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Sample records for cortical local field

  1. Decoupling Action Potential Bias from Cortical Local Field Potentials

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    Stephen V. David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurophysiologists have recently become interested in studying neuronal population activity through local field potential (LFP recordings during experiments that also record the activity of single neurons. This experimental approach differs from early LFP studies because it uses high impendence electrodes that can also isolate single neuron activity. A possible complication for such studies is that the synaptic potentials and action potentials of the small subset of isolated neurons may contribute disproportionately to the LFP signal, biasing activity in the larger nearby neuronal population to appear synchronous and cotuned with these neurons. To address this problem, we used linear filtering techniques to remove features correlated with spike events from LFP recordings. This filtering procedure can be applied for well-isolated single units or multiunit activity. We illustrate the effects of this correction in simulation and on spike data recorded from primary auditory cortex. We find that local spiking activity can explain a significant portion of LFP power at most recording sites and demonstrate that removing the spike-correlated component can affect measurements of auditory tuning of the LFP.

  2. Subthalamic and Cortical Local Field Potentials Associated with Pilocarpine-Induced Oral Tremor in the Rat.

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    Long, Lauren L; Podurgiel, Samantha J; Haque, Aileen F; Errante, Emily L; Chrobak, James J; Salamone, John D

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) are rapid vertical deflections of the lower jaw that resemble chewing but are not directed at any particular stimulus. In rodents, TJMs are induced by neurochemical conditions that parallel those seen in human Parkinsonism, including neurotoxic or pharmacological depletion of striatal dopamine (DA), DA antagonism, and cholinomimetic administration. Moreover, TJMs in rodents can be attenuated by antiparkinsonian agents, including levodopa (L-DOPA), DA agonists, muscarinic antagonists, and adenosine A2A antagonists. In human Parkinsonian patients, exaggerated physiological synchrony is seen in the beta frequency band in various parts of the cortical/basal ganglia/thalamic circuitry, and activity in the tremor frequency range (3-7 Hz) also has been recorded. The present studies were undertaken to determine if tremor-related local field potential (LFP) activity could be recorded from motor cortex (M1) or subthalamic nucleus (STN) during the TJMs induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, which is a well-known tremorogenic agent. Pilocarpine induced a robust TJM response that was marked by rhythmic electromyographic (EMG) activity in the temporalis muscle. Compared to periods with no tremor activity, TJM epochs were characterized by increased LFP activity in the tremor frequency range in both neocortex and STN. Tremor activity was not associated with increased synchrony in the beta frequency band. These studies identified tremor-related LFP activity in parts of the cortical/basal ganglia circuitry that are involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism. This research may ultimately lead to identification of the oscillatory neural mechanisms involved in the generation of tremulous activity, and promote development of novel treatments for tremor disorders.

  3. Cross-approximate entropy of cortical local field potentials quantifies effects of anesthesia - a pilot study in rats

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    Schwarz Cornelius

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anesthetics dose-dependently shift electroencephalographic (EEG activity towards high-amplitude, slow rhythms, indicative of a synchronization of neuronal activity in thalamocortical networks. Additionally, they uncouple brain areas in higher (gamma frequency ranges possibly underlying conscious perception. It is currently thought that both effects may impair brain function by impeding proper information exchange between cortical areas. But what happens at the local network level? Local networks with strong excitatory interconnections may be more resilient towards global changes in brain rhythms, but depend heavily on locally projecting, inhibitory interneurons. As anesthetics bias cortical networks towards inhibition, we hypothesized that they may cause excessive synchrony and compromise information processing already on a small spatial scale. Using a recently introduced measure of signal independence, cross-approximate entropy (XApEn, we investigated to what degree anesthetics synchronized local cortical network activity. We recorded local field potentials (LFP from the somatosensory cortex of three rats chronically implanted with multielectrode arrays and compared activity patterns under control (awake state with those at increasing concentrations of isoflurane, enflurane and halothane. Results Cortical LFP signals were more synchronous, as expressed by XApEn, in the presence of anesthetics. Specifically, XApEn was a monotonously declining function of anesthetic concentration. Isoflurane and enflurane were indistinguishable; at a concentration of 1 MAC (the minimum alveolar concentration required to suppress movement in response to noxious stimuli in 50% of subjects both volatile agents reduced XApEn by about 70%, whereas halothane was less potent (50% reduction. Conclusions The results suggest that anesthetics strongly diminish the independence of operation of local cortical neuronal populations, and that the

  4. Functional signature of recovering cortex: dissociation of local field potentials and spiking activity in somatosensory cortices of spinal cord injured monkeys.

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    Wang, Zheng; Qi, Hui-Xin; Kaas, Jon H; Roe, Anna W; Chen, Li Min

    2013-11-01

    After disruption of dorsal column afferents at high cervical spinal levels in adult monkeys, somatosensory cortical neurons recover responsiveness to tactile stimulation of the hand; this reactivation correlates with a recovery of hand use. However, it is not known if all neuronal response properties recover, and whether different cortical areas recover in a similar manner. To address this, we recorded neuronal activity in cortical area 3b and S2 in adult squirrel monkeys weeks after unilateral lesion of the dorsal columns. We found that in response to vibrotactile stimulation, local field potentials remained robust at all frequency ranges. However, neuronal spiking activity failed to follow at high frequencies (≥15 Hz). We suggest that the failure to generate spiking activity at high stimulus frequency reflects a changed balance of inhibition and excitation in both area 3b and S2, and that this mismatch in spiking and local field potential is a signature of an early phase of recovering cortex (

  5. Cortical source localization of infant cognition.

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    Reynolds, Greg D; Richards, John E

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission topography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been utilized with older children and adults to identify cortical sources of perceptual and cognitive processes. However, due to practical and ethical concerns, these techniques cannot be routinely applied to infant participants. An alternative to such neuroimaging techniques appropriate for use with infant participants is high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) recording and cortical source localization techniques. The current article provides an overview of a method developed for such analyses. The method consists of four steps: (1) recording high-density (e.g., 128-channel) EEG. (2) Analysis of individual participant raw segmented data with independent component analysis (ICA). (3) Estimation of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) that represent cortical sources for the observed ICA component clusters. (4) Calculation of component activations in relation to experimental factors. We discuss an example of research applying this technique to investigate the development of visual attention and recognition memory. We also describe the application of "realistic head modeling" to address some of the current limitations of infant cortical source localization.

  6. Mean field methods for cortical network dynamics

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    Hertz, J.; Lerchner, Alexander; Ahmadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    We review the use of mean field theory for describing the dynamics of dense, randomly connected cortical circuits. For a simple network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate- and-fire neurons, we can show how the firing irregularity, as measured by the Fano factor, increases with the stren...... cortex. Finally, an extension of the model to describe an orientation hypercolumn provides understanding of how cortical interactions sharpen orientation tuning, in a way that is consistent with observed firing statistics...

  7. Electrophysiological Data and the Biophysical Modelling of Local Cortical Circuits

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    Dimitris Pinotsis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how recordings of gamma oscillations – under different experimental conditions or from different subjects – can be combined with a class of population models called neural fields and dynamic causal modeling (DCM to distinguish among alternative hypotheses regarding cortical structure and function. This approach exploits inter-subject variability and trial-specific effects associated with modulations in the peak frequency of gamma oscillations. It draws on the computational power of Bayesian model inversion, when applied to neural field models of cortical dynamics. Bayesian model comparison allows one to adjudicate among different mechanistic hypotheses about cortical excitability, synaptic kinetics and the cardinal topographic features of local cortical circuits. It also provides optimal parameter estimates that quantify neuromodulation and the spatial dispersion of axonal connections or summation of receptive fields in the visual cortex. This paper provides an overview of a family of neural field models that have been recently implemented using the DCM toolbox of the academic freeware Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM. The SPM software is a popular platform for analyzing neuroimaging data, used by several neuroscience communities worldwide. DCM allows for a formal (Bayesian statistical analysis of cortical network connectivity, based upon realistic biophysical models of brain responses. It is this particular feature of DCM – the unique combination of generative models with optimization techniques based upon (variational Bayesian principles – that furnishes a novel way to characterize functional brain architectures. In particular, it provides answers to questions about how the brain is wired and how it responds to different experimental manipulations. For a review of the general role of neural fields in SPM the reader can consult e.g. see [1]. Neural fields have a long and illustrious history in mathematical

  8. Functional properties of human auditory cortical fields

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    David L Woods

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available While auditory cortex in non-human primates has been subdivided into multiple functionally-specialized auditory cortical fields (ACFs, the boundaries and functional specialization of human ACFs have not been defined. In the current study, we evaluated whether a widely accepted primate model of auditory cortex could explain regional tuning properties of fMRI activations on the cortical surface to attended and nonattended tones of different frequency, location, and intensity. The limits of auditory cortex were defined by voxels that showed significant activations to nonattended sounds. Three centrally-located fields with mirror-symmetric tonotopic organization were identified and assigned to the three core fields of the primate model while surrounding activations were assigned to belt fields following procedures similar to those used in macaque fMRI studies. The functional properties of core, medial belt, and lateral belt field groups were then analyzed. Field groups were distinguished by tonotopic organization, frequency selectivity, intensity sensitivity, contralaterality, binaural enhancement, attentional modulation, and hemispheric asymmetry. In general, core fields showed greater sensitivity to sound properties than did belt fields, while belt fields showed greater attentional modulation than core fields. Significant distinctions in intensity sensitivity and contralaterality were seen between adjacent core fields A1 and R, while multiple differences in tuning properties were evident at boundaries between adjacent core and belt fields. The reliable differences in functional properties between fields and field groups suggest that the basic primate pattern of auditory cortex organization is preserved in humans. A comparison of the sizes of functionally-defined ACFs in humans and macaques reveals a significant relative expansion in human lateral belt fields implicated in the processing of speech.

  9. Cortical Source Localization of Infant Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, GD; Richards, JE

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission topography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been utilized with older children and adults to identify cortical sources of perceptual and cognitive processes. However, due to practical and ethical concerns, these techniques cannot be routinely applied to infant participants. An alternative to such neuroimaging techniques appropriate for use with infant participants is high-density EEG recording and cortical source loca...

  10. Mean field methods for cortical network dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, J.; Lerchner, Alexander; Ahmadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    We review the use of mean field theory for describing the dynamics of dense, randomly connected cortical circuits. For a simple network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate- and-fire neurons, we can show how the firing irregularity, as measured by the Fano factor, increases...... with the strength of the synapses in the network and with the value to which the membrane potential is reset after a spike. Generalizing the model to include conductance-based synapses gives insight into the connection between the firing statistics and the high- conductance state observed experimentally in visual...

  11. Phonological Processing In Human Auditory Cortical Fields

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    David L Woods

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We used population-based cortical-surface analysis of functional magnetic imaging (fMRI data to characterize the processing of consonant-vowel-consonant syllables (CVCs and spectrally-matched amplitude-modulated noise bursts (AMNBs in human auditory cortex as subjects attended to auditory or visual stimuli in an intermodal selective attention paradigm. Average auditory cortical field (ACF locations were defined using tonotopic mapping in a previous study. Activations in auditory cortex were defined by two stimulus-preference gradients: (1 Medial belt ACFs preferred AMNBs and lateral belt and parabelt fields preferred CVCs. This preference extended into core ACFs with medial regions of primary auditory cortex (A1 and rostral field (R preferring AMNBs and lateral regions preferring CVCs. (2 Anterior ACFs showed smaller activations but more clearly defined stimulus preferences than did posterior ACFs. Stimulus preference gradients were unaffected by auditory attention suggesting that different ACFs are specialized for the automatic processing of different spectrotemporal sound features.

  12. Localization of cortical areas activated by thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roland, P E; Friberg, L

    1985-01-01

    These experiments were undertaken to demonstrate that pure mental activity, thinking, increases the cerebral blood flow and that different types of thinking increase the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in different cortical areas. As a first approach, thinking was defined as brain work...... study was taken with the subjects at rest. Then the rCBF was measured during three different simple algorithm tasks, each consisting of retrieval of a specific memory followed by a simple operation on the retrieved information. Once started, the information processing went on in the brain without any...... that they started at their front door and then walked alternatively to the left or the right each time they reached a corner. The rCBF increased only in homotypical cortical areas during thinking. The areas in the superior prefrontal cortex increased their rCBF equivalently during the three types of thinking...

  13. Qualia could arise from information processing in local cortical networks

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    Roger D Orpwood

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Re-entrant feedback, either within sensory cortex or arising from prefrontal areas, has been strongly linked to the emergence of consciousness, both in theoretical and experimental work. This idea, together with evidence for local micro-consciousness, suggests the generation of qualia could in some way result from local network activity under re-entrant activation. This paper explores the possibility by examining the processing of information by local cortical networks. It highlights the difference between the information structure (how the information is physically embodied, and the information message (what the information is about. It focuses on the network’s ability to recognise information structures amongst its inputs under conditions of extensive local feedback, and to then assign information messages to those structures. It is shown that if the re-entrant feedback enables the network to achieve an attractor state, then the message assigned in any given pass of information through the network is a representation of the message assigned in the previous pass-through of information. Based on this ability the paper argues that as information is repeatedly cycled through the network, the information message that is assigned evolves from a recognition of what the input structure is, to what it is like, to how it appears, to how it seems. It could enable individual networks to be the site of qualia generation. The paper goes on to show networks in cortical layers 2/3 and 5a have the connectivity required for the behaviour proposed, and reviews some evidence for a link between such local cortical cyclic activity and conscious percepts. It concludes with some predictions based on the theory discussed.

  14. Sparse cortical source localization using spatio-temporal atoms.

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    Korats, Gundars; Ranta, Radu; Le Cam, Steven; Louis-Dorr, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of sparse localization of cortical sources from scalp EEG recordings. Localization algorithms use propagation model under spatial and/or temporal constraints, but their performance highly depends on the data signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this work we propose a dictionary based sparse localization method which uses a data driven spatio-temporal dictionary to reconstruct the measurements using Single Best Replacement (SBR) and Continuation Single Best Replacement (CSBR) algorithms. We tested and compared our methods with the well-known MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC algorithms on simulated realistic data. Tests were carried out for different noise levels. The results show that our method has a strong advantage over MUSIC-type methods in case of synchronized sources.

  15. Posterior Cortical Atrophy Presenting with Superior Arcuate Field Defect

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    Sue Ling Wan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An 80-year-old female with reading difficulty presented with progressive arcuate field defect despite low intraocular pressure. Over a 5-year period, the field defect evolved into an incongruous homonymous hemianopia and the repeated neuroimaging revealed progressive posterior cortical atrophy. Further neuropsychiatric assessment demonstrated symptoms and signs consistent with Benson’s syndrome.

  16. Localization of Cortical Oscillations Induced by SCS Using Coherence

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    P. Sovka

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a method based on coherence analysis and scalp mapping of coherence suitable for more accurate localization of cortical oscillations induced by electric stimulation of the dorsal spinal cord (SCS, which were previously detected using spectral analysis. While power spectral density shows the increase of power during SCS only at small number of electrodes, coherence extends this area and sharpens its boundary simultaneously. Parameters of the method were experimentally optimized to maximize its reliability. SCS is applied to suppress chronic, intractable pain by patients, whom pharmacotherapy does not relieve. In our study, the pain developed in lower back and lower extremity as the result of unsuccessful vertebral discotomy, which is called failed-back surgery syndrome (FBSS. Our method replicated the results of previous analysis using PSD and extended them with more accurate localization of the area influenced by SCS.

  17. Cortico-Cortical Receptive Field Estimates in Human Visual Cortex

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    Koen V Haak

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Human visual cortex comprises many visual areas that contain a map of the visual field (Wandell et al 2007, Neuron 56, 366–383. These visual field maps can be identified readily in individual subjects with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during experimental sessions that last less than an hour (Wandell and Winawer 2011, Vis Res 718–737. Hence, visual field mapping with fMRI has been, and still is, a heavily used technique to examine the organisation of both normal and abnormal human visual cortex (Haak et al 2011, ACNR, 11(3, 20–21. However, visual field mapping cannot reveal every aspect of human visual cortex organisation. For example, the information processed within a visual field map arrives from somewhere and is sent to somewhere, and visual field mapping does not derive these input/output relationships. Here, we describe a new, model-based analysis for estimating the dependence between signals in distinct cortical regions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. Just as a stimulus-referred receptive field predicts the neural response as a function of the stimulus contrast, the neural-referred receptive field predicts the neural response as a function of responses elsewhere in the nervous system. When applied to two cortical regions, this function can be called the cortico-cortical receptive field (CCRF. We model the CCRF as a Gaussian-weighted region on the cortical surface and apply the model to data from both stimulus-driven and resting-state experimental conditions in visual cortex.

  18. Spatiotemporal receptive fields: a dynamical model derived from cortical architectonics.

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    Krone, G; Mallot, H; Palm, G; Schüz, A

    1986-01-22

    We assume that the mammalian neocortex is built up out of some six layers which differ in their morphology and their external connections. Intrinsic connectivity is largely excitatory, leading to a considerable amount of positive feedback. The majority of cortical neurons can be divided into two main classes: the pyramidal cells, which are said to be excitatory, and local cells (most notably the non-spiny stellate cells), which are said to be inhibitory. The form of the dendritic and axonal arborizations of both groups is discussed in detail. This results in a simplified model of the cortex as a stack of six layers with mutual connections determined by the principles of fibre anatomy. This stack can be treated as a multi-input-multi-output system by means of the linear systems theory of homogeneous layers. The detailed equations for the simulation are derived in the Appendix. The results of the simulations show that the temporal and spatial behaviour of an excitation distribution cannot be treated separately. Further, they indicate specific processing in the different layers and some independence from details of wiring. Finally, the simulation results are applied to the theory of visual receptive fields. This yields some insight into the mechanisms possibly underlying hypercomplexity, putative nonlinearities, lateral inhibition, oscillating cell responses, and velocity-dependent tuning curves.

  19. Cortical current source connectivity by means of partial coherence fields

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    Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Valdes-Sosa, Pedro A; Bosch-Bayard, Jorge; Riera-Diaz, Jorge J

    2011-01-01

    An important field of research in functional neuroimaging is the discovery of integrated, distributed brain systems and networks, whose different regions need to work in unison for normal functioning. The EEG is a non-invasive technique that can provide information for massive connectivity analyses. Cortical signals of time varying electric neuronal activity can be estimated from the EEG. Although such techniques have very high time resolution, two cortical signals even at distant locations will appear to be highly similar due to the low spatial resolution nature of the EEG. In this study a method for eliminating the effect of common sources due to low spatial resolution is presented. It is based on an efficient estimation of the whole-cortex partial coherence matrix. Using as a starting point any linear EEG tomography that satisfies the EEG forward equation, it is shown that the generalized partial coherences for the cortical grey matter current density time series are invariant to the selected tomography. I...

  20. Functional and anatomical properties of human visual cortical fields.

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    Zhang, Shouyu; Cate, Anthony D; Herron, Timothy J; Kang, Xiaojian; Yund, E William; Bao, Shanglian; Woods, David L

    2015-04-01

    Human visual cortical fields (VCFs) vary in size and anatomical location across individual subjects. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with retinotopic stimulation to identify VCFs on the cortical surface. We found that aligning and averaging VCF activations across the two hemispheres provided clear delineation of multiple retinotopic fields in visual cortex. The results show that VCFs have consistent locations and extents in different subjects that provide stable and accurate landmarks for functional and anatomical mapping. Interhemispheric comparisons revealed minor differences in polar angle and eccentricity tuning in comparable VCFs in the left and right hemisphere, and somewhat greater intersubject variability in the right than left hemisphere. We then used the functional boundaries to characterize the anatomical properties of VCFs, including fractional anisotropy (FA), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and the ratio of T1W and T2W images and found significant anatomical differences between VCFs and between hemispheres.

  1. Multidrug Resistance-Related Protein 1 (MRP1) Function and Localization Depend on Cortical Actin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Ina; Klappe, Karin; Ercan, Cigdem; Kok, Jan Willem

    2011-01-01

    MRP1 (ABCC1) is known to be localized in lipid rafts. Here we show in two different cell lines that localization of Mrp1/MRP1 (Abcc1/ABCC1) in lipid rafts and its function as an efflux pump are dependent on cortical actin. Latrunculin B disrupts both cortical actin and actin stress fibers. This resu

  2. Cortical organization of language pathways in children with non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy.

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    Frye, Richard Eugene; Liederman, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Children with a history of epilepsy are almost six times more likely than their unaffected siblings to be referred for speech or language therapy. However, the abnormalities in neural pathway that cause these delays are poorly understood. We recorded evoked fields using whole-head magnetoencephalography during real and non-word visual and auditory rhyme tasks in 15 children with non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy. Basic phonological and orthographic language skills were assessed using Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement subtests. Dynamic statistical parameter mapping was used with individual participant magnetic resonance images. Significant cortical activity was visualized on average and performance weighted maps. For the auditory rhyme tasks, bilateral primary and secondary auditory cortices, the superior temporal sulcus, and insular cortex were activated early with later increases in left hemisphere activity. Visual rhyme tasks evoked early bilateral primary and secondary occipital cortical and angular gyri activity followed by later activation of the planum temporale and supramarginal gyri and the left ventral occipitotemporal area. For the auditory rhyme tasks, performance weighted maps demonstrated that early right hemisphere activation was associated with poorer reading skills while later activity was associated with better reading skills; for the left hemisphere, greater early activation of the secondary auditory cortex, including the planum temporale, was related to better reading skills while relatively later activation of these areas was associated with poorer reading skills. For the visual rhyme tasks, greater activity in the bilateral ventral occipitotemporal and insular areas and angular and supramarginal gyri were associated with better performance. These data suggest that spatiotemporal cortical activation patterns are associated with variations in language performance in non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy.

  3. Cortical organization of language pathways in children with non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy

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    Richard Eugene Frye

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Children with a history of epilepsy are almost six-times more likely than their unaffected siblings to be referred for speech or language therapy. However, the abnormalities in neural pathway that cause these delays are poorly understood. We recorded evoked fields using whole-head magnetoencephalography during real and non-word visual and auditory rhyme tasks in 15 children with non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy. Basic phonological and orthographic language skills were assessed using Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement subtests. Dynamic statistical parameter mapping was used with individual participant magnetic resonance images. Significant cortical activity was visualized on average and performance weighted maps. For the auditory rhyme tasks, bilateral primary and secondary auditory cortices, the superior temporal sulcus and insular cortex were activated early with later increases in left hemisphere activity. Visual rhyme tasks evoked early bilateral primary and secondary occipital cortical and angular gyri activity followed by later activation of the planum temporale and supramarginal gyri and the left ventral occipitotemporal area. For the auditory rhyme tasks, performance weighted maps demonstrated that early right hemisphere activation was associated with poorer reading skills while later activity was associated with better reading skills; for the left hemisphere, greater early activation of the secondary auditory cortex, including the planum temporale, was related to better reading skills while relatively later activation of these areas was associated with poorer reading skills. For the visual rhyme tasks, greater activity in the bilateral ventral occipitotemporal and insular areas and angular and supramarginal gyri were associated with better performance. These data suggest that spatiotemporal cortical activation patterns are associated with variations in language performance in non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy.

  4. Global Neuromagnetic Cortical Fields Have Non-Zero Velocity.

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    David M Alexander

    Full Text Available Globally coherent patterns of phase can be obscured by analysis techniques that aggregate brain activity measures across-trials, whether prior to source localization or for estimating inter-areal coherence. We analyzed, at single-trial level, whole head MEG recorded during an observer-triggered apparent motion task. Episodes of globally coherent activity occurred in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands of the signal in the form of large-scale waves, which propagated with a variety of velocities. Their mean speed at each frequency band was proportional to temporal frequency, giving a range of 0.06 to 4.0 m/s, from delta to beta. The wave peaks moved over the entire measurement array, during both ongoing activity and task-relevant intervals; direction of motion was more predictable during the latter. A large proportion of the cortical signal, measurable at the scalp, exists as large-scale coherent motion. We argue that the distribution of observable phase velocities in MEG is dominated by spatial filtering considerations in combination with group velocity of cortical activity. Traveling waves may index processes involved in global coordination of cortical activity.

  5. Function spaces on local fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Weiyi; XU; Qiang

    2006-01-01

    We study the function spaces on local fields in this paper, such as Triebel Btype and F-type spaces, Holder type spaces, Sobolev type spaces, and so on, moreover,study the relationship between the p-type derivatives and the Holder type spaces. Our obtained results show that there exists quite difference between the functions defined on Euclidean spaces and local fields, respectively. Furthermore, many properties of functions defined on local fields motivate the new idea of solving some important topics on fractal analysis.

  6. Beyond blindsight: properties of visual relearning in cortically blind fields.

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    Das, Anasuya; Tadin, Duje; Huxlin, Krystel R

    2014-08-27

    Damage to the primary visual cortex (V1) or its immediate afferents results in a dense scotoma, termed cortical blindness (CB). CB subjects have residual visual abilities, or blindsight, which allow them to detect and sometimes discriminate stimuli with high temporal and low spatial frequency content. Recent work showed that with training, discriminations in the blind field can become more reliable, and even reach consciousness. However, the narrow spatiotemporal bandwidth of blindsight limits its functional usefulness in everyday vision. Here, we asked whether visual training can induce recovery outside the spatiotemporal bandwidth of blindsight. Specifically, could human CB subjects learn to discriminate static, nonflickering stimuli? Can such learning transfer to untrained stimuli and tasks, and does double training with moving and static stimuli provide additional advantages relative to static training alone? We found CB subjects capable of relearning static orientation discriminations following single as well as double training. However, double training with complex, moving stimuli in a separate location was necessary to recover complex motion thresholds at locations trained with static stimuli. Subjects trained on static stimuli alone could only discriminate simple motion. Finally, both groups had approximately equivalent, incomplete recovery of fine orientation and direction discrimination thresholds, as well as contrast sensitivity. These results support two conclusions: (1) from a practical perspective, complex moving stimuli and double training may be superior training tools for inducing visual recovery in CB, and (2) the cortically blind visual system can relearn to perform a wider range of visual discriminations than predicted by blindsight alone.

