7-0.8 m. The geophysical techniques that were used are shown to be successful in identifying pipes. GPR data suggest that the density of piping systems is much larger than that detectible from surface observations alone. Pipe length can be > 6.5-9.2% (maximum = 49%) higher than what surface mapping suggests. Thus, the significance of piping in hillslope hydrology and gully formation can be greater than previously assumed. These results also draw attention to the scale of piping activity in the Carpathians, where this process has been neglected for many years. The ERT profiles reveal areas affected by piping as places of higher resistivity values, which are an effect of a higher content of air-filled pores (due to higher soil porosity, intense biological activity, and well-developed soil structure). In addition, the ERT profiles show that the pipes in the study area develop at the soil-bedrock interface, probably above the layers of shales or mudstones which create a water restrictive layer

  17. First measurements of error fields on W7-X using flux surface mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazerson, Samuel A.; Otte, Matthias; Bozhenkov, Sergey; Biedermann, Christoph; Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; the W7-X Team

    2016-10-01

    Error fields have been detected and quantified using the flux surface mapping diagnostic system on Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X). A low-field ‘{\\rlap- \\iota} =1/2 ’ magnetic configuration ({\\rlap- \\iota} =\\iota /2π ), sensitive to error fields, was developed in order to detect their presence using the flux surface mapping diagnostic. In this configuration, a vacuum flux surface with rotational transform of n/m  =  1/2 is created at the mid-radius of the vacuum flux surfaces. If no error fields are present a vanishingly small n/m  =  5/10 island chain should be present. Modeling indicates that if an n  =  1 perturbing field is applied by the trim coils, a large n/m  =  1/2 island chain will be opened. This island chain is used to create a perturbation large enough to be imaged by the diagnostic. Phase and amplitude scans of the applied field allow the measurement of a small ∼ 0.04 m intrinsic island chain with a {{130}\\circ} phase relative to the first module of the W7-X experiment. These error fields are determined to be small and easily correctable by the trim coil system. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher, by accepting the article for publication acknowledges, that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  18. Automatic mapping of urban areas from Landsat data using impervious surface fraction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S. T.; Chen, C. F.; Chen, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Urbanization is a result of aggregation of people in urban areas that can help advance socioeconomic development and pull out people from the poverty line. However, if not monitored well, it can also lead to loss of farmlands, natural forests as well as to societal impacts including burgeoning growth of slums, pollution, and crime. Thus, spatiotemporal information that shapes the urbanization is thus critical to the process of urban planning. The overall objective of this study is to develop an impervious surface fraction algorithm (ISFA) for automatically mapping urban areas from Landsat data. We processed the data for 1986, 2001 and 2014 to trace the multi-decadal spatiotemporal change of Honduran capital city using a three-step procedure: (1) data pre-processing to perform image normalization as well as to produce the difference in the values (DVSS) between the simple ratio (SR) of green and shortwave bands and the soil adjust vegetation index (SAVI), (2) quantification of urban areas using ISFA, and (3) accuracy assessment of mapping results using the ground reference data constructed using land-cover maps and FORMOSAT-2 imagery. The mapping accuracy assessment was performed for 2001 and 2014 by comparing with the ground reference data indicated satisfactory results with the overall accuracies and Kappa coefficients generally higher than 90% and 0.8, respectively. When examining the urbanization between these years, it could be observed that the urban area was significantly expanded from 1986 to 2014, mainly driven by two factors of rapid population growth and socioeconomic development. This study eventually leads to a realization of the merit of using ISFA for multi-decadal monitoring of the urbanization of Honduran capital city from Landsat data. Results from this research can be used by urban planners as a general indicator to quantify urban change and environmental impacts. The methods were thus transferable to monitor urban growth in cities and their peri

  19. Potentiometric Surface Map of the Lower Patapsco Aquifer in Southern Maryland, September, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Stephen E.; Andreasen, David C.; Wheeler, Judith C.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a map showing the potentiometric surface of the Lower Patapsco aquifer in the Patapsco Formation of Lower Cretaceous age in Southern Maryland during September 2003. The map is based on water-level measurements in 66 wells. The highest measured water level was 112 feet above sea level near the northwestern boundary and outcrop area of the aquifer in northern Prince Georges County. From this area, the potentiometric surface declined towards well fields at Severndale, Arnold, and Annapolis. The measured ground-water levels were 86 feet below sea level at Severndale, 41 feet below sea level at Arnold, and 39 feet below sea level a few miles west of Annapolis. There was also a cone of depression covering a large area in Charles County that includes Waldorf, LaPlata, Indian Head, and the Morgantown powerplant. The ground-water levels measured were as low as 165 feet below sea level at Waldorf, 135 feet below sea level at LaPlata, 114 feet below sea level at Indian Head, and 92 feet below sea level at the Morgantown powerplant.

  20. A new capture fraction method to map how pumpage affects surface water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, S.A.; Reeves, H.W.; Dickinson, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    All groundwater pumped is balanced by removal of water somewhere, initially from storage in the aquifer and later from capture in the form of increase in recharge and decrease in discharge. Capture that results in a loss of water in streams, rivers, and wetlands now is a concern in many parts of the United States. Hydrologists commonly use analytical and numerical approaches to study temporal variations in sources of water to wells for select points of interest. Much can be learned about coupled surface/groundwater systems, however, by looking at the spatial distribution of theoretical capture for select times of interest. Development of maps of capture requires (1) a reasonably well-constructed transient or steady state model of an aquifer with head-dependent flow boundaries representing surface water features or evapotranspiration and (2) an automated procedure to run the model repeatedly and extract results, each time with a well in a different location. This paper presents new methods for simulating and mapping capture using three-dimensional groundwater flow models and presents examples from Arizona, Oregon, and Michigan. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  1. Mapping Surface Soil Organic Carbon for Crop Fields with Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Kissel, David E.; West, Larry T.; Rickman, Doug; Luvall, J. C.; Adkins, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The organic C concentration of surface soil can be used in agricultural fields to vary crop production inputs. Organic C is often highly spatially variable, so that maps of soil organic C can be used to vary crop production inputs using precision farming technology. The objective of this research was to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping soil organic C on three fields, using remotely sensed images of the fields with a bare surface. Enough soil samples covering the range in soil organic C must be taken from each field to develop a satisfactory relationship between soil organic C content and image reflectance values. The number of soil samples analyzed in the three fields varied from 22 to 26. The regression equations differed between fields, but gave highly significant relationships with R2 values of 0.93, 0.95, and 0.89 for the three fields. A comparison of predicted and measured values of soil organic C for an independent set of 2 soil samples taken on one of the fields gave highly satisfactory results, with a comparison equation of % organic C measured + 1.02% organic C predicted, with r2 = 0.87.

  2. Mapping Electrochemical Heterogeneity at Iron Oxide Surfaces: A Local Electrochemical Impedance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marie; Boily, Jean-François

    2015-12-22

    Alternating current scanning electrochemical microscopy (AC-SECM) was used for the first time to map key electrochemical attributes of oriented hematite (α-Fe2O3) single crystal surfaces at the micron-scale. Localized electrochemical impedance spectra (LEIS) of the (001) and (012) faces provided insight into the spatial variations of local double layer capacitance (C(dl)) and charge transfer resistance (R(ad)). These parameters were extracted by LEIS measurements in the 0.4-8000 Hz range to probe the impedance response generated by the redistribution of water molecules and charge carriers (ions) under an applied AC. These were attributed to local variations in the local conductivity of the sample surfaces. Comparison with global EIS measurements on the same samples uncovered highly comparable frequency-resolved processes, that were broken down into contributions from the bulk hematite, the interface as well as the microelectrode/tip assembly. This work paves the way for new studies aimed at mapping electrochemical processes at the mesoscale on this environmentally and technologically important material.

  3. Mapping lava flow textures using three-dimensional measures of surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallonee, H. C.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; McGregor, M.; Hughes, S. S.; Neish, C.; Downs, M.; Delparte, D.; Lim, D. S. S.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Lava flow emplacement conditions are reflected in the surface textures of a lava flow; unravelling these conditions is crucial to understanding the eruptive history and characteristics of basaltic volcanoes. Mapping lava flow textures using visual imagery alone is an inherently subjective process, as these images generally lack the resolution needed to make these determinations. Our team has begun mapping lava flow textures using visual spectrum imagery, which is an inherently subjective process involving the challenge of identifying transitional textures such as rubbly and slabby pāhoehoe, as these textures are similar in appearance and defined qualitatively. This is particularly problematic for interpreting planetary lava flow textures, where we have more limited data. We present a tool to objectively classify lava flow textures based on quantitative measures of roughness, including the 2D Hurst exponent, RMS height, and 2D:3D surface area ratio. We collected aerial images at Craters of the Moon National Monument (COTM) using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in 2015 and 2016 as part of the FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) and BASALT (Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains) research projects. The aerial images were stitched together to create Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) with resolutions on the order of centimeters. The DTMs were evaluated by the classification tool described above, with output compared against field assessment of the texture. Further, the DTMs were downsampled and reevaluated to assess the efficacy of the classification tool at data resolutions similar to current datasets from other planetary bodies. This tool allows objective classification of lava flow texture, which enables more accurate interpretations of flow characteristics. This work also gives context for interpretations of flows with comparatively low data resolutions, such as those on the Moon and Mars. Textural maps based on

  4. AVIRIS Land-Surface Mapping in Support of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Gamon, John; Keightley, Keir; Prentiss, Dylan; Reith, Ernest; Green, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A key scientific objective of the original Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) field campaign (1993-1996) was to obtain the baseline data required for modeling and predicting fluxes of energy, mass, and trace gases in the boreal forest biome. These data sets are necessary to determine the sensitivity of the boreal forest biome to potential climatic changes and potential biophysical feedbacks on climate. A considerable volume of remotely-sensed and supporting field data were acquired by numerous researchers to meet this objective. By design, remote sensing and modeling were considered critical components for scaling efforts, extending point measurements from flux towers and field sites over larger spatial and longer temporal scales. A major focus of the BOREAS follow-on program is concerned with integrating the diverse remotely sensed and ground-based data sets to address specific questions such as carbon dynamics at local to regional scales. The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has the potential of contributing to BOREAS through: (1) accurate retrieved apparent surface reflectance; (2) improved landcover classification; and (3) direct assessment of biochemical/biophysical information such as canopy liquid water and chlorophyll concentration through pigment fits. In this paper, we present initial products for major flux tower sites including: (1) surface reflectance of dominant cover types; (2) a land-cover classification developed using spectral mixture analysis (SMA) and Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA); and (3) liquid water maps. Our goal is to compare these land-cover maps to existing maps and to incorporate AVIRIS image products into models of photosynthetic flux.

  5. The Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: An Airborne Proof-of-concept Mapping Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Chuang, C.; Fisher, C.; Muellerschoen, R.; Milligan, L.; Sadowy, G.; Rignot, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year activities. This was achieved by integrating a Ka-band single-pass interferometric synthetic radar on the NASA Dryden Gulfstream III for a coordinated deployment. Although the technique of using radar interferometry for mapping terrain has been demonstrated before, this is the first such application at millimeter-wave frequencies. This proof-of-concept demonstration was motivated by the Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN) Instrument Incubator Program and furthermore, highly leveraged existing ESTO hardware and software assets (the Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) and processor and the PR2 (precipitation radar 2) RF assembly and power amplifier). Initial Ka-band test flights occurred in March and April of 2009 followed by the Greenland deployment. Instrument performance indicates swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. However, for this application the electromagnetic wave will penetrate an unknown amount into the snow cover thus producing an effective bias that must be calibrated. This penetration will be characterized as part of this program and is expected to vary as a function of snow wetness and radar incidence angle. To evaluate this, we flew a coordinated collection with the NASA Wallops Airborne Topographic Mapper on a transect from Greenland’s Summit its West coast. This flight included two field calibration sites at Colorado Institute for Research in Environmental Science’s Swiss Camp and the National Science Foundation’s Summit station. Additional collections entailed flying a grid over Jakobshavn glacier which were repeated after 6 days to reveal surface dynamics. In this time frame we were able to observe horizontal motion of over 1km on the glacier. While developed for

  6. Stratified spectral mixture analysis of medium resolution imagery for impervious surface mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Genyun; Chen, Xiaolin; Ren, Jinchang; Zhang, Aizhu; Jia, Xiuping

    2017-08-01

    Linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) is widely employed in impervious surface estimation, especially for estimating impervious surface abundance in medium spatial resolution images. However, it suffers from a difficulty in endmember selection due to within-class spectral variability and the variation in the number and the type of endmember classes contained from pixel to pixel, which may lead to over or under estimation of impervious surface. Stratification is considered as a promising process to address the problem. This paper presents a stratified spectral mixture analysis in spectral domain (Sp_SSMA) for impervious surface mapping. It categorizes the entire data into three groups based on the Combinational Build-up Index (CBI), the intensity component in the color space and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values. A suitable endmember model is developed for each group to accommodate the spectral variation from group to group. The unmixing into the associated subset (or full set) of endmembers in each group can make the unmixing adaptive to the types of endmember classes that each pixel actually contains. Results indicate that the Sp_SSMA method achieves a better performance than full-set-endmember SMA and prior-knowledge-based spectral mixture analysis (PKSMA) in terms of R, RMSE and SE.

  7. Mapping surface soil moisture using an aircraft-based passive microwave instrument: algorithm and example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, T. J.; Le Vine, David E.

    1996-10-01

    Microwave remote sensing at L-band (21 cm wavelength) can provide a direct measurement of the surface soil moisture for a range of cover conditions and within reasonable error bounds. Surface soil moisture observations are rare and, therefore, the use of these data in hydrology and other disciplines has not been fully explored or developed. Without satellite-based observing systems, the only way to collect these data in large-scale studies is with an aircraft platform. Recently, aircraft systems such as the push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR) and the electronically scanned thinned array radiometer (ESTAR) have been developed to facilitate such investigations. In addition, field experiments have attempted to collect the passive microwave data as part of an integrated set of hydrologic data. One of the most ambitious of these investigations was the Washita'92 experiment. Preliminary analysis of these data has shown that the microwave observations are indicative of deterministic spatial and temporal variations in the surface soil moisture. Users of these data should be aware of a number of issues related to using aircraft-based systems and practical approaches to applying soil moisture estimation algorithms to large data sets. This paper outlines the process of mapping surface soil moisture from an aircraft-based passive microwave radiometer system for the Washita'92 experiment.

  8. Persistent small-scale features in maps of the anisotropy of ocean surface velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A.; Arbic, B. K.; Scott, R. B.; Holland, C. L.; Logan, E.; Qiu, B.

    2006-12-01

    Much of the stirring and mixing in the upper ocean is due to geostrophically balanced mesoscale eddies. Ocean general circulation models commonly parameterize eddy effects and can aid in predicting dispersal of materials throughout the ocean or in predicting long-term climate change. Parameterizations of eddy mixing depend on the isotropy of the eddies. Motivated by this, we investigate the isotropy of oceanic mesoscale eddies with seven years of sea surface height data recorded by satellite altimeters. From these data, we determined a sea surface height anomaly, and surface geostrophic velocities u and v in the zonal (east-west) and meridional (north-south) directions, respectively. From the latter two quantities we can calculate zonal and meridional kinetic energies u2 and v2. Integrals of u2 and v2 around latitude bands 10 degrees wide are nearly equal, in contrast with the results of simple beta-plane geostrophic turbulence models, which suggest that zonal motions should predominate. Maps of the quantity u2-v2 (normalized by standard error) show fine-scale structures that persist over times longer than the lifespan of turbulent eddies. Thus the mesoscale eddy field is locally anisotropic almost everywhere. Further investigation into the causes of these small-scale structures is needed and may take advantage of animations of sea surface height, in which quasi- circular, westward-propagating eddies can easily be seen.

  9. Mapping Surface Soil Moisture With Synthetic Aperture Radar Data and Basin Indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, M.; Sorman, A.; Sorman, U.

    2008-12-01

    The soil moisture condition of a watershed plays a significant role in separation of infiltration and surface runoff, and hence is a key parameter for the majority of physical hydrological models. Due to the large difference in dielectric constants of dry soil and water, microwave remote sensing (particularly the commonly available synthetic aperture radar) is a potential tool for such studies. The main aim of this study is to compute a distributed soil moisture map of a catchment, which can be input to a hydrological model. For this purpose, nine field trips are performed and point surface soil moisture values are collected with a Time Domain Reflectometer. The field studies, which are carried out on a small catchment in western Anatolia, are planned to match radar image acquisitions and accomplished over a water year. First, the Dubois Model, a physical backscatter model is utilized in the reverse order to compute soil surface roughness values. This is accomplished for the field study dates which have two radar image acquisitions and with sparse vegetation cover. Then the first relationship of this study, between observed radar backscatter values and computed roughness values, is established with a correlation coefficient of 0.78. For bare soil surfaces, local incidence angle, soil moisture and roughness are the most dominant parameters effecting radar backscatter. After computing the incidence angle map of the study area, the second relationship, between observed radar backscatter values and the three governing parameters, is determined with a correlation coefficient of 0.87. The third and the last relationship of the study is estimated between the measured point soil moisture values and two basin indexes; topographic and solar radiation. In the last part of the study, the established three relationships, which are derived for point moisture measurements, are used to compute the soil moisture map of the whole catchment. This process is handled separately for the

  10. High-expanding cortical regions in human development and evolution are related to higher intellectual abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjell, Anders M; Westlye, Lars T; Amlien, Inge; Tamnes, Christian K; Grydeland, Håkon; Engvig, Andreas; Espeseth, Thomas; Reinvang, Ivar; Lundervold, Astri J; Lundervold, Arvid; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2015-01-01

    Cortical surface area has tremendously expanded during human evolution, and similar patterns of cortical expansion have been observed during childhood development. An intriguing hypothesis is that the high-expanding cortical regions also show the strongest correlations with intellectual function in humans. However, we do not know how the regional distribution of correlations between intellectual function and cortical area maps onto expansion in development and evolution. Here, in a sample of 1048 participants, we show that regions in which cortical area correlates with visuospatial reasoning abilities are generally high expanding in both development and evolution. Several regions in the frontal cortex, especially the anterior cingulate, showed high expansion in both development and evolution. The area of these regions was related to intellectual functions in humans. Low-expanding areas were not related to cognitive scores. These findings suggest that cortical regions involved in higher intellectual functions have expanded the most during development and evolution. The radial unit hypothesis provides a common framework for interpretation of the findings in the context of evolution and prenatal development, while additional cellular mechanisms, such as synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, dendritic arborization, and intracortical myelination, likely impact area expansion in later childhood.

  11. Crowding: a cortical constraint on object recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelli, Denis G

    2008-08-01

    The external world is mapped retinotopically onto the primary visual cortex (V1). We show here that objects in the world, unless they are very dissimilar, can be recognized only if they are sufficiently separated in visual cortex: specifically, in V1, at least 6mm apart in the radial direction (increasing eccentricity) or 1mm apart in the circumferential direction (equal eccentricity). Objects closer together than this critical spacing are perceived as an unidentifiable jumble. This is called 'crowding'. It severely limits visual processing, including speed of reading and searching. The conclusion about visual cortex rests on three findings. First, psychophysically, the necessary 'critical' spacing, in the visual field, is proportional to (roughly half) the eccentricity of the objects. Second, the critical spacing is independent of the size and kind of object. Third, anatomically, the representation of the visual field on the cortical surface is such that the position in V1 (and several other areas) is the logarithm of eccentricity in the visual field. Furthermore, we show that much of this can be accounted for by supposing that each 'combining field', defined by the critical spacing measurements, is implemented by a fixed number of cortical neurons.