  7. Lipschitz classes on local fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-yi SU; Guo-xiang CHEN

    2007-01-01

    The Lipschitz class Lipα on a local field K is defined in this note, and the equivalent relationship between the Lipschitz class Lipα and the Holder type space Cα (K) is proved. Then, those important characteristics on the Euclidean space Rn and the local field K are compared, so that one may interpret the essential differences between the analyses on Rn and K. Finally, the Cantor type fractal function (V)(x) is showed in the Lipschitz class Lip (m, K), m < ln2/ln3.

  8. Lipschitz classes on local fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Lipschitz class Lipαon a local field K is defined in this note,and the equivalent relationship between the Lipschitz class Lipαand the Holder type space C~α(K)is proved.Then,those important characteristics on the Euclidean space R~n and the local field K are compared,so that one may interpret the essential differences between the analyses on R~n and K.Finally,the Cantor type fractal functionθ(x)is showed in the Lipschitz class Lip(m,K),m<(ln 2/ln 3).

  9. Constructing higher dimensional local fields

    CERN Document Server

    Morrow, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This note is a gentle introduction to higher dimensional local fields, with the motivating problem being the standard geometric "localisation-completion" process by which they can be constructed. A direct proof of the behaviour of this construction, which is the simplest part of the theory of higher dimensional adeles, will hopefully be useful to both specialists and newcomers.

  10. Preoperative 3T high field blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging for glioma involving sensory cortical areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shao-wu; WANG Jiang-fei; JIANG Tao; LI Shou-wei; ZHANG Wen-bo; LI Zi-xiao; ZHANG Zhong; DAI Jian-ping; WANG Zhong-cheng

    2010-01-01

    Background Localization of sensory cortical areas during the operation is essential to preserve the sensory function.Intraoperative direct electrostimulation under awake anesthesia is the golden standard but time-consuming. We applied 3T high field blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify the relationship between glioma and cortical sensory areas preoperatively and to guide intraoperative direct electrostimulation for quick and precise localization.Methods Five glioma patients with sensory cortex involvement by or next to the lesion had preoperative BOLD fMRI to determine the spatial relationship of cortical sensory areas to the tumours. Bilateral hand opposite movement was performed by these patients for fMRI. Precentral and postcentral gyri were identified by electrical stimulation during the operation. Karnofsky Performance Status scores of the patients' pre- and postoperative and the role of BOLD fMRI were evaluated.Results The cortical sensory areas were all activated in five glioma patients involving postcentral gyrus areas by BOLDf MRI with bilateral hand opposite movement. The detected activation areas corresponded with the results from cortical electrical stimulation.Conclusions The relationship between cortical sensory areas and tumour can be accurately shown by BOLD fMRI before operation. And the information used to make the tumour resection could obtain good clinical results.

  11. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing

  12. INTRAOPERATIVE LOCALIZATION OF CORTICAL MOTOR EVOKED POTENTIALS IN CENTRAL SULCUS LESIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study direct cortical electrical stimulation technique for the recording of motor evoked potentials under general anesthesia in central sulcus lesions. Methods The largest N20-P25 response was recorded from postcentral gyrus by intraoperative monitoring of cortical motor evoked potentials in 10 patients with intracranial lesions near or in the central area. The muscles of upper extremity in all patients were activated by delivering stimulus to cortical areas continuously. Moving the cortical electrodes forward, the largest P20-N25 response, SEP phase reversal,was obtained as a motor center stimulus. In this site of cortex, a short train stimulation elicited reproducible muscle action potentials that could be observed from the oscilloscope without averaging.Results MEPs can be recorded, pre- and post-operatively, without motor deficits of upper limbs in all patients.Conclusion This technique seems to be preferable for intraoperative localization of motor evoked potentials in central sulcus lesions under total intravenous anesthesia.

  13. Gamma Oscillations and Neural Field DCMs Can Reveal Cortical Excitability and Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Pinotsis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how gamma oscillations can be combined with neural population models and dynamic causal modeling (DCM to distinguish among alternative hypotheses regarding cortical excitability and microstructure. This approach exploits inter-subject variability and trial-specific effects associated with modulations in the peak frequency of gamma oscillations. Neural field models are used to evaluate model evidence and obtain parameter estimates using invasive and non-invasive gamma recordings. Our overview comprises two parts: in the first part, we use neural fields to simulate neural activity and distinguish the effects of post synaptic filtering on predicted responses in terms of synaptic rate constants that correspond to different timescales and distinct neurotransmitters. We focus on model predictions of conductance and convolution based field models and show that these can yield spectral responses that are sensitive to biophysical properties of local cortical circuits like synaptic kinetics and filtering; we also consider two different mechanisms for this filtering: a nonlinear mechanism involving specific conductances and a linear convolution of afferent firing rates producing post synaptic potentials. In the second part of this paper, we use neural fields quantitatively—to fit empirical data recorded during visual stimulation. We present two studies of spectral responses obtained from the visual cortex during visual perception experiments: in the first study, MEG data were acquired during a task designed to show how activity in the gamma band is related to visual perception, while in the second study, we exploited high density electrocorticographic (ECoG data to study the effect of varying stimulus contrast on cortical excitability and gamma peak frequency.

  14. Knowledge about Sounds – Context-Specific Meaning Differently Activates Cortical Hemispheres, Auditory Cortical Fields and Layers in House Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana B. Geissler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the auditory cortex (AC by a given sound pattern is plastic, depending, in largely unknown ways, on the physiological state and the behavioral context of the receiving animal and on the receiver's experience with the sounds. Such plasticity can be inferred when house mouse mothers respond maternally to pup ultrasounds right after parturition and naïve females have to learn to respond. Here we use c-FOS immunocytochemistry to quantify highly activated neurons in the AC fields and layers of seven groups of mothers and naïve females who have different knowledge about and are differently motivated to respond to acoustic models of pup ultrasounds of different behavioral significance. Profiles of FOS-positive cells in the AC primary fields (AI, AAF, the ultrasonic field (UF, the secondary field (AII, and the dorsoposterior field (DP suggest that activation reflects in AI, AAF, and UF the integration of sound properties with animal state-dependent factors, in the higher-order field AII the news value of a given sound in the behavioral context, and in the higher-order field DP the level of maternal motivation and, by left-hemisphere activation advantage, the recognition of the meaning of sounds in the given context. Anesthesia reduced activation in all fields, especially in cortical layers 2/3. Thus, plasticity in the AC is field-specific preparing different output of AC fields in the process of perception, recognition and responding to communication sounds. Further, the activation profiles of the auditory cortical fields suggest the differentiation between brains hormonally primed to know (mothers and brains which acquired knowledge via implicit learning (naïve females. In this way, auditory cortical activation discriminates between instinctive (mothers and learned (naïve females cognition.

  15. Knowledge About Sounds-Context-Specific Meaning Differently Activates Cortical Hemispheres, Auditory Cortical Fields, and Layers in House Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Diana B; Schmidt, H Sabine; Ehret, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the auditory cortex (AC) by a given sound pattern is plastic, depending, in largely unknown ways, on the physiological state and the behavioral context of the receiving animal and on the receiver's experience with the sounds. Such plasticity can be inferred when house mouse mothers respond maternally to pup ultrasounds right after parturition and naïve females have to learn to respond. Here we use c-FOS immunocytochemistry to quantify highly activated neurons in the AC fields and layers of seven groups of mothers and naïve females who have different knowledge about and are differently motivated to respond to acoustic models of pup ultrasounds of different behavioral significance. Profiles of FOS-positive cells in the AC primary fields (AI, AAF), the ultrasonic field (UF), the secondary field (AII), and the dorsoposterior field (DP) suggest that activation reflects in AI, AAF, and UF the integration of sound properties with animal state-dependent factors, in the higher-order field AII the news value of a given sound in the behavioral context, and in the higher-order field DP the level of maternal motivation and, by left-hemisphere activation advantage, the recognition of the meaning of sounds in the given context. Anesthesia reduced activation in all fields, especially in cortical layers 2/3. Thus, plasticity in the AC is field-specific preparing different output of AC fields in the process of perception, recognition and responding to communication sounds. Further, the activation profiles of the auditory cortical fields suggest the differentiation between brains hormonally primed to know (mothers) and brains which acquired knowledge via implicit learning (naïve females). In this way, auditory cortical activation discriminates between instinctive (mothers) and learned (naïve females) cognition.

  16. Mapping the motor and sensory cortices: a historical look and a current case study in sensorimotor localization and direct cortical motor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Justin

    2012-03-01

    The utilization of cortical mapping during craniotomies for epilepsy and brain tumor resection is extremely important. Cortical mapping can guide the surgical team intraoperatively with regards to the layout of important anatomical structures and their function to prevent post-operative deficits. Electroneurophysiological methods employed include sensorimotor localization recorded directly from the surface of the brain when stimulated from a peripheral nerve and direct cortical stimulation (DCS) of the motor cortex to elicit a distal muscle response. This paper presents a case, in which a paradigm of neurophysiological modalities is utilized to assist the surgeon in creating a topographic map of the motor cortex and with localizing the sensory and motor cortices, in addition to a historical review of functional localization.

  17. Low and High-Frequency Field Potentials of Cortical Networks ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural networks grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have become an important, high content in vitro assay for assessing neuronal function. MEA experiments typically examine high- frequency (HF) (>200 Hz) spikes, and bursts which can be used to discriminate between different pharmacological agents/chemicals. However, normal brain activity is additionally composed of integrated low-frequency (0.5-100 Hz) field potentials (LFPs) which are filtered out of MEA recordings. The objective of this study was to characterize the relationship between HF and LFP neural network signals, and to assess the relative sensitivity of LFPs to selected neurotoxicants. Rat primary cortical cultures were grown on glass, single-well MEA chips. Spontaneous activity was sampled at 25 kHz and recorded (5 min) (Multi-Channel Systems) from mature networks (14 days in vitro). HF (spike, mean firing rate, MFR) and LF (power spectrum, amplitude) components were extracted from each network and served as its baseline (BL). Next, each chip was treated with either 1) a positive control, bicuculline (BIC, 25μM) or domoic acid (DA, 0.3μM), 2) or a negative control, acetaminophen (ACE, 100μM) or glyphosate (GLY, 100μM), 3) a solvent control (H2O or DMSO:EtOH), or 4) a neurotoxicant, (carbaryl, CAR 5, 30μM ; lindane, LIN 1, 10μM; permethrin, PERM 25, 50μM; triadimefon, TRI 5, 65μM). Post treatment, 5 mins of spontaneous activity was recorded and analyzed. As expected posit

  18. Functional localization of the cortical motor area in the brain Electrocorticogram analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Jiang; Xiaoming Wu; Binggang Ye; Sijuan Huang

    2010-01-01

    The method for rapidly,precisely and non-invasively localizing functional regions of the brain is a problem in neuromedicine research.Cortical electrostimulation is the optimal localization method during brain surgery,with a degree of accuracy of approximately 5 mm.However,electrostimulation can damage the cerebral cortex,trigger epilepsy,and extend the operation time.Studies are required to determine whether cortical motor regions can be localized by wavelet analysis from electrocorticograms.In this study,based on wavelet analysis of electrocorticograms,a selection of algorithms for classification of the mu rhythm in the motor regions utilizing experimental data was verified.Results demonstrated that a characteristic quantity of energy ratio in the reconstructed signal was filtered in the d6(7.81-15.62 Hz)band prior to and following motion events.A characteristic threshold was considered to be 40%.The accuracy of localization detection was 93%.The degree of accuracy was less than 5 mm.The present study avoided the problems of cerebral cortex injury and epilepsy onset,with an operation time of 60 seconds.Therefore,wavelet analysis on electrocorticogram is feasible for localizing cortical motor regions.Furthermore,this localization technique is accurate,safe and rapid.

  19. Clinical and imaging characteristics of localized megalencephaly: a retrospective comparison of diffuse hemimegalencephaly and multilobar cortical dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahashi, Masumi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Amanuma, Makoto; Endo, Keigo [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Sato, Noriko; Ota, Miho [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Yagishita, Akira [Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Kokubunji, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Yoshiaki; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Child Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Natsume, Jun [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Hemimegalencephaly is a well-known congenital malformation. However, localized megalencephaly, which may be one of the subtypes of hemimegalencephaly, has not been separately investigated. In the present study, we attempted to characterize the clinical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of localized megalencephaly in comparison with ordinary diffuse hemimegalencephaly and multilobar cortical dysplasia. MR findings for 43 patients with hemimegalencephaly and ten with multilobar cortical dysplasia, which is the differential diagnosis of localized megalencephaly, were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical findings such as the onset and severity of seizures and imaging findings including the affected area of the brain, structures outside of the hemisphere, and interval morphological changes were examined. Of the 43 patients, 11 showed signs of localized megalencephaly (25.6%). Localized megalencephaly was predominantly seen on the left side (72.7%) and had a tendency toward severe-grade seizures compared to multilobar cortical dysplasia. The frequencies of the extracerebral abnormalities in the diffuse hemimegalencephaly, localized megalencephaly, and multilobar cortical dysplasia groups were 84.4%, 36.4%, and 0.0%, respectively. There were three localized megalencephaly patients whose affected areas shrank and whose images were similar to those of multilobar cortical dysplasia. Localized megalencephaly accounts for one quarter of all hemimegalencephaly cases in this study. The incidence of extracerebral abnormalities in patients with localized hemimegalencephaly was almost half that of patients with diffuse hemimegalencephaly. Extracerebral abnormalities were absent in patients with multilobar cortical dysplasia. Associated extracerebral abnormalities may be a clue to differentiating localized megalencephaly from multilobar cortical dysplasia. (orig.)

  20. Clinical and imaging characteristics of localized megalencephaly: a retrospective comparison of diffuse hemimegalencephaly and multilobar cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahashi, Masumi; Sato, Noriko; Yagishita, Akira; Ota, Miho; Saito, Yoshiaki; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Natsume, Jun; Tsushima, Yoshito; Amanuma, Makoto; Endo, Keigo

    2009-12-01

    Hemimegalencephaly is a well-known congenital malformation. However, localized megalencephaly, which may be one of the subtypes of hemimegalencephaly, has not been separately investigated. In the present study, we attempted to characterize the clinical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of localized megalencephaly in comparison with ordinary diffuse hemimegalencephaly and multilobar cortical dysplasia. MR findings for 43 patients with hemimegalencephaly and ten with multilobar cortical dysplasia, which is the differential diagnosis of localized megalencephaly, were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical findings such as the onset and severity of seizures and imaging findings including the affected area of the brain, structures outside of the hemisphere, and interval morphological changes were examined. Of the 43 patients, 11 showed signs of localized megalencephaly (25.6%). Localized megalencephaly was predominantly seen on the left side (72.7%) and had a tendency toward severe-grade seizures compared to multilobar cortical dysplasia. The frequencies of the extracerebral abnormalities in the diffuse hemimegalencephaly, localized megalencephaly, and multilobar cortical dysplasia groups were 84.4%, 36.4%, and 0.0%, respectively. There were three localized megalencephaly patients whose affected areas shrank and whose images were similar to those of multilobar cortical dysplasia. Localized megalencephaly accounts for one quarter of all hemimegalencephaly cases in this study. The incidence of extracerebral abnormalities in patients with localized hemimegalencephaly was almost half that of patients with diffuse hemimegalencephaly. Extracerebral abnormalities were absent in patients with multilobar cortical dysplasia. Associated extracerebral abnormalities may be a clue to differentiating localized megalencephaly from multilobar cortical dysplasia.

  1. Fourier analysis on local fields (MN-15)

    CERN Document Server

    Taibleson, M H

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a development of the basic facts about harmonic analysis on local fields and the n-dimensional vector spaces over these fields. It focuses almost exclusively on the analogy between the local field and Euclidean cases, with respect to the form of statements, the manner of proof, and the variety of applications. The force of the analogy between the local field and Euclidean cases rests in the relationship of the field structures that underlie the respective cases. A complete classification of locally compact, non-discrete fields gives us two examples of connected fields (rea

  2. String-localized quantum fields and modular localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mund, J. [Juiz de Fora Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Schroer, B. [FU-Berlin, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Yngvason, J. [Erwin Schroedinger Institute for Mathematical Physics, Vienna (Austria)

    2005-12-15

    We study free, covariant, quantum (Bose) fields that are associated with irreducible representations of the Poincare group and localized in semi-infinite strings extending to spacelike infinity. Among these are fields that generate the irreducible representations of mass zero and infinite spin that are known to be incompatible with point-like localized fields. For the massive representation and the massless representations of finite helicity, all string-localized free fields can be written as an integral, along the string, of point-localized tensor or spinor fields. As a special case we discuss the string-localized vector fields associated with the point-like electromagnetic field and their relation to the axial gauge condition in the usual setting. (author)

  3. Neuromagnetic fields reveal cortical plasticity when learning an auditory discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, S; Williamson, S J

    1997-08-01

    Auditory evoked neuromagnetic fields of the primary and association auditory cortices were recorded while subjects learned to discriminate small differences in frequency and intensity between two consecutive tones. When discrimination was no better than chance, evoked field patterns across the scalp manifested no significant differences between correct and incorrect responses. However, when performance was correct on at least 75% of the trials, the spatial pattern of magnetic field differed significantly between correct and incorrect responses during the first 70 ms following the onset of the second tone. In this respect, the magnetic field pattern predicted when the subject would make an incorrect judgment more than 100 ms prior to indicating the judgment by a button press. One subject improved discrimination for much smaller differences between stimuli after 200 h of training. Evidence of cortical plasticity with improved discrimination is provided by an accompanying decrease of the relative magnetic field amplitude of the 100 ms response components in the primary and association auditory cortices.

  4. Bi-local Fields in Noncommutative Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Iso, S; Kitazawa, Y; Iso, Satoshi; Kawai, Hikaru; Kitazawa, Yoshihisa

    2000-01-01

    We propose a bi-local representation in noncommutative field theory. It provides a simple description for high momentum degrees of freedom. It also shows that the low momentum modes can be well approximated by ordinary local fields. Long range interactions are generated in the effective action for the lower momentum modes after integrating out the high momentum bi-local fields. The low momentum modes can be represented by diagonal blocks in the matrix model picture and the high momentum bi-local fields correspond to off-diagonal blocks. This block-block interaction picture simply reproduces the infrared singular behaviors of nonplanar diagrams in noncommutative field theory.

  5. The dynamic brain: from spiking neurons to neural masses and cortical fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Deco

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cortex is a complex system, characterized by its dynamics and architecture, which underlie many functions such as action, perception, learning, language, and cognition. Its structural architecture has been studied for more than a hundred years; however, its dynamics have been addressed much less thoroughly. In this paper, we review and integrate, in a unifying framework, a variety of computational approaches that have been used to characterize the dynamics of the cortex, as evidenced at different levels of measurement. Computational models at different space-time scales help us understand the fundamental mechanisms that underpin neural processes and relate these processes to neuroscience data. Modeling at the single neuron level is necessary because this is the level at which information is exchanged between the computing elements of the brain; the neurons. Mesoscopic models tell us how neural elements interact to yield emergent behavior at the level of microcolumns and cortical columns. Macroscopic models can inform us about whole brain dynamics and interactions between large-scale neural systems such as cortical regions, the thalamus, and brain stem. Each level of description relates uniquely to neuroscience data, from single-unit recordings, through local field potentials to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, electroencephalogram (EEG, and magnetoencephalogram (MEG. Models of the cortex can establish which types of large-scale neuronal networks can perform computations and characterize their emergent properties. Mean-field and related formulations of dynamics also play an essential and complementary role as forward models that can be inverted given empirical data. This makes dynamic models critical in integrating theory and experiments. We argue that elaborating principled and informed models is a prerequisite for grounding empirical neuroscience in a cogent theoretical framework, commensurate with the achievements in the

  6. Age-Dependent Cortical Thinning of Peripheral Visual Field Representations in Primary Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, Joseph C; Burge, Wesley K; Visscher, Kristina M

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex changes throughout the lifespan, and the cortical gray matter in many brain regions becomes thinner with advancing age. Effects of aging on cortical thickness (CT) have been observed in many brain regions, including areas involved in basic perceptual functions such as processing visual inputs. An important property of early visual cortices is their topographic organization-the cortical structure of early visual areas forms a topographic map of retinal inputs. Primary visual cortex (V1) is considered to be the most basic cortical area in the visual processing hierarchy, and is topographically organized from posterior (central visual representation) to anterior (peripheral visual representation) along the calcarine sulcus. Some studies have reported strong age-dependent cortical thinning in portions of V1 that likely correspond to peripheral visual representations, while there is less evidence of substantial cortical thinning in central V1. However, the effect of aging on CT in V1 as a function of its topography has not been directly investigated. To address this gap in the literature, we estimated the CT of different eccentricity sectors in V1 using T1-weighted MRI scans acquired from groups of healthy younger and older adults, and then assessed whether between-group differences in V1 CT depended on cortical eccentricity. These analyses revealed age-dependent cortical thinning specific to peripheral visual field representations in anterior portions of V1, but did not provide evidence for age-dependent cortical thinning in other portions of V1. Additional analyses found similar effects when analyses were restricted to the gyral crown, sulcul depth and sulcul wall, indicating that these effects are not likely due to differences in gyral/sulcul contributions to our regions of interest (ROI). Importantly, this finding indicates that age-dependent changes in cortical structure may differ among functionally distinct zones within larger canonical

  7. Modulation of Cortical-subcortical Networks in Parkinson’s Disease by Applied Field Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher William Hess

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest that endogenous field effects may play a role in neuronal oscillations and communication. Non-invasive transcranial electrical stimulation with low-intensity currents can also have direct effects on the underlying cortex as well as distant network effects. While Parkinson's disease (PD is amenable to invasive neuromodulation in the basal ganglia by deep brain stimulation, techniques of non-invasive neuromodulation like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS are being investigated as possible therapies. tDCS and tACS have the potential to influence the abnormal cortical-subcortical network activity that occurs in PD through sub-threshold changes in cortical excitability or through entrainment or disruption of ongoing rhythmic cortical activity. This may allow for the targeting of specific features of the disease involving abnormal oscillatory activity, as well as the enhancement of potential cortical compensation for basal ganglia dysfunction and modulation of cortical plasticity in neurorehabilitation. However, little is currently known about how cortical stimulation will affect subcortical structures, the size of any effect, and the factors of stimulation that will influence these effects.

  8. Cortical geometry as a determinant of brain activity eigenmodes: Neural field analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, Natasha C.; Robinson, P. A.

    2017-09-01

    Perturbation analysis of neural field theory is used to derive eigenmodes of neural activity on a cortical hemisphere, which have previously been calculated numerically and found to be close analogs of spherical harmonics, despite heavy cortical folding. The present perturbation method treats cortical folding as a first-order perturbation from a spherical geometry. The first nine spatial eigenmodes on a population-averaged cortical hemisphere are derived and compared with previous numerical solutions. These eigenmodes contribute most to brain activity patterns such as those seen in electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging. The eigenvalues of these eigenmodes are found to agree with the previous numerical solutions to within their uncertainties. Also in agreement with the previous numerics, all eigenmodes are found to closely resemble spherical harmonics. The first seven eigenmodes exhibit a one-to-one correspondence with their numerical counterparts, with overlaps that are close to unity. The next two eigenmodes overlap the corresponding pair of numerical eigenmodes, having been rotated within the subspace spanned by that pair, likely due to second-order effects. The spatial orientations of the eigenmodes are found to be fixed by gross cortical shape rather than finer-scale cortical properties, which is consistent with the observed intersubject consistency of functional connectivity patterns. However, the eigenvalues depend more sensitively on finer-scale cortical structure, implying that the eigenfrequencies and consequent dynamical properties of functional connectivity depend more strongly on details of individual cortical folding. Overall, these results imply that well-established tools from perturbation theory and spherical harmonic analysis can be used to calculate the main properties and dynamics of low-order brain eigenmodes.

  9. Optimization of multifocal transcranial current stimulation for weighted cortical pattern targeting from realistic modeling of electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, Giulio; Fox, Michael D; Ripolles, Oscar; Miranda, Pedro Cavaleiro; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-04-01

    Recently, multifocal transcranial current stimulation (tCS) devices using several relatively small electrodes have been used to achieve more focal stimulation of specific cortical targets. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that many behavioral manifestations of neurological and psychiatric disease are not solely the result of abnormality in one isolated brain region but represent alterations in brain networks. In this paper we describe a method for optimizing the configuration of multifocal tCS for stimulation of brain networks, represented by spatially extended cortical targets. We show how, based on fMRI, PET, EEG or other data specifying a target map on the cortical surface for excitatory, inhibitory or neutral stimulation and a constraint on the maximal number of electrodes, a solution can be produced with the optimal currents and locations of the electrodes. The method described here relies on a fast calculation of multifocal tCS electric fields (including components normal and tangential to the cortical boundaries) using a five layer finite element model of a realistic head. Based on the hypothesis that the effects of current stimulation are to first order due to the interaction of electric fields with populations of elongated cortical neurons, it is argued that the optimization problem for tCS stimulation can be defined in terms of the component of the electric field normal to the cortical surface. Solutions are found using constrained least squares to optimize current intensities, while electrode number and their locations are selected using a genetic algorithm. For direct current tCS (tDCS) applications, we provide some examples of this technique using an available tCS system providing 8 small Ag/AgCl stimulation electrodes. We demonstrate the approach both for localized and spatially extended targets defined using rs-fcMRI and PET data, with clinical applications in stroke and depression. Finally, we extend these ideas to more general

  10. Dissociation between goal-directed and discrete response localization in a patient with bilateral cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetti, Simona; Tamietto, Marco; Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Kerzel, Dirk; de Gelder, Beatrice; Pegna, Alan J

    2013-10-01

    We investigated localization performance of simple targets in patient TN, who suffered bilateral damage of his primary visual cortex and shows complete cortical blindness. Using a two-alternative forced-choice paradigm, TN was asked to guess the position of left-right targets with goal-directed and discrete manual responses. The results indicate a clear dissociation between goal-directed and discrete responses. TN pointed toward the correct target location in approximately 75% of the trials but was at chance level with discrete responses. This indicates that the residual ability to localize an unseen stimulus depends critically on the possibility to translate a visual signal into a goal-directed motor output at least in certain forms of blindsight.

  11. High-conductance states in a mean-field cortical network model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerchner, Alexander; Ahmadi, Mandana; Hertz, John

    2004-01-01

    cortical network model with random connectivity and conductance-based synapses. We employ mean-field theory with correctly colored noise to describe temporal correlations in the neuronal activity. Our results illuminate the connection between two independent experimental findings: high-conductance states......Measured responses from visual cortical neurons show that spike times tend to be correlated rather than exactly Poisson distributed. Fano factors vary and are usually greater than 1, indicating a tendency toward spikes being clustered. We show that this behavior emerges naturally in a balanced...... of cortical neurons in their natural environment, and variable non-Poissonian spike statistics with Fano factors greater than 1. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. TMS-induced cortical potentiation during wakefulness locally increases slow wave activity during sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Huber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep slow wave activity (SWA is thought to reflect sleep need, increasing in proportion to the length of prior wakefulness and decreasing during sleep. However, the process responsible for SWA regulation is not known. We showed recently that SWA increases locally after a learning task involving a circumscribed brain region, suggesting that SWA may reflect plastic changes triggered by learning. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis directly, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS in conjunction with high-density EEG in humans. We show that 5-Hz TMS applied to motor cortex induces a localized potentiation of TMS-evoked cortical EEG responses. We then show that, in the sleep episode following 5-Hz TMS, SWA increases markedly (+39.1+/-17.4%, p<0.01, n = 10. Electrode coregistration with magnetic resonance images localized the increase in SWA to the same premotor site as the maximum TMS-induced potentiation during wakefulness. Moreover, the magnitude of potentiation during wakefulness predicts the local increase in SWA during sleep. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide direct evidence for a link between plastic changes and the local regulation of sleep need.

  13. In Vitro Fracture of Human Cortical Bone: Local Fracture Criteria and Toughening Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalla, R; Stolken, J; Kinney, J; Ritchie, R

    2004-08-18

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture that encompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure and defines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research on the response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/or disease. Micro-mechanical models for fracture incorporating such local failure criteria have been widely developed for metallic and ceramic materials systems; however, few such deliberations have been undertaken for the fracture of bone. In fact, although the fracture event in mineralized tissues such as bone is commonly believed to be locally strain controlled, until recently there has been little experimental evidence to support this widely held belief. In the present study, a series of in vitro experiments involving a double-notch bend test geometry are performed in order to shed further light on the nature of the local cracking events that precede catastrophic fracture in bone and to define their relationship to the microstructure. Specifically, crack-microstructure interactions are examined to determine the salient toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone and to characterize how these may affect the anisotropy in fracture properties. Based on preliminary micro-mechanical models of these processes, in particular crack deflection and uncracked ligament bridging, the relative importance of these toughening mechanisms is established.

  14. Extracellular recordings from locally dense microelectrode arrays coupled to dissociated cortical cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdondini, L; Massobrio, P; Chiappalone, M; Tedesco, M; Imfeld, K; Maccione, A; Gandolfo, M; Koudelka-Hep, M; Martinoia, S

    2009-03-15

    High-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) enabled by recent developments of microelectronic circuits (CMOS-MEA) and providing spatial resolutions down to the cellular level open the perspective to access simultaneously local and overall neuronal network activities expressed by in vitro preparations. The short inter-electrode separation results in a gain of information on the micro-circuit neuronal dynamics and signal propagation, but requires the careful evaluation of the time resolution as well as the assessment of possible cross-talk artifacts. In this respect, we have realized and tested Pt high-density (HD)-MEAs featuring four local areas with 10microm inter-electrode spacing and providing a suitable noise level for the assessment of the high-density approach. First, simulated results show how possible artifacts (duplicated spikes) can be theoretically observed on nearby microelectrodes only for very high-shunt resistance values (e.g. R(sh)=50 kOmega generates up to 60% of false positives). This limiting condition is not compatible with typical experimental conditions (i.e. dense but not confluent cultures). Experiments performed on spontaneously active cortical neuronal networks show that spike synchronicity decreases by increasing the time resolution and analysis results show that the detected synchronous spikes on nearby electrodes are likely to be unresolved (in time) fast local propagations. Finally, functional connectivity analysis results show stronger local connections than long connections spread homogeneously over the whole network demonstrating the expected gain in detail provided by the spatial resolution.

  15. Quantum field theory on locally noncommutative spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, Gandalf [Univ. Leipzig (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Waldmann, Stefan [Leuven Univ. (Belgium)

    2012-07-01

    A class of spacetimes which are noncommutative only in a prescribed region is presented. These spacetimes are obtained by a generalization of Rieffel's deformation procedure to deformations of locally convex algebras and modules by smooth polynomially bounded R{sup n}-actions with compact support. Extending previous results of Bahns and Waldmann, it is shown how to perform such deformations in a strict sense. Some results on quantum fields propagating on locally noncommutative spacetimes are also given.

  16. Early experiences can alter the size of cortical fields in prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelke, A.M.H.; Yuan, S.-M.; Perkeybile, A.M.; Krubitzer, L.A.; Bales, K.L.

    2016-01-01

    The neocortex of the prairie vole is composed of three well-defined sensory areas and one motor area: primary somatosensory, visual, auditory areas and the primary motor area respectively. The boundaries of these cortical areas are identifiable very early in development, and have been thought to resist alteration by all but the most extreme physical or genetic manipulations. Here we assessed the extent to which the boundaries of sensory/motor cortical areas can be altered by exposing young prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) to a chronic stimulus, high or low levels of parental contact, or an acute stimulus, a single dose of saline, oxytocin (OT), or oxytocin antagonist on the day of birth. When animals reached adulthood, their brains were removed, the cortex was flattened, cut parallel to the pial surface, and stained for myelin to identify the architectonic boundaries of sensory and motor areas. We measured the overall proportion of cortex that was myelinated, as well as the proportion of cortex devoted to the sensory and motor areas. Both the chronic and acute manipulations were linked to significant alterations in areal boundaries of cortical fields, but the areas affected differed with different conditions. Thus, differences in parental care and early exposure to OT can both change cortical organization, but their effects are not identical. Furthermore, the effects of both manipulations were sexually dimorphic, with a greater number of statistically significant differences in females than in males. These results indicate that early environmental experience, both through exposure to exogenous neuropeptides and parental contact, can alter the size of cortical fields.

  17. The Local Group: The Ultimate Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S; Cooper, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Near-field cosmology - using detailed observations of the Local Group and its environs to study wide-ranging questions in galaxy formation and dark matter physics - has become a mature and rich field over the past decade. There are lingering concerns, however, that the relatively small size of the present-day Local Group ($\\sim$ 2 Mpc diameter) imposes insurmountable sample-variance uncertainties, limiting its broader utility. We consider the evolution of the Local Group with time and show that it reaches $3' \\approx 7$ co-moving Mpc in linear size (a volume of $\\approx 350\\,{\\rm Mpc}^3$) at $z=7$. The Local Group is a representative portion of the Universe at early cosmic epochs according to multiple metrics. In a sense, the Local Group is therefore the ultimate deep field: its stellar fossil record traces the cosmic evolution for galaxies with $10^{3} 38$ at $z\\sim7$) over a region that, in terms of size, is comparable to or larger than the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) for the entire history of the Unive...

  18. The Local Group: the ultimate deep field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Weisz, Daniel R.; Bullock, James S.; Cooper, Michael C.

    2016-10-01

    Near-field cosmology - using detailed observations of the Local Group and its environs to study wide-ranging questions in galaxy formation and dark matter physics - has become a mature and rich field over the past decade. There are lingering concerns, however, that the relatively small size of the present-day Local Group (˜2 Mpc diameter) imposes insurmountable sample-variance uncertainties, limiting its broader utility. We consider the region spanned by the Local Group's progenitors at earlier times and show that it reaches 3 arcmin ≈ 7 comoving Mpc in linear size (a volume of ≈350 Mpc3) at z = 7. This size at early cosmic epochs is large enough to be representative in terms of the matter density and counts of dark matter haloes with Mvir(z = 7) ≲ 2 × 109 M⊙. The Local Group's stellar fossil record traces the cosmic evolution of galaxies with 103 ≲ M⋆(z = 0)/M⊙ ≲ 109 (reaching M1500 > -9 at z ˜ 7) over a region that is comparable to or larger than the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) for the entire history of the Universe. In the JWST era, resolved stellar populations will probe regions larger than the HUDF and any deep JWST fields, further enhancing the value of near-field cosmology.

  19. Localization of Gravitino Field on Thin Branes

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Yun-Zhi; Zhou, Xiang-Nan; Zhong, Yi; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the localization of a gravitino field on two kinds of thin branes, the Randall-Sundrum-1 (RS1) branes and the scalar-tensor branes. The coupled chiral equations for the Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of a gravitino field are obtained by the gravitino chiral KK decompositions with the supersymmetry transformations.It is shown that, in the RS1 model for the left- and right-handed zero modes of the gravitino field, only one of them can be localized near one brane. For the massive modes, both chiral modes survive and the lower KK modes are localized near the IR brane from the four-dimensional physical coordinate point of view. For the scalar-tensor brane model, the localization of the gravitino chiral zero modes depends on the coupling parameter $\\lambda$, and they will be not localized around anyone brane within a certain range of the parameter $\\lambda$, which is quite different from the RS1 model. Furthermore, we also give the corresponding mass spectra of the massive KK gravitinos in th...

  20. Local field effects in periodic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porvatkina, O. V.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this article we investigate dielectric and magnetic properties of periodic metamaterials taking into account the so-called local field effect, caused by interaction between single particles the material consists of. We also consider the spatial dispersion effects. As a result, generalized Clausius-Mossotti techniques have been extended to the case of periodic metamaterials; permittivity tensor and permeability tensor were obtained.

  1. The magnetic field of cortical current sources: the application of a spatial filtering model to the forward and inverse problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S; Roth, B J; Wikswo, J P

    1990-07-01

    We extend our theoretical model based on spatial filtering to determine the ability of a SQUID magnetometer to resolve 2 localized current sources in the brain. We find that in order to resolve 2 separated but coaxial cortical sources, the source-to-pickup coil distance must be comparable to the distance between the 2 sources. The size of the current sources affects the resolving power of a magnetometer, but an anisotropy of 3 in the cortical tissue does not produce a significant effect. The model also provides a solution of the inverse calculation, either to reconstruct the original current source distribution from the measured magnetic field, or to continue the field at the magnetometer inward towards the sources. Both the inverse and inward calculations are limited by the fact that the inverse filter function serves as a high-pass filter, which leads to instabilities at high spatial frequencies, particularly in the presence of noise. The instabilities can be minimized by choosing an appropriate window to attenuate the noise, but this in turn reduces the spatial resolution.

  2. Implementation of a Peltier-based cooling device for localized deep cortical deactivation during in vivo object recognition testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Kyle; Graham, Brett; Carouso, Samantha; Cox, David

    2012-02-01

    While the application of local cortical cooling has recently become a focus of neurological research, extended localized deactivation deep within brain structures is still unexplored. Using a wirelessly controlled thermoelectric (Peltier) device and water-based heat sink, we have achieved inactivating temperatures (8 mm) than previously reported. After implanting the device into Long Evans rats' basolateral amygdala (BLA), an inhibitory brain center that controls anxiety and fear, we ran an open field test during which anxiety-driven behavioral tendencies were observed to decrease during cooling, thus confirming the device's effect on behavior. Our device will next be implanted in the rats' temporal association cortex (TeA) and recordings from our signal-tracing multichannel microelectrodes will measure and compare activated and deactivated neuronal activity so as to isolate and study the TeA signals responsible for object recognition. Having already achieved a top performing computational face-recognition system, the lab will utilize this TeA activity data to generalize its computational efforts of face recognition to achieve general object recognition.

  3. Localization of Fibrinogen in the Vasculo-Astrocyte Interface after Cortical Contusion Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Muradashvili

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Besides causing neuronal damage, traumatic brain injury (TBI is involved in memory reduction, which can be a result of alterations in vasculo-neuronal interactions. Inflammation following TBI is involved in elevation of blood content of fibrinogen (Fg, which is known to enhance cerebrovascular permeability, and thus, enhance its deposition in extravascular space. However, the localization of Fg in the extravascular space and its possible interaction with nonvascular cells are not clear. The localization of Fg deposition in the extravascular space was defined in brain samples of mice after cortical contusion injury (CCI and sham-operation (control using immunohistochemistry and laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Memory changes were assessed with new object recognition and Y-maze tests. Data showed a greater deposition of Fg in the vascular and astrocyte endfeet interface in mice with CCI than in control animals. This effect was accompanied by enhanced neuronal degeneration and reduction in short-term memory in mice with CCI. Thus, our results suggest that CCI induces increased deposition of Fg in the vasculo-astrocyte interface, and is accompanied by neuronal degeneration, which may result in reduction of short-term memory.

  4. Encoding of naturalistic stimuli by local field potential spectra in networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mazzoni

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Recordings of local field potentials (LFPs reveal that the sensory cortex displays rhythmic activity and fluctuations over a wide range of frequencies and amplitudes. Yet, the role of this kind of activity in encoding sensory information remains largely unknown. To understand the rules of translation between the structure of sensory stimuli and the fluctuations of cortical responses, we simulated a sparsely connected network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons modeling a local cortical population, and we determined how the LFPs generated by the network encode information about input stimuli. We first considered simple static and periodic stimuli and then naturalistic input stimuli based on electrophysiological recordings from the thalamus of anesthetized monkeys watching natural movie scenes. We found that the simulated network produced stimulus-related LFP changes that were in striking agreement with the LFPs obtained from the primary visual cortex. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the network encoded static input spike rates into gamma-range oscillations generated by inhibitory-excitatory neural interactions and encoded slow dynamic features of the input into slow LFP fluctuations mediated by stimulus-neural interactions. The model cortical network processed dynamic stimuli with naturalistic temporal structure by using low and high response frequencies as independent communication channels, again in agreement with recent reports from visual cortex responses to naturalistic movies. One potential function of this frequency decomposition into independent information channels operated by the cortical network may be that of enhancing the capacity of the cortical column to encode our complex sensory environment.

  5. Local connections of excitatory neurons in motor-associated cortical areas of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    In spite of recent progress in brain sciences, the local circuit of the cerebral neocortex, including motor areas, still remains elusive. Morphological works on excitatory cortical circuitry from thalamocortical (TC) afferents to corticospinal neurons (CSNs) in motor-associated areas are reviewed here. First, TC axons of motor thalamic nuclei have been re-examined by the single-neuron labeling method. There are middle layer (ML)-targeting and layer (L) 1-preferring TC axon types in motor-associated areas, being analogous to core and matrix types, respectively, of Jones (1998) in sensory areas. However, the arborization of core-like motor TC axons spreads widely and disregards the columnar structure that is the basis of information processing in sensory areas, suggesting that motor areas adopt a different information-processing framework such as area-wide laminar organization. Second, L5 CSNs receive local excitatory inputs not only from L2/3 pyramidal neurons but also from ML spiny neurons, the latter directly processing cerebellar information of core-like TC neurons (TCNs). In contrast, basal ganglia information is targeted to apical dendrites of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons through matrix TCNs. Third, L6 corticothalamic neurons (CTNs) are most densely innervated by ML spiny neurons located just above CTNs. Since CTNs receive only weak connections from L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons, the TC recurrent circuit composed of TCNs, ML spiny neurons and CTNs appears relatively independent of the results of processing in L2/3 and L5. It is proposed that two circuits sharing the same TC projection and ML neurons are embedded in the neocortex: one includes L2/3 and L5 neurons, processes afferent information in a feedforward way and sends the processed information to other cortical areas and subcortical regions; and the other circuit participates in a dynamical system of the TC recurrent circuit and may serve as the basis of autonomous activity of the neocortex. PMID

  6. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    CERN Document Server

    Chyzy, Krzysztof T; Beck, Rainer; Bomans, Dominik J

    2011-01-01

    We clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and what is the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 and 4.85GHz. Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are three times weaker than in the normal spirals (6muG) are observed only in dwarfs of extreme characteristics while typical LG dwarfs are not suitable objects for efficient supply of magnetic fields to the intergalactic medium.

  7. Supergeometry in locally covariant quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hack, Thomas-Paul; Schenkel, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze supergeometric locally covariant quantum field theories. We develop suitable categories SLoc of super-Cartan supermanifolds, which generalize Lorentz manifolds in ordinary quantum field theory, and show that, starting from a few representation theoretic and geometric data, one can construct a functor A : SLoc --> S*Alg to the category of super-*-algebras which can be interpreted as a non-interacting super-quantum field theory. This construction turns out to disregard supersymmetry transformations as the morphism sets in the above categories are too small. We then solve this problem by using techniques from enriched category theory, which allows us to replace the morphism sets by suitable morphism supersets that contain supersymmetry transformations as their higher superpoints. We construct super-quantum field theories in terms of enriched functors eA : eSLoc --> eS*Alg between the enriched categories and show that supersymmetry transformations are appropriately described within the en...

  8. Large Purcell enhancement without strong field localization

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnok, Alexander; Petrov, Mihail; Makarov, Sergey; Savelev, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Simovski, Constantin; Kivshar, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    The Purcell effect is defined as the modification of spontaneous decay in the presence of a resonator, and in plasmonics it is usually associated with the large local-field enhancement in "hot spots" due to surface plasmon polaritons. Here we propose a novel strategy for enhancing the Purcell effect through engineering the radiation directivity without a strict requirement of the local field enhancement. Employing this approach, we demonstrate how to enhance the Purcell effect by two orders of magnitude in all-dielectric nanostructures recently suggested as building blocks of low-loss nanophotonics and metamaterials. We support our concept by proof-of-principle microwave experiments with arrays of high-index dielectric resonators.

  9. Nonlocal and quasi-local field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Tomboulis, E T

    2015-01-01

    We investigate nonlocal field theories, a subject that has attracted some renewed interest in connection with nonlocal gravity models. We study, in particular, scalar theories of interacting delocalized fields, the delocalization being specified by nonlocal integral kernels. We distinguish between strictly nonlocal and quasi-local (compact support) kernels and impose conditions on them to insure UV finiteness and unitarity of amplitudes. We study the classical initial value problem for the partial integro-differential equations of motion in detail. We give rigorous proofs of the existence but accompanying loss of uniqueness of solutions due to the presence of future, as well as past, "delays," a manifestation of acausality. In the quantum theory we derive a generalization of the Bogoliubov causality condition equation for amplitudes, which explicitly exhibits the corrections due to nonlocality. One finds that, remarkably, for quasi-local kernels all acausal effects are confined within the compact support regi...

  10. Gauge field localization on brane worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, Rommel; Pantoja, Nelson; Rodriguez, R Omar

    2009-01-01

    We consider the effects of spacetime curvature and brane thickness on the localization of gauge fields on a brane via kinetic terms induced by localized fermions. We find that in a warped geometry with and infinitely thin brane, both the infrared and the ultraviolet behavior of the electromagnetic propagator are affected, providing a more stringent bound on the brane's tension than that coming from the requirement of four-dimensional gravity on the brane. On the other hand, for a thick wall in a flat spacetime, where the fermions are localized by means of a Yukawa coupling, we find that 4-dimensional electromagnetism is recovered in a region bounded from above by the same critical distance appearing in the thin case, but also from below by a new scale related to the brane's thickness and the electromagnetic couplings.

  11. Near-field Localization of Audio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2014-01-01

    Localization of audio sources using microphone arrays has been an important research problem for more than two decades. Many traditional methods for solving the problem are based on a two-stage procedure: first, information about the audio source, such as time differences-of-arrival (TDOAs......) and gain ratios-of-arrival (GROAs) between microphones is estimated, and, second, this knowledge is used to localize the audio source. These methods often have a low computational complexity, but this comes at the cost of a limited estimation accuracy. Therefore, we propose a new localization approach......, where the desired signal is modeled using TDOAs and GROAs, which are determined by the source location. This facilitates the derivation of one-stage, maximum likelihood methods under a white Gaussian noise assumption that is applicable in both near- and far-field scenarios. Simulations show...

  12. Local pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of the myosin 2A motor in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michelle A.; Billington, Neil; Wang, Aibing; Adelstein, Robert S.; Sellers, James R.; Fischer, Robert S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) pulsatile dynamics in generating contractile forces required for developmental morphogenesis has been characterized, but whether these pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of all actomyosin networks is not known. Here we used live-cell fluorescence imaging to show that transient, local assembly of NM2A “pulses” occurs in the cortical cytoskeleton of single adherent cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and sarcoma origin, independent of developmental signaling cues and cell–cell or cell–ECM interactions. We show that pulses in the cortical cytoskeleton require Rho-associated kinase– or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity, increases in cytosolic calcium, and NM2 ATPase activity. Surprisingly, we find that cortical cytoskeleton pulses specifically require the head domain of NM2A, as they do not occur with either NM2B or a 2B-head-2A-tail chimera. Our results thus suggest that pulsatile contractions in the cortical cytoskeleton are an intrinsic property of the NM2A motor that may mediate its role in homeostatic maintenance of tension in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells. PMID:27881665

  13. Electronically induced contrast enhancement in whisker S1 cortical response fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kraus, Lee M; Francis, Joseph T

    2014-01-01

    The ability of an organism to specifically attend to relevant sensory information during learning and subsequent performance of a task is highly dependent on the release of the neurotransmitter Acetylcholine (ACh). Electrophysiological studies have shown that pairing endogenous ACh with specific visual or auditory stimuli induces long lasting enhancements of subsequent cortical responses to the previously paired stimulus. In this study we present data suggesting that similar effects can be elicited in the rat whisker sensory system. Specifically, we show that pairing whisker deflection with electrical stimulation of the magnocellular basal nucleus (BN: a natural source of cortical ACh) causes an increase in the center-surround contrast of the treated whisker's cortical response field (CRF). Meanwhile, deflections of whiskers distant from the treated whisker show overall increased response magnitudes, but non-significant changes in contrast between principle vs. surround barrel responses. Control trials, in which BN stimulation was not paired with whisker deflection, showed similar lack of contrast enhancement. These results indicate that BN stimulation, paired with incoming whisker information, selectively increases the paired whisker's CRF center-surround contrast, while unpaired BN stimulation causes a more general increases in S1 responsiveness, without contrast modulation. Enhanced control over whisker sensory pathway attentional mechanisms has the potential to facilitate a more effective transfer of desired information to the animal's neural processing circuitry, thereby allowing experimental evaluation of more complex behavior and cognition than was previously possible.

  14. Globally Divergent but Locally Convergent X- and Y-Chromosome Influences on Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raznahan, Armin; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Greenstein, Deanna; Wallace, Gregory L; Blumenthal, Jonathan D; Clasen, Liv S; Giedd, Jay N

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their unique evolutionary history, modern mammalian X- and Y-chromosomes have highly divergent gene contents counterbalanced by regulatory features, which preferentially restrict expression of X- and Y-specific genes. These 2 characteristics make opposing predictions regarding the expected dissimilarity of X- vs. Y-chromosome influences on biological structure and function. Here, we quantify this dissimilarity using in vivo neuroimaging within a rare cohort of humans with diverse sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). We show that X- and Y-chromosomes have opposing effects on overall brain size but exert highly convergent influences on local brain anatomy, which manifest across biologically distinct dimensions of the cerebral cortex. Large-scale online meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging data indicates that convergent sex chromosome dosage effects preferentially impact centers for social perception, communication, and decision-making. Thus, despite an almost complete lack of sequence homology, and opposing effects on overall brain size, X- and Y-chromosomes exert congruent effects on the proportional size of cortical systems involved in adaptive social functioning. These convergent X-Y effects (i) track the dosage of those few genes that are still shared by X- and Y-chromosomes, and (ii) may provide a biological substrate for the link between SCA and increased rates of psychopathology.