  12. Phonological Processing In Human Auditory Cortical Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Woods

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We used population-based cortical-surface analysis of functional magnetic imaging (fMRI data to characterize the processing of consonant-vowel-consonant syllables (CVCs and spectrally-matched amplitude-modulated noise bursts (AMNBs in human auditory cortex as subjects attended to auditory or visual stimuli in an intermodal selective attention paradigm. Average auditory cortical field (ACF locations were defined using tonotopic mapping in a previous study. Activations in auditory cortex were defined by two stimulus-preference gradients: (1 Medial belt ACFs preferred AMNBs and lateral belt and parabelt fields preferred CVCs. This preference extended into core ACFs with medial regions of primary auditory cortex (A1 and rostral field (R preferring AMNBs and lateral regions preferring CVCs. (2 Anterior ACFs showed smaller activations but more clearly defined stimulus preferences than did posterior ACFs. Stimulus preference gradients were unaffected by auditory attention suggesting that different ACFs are specialized for the automatic processing of different spectrotemporal sound features.

  13. The surface of crystalline basement, Great Valley and Sierra Nevada, California: A digital map database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Carl M.; Fisher, G. Reid; Levine, Paia; Jachens, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    Crystalline basement in central California extends westward from the exposed Sierra Nevada beneath the sedimentary fill of the Great Valley and under the eastern edge of the Coast Ranges at mid-crustal depth. The surface of this basement is defined from three types of control: in the Sierra Nevada from the topography itself, beneath the eastern two thirds of the Great Valley in considerable detail from numerous wells drilled for oil and gas, and beneath the western San Joaquin Valley in less detail from seismic reflection and refraction profiles. Together, these data demonstrate that the surface of crystalline rock is continuous from the exposed rock in the mountains to the top of high-velocity rock buried deep beneath the eastern front of the southern Coast Ranges. This report presents a compilation of data through 1985 that define the surface of this crystalline basement, a contour map of the surface, and the lithology of the basement rock sampled by many of the wells. The compilation was begun as part of the investigation of the 1983 Coalinga earthquake, and was subsequently converted to digital form and extended to the whole of the Great Valley and Sierra Nevada. The main purpose was to explore and document the shape and continuity of the basement surface and to determine the relation of the surface to the tectonic wedge hypothesis (Wentworth and others, 1984; Wentworth and Zoback, 1989). Available basement samples from wells - principally the thin-section collection of May and Hewitt (1948) preserved by the California Academy of Sciences - were also reexamined by cooperating petrologists in an effort to distinguish wells that bottomed in ophiolitic rocks.

  14. Atmospheric Drivers of Greenland Surface Melt Revealed by Self-Organizing Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioduszewski, J. R.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Hammann, A.; Tedesco, M.; Noble, E. U.; Stroeve, J. C.; Mote, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent acceleration in surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has occurred concurrently with a rapidly warming Arctic and has been connected to persistent, anomalous atmospheric circulation patterns over Greenland. To identify synoptic setups favoring enhanced GrIS surface melt and their decadal changes, we develop a summer Arctic synoptic climatology by employing self-organizing maps. These are applied to daily 500 hPa geopotential height fields obtained from the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications reanalysis, 1979-2014. Particular circulation regimes are related to meteorological conditions and GrIS surface melt estimated with outputs from the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional. Our results demonstrate that the largest positive melt anomalies occur in concert with positive height anomalies near Greenland associated with wind, temperature, and humidity patterns indicative of strong meridional transport of heat and moisture. We find an increased frequency in a 500 hPa ridge over Greenland coinciding with a 63% increase in GrIS melt between the 1979-1988 and 2005-2014 periods, with 75.0% of surface melt changes attributed to thermodynamics, 17% to dynamics, and 8.0% to a combination. We also confirm that the 2007-2012 time period has the largest dynamic forcing relative of any period but also demonstrate that increased surface energy fluxes, temperature, and moisture separate from dynamic changes contributed more to melt even during this period. This implies that GrIS surface melt is likely to continue to increase in response to an ever warmer future Arctic, regardless of future atmospheric circulation patterns.

  15. ON THE GAUSS MAP OF RULED SURFACES OF TYPE II IN 3-DIMENSIONAL PSEUDO-GALILEAN SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Osman Öğrenmis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, ruled surfaces of type II in a three-dimensional Pseudo-Galilean space are given. By studying its Gauss map and Laplacian operator, we obtain a classification of ruled surfaces of type II in a three-dimensional Pseudo-Galilean space.

  16. Vectorial mapping of noncollinear antiferromagnetic structure of semiconducting FeSe surface with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, K. F.; Yang, Fang; Song, Y. R. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Xiaole [Institute of Natural Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chen, Xianfeng [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Gao, C. L., E-mail: clgao@sjtu.edu.cn; Jia, Jin-Feng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing (China); Luo, Weidong, E-mail: wdluo@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Institute of Natural Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing (China)

    2016-02-08

    Antiferromagnetic semiconductors gain increasing interest due to their possible application in spintronics. Using spin polarized scanning tunneling microscopy operating in a vector field, we mapped the noncollinear antiferromagnetic spin structure of a semiconducting hexagonal FeSe surface on the atomic scale. The surface possesses an in-plane compensated Néel structure which is further confirmed by first-principles calculations.

  17. A next generation altimeter for mapping the sea surface height variability: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Morrow, Rosemary

    2016-07-01

    The global observations of the sea surface height (SSH) have revolutionized oceanography since the beginning of precision radar altimetry in the early 1990s. For the first time we have continuous records of SSH with spatial and temporal sampling for detecting the global mean sea level rise, the waxing and waning of El Niño, and the ocean circulation from gyres to ocean eddies. The limit of spatial resolution of the present constellation of radar altimeters in mapping SSH variability is approaching 100 km (in wavelength) with 3 or more simultaneous altimetric satellites in orbit. At scales shorter than 100 km, the circulation contains substantial amount of kinetic energy in currents, eddies and fronts that are responsible for the stirring and mixing of the ocean, especially from the vertical exchange of the upper ocean with the deep. A mission currently in development will use the technique of radar interferometry for making high-resolution measurement of the height of water over the ocean as well as on land. It is called Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), which is a joint mission of US NASA and French CNES, with contributions from Canada and UK. SWOT promises the detection of SSH at scales approaching 15 km, depending on the sea state. SWOT will make SSH measurement over a swath of 120 km with a nadir gap of 20 km in a 21-day repeat orbit. A conventional radar altimeter will provide measurement along the nadir. This is an exploratory mission with applications in oceanography and hydrology. The increased spatial resolution offers an opportunity to study ocean surface processes to address important questions about the ocean circulation. However, the limited temporal sampling poses challenges to map the evolution of the ocean variability that changes rapidly at the small scales. The measurement technique and the development of the mission will be presented with emphasis on its science program with outlook on the opportunities and challenges.

  18. Mining for diagnostic information in body surface potential maps: A comparison of feature selection techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCullagh Paul J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In body surface potential mapping, increased spatial sampling is used to allow more accurate detection of a cardiac abnormality. Although diagnostically superior to more conventional electrocardiographic techniques, the perceived complexity of the Body Surface Potential Map (BSPM acquisition process has prohibited its acceptance in clinical practice. For this reason there is an interest in striking a compromise between the minimum number of electrocardiographic recording sites required to sample the maximum electrocardiographic information. Methods In the current study, several techniques widely used in the domains of data mining and knowledge discovery have been employed to mine for diagnostic information in 192 lead BSPMs. In particular, the Single Variable Classifier (SVC based filter and Sequential Forward Selection (SFS based wrapper approaches to feature selection have been implemented and evaluated. Using a set of recordings from 116 subjects, the diagnostic ability of subsets of 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 32 electrocardiographic recording sites have been evaluated based on their ability to correctly asses the presence or absence of Myocardial Infarction (MI. Results It was observed that the wrapper approach, using sequential forward selection and a 5 nearest neighbour classifier, was capable of choosing a set of 24 recording sites that could correctly classify 82.8% of BSPMs. Although the filter method performed slightly less favourably, the performance was comparable with a classification accuracy of 79.3%. In addition, experiments were conducted to show how (a features chosen using the wrapper approach were specific to the classifier used in the selection model, and (b lead subsets chosen were not necessarily unique. Conclusion It was concluded that both the filter and wrapper approaches adopted were suitable for guiding the choice of recording sites useful for determining the presence of MI. It should be noted however

  19. Cortical potentials associated with voluntary mandibular movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K; Kaji, R; Hamano, T; Kohara, N; Kimura, J; Shibasaki, H; Iizuka, T

    2000-07-01

    Movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) are negative potentials over the scalp, which gradually increase prior to voluntary movements, and might be applied to elucidate the cortical efferent function of the mandibular movements. We compared the MRCPs accompanying various mandibular movements to study the motor control mechanism underlying these movements. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded from 11 electrodes placed over the scalp (F3, Fz, F4, T3, C3, Cz, C4, T4, P3, Pz, and P4), according to the International 10-20 System, and electromyograms (EMGs) were obtained from surface electrodes over the masseter muscle and the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. Ten healthy subjects were requested to make brisk and self-paced mandibular movements in 4 different directions (mouth-opening and -closing, and left and right lateral movements). We obtained MRCPs by averaging the EEG, using the visually determined EMG onset as a trigger signal. In all the movements, a slowly increasing, bilaterally widespread negativity starting 1.5 to 2.0 sec before the EMG onset (Bereitschaftspotential, or BP proper) was observed, with the maximum over the vertex region. The negative slope (NS') occurred about 300 to 700 msec before the EMG onset. The cortical maps of BP/NS' (BP and NS' combined), immediately prior to the mouth-opening and closing, showed a symmetrical distribution, whereas that for the lateral movements showed a tendency of predominance over the hemisphere ipsilateral to the direction of the movement. BP/NS' amplitudes at the onset of movement differed significantly or tended to do so between open, close, and lateral movements, suggesting that MRCP recordings may thus provide a means to explore the role of the cerebral cortex in the control of mandibular movements.

  20. Automated Subpixel Surface Water Mapping from Heterogeneous Urban Environments Using Landsat 8 OLI Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Xie

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Water bodies are a fundamental element of urban ecosystems, and water mapping is critical for urban and landscape planning and management. Remote sensing has increasingly been used for water mapping in rural areas; however, when applied to urban areas, this spatially- explicit approach is a challenging task due to the fact that the water bodies are often of a small size and spectral confusion is common between water and the complex features in the urban environment. Water indexes are the most common method of water extraction at the pixel level. More recently, spectral mixture analysis (SMA has been widely employed in analyzing the urban environment at the subpixel level. The objective of this study is to develop an automatic subpixel water mapping method (ASWM which can achieve a high accuracy in urban areas. Specifically, we first apply a water index for the automatic extraction of mixed land-water pixels, and the pure water pixels that are generated in this process are exported as the final result. Secondly, the SMA technique is applied to the mixed land-water pixels for water abundance estimation. As for obtaining the most representative endmembers, we propose an adaptive iterative endmember selection method based on the spatial similarity of adjacent ground surfaces. One classical water index method (the modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI, a pixel-level target detection method (constrained energy minimization (CEM, and two widely used SMA methods (fully constrained least squares (FCLS and multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA were chosen for the water mapping comparison in the experiments. The results indicate that the proposed ASWM was able to detect water pixels more efficiency than other unsupervised water extraction methods, and the water fractions estimated by the proposed ASWM method correspond closely to the reference fractions with the slopes of 0.97, 1.02, 1.04, and 0.98 and the R-squared values of 0

  1. Pycortex: an interactive surface visualizer for fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Shuang Gao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface visualizations of fMRI provide a comprehensive view of cortical activity. However, surface visualizations are difficult to generate and most common visualization techniques rely on unnecessary interpolation which limits the fidelity of the resulting maps. Furthermore, it is difficult to understand the relationship between flattened cortical surfaces and the underlying 3D anatomy using tools available currently. To address these problems we have developed pycortex, a Python toolbox for interactive surface mapping and visualization. Pycortex exploits the power of modern graphics cards to sample volumetric data on a per-pixel basis, allowing dense and accurate mapping of the voxel grid across the surface. Anatomical, functional and fiduciary information can be projected onto the cortical surface. The surface can be inflated and flattened interactively, aiding interpretation of the correspondence between the anatomical surface and the flattened cortical sheet. The output of pycortex can be viewed using WebGL, a technology compatible with modern web browsers. This allows complex fMRI surface maps to be distributed broadly online without requiring installation of complex software.

  2. Mapping Biophysical Parameters for Land Surface Modeling over the Continental US Using MODIS and Landsat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahouari Bounoua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In terms of the space cities occupy, urbanization appears as a minor land transformation. However, it permanently modifies land’s ecological functions, altering its carbon, energy, and water fluxes. It is therefore necessary to develop a land cover characterization at fine spatial and temporal scales to capture urbanization’s effects on surface fluxes. We develop a series of biophysical vegetation parameters such as the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation, leaf area index, vegetation greenness fraction, and roughness length over the continental US using MODIS and Landsat products for 2001. A 13-class land cover map was developed at a climate modeling grid (CMG merging the 500 m MODIS land cover and the 30 m impervious surface area from the National Land Cover Database. The landscape subgrid heterogeneity was preserved using fractions of each class from the 500 m and 30 m into the CMG. Biophysical parameters were computed using the 8-day composite Normalized Difference Vegetation Index produced by the North American Carbon Program. In addition to urban impact assessments, this dataset is useful for the computation of surface fluxes in land, vegetation, and urban models and is expected to be widely used in different land cover and land use change applications.

  3. Mapping antigenic motifs in the trypomastigote small surface antigen from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouz, Virginia; Cámara, María de Los Milagros; Cánepa, Gaspar E; Carmona, Santiago J; Volcovich, Romina; Gonzalez, Nicolás; Altcheh, Jaime; Agüero, Fernán; Buscaglia, Carlos A

    2015-03-01

    The trypomastigote small surface antigen (TSSA) is a mucin-like molecule from Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, which displays amino acid polymorphisms in parasite isolates. TSSA expression is restricted to the surface of infective cell-derived trypomastigotes, where it functions as an adhesin and engages surface receptors on the host cell as a prerequisite for parasite internalization. Previous results have established TSSA-CL, the isoform encoded by the CL Brener clone, as an appealing candidate for use in serology-based diagnostics for Chagas disease. Here, we used a combination of peptide- and recombinant protein-based tools to map the antigenic structure of TSSA-CL at maximal resolution. Our results indicate the presence of different partially overlapping B-cell epitopes clustering in the central portion of TSSA-CL, which contains most of the polymorphisms found in parasite isolates. Based on these results, we assessed the serodiagnostic performance of a 21-amino-acid-long peptide that spans TSSA-CL major antigenic determinants, which was similar to the performance of the previously validated glutathione S-transferase (GST)-TSSA-CL fusion molecule. Furthermore, the tools developed for the antigenic characterization of the TSSA antigen were also used to explore other potential diagnostic applications of the anti-TSSA humoral response in Chagasic patients. Overall, our present results provide additional insights into the antigenic structure of TSSA-CL and support this molecule as an excellent target for molecular intervention in Chagas disease.

  4. A Global Map of Coherent M2 Internal Tide Surface Elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. D.; Zaron, E. D.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite altimetry reveals small surface waves, with elevations of order 1 cm or smaller, associated with internal tides in the deep ocean. The global satellite data provide an unprecedented picture of such waves, potentially yielding much information about the ocean interior. Accurate knowledge of these waves is also needed for de-tiding altimetry in certain sensitive applications, including the future SWOT mission. Several approaches have been initiated recently to map these tiny waves, usually with some reliance on hydrographic information (e.g., recent work by Dushaw et al., 2011). Here we explore the feasibility of a purely empirical approach which avoids assumptions about stratification or modal wavelengths. A global elevation map is constructed based on tidal analysis of Topex/Poseidon, Jason, ERS-2, Envisat and GFO data. Small (order 5 mm) residuals, with wavelengths much longer than the baroclinic tide, appear unless now-standard along-track high-pass filters are applied, but filtering is shown to cause serious loss of information for east-west propagating waves (given typical track patterns). The technique is probably infeasible for S2 because of Envisat's and ERS's sun-synchronous orbits. Independent data from Cryosat-2 is used to validate the results. Applying our internal-tide 'correction' to Cryosat-2 data confirms a small reduction in variance in expected locations of significant internal tides.

  5. VALIDATION OF SPACEBORNE RADAR SURFACE WATER MAPPING WITH OPTICAL sUAS IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li-Chee-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS has over 40 years of experience with airborne and spaceborne sensors and is now starting to use small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS to validate products from large coverage area sensors and create new methodologies for very high resolution products. Wetlands have several functions including water storage and retention which can reduce flooding and provide continuous flow for hydroelectric generation and irrigation for agriculture. Synthetic Aperture Radar is well suited as a tool for monitoring surface water by supplying acquisitions irrespective of cloud cover or time of day. Wetlands can be subdivided into three classes: open water, flooded vegetation and upland which can vary seasonally with time and water level changes. RADARSAT‐2 data from the Wide-Ultra Fine, Spotlight and Fine Quad-Pol modes has been used to map the open water in the Peace‐Athabasca Delta, Alberta using intensity thresholding. We also use spotlight modes for higher resolution and the fully polarimetric mode (FQ for polarimetric decomposition. Validation of these products will be done using a low altitude flying sUAS to generate optical georeferenced images. This project provides methodologies which could be used for flood mapping as well as ecological monitoring.

  6. Adiabatic Isometric Mapping Algorithm for Embedding 2-Surfaces in Euclidean 3-Space

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Shannon; Alsing, Paul M; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Alexandrov proved that any simplicial complex homeomorphic to a sphere with strictly non-negative Gaussian curvature at each vertex can be isometrically embedded uniquely in $\\mathbb{R}^3$ as a convex polyhedron. Due to the nonconstructive nature of his proof, there have yet to be any algorithms, that we know of, that realizes the Alexandrov embedding in polynomial time. Following his proof, we developed the adiabatic isometric mapping (AIM) algorithm. AIM uses a guided adiabatic pull-back procedure to produce "smooth" embeddings. Tests of AIM applied to two different polyhedral metrics suggests that its run time is sub cubic with respect to the number of vertices. Although Alexandrov's theorem specifically addresses the embedding of convex polyhedral metrics, we tested AIM on a broader class of polyhedral metrics that included regions of negative Gaussian curvature. One test was on a surface just outside the ergosphere of a Kerr black hole.

  7. Adiabatic isometric mapping algorithm for embedding 2-surfaces in Euclidean 3-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shannon; Miller, Warner A.; Alsing, Paul M.; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2015-12-01

    Alexandrov proved that any simplicial complex homeomorphic to a sphere with strictly non-negative Gaussian curvature at each vertex can be isometrically embedded uniquely in {{{R}}}3 as a convex polyhedron. Due to the nonconstructive nature of his proof, there have yet to be any algorithms, that we know of, that realizes the Alexandrov embedding in polynomial time. Following his proof, we developed the adiabatic isometric mapping (AIM) algorithm. AIM uses a guided adiabatic pull-back procedure on a given polyhedral metric to produce an embedding that approximates the unique Alexandrov polyhedron. Tests of AIM applied to two different polyhedral metrics suggests that its run time is sub cubic with respect to the number of vertices. Although Alexandrov’s theorem specifically addresses the embedding of convex polyhedral metrics, we tested AIM on a broader class of polyhedral metrics that included regions of negative Gaussian curvature. One test was on a surface just outside the ergosphere of a Kerr black hole.