  15. Spiking cortical model based non-local means method for despeckling multiframe optical coherence tomography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yameng; Zhang, Xuming

    2017-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images are severely degraded by speckle noise. Existing methods for despeckling multiframe OCT data cannot deliver sufficient speckle suppression while preserving image details well. To address this problem, the spiking cortical model (SCM) based non-local means (NLM) method has been proposed in this letter. In the proposed method, the considered frame and two neighboring frames are input into three SCMs to generate the temporal series of pulse outputs. The normalized moment of inertia (NMI) of the considered patches in the pulse outputs is extracted to represent the rotational and scaling invariant features of the corresponding patches in each frame. The pixel similarity is computed based on the Euclidean distance between the NMI features and used as the weight. Each pixel in the considered frame is restored by the weighted averaging of all pixels in the pre-defined search window in the three frames. Experiments on the real multiframe OCT data of the pig eye demonstrate the advantage of the proposed method over the frame averaging method, the multiscale sparsity based tomographic denoising method, the wavelet-based method and the traditional NLM method in terms of visual inspection and objective metrics such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL) and cross-correlation (XCOR).

  16. Spiking Cortical Model Based Multimodal Medical Image Fusion by Combining Entropy Information with Weber Local Descriptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuming; Ren, Jinxia; Huang, Zhiwen; Zhu, Fei

    2016-09-15

    Multimodal medical image fusion (MIF) plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and therapy. Existing MIF methods tend to introduce artifacts, lead to loss of image details or produce low-contrast fused images. To address these problems, a novel spiking cortical model (SCM) based MIF method has been proposed in this paper. The proposed method can generate high-quality fused images using the weighting fusion strategy based on the firing times of the SCM. In the weighting fusion scheme, the weight is determined by combining the entropy information of pulse outputs of the SCM with the Weber local descriptor operating on the firing mapping images produced from the pulse outputs. The extensive experiments on multimodal medical images show that compared with the numerous state-of-the-art MIF methods, the proposed method can preserve image details very well and avoid the introduction of artifacts effectively, and thus it significantly improves the quality of fused images in terms of human vision and objective evaluation criteria such as mutual information, edge preservation index, structural similarity based metric, fusion quality index, fusion similarity metric and standard deviation.

  17. Spiking Cortical Model Based Multimodal Medical Image Fusion by Combining Entropy Information with Weber Local Descriptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuming Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal medical image fusion (MIF plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and therapy. Existing MIF methods tend to introduce artifacts, lead to loss of image details or produce low-contrast fused images. To address these problems, a novel spiking cortical model (SCM based MIF method has been proposed in this paper. The proposed method can generate high-quality fused images using the weighting fusion strategy based on the firing times of the SCM. In the weighting fusion scheme, the weight is determined by combining the entropy information of pulse outputs of the SCM with the Weber local descriptor operating on the firing mapping images produced from the pulse outputs. The extensive experiments on multimodal medical images show that compared with the numerous state-of-the-art MIF methods, the proposed method can preserve image details very well and avoid the introduction of artifacts effectively, and thus it significantly improves the quality of fused images in terms of human vision and objective evaluation criteria such as mutual information, edge preservation index, structural similarity based metric, fusion quality index, fusion similarity metric and standard deviation.

  18. Motor area localization using fMRI-constrained cortical current density reconstruction of movement-related cortical potentials, a comparison with fMRI and TMS mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuggi, Alberto; Filippi, Massimo; Chieffo, Raffaella; Agosta, Federica; Rocca, Maria A; González-Rosa, Javier J; Cursi, Marco; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2010-01-13

    The localization of human hand primary motor area (M1) has been the object of several studies during the last decades. EEG source analysis, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are non-invasive methods for localizing M1 with good accuracy compared to direct electrocorticography (ECoG) results. EEG sources were reconstructed with Cortical Current Density (CCD) method, allowing to evaluate simultaneous and distributed patterns of activation and to increase accuracy by constraining on information derived from fMRI (fMRI-CCD). The aim of this study was to compare the M1 contribution of movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP) with TMS and fMRI results and to test the effect of constraints strength, algorithm norm and localization methods over CCD reconstruction. Seven right-handed healthy subjects underwent 64-channel EEG recording of MRCP to right thumb movement, focal TMS mapping of the right abductor pollicis brevis muscle and fMRI during right hand movement. We found fMRI activations, EEG sources and TMS mapping corresponding to the anatomical landmark of the hand area in all subjects with fMRI and TMS center-of-gravity and in almost all subjects using fMRI-CCD with moderate constraint. A significant improvement was found using fMRI-CCD compared to CCD alone. This study confirms the usefulness of multimodal integration of fMRI, EEG and TMS in localizing M1 and the possibility to increase EEG spatial resolution using fMRI information.

  19. Millisecond Coupling of Local Field Potentials to Synaptic Currents in the Awake Visual Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, Bilal; Schulz, David P.A.; Häusser, Michael; Carandini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Summary The cortical local field potential (LFP) is a common measure of population activity, but its relationship to synaptic activity in individual neurons is not fully established. This relationship has been typically studied during anesthesia and is obscured by shared slow fluctuations. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings in visual cortex of anesthetized and awake mice to measure intracellular activity; we then applied a simple method to reveal its coupling to the simultaneously recorded ...

  20. Millisecond Coupling of Local Field Potentials to Synaptic Currents in the Awake Visual Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, B; Schulz, D. P.; Häusser, M.; Carandini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The cortical local field potential (LFP) is a common measure of population activity, but its relationship to synaptic activity in individual neurons is not fully established. This relationship has been typically studied during anesthesia and is obscured by shared slow fluctuations. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings in visual cortex of anesthetized and awake mice to measure intracellular activity; we then applied a simple method to reveal its coupling to the simultaneously recorded LFP. LFP...

  1. Activity-dependent regulation of 'on' and 'off' responses in cat visual cortical receptive fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debanne, D; Shulz, D E; Fregnac, Y

    1998-04-15

    1. A supervised learning procedure was applied to individual cat area 17 neurons to test the possible role of neuronal co-activity in controlling the plasticity of the spatial 'on-off' organization of visual cortical receptive fields (RFs). 2. Differential pairing between visual input evoked in a fixed position of the RF and preset levels of postsynaptic firing (imposed iontophoretically) were used alternately to boost the 'on' (or 'off') response to a 'high' level of firing (S+ pairing), and to reduce the opponent response (respectively 'off' or 'on') in the same position to a 'low' level (S- pairing). This associative procedure was repeated 50-100 times at a low temporal frequency (0.1-0.15 s-1). 3. Long-lasting modifications of the ratio of 'on-off' responses, measured in the paired position or integrated across the whole RF, were found in 44 % of the conditioned neurons (17/39), and in most cases this favoured the S+ paired characteristic. The amplitude change was on average half of that imposed during pairing. Comparable proportions of modified cells were obtained in 'simple' (13/27) and 'complex' (4/12) RFs, both in adult cats (4/11) and in kittens within the critical period (13/28). 4. The spatial selectivity of the pairing effects was studied by pseudorandomly stimulating both paired and spatially distinct unpaired positions within the RF. Most modifications were observed in the paired position (for 88 % of successful pairings). 5. In some cells (n = 13), a fixed delay pairing procedure was applied, in which the temporal phase of the onset of the current pulse was shifted by a few hundred milliseconds from the presentation or offset of the visual stimulus. Consecutive effects were observed in 4/13 cells, which retained the temporal pattern of activity imposed during pairing for 5-40 min. They were expressed in the paired region only. 6. The demonstration of long-lasting adaptive changes in the ratio of 'on' and 'off' responses, expressed in localized

  2. The effect of high voltage, high frequency pulsed electric field on slain ovine cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgarifar, Hajarossadat; Oloyede, Adekunle; Zare, Firuz

    2014-04-01

    High power, high frequency pulsed electric fields known as pulsed power (PP) has been applied recently in biology and medicine. However, little attention has been paid to investigate the application of pulse power in musculoskeletal system and its possible effect on functional behavior and biomechanical properties of bone tissue. This paper presents the first research investigating whether or not PP can be applied safely on bone tissue as a stimuli and what will be the possible effect of these signals on the characteristics of cortical bone by comparing the mechanical properties of this type of bone pre and post expose to PP and in comparison with the control samples. A positive buck-boost converter was applied to generate adjustable high voltage, high frequency pulses (up to 500 V and 10 kHz). The functional behavior of bone in response to pulse power excitation was elucidated by applying compressive loading until failure. The stiffness, failure stress (strength) and the total fracture energy (bone toughness) were determined as a measure of the main bone characteristics. Furthermore, an ultrasonic technique was applied to determine and comprise bone elasticity before and after pulse power stimulation. The elastic property of cortical bone samples appeared to remain unchanged following exposure to pulse power excitation for all three orthogonal directions obtained from ultrasonic technique and similarly from the compression test. Nevertheless, the compressive strength and toughness of bone samples were increased when they were exposed to 66 h of high power pulsed electromagnetic field compared to the control samples. As the toughness and the strength of the cortical bone tissue are directly associated with the quality and integrity of the collagen matrix whereas its stiffness is primarily related to bone mineral content these overall results may address that although, the pulse power stimulation can influence the arrangement or the quality of the collagen network

  3. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyży, K. T.; Weżgowiec, M.; Beck, R.; Bomans, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We wish to clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and to assess the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. Methods: We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100-m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 GHz. Three galaxies were detected. A higher frequency (4.85 GHz) was used to search for polarized emission in five dwarfs that are the most luminous ones in the infrared domain, of which three were detected. Results: Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are weak, with a mean value of the total field strength of regulated mainly by the star-formation surface density (with the power-law exponent of 0.30 ± 0.04) or by the gas surface density (with the exponent 0.47 ± 0.09). In addition, we find systematically stronger fields in objects of higher global star-formation rate. The dwarf galaxies follow a similar far-infrared relationship (with a slope of 0.91 ± 0.08) to that determined for high surface brightness spiral galaxies. The magnetic field strength in dwarf galaxies does not correlate with their maximum rotational velocity, indicating that a small-scale rather than a large-scale dynamo process is responsible for producting magnetic fields in dwarfs. If magnetization of the Universe by galactic outflows is coeval with its metal enrichment, we show that more massive objects (such as Lyman break galaxies) can efficiently magnetize the intergalactic medium with a magnetic field strength of about 0.8 nG out to a distance of 160-530 kpc at redshifts 5-3, respectively. Magnetic fields that are several times weaker and shorter magnetization distances are expected for primordial dwarf galaxies. We also predict that most star-forming local dwarfs might have magnetized their surroundings up to a field strength about 0.1 μG within about a 5 kpc distance. Conclusions: Strong magnetic

  4. Bone balance within a cortical BMU: local controls of bone resorption and formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Smith

    Full Text Available Maintaining bone volume during bone turnover by a BMU is known as bone balance. Balance is required to maintain structural integrity of the bone and is often dysregulated in disease. Consequently, understanding how a BMU controls bone balance is of considerable interest. This paper develops a methodology for identifying potential balance controls within a single cortical BMU. The theoretical framework developed offers the possibility of a directed search for biological processes compatible with the constraints of balance control. We first derive general control constraint equations and then introduce constitutive equations to identify potential control processes that link key variables that describe the state of the BMU. The paper describes specific local bone volume balance controls that may be associated with bone resorption and bone formation. Because bone resorption and formation both involve averaging over time, short-term fluctuations in the environment are removed, leaving the control systems to manage deviations in longer-term trends back towards their desired values. The length of time for averaging is much greater for bone formation than for bone resorption, which enables more filtering of variability in the bone formation environment. Remarkably, the duration for averaging of bone formation may also grow to control deviations in long-term trends of bone formation. Providing there is sufficient bone formation capacity by osteoblasts, this leads to an extraordinarily robust control mechanism that is independent of either osteoblast number or the cellular osteoid formation rate. A complex picture begins to emerge for the control of bone volume. Different control relationships may achieve the same objective, and the 'integration of information' occurring within a BMU may be interpreted as different sets of BMU control systems coming to the fore as different information is supplied to the BMU, which in turn leads to different observable

  5. Bone balance within a cortical BMU: local controls of bone resorption and formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Dunstan, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining bone volume during bone turnover by a BMU is known as bone balance. Balance is required to maintain structural integrity of the bone and is often dysregulated in disease. Consequently, understanding how a BMU controls bone balance is of considerable interest. This paper develops a methodology for identifying potential balance controls within a single cortical BMU. The theoretical framework developed offers the possibility of a directed search for biological processes compatible with the constraints of balance control. We first derive general control constraint equations and then introduce constitutive equations to identify potential control processes that link key variables that describe the state of the BMU. The paper describes specific local bone volume balance controls that may be associated with bone resorption and bone formation. Because bone resorption and formation both involve averaging over time, short-term fluctuations in the environment are removed, leaving the control systems to manage deviations in longer-term trends back towards their desired values. The length of time for averaging is much greater for bone formation than for bone resorption, which enables more filtering of variability in the bone formation environment. Remarkably, the duration for averaging of bone formation may also grow to control deviations in long-term trends of bone formation. Providing there is sufficient bone formation capacity by osteoblasts, this leads to an extraordinarily robust control mechanism that is independent of either osteoblast number or the cellular osteoid formation rate. A complex picture begins to emerge for the control of bone volume. Different control relationships may achieve the same objective, and the 'integration of information' occurring within a BMU may be interpreted as different sets of BMU control systems coming to the fore as different information is supplied to the BMU, which in turn leads to different observable BMU behaviors.

  6. Cortical information flow in Parkinson's disease: a composite network/field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliff C. Kerr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play a crucial role in the execution of movements, as demonstrated by the severe motor deficits that accompany Parkinson's disease (PD. Since motor commands originate in the cortex, an important question is how the basal ganglia influence cortical information flow, and how this influence becomes pathological in PD. To explore this, we developed a composite neuronal network/neural field model. The network model consisted of 4950 spiking neurons, divided into 15 excitatory and inhibitory cell populations in the thalamus and cortex. The field model consisted of the cortex, thalamus, striatum, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus. Both models have been separately validated in previous work. Three field models were used: one with basal ganglia parameters based on data from healthy individuals, one based on data from individuals with PD, and one purely thalamocortical model. Spikes generated by these field models were then used to drive the network model. Compared to the network driven by the healthy model, the PD-driven network had lower firing rates, a shift in spectral power towards lower frequencies, and higher probability of bursting; each of these findings is consistent with empirical data on PD. In the healthy model, we found strong Granger causality in the beta and low gamma bands between cortical layers, but this was largely absent in the PD model. In particular, the reduction in Granger causality from the main "input" layer of the cortex (layer 4 to the main "output" layer (layer 5 was pronounced. This may account for symptoms of PD that seem to reflect deficits in information flow, such as bradykinesia. In general, these results demonstrate that the brain's large-scale oscillatory environment, represented here by the field model, strongly influences the information processing that occurs within its subnetworks. Hence, it may be preferable to drive spiking network models with physiologically realistic inputs rather than

  7. JAM-A regulates cortical dynein localization through Cdc42 to control planar spindle orientation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Schürmann, Annika; Gerke, Volker; Iden, Sandra; Ebnet, Klaus

    2015-08-26

    Planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex at the lateral cortex. The contribution of cell adhesion molecules to the cortical localization of the dynein-dynactin complex is poorly understood. Here we find that junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates the planar orientation of the mitotic spindle during epithelial morphogenesis. During mitosis, JAM-A triggers a transient activation of Cdc42 and PI(3)K, generates a gradient of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 at the cortex and regulates the formation of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. In the absence of functional JAM-A, dynactin localization at the cortex is reduced, the mitotic spindle apparatus is misaligned and epithelial morphogenesis in three-dimensional culture is compromised. Our findings indicate that a PI(3)K- and cortical F-actin-dependent pathway of planar spindle orientation operates in polarized epithelial cells to regulate epithelial morphogenesis, and we identify JAM-A as a junctional regulator of this pathway.

  8. Neuromagnetic fields accompanying unilateral and bilateral voluntary movements: topography and analysis of cortical sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristeva, R; Cheyne, D; Deecke, L

    1991-08-01

    Movement-related magnetic fields (MRMFs) accompanying left and right unilateral and bilateral finger flexions were studied in 6 right-handed subjects. Six different MRMF components occurring prior to, and during both unilateral and bilateral movements are described: a slow pre-movement readiness field (RF, 1-0.5 sec prior to movement onset); a motor field (MF) starting shortly before EMG onset; 3 separate "movement-evoked" fields following EMG onset (MEFI at 100 msec; MEFII at 225 msec; and MEFIII at 320 msec); and a "post-movement" field (PMF) following the movement itself. The bilateral topography of the RF and MF for both unilateral and bilateral movements suggested bilateral generators for both conditions. Least-squares fitting of equivalent current dipole sources also indicated bilateral sources for MF prior to both unilateral and bilateral movements with significantly greater strength of contralateral sources in the case of unilateral movements. Differences in pre-movement field patterns for left versus right unilateral movements indicated possible cerebral dominance effects as well. A single current dipole in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex could account for the MEFI for unilateral movements and bilateral sensorimotor sources for bilateral movements. Other MRMF components following EMG onset indicated similar sources in sensorimotor cortex related to sensory feedback or internal monitoring of the movement. The results are discussed with respect to the possible generators active in sensorimotor cortex during unilateral and bilateral movement preparation and execution and their significance for the study of cortical organization of voluntary movement.

  9. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhov, Anton V.; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models.

  10. Cortical field potentials associated with audio-initiated vocalization in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemba, H; Kyuhou, S; Matsuzaki, R; Amino, Y

    1999-09-03

    Five monkeys vocalizing at self-pace (self-paced vocalization) were well trained to vocalize in response to a monkey call (audio-initiated vocalization). Field potentials associated with audio-initiated vocalizations were recorded by using electrodes which were implanted chronically on the surface and at a 2.0-3.0 mm depth in various cortical areas. A surface-negative (s-N), depth-positive (d-P) potential (at about 70 ms latency after stimulus onset) was recorded in the rostral bank of the inferior limb of the arcuate sulcus in the left hemisphere, in which an insignificant potential was associated with self-paced vocalizations. An s-N, d-P slow potential which occurred in the motor and somatosensory cortices with a latency of about 300 ms after stimulus, started about 700 ms before vocalizations. The duration and amplitude of this potential was substantially the same with those of the potential which occurred with self-paced vocalizations. Reaction times from stimulus onset to vocalization start were variable, but were about 0.9s on the average. The findings were discussed in connection with reaction-time hand movements.

  11. Wide-field retinotopy defines human cortical visual area v6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzalis, Sabrina; Galletti, Claudio; Huang, Ruey-Song; Patria, Fabiana; Committeri, Giorgia; Galati, Gaspare; Fattori, Patrizia; Sereno, Martin I

    2006-07-26

    The retinotopic organization of a newly identified visual area near the midline in the dorsalmost part of the human parieto-occipital sulcus was mapped using high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging, cortical surface-based analysis, and wide-field retinotopic stimulation. This area was found in all 34 subjects that were mapped. It represents the contralateral visual hemifield in both hemispheres of all subjects, with upper fields located anterior and medial to areas V2/V3, and lower fields medial and slightly anterior to areas V3/V3A. It contains a representation of the center of gaze distinct from V3A, a large representation of the visual periphery, and a mirror-image representation of the visual field. Based on similarity in position, visuotopic organization, and relationship with the neighboring extrastriate visual areas, we suggest it might be the human homolog of macaque area V6, and perhaps of area M (medial) or DM (dorsomedial) of New World primates.

  12. Representation and prediction for locally harmonizable isotropic random fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall J. Swift

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The class of harmonizable fields is a natural extension of the class of stationary fields. This paper considers fields whose increments are harmonizable and isotropic. Spectral representations are obtained for locally harmonizable isotropic fields. A linear least squares prediction for locally harmonizable isotropic fields is considered.

  13. Local domains of motor cortical activity revealed by fiber-optic calcium recordings in behaving nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelsberger, Helmuth; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Romo, Ranulfo; Konnerth, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Brain mapping experiments involving electrical microstimulation indicate that the primary motor cortex (M1) directly regulates muscle contraction and thereby controls specific movements. Possibly, M1 contains a small circuit “map” of the body that is formed by discrete local networks that code for specific movements. Alternatively, movements may be controlled by distributed, larger-scale overlapping circuits. Because of technical limitations, it remained unclear how movement-determining circuits are organized in M1. Here we introduce a method that allows the functional mapping of small local neuronal circuits in awake behaving nonhuman primates. For this purpose, we combined optic-fiber–based calcium recordings of neuronal activity and cortical microstimulation. The method requires targeted bulk loading of synthetic calcium indicators (e.g., OGB-1 AM) for the staining of neuronal microdomains. The tip of a thin (200 µm) optical fiber can detect the coherent activity of a small cluster of neurons, but is insensitive to the asynchronous activity of individual cells. By combining such optical recordings with microstimulation at two well-separated sites of M1, we demonstrate that local cortical activity was tightly associated with distinct and stereotypical simple movements. Increasing stimulation intensity increased both the amplitude of the movements and the level of neuronal activity. Importantly, the activity remained local, without invading the recording domain of the second optical fiber. Furthermore, there was clear response specificity at the two recording sites in a trained behavioral task. Thus, the results provide support for movement control in M1 by local neuronal clusters that are organized in discrete cortical domains. PMID:24344287

  14. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy of cortical bone reveals details of extrafibrillar crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Henry P; McNally, Elizabeth A; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2014-12-01

    In a previous study we showed that most of the mineral in bone is present in the form of "mineral structures", 5-6nm-thick, elongated plates which surround and are oriented parallel to collagen fibrils. Using dark-field transmission electron microscopy, we viewed mineral structures in ion-milled sections of cortical human bone cut parallel to the collagen fibrils. Within the mineral structures we observe single crystals of apatite averaging 5.8±2.7nm in width and 28±19nm in length, their long axes oriented parallel to the fibril axis. Some appear to be composite, co-aligned crystals as thin as 2nm. From their similarity to TEM images of crystals liberated from deproteinated bone we infer that we are viewing sections through platy crystals of apatite that are assembled together to form the mineral structures.

  15. Spatiotemporal architecture of cortical receptive fields and its impact on multisensory interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Brian N.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent electrophysiology studies have suggested that neuronal responses to multisensory stimuli may possess a unique temporal signature. To evaluate this temporal dynamism, unisensory and multisensory spatiotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) of neurons in the cortex of the cat anterior ectosylvian sulcus were constructed. Analyses revealed that the multisensory STRFs of these neurons differed significantly from the component unisensory STRFs and their linear summation. Most notably, multisensory responses were found to have higher peak firing rates, shorter response latencies, and longer discharge durations. More importantly, multisensory STRFs were characterized by two distinct temporal phases of enhanced integration that reflected the shorter response latencies and longer discharge durations. These findings further our understanding of the temporal architecture of cortical multisensory processing, and thus provide important insights into the possible functional role(s) played by multisensory cortex in spatially directed perceptual processes. PMID:19308362

  16. Integral spinor norms in dyadic local fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we give an alternative computation of integral spinor norms over dyadic local fields by using the Jordan decomposition of W-type.In particular,we emphasize the striking similarity between the theory over dyadic local fields and that over the local fields of characteristic 2.

  17. Local Field Potentials: Myths and Misunderstandings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Herreras

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The intracerebral local field potential (LFP is a measure of brain activity that reflects the highly dynamic flow of information across neural networks. This is a composite signal that receives contributions from multiple neural sources, yet interpreting its nature and significance may be hindered by several confounding factors and technical limitations. By and large, the main factor defining the amplitude of LFPs is the geometry of the current sources, over and above the degree of synchronization or the properties of the media. As such, similar levels of activity may result in potentials that differ in several orders of magnitude in different populations. The geometry of these sources has been experimentally inaccessible until intracerebral high density recordings enabled the co-activating sources to be revealed. Without this information, it has proven difficult to interpret a century’s worth of recordings that used temporal cues alone, such as event or spike related potentials and frequency bands. As such, a collection of biophysically ill-founded concepts have been considered legitimate, which can now be corrected in the light of recent advances. The relationship of LFPs to their sources is often counterintuitive. For instance, most LFP activity is not local but remote, it may be larger further from rather than close to the source, the polarity does not define its excitatory or inhibitory nature, and the amplitude may increase when source’s activity is reduced. As technological developments foster the use of LFPs, the time is now ripe to raise awareness of the need to take into account spatial aspects of these signals and of the errors derived from neglecting to do so.

  18. Local diversity and fine-scale organization of receptive fields in mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Vincent; Histed, Mark H; Yurgenson, Sergey; Reid, R Clay

    2011-12-14

    Many thousands of cortical neurons are activated by any single sensory stimulus, but the organization of these populations is poorly understood. For example, are neurons in mouse visual cortex--whose preferred orientations are arranged randomly--organized with respect to other response properties? Using high-speed in vivo two-photon calcium imaging, we characterized the receptive fields of up to 100 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a 200 μm imaged plane. Inhibitory neurons had nonlinearly summating, complex-like receptive fields and were weakly tuned for orientation. Excitatory neurons had linear, simple receptive fields that can be studied with noise stimuli and system identification methods. We developed a wavelet stimulus that evoked rich population responses and yielded the detailed spatial receptive fields of most excitatory neurons in a plane. Receptive fields and visual responses were locally highly diverse, with nearby neurons having largely dissimilar receptive fields and response time courses. Receptive-field diversity was consistent with a nearly random sampling of orientation, spatial phase, and retinotopic position. Retinotopic positions varied locally on average by approximately half the receptive-field size. Nonetheless, the retinotopic progression across the cortex could be demonstrated at the scale of 100 μm, with a magnification of ≈ 10 μm/°. Receptive-field and response similarity were in register, decreasing by 50% over a distance of 200 μm. Together, the results indicate considerable randomness in local populations of mouse visual cortical neurons, with retinotopy as the principal source of organization at the scale of hundreds of micrometers.

  19. Spatial Heterogeneity of Cortical Receptive Fields and Its Impact on Multisensory Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Brian N.; Royal, David W.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of multisensory processing at the level of the single neuron have illustrated the importance of the spatial and temporal relationship of the paired stimuli and their relative effectiveness in determining the product of the resultant interaction. Although these principles provide a good first-order description of the interactive process, they were derived by treating space, time, and effectiveness as independent factors. In the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (AES) of the cat, previous work hinted that the spatial receptive field (SRF) architecture of multisensory neurons might play an important role in multisensory processing due to differences in the vigor of responses to identical stimuli placed at different locations within the SRF. In this study the impact of SRF architecture on cortical multisensory processing was investigated using semichronic single-unit electrophysiological experiments targeting a multisensory domain of the cat AES. The visual and auditory SRFs of AES multisensory neurons exhibited striking response heterogeneity, with SRF architecture appearing to play a major role in the multisensory interactions. The deterministic role of SRF architecture was tightly coupled to the manner in which stimulus location modulated the responsiveness of the neuron. Thus multisensory stimulus combinations at weakly effective locations within the SRF resulted in large (often superadditive) response enhancements, whereas combinations at more effective spatial locations resulted in smaller (additive/subadditive) interactions. These results provide important insights into the spatial organization and processing capabilities of cortical multisensory neurons, features that may provide important clues as to the functional roles played by this area in spatially directed perceptual processes. PMID:18287544

  20. Isolation of locally derived stem/progenitor cells from the peri-infarct area that do not migrate from the lateral ventricle after cortical stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Issei S; Peterson, Brittni M; Spees, Jeffrey L

    2010-09-01

    Neurogenesis can arise from neural stem/progenitor cells of the subventricular zone after strokes involving both the cortex and striatum. However, it is controversial whether all types of stroke and strokes of different sizes activate neurogenesis from the subventricular zone niche. In contrast with cortical/striatal strokes, repair and remodeling after mild cortical strokes may involve to a greater extent local cortical stem/progenitor cells and cells from nonneurogenic niches. We compared stem/progenitor cell responses after focal cortical strokes produced by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion and cortical/striatal strokes produced by the intraluminal suture model. To label migrating neuroblasts from the subventricular zone, we injected DiI to the lateral ventricle after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. By immunohistochemistry, we characterized cells expressing stem/progenitor cell markers in the peri-infarct area. We isolated cortical stem/progenitor cells from the peri-infarct area after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion and assayed their self-renewal and differentiation capacity. In contrast with cortical/striatal strokes, focal cortical strokes did not induce neuroblast migration from the subventricular zone to the infarct zone after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. By immunohistochemistry, we observed subpopulations of reactive astrocytes in the peri-infarct area that coexpressed radial glial cell markers such as Sox2, Nestin, and RC2. Clonal neural spheres isolated from the peri-infarct area after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and smooth muscle cells. Notably, neural spheres isolated from the peri-infarct area also expressed RC2 before differentiation. Mild cortical strokes that do not penetrate the striatum activate local cortical stem/progenitor cells but do not induce neuroblast migration from the subventricular zone niche.

  1. Fingerprint Matching Based on Local Relative Orientation Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU En; YIN Jian-ping; ZHANG Guo-min

    2004-01-01

    A fingerprint matching method based on local relative orientation field is proposed. It extracts local relative orientation field around each minutia for minutiae matching. Local orientation features are also used to sorting minutiae in order to speed up searching a minutia when pairing minutiae. The experimental result reveals that this method achieves improved recognition accuracy.

  2. Multifocal topographic visual evoked potential: improving objective detection of local visual field defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klistorner, A I; Graham, S L; Grigg, J R; Billson, F A

    1998-05-01

    To investigate the relationships between the pattern stimulation of different parts of the visual field (up to 25 degrees of eccentricity), the electrode position, and the cortical response to improve objective detection of local visual field defects. The human visual evoked potential (VEP) was assessed using multifocal pseudorandomly alternated pattern stimuli that were cortically scaled in size. Monopolar and bipolar electrode positions were used. The visual field was investigated up to 26 degrees of eccentricity. Twelve normal subjects and seven subjects with visual field defects of different nature were studied. Although the monopolar response is heavily biased toward the lower hemifield, bipolar leads overlying the active occipital cortex (straddling the inion) demonstrate good signals from all areas of the visual field tested. The amplitude is almost equal for the averaged upper and lower hemifields, but the polarity is opposite, causing partial cancellation of the full-field VEP. The degree of cancellation depends mainly on latency differences between the vertical hemifields. The bipolar VEP corresponded well with Humphrey visual field defects, and it showed a loss of signal in the scotoma area. The multifocal VEP demonstrates good correspondence with the topography of the visual field. Recording with occipital bipolar electrode placement is superior to standard monopolar recording. To avoid a full-field cancellation effect, a separate evaluation of upper and lower hemifields should be used for the best assessment of retinocortical pathways. This technique represents a significant step toward the possible application of the multifocal VEP to objective detection of local defects in the visual field.

  3. The functional roles of alpha-band phase synchronization in local and large-scale cortical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satu ePalva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-frequency band (8-14 Hz oscillations are among the most salient phenomena in human electroencephalography (EEG recordings and yet their functional roles have remained unclear. Much of research on alpha oscillations in human EEG has focused on peri-stimulus amplitude dynamics, which phenomenologically support an idea of alpha oscillations being negatively correlated with local cortical excitability and having a role in the suppression of task-irrelevant neuronal processing. This kind of an inhibitory role for alpha oscillations is also supported by several functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies. Nevertheless, investigations of local and inter-areal alpha phase dynamics suggest that the alpha-frequency band rhythmicity may play a role also in active task-relevant neuronal processing. These data imply that inter-areal alpha phase synchronization could support attentional, executive, and contextual functions. In this review, we outline evidence supporting different views on the roles of alpha oscillations in cortical networks and unresolved issues that should be addressed to resolve or reconcile these apparently contrasting hypotheses.

  4. Localized magnetic fields in arbitrary directions using patterned nanomagnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNeil, Robert P G; Schneble, Jeff; Kataoka, Masaya

    2010-01-01

    Control of the local magnetic fields desirable for spintronics and quantum information technology is not well developed. Existing methods produce either moderately small local fields or one held orientation. We present designs of patterned magnetic elements that produce remanent fields of 50 m...

  5. Localization of abelian gauge fields on thick branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaquera-Araujo, Carlos A. [Universidad de Colima, Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Colima (Mexico); Corradini, Olindo [Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas, Ciudad Universitaria, Facultad de Ciencias en Fisica y Matematicas, Tuxtla Gutierrez (Mexico); Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche e Matematiche, Modena (Italy)

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we explore a mechanism for abelian gauge field localization on thick branes based on a five-dimensional Stueckelberg-like action. A normalizable zero mode is found through the identification of a suitable coupling function between the brane and the gauge field. The same mechanism is studied for the localization of the abelian Kalb-Ramond field. (orig.)

  6. Measurements of weak localization of graphene in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvall, N.; Shivayogimath, Abhay; Yurgens, A.

    2015-01-01

    Weak localization in graphene is studied in inhomogeneous magnetic fields. To generate the inhomogeneous field, a thin film of type-II superconducting niobium is put in close proximity to graphene. A deviation from the ordinary quadratic weak localization behavior is observed at low fields. We...

  7. Noether's theorem in non-local field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Krivoruchenko, M I

    2016-01-01

    Explicit expressions are constructed for a locally conserved vector current associated with a continuous internal symmetry and for energy-momentum and angular-momentum density tensors associated with the Poincar\\'e group in field theories with higher-order derivatives and in non-local field theories. An example of non-local charged scalar field equations with broken C and CPT symmetries is considered. For this case, we find simple analytical expressions for the conserved currents.

  8. Measures and dimensions of fractal sets in local fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Hua; SU Weiyi

    2006-01-01

    The study of fractal analysis over the local fields as underline spaces is very important since it can motivate new approaches and new ideas, and discover new techniques in the study of fractals. To study fractal sets in a local field K, in this paper, we define several kinds of fractal measures and dimensions of subsets in K. Some typical fractal sets in K are constructed. We also give out the Hausdorff dimensions and measures, Box-counting dimensions and Packing dimensions, and stress that there exist differences between fractal analysis on local fields and Euclidean spaces. Consequently, the theoretical foundation of fractal analysis on local fields is established.

  9. Entropy of local smeared field observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satz, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    We re-conceptualize the usual entanglement entropy of quantum fields in a spatial region as a limiting case of a more general and well-defined quantity, the entropy of a subalgebra of smeared field observables. We introduce this notion, discuss various examples, and recover from it the area law for the entanglement entropy of a sphere in Minkowski space.

  10. Model to localize gauge and tensor fields on thick branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumbes, A. E. R.; Hoff da Silva, J. M.; Hott, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    It is shown that the introduction of a suitable function in the higher-dimensional gauge field action may be used in order to achieve gauge bosons localization on a thick brane. The model is constructed upon analogies to the effective coupling of neutral scalar field to electromagnetic field and to the Friedberg-Lee model for hadrons. After that we move forward studying the localization of the Kalb-Ramond field via this procedure.

  11. The effect of local anatomy on the electric field induced by TMS: evaluation at 14 different target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Arno M; Oostendorp, Thom F; Stegeman, Dick F

    2014-10-01

    Many human cortical regions are targeted with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The stimulus intensity used for a certain region is generally based on the motor threshold stimulation intensity determined over the motor cortex (M1). However, it is well known that differences exist in coil-target distance and target site anatomy between cortical regions. These differences may well make the stimulation intensity derived from M1 sub-optimal for other regions. Our goal was to determine in what way the induced electric fields differ between cortical target regions. We used finite element method modeling to calculate the induced electric field for multiple target sites in a realistic head model. The effects on the electric field due to coil-target distance and target site anatomy have been quantified. The results show that a correction based on the distance alone does not correctly adjust the induced electric field for regions other than M1. In addition, a correction based solely on the TMS-induced electric field (primary field) does not suffice. A precise adjustment should include coil-target distance, the secondary field caused by charge accumulation at conductivity discontinuities and the direction of the field relative to the local cerebrospinal fluid-grey matter boundary.

  12. Local Magnetic Field Role in Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Patrick M; Ho, Paul T P; Zhang, Qizhou; Girart, Josep M; Chen, Huei-Ru V; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Hua-bai; Li, Zhi-Yun; Liu, Hau-Yu B; Padovani, Marco; Qiu, Keping; Rao, Ramprasad; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Frau, Pau; Chen, How-Huan; Ching, Tao-Chung

    2015-01-01

    We highlight distinct and systematic observational features of magnetic field morphologies in polarized submm dust continuum. We illustrate this with specific examples and show statistical trends from a sample of 50 star-forming regions.

  13. Local electric field measurements by optical tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pesce

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a new technique to measure direction and amplitude of electric fields generated by microelectrodes embedded in polar liquid environment, as often used in microfluidic devices. The method is based on optical tweezers which act as sensitive force transducer while a trapped charged microsphere behaves as a probe. When an electric field is applied the particles moves from its equilibrium position and finishes in a new equilibrium position where electric and optical forces are balanced. A trapped bead is moved to explore the electric field in a wide region around the microelectrodes. In such way maps of electric fields with high spatial resolution can be reconstructed even for complex electrode geometries where numerical simulation approaches can fail. Experimental results are compared with calculations based on finite element analysis simulation.

  14. Local cortical thinning links to resting-state disconnectivity in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, M. -J.; Li, M.; Metzger, C. D.; Hailla, N.; Horn, D. I.; Li, W.; Heinze, H. J.; Bogerts, B.; Steiner, J.; He, H.; Walter, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Local structural and metabolic as well as inter-regional connectivity abnormalities have been implicated in the neuropathology of major depressive disorder (MDD). How local tissue properties affect intrinsic functional connectivity is, however, unclear. Using a cross-sectional, multi-mod

  15. Structural asymmetry of the human cerebral cortex: Regional and between-subject variability of surface area, cortical thickness, and local gyrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarello, Christine; Vazquez, David; Felton, Adam; McDowell, Alessandra

    2016-12-01

    Structural asymmetry varies across individuals, brain regions, and metrics of cortical organization. The current study investigated regional differences in asymmetry of cortical surface area, thickness, and local gyrification, and the extent of between-subject variability in these metrics, in a sample of healthy young adults (N=200). Between-subject variability in cortical structure may provide a means to assess the extent of biological flexibility or constraint of brain regions, and we explored the potential influence of this variability on the phenotypic expression of structural asymmetry. The findings demonstrate that structural asymmetries are nearly ubiquitous across the cortex, with differing regional organization for the three cortical metrics. This implies that there are multiple, only partially overlapping, maps of structural asymmetry. The results further indicate that the degree of asymmetry of a brain region can be predicted by the extent of the region's between-subject variability. These findings provide evidence that reduced biological constraint promotes the expression of strong structural asymmetry.

  16. Local freedom in the gravitational field revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareja, Maria Jesus [Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); MacCallum, Malcolm A H [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-07

    Maartens et al (1997 Class. Quantum Grav. 14 1927) gave a covariant characterization, in a (1 + 3) formalism based on a perfect fluid's velocity, of the parts of the first derivatives of the curvature tensor in general relativity which are 'locally free', i.e. not pointwise determined by the fluid energy-momentum and its derivative. The full decomposition of independent curvature derivative components given in earlier work on the spinor approach to the equivalence problem enables analogous general results to be stated for any order: the independent matter terms can also be characterized. Explicit relations between the two sets of results are obtained. The 24 Maartens et al locally free data are shown to correspond to the {nabla}{psi} quantities in the spinor approach, and the fluid terms are similarly related to the remaining 16 independent quantities in the first derivatives of the curvature.

  17. Local freedom in the gravitational field revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Pareja, M J; Callum, Malcolm A.H. Mac; Pareja, Mar\\'{\\i}a Jes\\'us

    2006-01-01

    Maartens {\\it et al.}\\@ gave a covariant characterization, in a 1+3 formalism based on a perfect fluid's velocity, of the parts of the first derivatives of the curvature tensor in general relativity which are ``locally free'', i.e. not pointwise determined by the fluid energy momentum and its derivative. The full decomposition of independent curvature derivative components given in earlier work on the spinor approach to the equivalence problem enables analogous general results to be stated for any order: the independent matter terms can also be characterized. Explicit relations between the two sets of results are obtained. The 24 Maartens {\\it et al.} locally free data are shown to correspond to the $\

  18. Linking physics with physiology in TMS: a sphere field model to determine the cortical stimulation site in TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielscher, Axel; Kammer, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    A fundamental problem of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is determining the site and size of the stimulated cortical area. In the motor system, the most common procedure for this is motor mapping. The obtained two-dimensional distribution of coil positions with associated muscle responses is used to calculate a center of gravity on the skull. However, even in motor mapping the exact stimulation site on the cortex is not known and only rough estimates of its size are possible. We report a new method which combines physiological measurements with a physical model used to predict the electric field induced by the TMS coil. In four subjects motor responses in a small hand muscle were mapped with 9-13 stimulation sites at the head perpendicular to the central sulcus in order to keep the induced current direction constant in a given cortical region of interest. Input-output functions from these head locations were used to determine stimulator intensities that elicit half-maximal muscle responses. Based on these stimulator intensities the field distribution on the individual cortical surface was calculated as rendered from anatomical MR data. The region on the cortical surface in which the different stimulation sites produced the same electric field strength (minimal variance, 4.2 +/- 0.8%.) was determined as the most likely stimulation site on the cortex. In all subjects, it was located at the lateral part of the hand knob in the motor cortex. Comparisons of model calculations with the solutions obtained in this manner reveal that the stimulated cortex area innervating the target muscle is substantially smaller than the size of the electric field induced by the coil. Our results help to resolve fundamental questions raised by motor mapping studies as well as motor threshold measurements.

  19. Reorganization of the connectivity of cortical field DZ in congenitally deaf cat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Barone

    Full Text Available Psychophysics and brain imaging studies in deaf patients have revealed a functional crossmodal reorganization that affects the remaining sensory modalities. Similarly, the congenital deaf cat (CDC shows supra-normal visual skills that are supported by specific auditory fields (DZ-dorsal zone and P-posterior auditory cortex but not the primary auditory cortex (A1. To assess the functional reorganization observed in deafness we analyzed the connectivity pattern of the auditory cortex by means of injections of anatomical tracers in DZ and A1 in both congenital deaf and normally hearing cats. A quantitative analysis of the distribution of the projecting neurons revealed the presence of non-auditory inputs to both A1 and DZ of the CDC which were not observed in the hearing cats. Firstly, some visual (areas 19/20 and somatosensory (SIV areas were projecting toward DZ of the CDC but not in the control. Secondly, A1 of the deaf cat received a weak projection from the visual lateral posterior nuclei (LP. Most of these abnormal projections to A1 and DZ represent only a small fraction of the normal inputs to these areas. In addition, most of the afferents to DZ and A1 appeared normal in terms of areal specificity and strength of projection, with preserved but smeared nucleotopic gradient of A1 in CDCs. In conclusion, while the abnormal projections revealed in the CDC can participate in the crossmodal compensatory mechanisms, the observation of a limited reorganization of the connectivity pattern of the CDC implies that functional reorganization in congenital deafness is further supported also by normal cortico-cortical connectivity.

  20. Measuring sound absorption using local field assumptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, E.R.

    2013-01-01

    To more effectively apply acoustically absorbing materials, it is desirable to measure angle-dependent sound absorption coefficients, preferably in situ. Existing measurement methods are based on an overall model of the acoustic field in front of the absorber, and are therefore sensitive to

  1. Influence of local field on spontaneous light emission by nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole; Lozovski, V.; Iezhokin, I.

    2009-01-01

    moment of transition that takes local-field effects into account. The effective dipole moment depends on the particle shape and size. Therefore, dipole radiation depends on those parameters too. The direction patterns of light emission by cubic particles have been calculated. The particles have been......A self-consistent approach based on the local-field concept has been proposed to calculate the direction patterns of light emission by nanoparticles with various shapes. The main idea of the method consists in constructing self-consistent equations for the electromagnetic field at any point...... of the system. The solution of the equations brings about relationships between the local field at an arbitrary point in the system and the external long-wave field via the local-field factor. The latter connects the initial moment of optical dipole transition per system volume unit and the effective dipole...

  2. Asymptotic behavior of local dipolar fields in thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowden, G.J., E-mail: gjb@phys.soton.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Stenning, G.B.G., E-mail: Gerrit.vanderlaan@diamond.ac.uk [Magnetic Spectroscopy Group, Diamond Light Source, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Laan, G. van der, E-mail: gavin.stenning@stfc.ac.uk [ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    A simple method, based on layer by layer direct summation, is used to determine the local dipolar fields in uniformly magnetized thin films. The results show that the dipolar constants converge ~1/m where the number of spins in a square film is given by (2m+1){sup 2}. Dipolar field results for sc, bcc, fcc, and hexagonal lattices are presented and discussed. The results can be used to calculate local dipolar fields in films with either ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, spiral, exponential decay behavior, provided the magnetic order only changes normal to the film. Differences between the atomistic (local fields) and macroscopic fields (Maxwellian) are also examined. For the latter, the macro B-field inside the film is uniform and falls to zero sharply outside, in accord with Maxwell boundary conditions. In contrast, the local field for the atomistic point dipole model is highly non-linear inside and falls to zero at about three lattice spacing outside the film. Finally, it is argued that the continuum field B (used by the micromagnetic community) and the local field B{sub loc}(r) (used by the FMR community) will lead to differing values for the overall demagnetization energy. - Highlights: • Point-dipolar fields in uniformly magnetized thin films are characterized by just three numbers. • Maxwell's boundary condition is partially violated in the point-dipole approximation. • Asymptotic values of point dipolar fields in circular monolayers scale as π/r.

  3. A model to localize gauge fields on thick branes

    CERN Document Server

    Chumbes, A E R; Hott, M B

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the introduction of a suitable function in the higher dimensional gauge field action may be used in order to achieve gauge bosons localization on a thick brane. The model is constructed upon analogies to the effective coupling of neutral scalar field to electromagnetic field and to the Friedberg-Lee model for hadrons.

  4. Completely local interpretation of quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sverdlov, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to come up with a framework that "converts" existing concepts from configuration space to ordinary one. This is done by modeling our universe as a big "computer" that simulates configuration space. If that "computer" exists in ordinary space and is ran by "classical" laws, our theory becomes "classical" by default. We have first applied this concept to a version of quantum field theory in which elementary particles have size (that is, a theory that does not yet exists). After that, we have also done the same with Pilot Wave model of discrete jumps, due to D\\"urr et el.

  5. Anderson Localization with Second Quantized Fields: Quantum Statistical Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Clinton; Agarwal, G S

    2010-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of Anderson localization of nonclassical light with emphasis on the quantum statistical aspects of localized light. We demonstrate, from the variance in mean intensity of localized light, as well as site-to-site correlations, that the localized light carries signatures of quantum statistics of input light. For comparison, we also present results for input light with coherent field statistics and thermal field statistics. Our results show that there is an enhancement in fluctuations of localized light due to the medium's disorder. We also find superbunching of the localized light, which may be useful for enhancing the interaction between radiation and matter. Another important consequence of sub-Poissonian statistics of the incoming light is to quench the total fluctuations at the output. Finally, we compare the effects of Gaussian and Rectangular distributions for the disorder, and show that Gaussian disorder accelerates the localization of light.

  6. Cortical field potentials preceding self-paced forelimb movements and influences of cerebellectomy upon them in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Hiroko; Ichikawa, Jun; Matsuzaki, Ryuichi; Kyuhou, Shin ichi; Matsuura-Nakao, Kazuko; Seki, Tomomi; Gemba, Hisae

    2003-11-27

    Seven rats were well trained to move lever to the left by right forelimb at self-pace (self-paced forelimb movements). Cortical field potentials associated with self-paced forelimb movements were recorded by electrodes implanted chronically on the surface and at a 2.0 mm depth in the forelimb motor cortex on the left side. A surface-negative, depth-positive potential starting about 1.0 s prior to the movement was recorded in the rostral part of the forelimb motor cortex. Further we found that the premovement potential was eliminated by the cerebellar hemispherectomy on the right side. This suggests the participation of the cerebellar hemisphere in preparing the activity of the motor cortex before self-paced forelimb movements in rats, by cerebello-thalamo-cortical projections.

  7. Acoustic source localization in mixed field using spherical microphone arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinghua; Wang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been used for source localization in three-dimensional space recently. In this paper, a two-stage algorithm is developed to localize mixed far-field and near-field acoustic sources in free-field environment. In the first stage, an array signal model is constructed in the spherical harmonics domain. The recurrent relation of spherical harmonics is independent of far-field and near-field mode strengths. Therefore, it is used to develop spherical estimating signal parameter via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT)-like approach to estimate directions of arrival (DOAs) for both far-field and near-field sources. In the second stage, based on the estimated DOAs, simple one-dimensional MUSIC spectrum is exploited to distinguish far-field and near-field sources and estimate the ranges of near-field sources. The proposed algorithm can avoid multidimensional search and parameter pairing. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance for localizing far-field sources, or near-field ones, or mixed field sources.

  8. Model cortical association fields account for the time course and dependence on target complexity of human contour perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadas Gintautas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Can lateral connectivity in the primary visual cortex account for the time dependence and intrinsic task difficulty of human contour detection? To answer this question, we created a synthetic image set that prevents sole reliance on either low-level visual features or high-level context for the detection of target objects. Rendered images consist of smoothly varying, globally aligned contour fragments (amoebas distributed among groups of randomly rotated fragments (clutter. The time course and accuracy of amoeba detection by humans was measured using a two-alternative forced choice protocol with self-reported confidence and variable image presentation time (20-200 ms, followed by an image mask optimized so as to interrupt visual processing. Measured psychometric functions were well fit by sigmoidal functions with exponential time constants of 30-91 ms, depending on amoeba complexity. Key aspects of the psychophysical experiments were accounted for by a computational network model, in which simulated responses across retinotopic arrays of orientation-selective elements were modulated by cortical association fields, represented as multiplicative kernels computed from the differences in pairwise edge statistics between target and distractor images. Comparing the experimental and the computational results suggests that each iteration of the lateral interactions takes at least [Formula: see text] ms of cortical processing time. Our results provide evidence that cortical association fields between orientation selective elements in early visual areas can account for important temporal and task-dependent aspects of the psychometric curves characterizing human contour perception, with the remaining discrepancies postulated to arise from the influence of higher cortical areas.

  9. Local Approximations for Effective Scalar Field Equations of Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Berera, Arjun; Ramos, Rudnei O

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuation and dissipation dynamics is examined at all temperature ranges for the general case of a background time evolving scalar field coupled to heavy intermediate quantum fields which in turn are coupled to light quantum fields. The evolution of the background field induces particle production from the light fields through the action of the intermediate catalyzing heavy fields. Such field configurations are generically present in most particle physics models, including Grand Unified and Supersymmetry theories, with application of this mechanism possible in inflation, heavy ion collision and phase transition dynamics. The effective evolution equation for the background field is obtained and a fluctuation-dissipation theorem is derived for this system. The effective evolution in general is nonlocal in time. Appropriate conditions are found for when these time nonlocal effects can be approximated by local terms. Here careful distinction is made between a local expansion and the special case of a derivative...