  8. Detailed mapping of surface units on Mars with HRSC color data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, J.-Ph.; Wendt, L.; McCord, T. B.; Neukum, G.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction: Making use of HRSC color data Mapping outcrops of clays, sulfates and ferric oxides are basis information to derive the climatic, tectonic and volcanic evolution of Mars, especially the episodes related to the presence of liquid water. The challenge is to resolve spatially the outcrops and to distinguish these components from the globally-driven deposits like the iron oxide-rich bright red dust and the basaltic dark sands. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard Mars-Express has five color filters in the visible and near infrared that are designed for visual interpretation and mapping various surface units [1]. It provides also information on the topography at scale smaller than a pixel (roughness) thanks to the different geometry of observation for each color channel. The HRSC dataset is the only one that combines global coverage, 200 m/pixel spatial resolution or better and filtering colors of light. The present abstract is a work in progress (to be submitted to Planetary and Space Science) that shows the potential and limitations of HRSC color data as visual support and as multispectral images. Various methods are described from the most simple to more complex ones in order to demonstrate how to make use of the spectra, because of the specific steps of processing they require [2-4]. The objective is to broaden the popularity of HRSC color data, as they could be used more widely by the scientific community. Results prove that imaging spectrometry and HRSC color data complement each other for mapping outcrops types. Example regions of interest HRSC is theoretically sensitive to materials with absorption features in the visible and near-infrared up to 1 μm. Therefore, oxide-rich red dust and basalts (pyroxenes) can be mapped, as well as very bright components like water ice [5, 6]. Possible detection of other materials still has to be demonstrated. We first explore regions where unusual mineralogy appears clearly from spectral data. Hematite

  9. Mapping Temperate Vegetation Climate Adaptation Variability Using Normalized Land Surface Phenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Liang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate influences geographic differences of vegetation phenology through both contemporary and historical variability. The latter effect is embodied in vegetation heterogeneity underlain by spatially varied genotype and species compositions tied to climatic adaptation. Such long-term climatic effects are difficult to map and therefore often neglected in evaluating spatially explicit phenological responses to climate change. In this study we demonstrate a way to indirectly infer the portion of land surface phenology variation that is potentially contributed by underlying genotypic differences across space. The method undertaken normalized remotely sensed vegetation start-of-season (or greenup onset with a cloned plants-based phenological model. As the geography of phenological model prediction (first leaf represents the instantaneous effect of contemporary climate, the normalized land surface phenology potentially reveals vegetation heterogeneity that is related to climatic adaptation. The study was done at the continental scale for the conterminous U.S., with a focus on the eastern humid temperate domain. Our findings suggest that, in an analogous scenario, if a uniform contemporary climate existed everywhere, spring vegetation greenup would occur earlier in the north than in the south. This is in accordance with known species-level clinal variations—for many temperate plant species, populations adapted to colder climates require less thermal forcing to initiate growth than those in warmer climates. This study, for the first time, shows that such geographic adaption relationships are supported at the ecosystem level. Mapping large-scale vegetation climate adaptation patterns contributes to our ability to better track geographically varied phenological responses to climate change.

  10. Photothermal and photoacoustic methods for mapping surface absorbance: Adaptation for screening chemical and biomolecular libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebel, Matthias M.

    Photoacoustic and photothermal methods are useful tools for the analysis of solid state samples and thin films. Both techniques may be used to study surface absorber distributions on surfaces. In the photoacoustic experiment, light absorption at a solid/air interface launches a pressure wave which propagates through the air. The acoustic wave is detected by deflection of a probe laser beam. For non-parallel orientation of the probe beam with respect to the sample surface, acoustic waves launched from individual absorber features travel different distances before they intersect with the probe beam. This allows temporal encoding of the spatial distribution of surface absorbers. An experimental demonstration of this novel photoacoustic of detection scheme is presented. In the photothermal experiment, detection is based on production of a temperature change at the sample surface following light absorption. Thermal diffusion generates temperature gradients in the solid sample and the adjacent fluid layer. The resulting refractive index gradient in the adjacent fluid medium is measured by deflection of a probe laser beam. Using the transverse photothermal deflection spectroscopy (t-PDS) method, two dimensional absorber distribution maps of a flat sample surface can be recorded. A number of colored thin polymer film are used to characterize the sensitivity in air and a value of 7.5 · 10-6 W is found. Gold nanoparticles are excellent optical absorber labels for biological and biochemical binding assays. The synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles of different sizes and surface chemical functionalities is presented. A novel readout method for protein microarrays based on photothermal detection of nanoparticle labeled proteins is described. Protein microarrays are developed with functionalized gold nanoparticles and analyzed using t-PDS. The observed coloration intensity performance depends on the intrinsic nature of the target protein. Neutravidin produces the

  11. High-Resolution Mapping of Urban Surface Water Using ZY-3 Multi-Spectral Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Yao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate information of urban surface water is important for assessing the role it plays in urban ecosystem services under the content of urbanization and climate change. However, high-resolution monitoring of urban water bodies using remote sensing remains a challenge because of the limitation of previous water indices and the dark building shadow effect. To address this problem, we proposed an automated urban water extraction method (UWEM which combines a new water index, together with a building shadow detection method. Firstly, we trained the parameters of UWEM using ZY-3 imagery of Qingdao, China. Then we verified the algorithm using five other sub-scenes (Aksu, Fuzhou, Hanyang, Huangpo and Huainan ZY-3 imagery. The performance was compared with that of the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI. Results indicated that UWEM performed significantly better at the sub-scenes with kappa coefficients improved by 7.87%, 32.35%, 12.64%, 29.72%, 14.29%, respectively, and total omission and commission error reduced by 61.53%, 65.74%, 83.51%, 82.44%, and 74.40%, respectively. Furthermore, UWEM has more stable performances than NDWI’s in a range of thresholds near zero. It reduces the over- and under-estimation issues which often accompany previous water indices when mapping urban surface water under complex environmental conditions.

  12. Mapping of upper electronic reaction surfaces by tuned laser photolysis and by absorption and emission spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, M.A.

    1989-07-01

    Potential energy surfaces for photorotamerization of two intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded molecules, o-hydroxybenzaldehyde (OHBA) and methyl salicylate (MS), isolated in cryogenic matrices have been spectroscopically mapped. In addition, the external heavy atom effect of krypton and xenon matrices on the coupling between the S{sub 1} and T{sub 1} surfaces of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile has been examined. Heavy atom matrices are known to increase rates of spin-forbidden processes. The phosphorescence intensity of DMABN increases in krypton and xenon matrices, while the fluorescence intensity, and phosphorescence and fluorescence lifetimes, decrease. These effects are interpreted in terms of a model in which the phosphorescence rate constant increases 300-fold in xenon compared to argon, while the rate constants for intersystem crossing and nonradiative relaxation from the triplet state increase by factors of less than 5. Lifetime measurements in argon matrices doped with heavy atoms indicate that even one heavy atom neighbor has a significant effect on both singlet and triplet lifetimes. 78 refs., 35 figs., 15 tabs.

  13. Surface mapping of field-induced piezoelectric strain at elevated temperature employing full-field interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Tim; Quast, Tatjana; Bartl, Guido; Schmitz-Kempen, Thorsten; Weaver, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric actuators and sensors are widely used for flow control valves, including diesel injectors, ultrasound generation, optical positioning, printing, pumps, and locks. Degradation and failure of material and electrical properties at high temperature typically limits these applications to operating temperatures below 200°C, based on the ubiquitous Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ceramic. There are, however, many applications in sectors such as automotive, aerospace, energy and process control, and oil and gas, where the ability to operate at higher temperatures would open up new markets for piezoelectric actuation. Presented here is a review of recent progress and initial results toward a European effort to develop measurement techniques to characterize high-temperature materials. Full-field, multi-wavelength absolute length interferometry has, for the first time, been used to map the electric-field-induced piezoelectric strain across the surface of a PZT ceramic. The recorded variation as a function of temperature has been evaluated against a newly developed commercial single-beam system. Conventional interferometry allows measurement of the converse piezoelectric effect with high precision and resolution, but is often limited to a single point, average measurement and to limited sample environments because of optical aberrations in varying atmospheres. Here, the full-field technique allows the entire surface to be analyzed for strain and, in a bespoke sample chamber, for elevated temperatures.

  14. Mathematical modeling of temperature mapping over skin surface and its implementation in thermal disease diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhong-Shan; Liu, Jing

    2004-09-01

    In non-invasive thermal diagnostics, accurate correlations between the thermal image on skin surface and interior human pathophysiology are often desired, which require general solutions for the bioheat equation. In this study, the Monte Carlo method was implemented to solve the transient three-dimensional bio-heat transfer problem with non-linear boundary conditions (simultaneously with convection, radiation and evaporation) and space-dependent thermal physiological parameters. Detailed computations indicated that the thermal states of biological bodies, reflecting physiological conditions, could be correlated to the temperature or heat flux mapping recorded at the skin surface. The effect of the skin emissivity and humidity, the convective heat transfer coefficient, the relative humidity and temperature of the surrounding air, the metabolic rate and blood perfusion rate in the tumor, and the tumor size and number on the sensitivity of thermography are comprehensively investigated. Moreover, several thermal criteria for disease diagnostic were proposed based on statistical principles. Implementations of this study for the clinical thermal diagnostics are discussed.

  15. Raman mapping analysis for removal of surface secondary phases of CZTS films using chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengfei; Newman, Michael J.; Tsoi, Wing C.; Watson, Trystan M.

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used as a non-destructive surface characterization method for the Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films. Secondary phases, which often co-exist with CZTS, are detrimental to the device performance. In this work, removal of the secondary phases using sodium sulfide (Na2S) aqueous solution etching in various time durations was investigated. Raman scattering mapping provides a direct visualization of phase distribution in CZTS-based materials on a relatively large scale (1 mm × 10 mm). Both as-grown and etched CZTS absorber layers were examined by Raman spectroscopy with a 532 nm excitation laser light in the range of 50-500 cm-1. A clear reduction of the secondary phases (mainly SnS) at the surface after etching was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) reveals a pronounced correlation between the amount of secondary phases and photoluminescence peak position. The PL spectra of the regions with more Sn-rich secondary phases show clearly a shift to high wavelength of the peak position, in comparison with regions with less Sn-rich secondary phases. These observed PL changes could be due to Sn-rich defects which may cause recombination processes.

  16. Point contact tunneling spectroscopy apparatus for large scale mapping of surface superconducting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groll, Nickolas; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zasadzinksi, John F. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We describe the design and testing of a point contact tunneling spectroscopy device that can measure material surface superconducting properties (i.e., the superconducting gap Δ and the critical temperature T{sub C}) and density of states over large surface areas with size up to mm{sup 2}. The tip lateral (X,Y) motion, mounted on a (X,Y,Z) piezo-stage, was calibrated on a patterned substrate consisting of Nb lines sputtered on a gold film using both normal (Al) and superconducting (PbSn) tips at 1.5 K. The tip vertical (Z) motion control enables some adjustment of the tip-sample junction resistance that can be measured over 7 orders of magnitudes from a quasi-ohmic regime (few hundred Ω) to the tunnel regime (from tens of kΩ up to few GΩ). The low noise electronic and LabVIEW program interface are also presented. The point contact regime and the large-scale motion capabilities are of particular interest for mapping and testing the superconducting properties of macroscopic scale superconductor-based devices.

  17. Automated mapping of impervious surfaces in urban and suburban areas: Linear spectral unmixing of high spatial resolution imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; He, Yuhong

    2017-02-01

    Quantifying impervious surfaces in urban and suburban areas is a key step toward a sustainable urban planning and management strategy. With the availability of fine-scale remote sensing imagery, automated mapping of impervious surfaces has attracted growing attention. However, the vast majority of existing studies have selected pixel-based and object-based methods for impervious surface mapping, with few adopting sub-pixel analysis of high spatial resolution imagery. This research makes use of a vegetation-bright impervious-dark impervious linear spectral mixture model to characterize urban and suburban surface components. A WorldView-3 image acquired on May 9th, 2015 is analyzed for its potential in automated unmixing of meaningful surface materials for two urban subsets and one suburban subset in Toronto, ON, Canada. Given the wide distribution of shadows in urban areas, the linear spectral unmixing is implemented in non-shadowed and shadowed areas separately for the two urban subsets. The results indicate that the accuracy of impervious surface mapping in suburban areas reaches up to 86.99%, much higher than the accuracies in urban areas (80.03% and 79.67%). Despite its merits in mapping accuracy and automation, the application of our proposed vegetation-bright impervious-dark impervious model to map impervious surfaces is limited due to the absence of soil component. To further extend the operational transferability of our proposed method, especially for the areas where plenty of bare soils exist during urbanization or reclamation, it is still of great necessity to mask out bare soils by automated classification prior to the implementation of linear spectral unmixing.

  18. Near-surface gas mapping studies of salt geologic features at Weeks Island and other sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molecke, M.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carney, K.R.; Autin, W.J.; Overton, E.B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Field sampling and rapid gas analysis techniques were used to survey near-surface soil gases for geotechnical diagnostic purposes at the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site and other salt dome locations in southern Louisiana. This report presents the complete data, results and interpretations obtained during 1995. Weeks Island 1994 gas survey results are also briefly summarized; this earlier study did not find a definitive correlation between sinkhole No. 1 and soil gases. During 1995, several hundred soil gas samples were obtained and analyzed in the field by gas chromatography, for profiling low concentrations and gas anomalies at ppm to percent levels. The target gases included hydrogen, methane, ethane and ethylene. To supplement the field data, additional gas samples were collected at various site locations for laboratory analysis of target gases at ppb levels. Gases in the near-surface soil originate predominantly from the oil, from petrogenic sources within the salt, or from surface microbial activity. Surveys were conducted across two Weeks Island sinkholes, several mapped anomalous zones in the salt, and over the SPR repository site and its perimeter. Samples were also taken at other south Louisiana salt dome locations for comparative purposes. Notable results from these studies are that elevated levels of hydrogen and methane (1) were positively associated with anomalous gassy or shear zones in the salt dome(s) and (2) are also associated with suspected salt fracture (dilatant) zones over the edges of the SPR repository. Significantly elevated areas of hydrogen, methane, plus some ethane, were found over anomalous shear zones in the salt, particularly in a location over high pressure gas pockets in the salt, identified in the mine prior to SPR operations. Limited stable isotope ratio analyses, SIRA, were also conducted and determined that methane samples were of petrogenic origin, not biogenic.

  19. Somatosensory cortical representation in the Australian ghost bat, Macroderma gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, L Z; Pettigrew, J D; Calford, M B

    1986-06-08

    Bats of the two suborders Microchiroptera and Megachiroptera have a modified hand in which the digits of the forelimb are caudally oriented to form the wing. In a previous study of a megachiropteran species, this modification of body plan was found to be reflected in the somatosensory cortical representation such that the orientation of the digit representation was reversed compared with walking mammals. This finding suggests that the precise details of arrangement of topographical maps are functionally significant and do not merely reflect an order imposed by peripheral innervation. Recent evidence for separate origins of Microchiroptera and Megachiroptera raises the question of whether the cortical somatosensory representation in Microchiroptera will also have a reversal of digit orientation compared with walking mammals. We recorded multiunit activity from the somatosensory cortex of a microchiropteran bat, Macroderma gigas. We found two orderly representations of the body surface, SI and SII, in both of which the digit orientation was opposite to the head orientation in accordance with adaptation for flight, and reversed with respect to equivalent maps in other mammals. We also found minor variations in body surface representation compared with Megachiroptera, in line with their proposed independent evolution.

  20. Multifractal and Singularity Maps of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbrera, Ramiro; Millán, Humberto; Martín-Sotoca, Juan Jose; Pérez Soto, Luis; Sanchez, Maria Elena; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    methods for mapping geochemical anomalies caused by buried sources and for predicting undiscovered mineral deposits in covered areas. Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 122, 55-70. Cumbrera, R., Ana M. Tarquis, Gabriel Gascó, Humberto Millán (2012) Fractal scaling of apparent soil moisture estimated from vertical planes of Vertisol pit images. Journal of Hydrology (452-453), 205-212. Martin Sotoca; J.J. Antonio Saa-Requejo, Juan Grau and Ana M. Tarquis (2016). Segmentation of singularity maps in the context of soil porosity. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 18, EGU2016-11402. Millán, H., Cumbrera, R. and Ana M. Tarquis (2016) Multifractal and Levy-stable statistics of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis. Applied Mathematical Modelling, 40(3), 2384-2395.

  1. A Fine-Resolution Radar for Mapping Near-Surface Isochronous Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, T. P.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Braaten, D.; Zimmerman, K.; Akins, T.; Gogineni, S.

    2005-12-01

    Information on the spatial and temporal variation of snow accumulation is required for interpreting satellite-based radar and laser surface elevation measurements made by CryoSAT and ICESAT altimeters. Current methods of using ice cores and analyzing snow pit stratigraphy is time consuming and prone to errors in spatial representation due to the sparse sampling. Remote sensing methods that can map near-surface internal layers for estimating spatial and temporal variation are required. To accomplish this, we developed a 12-18 GHz FMCW radar to map near-surface layers with 3 cm vertical resolution to a depth of about 10 m. We developed the system to be mobile and self-contained so that spatial variability of the accumulation over a large area can be characterized. The fine resolution of this radar is achieved by its wide bandwidth and by illuminating the target area with a plane-wave, which is implemented using an offset-fed parabolic reflector. Traditional wide-beamwidth antennas are susceptible to spherical wave scattering from off-vertical targets that can potentially mask weaker reflections from internal layers. The radar features a fast transmit waveform synthesizer implemented using a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) and a phase-locked loop (PLL) using a linear chirp as the reference. The highly linear reference chirp was generated by a direct digital synthesis (DDS) waveform generator and compared against the instantaneous output of the VCO to create a highly linear 12 to 18 GHz transmit chirp. The waveform synthesizer can be swept from 12 to 18 GHz in 500 microseconds. The antenna was mounted on a sled and the radar system was integrated with the antenna feed. We designed and built the sled with a gimbaled antenna mount and sensing control system to ensure that the antenna points at nadir. The radar system was successfully tested at the Summit camp, Greenland, in July 2005. We collected a large amount of data from various locations around Summit camp. The

  2. Color Shaded-Relief and Surface-Classification Maps of the Fish Creek Area, Harrison Bay Quadrangle, Northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, John L.; Garrity, Christopher P.; Houseknecht, David W.; Amoroso, Lee; Meares, Donald C.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The northeastern part of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) has become an area of active petroleum exploration during the past five years. Recent leasing and exploration drilling in the NPRA requires the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to manage and monitor a variety of surface activities that include seismic surveying, exploration drilling, oil-field development drilling, construction of oil-production facilities, and construction of pipelines and access roads. BLM evaluates a variety of permit applications, environmental impact studies, and other documents that require rapid compilation and analysis of data pertaining to surface and subsurface geology, hydrology, and biology. In addition, BLM must monitor these activities and assess their impacts on the natural environment. Timely and accurate completion of these land-management tasks requires elevation, hydrologic, geologic, petroleum-activity, and cadastral data, all integrated in digital formats at a higher resolution than is currently available in nondigital (paper) formats. To support these land-management tasks, a series of maps was generated from remotely sensed data in an area of high petroleum-industry activity (fig. 1). The maps cover an area from approximately latitude 70?00' N. to 70?30' N. and from longitude 151?00' W. to 153?10' W. The area includes the Alpine oil field in the east, the Husky Inigok exploration well (site of a landing strip) in the west, many of the exploration wells drilled in NPRA since 2000, and the route of a proposed pipeline to carry oil from discovery wells in NPRA to the Alpine oil field. This map area is referred to as the 'Fish Creek area' after a creek that flows through the region. The map series includes (1) a color shaded-relief map based on 5-m-resolution data (sheet 1), (2) a surface-classification map based on 30-m-resolution data (sheet 2), and (3) a 5-m-resolution shaded relief-surface classification map that combines the shaded

  3. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, F-E; Lubrano, V; Lauwers-Cances, V; Giussani, C; Démonet, J-F

    2008-01-15

    Distinct functional pathways for processing words and numbers have been hypothesized from the observation of dissociated impairments of these categories in brain-damaged patients. We aimed to identify the cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading process in patients operated on for various brain lesions. Direct cortical electrostimulation was prospectively used in 60 brain mappings. We used object naming and two reading tasks: alphabetic script (sentences and number words) and Arabic number reading. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading were identified according to location, type of interference, and distinctness from areas associated with other language tasks. Arabic number reading was sustained by small cortical areas, often extremely well localized (area (Brodmann area 45), the anterior part of the dominant supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40; p area (Brodmann area 37; p areas.

  4. Global Distribution of Shallow Water on Mars: Neutron Mapping of Summer-Time Surface by HEND/Odyssey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.; Boynton, W.; Hamara, D.; Shinohara, C.; Saunders, R. S.; Drake, D.

    2003-01-01

    Orbital mapping of induced neutrons and gamma-rays by Odyssey has recently successfully proven the applicability of nuclear methods for studying of the elementary composition of Martian upper-most subsurface. In particular, the suite of Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) has discovered the presence of large water-ice rich regions southward and northward on Mars. The data of neutron mapping of summer-time surface are presented below from the Russian High Energy Neutron Spectrometer (HEND), which is a part of GRS suite. These maps represent the content of water in the soil for summer season at Southern and Northern hemispheres, when the winter deposit of CO2 is absent on the surface. The seasonal evolution of CO2 coverage on Mars is the subject of the complementary paper.

  5. Advances in soil mapping: Mapping quartz content of soil surface using airborne hyperspectral remote sensing in the longwave-infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weksler, Shahar; Notesco, Gila; Ben-Dor, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing in the longwave-infrared (LWIR) spectral region has proven to be a new and efficient tool for mineral mapping (Adar et al. 2013). Minerals which are featureless in the visible, near-infrared and shortwave-infrared regions, e.g., quartz, have a unique fingerprint in the LWIR region (8-12 μm). This spectral region adds to the optical region in which several important minerals can be characterized with significant features (e.g., clay). Accordingly, using airborne hyperspectral remote-sensing data in the LWIR region is an important and practical means of classifying and quantifying minerals. Day and night airborne data, acquired by the AisaOWL sensor over Nitzana National Park in Israel, were used to demonstrate how LWIR region data can be used to map quartz content on the soil surface in a pixel-by-pixel process. The LWIR radiance image is composed of the surface emissivity (and hence the surface's chemical and physical properties), the radiant temperature (according to the Plank equation) and the atmospheric attenuation (which is different during the day and at night). In this work, we show that it is possible to separate surface emissivity, temperature and atmospheric attenuation by using the radiance measured from a vicarious calibration site which was found to be distinctive for the atmospheric contribution. Applying the spectrum of this area as a gain factor to each pixel in the image reduced the atmospheric effects while emphasizing the mineralogical features. Based on this finding and using the same vicarious calibration site used by Notesco et al. (2015), we further studied the possibility of mapping quartz in an area outside the vicarious calibration site. The resulting emissivity image of Nitzana soils (100 km away from the vicarious calibration site) enabled quantifying the quartz in each pixel and mapping its abundance. The day and night images showed a similar quartz distribution, thereby validating the methodology and

  6. Age Effects on Cortical Thickness in Cognitively Normal Elderly Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Hurtz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Atrophy in both grey and white matter is found in normal aging. The prefrontal cortex and the frontal lobe white matter are thought to be the most affected regions. Our aim was to examine the effects of normal aging on cortical grey matter using a 3D quantitative cortical mapping method. Methods: We analyzed 1.5-tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 44 cognitively normal elderly subjects using cortical pattern matching and cortical thickness analyses. Linear regression analysis was used to study the effect of age on cortical thickness. 3D map-wide correction for multiple comparisons was conducted with permutation analyses using a threshold of p Results: We found a significant negative association between age and cortical thickness in the right hemisphere (pcorrected = 0.009 and a trend level association in the left hemisphere (pcorrected = 0.081. Age-related changes were greatest in the sensorimotor, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate and supplementary motor cortices, and the right posterior middle and inferior frontal gyri. Age effects greater in the medial than lateral visual association cortices were also seen bilaterally. Conclusion: Our novel method further validates that normal aging results in diffuse cortical thinning that is most pronounced in the frontal and visual association cortices.

  7. Global 30m 2000-2014 Surface Water Dynamics Map Derived from All Landsat 5, 7, and 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, A.; Hansen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Water is critical for human life, agriculture, and ecosystems. A better understanding of where it is and how it is changing will enable better management of this valuable resource and guide protection of sensitive ecological areas. Global water maps have typically been representations of surface water at one given time. However, there is both seasonal and interannual variability: rivers meander, lakes disappear, floods arise. To address this ephemeral nature of water, in this study University of Maryland has developed a method that analyzes every Landsat 5, 7, and 8 scene from 1999-2015 to produce global seasonal maps (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall) of surface water dynamics from 2000-2014. Each Landsat scene is automatically classified into land, water, cloud, haze, shadow, and snow via a decision tree algorithm. The land and water observations are aggregated per pixel into percent occurrence of water in a 3 year moving window for each meteorological season. These annual water percentages form a curve for each season that is discretized into a continuous 3 band RGB map. Frequency of water observation and type of surface water change (loss, gain, peak, or dip) is clearly seen through brightness and hue respectively. Additional data layers include: the year the change began, peak year, minimum year, and the year the change process ended. Currently these maps have been created for 18 1°x1° test tiles scattered around the world, and a portion of the September-November map over Bangladesh is shown below. The entire Landsat archive from 1999-2015 will be processed through a partnership with Google Earth Engine to complete the global product in the coming months. In areas where there is sufficient satellite data density (e.g. the United States), this project could be expanded to 1984-2015. This study provides both scientific researchers and the public an understandable, temporally rich, and globally consistent map showing surface water changes over time.

  8. Intelligence and cortical thickness in children with complex partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Duygu; Caplan, Rochelle; Siddarth, Prabha; Seidenberg, Michael; Gurbani, Suresh; Toga, Arthur W; Hermann, Bruce

    2011-07-15

    Prior studies on healthy children have demonstrated regional variations and a complex and dynamic relationship between intelligence and cerebral tissue. Yet, there is little information regarding the neuroanatomical correlates of general intelligence in children with epilepsy compared to healthy controls. In vivo imaging techniques, combined with methods for advanced image processing and analysis, offer the potential to examine quantitative mapping of brain development and its abnormalities in childhood epilepsy. A surface-based, computational high resolution 3-D magnetic resonance image analytic technique was used to compare the relationship of cortical thickness with age and intelligence quotient (IQ) in 65 children and adolescents with complex partial seizures (CPS) and 58 healthy controls, aged 6-18 years. Children were grouped according to health status (epilepsy; controls) and IQ level (average and above; below average) and compared on age-related patterns of cortical thickness. Our cross-sectional findings suggest that disruption in normal age-related cortical thickness expression is associated with intelligence in pediatric CPS patients both with average and below average IQ scores. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of high grade glial neoplasms on human cortical electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Mrinal; Hacker, Carl D.; Bundy, David T.; Breshears, Jonathan D.; Sharma, Mohit; Shimony, Joshua S.; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The brain’s functional architecture of interconnected network-related oscillatory patterns in discrete cortical regions has been well established with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies or direct cortical electrophysiology from electrodes placed on the surface of the brain, or electrocorticography (ECoG). These resting state networks exhibit a robust functional architecture that persists through all stages of sleep and under anesthesia. While the stability of these networks provides a fundamental understanding of the organization of the brain, understanding how these regions can be perturbed is also critical in defining the brain’s ability to adapt while learning and recovering from injury. Methods Patients undergoing an awake craniotomy for resection of a tumor were studied as a unique model of an evolving injury to help define how the cortical physiology and the associated networks were altered by the presence of an invasive brain tumor. Results This study demonstrates that there is a distinct pattern of alteration of cortical physiology in the setting of a malignant glioma. These changes lead to a physiologic sequestration and progressive synaptic homogeneity suggesting that a de-learning phenomenon occurs within the tumoral tissue compared to its surroundings. Significance These findings provide insight into how the brain accommodates a region of “defunctionalized” cortex. Additionally, these findings may have important implications for emerging techniques in brain mapping using endogenous cortical physiology. PMID:28319187

  10. Multi-spectrum retrieval of Venus IR surface emissivity maps from VIRTIS/VEX nightside measurements at Themis Regio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, David; Arnold, Gabriele; Haus, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Surface emissivity maps in the infrared can contribute to explore Venus' geology. Nightside radiance spectra at Themis Regio acquired by the IR mapping channel of the Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS-M-IR) aboard Venus EXpress (VEX) are used to derive emissivity data from the three accessible spectral surface windows at 1.02, 1.10, and 1.18 μm. The measured spectra are simulated by applying a full radiative transfer model. Neglecting geologic activity, a multi-spectrum retrieval algorithm is utilized to determine the emissivity maps of the surface target as parameter vectors that are common to many spectrally resolved images that cover this target. Absolute emissivity values are difficult to obtain due to strong interferences from other parameters. The true emissivity mean of the target cannot be retrieved, nor can the emissivity mean of a retrieved map be strictly preset. The retrieved map can exhibit trends with latitude and topography that are probably artificial. Once the trends have been removed in a post-processing step, it can be observed that the magnitude of the resulting spatial emissivity fluctuations around their mean value increases with increasing mean value. A linear transformation is applied that converts the de-trended map to exhibit a defined emissivity mean value called reference emissivity, here 0.5, yielding the 'renormalized emissivity map' with accordingly transformed fluctuations. It is verified that renormalized emissivity maps are largely independent of the emissivity mean before renormalization, of modifications to interfering atmospheric, surface, and instrumental parameters, and of selected details of the retrieval pipeline and data calibration and preprocessing. Extremely large emissivity retrieval errors due to imperfect or unconsidered forward model parameters are effectively avoided. If the absolute emissivity at a given bin of the target were known, the absolute emissivity map of the entire target could be

  11. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  12. Self-organizing adaptive map: autonomous learning of curves and surfaces from point samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piastra, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Competitive Hebbian Learning (CHL) (Martinetz, 1993) is a simple and elegant method for estimating the topology of a manifold from point samples. The method has been adopted in a number of self-organizing networks described in the literature and has given rise to related studies in the fields of geometry and computational topology. Recent results from these fields have shown that a faithful reconstruction can be obtained using the CHL method only for curves and surfaces. Within these limitations, these findings constitute a basis for defining a CHL-based, growing self-organizing network that produces a faithful reconstruction of an input manifold. The SOAM (Self-Organizing Adaptive Map) algorithm adapts its local structure autonomously in such a way that it can match the features of the manifold being learned. The adaptation process is driven by the defects arising when the network structure is inadequate, which cause a growth in the density of units. Regions of the network undergo a phase transition and change their behavior whenever a simple, local condition of topological regularity is met. The phase transition is eventually completed across the entire structure and the adaptation process terminates. In specific conditions, the structure thus obtained is homeomorphic to the input manifold. During the adaptation process, the network also has the capability to focus on the acquisition of input point samples in critical regions, with a substantial increase in efficiency. The behavior of the network has been assessed experimentally with typical data sets for surface reconstruction, including suboptimal conditions, e.g. with undersampling and noise.

  13. High-precision geologic mapping to evaluate the potential for seismic surface rupture at TA-55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, J.N.; Lavine, A.; Vaniman, D.; WoldeGabriel, G.

    1998-06-01

    In this report the authors document results of high-precision geologic mapping in the vicinity of TA-55 that has been done to identify parts of the southern portion of the Rendija Canyon Fault, or any other faults, with the potential for seismic surface rupture. To assess the potential for surface rupture at TA-55, an area of approximately 3 square miles that includes the Los Alamos County Landfill and Twomile, Mortandad, and Sandia Canyons has been mapped in detail. Map units are mostly cooling or flow units within the Tshirege Member (1.2 Ma) of the Bandelier Tuff. Stratigraphic markers that are useful for determining offsets in the map area include a distinct welding break at or near the cooling Unit 2-Unit 3 contact, and the Unit 3-Unit 4 contact. At the County Landfill the contact between the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff and overlying Quaternary alluvium has also been mapped. The mapping indicates that there is no faulting in the near-surface directly below TA-55, and that the closest fault is about 1500 feet west of the Plutonium Facility. Faulting is more abundant on the western edge of the map area, west of TA-48 in uppermost Mortandad Canyon, upper Sandia Canyon, and at the County Landfill. Measured vertical offsets on the faults range from 1 to 8 feet on mapped Bandelier Tuff contacts. Faulting exposed at the Los Alamos County Landfill has deformed a zone over 1000 feet wide, and has a net vertical down-to-the-west displacement of at least 15 feet in the Bandelier Tuff. Individual faults at the landfill have from less than 1 foot to greater than 15 feet of vertical offset on the Bandelier Tuff. Most faults in the landfill trend N-S, N20W, or N45E. Results of the mapping indicate that the Rendija Canyon Fault does not continue directly south to TA-55. At present, the authors have insufficient data to connect faulting they have mapped to areas of known faulting to the north or south of the study area.

  14. Experimental investigation of free surface vortices and definition of gas entrainment occurrence maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, G.; Cristofano, L.; Nobili, M.; Vitale Di Maio, D.

    2014-04-01

    For the future development of Generation IV nuclear reactors, both safety and economic targets have to be achieved. In order to increase, at the same time, the power density generation and the safety features, a huge R&D effort is still required. Referring especially to Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Reactors, much attention is placed on Gas Entrainment (GE) phenomena, which could cause unlikely positive reactivity insertion accident. The GETS experimental facility (Gas Entrainment Test Section), especially aimed at studying the free surface vortices occurrence, has been built in the thermal-hydraulics laboratory of the DIAEE. The main purpose of this facility is to identify the most important parameters affecting the whirlpools formation and evolution. Experimental tests and preliminary observations have been performed. Different vortex behaviours related to different experimental conditions have been identified and presented in the present paper. 2D occurrence maps as function of different dimensionless groups (Reynolds, Froude and Weber numbers and H* = H/d ratio) have been defined. In the present paper, the results of a first experimental campaign, carried out with tap water, are discussed.

  15. Comparison of different Geostatistical Approaches to map Sea Surface Temperature (SST) of Southern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Azizi; Mohd Muslim, Aidy; Lokman Husain, Mohd; Fadzil Akhir, Mohd

    2013-04-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) variation provides vital information for weather and ocean forecasting especially when studying climate change. Conventional methods of collecting ocean parameters such as SST, remains expensive and labor intensive due to the large area coverage and complex analytical procedure required. Therefore, some studies need to be conducted on the spatial and temporal distribution of ocean parameters. This study looks at Geo-statisctical methods in interpolating SST values and its impact on accuracy. Two spatial Geo-statistical techniques, mainly kriging and inverse distance functions (IDW) were applied to create variability distribution maps of SST for the Southern South China Sea (SCS). Data from 72 sampling station was collected in July 2012 covering an area of 270 km x 100 km and 263 km away from shore. This data provide the basis for the interpolation and accuracy analysis. After normalization, variograms were computed to fit the data sets producing models with the least RSS value. The accuracy were later evaluated based on on root mean squared error (RMSE) and root mean kriging variance (RMKV). Results show that Kriging with exponential model produced most accuracy estimates, reducing error in 17.3% compared with inverse distance functions.

  16. Capacitive ECG system with direct access to standard leads and body surface potential mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Martin; Schilling, Meinhard; Esperer, Hans Dieter

    2009-12-01

    Capacitive electrodes provide the same access to the human electrocardiogram (ECG) as galvanic electrodes, but without the need of direct electrical skin contact and even through layers of clothing. Thus, potential artifacts as a result of poor electrode contact to the skin are avoided and preparation time is significantly reduced. Our system integrates such capacitive electrodes in a 15 sensor array, which is combined with a Tablet PC. This integrated lightweight ECG system (cECG) is easy to place on the chest wall and allows for simultaneous recordings of 14 ECG channels, even if the patient is slightly dressed, e.g., with a t-shirt. In this paper, we present preliminary results on the performance of the cECG regarding the capability of recording body surface potential maps (BSPMs) and obtaining reconstructed standard ECG leads including Einthoven, Goldberger and, with some limitations, Wilson leads. All signals were measured having the subject lie in a supine position and wear a cotton shirt. Signal quality and diagnostic ECG information of the extracted leads are compared with standard ECG measurements. The results show a very close correlation between both types of ECG measurements. It is concluded that the cECG lends itself to rapid screening in clinically unstable patients.

  17. Surface Water Mapping from Suomi NPP-VIIRS Imagery at 30 m Resolution via Blending with Landsat Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Huang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the dynamics of surface water using remotely sensed data generally requires both high spatial and high temporal resolutions. One effective and popular approach for achieving this is image fusion. This study adopts a widely accepted fusion model, the Enhanced Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (ESTARFM, for blending the newly available coarse-resolution Suomi NPP-VIIRS data with Landsat data in order to derive water maps at 30 m resolution. The Pan-sharpening technique was applied to preprocessing NPP-VIIRS data to achieve a higher-resolution before blending. The modified Normalized Difference Water Index (mNDWI was employed for mapping surface water area. Two fusion alternatives, blend-then-index (BI or index-then-blend (IB, were comparatively analyzed against a Landsat derived water map. A case study of mapping Poyang Lake in China, where water distribution pattern is complex and the water body changes frequently and drastically, was conducted. It has been revealed that the IB method derives more accurate results with less computation time than the BI method. The BI method generally underestimates water distribution, especially when the water area expands radically. The study has demonstrated the feasibility of blending NPP-VIIRS with Landsat for achieving surface water mapping at both high spatial and high temporal resolutions. It suggests that IB is superior to BI for water mapping in terms of efficiency and accuracy. The finding of this study also has important reference values for other blending works, such as image blending for vegetation cover monitoring.