  10. Cortical connective field estimates from resting state fMRI activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gravel, Nicolas; Harvey, Ben; Nordhjem, Barbara; Haak, Koen V.; Dumoulin, Serge O.; Renken, Remco; Curcic-Blake, Branisalava; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2014-01-01

    One way to study connectivity in visual cortical areas is by examining spontaneous neural activity. In the absence of visual input, such activity remains shaped by the underlying neural architecture and, presumably, may still reflect visuotopic organization. Here, we applied population connective fi

  11. Changes in cortical grey matter density associated with long-standing retinal visual field defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucard, Christine C.; Hernowo, Aditya T.; Maguire, R. Paul; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Hooymans, Johanna M.M.; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal lesions caused by eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration can, over time, eliminate stimulation of parts of the visual cortex. This could lead to degeneration of inactive cortical neuronal tissue, but this has not been established in humans. Here, we used magnetic

  12. Incompressible turbulence as non-local field theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma

    2005-03-01

    It is well-known that incompressible turbulence is non-local in real space because sound speed is infinite in incompressible fluids. The equation in Fourier space indicates that it is non-local in Fourier space as well. However, the shell-to-shell energy transfer is local. Contrast this with Burgers equation which is local in real space. Note that the sound speed in Burgers equation is zero. In our presentation we will contrast these two equations using non-local field theory. Energy spectrum and renormalized parameters will be discussed.

  13. Localization of massive and massless fermion on two field brane

    CERN Document Server

    Farokhtabar, A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study fermion localization and resonances on a special type of braneworld model supporting brane splitting. In such models one can construct multi-wall branes which cause considerable simplification in field equations. We use a polynomial superpotential to construct this brane. The suitable Yukawa coupling between the background scalar field and localized fermion is determined. The massive fermion resonance spectrum is obtained. The number of resonances is increased for higher values of Yukawa coupling.

  14. Dynamical localization: Hydrogen atoms in magnetic and microwave fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, F.; Casati, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dellUniversita, Via Castelnuovo 7, 22100 Como (Italy); Shepelyansky, D.L. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, UMR C5626 du CNRS, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062, Toulouse (France)

    1997-03-01

    We show that dynamical localization for excited hydrogen atoms in magnetic and microwave fields takes place at quite low microwave frequency ({omega}n{sup 3}{lt}1). Estimates of the localization length are given for different parameter regimes, showing that the quantum delocalization border drops significantly as compared to the case of zero magnetic field. This opens up broad possibilities for laboratory investigations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Object localization using the statistical behavior of volume speckle fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abregana, Timothy Joseph T.; Almoro, Percival F.

    2016-12-01

    Speckle noise presents challenges in object localization using reconstructed wavefronts. Here, a technique for axial localization of rough test objects based on a statistical algorithm that processes volume speckle fields is demonstrated numerically and experimentally. The algorithm utilizes the standard deviation of phase difference maps as a metric to characterize the object wavefront at different axial locations. Compared with an amplitude-based localization method utilizing energy of image gradient, the technique is shown to be robust against speckle noise.

  16. Improved selection of cortical ovarian strips for autotransplantation of ovarian tissue using full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegehuis, Paulien L.; Peters, Inge T. A.; Eggermont, Jeroen; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Trimbos, J. Baptist; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Bosse, Tjalling; Dijkstra, Jouke; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2016-02-01

    Premature ovarian failure is a major concern in women of reproductive age who undergo gonadotoxic cancer treatment. Autotransplantation of frozen-thawed cortical ovarian tissue allows the immediate start of cancer treatment, but risks reintroduction of cancer. Current tumor detection methods compromise the ovarian tissue's viability and can therefore only be used to exclude the presence of metastases in the cortical ovarian strips that are not transplanted. A non-invasive method is needed that can be used to exclude metastases in the actual ovarian autografts without affecting the tissue's viability. In this study we applied FFOCT - a non-fixative technique that uses white light interferometry to make highresolution images (1μm isotropic) of fresh tissue - to study healthy and malignant ovarian tissue. We created an image atlas of healthy ovarian tissues from premenopausal patients and ovarian tissues with breast cancer metastases. To get the best possible match between hematoxylin-and-eosin stained slides and FFOCT images formalinfixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples were deparaffinized and FFOCT images were acquired within a few minutes. FFOCT images were compared with histology images. All normal structures such as follicles in all phases, inclusion cysts, blood vessels, corpora lutea, and corpora albicantia were clearly recognizable. Ovarian metastases could be well distinguished from normal ovarian tissue. FFOCT is a promising technique in the field of fertility preservation: metastases can be detected and additionally cortical ovarian strips can be selected on the basis of high follicle density.

  17. A cortical source localization analysis of resting EEG data after remifentanil infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khodayari-Rostamabad, Ahmad; Graversen, Carina; Malver, Lasse P;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore changes in current source density locations after remifentanil infusion in healthy volunteers using source localization of the electroencephalography (EEG). METHODS: EEG data was collected from 21 males using a 62-electrode system. Additionally, cognitive performance.......1-18Hz), and beta2 (18.1-30Hz) frequency bands. RESULTS: Pre-treatment recordings demonstrated reproducible source characteristics. The alterations (i.e., pre- versus post-treatment) due to remifentanil were significantly and robustly different from placebo infusions. The results indicated that neurons...... in several brain areas including inferior frontal gyrus and insula at frontal lobe oscillated more strongly after remifentanil infusion compared to placebo. Furthermore, the source activity at delta band was correlated with continuous reaction time index. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that alterations...

  18. Novel Localized Excitations of Nonlinear Coupled Scalar Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ren-Gui; LI Jin-Hua; WANG An-Min; WU Huang-Jiao

    2008-01-01

    Some extended solution mapping relations of the nonlinear coupled scalar field and the well-known φ4 model are presented. Simultaneously, inspired by the new solutions of the famous φ4 model recently proposed by Jia, Huang and Lou, five kinds of new localized excitations of the nonlinear coupled scalar field (NCSF) system are obtained.

  19. Local field enhancement: comparing self-similar and dimer nanoantennas

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, Giovanni; Finazzi, Marco; Biagioni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We study the local field enhancement properties of self-similar nanolenses and compare the obtained results with the performance of standard dimer nanoantennas. We report that, despite the additional structural complexity, self-similar nanolenses are unable to provide significant improvements over the field enhancement performance of standard plasmonic dimers.

  20. The local Galactic magnetic field in the direction of Geminga

    CERN Document Server

    Salvati, M

    2010-01-01

    The Milagro hot spot A, close to the Galactic anticenter direction, has been tentatively attributed to cosmic rays from a local reservoir (at a distance ~100 pc), freely streaming along diverging and smooth magnetic field lines. This is at variance with the geometry of the ~kpc scale Galactic magnetic field, which is known to be aligned with the spiral arms. We investigate the information available on the geometry of the magnetic field on the scales (~100 pc) of relevance here. The magnetic field immediately upstream of the heliosphere has been investigated by previous authors by modeling the interaction of this field with the solar wind. At larger distances, we use the dispersion measure and the rotation measure of nearby pulsars (especially towards the third Galactic quadrant). Additional information about the local field towards the North Polar Spur is taken from previous studies of the diffuse radio emission and the polarization of starlight. The asymmetry of the heliosphere with respect to the incoming i...

  1. Ignition's glow: Ultra-fast spread of global cortical activity accompanying local "ignitions" in visual cortex during conscious visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, N; Bickel, S; Zion-Golumbic, E; Harel, M; Golan, T; Davidesco, I; Schevon, C A; McKhann, G M; Goodman, R R; Schroeder, C E; Mehta, A D; Malach, R

    2015-09-01

    ) with an ultra-fast spread of signals of lower magnitude that invaded selected sites throughout fronto-parietal cortical areas. Our results are compatible with local models in demonstrating a clear task-dependence of the 300 ms fronto-parietal activation. However, they also reveal a more global component of low-magnitude and poor content selectivity that rapidly spreads into fronto-parietal sites. The precise functional role of this global "glow" remains to be elucidated.

  2. Experimental observation of spatially localized dynamo magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, B; Aumaître, S; Boisson, J; Daviaud, F; Dubrulle, B; Bonnefoy, N; Bourgoin, M; Odier, Ph; Pinton, J-F; Plihon, N; Verhille, G; Fauve, S; Pétrélis, F

    2012-04-06

    We report the first experimental observation of a spatially localized dynamo magnetic field, a common feature of astrophysical dynamos and convective dynamo simulations. When the two propellers of the von Kármán sodium experiment are driven at frequencies that differ by 15%, the mean magnetic field's energy measured close to the slower disk is nearly 10 times larger than the one close to the faster one. This strong localization of the magnetic field when a symmetry of the forcing is broken is in good agreement with a prediction based on the interaction between a dipolar and a quadrupolar magnetic mode.

  3. High field (9.4 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging of cortical grey matter lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmierer, Klaus; Parkes, Harold G; So, Po-Wah; An, Shu F; Brandner, Sebastian; Ordidge, Roger J; Yousry, Tarek A; Miller, David H

    2010-03-01

    .9; SD = 5 versus 22.6 ms; SD = 4.7; P < 0.01). Associations were detected between phosphorylated neurofilament and myelin basic protein (r = 0.58, P < 0.01), myelin basic protein and T(2) (r = -0.59, P < 0.01), and neuronal density and T(1) (r = -0.57, P < 0.01). All indices correlated with duration of tissue fixation, however, including the latter in the analysis did not fundamentally affect the associations described. Our data show that T(2)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 9.4 T enables detection of cortical grey matter lesion in post-mortem multiple sclerosis brain. The quantitative associations suggest that in cortical grey matter T(1) may be a predictor of neuronal density, and T(2) of myelin content (and-secondarily-axons). Successful translation of these results into in vivo studies using high field magnetic resonance imaging (e.g. 3 T and 7 T) will improve the assessment of cortical pathology and thereby have an impact on the diagnosis and natural history studies of patients with multiple sclerosis, as well as clinical trial designs for putative treatments to prevent cortical demyelination and neuronal loss.

  4. Generalized conservation laws in non-local field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegeles, Alexander; Oriti, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    We propose a geometrical treatment of symmetries in non-local field theories, where the non-locality is due to a lack of identification of field arguments in the action. We show that the existence of a symmetry of the action leads to a generalized conservation law, in which the usual conserved current acquires an additional non-local correction term, obtaining a generalization of the standard Noether theorem. We illustrate the general formalism by discussing the specific physical example of complex scalar field theory of the type describing the hydrodynamic approximation of Bose-Einstein condensates. We expect our analysis and results to be of particular interest for the group field theory formulation of quantum gravity.

  5. Generalised conservation laws in non-local field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Kegeles, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We propose a geometrical treatment of symmetries in non-local field theories, where the non-locality is due to a lack of identification of field arguments in the action. We show that the existence of a symmetry of the action leads to a generalised conservation law, in which the usual conserved current acquires an additional non-local correction term, obtaining a generalisation of the standard Noether theorem. We illustrate the general formalism by discussing the specific physical example of complex scalar field theory of the type describing the hydrodynamic approximation of Bose-Einstein condensates. We expect our analysis and results to be of particular interest for the group field theory formulation of quantum gravity.

  6. Stimulating forebrain communications: Slow sinusoidal electric fields over frontal cortices dynamically modulate hippocampal activity and cortico-hippocampal interplay during slow-wave states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Anastasia; Whitten, Tara A; Dickson, Clayton T

    2016-06-01

    Slow-wave states are characterized by the most global physiological phenomenon in the mammalian brain, the large-amplitude slow oscillation (SO; ~1Hz) composed of alternating states of activity (ON/UP states) and silence (OFF/DOWN states) at the network and single cell levels. The SO is cortically generated and appears as a traveling wave that can propagate across the cortical surface and can invade the hippocampus. This cortical rhythm is thought to be imperative for sleep-dependent memory consolidation, potentially through increased interactions with the hippocampus. The SO is correlated with learning and its presumed enhancement via slow rhythmic electrical field stimulation improves subsequent mnemonic performance. However, the mechanism by which such field stimulation influences the dynamics of ongoing cortico-hippocampal communication is unknown. Here we show - using multi-site recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats - that sinusoidal electrical field stimulation applied to the frontal region of the cerebral cortex creates a platform for improved cortico-hippocampal communication. Moderate-intensity field stimulation entrained hippocampal slow activity (likely by way of the temporoammonic pathway) and also increased sharp-wave ripples, the signature memory replay events of the hippocampus, and further increased cortical spindles. Following cessation of high-intensity stimulation, SO interactions in the cortical-to-hippocampal direction were reduced, while the reversed hippocampal-to-cortical communication at both SO and gamma bandwidths was enhanced. Taken together, these findings suggest that cortical field stimulation may function to boost memory consolidation by strengthening cortico-hippocampal and hippocampo-cortical interplay at multiple nested frequencies in an intensity-dependent fashion.

  7. Self-sustained firing activities of the cortical network with plastic rules in weak AC electrical fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Ying-Mei; Wang Jiang; Men Cong; Zhao Jia; Wei Xi-Le; Deng Bin

    2012-01-01

    Both external and endogenous electrical fields widely exist in the environment of cortical neurons.The effects of a weak alternating current (AC) field on a neural network model with synaptic plasticity are studied.It is found that self-sustained rhythmic firing patterns,which are closely correlated with the cognitive functions,are significantly modified due to the self-organizing of the network in the weak AC field.The activities of the neural networks are affected by the synaptic connection strength,the external stimuli,and so on.In the presence of learning rules,the synaptic connections can be modulated by the external stimuli,which will further enhance the sensitivity of the network to the external signal.The properties of the external AC stimuli can serve as control parameters in modulating the evolution of the neural network.

  8. Vortex configuration in the presence of local magnetic field and locally applied stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissberg, Shai; Kremen, Anna; Shperber, Yishai; Kalisky, Beena

    2017-02-01

    Vortex configuration is determined by the repulsive interaction, which becomes dominant with increasing vortex density, by the pinning potential, and by other considerations such as the local magnetic fields, currents flowing in the sample, or as we showed recently, by local stress applied on the sample. In this work we describe different ways to control vortex configuration using scanning SQUID microscopy.

  9. The role of local field potential coupling in epileptic synchronization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiongxing Wu; Heng Yang; Yufeng Peng; Liangjuan Fang; Wen Zheng; Zhi Song

    2013-01-01

    This review hopes to clearly explain the following viewpoints: (1) Neuronal synchronization underlies brain functioning, and it seems possible that blocking excessive synchronization in an epileptic neural network could reduce or even control seizures. (2) Local field potential coupling is a very common phenomenon during synchr in networks. Removal of neurons or neuronal networks that are coupled can significantly alter the extracellular field potential. Interventions of coupling mediated by local field potentials could result in desynchronization of epileptic seizures. (3) The synchronized electrical activity generated by neurons is sensitive to changes in the size of the extracellular space, which affects the efficiency of field potential transmission and the threshold of cell excitability. (4) Manipulations of the field potential fluctuations could help block synchronization at seizure onset.

  10. A Unique Egg Cortical Granule Localization Motif Is Required for Ovastacin Sequestration to Prevent Premature ZP2 Cleavage and Ensure Female Fertility in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Monospermic fertilization is mediated by the extracellular zona pellucida composed of ZP1, ZP2 and ZP3. Sperm bind to the N-terminus of ZP2 which is cleaved after fertilization by ovastacin (encoded by Astl exocytosed from egg cortical granules to prevent sperm binding. AstlNull mice lack the post-fertilization block to sperm binding and the ability to rescue this phenotype with AstlmCherry transgenic mice confirms the role of ovastacin in providing a definitive block to polyspermy. During oogenesis, endogenous ovastacin traffics through the endomembrane system prior to storage in peripherally located cortical granules. Deletion mutants of ovastacinmCherry expressed in growing oocytes define a unique 7 amino acid motif near its N-terminus that is necessary and sufficient for cortical granule localization. Deletion of the 7 amino acids by CRISPR/Cas9 at the endogenous locus (AstlΔ prevents cortical granule localization of ovastacin. The misdirected enzyme is present within the endomembrane system and ZP2 is prematurely cleaved. Sperm bind poorly to the zona pellucida of AstlΔ/Δ mice with partially cleaved ZP2 and female mice are sub-fertile.

  11. A Unique Egg Cortical Granule Localization Motif Is Required for Ovastacin Sequestration to Prevent Premature ZP2 Cleavage and Ensure Female Fertility in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Bo; Zhao, Yangu; Beall, Stephanie; Sadusky, Anna Burkart

    2017-01-01

    Monospermic fertilization is mediated by the extracellular zona pellucida composed of ZP1, ZP2 and ZP3. Sperm bind to the N-terminus of ZP2 which is cleaved after fertilization by ovastacin (encoded by Astl) exocytosed from egg cortical granules to prevent sperm binding. AstlNull mice lack the post-fertilization block to sperm binding and the ability to rescue this phenotype with AstlmCherry transgenic mice confirms the role of ovastacin in providing a definitive block to polyspermy. During oogenesis, endogenous ovastacin traffics through the endomembrane system prior to storage in peripherally located cortical granules. Deletion mutants of ovastacinmCherry expressed in growing oocytes define a unique 7 amino acid motif near its N-terminus that is necessary and sufficient for cortical granule localization. Deletion of the 7 amino acids by CRISPR/Cas9 at the endogenous locus (AstlΔ) prevents cortical granule localization of ovastacin. The misdirected enzyme is present within the endomembrane system and ZP2 is prematurely cleaved. Sperm bind poorly to the zona pellucida of AstlΔ/Δ mice with partially cleaved ZP2 and female mice are sub-fertile. PMID:28114310

  12. Lateral visual field stimulation reveals extrastriate cortical activation in the contralateral hemisphere: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Fredric; Mottaghy, Felix M; Pandey Vimal, Ram Lakhan; Renshaw, Perry F; Cowan, Ronald; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Teicher, Martin; Valente, Elizabeth; Rohan, Michael

    2004-05-30

    We examined whether lateral visual field stimulation (LSTM) could activate contralateral extrastriate cortical areas as predicted by a large experimental literature. We asked seven unscreened, control subjects to wear glasses designed to allow vision out of either the left (LVF) or right lateral visual field (RVF) depending upon which side the subject looked toward. Each subject participated in a block design functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study with alternating 30-s epochs in which he was asked to look to one side and then the other for a total of five epochs. On each side of the bore of the scanner, we taped a photograph for the subject to view in the LVF and RVF. The data were analyzed with SPM99 using a fixed effect, box-car design with contrasts for the LVF and the RVF conditions. Both LVF and RVF conditions produced the strongest fMRI activation in the contralateral occipitotemporal and posterior parietal areas as well as the contralateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. LSTM appears to increase contralateral fMRI activation in striate and extrastriate cortical areas as predicted by earlier studies reporting differential cognitive and/or emotional effects from unilateral sensory or motor stimulation.

  13. Representations of unipotent groups over local fields and Gutkin's conjecture

    CERN Document Server

    Boyarchenko, Mitya

    2010-01-01

    Let F be a finite field or a local field of any characteristic. If A is a finite dimensional associative nilpotent algebra over F, the set 1+A of all formal expressions of the form 1+x, where x ranges over the elements of A, is a locally compact group with the topology induced by the standard one on F and the multiplication given by (1+x)(1+y)=1+(x+y+xy). We prove a result conjectured by Eugene Gutkin in 1973: every unitary irreducible representation of 1+A can be obtained by unitary induction from a 1-dimensional unitary character of a subgroup of the form 1+B, where B is an F-subalgebra of A. In the case where F is local and nonarchimedean we also establish an analogous result for smooth irreducible representations of 1+A over the field of complex numbers and show that every such representation is admissible and carries an invariant Hermitian inner product.

  14. Pedestrian simulations in hexagonal cell local field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Biao; Wang, Jianyuan; Xiong, Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Pedestrian dynamics have caused wide concern over the recent years. This paper presents a local field (LF) model based on regular hexagonal cells to simulate pedestrian dynamics in scenarios such as corridors and bottlenecks. In this model, the simulation scenarios are discretized into regular hexagonal cells. The local field is a small region around pedestrian. Each pedestrian will choose his/her target cell according to the situation in his/her local field. Different walking strategies are considered in the simulation in corridor scenario and the fundamental graphs are used to verify this model. Different shapes of exit are also discussed in the bottleneck scenario. The statistics of push effect show that the smooth bottleneck exit may be more safe.

  15. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  16. A hierarchy of timescales explains distinct effects of local inhibition of primary visual cortex and frontal eye fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Luca; Sale, Martin V; L Gollo, Leonardo; Bell, Peter T; Nguyen, Vinh T; Zalesky, Andrew; Breakspear, Michael; Mattingley, Jason B

    2016-09-06

    Within the primate visual system, areas at lower levels of the cortical hierarchy process basic visual features, whereas those at higher levels, such as the frontal eye fields (FEF), are thought to modulate sensory processes via feedback connections. Despite these functional exchanges during perception, there is little shared activity between early and late visual regions at rest. How interactions emerge between regions encompassing distinct levels of the visual hierarchy remains unknown. Here we combined neuroimaging, non-invasive cortical stimulation and computational modelling to characterize changes in functional interactions across widespread neural networks before and after local inhibition of primary visual cortex or FEF. We found that stimulation of early visual cortex selectively increased feedforward interactions with FEF and extrastriate visual areas, whereas identical stimulation of the FEF decreased feedback interactions with early visual areas. Computational modelling suggests that these opposing effects reflect a fast-slow timescale hierarchy from sensory to association areas.

  17. The local potential approximation in the background field formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Bridle, I Hamzaan; Morris, Tim R

    2013-01-01

    Working within the familiar local potential approximation, and concentrating on the example of a single scalar field in three dimensions, we show that the commonly used approximation method of identifying the total and background fields, leads to pathologies in the resulting fixed point structure and the associated spaces of eigenoperators. We then show how a consistent treatment of the background field through the corresponding modified shift Ward identity, can cure these pathologies, restoring universality of physical quantities with respect to the choice of dependence on the background field, even within the local potential approximation. Along the way we point out similarities to what has been previously found in the f(R) approximation in asymptotic safety for gravity.

  18. Towards state locality in quantum field theory: free fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Oeckl, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We provide a restricted solution to the state locality problem in quantum field theory for the case of free fermions. Concretely, we present a functorial quantization scheme that takes as input a classical free fermionic field theory. Crucially, no data is needed beyond the classical structures evident from a Lagrangian setting. The output is a quantum field theory encoded in a weakened version of the positive formalism of the general boundary formulation. When the classical data is augmented with complex structures on hypersurfaces, the quantum data correspondingly augment to the full positive formalism and the standard quantization of free fermionic field theory is recovered. This augmentation can be performed selectively, i.e., it may be limited to a subcollection of hypersurfaces. The state locality problem arises from the fact that suitable complex structures only exist on a very restricted class of unbounded hypersurfaces. But standard quantization requires them on all hypersurfaces and is thus only abl...

  19. Mutual information after a local quench in conformal field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Asplund, Curtis T

    2013-01-01

    We compute the entanglement entropy and mutual information for two disjoint intervals in two-dimensional conformal field theories as a function of time after a local quench, using the replica trick and boundary conformal field theory. We obtain explicit formulae for the universal contributions, which are leading in the regimes of, for example, close or well-separated intervals of fixed length. The results are largely consistent with the quasiparticle picture, in which entanglement above that present in the ground state is carried by pairs of entangled, freely propagating excitations. We also calculate the mutual information for two disjoint intervals in a proposed holographic local quench, whose holographic energy-momentum tensor matches the conformal field theory one. We find that the holographic mutual information shows qualitative differences from the conformal field theory results and we discuss possible interpretations of this.

  20. Wedge-local quantum fields on a nonconstant noncommutative spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Much, A. [Max-Planck-Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences, 04103 Leipzig (Germany) and Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Leipzig, 04009 Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Within the framework of warped convolutions we deform the massless free scalar field. The deformation is performed by using the generators of the special conformal transformations. The investigation shows that the deformed field turns out to be wedge-local. Furthermore, it is shown that the spacetime induced by the deformation with the special conformal operators is nonconstant noncommutative. The noncommutativity is obtained by calculating the deformed commutator of the coordinates.

  1. Local approximations for effective scalar field equations of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berera, Arjun; Moss, Ian G.; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2007-10-01

    Fluctuation and dissipation dynamics is examined at all temperature ranges for the general case of a background time evolving scalar field coupled to heavy intermediate quantum fields which in turn are coupled to light quantum fields. The evolution of the background field induces particle production from the light fields through the action of the intermediate catalyzing heavy fields. Such field configurations are generically present in most particle physics models, including grand unified and supersymmetry theories, with application of this mechanism possible in inflation, heavy ion collision, and phase transition dynamics. The effective evolution equation for the background field is obtained and a fluctuation-dissipation theorem is derived for this system. The effective evolution, in general, is nonlocal in time. Appropriate conditions are found for when these time nonlocal effects can be approximated by local terms. Here careful distinction is made between a local expansion and the special case of a derivative expansion to all orders, which requires analytic behavior of the evolution equation in Fourier space.

  2. Local self-field measurements in Tl-2223 polycrystalline superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenz, A. [Univ. de Costa Rica, San Jose (Costa Rica). Escuela de Fisica; Niculescu, H. [Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Gielisse, P.J. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    We report local self-field measurements on superconducting (Tl-2223) disks in an applied field. The axial components of the self-field generated by polycrystalline superconductors, have been measured at points above the sample using a Hall probe. The measurements were conducted with a computer controlled precision x-y scanning assembly, at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Single point and two- dimensional distributions of the local self-field above the samples immersed in a homogeneous applied field up to 16 mT, were recorded. In an increasing/decreasing magnetic field the magnetic response of the superconductors traverses hysteresis loops due to inter- and intragranular flux pinning. The field for full flux penetration and the maximum shielded field have been identified from characteristic points on the hysteresis loops. Evaluation of the average intergrain current density j{sub c}, assuming a uniform critical current density, resulted in the value 2.7 x 10{sup 6} A/m{sup 2}. (orig.)