  18. A Web-based tool for processing and visualizing body surface potential maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Raymond R; Finlay, Dewar D; Nugent, Chris D; Moore, George

    2010-01-01

    The body surface potential map (BSPM) is potentially more accurate for diagnosing cardiac pathologies when compared to the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). However, a contributing factor to the lack of widespread adoption of the BSPM is the shortage of standard methods for its storage and visualization. Based on these observations, a BSPM storage format based on the eXtensible Markup Language has been developed within this study, alongside a Web-based BSPM viewer. This viewer was created using a lossless vector graphics tool (Adobe Flash) to maintain the quality of the ECG waveforms when they are enlarged. The viewer also runs inside the Web browser to facilitate BSPM visualization independent of the clinician's geographical location. This online nature enabled the creation of a comments system that can be used to assist in a collaborative diagnosis. This is useful because BSPM diagnostic criteria are not well established. Moreover, using the viewer's innovative tools (ie, calipers, isopotential maps), the clinician can explore BSPM datasets. Algorithms have also been integrated within the system to extract and display the 12-lead ECG and the vectorcardiogram from the BSPM. This viewer has been available online for 10 months alongside a Weblog, which has been used to record the user's feedback. During this period, 12 experts from both the clinical and visualization domains evaluated the viewer and contributed to its design. It has been the general consensus of all experts that the application is an effective solution for visualizing BSPMs. This viewer has been tested to visualize 2 different BSPMs using a PC (3 GHz CPU, 3 GB RAM, 6 MB broadband). The Lux-192 BSPM and the Kornreich-117 BSPM where both uploaded and visualized within 3.8 seconds (mean time from 10 trials). This BSPM storage format and its associated viewer provide a framework for a BSPM management system. If this system is made widely available, it has the potential to provide BSPM

  19. In vivo microcirculation imaging of the sub surface fingertip using correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (cmOCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dsouza, Roshan I.; Zam, Azhar; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Larin, Kirill V.; Leahy, Martin

    2013-02-01

    We describe a novel application of correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (cmOCT) for sub-surface fingerprint biometric identification. Fingerprint biometrics including automated fingerprint identification systems, are commonly used to recognise the fingerprint, since they constitute simple, effective and valuable physical evidence. Spoofing of biometric fingerprint devices can be easily done because of the limited information obtained from the surface topography. In order to overcome this limitation a potentially more secure source of information is required for biometric identification applications. In this study, we retrieve the microcirculation map of the subsurface fingertip by use of the cmOCT technique. To increase probing depth of the sub surface microcirculation, an optical clearing agent composed of 75% glycerol in aqueous solution was applied topically and kept in contact for 15 min. OCT intensity images were acquired from commercial research grade swept source OCT system (model OCT1300SS, Thorlabs Inc. USA). A 3D OCT scan of the fingertip was acquired over an area of 5x5 mm using 1024x1024 A-scans in approximately 70 s. The resulting volume was then processed using the cmOCT technique with a 7x7 kernel to provide a microcirculation map. We believe these results will demonstrate an enhanced security level over artificial fingertips. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of imaging microcirculation map of the subsurface fingertip.

  20. A Pattern Analysis of Using Self-Organizing-Maps in a Unspoken Vowel Recognition System Based on Surface Electromyogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Hisao; Noguchi, Yusuke; Ohchi, Masashi; Furukawa, Tatsuya

    In this paper, we present some results of analysis on surface electromyogram (SEMG) using Self-Organizing -Maps (SOM) algorithm, which is one of the neural network algorithm, for unspoken vowel recognition system. Three pairs of electrodes were placed on facial muscles and SEMG signals were recorded. We have examined the classification of three pairs of the values of activity for each muscle using SOM algorithm. The SOM algorithm is also able to translate the multi-dimensional vectors of RMS values of SEMG signal into the two-dimensional map.

  1. The abandoned surface mining sites in the Czech Republic: mapping and creating a database with a GIS web application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Richard; Tereza Peterková, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Based on the vectorization of the 55-volume book series the Quarry Inventories of the Czechoslovak Republic/Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, published in the years 1932-1961, a new comprehensive database was built comprising 9958 surface mining sites of raw materials, which were active in the first half of the 20th century. The mapped area covers 40.9 % of the territory of the Czech Republic. For the purposes of visualization, a map application, the Quarry Inventories Online, was created that enables the data visualization.

  2. Response surface mapping of neurobehavioral performance: Testing the feasibility of split sleep schedules for space operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollicone, Daniel J.; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Rogers, Naomi L.; Dinges, David F.

    The demands of sustaining high levels of neurobehavioral performance during space operations necessitate precise scheduling of sleep opportunities in order to best preserve optimal performance. We report here the results of the first split sleep, dose-response experiment involving a range of sleep/wake scenarios with chronically reduced nocturnal sleep, augmented with a diurnal nap. To characterize performance over all combinations of split sleep in the range studied, we used response surface mapping methodology. Waking neurobehavioral performance was studied in N=90 subjects each assigned to one of 18 sleep regimens consisting of a restricted nocturnal anchor sleep period and a diurnal nap. Psychomotor vigilance task performance and subjective assessments of sleepiness were found to be primarily a function of total time in bed per 24 h regardless of how sleep was divided among nocturnal anchor sleep and diurnal nap periods. Digit symbol substitution task performance was also found to be primarily a function of total time in bed per 24 h; however, accounting for nocturnal sleep duration and nap duration separately provided a small but significant enhancement in the variance explained. The results suggest that reductions in total daily sleep result in a near-linear accumulation of impairment regardless of whether sleep is scheduled as a consolidated nocturnal sleep period or split into a nocturnal anchor sleep period and a diurnal nap. Thus, split sleep schedules are feasible and can be used to enhance the flexibility of sleep/work schedules for space operations involving restricted nocturnal sleep due to mission-critical task scheduling. These results are generally applicable to any continuous industrial operation that involves sleep restriction, night operations, and shift work.

  3. Response Surface Mapping of Neurobehavioral Performance: Testing the Feasibility of Split Sleep Schedules for Space Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollicone, Daniel J.; Van Dongen, Hans P.A.; Rogers, Naomi L.; Dinges, David F.

    2008-01-01

    The demands of sustaining high levels of neurobehavioral performance during space operations necessitate precise scheduling of sleep opportunities in order to best preserve optimal performance. We report here the results of the first split-sleep, dose-response experiment involving a range of sleep/wake scenarios with chronically reduced nocturnal sleep, augmented with a diurnal nap. To characterize performance over all combinations of split sleep in the range studied, we used response surface mapping methodology. Waking neurobehavioral performance was studied in N=90 subjects each assigned to one of 18 sleep regimens consisting of a restricted nocturnal anchor sleep period and a diurnal nap. Psychomotor vigilance task performance and subjective assessments of sleepiness were found to be primarily a function of total time in bed per 24 h regardless of how sleep was divided among nocturnal anchor sleep and diurnal nap periods. Digit symbol substitution task performance was also found to be primarily a function of total time in bed per 24 h; however, accounting for nocturnal sleep duration and nap duration separately provided a small but significant enhancement in the variance explained. The results suggest that reductions in total daily sleep result in a near-linear accumulation of impairment regardless of whether sleep is scheduled as a consolidated nocturnal sleep period or split into a nocturnal anchor sleep period and a diurnal nap. Thus, split sleep schedules are feasible and can be used to enhance the flexibility of sleep/work schedules for space operations involving restricted nocturnal sleep due to mission-critical task scheduling. These results are generally applicable to any continuous industrial operation that involves sleep restriction, night operations, and shift work. PMID:19194521

  4. Automated mapping of sub-pixel impervious surface area from landsat imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphaus, Benjamin D.

    The past few decades have seen rapid, global urbanization. Remotely sensed imagery is the best source of information about the extent of urbanization, but extracting urban extent from remotely sensed imagery is often an intensive, supervised task for analysts to perform. This project presents a fully automated method to extract impervious surface area (ISA), an important component of urban expansion, from Landsat TM and similar sensors. These moderate resolution sensors have a multi-decade collection archive, sub-monthly revisit rate and have served as a model for other national and commercial programs. The unsupervised methodology proposed herein, termed the PEEL process (pre-processing, endmember extraction and labeling), is an SMA (spectral mixture analysis) technique that uses as inputs endmembers that have been labeled by a SVM (support vector machine) classification through the fusion of the PanTex GLCM-based texture measure and endmembers drawn from the SMACC (sequential maximum angle convex cone) algorithm. Labels are provided to endmembers with an overall accuracy of 94% across 13 Landsat scenes from different sensor types and of several regions and urban forms. Multiple unmixing methods are tested, with BNMESMA (brightness normalized multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis) performing the best with a RMSE of 0.276. Caution is given regarding the value of RMSE as a metric for comparing method accuracy and more detailed error metrics are introduced. The method is shown as a viable template for mapping ISA across multiple scenes and as a useful framework for analyzing large archives of imagery with a common, automatable methodology.

  5. A Comparison of Land Surface Water Mapping Using the Normalized Difference Water Index from TM, ETM+ and ALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyu Sun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing has more advantages than the traditional methods of land surface water (LSW mapping because it is a low-cost, reliable information source that is capable of making high-frequency and repeatable observations. The normalized difference water indexes (NDWIs, calculated from various band combinations (green, near-infrared (NIR, or shortwave-infrared (SWIR, have been successfully applied to LSW mapping. In fact, new NDWIs will become available when Advanced Land Imager (ALI data are used as the ALI sensor provides one green band (Band 4, two NIR bands (Bands 6 and 7, and three SWIR bands (Bands 8, 9, and 10. Thus, selecting the optimal band or combination of bands is critical when ALI data are employed to map LSW using NDWI. The purpose of this paper is to find the best performing NDWI model of the ALI data in LSW map. In this study, eleven NDWI models based on ALI, Thematic Mapper (TM, and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ data were compared to assess the performance of ALI data in LSW mapping, at three different study sites in the Yangtze River Basin, China. The contrast method, Otsu method, and confusion matrix were calculated to evaluate the accuracies of the LSW maps. The accuracies of LSW maps derived from eleven NDWI models showed that five NDWI models of the ALI sensor have more than an overall accuracy of 91% with a Kappa coefficient of 0.78 of LSW maps at three test sites. In addition, the NDWI model, calculated from the green (Band 4: 0.525–0.605 μm and SWIR (Band 9: 1.550–1.750 μm bands of the ALI sensor, namely NDWIA4,9, was shown to have the highest LSW mapping accuracy, more than the other NDWI models. Therefore, the NDWIA4,9 is the best indicator for LSW mapping of the ALI sensor. It can be used for mapping LSW with high accuracy.

  6. SU-E-J-193: Application of Surface Mapping in Detecting Swallowing for Head-&-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, D; Xie, X; Mehta, V; Shepard, D [Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Recent evidence is emerging that long term swallowing function may be improved after radiotherapy for head-&-neck cancer if doses are limited to certain swallowing structures. Immobilization of patients with head-&-neck cancer is typically done with a mask. This mask, however, doesn’t limit patient swallowing. Patient voluntary or involuntary swallowing may introduce significant tumor motion, which can lead to suboptimal delivery. In this study, we have examined the feasibility of using surface mapping technology to detect patient swallowing during treatment and evaluated its magnitude. Methods: The C-RAD Catalyst system was used to detect the patient surface map. A volunteer lying on the couch was used to simulate the patient under treatment. A virtual marker was placed near the throat and was used to monitor the swallowing action. The target motion calculated by the Catalyst system through deformable registration was also collected. Two treatment isocenters, one placed close to the throat and the other placed posterior to the base-of-tongue, were used to check the sensitivity of surface mapping technique. Results: When the patient’s throat is not in the shadow of the patient’s chest, the Catalyst system can clearly identify the swallowing motion. In our tests, the vertical motion of the skin can reach to about 5mm. The calculated target motion can reach up to 1 cm. The magnitude of this calculated target motion is more dramatic when the plan isocenter is closer to the skin surface, which suggests that the Catalyst motion tracking technique is more sensitive to the swallowing motion with a shallower isocenter. Conclusion: Surface mapping can clearly identify patient swallowing during radiation treatment. This information can be used to evaluate the dosimetric impact of the involuntary swallowing. It may also be used to potentially gate head-&-neck radiation treatments. A prospective IRB approved study is currently enrolling patients in our

  7. The signalling mucin Msb2 regulates surface sensing and host penetration via BMP1 MAP kinase signalling in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroch, Michaela; Mueller, Nathalie; Hinsenkamp, Isabel; Hahn, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic fungus that infects a wide range of fruit, vegetable and flower crops. Penetration of the host cuticle occurs via infection structures that are formed in response to appropriate plant surface signals. The differentiation of these structures requires a highly conserved mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade including the MAP kinase BMP1. In yeast and several plant-pathogenic fungi, the signalling mucin Msb2 has been shown to be involved in surface recognition and MAP kinase activation. In this study, a B. cinerea msb2 mutant was generated and characterized. The mutant showed normal growth, sporulation, sclerotia formation and stress resistance. In the absence of nutrients, abnormal germination with multiple germ tubes was observed. In the presence of sugars, normal germination occurred, but msb2 germlings were almost unable to form appressoria or infection cushions on hard surfaces. Nevertheless, the msb2 mutant showed only a moderate delay in lesion formation on different host plants, and formed expanding lesions similar to the wild-type. Although the wild-type showed increasing BMP1 phosphorylation during the first hours of germination on hard surfaces, the phosphorylation levels in the msb2 mutant were strongly reduced. Several genes encoding secreted proteins were found to be co-regulated by BMP1 and Msb2 during germination. Taken together, B. cinerea Msb2 is likely to represent a hard surface sensor of germlings and hyphae that triggers infection structure formation via the activation of the BMP1 MAP kinase pathway.

  8. Sea surface velocities from visible and infrared multispectral atmospheric mapping sensor imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, P. A.; Emery, W. J.; Radebaugh, M.

    1992-01-01

    High resolution (100 m), sequential Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) images were used in a study to calculate advective surface velocities using the Maximum Cross Correlation (MCC) technique. Radiance and brightness temperature gradient magnitude images were formed from visible (0.48 microns) and infrared (11.12 microns) image pairs, respectively, of Chandeleur Sound, which is a shallow body of water northeast of the Mississippi delta, at 145546 GMT and 170701 GMT on 30 Mar. 1989. The gradient magnitude images enhanced the surface water feature boundaries, and a lower cutoff on the gradient magnitudes calculated allowed the undesirable sunglare and backscatter gradients in the visible images, and the water vapor absorption gradients in the infrared images, to be reduced in strength. Requiring high (greater than 0.4) maximum cross correlation coefficients and spatial coherence of the vector field aided in the selection of an optimal template size of 10 x 10 pixels (first image) and search limit of 20 pixels (second image) to use in the MCC technique. Use of these optimum input parameters to the MCC algorithm, and high correlation and spatial coherence filtering of the resulting velocity field from the MCC calculation yielded a clustered velocity distribution over the visible and infrared gradient images. The velocity field calculated from the visible gradient image pair agreed well with a subjective analysis of the motion, but the velocity field from the infrared gradient image pair did not. This was attributed to the changing shapes of the gradient features, their nonuniqueness, and large displacements relative to the mean distance between them. These problems implied a lower repeat time for the imagery was needed in order to improve the velocity field derived from gradient imagery. Suggestions are given for optimizing the repeat time of sequential imagery when using the MCC method for motion studies. Applying the MCC method to the infrared

  9. Using dose-surface maps to predict radiation-induced rectal bleeding: a neural network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Florian; Gulliford, Sarah L; Webb, Steve; Partridge, Mike

    2009-09-07

    The incidence of late-toxicities after radiotherapy can be modelled based on the dose delivered to the organ under consideration. Most predictive models reduce the dose distribution to a set of dose-volume parameters and do not take the spatial distribution of the dose into account. The aim of this study was to develop a classifier predicting radiation-induced rectal bleeding using all available information on the dose to the rectal wall. The dose was projected on a two-dimensional dose-surface map (DSM) by virtual rectum-unfolding. These DSMs were used as inputs for a classification method based on locally connected neural networks. In contrast to fully connected conventional neural nets, locally connected nets take the topology of the input into account. In order to train the nets, data from 329 patients from the RT01 trial (ISRCTN 47772397) were split into ten roughly equal parts. By using nine of these parts as a training set and the remaining part as an independent test set, a ten-fold cross-validation was performed. Ensemble learning was used and 250 nets were built from randomly selected patients from the training set. Out of these 250 nets, an ensemble of expert nets was chosen. The performances of the full ensemble and of the expert ensemble were quantified by using receiver-operator-characteristic (ROC) curves. In order to quantify the predictive power of the shape, ensembles of fully connected conventional neural nets based on dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were generated and their performances were quantified. The expert ensembles performed better than or equally as well as the full ensembles. The area under the ROC curve for the DSM-based expert ensemble was 0.64. The area under the ROC curve for the DSH-based expert ensemble equalled 0.59. This difference in performance indicates that not only volumetric, but also morphological aspects of the dose distribution are correlated to rectal bleeding after radiotherapy. Thus, the shape of the dose

  10. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Mapping of Relative Local Surface Temperatures with a Thin-Film Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic mapping of an object’s local temperature distribution may offer valuable information for failure analysis, system control and improvement. In this letter we present a computerized measurement system which is equipped with a hybrid, low-noise mechanical-electrical multiplexer for real-time two-dimensional (2D mapping of surface temperatures. We demonstrate the performance of the system on a device embedded with 32 pieces of built-in Cr-Pt thin-film thermocouples arranged in a 4 × 8 matrix. The system can display a continuous 2D mapping movie of relative temperatures with a time interval around 1 s. This technique may find applications in a variety of practical devices and systems.

  11. Flexible Neural Electrode Array Based-on Porous Graphene for Cortical Microstimulation and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yichen; Lyu, Hongming; Richardson, Andrew G.; Lucas, Timothy H.; Kuzum, Duygu

    2016-09-01

    Neural sensing and stimulation have been the backbone of neuroscience research, brain-machine interfaces and clinical neuromodulation therapies for decades. To-date, most of the neural stimulation systems have relied on sharp metal microelectrodes with poor electrochemical properties that induce extensive damage to the tissue and significantly degrade the long-term stability of implantable systems. Here, we demonstrate a flexible cortical microelectrode array based on porous graphene, which is capable of efficient electrophysiological sensing and stimulation from the brain surface, without penetrating into the tissue. Porous graphene electrodes show superior impedance and charge injection characteristics making them ideal for high efficiency cortical sensing and stimulation. They exhibit no physical delamination or degradation even after 1 million biphasic stimulation cycles, confirming high endurance. In in vivo experiments with rodents, same array is used to sense brain activity patterns with high spatio-temporal resolution and to control leg muscles with high-precision electrical stimulation from the cortical surface. Flexible porous graphene array offers a minimally invasive but high efficiency neuromodulation scheme with potential applications in cortical mapping, brain-computer interfaces, treatment of neurological disorders, where high resolution and simultaneous recording and stimulation of neural activity are crucial.

  12. Land Surface Water Mapping Using Multi-Scale Level Sets and a Visual Saliency Model from SAR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Xu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Land surface water mapping is one of the most basic classification tasks to distinguish water bodies from dry land surfaces. In this paper, a water mapping method was proposed based on multi-scale level sets and a visual saliency model (MLSVS, to overcome the lack of an operational solution for automatically, rapidly and reliably extracting water from large-area and fine spatial resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images. This paper has two main contributions, as follows: (1 The method integrated the advantages of both level sets and the visual saliency model. First, the visual saliency map was applied to detect the suspected water regions (SWR, and then the level set method only needed to be applied to the SWR regions to accurately extract the water bodies, thereby yielding a simultaneous reduction in time cost and increase in accuracy; (2 In order to make the classical Itti model more suitable for extracting water in SAR imagery, an improved texture weighted with the Itti model (TW-Itti is employed to detect those suspected water regions, which take into account texture features generated by the Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM algorithm, Furthermore, a novel calculation method for center-surround differences was merged into this model. The proposed method was tested on both Radarsat-2 and TerraSAR-X images, and experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method, the overall accuracy of water mapping is 98.48% and the Kappa coefficient is 0.856.