  3. Virtual local target method for avoiding local minimum in potential field based robot navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xi-Yong; Zhu, Jing

    2003-01-01

    A novel robot navigation algorithm with global path generation capability is presented. Local minimum is a most intractable but is an encountered frequently problem in potential field based robot navigation. Through appointing appropriately some virtual local targets on the journey, it can be solved effectively. The key concept employed in this algorithm are the rules that govern when and how to appoint these virtual local targets. When the robot finds itself in danger of local minimum, a virtual local target is appointed to replace the global goal temporarily according to the rules. After the virtual target is reached, the robot continues on its journey by heading towards the global goal. The algorithm prevents the robot from running into local minima anymore. Simulation results showed that it is very effective in complex obstacle environments.

  4. Virtual local target method for avoiding local minimum in potential field based robot navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹细勇; 诸静

    2003-01-01

    A novel robot navigation algorithm with global path generation capability is presented. Local minimum is a most intractable but is an encountered frequently problem in potential field based robot navigation. Through appointing appropriately some virtual local targets on the journey, it can be solved effectively. The key concept employed in this algorithm are the rules that govern when and how to appoint these virtual local targets. When the robot finds itself in danger of local minimum, a virtual local target is appointed to replace the global goal temporarily according to the rules. After the virtual target is reached, the robot continues on its journey by heading towards the global goal. The algorithm prevents the robot from running into local minima anymore. Simulation results showed that it is very effective in complex obstacle environments.

  5. Virtual local target method for avoiding local minimum in potential field based robot navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹细勇; 诸静

    2003-01-01

    A novel robot navigation algorithm with global path generation capability is presented. Local minimum is a most intractable but is an encountered frequently problem in potential field based robot navigation.Through appointing appropriately some virtual local targets on the journey, it can be solved effectively. The key concept employed in this algorithm are the rules that govern when and how to appoint these virtual local targets. When the robot finds itself in danger of local minimum, a virtual local target is appointed to replace the global goal temporarily according to the rules. After the virtual target is reached, the robot continues on its journey by heading towards the global goal. The algorithm prevents the robot from running into local minima anymore. Simulation results showed that it is very effective in complex obstacle environments.

  6. Field patching, factorization and local-global principles

    CERN Document Server

    Krashen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we first describe the method of field patching, developed by Harbater and Hartmann, paying special attention to the relationship between factorization and local-global principles, and second, we extend the basic factorization result previously known for rational groups to the case of retract rational groups.

  7. Engineering Optical Antenna for Efficient Local Field Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    spacing 10nm). In this dissertation, we theoretically derived the local field enhancement of the optical antenna and found that optimized radiation and...present a novel optical antenna design--the arch-dipole antenna--which has optimal radiation efficiency and small gap spacing (5 nm) fabricated by CMOS

  8. Principal series representations of metaplectic groups over local fields

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Let G be a split reductive algebraic group over a non-archimedean local field. We study the representation theory of a central extension $\\G$ of G by a cyclic group of order n, under some mild tameness assumptions on n. In particular, we focus our attention on the development of the theory of principal series representations for $\\G$ and applications of this theory.

  9. Fifty hertz extremely low-frequency magnetic field exposure elicits redox and trophic response in rat-cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Loreto, Silvia; Falone, Stefano; Caracciolo, Valentina; Sebastiani, Pierluigi; D'Alessandro, Antonella; Mirabilio, Alessandro; Zimmitti, Vincenzo; Amicarelli, Fernanda

    2009-05-01

    Large research activity has raised around the mechanisms of interaction between extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) and biological systems. ELF-MFs may interfere with chemical reactions involving reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus facilitating oxidative damages in living cells. Cortical neurons are particularly susceptible to oxidative stressors and are also highly dependent on the specific factors and proteins governing neuronal development, activity and survival. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of exposures to two different 50 Hz sinusoidal ELF-MFs intensities (0.1 and 1 mT) in maturing rat cortical neurons' major anti-oxidative enzymatic and non-enzymatic cellular protection systems, membrane peroxidative damage, as well as growth factor, and cytokine expression pattern. Briefly, our results showed that ELF-MFs affected positively the cell viability and concomitantly reduced the levels of apoptotic death in rat neuronal primary cultures, with no significant effects on the main anti-oxidative defences. Interestingly, linear regression analysis suggested a positive correlation between reduced glutathione (GSH) and ROS levels in 1 mT MF-exposed cells. On this basis, our hypothesis is that GSH could play an important role in the antioxidant defence towards the ELF-MF-induced redox challenge. Moreover, the GSH-based cellular response was achieved together with a brain-derived neurotrophic factor over-expression as well as with the interleukin 1beta-dependent regulation of pro-survival signaling pathways after ELF-MF exposure.

  10. Bridging global and local quantum quenches in conformal field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Xueda

    2016-01-01

    Entanglement evolutions after a global quantum quench and a local quantum quench in 1+1 dimensional conformal field theories (CFTs) show qualitatively different behaviors, and are studied within two different setups. In this work, we bridge global and local quantum quenches in (1+1)-d CFTs in the same setup, by studying the entanglement evolution from a specific inhomogeneous initial state. By utilizing conformal mappings, this inhomogeneous quantum quench is analytically solvable. It is found that the entanglement evolution shows a global quantum quench feature in the short time limit, and a local quantum quench feature in the long time limit. The same features are observed in single-point correlation functions of primary fields. We provide a clear physical picture for the underlying reason.

  11. Localization of Vector Field on Dynamical Domain Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Higuchi, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    In the previous works (arXiv:1202.5375 and 1402.1346), the dynamical domain wall, where the four dimensional FRW universe is embedded in the five imensional space-time, has been realized by using two scalar fields. In this paper, we consider the localization of vector field in three formulations. The first formulation was investigated in the previous paper (arXiv:1510.01099) for the $U(1)$ gauge field. In the second formulation, we investigate the Dvali-Shifman mechanism (hep-th/9612128), where the non-abelian gauge field is confined in the bulk but the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken on the domain wall. In the third formulation, we investigate the Kaluza-Klein modes coming from the five dimensional graviton. In the Randall-Sundrum model, the graviton was localized on the brane. We show that the $(5,\\mu)$ components $\\left(\\mu=0,1,2,3\\right)$ of the graviton are also localized on the domain wall and can be regarded as the vector field on the domain wall. There are, however, some corrections coming from...

  12. Local Magnetic Fields in Ferromagnetics Studied by Positive Muon Precession

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Positive muons are used to study local magnetic fields in different materials. A polarized muon beam is employed with energies of 30-50 MeV, and the muons are stopped in the target being studied. During its lifetime the muon will precess in the magnetic fields present, and after the decay of the muon the emitted positron is detected in plastic scintillators. The time and angle of the detected positron is used to calculate the magnetic field at the position of the muon in the sample. \\\\ \\\\ The detector system consists of plastic scintillators. Most of the measurements are made in an applied magnetic field. A dilution cryostat is used to produce temperatures down to well below $ 1 ^0 $ K. \\\\ \\\\ The present line of experiments concern mainly: \\item a)~~~~Local magnetism in the paramagnetic state of the Lave's phase type REAl$_{2} $ and RENi$_{2} $ systems ~~~where RE is a rare-earth ion. \\item b)~~~~Local magnetic fields and critical behaviour of the magnetism in Gd metal. \\item c)~~~~Investigation of flux exclu...

  13. Localization of vector field on dynamical domain wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Higuchi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the previous works (arXiv:1202.5375 and arXiv:1402.1346, the dynamical domain wall, where the four dimensional FRW universe is embedded in the five dimensional space–time, has been realized by using two scalar fields. In this paper, we consider the localization of vector field in three formulations. The first formulation was investigated in the previous paper (arXiv:1510.01099 for the U(1 gauge field. In the second formulation, we investigate the Dvali–Shifman mechanism (arXiv:hep-th/9612128, where the non-abelian gauge field is confined in the bulk but the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken on the domain wall. In the third formulation, we investigate the Kaluza–Klein modes coming from the five dimensional graviton. In the Randall–Sundrum model, the graviton was localized on the brane. We show that the (5,μ components (μ=0,1,2,3 of the graviton are also localized on the domain wall and can be regarded as the vector field on the domain wall. There are, however, some corrections coming from the bulk extra dimension if the domain wall universe is expanding.

  14. Spacetime Dependence of Local Temperature in Relativistic Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gransee, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The spacetime dependence of the inverse temperature four-vector $\\boldsymbol{\\beta}$ for certain states of the quantized Klein-Gordon field on (parts of) Minkowski spacetime is discussed. These states fulfill a recently proposed version of the Kubo-Martin-Schwinger (KMS) boundary value condition, the so-called "local KMS (LKMS) condition". It turns out that, depending on the mass parameter $m\\geq 0$, any such state can be extended either (i) to a LKMS state on some forward or backward lightcone, with $\\boldsymbol{\\beta}$ depending linearily on spacetime, or (ii) to a thermal equilibrium (KMS) state on all of Minkowski space with constant $\\boldsymbol{\\beta}$. This parallels previously known results for local thermal equilibrium (LTE) states of the quantized Klein-Gordon field. Furthermore, in the case of a massless field our results point to a discrepancy with some classic results in general approaches to (non-quantum) relativistic thermodynamics.

  15. Local Thermal Equilibrium States in Relativistic Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gransee, Michael

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that thermal equilibrium states in quantum statistical mechanics and quantum field theory can be described in a mathematically rigorous manner by means of the so-called Kubo-Martin-Schwinger (KMS) condition, which is based on certain analyticity and periodicity properties of correlation functions. On the other hand, the characterization of non-equilibrium states which only locally have thermal properties still constitutes a challenge in quantum field theory. We discuss a recent proposal for characterization of such states by a generalized KMS condition. The connection of this proposal to a proposal by D. Buchholz, I. Ojima and H.-J. Roos for characterizing local thermal equilibrium states in quantum field theory is discussed.

  16. Quantum entanglement of local operators in conformal field theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Masahiro; Numasawa, Tokiro; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2014-03-21

    We introduce a series of quantities which characterize a given local operator in any conformal field theory from the viewpoint of quantum entanglement. It is defined by the increased amount of (Rényi) entanglement entropy at late time for an excited state defined by acting the local operator on the vacuum. We consider a conformal field theory on an infinite space and take the subsystem in the definition of the entanglement entropy to be its half. We calculate these quantities for a free massless scalar field theory in two, four and six dimensions. We find that these results are interpreted in terms of quantum entanglement of a finite number of states, including Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states. They agree with a heuristic picture of propagations of entangled particles.

  17. Spectral distribution of local field potential responses to electrical stimulation of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yan T.; Halupka, Kerry; Kameneva, Tatiana; Cloherty, Shaun L.; Grayden, David B.; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Meffin, Hamish; Shivdasani, Mohit N.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP) have been shown to reflect neuronal activity occurring at varying cortical scales. As such, recordings of the LFP may offer a novel way to test the efficacy of neural prostheses and allow improvement of stimulation strategies via neural feedback. Here we use LFP measurements from visual cortex to characterize neural responses to electrical stimulation of the retina. We aim to show that the LFP is a viable signal that contains sufficient information to optimize the performance of sensory neural prostheses. Approach. Clinically relevant electrode arrays were implanted in the suprachoroidal space of one eye in four felines. LFPs were simultaneously recorded in response to stimulation of individual electrodes using penetrating microelectrode arrays from the visual cortex. The frequency response of each electrode was extracted using multi-taper spectral analysis and the uniqueness of the responses was determined via a linear decoder. Main results. We found that cortical LFPs are reliably modulated by electrical stimulation of the retina and that the responses are spatially localized. We further characterized the spectral distribution of responses, with maximum information being contained in the low and high gamma bands. Finally, we found that LFP responses are unique to a large range of stimulus parameters (∼40) with a maximum conveyable information rate of 6.1 bits. Significance. These results show that the LFP can be used to validate responses to electrical stimulation of the retina and we provide the first steps towards using these responses to provide more efficacious stimulation strategies.

  18. Receptive field self-organization in a model of the fine structure in v1 cortical columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücke, Jörg

    2009-10-01

    We study a dynamical model of processing and learning in the visual cortex, which reflects the anatomy of V1 cortical columns and properties of their neuronal receptive fields. Based on recent results on the fine-scale structure of columns in V1, we model the activity dynamics in subpopulations of excitatory neurons and their interaction with systems of inhibitory neurons. We find that a dynamical model based on these aspects of columnar anatomy can give rise to specific types of computations that result in self-organization of afferents to the column. For a given type of input, self-organization reliably extracts the basic input components represented by neuronal receptive fields. Self-organization is very noise tolerant and can robustly be applied to different types of input. To quantitatively analyze the system's component extraction capabilities, we use two standard benchmarks: the bars test and natural images. In the bars test, the system shows the highest noise robustness reported so far. If natural image patches are used as input, self-organization results in Gabor-like receptive fields. In quantitative comparison with in vivo measurements, we find that the obtained receptive fields capture statistical properties of V1 simple cells that algorithms such as independent component analysis or sparse coding do not reproduce.

  19. The Metagalactic Ionizing Field in the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Bland-Hawthorn, J

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the sources which are likely to dominate the ionizing field throughout the Local Group. In terms of the limiting flux to produce detectable H-alpha emission (4-10 x 10**3 phot/cm**2/s), the four dominant galaxies (M31, Galaxy, M33, LMC) have spheres of influence which occupy a small fraction (<10%) of the Local Volume. There are at least two possible sources of ionization whose influence could be far more pervasive: (i) a cosmic background of ionizing photons; (ii) a pervasive warm plasma throughout the Local Group. The COBE FIRAS sky temperature measurements permit a wide variety of plasmas with detectable ionizing fields. It has been suggested (Blitz et al. 1996; Spergel et al. 1996; Sembach et al. 1995, 1998) that a substantial fraction of high velocity clouds are external to the Galaxy but within the Local Group. Deep H-alpha detections are the crucial test of these claims and, indeed, provide a test bed for the putative Local Group corona.

  20. Mismatch responses in the awake rat: evidence from epidural recordings of auditory cortical fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Jung

    Full Text Available Detecting sudden environmental changes is crucial for the survival of humans and animals. In the human auditory system the mismatch negativity (MMN, a component of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs, reflects the violation of predictable stimulus regularities, established by the previous auditory sequence. Given the considerable potentiality of the MMN for clinical applications, establishing valid animal models that allow for detailed investigation of its neurophysiological mechanisms is important. Rodent studies, so far almost exclusively under anesthesia, have not provided decisive evidence whether an MMN analogue exists in rats. This may be due to several factors, including the effect of anesthesia. We therefore used epidural recordings in awake black hooded rats, from two auditory cortical areas in both hemispheres, and with bandpass filtered noise stimuli that were optimized in frequency and duration for eliciting MMN in rats. Using a classical oddball paradigm with frequency deviants, we detected mismatch responses at all four electrodes in primary and secondary auditory cortex, with morphological and functional properties similar to those known in humans, i.e., large amplitude biphasic differences that increased in amplitude with decreasing deviant probability. These mismatch responses significantly diminished in a control condition that removed the predictive context while controlling for presentation rate of the deviants. While our present study does not allow for disambiguating precisely the relative contribution of adaptation and prediction error processing to the observed mismatch responses, it demonstrates that MMN-like potentials can be obtained in awake and unrestrained rats.

  1. Far-field DOA estimation and near-field localization for multipath signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbir, Ahmet M.; Tuncer, T. Engin

    2014-09-01

    In direction finding and localization applications, multipath signals are important sources of error for parameter estimation. When the antenna array receives multipath reflections which are coherent with the far-field line-of-sight signal, estimating the far- and near-field components becomes an important problem. In this paper, a new method is proposed to estimate the direction-of-arrival (DOA) of the far-field source and to localize its near-field multipaths. Far-field source DOA is estimated using calibration of the antenna array. A near-to-far transformation is proposed for the estimation of the near-field source DOA angles. In order to estimate the near-field range parameters, a compressive sensing approach is presented where a dictionary with near-field sources with different ranges is employed. As a result, the proposed method estimates the far-field and near-field source DOAs as well as the range and the signal amplitudes of the near-field sources. This method is evaluated using close-to-real world data generated by a numerical electromagnetic tool, where the array and transmitter are placed in an irregular terrain and array data are generated using full 3-D propagation model. It is shown that unknown source parameters can be estimated effectively showing the potential of the proposed approach in applications involving high-frequency direction finding and indoor localization.

  2. Exact time-localized solutions in Vacuum String Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bonora, L; Santos, R J S; Tolla, D D

    2004-01-01

    We address the problem of finding star algebra projectors that exhibit localized time profiles. We use the double Wick rotation method, starting from an Euclidean (unconventional) lump solution, which is characterized by the Neumann matrix being the conventional one for the continuous spectrum, while the inverse of the conventional one for the discrete spectrum. This is still a solution of the projector equation and we show that, after inverse Wick-rotation, its time profile has the desired localized time dependence. We study it in detail in the low energy regime (field theory limit) and in the extreme high energy regime (tensionless limit) and show its similarities with the rolling tachyon solution.

  3. Systematic variation of population receptive field properties across cortical depth in human visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fracasso, A.; Petridou, Natalia; Dumoulin, Serge O

    2016-01-01

    Receptive fields (RFs) in visual cortex are organized in antagonistic, center-surround, configurations. RF properties change systematically across eccentricity and between visual field maps. However, it is unknown how center-surround configurations are organized in human visual cortex across lamina.

  4. Lateralized occipital degeneration in posterior cortical atrophy predicts visual field deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S Millington

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Detailed brain imaging shows that the asymmetric visual field deficits in patients with PCA reflect the pattern of degeneration of both white and gray matter in the occipital lobe. Understanding the nature of both visual field deficits and the neurodegenerative brain changes in PCA may improve diagnosis and understanding of this disease.

  5. Fate of Extended States and Localization Transition at Weak Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun

    1997-03-01

    The reconciliation between the nonexistence of extended states in two dimensions in zero magnetic field, and the existence of critical energies in the high field limit, first addressed qualitatively (D. E. Khmelnitskii, Phys. Lett. A 106), 182 (1984); R. B. Laughlin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 2304 (1984). a decade ago, has reemerged as a subject of considerable interest and debate, following experimental investigations in the two dimensional electron gas at low fields. We have addressed the problem on two fronts. For strong magnetic fields, where Landau level mixing effects are weak, we have developed a systematic analytic expansion in powers of 1\\over B. (F. D. M. Haldane and Kun Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), to appear. We find the dominant level repulsion effect (of order 1\\over B^2), lowers the energies of typical states in a Landau band. The critical energies, however, are not affected at this order. In contrast, we find that, the extended state energies levitates to order 1\\over B^3, thus reconciling levitation of extended states with level repulsion due to Landau level mixing. In the regime of weak magnetic field and strong Landau level mixing, where the perturbative approach is not applicable, we have performed a numerical study on lattice models, (Kun Yang and R. N. Bhatt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 1316 (1996). which provides evidence for this levitation at weak magnetic field. Furthermore, we obtain a localization transition to an insulating phase at weak field, and a finite size scaling analysis shows that the localization length diverges at this transition with an exponent that is the same as that of the plateau transitions in the strong field regime, ν≈ 2.3. Relations between our theoretical results and experimental findings will be discussed.

  6. Fermion localization and resonances on two-field thick branes

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, C A S; Gomes, A R; Casana, R

    2009-01-01

    We consider $(4,1)$-dimensional branes constructed with two scalar fields $\\phi$ and $\\chi$ coupled to a Dirac spinor field by means of a general Yukawa coupling. The equation of motion for the coefficients of the chiral decomposition of the spinor in curved spacetime leads to a Sch\\"odinger-like equation whose solutions allow to obtain the masses of the fermionic modes. The simplest Yukawa coupling $\\bar\\Psi\\phi\\chi\\Psi$ is considered for the Bloch brane model and fermion localization is studied. We found resonances for both chiralities and related their appearance to branes with internal structure.

  7. Fermion localization and resonances on two-field thick branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, C. A. S.; Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M., Jr.; Gomes, A. R.

    2009-06-01

    We consider (4, 1)-dimensional branes constructed with two scalar fields ϕ and χ coupled to a Dirac spinor field by means of a general Yukawa coupling. The equation of motion for the coefficients of the chiral decomposition of the spinor in curved spacetime leads to a Schrödinger-like equation whose solutions allow to obtain the masses of the fermionic modes. The simplest Yukawa coupling Ψ¯ϕχΨ is considered for the Bloch brane model and fermion localization is studied. We found resonances for both chiralities and related their appearance to branes with internal structure.

  8. A course on quantum field theory and local observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Frankfurt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    1997-03-01

    A monograph on Quantum Field Theory and Local Observables is presented, aiming to unify two presently largely disconnected branches of QFT, as follows: the standard (canonical, functional) approach which is mainly perturbative in the sense of an infinitesimal `deformation` of free fields; nonperturbative constructions of low-dimensional models as the form factor-bootstrap approach (which for the time being is limited to factorable models in d=1+1 spacetime dimensions) and the non-Lagrangian constructions of conformal chiral QFT`s

  9. Influence of head models on neuromagnetic fields and inverse source localizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schimpf Paul H

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The magnetoencephalograms (MEGs are mainly due to the source currents. However, there is a significant contribution to MEGs from the volume currents. The structure of the anatomical surfaces, e.g., gray and white matter, could severely influence the flow of volume currents in a head model. This, in turn, will also influence the MEGs and the inverse source localizations. This was examined in detail with three different human head models. Methods Three finite element head models constructed from segmented MR images of an adult male subject were used for this study. These models were: (1 Model 1: full model with eleven tissues that included detailed structure of the scalp, hard and soft skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter and other prominent tissues, (2 the Model 2 was derived from the Model 1 in which the conductivity of gray matter was set equal to the white matter, i.e., a ten tissuetype model, (3 the Model 3 consisted of scalp, hard skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter, i.e., a five tissue-type model. The lead fields and MEGs due to dipolar sources in the motor cortex were computed for all three models. The dipolar sources were oriented normal to the cortical surface and had a dipole moment of 100 μA meter. The inverse source localizations were performed with an exhaustive search pattern in the motor cortex area. A set of 100 trial inverse runs was made covering the 3 cm cube motor cortex area in a random fashion. The Model 1 was used as a reference model. Results The reference model (Model 1, as expected, performed best in localizing the sources in the motor cortex area. The Model 3 performed the worst. The mean source localization errors (MLEs of the Model 3 were larger than the Model 1 or 2. The contour plots of the magnetic fields on top of the head were also different for all three models. The magnetic fields due to source currents were larger in magnitude as compared to the magnetic fields of volume currents

  10. Alternative Splicing of AMPA subunits in Prefrontal Cortical Fields of Cynomolgus Monkeys following Chronic Ethanol Self-Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen eAcosta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional impairment of the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex underlies deficits in executive control that characterize addictive disorders, including alcohol addiction. Previous studies indicate that alcohol alters glutamate neurotransmission and one substrate of these effects may be through the reconfiguration of the subunits constituting ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR complexes. Glutamatergic transmission is integral to cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical communication and alcohol-induced changes in the abundance of the receptor subunits and/or their splice variants may result in critical functional impairments of prefrontal cortex in alcohol dependence. To this end, the effects of chronic ethanol self-administration on glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA (GRIA subunit variant and kainate (GRIK subunit mRNA expression were studied in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC of male cynomolgus monkeys. In DLPFC, total AMPA splice variant expression and total kainate receptor subunit expression were significantly decreased in alcohol drinking monkeys. Expression levels of GRIA3 flip and flop and GRIA4 flop mRNAs in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations averaged over the six months prior to necropsy. In OFC, AMPA subunit splice variant expression was reduced in the alcohol treated group. GRIA2 flop mRNA levels in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations averaged over the six months prior to necropsy. Results from these studies provide further evidence of transcriptional regulation of iGluR subunits in the primate brain following chronic alcohol self-administration. Additional studies examining the cellular localization of such effects in the framework of primate prefrontal cortical circuitry are warranted.

  11. Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury by Localized Application of Sub-atmospheric Pressure to the Site of Cortical Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Resuscitation (MTR – the controlled application of vacuum) to the cerebral cortex following a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury reduces brain... edema and the extent of injury, modulates metabolites in injured neuronal tissues, preserves neuronal tissue, and improves functional recovery. The...hyperintense region ipsilateral to the injured site. There was a large area of T2 hyperintensity ( edema ) sometimes associated with hypointensity

  12. Complexity of OM factorizations of polynomials over local fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bauch, Jens-Dietrich; Stainsby, Hayden D

    2012-01-01

    Let $k$ be a locally compact complete field with respect to a discrete valuation $v$. Let $\\oo$ be the valuation ring, $\\m$ the maximal ideal and $F(x)\\in\\oo[x]$ a monic separable polynomial of degree $n$. Let $\\delta=v(\\dsc(F))$. The Montes algorithm computes an OM factorization of $F$. The single-factor lifting algorithm derives from this data a factorization of $F \\md{\\m^\

  13. The local dayside reconnection rate for oblique interplanetary magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Komar, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of local properties of magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause for various interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations in global magnetospheric simulations. This has heretofore not been practical because it is difficult to locate where reconnection occurs for oblique IMF, but new techniques make this possible. The approach is to identify magnetic separators, the curves separating four regions of differing magnetic topology, which map the reconnection X-line. The electric field parallel to the X-line is the local reconnection rate. We compare results to a simple model of local two-dimensional asymmetric reconnection. To do so, we find the plasma parameters that locally drive reconnection in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere in planes perpendicular to the X-line at a large number of points along the X-line. The global magnetohydrodynamic simulations are from the three-dimensional Block-Adaptive, Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a uniform resisti...