  13. Surface Temperature Mapping of the University of Northern Iowa Campus Using High Resolution Thermal Infrared Aerial Imageries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Alexander; Sugumaran, Ramanathan

    2008-08-25

    The goal of this project was to map the surface temperature of the University of Northern Iowa campus using high-resolution thermal infrared aerial imageries. A thermal camera with a spectral bandwidth of 3.0-5.0 μm was flown at the average altitude of 600 m, achieving ground resolution of 29 cm. Ground control data was used to construct the pixelto-temperature conversion model, which was later used to produce temperature maps of the entire campus and also for validation of the model. The temperature map then was used to assess the building rooftop conditions and steam line faults in the study area. Assessment of the temperature map revealed a number of building structures that may be subject to insulation improvement due to their high surface temperatures leaks. Several hot spots were also identified on the campus for steam pipelines faults. High-resolution thermal infrared imagery proved highly effective tool for precise heat anomaly detection on the campus, and it can be used by university facility services for effective future maintenance of buildings and grounds.

  14. Retention of features on a mapped Drosophila brain surface using a Bézier-tube-based surface model averaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guan-Yu; Wu, Cheng-Chi; Shao, Hao-Chiang; Chang, Hsiu-Ming; Chiang, Ann-Shyn; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2012-12-01

    Model averaging is a widely used technique in biomedical applications. Two established model averaging methods, iterative shape averaging (ISA) method and virtual insect brain (VIB) method, have been applied to several organisms to generate average representations of their brain surfaces. However, without sufficient samples, some features of the average Drosophila brain surface obtained using the above methods may disappear or become distorted. To overcome this problem, we propose a Bézier-tube-based surface model averaging strategy. The proposed method first compensates for disparities in position, orientation, and dimension of input surfaces, and then evaluates the average surface by performing shape-based interpolation. Structural features with larger individual disparities are simplified with half-ellipse-shaped Bézier tubes, and are unified according to these tubes to avoid distortion during the averaging process. Experimental results show that the average model yielded by our method could preserve fine features and avoid structural distortions even if only a limit amount of input samples are used. Finally, we qualitatively compare our results with those obtained by ISA and VIB methods by measuring the surface-to-surface distances between input surfaces and the averaged ones. The comparisons show that the proposed method could generate a more representative average surface than both ISA and VIB methods.

  15. Development of a Silicon Drift Detector Array: An X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer for Remote Surface Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskin, J.A.; De Geronimo, G.; Carini, G.A.; Chen, W.; Elsner, R.F.; Kramer, G.; Keister, J.W.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D.P.

    2009-09-11

    Over the past three years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory to develop a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) intended for fine surface mapping of the light elements of the moon. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is underlined by the fact that the technique has recently been employed by three lunar orbiter missions; Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1, and Chang'e. The SDD-XRS instrument we have been developing can operate at a low energy threshold (i.e. is capable of detecting Carbon), comparable energy resolution to Kaguya (<150 eV at 5.9 keV) and an order of magnitude lower power requirement, making much higher sensitivities possible. Furthermore, the intrinsic radiation resistance of the SDD makes it useful even in radiation-harsh environments such as that of Jupiter and its surrounding moons.

  16. Development of a Silicon Drift Detector Array: An X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer for Remote Surface Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Carini, Gabriella A.; Wei, Chen; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kramer, Georgiana; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Keister, Jeffrey W.; Zheng, Li; Ramsey, Brian D.; Rehak, Pavel; Siddons, D. Peter

    2009-01-01

    Over the past three years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory to develop a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) intended for fine surface mapping of the light elements of the moon. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is underlined by the fact that the technique has recently been employed by three lunar orbiter missions; Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1, and Chang e. The SDD-XRS instrument we have been developing can operate at a low energy threshold (i.e. is capable of detecting Carbon), comparable energy resolution to Kaguya (SDD makes it useful even in radiation-harsh environments such as that of Jupiter and its surrounding moons.

  17. Geomorphologic Mapping of Titan's Polar Terrains: Constraining Surface Processes and Landscape Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Birch, Samuel; Dietrich, William; Howard, Alan; Bristow, Charlie; Malaska, Michael; Moore, Jeff; Mastrogiuseppe, Marco; Hofgartner, Jason; Williams, David; White, Oliver; Soderblom, Jason; Barnes, Jason; Turtle, Elizabeth; Lunine, Jonathan; Wood, Charles; Neish, Catherine; Kirk, Randy; Stofan, Ellen; Lorenz, Ralph; Lopes, Rosaly

    2016-01-01

    We present a geomorphologic map of Titan's polar terrains. The map was generated from a combination of Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Imaging Science Subsystem imaging products, as well as altimetry, SARTopo and radargrammetry topographic datasets. In combining imagery with topographic data, our geomorphologic map reveals a stratigraphic sequence from which we infer process interactions between units. In mapping both polar regions with the same geomorphologic units, we conclude that processes that formed the terrains of the north polar region also acted to form the landscape we observe at the south. Uniform, SAR-dark plains are interpreted as sedimentary deposits, and are bounded by moderately dissected uplands. These plains contain the highest density of filled and empty lake depressions, and canyons. These units unconformably overlay a basement rock that outcrops as mountains and SAR-bright dissected terrains at various elevations across both poles. All these units are then superposed by surfici...

  18. Surface Ruptures and Building Damage of the 2003 Bam, Iran, Earthquake Mapped by Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Eric J.; Talebian, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Nazari, H.; Jackson, J. A.; Ghorashi, M.; Walker, R.

    2005-01-01

    We use the interferometric correlation from Envisat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to map the details of the surface ruptures related to the 26 December 2003 earthquake that devastated Bam, Iran. The main strike-slip fault rupture south of the city of Bam has a series of four segments with left steps shown by a narrow line of low correlation in the coseismic interferogram. This also has a clear expression in the field because of the net extension across the fault. Just south of the city limits, the surface strain becomes distributed over a width of about 500 m, probably because of a thicker layer of soft sedimentary material.

  19. Mapping land water and energy balance relations through conditional sampling of remote sensing estimates of atmospheric forcing and surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Leila; Entekhabi, Dara; Salvucci, Guido

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop and apply a mapping estimation capability for key unknown parameters that link the surface water and energy balance equations. The method is applied to the Gourma region in West Africa. The accuracy of the estimation method at point scale was previously examined using flux tower data. In this study, the capability is scaled to be applicable with remotely sensed data products and hence allow mapping. Parameters of the system are estimated through a process that links atmospheric forcing (precipitation and incident radiation), surface states, and unknown parameters. Based on conditional averaging of land surface temperature and moisture states, respectively, a single objective function is posed that measures moisture and temperature-dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings and surface states. This objective function is minimized with respect to parameters to identify evapotranspiration and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The uncertainty of the estimated parameters (and associated statistical confidence limits) is obtained through the inverse of Hessian of the objective function, which is an approximation of the covariance matrix. This calibration-free method is applied to the mesoscale region of Gourma in West Africa using multiplatform remote sensing data. The retrievals are verified against tower-flux field site data and physiographic characteristics of the region. The focus is to find the functional form of the evaporative fraction dependence on soil moisture, a key closure function for surface and subsurface heat and moisture dynamics, using remote sensing data.

  20. Scalable and Detail-Preserving Ground Surface Reconstruction from Large 3D Point Clouds Acquired by Mobile Mapping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, D.; Serna Morales, A.; Deschaud, J.-E.; Marcotegui, B.; Goulette, F.

    2014-08-01

    The currently existing mobile mapping systems equipped with active 3D sensors allow to acquire the environment with high sampling rates at high vehicle velocities. While providing an effective solution for environment sensing over large scale distances, such acquisition provides only a discrete representation of the geometry. Thus, a continuous map of the underlying surface must be built. Mobile acquisition introduces several constraints for the state-of-the-art surface reconstruction algorithms. Smoothing becomes a difficult task for recovering sharp depth features while avoiding mesh shrinkage. In addition, interpolation-based techniques are not suitable for noisy datasets acquired by Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) systems. Furthermore, scalability is a major concern for enabling real-time rendering over large scale distances while preserving geometric details. This paper presents a fully automatic ground surface reconstruction framework capable to deal with the aforementioned constraints. The proposed method exploits the quasi-flat geometry of the ground throughout a morphological segmentation algorithm. Then, a planar Delaunay triangulation is applied in order to reconstruct the ground surface. A smoothing procedure eliminates high frequency peaks, while preserving geometric details in order to provide a regular ground surface. Finally, a decimation step is applied in order to cope with scalability constraints over large scale distances. Experimental results on real data acquired in large urban environments are presented and a performance evaluation with respect to ground truth measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  1. Improving maps of ice-sheet surface elevation change using combined laser altimeter and stereoscopic elevation model data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Howat, I. M.; Tscherning, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    laser altimeters have relatively low errors but are spatially limited to the ground tracks, while DEMs have larger errors but provide spatially continuous surfaces. The principle of our method is to fit the DEM surface to the altimeter point clouds in time and space to minimize the DEM errors and use......We combine the complementary characteristics of laser altimeter data and stereoscopic digital elevation models (DEMs) to construct high-resolution (_100 m) maps of surface elevations and elevation changes over rapidly changing outlet glaciers in Greenland. Measurements from spaceborne and airborne...... that surface to extrapolate elevations away from altimeter flight lines. This reduces the DEM registration errors and fills the gap between the altimeter paths. We use data from ICESat and ATM as well as SPOT 5 DEMs from 2007 and 2008 and apply them to the outlet glaciers Jakobshavn Isbræ (JI...

  2. Hydrated salt minerals on Europa's Surface from the Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, T.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Matson, D.L.; Johnson, T.V.; Crowley, J.K.; Fanale, F.P.; Carlson, R.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Martin, P.D.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Granahan, J.C.; Ocampo, A.

    1999-01-01

    We reported evidence of heavily hydrated salt minerals present over large areas of Europa's surface from analysis of reflectance spectra returned by the Galileo mission near infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) [McCord et al., 1997a, b, 1998a, b]. Here we elaborate on this earlier evidence, present spatial distributions of these minerals, examine alternate water-ice interpretations, expand on our hydrated-salts interpretation, consider salt mineral stability on Europa, and discuss the implications. Extensive well-defined areas on Europa show distinct, asymmetric water-related absorption bands in the 1 to 2.5-??m region. Radiative transfer modeling of water ice involving different particle sizes and layers at Europa temperatures does not reproduce the distinctive Europa water bands. However, ice near its melting temperature, such as in terrestrial environments, does have some characteristics of the Europa spectrum. Alternatively, some classes of heavily hydrated minerals do exhibit such water bands. Among plausible materials, heavily hydrated salt minerals, such as magnesium and sodium sulfates, sodium carbonate and their mixtures, are preferred. All Europa spectral features are present in some salt minerals and a very good match to the Europa spectrum can be achieved by mixing several salt spectra. However, no single or mix of salt mineral spectra from the limited library available has so far been found to perfectly match the Europa spectrum in every detail. The material is concentrated at the lineaments and in chaotic terrain, which are technically disrupted areas on the trailing side. Since the spectrum of the material on Europa is nearly the same everywhere so-far studied, the salt or salt-mixture composition may be nearly uniform. This suggests similar sources and processes over at least a near-hemispheric scale. This would suggest that an extensive subsurface ocean containing dissolved salts is the source, and several possible mechanisms for deposit

  3. Integrable generalizations of Schrödinger maps and Heisenberg spin models from Hamiltonian flows of curves and surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anco, Stephen C.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2010-10-01

    A moving frame formulation of non-stretching geometric curve flows in Euclidean space is used to derive a 1+1 dimensional hierarchy of integrable SO(3)-invariant vector models containing the Heisenberg ferromagnetic spin model as well as a model given by a spin vector version of the mKdV equation. These models describe a geometric realization of the NLS hierarchy of soliton equations whose bi-Hamiltonian structure is shown to be encoded in the Frenet equations of the moving frame. This derivation yields an explicit bi-Hamiltonian structure, recursion operator, and constants of motion for each model in the hierarchy. A generalization of these results to geometric surface flows is presented, where the surfaces are non-stretching in one direction while stretching in all transverse directions. Through the Frenet equations of a moving frame, such surface flows are shown to encode a hierarchy of 2+1 dimensional integrable SO(3)-invariant vector models, along with their bi-Hamiltonian structure, recursion operator, and constants of motion, describing a geometric realization of 2+1 dimensional bi-Hamiltonian NLS and mKdV soliton equations. Based on the well-known equivalence between the Heisenberg model and the Schrödinger map equation in 1+1 dimensions, a geometrical formulation of these hierarchies of 1+1 and 2+1 vector models is given in terms of dynamical maps into the 2-sphere. In particular, this formulation yields a new integrable generalization of the Schrödinger map equation in 2+1 dimensions as well as a mKdV analog of this map equation corresponding to the mKdV spin model in 1+1 and 2+1 dimensions.

  4. MODELING THE ANOMALY OF SURFACE NUMBER DENSITIES OF GALAXIES ON THE GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP DUE TO THEIR FIR EMISSION CONTAMINATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Yahata, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kayo, Issha [Department of Physics, Toho University, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Nishimichi, Takahiro, E-mail: kashiwagi@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used Galactic extinction map is constructed assuming that the observed far-infrared (FIR) fluxes come entirely from Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al., we consider how FIR emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies as a function of the r-band extinction, A {sub r,} {sub SFD}. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with A {sub r,} {sub SFD} for A {sub r,} {sub SFD} < 0.1, as first discovered by Yahata et al. for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytical model to compute the surface density of galaxies, taking into account the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of 100 μm and r-band luminosities of each galaxy, y ≡ (νL){sub 100} {sub μm}/(νL) {sub r}. Then we search for the mean and rms values of y that fit the observed anomaly, using the analytical model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies. Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless, the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. Whereas the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1-1 mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.

  5. Motor cortical organization in an adult with hemimegalencephaly and late onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Carlo; Vicentini, Roberta; Collini, Alessandra; Boccagni, Cristina; Cantello, Roberto; Monaco, Francesco

    2009-08-28

    Hemimegalencephaly is a rare brain malformation whose physiology is largely obscure. In a single patient, we studied motor cortex using several transcranial magnetic stimulation variables testing cortical excitability, and mapping motor area. The megalencephalic hemisphere showed an enlargement of cortical motor map with abnormal axonal orientation and an excess spread of corticospinal excitation, associated with multiple defects of cortical inhibition. TMS gave new information on the anatomic/functional features and epileptogenesis in this complex and physiologically obscure syndrome.

  6. Bedrock geology Forsmark. Modelling stage 2.3. Description of the bedrock geological map at the ground surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Michael B.; Bergman, Torbjoern (Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)); Isaksson, Hans (GeoVista AB, Luleaa (Sweden)); Petersson, Jesper (SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    A description of the bedrock geological map of the ground surface at the Forsmark site is presented here. This map is essentially a 2D model for the distribution of different types of rock unit on this surface. Besides showing the distribution of these rock units, the bedrock geological map also displays the distribution of some deformation zones that intersect the ground surface. It also presents information bearing on the position and form of outcrops, the location and projection of boreholes drilled during the site investigation programme, subordinate rock types, the occurrence of abandoned mines or exploration prospects, measurements of ductile structures in outcrops, inferred form lines, key minerals, and the occurrence of mylonite and cataclastic rock. Bedrock data from outcrops and excavations, airborne and ground magnetic data and information from the uppermost part of boreholes have all been used in the construction of the geological map. The description has also made use of complementary analytical data bearing on the composition and age of the rocks as well gamma-ray spectrometry and gravity data. Uncertainty in the position of the boundaries between rock units over the mapped area are addressed in a qualitative manner. Four model versions of the bedrock geological map have been delivered to SKB's GIS database (bedrock geological map, Forsmark, versions 1.1, 1.2, 2.2 and 2.3) at different times during the site investigation programme. The Forsmark area is situated along the coast of the Baltic Sea in northern Uppland, Sweden, in a region where the overall level of ductile strain in the bedrock is high. This high-strain region extends several tens of kilometres across the WNW-ENE to NW-SE strike of the rocks in this part of the Fennoscandian Shield. At Forsmark, the coastal region is composed partly of high-strain belts, which formed under amphibolite-facies metamorphic conditions, and partly of tectonic lenses, where the bedrock is also affected by

  7. A semi-automatic multiple view texture mapping for the surface model extracted by laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhichao; Huang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Fan; Chang, Yongmin; Li, Deren

    2008-12-01

    Laser scanning is an effective way to acquire geometry data of the cultural heritage with complex architecture. After generating the 3D model of the object, it's difficult to do the exactly texture mapping for the real object. we take effort to create seamless texture maps for a virtual heritage of arbitrary topology. Texture detail is acquired directly from the real object in a light condition as uniform as we can make. After preprocessing, images are then registered on the 3D mesh by a semi-automatic way. Then we divide the mesh into mesh patches overlapped with each other according to the valid texture area of each image. An optimal correspondence between mesh patches and sections of the acquired images is built. Then, a smoothing approach is proposed to erase the seam between different images that map on adjacent mesh patches, based on texture blending. The obtained result with a Buddha of Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes is presented and discussed.

  8. An unusual MAP kinase is required for efficient penetration of the plant surface by Ustilago maydis

    OpenAIRE

    Brachmann, Andreas; Schirawski, Jan; Müller, Philip; Kahmann, Regine

    2003-01-01

    In Ustilago maydis, pathogenic development is controlled by a heterodimer of the two homeodomain proteins bW and bE. We have identified by RNA fingerprinting a b-regulated gene, kpp6, which encodes an unusual MAP kinase. Kpp6 is similar to a number of other fungal MAP kinases involved in mating and pathogenicity, but contains an additional N-terminal domain unrelated to other proteins. Transcription of the kpp6 gene yields two transcripts differing in length, but encoding proteins of identica...

  9. High-density surface EMG maps from upper-arm and forearm muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas-Martínez Monica

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background sEMG signal has been widely used in different applications in kinesiology and rehabilitation as well as in the control of human-machine interfaces. In general, the signals are recorded with bipolar electrodes located in different muscles. However, such configuration may disregard some aspects of the spatial distribution of the potentials like location of innervation zones and the manifestation of inhomogineties in the control of the muscular fibers. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of motor unit action potentials has recently been assessed with activation maps obtained from High Density EMG signals (HD-EMG, these lasts recorded with arrays of closely spaced electrodes. The main objective of this work is to analyze patterns in the activation maps, associating them with four movement directions at the elbow joint and with different strengths of those tasks. Although the activation pattern can be assessed with bipolar electrodes, HD-EMG maps could enable the extraction of features that depend on the spatial distribution of the potentials and on the load-sharing between muscles, in order to have a better differentiation between tasks and effort levels. Methods An experimental protocol consisting of isometric contractions at three levels of effort during flexion, extension, supination and pronation at the elbow joint was designed and HD-EMG signals were recorded with 2D electrode arrays on different upper-limb muscles. Techniques for the identification and interpolation of artifacts are explained, as well as a method for the segmentation of the activation areas. In addition, variables related to the intensity and spatial distribution of the maps were obtained, as well as variables associated to signal power of traditional single bipolar recordings. Finally, statistical tests were applied in order to assess differences between information extracted from single bipolar signals or from HD-EMG maps and to analyze

  10. Usefulness of ventricular endocardial electric reconstruction from body surface potential maps to noninvasively localize ventricular ectopic activity in patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Dakun; Sun, Jian; Li, Yigang; He, Bin

    2013-06-01

    As radio frequency (RF) catheter ablation becomes increasingly prevalent in the management of ventricular arrhythmia in patients, an accurate and rapid determination of the arrhythmogenic site is of important clinical interest. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the inversely reconstructed ventricular endocardial current density distribution from body surface potential maps (BSPMs) can localize the regions critical for maintenance of a ventricular ectopic activity. Patients with isolated and monomorphic premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) were investigated by noninvasive BSPMs and subsequent invasive catheter mapping and ablation. Equivalent current density (CD) reconstruction (CDR) during symptomatic PVCs was obtained on the endocardial ventricular surface in six patients (four men, two women, years 23-77), and the origin of the spontaneous ectopic activity was localized at the location of the maximum CD value. Compared with the last (successful) ablation site (LAS), the mean and standard deviation of localization error of the CDR approach were 13.8 and 1.3 mm, respectively. In comparison, the distance between the LASs and the estimated locations of an equivalent single moving dipole in the heart was 25.5 ± 5.5 mm. The obtained CD distribution of activated sources extending from the catheter ablation site also showed a high consistency with the invasively recorded electroanatomical maps. The noninvasively reconstructed endocardial CD distribution is suitable to predict a region of interest containing or close to arrhythmia source, which may have the potential to guide RF catheter ablation.

  11. Cortical Lewy Body Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. G. Gibb

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In cortical Lewy body dementia the distribution of Lewy bodies in the nervous system follows that of Parkinson's disease, except for their greater profusion in the cerebral cortex. The cortical tangles and plaques of Alzheimer pathology are often present, the likely explanation being that Alzheimer pathology provokes dementia in many patients. Pure cortical Lewy body dementia without Alzheimer pathology is uncommon. The age of onset reflects that of Parkinson's disease, and clinical features, though not diagnostic, include aphasias, apraxias, agnosias, paranoid delusions and visual hallucinations. Parkinsonism may present before or after the dementia, and survival duration is approximately half that seen in Parkinson's disease without dementia.

  12. Gamma event-related synchronization analysis: a new method for cortical function mapping%通过Gamma频段能量分析进行大脑皮层功能区定位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘鑫; 钱天翼; 韩宏彦; 周文静; 孙朝晖; 王东明; 左焕琮

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过分析颅内脑电中Gamma频段能量变化来实现大脑皮层感觉运动区定位.方法 利用Gamma频段能量分析法、诱发电位(SEP)和皮层电刺激(CES)等电生理检查对8例因难治性癫痫而行颅内电极植入术的患者进行大脑皮层感觉运动区定位,以减少术后功能缺失等并发症.将Gamma频段能量分析方法的定位结果与SEP与CES进行比较.结果 通过统计对比,Gamma频段能量分析所得上肢感觉运动区电极编号与CES和SEP所得感觉运动区电极编号完全重合的占80.7%,完全重合或者紧邻的达92.3%.结论 Gamma频段能量分析方法是一种敏感性高、结果准确的大脑皮层功能区定位的新方法.%Objective To localize the sensory motor cortex of human brain by analyzing the power change in Gamma band ( > 60 Hz ) of electrocorticography (ECoG) data.Methods Eight patients with intractable epilepsy underwent temporary placement of subdural electrodes. After surgery,scnsory cvokcd potential (SEP),electrocortical stimulation (CES) and event-related synchronization analysis of Gamma band ( Gamma ERS analysis) were performed to reduce the risk of complications.The results of Gamma ERS analysis were compared with those of SEP and CES.Results The results of Gamma ERS analysis had 80.7% electrodes fitting perfectly those of CES and SEP.And the percentage reached 92.3% if electrodes were superimposed or added adjacently.Conclusion The Gamma ERS analysis is a new sensitive and precise method for cortical function mapping.

  13. Feasibility of correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (cmOCT) for anti-spoof sub-surface fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zam, Azhar; Dsouza, Roshan; Subhash, Hrebesh M; O'Connell, Marie-Louise; Enfield, Joey; Larin, Kirill; Leahy, Martin J

    2013-09-01

    We propose the use of correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (cmOCT) to deliver additional biometrics associated with the finger that could complement existing fingerprint technology for law enforcement applications. The current study extends the existing fingerprint paradigm by measuring additional biometrics associated with sub-surface finger tissue such as sub-surface fingerprints, sweat glands, and the pattern of the capillary bed to yield a user-friendly cost effective and anti-spoof multi-mode biometric solution associated with the finger. To our knowledge no other method has been able to capture sub-surface fingerprint, papillary pattern and horizontal vessel pattern in a single scan or to show the correspondence between these patterns in live adult human fingertip. Unlike many current technologies this approach incorporates 'liveness' testing by default. The ultimate output is a biometric module which is difficult to defeat and complements fingerprint scanners that currently are used in border control and law enforcement applications.

  14. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qiguang [Norfolk State University; Williams, Frances [Norfolk State University; Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Krishnan, Mahadevan [AASC, San Leandro, California

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surfaces top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  15. Mapping of Proteomic Composition on the Surfaces of Bacillus spores by Atomic Force Microscopy-based Immunolabeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plomp, M; Malkin, A J

    2008-06-02

    Atomic force microscopy provides a unique capability to image high-resolution architecture and structural dynamics of pathogens (e.g. viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores) at near molecular resolution in native conditions. Further development of atomic force microscopy in order to enable the correlation of pathogen protein surface structures with specific gene products is essential to understand the mechanisms of the pathogen life cycle. We have applied an AFM-based immunolabeling technique for the proteomic mapping of macromolecular structures through the visualization of the binding of antibodies, conjugated with nanogold particles, to specific epitopes on Bacillus spore surfaces. This information is generated while simultaneously acquiring the surface morphology of the pathogen. The immunospecificity of this labeling method was established through the utilization of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that target spore coat and exosporium epitopes of Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus anthracis spores.

  16. Developed Design for Humeral Head Replacement Using 3D Surface Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Assessment of dimensional and geometrical data on the humeral head replacement (HHR) objects is essential for solving the relevant designing problems in the physics of reverse engineering (RE). In this work, 2D-assessment for human humerus was performed using the computed tomography (CT) technique within the RE plan, after which the 2D images of humeral objects were converted into 3D images. The conversion was successful and indicated a clear difference in the 2D and 3D estimates of sizes and geometry of the humerus. The authors have analyzed and confirmed experimentally the statistical information on the relevant anatomical objects. The results of finite-element simulation of the compressive stresses affecting the geometry of 3D surface mapping were analyzed using SolidWorks software. For developing the biomechanical design of an HHR object suitable biomaterials were selected, and different metal-based biomaterials are discussed as applied at various loads. New methodology is presented for the size estimation of humeral head - both anatomical and artificial - in 3D-shape. A detailed interpretation is given for the results of CT D-measurements. Izmēru un ģeometrisko datu novērtējums, kas attiecas uz pleca kaula galviņas nomaiņas (PKGN) objektiem, nepieciešams, lai risinātu virkni reversīvās inženierijas (RI) problēmu. Šajā darbā cilvēka pleca kaula galviņas divdimensiju novērtējums tika veikts ar datortomogrāfijas palīdzību (RI) ietvaros, un pēc tam objekta divdimensiju attēlojums tika pārveidots trīsdimensiju. Pārveidojums bija sekmīgs, parādot pleca kaula galviņas izmēru un ģeometrijas atšķirības starp 2D un 3D novērtējumiem. Autori izanalizēja un eksperimentāli apstiprināja statistisko informāciju pēc dotā veida anatomiskiem objektiem. Saspiešanas sasprindzinājumi, kuri ietekmē trīsdimensiju virsmas attēlojuma ģeometriju, tika analizēti ar gala-elementu simulācijas metodi, lietojot programmu Solid

  17. Multivariate tensor-based morphometry on surfaces: application to mapping ventricular abnormalities in HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalin; Zhang, Jie; Gutman, Boris; Chan, Tony F; Becker, James T; Aizenstein, Howard J; Lopez, Oscar L; Tamburo, Robert J; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-02-01

    Here we developed a new method, called multivariate tensor-based surface morphometry (TBM), and applied it to study lateral ventricular surface differences associated with HIV/AIDS. Using concepts from differential geometry and the theory of differential forms, we created mathematical structures known as holomorphic one-forms, to obtain an efficient and accurate conformal parameterization of the lateral ventricular surfaces in the brain. The new meshing approach also provides a natural way to register anatomical surfaces across subjects, and improves on prior methods as it handles surfaces that branch and join at complex 3D junctions. To analyze anatomical differences, we computed new statistics from the Riemannian surface metrics-these retain multivariate information on local surface geometry. We applied this framework to analyze lateral ventricular surface morphometry in 3D MRI data from 11 subjects with HIV/AIDS and 8 healthy controls. Our method detected a 3D profile of surface abnormalities even in this small sample. Multivariate statistics on the local tensors gave better effect sizes for detecting group differences, relative to other TBM-based methods including analysis of the Jacobian determinant, the largest and smallest eigenvalues of the surface metric, and the pair of eigenvalues of the Jacobian matrix. The resulting analysis pipeline may improve the power of surface-based morphometry studies of the brain.

  18. Surface Mapping with an AFM-CMM Integrated System and Stitching Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Marinello, Francesco; Bariani, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    with piezoelectric actuation, provide sub nanometre vertical resolution and a few nanometres lateral resolution. On the other hand, the scanning range is limited to few hundred micrometers. In this respect, mapping is a solution. During the past few years, an integrated instrument has been developed at IPL based...

  19. A chord diagrammatic presentation of the mapping class group of a once bordered surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bene, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The Ptolemy groupoid is a combinatorial groupoid generated by elementary moves on marked trivalent fatgraphs with three types of relations. Through the fatgraph decomposition of Teichmüller space, the Ptolemy groupoid is a mapping class group equivariant subgroupoid of the fundamental path groupo...

  20. Potential of EnMAP spaceborne imaging spectroscopy for the prediction of common surface soil properties and expected accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrillat, Sabine; Foerster, Saskia; Steinberg, Andreas; Stevens, Antoine; Segl, Karl

    2016-04-01

    There is a renewed awareness of the finite nature of the world's soil resources, growing concern about soil security, and significant uncertainties about the carrying capacity of the planet. As a consequence, soil scientists are being challenged to provide regular assessments of soil conditions from local through to global scales. However, only a few countries have the necessary survey and monitoring programs to meet these new needs and existing global data sets are out-of-date. A particular issue is the clear demand for a new area-wide regional to global coverage with accurate, up-to-date, and spatially referenced soil information as expressed by the modeling scientific community, farmers and land users, and policy and decision makers. Soil spectroscopy from remote sensing observations based on studies from the laboratory scale to the airborne scale has been shown to be a proven method for the quantitative prediction of key soil surface properties in local areas for exposed soils in appropriate surface conditions such as low vegetation cover and low water content. With the upcoming launch of the next generation of hyperspectral satellite sensors in the next 3 to 5 years (EnMAP, HISUI, PRISMA, SHALOM), a great potential for the global mapping and monitoring of soil properties is appearing. Nevertheless, the capabilities to extend the soil properties current spectral modeling from local to regional scales are still to be demonstrated using robust methods. In particular, three central questions are at the forefront of research nowadays: a) methodological developments toward improved algorithms and operational tools for the extraction of soil properties, b) up scaling from the laboratory into space domain, and c) demonstration of the potential of upcoming satellite systems and expected accuracy of soil maps. In this study, airborne imaging spectroscopy data from several test sites are used to simulate EnMAP satellite images at 30 m scale. Then, different soil

  1. Statistical mapping of zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Slater, Lee D.

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) increasingly is used to map zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange (GWSWE). Previous studies of GWSWE using FO-DTS involved identification of zones of focused GWSWE based on arbitrary cutoffs of FO-DTS time-series statistics (e.g., variance, cross-correlation between temperature and stage, or spectral power). New approaches are needed to extract more quantitative information from large, complex FO-DTS data sets while concurrently providing an assessment of uncertainty associated with mapping zones of focused GSWSE. Toward this end, we present a strategy combining discriminant analysis (DA) and spectral analysis (SA). We demonstrate the approach using field experimental data from a reach of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 Area site. Results of the combined SA/DA approach are shown to be superior to previous results from qualitative interpretation of FO-DTS spectra alone.

  2. Linking physics with physiology in TMS: a sphere field model to determine the cortical stimulation site in TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielscher, Axel; Kammer, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    A fundamental problem of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is determining the site and size of the stimulated cortical area. In the motor system, the most common procedure for this is motor mapping. The obtained two-dimensional distribution of coil positions with associated muscle responses is used to calculate a center of gravity on the skull. However, even in motor mapping the exact stimulation site on the cortex is not known and only rough estimates of its size are possible. We report a new method which combines physiological measurements with a physical model used to predict the electric field induced by the TMS coil. In four subjects motor responses in a small hand muscle were mapped with 9-13 stimulation sites at the head perpendicular to the central sulcus in order to keep the induced current direction constant in a given cortical region of interest. Input-output functions from these head locations were used to determine stimulator intensities that elicit half-maximal muscle responses. Based on these stimulator intensities the field distribution on the individual cortical surface was calculated as rendered from anatomical MR data. The region on the cortical surface in which the different stimulation sites produced the same electric field strength (minimal variance, 4.2 +/- 0.8%.) was determined as the most likely stimulation site on the cortex. In all subjects, it was located at the lateral part of the hand knob in the motor cortex. Comparisons of model calculations with the solutions obtained in this manner reveal that the stimulated cortex area innervating the target muscle is substantially smaller than the size of the electric field induced by the coil. Our results help to resolve fundamental questions raised by motor mapping studies as well as motor threshold measurements.

  3. Overweight is not associated with cortical thickness alterations in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Jane Sharkey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSeveral studies report an association between body mass index (BMI and cortical thickness in adults. Some studies demonstrate diffuse cortical thinning in obesity, while others report effects in areas that are associated with self-regulation, such as lateral prefrontal cortex. MethodsThis study used multilevel modelling of data from the NIH Pediatric MRI Data Repository, a mixed longitudinal and cross-sectional database, to examine the relationship between cortical thickness and body weight in children. Cortical thickness was computed at 81,942 vertices of 716 MRI scans from 378 children aged between 4 and 18 years. Body mass index Z score for age was computed for each participant. We preformed vertex-wise statistical analysis of the relationship between cortical thickness and BMI, accounting for age and gender. In addition, cortical thickness was extracted from regions of interest in prefrontal cortex and insula.ResultsNo significant association between cortical thickness and BMI was found, either by statistical parametric mapping or by region of interest analysis. Results remained negative when the analysis was restricted to children aged 12-18.ConclusionsThe correlation between BMI and cortical thickness was not found in this large pediatric sample. The association between BMI and cortical thinning develops after adolescence. This has implications for the nature of the relationship between brain anatomy and weight gain.

  4. Apical versus Basal Neurogenesis Directs Cortical Interneuron Subclass Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Petros

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fate determination in the mammalian telencephalon, with its diversity of neuronal subtypes and relevance to neuropsychiatric disease, remains a critical area of study in neuroscience. Most studies investigating this topic focus on the diversity of neural progenitors within spatial and temporal domains along the lateral ventricles. Often overlooked is whether the location of neurogenesis within a fate-restricted domain is associated with, or instructive for, distinct neuronal fates. Here, we use in vivo fate mapping and the manipulation of neurogenic location to demonstrate that apical versus basal neurogenesis influences the fate determination of major subgroups of cortical interneurons derived from the subcortical telencephalon. Somatostatin-expressing interneurons arise mainly from apical divisions along the ventricular surface, whereas parvalbumin-expressing interneurons originate predominantly from basal divisions in the subventricular zone. As manipulations that shift neurogenic location alter interneuron subclass fate, these results add an additional dimension to the spatial-temporal determinants of neuronal fate determination.

  5. Focal cortical dysplasia - review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults.Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed - from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized.Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe.Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes.New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life.Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias.THE MOST COMMON FINDINGS ON MRI IMAGING INCLUDE: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also in both types

  6. Postpartum cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Shakeel Ahmed

    2008-09-01

    A 30-years-old third gravida with previous normal pregnancies and an unremarkable prenatal course had an emergency lower segment caesarean section at a periphery hospital for failure of labour to progress. She developed bilateral cortical blindness immediately after recovery from anesthesia due to cerebral angiopathy shown by CT and MR scan as cortical infarct cerebral angiopathy, which is a rare complication of a normal pregnancy.

  7. G.POT: a method for the assessment and mapping of the near-surface geothermal potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasso, Alessandro; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2017-04-01

    Shallow geothermal systems are widely recognised as a valuable technology for the heating and cooling of buildings. The most adopted technology is the Borehole Heat Exchanger (BHE), since it can be installed almost everywhere. However, the economic viability of BHEs depends on the thermal load that can be efficiently exchanged with the ground, i.e. the near-surface geothermal potential. We present the G.POT (Geothermal POTential) method for the assessment of near-surface geothermal potential as a function of the thermal conductivity and capacity of the ground, of its initial temperature, of the thermal resistance of the BHE and of the duration of the sinusoidal thermal load cycle, which reproduces the typical pattern of a thermal load during a heating or a cooling season. The function was calibrated from the results of numerical heat transfer simulations, performed varying the values of the aforementioned parameters over broad ranges. G.POT is a simple mathematical tool which can be easily implemented for the large-scale assessment and mapping of the near-surface geothermal potential for heating or cooling purpose. An example of its application is also shown, and advice is provided on the processing of input parameters. References A. Casasso, R. Sethi, G.POT: A quantitative method for the assessment and mapping of the shallow geothermal potential, Energy 106 (2016) 765-773. A. Casasso, R. Sethi, Assessment and mapping of the shallow geothermal potential in the province of Cuneo (Piedmont, NW Italy), Renewable Energy 102, Part B (2017) 306-315.

  8. C-band RISAT-1 imagery for geospatial mapping of cryospheric surface features in the Antarctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawak, Shridhar D.; Panditrao, Satej N.; Luis, Alvarinho J.

    2016-05-01

    Cryospheric surface feature classification is one of the widely used applications in the field of polar remote sensing. Precise surface feature maps derived from remotely sensed imageries are the major requirement for many geoscientific applications in polar regions. The present study explores the capabilities of C-band dual polarimetric (HH & HV) SAR imagery from Indian Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT-1) for land cryospheric surface feature mapping. The study areas selected for the present task were Larsemann Hills and Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica. RISAT-1 Fine Resolution STRIPMAP (FRS-1) mode data with 3-m spatial resolution was used in the present research attempt. In order to provide additional context to the amount of information in dual polarized RISAT-1 SAR data, a band HH+HV was introduced to make use of the original two polarizations. In addition to the data calibration, transformed divergence (TD) procedure was performed for class separability analysis to evaluate the quality of the statistics before image classification. For most of the class pairs the TD values were comparable, which indicated that the classes have good separability. Fuzzy and Artificial Neural Network classifiers were implemented and accuracy was checked. Nonparametric classifier Support Vector Machine (SVM) was also used to classify RISAT-1 data with an optimized polarization combination into three land-cover classes consisting of sea ice/snow/ice, rocks/landmass, and lakes/waterbodies. This study demonstrates that C-band FRS1 image mode data from the RISAT-1 mission can be exploited to identify, map and monitor land cover features in the polar regions, even during dark winter period. For better landcover classification and analysis, hybrid polarimetric data (cFRS-1 mode) from RISAT-1, which incorporates phase information, unlike the dual-pol linear (HH, HV) can be used for obtaining better polarization signatures.

  9. Simultaneous Mapping of Titan's Atmospheric and Surface Properties Through the Massive Inversion of Cassini/VIMS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Appéré, T.; Vincendon, M.; Douté, S.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rannou, P.; Sotin, C.; Barnes, J. W.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R. H.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer solver (i.e. SHDOM) is the most powerful tool to extract simultaneous information of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan from the hyperspectral data of the VIMS imaging spectrometer onboard Cassini. However, the sheer amount of data (~40000 VIMS cubes containing several millions of spectra since the beginning of the mission) makes this approach too demanding in computational time. In our analysis we use a radiative transfer model to create look-up tables for different values of the model's parameters (geometry of the observation, surface albedo, aerosols opacity). We employ up-to-date information on gaseous spectral coefficients, aerosols' optical properties and Titan's climatology. These look-up tables, appropriately interpolated, are then used to minimize the observations and create simultaneous maps of surface albedo at the wavelengths of Titan's spectral windows and of aerosols opacity. This approach allows the gain of a factor of several thousands in computational time and thus, for the first time, a truly massive treatment of VIMS data. This capacity of processing full mapping quickly will consent to monitor closely the global and local seasonal evolution of the atmosphere and the surface. We will present the results of our method applied to some cases of interest. We will analyze several hyperspectral images of the Huygens landing site and show the comparison of our results with observations of other Cassini instruments. We will also investigate regions that have been observed multiple times at different Cassini flybys with different observational conditions, as the T13/T17 mosaic of the Atzlan area. The perspectives for atmospheric and surface seasonal monitoring will be highlighted.

  10. Geomorphologic mapping of titan's polar terrains: Constraining surface processes and landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, S. P. D.; Hayes, A. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Howard, A. D.; Bristow, C. S.; Malaska, M. J.; Moore, J. M.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Hofgartner, J. D.; Williams, D. A.; White, O. L.; Soderblom, J. M.; Barnes, J. W.; Turtle, E. P.; Lunine, J. I.; Wood, C. A.; Neish, C. D.; Kirk, R. L.; Stofan, E. R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Lopes, R. M. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present a geomorphologic map of Titan's polar terrains. The map was generated from a combination of Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Imaging Science Subsystem imaging products, as well as altimetry, SARTopo and radargrammetry topographic datasets. In combining imagery with topographic data, our geomorphologic map reveals a stratigraphic sequence from which we infer process interactions between units. In mapping both polar regions with the same geomorphologic units, we conclude that processes that formed the terrains of the north polar region also acted to form the landscape we observe at the south. Uniform, SAR-dark plains are interpreted as sedimentary deposits, and are bounded by moderately dissected uplands. These plains contain the highest density of filled and empty lake depressions, and canyons. These units unconformably overlay a basement rock that outcrops as mountains and SAR-bright dissected terrains at various elevations across both poles. All these units are then superposed by surficial units that slope towards the seas, suggestive of subsequent overland transport of sediment. From estimates of the depths of the embedded empty depressions and canyons that drain into the seas, the SAR-dark plains must be >600 m thick in places, though the thickness may vary across the poles. At the lowest elevations of each polar region, there are large seas, which are currently liquid methane/ethane filled at the north and empty at the south. The large plains deposits and the surrounding hillslopes may represent remnant landforms that are a result of previously vast polar oceans, where larger liquid bodies may have allowed for a sustained accumulation of soluble and insoluble sediments, potentially forming layered sedimentary deposits. Coupled with vertical crustal movements, the resulting layers would be of varying solubilities and erosional resistances, allowing formation of the complex landscape that we observe today.

  11. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Based Quantitative Bioassay on Aptamer-Functionalized Nanopillars Using Large-Area Raman Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jaeyoung; Palla, Mirko; Bosco, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been used in a variety of biological applications due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here, we report a SERS-based biosensing approach for quantitative detection of biomolecules. A SERS substrate bearing gold-decorated silicon nanopillars......-to-spot variation in conventional SERS quantification. Furthermore, we have developed an analytical model capable of predicting experimental intensity distributions on the substrates for reliable quantification of biomolecules. Lastly, we have calculated the minimum needed area of Raman mapping for efficient...

  12. Digital Elevation Map Reconstruction for Port-based Dynamic Simulation of Contacts on Irregular Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, Martin; Carloni, Raffaella; Poulakis, Pantelis; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method to utilize a port-based multibody contact model for simulating dynamic interaction between irregular surfaces. The existing compliant contact model requires an analytic parametrization of the surfaces involved in the interaction, the definition of a Gauss frame in each o

  13. DNA self-assembly on graphene surface studied by SERS mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botti, Sabina; Rufoloni, Alessandro; Laurenzi, Susanna;

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) segments on two variations of graphene surfaces having nano-platelets with different lateral sizes and thicknesses was investigated using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Due to the ...

  14. Mapping surface tension induced menisci with application to tensiometry and refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Avanish; Kulkarni, Varun; Khor, Jian-Wei; Wereley, Steve

    2015-07-28

    In this work, we discuss an optical method for measuring surface tension induced menisci. The principle of measurement is based upon the change in the background pattern produced by the curvature of the meniscus acting as a lens. We measure the meniscus profile over an inclined glass plate and utilize the measured meniscus for estimation of surface tension and refractive index.

  15. Reactivity mapping: electrochemical gradients for monitoring reactivity at surfaces in space and time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbenborg, Sven; Nicosia, Carlo; Chen, P.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2013-01-01

    Studying and controlling reactions at surfaces is of great fundamental and applied interest in, among others, biology, electronics and catalysis. Because reaction kinetics is different at surfaces compared with solution, frequently, solution-characterization techniques cannot be used. Here we report

  16. Reactivity mapping: electrochemical gradients for monitoring reactivity at surfaces in space and time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbenborg, S.O.; Nicosia, C.; Chen, P.; Huskens, J.

    2013-01-01

    Studying and controlling reactions at surfaces is of great fundamental and applied interest in, among others, biology, electronics and catalysis. Because reaction kinetics is different at surfaces compared with solution, frequently, solution-characterization techniques cannot be used. Here we report

  17. Mapping the environmental risk potential on surface water of pesticide contamination in the Prosecco's vineyard terraced landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Patricia; Ferrarese, Francesco; Loddo, Donato; Eugenio Pappalardo, Salvatore; Varotto, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Intensive cropping systems today represent a paramount issue in terms of environmental impacts, since agricultural pollutants can constitute a potential threat to surface water, non-target organisms and aquatic ecosystems. Levels of pesticide concentrations in surface waters are indeed unquestionably correlated to crop and soil management practices at field-scale. Due to the numerous applications of pesticides required, orchards and vineyards can represent relevant non-point sources for pesticide contamination of water bodies, mainly prompted by soil erosion, surface runoff and spray drift. To reduce risks of pesticide contamination of surface water, the Directive 2009/128/CET imposed the local implementation of agricultural good practices and mitigation actions such as the use of vegetative buffer filter strips and hedgerows along river and pond banks. However, implementation of mitigation actions is often difficult, especially in extremely fragmented agricultural landscapes characterized by a complex territorial matrix set up on urban sprawling, frequent surface water bodies, important geomorphological processes and protected natural areas. Typically, such landscape matrix is well represented by the, Prosecco-DOCG vineyards area (NE of Italy, Province of Treviso) which lays on hogback hills of conglomerate, marls and sandstone that ranges between 50 and 500 m asl. Moreover such vineyards landscape is characterized by traditional and non-traditional agricultural terraces The general aim of this paper is to identify areas of surface water bodies with high potential risk of pesticide contamination from surrounding vineyards in the 735 ha of Lierza river basin (Refrontolo, TV), one of the most representative terraced landscape of the Prosecco-DOCG area. Specific aims are i) mapping terraced Prosecco-DOCG vineyards, ii) classifying potential risk from pesticide of the different areas. Remote sensing technologies such as four bands aerial photos (RGB+NIR) and Light

  18. Impact of lanthanum carbonate on cortical bone in dialysis patients with adynamic bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Aiji; Inaba, Masaaki; Tominaga, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Motoko; Otsubo, Shigeru; Nitta, Kosaku; Ito, Akemi; Satoh, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Among the most serious problems in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is fragility of cortical bone caused by cortical thinning and increased cortical porosity; the cortical fragility is sometimes irreversible, with fractures generally initiating from cortical bone. Therefore, development of treatments for problems of cortical bone is urgently desired. Cortical bone has the three surfaces, including the periosteal surface, intracortical spaces and endocortical surface. Bone turnover at the endocortical surface and intracortical resorption spaces are increased as compared with that at cancellous surface. Bone growth sometimes depends on apposition at the periosteal surface. We treated hyperphosphatemia in two hemodialysis patients with adynamic bone disease with 750-1500 mg/day of lanthanum carbonate, which is a non-calcium containing phosphate binder; the treatment resulted in a decrease of the serum phosphorus levels (P levels), without significant change of the serum intact parathyroid hormone levels. We now report that treatment of these patients with lanthanum carbonate increased mineralization of the periosteal surface, increased bone mass within the intracortical resorption spaces and increased mineralization of the minimodeling surface at the endocortical surface. In addition, woven bone volume in cortical bone was decreased and mineralization of bone units, namely, osteons, was increased. Although these findings were not observed across all surfaces of the cortical bone in the patients, it is expected that lanthanum carbonate would increase the cortical stability in CKD patients, with consequent reduction in the fracture rate in these patients.

  19. Sensitivity of thermal inertia calculations to variations in environmental factors. [in mapping of Earth's surface by remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Alley, R. E.; Schieldge, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The sensitivity of thermal inertia (TI) calculations to errors in the measurement or parameterization of a number of environmental factors is considered here. The factors include effects of radiative transfer in the atmosphere, surface albedo and emissivity, variations in surface turbulent heat flux density, cloud cover, vegetative cover, and topography. The error analysis is based upon data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite for July 1978 at three separate test sites in the deserts of the western United States. Results show that typical errors in atmospheric radiative transfer, cloud cover, and vegetative cover can individually cause root-mean-square (RMS) errors of about 10 percent (with atmospheric effects sometimes as large as 30-40 percent) in HCMM-derived thermal inertia images of 20,000-200,000 pixels.

  20. Sensitivity of thermal inertia calculations to variations in environmental factors. [in mapping of Earth's surface by remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Alley, R. E.; Schieldge, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The sensitivity of thermal inertia (TI) calculations to errors in the measurement or parameterization of a number of environmental factors is considered here. The factors include effects of radiative transfer in the atmosphere, surface albedo and emissivity, variations in surface turbulent heat flux density, cloud cover, vegetative cover, and topography. The error analysis is based upon data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) satellite for July 1978 at three separate test sites in the deserts of the western United States. Results show that typical errors in atmospheric radiative transfer, cloud cover, and vegetative cover can individually cause root-mean-square (RMS) errors of about 10 percent (with atmospheric effects sometimes as large as 30-40 percent) in HCMM-derived thermal inertia images of 20,000-200,000 pixels.

  1. Mapping the Atmospheric and Surface Properties of Titan by the Massive Inversion of Cassini/VIMS Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Appéré, Thomas; Vincendon, Mathieu; Douté, Sylvain; LeMouelic, Stéphane; Rannou, Pascal; Sotin, Christophe; Barnes, Jason W.; Coustenis, Athena; Brown, Robert H.

    2014-11-01

    Since the beginning of the Cassini mission, the imaging spectrometer VIMS has acquired ~40000 hyperspectral images of Titan containing several millions of spectra. Such a huge amount of data cannot be analyzed with a radiative transfer solver like SHDOM because of computational limits. Nevertheless, such a solver is the most suited tool to extract simultaneous information of the atmosphere and the surface of Titan from VIMS datacubes. We have developed a method of analyzing VIMS data that consents to use the power of a RT model without the inconvenience of long computational times, by the creation of look-up tables for different values of the RT model's parameters (geometry of the observation, surface albedo, aerosols opacity). We employ up-to-date information on gaseous spectral coefficients, aerosols’ optical properties and Titan’s climatology. These look-up tables, appropriately interpolated, are then used to minimize the observations and create simultaneous maps of aerosols opacity and of surface albedo (at the wavelengths of Titan’s spectral windows). This method lowers the computational time by a factor of several thousands and thus, for the first time, a truly massive treatment of VIMS data. In this paper we present the results of our method applied to the area of the Huygens landing site and their comparison with the results of other Cassini instruments. We also show the retrieved maps of a region observed multiple times at different Cassini flybys with different observational conditions, as the T13/T17 mosaic of the Atzlan area. The perspectives for atmospheric and surface seasonal monitoring are highlighted.

  2. Surface mapping, organic matter and water stocks in peatlands of the Serra do Espinhaço meridional - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Luiz da Silva

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands are soil environments that store carbon and large amounts of water, due to their composition (90 % water, low hydraulic conductivity and a sponge-like behavior. It is estimated that peat bogs cover approximately 4.2 % of the Earth's surface and stock 28.4 % of the soil carbon of the planet. Approximately 612 000 ha of peatlands have been mapped in Brazil, but the peat bogs in the Serra do Espinhaço Meridional (SdEM were not included. The objective of this study was to map the peat bogs of the northern part of the SdEM and estimate the organic matter pools and water volume they stock. The peat bogs were pre-identified and mapped by GIS and remote sensing techniques, using ArcGIS 9.3, ENVI 4.5 and GPS Track Maker Pro software and the maps validated in the field. Six peat bogs were mapped in detail (1:20,000 and 1:5,000 by transects spaced 100 m and each transect were determined every 20 m, the UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator coordinates, depth and samples collected for characterization and determination of organic matter, according to the Brazilian System of Soil Classification. In the northern part of SdEM, 14,287.55 ha of peatlands were mapped, distributed over 1,180,109 ha, representing 1.2 % of the total area. These peatlands have an average volume of 170,021,845.00 m³ and stock 6,120,167 t (428.36 t ha-1 of organic matter and 142,138,262 m³ (9,948 m³ ha-1 of water. In the peat bogs of the Serra do Espinhaço Meridional, advanced stages of decomposing (sapric organic matter predominate, followed by the intermediate stage (hemic. The vertical growth rate of the peatlands ranged between 0.04 and 0.43 mm year-1, while the carbon accumulation rate varied between 6.59 and 37.66 g m-2 year-1. The peat bogs of the SdEM contain the headwaters of important water bodies in the basins of the Jequitinhonha and San Francisco Rivers and store large amounts of organic carbon and water, which is the reason why the protection and preservation

  3. Surface Mapping with an AFM-CMM Integrated System and Stitching Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Marinello, Francesco; Bariani, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    In the context of micro-technology, dimensions in the order of hundreds of micrometers are often to be measured, while the detection of the finest details and the analysis of nano-roughness call for the use of highly resolving sensors. AFM probes, owing to the sharpness of their tip combined...... with piezoelectric actuation, provide sub nanometre vertical resolution and a few nanometres lateral resolution. On the other hand, the scanning range is limited to few hundred micrometers. In this respect, mapping is a solution. During the past few years, an integrated instrument has been developed at IPL based...

  4. High-resolution mapping of global surface water and its long-term changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekel, Jean-François; Cottam, Andrew; Gorelick, Noel; Belward, Alan S.

    2016-12-01

    The location and persistence of surface water (inland and coastal) is both affected by climate and human activity and affects climate, biological diversity and human wellbeing. Global data sets documenting surface water location and seasonality have been produced from inventories and national descriptions, statistical extrapolation of regional data and satellite imagery, but measuring long-term changes at high resolution remains a challenge. Here, using three million Landsat satellite images, we quantify changes in global surface water over the past 32 years at 30-metre resolution. We record the months and years when water was present, where occurrence changed and what form changes took in terms of seasonality and persistence. Between 1984 and 2015 permanent surface water has disappeared from an area of almost 90,000 square kilometres, roughly equivalent to that of Lake Superior, though new permanent bodies of surface water covering 184,000 square kilometres have formed elsewhere. All continental regions show a net increase in permanent water, except Oceania, which has a fractional (one per cent) net loss. Much of the increase is from reservoir filling, although climate change is also implicated. Loss is more geographically concentrated than gain. Over 70 per cent of global net permanent water loss occurred in the Middle East and Central Asia, linked to drought and human actions including river diversion or damming and unregulated withdrawal. Losses in Australia and the USA linked to long-term droughts are also evident. This globally consistent, validated data set shows that impacts of climate change and climate oscillations on surface water occurrence can be measured and that evidence can be gathered to show how surface water is altered by human activities. We anticipate that this freely available data will improve the modelling of surface forcing, provide evidence of state and change in wetland ecotones (the transition areas between biomes), and inform water

  5. Mapping the Qademah Fault with Traveltime, Surface-wave, and Resistivity Tomograms

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    Traveltime, surface-wave, and resistivity tomograms are used to track the buried Qademah fault located near King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC), Saudi Arabia. The fault location is confirmed by the 1) resistivity tomogram obtained from an electrical resistivity experiment, 2) the refraction traveltime tomogram, 3) the reflection image computed from 2D seismic data set recorded at the northern part of the fault, and 4) the surface-wave tomogram.

  6. Temporal and spatial mapping of surface albedo and atmospheric dust opacity on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The Mariner 9 and Viking provided abundant evidence that eolian processes are active over much of the surface of Mars. Past studies have demonstrated that variations in regional albedo and wind-streak patterns are indicative of sediment transport through a region, while thermal inertia data (derived from the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) dataset) are indicative of the degree of surface mantling by dust deposits. The visual and thermal data are therefore diagnostic of whether net erosion or deposition of dust-storm fallout is taking place currently and whether such processes have been active in a region over the long term. These previous investigations, however, have not attempted to correct for the effects of atmospheric dust loading on observations of the martian surface, so quantitative studies of current sediment transport rates have included large errors due to uncertainty in the magnitude of this 'atmospheric component' of the observations. We have developed a radiative transfer model that allows the atmospheric dust opacity to be determined from IRTM thermal observations. Corrections for the effects of atmospheric dust loading on observations of surface albedo can also be modeled. This approach to determining 'dust-corrected surface albedo' incorporates the atmospheric dust opacity, the single-scattering albedo and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, and the bidirectional reflectance of the surface, and it accounts for variable lighting and viewing geometry.

  7. Non-invasive localization of atrial ectopic beats by using simulated body surface P-wave integral maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Eduardo J.; Lozano, Miguel; Martínez-Mateu, Laura; Atienza, Felipe; Saiz, Javier; Sebastian, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive localization of continuous atrial ectopic beats remains a cornerstone for the treatment of atrial arrhythmias. The lack of accurate tools to guide electrophysiologists leads to an increase in the recurrence rate of ablation procedures. Existing approaches are based on the analysis of the P-waves main characteristics and the forward body surface potential maps (BSPMs) or on the inverse estimation of the electric activity of the heart from those BSPMs. These methods have not provided an efficient and systematic tool to localize ectopic triggers. In this work, we propose the use of machine learning techniques to spatially cluster and classify ectopic atrial foci into clearly differentiated atrial regions by using the body surface P-wave integral map (BSPiM) as a biomarker. Our simulated results show that ectopic foci with similar BSPiM naturally cluster into differentiated non-intersected atrial regions and that new patterns could be correctly classified with an accuracy of 97% when considering 2 clusters and 96% for 4 clusters. Our results also suggest that an increase in the number of clusters is feasible at the cost of decreasing accuracy. PMID:28704537

  8. Variance decomposition of MRI-based covariance maps using genetically informative samples and