  14. Vocal sequences suppress spiking in the bat auditory cortex while evoking concomitant steady-state local field potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechavarría, Julio C.; Beetz, M. Jerome; Macias, Silvio; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms by which the mammalian brain copes with information from natural vocalization streams remain poorly understood. This article shows that in highly vocal animals, such as the bat species Carollia perspicillata, the spike activity of auditory cortex neurons does not track the temporal information flow enclosed in fast time-varying vocalization streams emitted by conspecifics. For example, leading syllables of so-called distress sequences (produced by bats subjected to duress) suppress cortical spiking to lagging syllables. Local fields potentials (LFPs) recorded simultaneously to cortical spiking evoked by distress sequences carry multiplexed information, with response suppression occurring in low frequency LFPs (i.e. 2–15 Hz) and steady-state LFPs occurring at frequencies that match the rate of energy fluctuations in the incoming sound streams (i.e. >50 Hz). Such steady-state LFPs could reflect underlying synaptic activity that does not necessarily lead to cortical spiking in response to natural fast time-varying vocal sequences.

  15. New localization mechanism and Hodge duality for q -form field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chun-E.; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Guo, Heng; Zhang, Sheng-Li

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of localization and the Hodge duality for a q -form field on a p -brane with codimension one. By a general Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposition without gauge fixing, we obtain two Schrödinger-like equations for two types of KK modes of the bulk q -form field, which determine the localization and mass spectra of these KK modes. It is found that there are two types of zero modes (the 0-level modes): a q -form zero mode and a (q -1 )-form one, which cannot be localized on the brane at the same time. For the n -level KK modes, there are two interacting KK modes, a massive q -form KK mode and a massless (q -1 )-form one. By analyzing gauge invariance of the effective action and choosing a gauge condition, the n -level massive q -form KK mode decouples from the n -level massless (q -1 )-form one. It is also found that the Hodge duality in the bulk naturally becomes two dualities on the brane. The first one is the Hodge duality between a q -form zero mode and a (p -q -1 )-form one, or between a (q -1 )-form zero mode and a (p -q )-form one. The second duality is between two group KK modes: one is an n -level massive q -form KK mode with mass mn and an n -level massless (q -1 )-form mode; another is an n -level (p -q )-form one with the same mass mn and an n -level massless (p -q -1 )-form mode. Because of the dualities, the effective field theories on the brane for the KK modes of the two dual bulk form fields are physically equivalent.

  16. Modulation of cortical-subcortical networks in Parkinson’s disease by applied field effects

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher William Hess

    2013-01-01

    Studies suggest that endogenous field effects may play a role in neuronal oscillations and communication. Non-invasive transcranial electrical stimulation with low-intensity currents can also have direct effects on the underlying cortex as well as distant network effects. While Parkinson’s disease (PD) is amenable to invasive neuromodulation in the basal ganglia by deep brain stimulation (DBS), techniques of non-invasive neuromodulation like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and ...

  17. Exponentially Localized Wannier Functions in Periodic Zero Flux Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    De Nittis, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    n this work, we investigate conditions which ensure the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis for a given periodic hamiltonian. We extend previous results [Pan07, Kuc09] to include periodic zero flux magnetic fields. The new notion of magnetic symmetry plays a crucial r\\^ole; to a large class of symmetries for a non-magnetic system, one can associate "magnetic" symmetries of the related magnetic system. Observing that the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis is equivalent to the triviality of the so-called Bloch bundle, a rank m hermitian vector bundle over the Brillouin zone, we prove that magnetic time-reversal symmetry is sufficient to ensure the triviality of the Bloch bundle in spatial dimension d = 1, 2, 3. For d = 4, an exponentially localized Wannier basis exists provided that the trace per unit volume of a suitable function of the Fermi projection vanishes. For d > 4 and d \\leq 2m (stable rank regime) only the exponential localization of a subset of Wannier functions ...

  18. Vortex configuration in the presence of local magnetic field and locally applied stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissberg, Shai; Kremen, Anna; Shperber, Yishai; Kalisky, Beena, E-mail: beena@biu.ac.il

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We discuss different ways to determine vortex configuration using a scanning SQUID. • We determined the vortex configuration by approaching the sample during cooling. • We observed an accumulation of vortices when contact was made with the sample. • We show how we can manipulate local vortex configuration using contact. - Abstract: Vortex configuration is determined by the repulsive interaction, which becomes dominant with increasing vortex density, by the pinning potential, and by other considerations such as the local magnetic fields, currents flowing in the sample, or as we showed recently, by local stress applied on the sample. In this work we describe different ways to control vortex configuration using scanning SQUID microscopy.

  19. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  20. Perceptual suppression revealed by adaptive multi-scale entropy analysis of local field potential in monkey visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Meng; Liang, Hualou

    2013-04-01

    Generalized flash suppression (GFS), in which a salient visual stimulus can be rendered invisible despite continuous retinal input, provides a rare opportunity to directly study the neural mechanism of visual perception. Previous work based on linear methods, such as spectral analysis, on local field potential (LFP) during GFS has shown that the LFP power at distinctive frequency bands are differentially modulated by perceptual suppression. Yet, the linear method alone may be insufficient for the full assessment of neural dynamic due to the fundamentally nonlinear nature of neural signals. In this study, we set forth to analyze the LFP data collected from multiple visual areas in V1, V2 and V4 of macaque monkeys while performing the GFS task using a nonlinear method - adaptive multi-scale entropy (AME) - to reveal the neural dynamic of perceptual suppression. In addition, we propose a new cross-entropy measure at multiple scales, namely adaptive multi-scale cross-entropy (AMCE), to assess the nonlinear functional connectivity between two cortical areas. We show that: (1) multi-scale entropy exhibits percept-related changes in all three areas, with higher entropy observed during perceptual suppression; (2) the magnitude of the perception-related entropy changes increases systematically over successive hierarchical stages (i.e. from lower areas V1 to V2, up to higher area V4); and (3) cross-entropy between any two cortical areas reveals higher degree of asynchrony or dissimilarity during perceptual suppression, indicating a decreased functional connectivity between cortical areas. These results, taken together, suggest that perceptual suppression is related to a reduced functional connectivity and increased uncertainty of neural responses, and the modulation of perceptual suppression is more effective at higher visual cortical areas. AME is demonstrated to be a useful technique in revealing the underlying dynamic of nonlinear/nonstationary neural signal.

  1. Investigation of nanogap localized field enhancement in gold plasmonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debu, Desalegn Tadesse; Bauman, Stephen; Saylor, Cameron; Novak, Eric; French, David; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Nanogaps between plasmonic structures allow confining the localized electric field with moreenhancements. Based on previously implemented two-step lithography process, we introducea nano-masking technique to fabricate nanostructrues and nanogaps for various geometrical patterns. This new method can fabricate gold nanostructures as well as nanogaps that are less than 10nm, below the limiting scale of lithography. Simulation from finite element method (FEM) shows strong gap dependence of optical properties and peak enhancement of these devices. The fabricated plasmonic nanostructure provides wide range of potential future application including highly sensitive optical antenna, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and biosensing.

  2. Local field enhanced second-harmonic response of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek

    Organic CNHP4 nanofibers showing a strong second-harmonic (SH) response have been successfully implemented as active components in a metal-organic hybrid system. Using nondestructive roll-on transfer technique nanofibers were transferred from the growing mica substrates onto electron......-beam lithography-defined regular arrays of gold, titanium and silicon oxide. As shown in a femtosecond laser scanning microscopy study the fiber-substrate interplay leads (only) on gold to a significantly enhanced SH signal. We suggest that this effect is driven by the local field enhancement i.e. the excitation...

  3. Basic Results of Gabor Frame on Local Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dengfeng LI; Huikun JIANG

    2007-01-01

    Basic facts for Gabor frame { Eu(m)bTu(n)ag}m, n∈ P on local field are investigated. Accurately, that the canonical dual of frame {Eu(m)bTu(n)ag}m,n∈P also has the Gabor structure is showed; that the product ab decides whether it is possible for {Eu(m)bTu(n)ag}m,n∈P to be a frame for L2(K) is discussed; some necessary conditions and two sufficient conditions of Gabor frame for L2(K) are established. An example is finally given.

  4. The human cerebral cortex is neither one nor many: Neuronal distribution reveals two quantitatively different zones in the grey matter, three in the white matter, and explains local variations in cortical folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro F. M. Ribeiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The human prefrontal cortex has been considered different in several aspects and relatively enlarged compared to the rest of the cortical areas. Here we determine whether the white and gray matter of the prefrontal portion of the human cerebral cortex have similar or different cellular compositions relative to the rest of the cortical regions by applying the Isotropic Fractionator to analyze the distribution of neurons along the entire anteroposterior axis of the cortex, and its relationship with the degree of gyrification, number of neurons under the cortical surface, and other parameters. The prefrontal region shares with the remainder of the cerebral cortex (except for occipital cortex the same relationship between cortical volume and number of neurons. In contrast, both occipital and prefrontal areas vary from other cortical areas in their connectivity through the white matter, with a systematic reduction of cortical connectivity through the white matter and an increase of the mean axon caliber along the anteroposterior axis. These two parameters explain local differences in the distribution of neurons underneath the cortical surface. We also show that local variations in cortical folding are neither a function of local numbers of neurons nor of cortical thickness, but correlate with properties of the white matter, and are best explained by the folding of the white matter surface. Our results suggest that the human cerebral cortex is divided in two zones (occipital and non-occipital that differ in how neurons distributed across their grey matter volume and in three zones (prefrontal, occipital, and non-occipital that differ in how neurons are connected through the white matter. Thus, the human prefrontal cortex has the largest fraction of neuronal connectivity through the white matter and the smallest average axonal caliber in the white matter within the cortex, although its neuronal composition fits the pattern found for other, non

  5. Field-programmable gate array implementation of a probabilistic neural network for motor cortical decoding in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fan; Liu, Jun; Yu, Yi; Tian, Xiang; Liu, Hui; Hao, Yaoyao; Zhang, Shaomin; Chen, Weidong; Dai, Jianhua; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2010-01-15

    A practical brain-machine interface (BMI) requires real-time decoding algorithms to be realised in a portable device rather than a personal computer. In this article, a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of a probabilistic neural network (PNN) is proposed and developed to decode motor cortical ensemble recordings in rats performing a lever-pressing task for water rewards. A chronic 16-channel microelectrode array was implanted into the primary motor cortex of the rat to record neural activity, and the pressure signal of the lever were recorded simultaneously. To decode the pressure value from neural activity, both Matlab-based and FPGA-based mapping algorithms using a PNN were implemented and evaluated. In the FPGA architecture, training data of the network were stored in random access memory (RAM) blocks and multiply-add operations were realised by on-chip DSP48E slices. In the approximation of the activation function, a Taylor series and a look-up table (LUT) are used to achieve an accurate approximation. The results of FPGA implementation are as accurate as the realisation of Matlab, but the running speed is 37.9 times faster. This novel and feasible method indicates that the performance of current FPGAs is competent for portable BMI applications.

  6. Speed hysteresis and noise shaping of traveling fronts in neural fields: role of local circuitry and nonlocal connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Cristiano; Mattia, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Neural field models are powerful tools to investigate the richness of spatiotemporal activity patterns like waves and bumps, emerging from the cerebral cortex. Understanding how spontaneous and evoked activity is related to the structure of underlying networks is of central interest to unfold how information is processed by these systems. Here we focus on the interplay between local properties like input-output gain function and recurrent synaptic self-excitation of cortical modules, and nonlocal intermodular synaptic couplings yielding to define a multiscale neural field. In this framework, we work out analytic expressions for the wave speed and the stochastic diffusion of propagating fronts uncovering the existence of an optimal balance between local and nonlocal connectivity which minimizes the fluctuations of the activation front propagation. Incorporating an activity-dependent adaptation of local excitability further highlights the independent role that local and nonlocal connectivity play in modulating the speed of propagation of the activation and silencing wavefronts, respectively. Inhomogeneities in space of local excitability give raise to a novel hysteresis phenomenon such that the speed of waves traveling in opposite directions display different velocities in the same location. Taken together these results provide insights on the multiscale organization of brain slow-waves measured during deep sleep and anesthesia.

  7. Speed hysteresis and noise shaping of traveling fronts in neural fields: role of local circuitry and nonlocal connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Cristiano; Mattia, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Neural field models are powerful tools to investigate the richness of spatiotemporal activity patterns like waves and bumps, emerging from the cerebral cortex. Understanding how spontaneous and evoked activity is related to the structure of underlying networks is of central interest to unfold how information is processed by these systems. Here we focus on the interplay between local properties like input-output gain function and recurrent synaptic self-excitation of cortical modules, and nonlocal intermodular synaptic couplings yielding to define a multiscale neural field. In this framework, we work out analytic expressions for the wave speed and the stochastic diffusion of propagating fronts uncovering the existence of an optimal balance between local and nonlocal connectivity which minimizes the fluctuations of the activation front propagation. Incorporating an activity-dependent adaptation of local excitability further highlights the independent role that local and nonlocal connectivity play in modulating the speed of propagation of the activation and silencing wavefronts, respectively. Inhomogeneities in space of local excitability give raise to a novel hysteresis phenomenon such that the speed of waves traveling in opposite directions display different velocities in the same location. Taken together these results provide insights on the multiscale organization of brain slow-waves measured during deep sleep and anesthesia. PMID:28045036

  8. Localized cortical thickening of the femoral diaphysis captured on an X-ray before alendronate therapy in two cases of atypical femoral fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka, Yoichi [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Shibukawa General Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shibukawa, Gunma (Japan); Takechi, Rumi [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gunma Cardiovascular Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Iizuka, Haku; Takagishi, Kenji [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Omodaka, Takuya [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gunma Central Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    We herein report two cases of atypical femoral fracture (AFF). X-ray examinations at the first visit of these two female patients showed a complete fracture of the femoral diaphysis diagnosed as an atypical femoral fracture (AFF). X-rays of these two cases also showed localized cortical thickening of the femoral diaphysis. Both patients had been taking alendronate for more than 3 years because of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We assumed that both of the fractures were associated with the long-term use of alendronate. However, we retrospectively identified localized cortical thickening of the femoral diaphysis on an X-ray taken before the alendronate therapy in both of these cases. Therefore, we suspected a pathogenesis of AFFs in which preexisting stress or an insufficient fracture unrelated to bisphosphonate (BP) therapy and subsequent suppression of bone turnover due to BP administration led to the occurrence of an AFF. The patient underwent surgery using intramedullary nails in both of these cases, followed by the administration of teriparatide, and they were able to walk without any support at the final follow-up examination. (orig.)

  9. Near-Field Second-Harmonic Generation Induced by Local Field Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhelier, Alexandre; Beversluis, M.; Hartschuh, Achim; Novotny, Lukas

    2003-01-01

    The field near a sharp metal tip can be strongly enhanced if irradiated with an optical field polarized along the tip axis. We demonstrate that the enhanced field gives rise to local second-harmonic (SH) generation at the tip surface thereby creating a highly confined photon source. A theoretical model for the excitation and emission of SH radiation at the tip is developed and it is found that this source can be represented by a single on-axis oscillating dipole. The model is experimentally v...

  10. Matched field localization based on CS-MUSIC algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuangle; Tang, Ruichun; Peng, Linhui; Ji, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    The problem caused by shortness or excessiveness of snapshots and by coherent sources in underwater acoustic positioning is considered. A matched field localization algorithm based on CS-MUSIC (Compressive Sensing Multiple Signal Classification) is proposed based on the sparse mathematical model of the underwater positioning. The signal matrix is calculated through the SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) of the observation matrix. The observation matrix in the sparse mathematical model is replaced by the signal matrix, and a new concise sparse mathematical model is obtained, which means not only the scale of the localization problem but also the noise level is reduced; then the new sparse mathematical model is solved by the CS-MUSIC algorithm which is a combination of CS (Compressive Sensing) method and MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) method. The algorithm proposed in this paper can overcome effectively the difficulties caused by correlated sources and shortness of snapshots, and it can also reduce the time complexity and noise level of the localization problem by using the SVD of the observation matrix when the number of snapshots is large, which will be proved in this paper.

  11. Local Field Distribution Function and High Order Field Moments for metal-dielectric composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genov, Dentcho A.; Sarychev, Andrey K.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.

    2001-11-01

    In a span of two decades the physics of nonlinear optics saw vast improvement in our understanding of optical properties for various inhomogeneous mediums. One such medium is the metal-dielectric composite, where the metal inclusions have a surface coverage fraction of p, while the rest (1-p) is assumed to represent the dielectric host. The computations carried out by using different theoretical models and the experimental data show existence of giant local electric and magnetic field fluctuations. In this presentation we will introduce a new developed 2D model that determines exactly the Local Field Distribution Function (LFDF) and all other relevant parameters of the film. The LFDF for small filling factors will be shown to transform from lognormal distribution into a single-dipole distribution function. We also will confirm the predictions of the scaling theory for the high field moments, which have a power law dependence on the loss factor.

  12. The Convergence Depth of the Local Peculiar Velocity Field

    CERN Document Server

    Dale, D A; Dale, Daniel A.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    1999-01-01

    We have obtained Tully-Fisher (TF) measurements for some 3000 late-type galaxies in the field and in 76 clusters distributed throughout the sky between 10 and 200\\h Mpc. The cluster data are applied to the construction of an I band TF template, resulting in a relation with a scatter of 0.35 magnitudes and a zero-point accurate to 0.02 magnitudes. Peculiar motions are computed by referral to the template relation, and the distribution of line-of-sight cluster peculiar motions is presented. The dipole of the reflex motion of the Local Group of galaxies with respect to galaxies with measured peculiar velocity converges to the CMB dipole within less than 6000 km/s. The progression of this convergence is well illustrated when the reflex motion is referred to a well-distributed sample of field galaxies, and it is maintained when the reflex motion is referred to the reference frame constituted by the distant clusters in our sample. The field and cluster samples exhibit bulk motion amplitudes of order 200 km/s or sma...

  13. Generation of spatiotemporally correlated spike trains and local field potentials using a multivariate autoregressive process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutnisky, Diego A; Josić, Kresimir

    2010-05-01

    Experimental advances allowing for the simultaneous recording of activity at multiple sites have significantly increased our understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns in neural activity. The impact of such patterns on neural coding is a fundamental question in neuroscience. The simulation of spike trains with predetermined activity patterns is therefore an important ingredient in the study of potential neural codes. Such artificially generated spike trains could also be used to manipulate cortical neurons in vitro and in vivo. Here, we propose a method to generate spike trains with given mean firing rates and cross-correlations. To capture this statistical structure we generate a point process by thresholding a stochastic process that is continuous in space and discrete in time. This stochastic process is obtained by filtering Gaussian noise through a multivariate autoregressive (AR) model. The parameters of the AR model are obtained by a nonlinear transformation of the point-process correlations to the continuous-process correlations. The proposed method is very efficient and allows for the simulation of large neural populations. It can be optimized to the structure of spatiotemporal correlations and generalized to nonstationary processes and spatiotemporal patterns of local field potentials and spike trains.

  14. Probing N=2 superconformal field theories with localization

    CERN Document Server

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Torrents, Genis

    2015-01-01

    We use supersymmetric localization to study probes of four dimensional Lagrangian N=2 superconformal field theories. We first derive a unique equation for the eigenvalue density of these theories. We observe that these theories have a Wigner eigenvalue density precisely when they satisfy a necessary condition for having a holographic dual with a sensible higher-derivative expansion. We then compute in the saddle-point approximation the vacuum expectation value of 1/2-BPS circular Wilson loops, and the two-point functions of these Wilson loops with the Lagrangian density and with the stress-energy tensor. This last computation also provides the corresponding Bremsstrahlung functions and entanglement entropies. As expected, whenever a finite fraction of the matter is in the fundamental representation, the results are drastically different from those of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  15. The local field potential reflects surplus spike synchrony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denker, Michael; Roux, Sébastien; Lindén, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    While oscillations of the local field potential (LFP) are commonly attributed to the synchronization of neuronal firing rate on the same time scale, their relationship to coincident spiking in the millisecond range is unknown. Here, we present experimental evidence to reconcile the notions...... of synchrony at the level of spiking and at the mesoscopic scale. We demonstrate that only in time intervals of significant spike synchrony that cannot be explained on the basis of firing rates, coincident spikes are better phase locked to the LFP than predicted by the locking of the individual spikes....... This effect is enhanced in periods of large LFP amplitudes. A quantitative model explains the LFP dynamics by the orchestrated spiking activity in neuronal groups that contribute the observed surplus synchrony. From the correlation analysis, we infer that neurons participate in different constellations...

  16. Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism in locally covariant field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rejzner, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    The present work contains a complete formulation of the Batalin-Vilkovisky (BV) formalism in the framework of locally covariant field theory. In the first part of the thesis the classical theory is investigated with a particular focus on the infinite dimensional character of the underlying structures. It is shown that the use of infinite dimensional differential geometry allows for a conceptually clear and elegant formulation. The construction of the BV complex is performed in a fully covariant way and we also generalize the BV framework to a more abstract level, using functors and natural transformations. In this setting we construct the BV complex for classical gravity. This allows us to give a homological interpretation to the notion of diffeomorphism invariant physical quantities in general relativity. The second part of the thesis concerns the quantum theory. We provide a framework for the BV quantization that doesn't rely on the path integral formalism, but is completely formulated within perturbative a...

  17. Probing N=2 superconformal field theories with localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiol, Bartomeu [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Garolera, Blai [Escuela de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica,11501-2060 San José (Costa Rica); Torrents, Genís [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-01-27

    We use supersymmetric localization to study probes of four dimensional Lagrangian N=2 superconformal field theories. We first derive a unique equation for the eigenvalue density of these theories. We observe that these theories have a Wigner eigenvalue density precisely when they satisfy a necessary condition for having a holographic dual with a sensible higher-derivative expansion. We then compute in the saddle-point approximation the vacuum expectation value of 1/2-BPS circular Wilson loops, and the two-point functions of these Wilson loops with the Lagrangian density and with the stress-energy tensor. This last computation also provides the corresponding Bremsstrahlung functions and entanglement entropies. As expected, whenever a finite fraction of the matter is in the fundamental representation, the results are drastically different from those of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  18. Localization of gravity on a thick braneworld without scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Mora-Luna, Refugio Rigel

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present a simple thick braneworld model that is generated by an intriguing interplay between a 5D cosmological constant with a de Sitter metric induced in the 3-brane without the inclusion of scalar fields. We show that 4D gravity is localized on this brane, provide analytic expressions for the massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) fluctuation modes and also show that the spectrum of metric excitations displays a mass gap. We finally present the corrections to Newton's law due to these massive modes. This model has no naked singularities along the fifth dimension despite the existence of a mass gap in the graviton spectrum as it happens in thick branes with 4D Poincare symmetry, providing a simple model with very good features: the curvature is completely smooth along the fifth dimension, it localizes 4D gravity and the spectrum of gravity fluctuations presents a mass gap, a fact that rules out the existence of phenomenologically dangerous ultralight KK excitations in the model.

  19. Field trips local and abroad: What every field trip leader needs to know about insurance coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanelly, T.

    2016-12-01

    Leading field trips locally or internationally is an essential part of being a geoscience educator. Being a field trip guide and coordinator often means that you will be responsible for minors (under the age of 21), transportation, and touring (e.g. hiking, exploring) in unique and sometimes rugged environments. Professors, and alike, at universities and colleges may not have adequate insurance covered should a student(s) render maladies, or worse death, under your advisement. This poster outlines questions that could be presented to your university or college's lawyer to ensure field trip guides are properly covered for liability in most situations. Additionally, it will provide explanation for common legal terms often used when explaining insurance coverage relating to university or college employment. Lastly, this poster will provide suggestions on how to pursue professional coverage polices that can protect you both in the field and in the classroom/laboratory.

  20. [Cortical blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokron, S

    2014-02-01

    Cortical blindness refers to a visual loss induced by a bilateral occipital lesion. The very strong cooperation between psychophysics, cognitive psychology, neurophysiology and neuropsychology these latter twenty years as well as recent progress in cerebral imagery have led to a better understanding of neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness. It thus becomes possible now to propose an earlier diagnosis of cortical blindness as well as new perspectives for rehabilitation in children as well as in adults. On the other hand, studying complex neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness is a way to infer normal functioning of the visual system.

  1. Non-local correlations within dynamical mean field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gang

    2009-03-15

    The contributions from the non-local fluctuations to the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) were studied using the recently proposed dual fermion approach. Straight forward cluster extensions of DMFT need the solution of a small cluster, where all the short-range correlations are fully taken into account. All the correlations beyond the cluster scope are treated in the mean-field level. In the dual fermion method, only a single impurity problem needs to be solved. Both the short and long-range correlations could be considered on equal footing in this method. The weak-coupling nature of the dual fermion ensures the validity of the finite order diagram expansion. The one and two particle Green's functions calculated from the dual fermion approach agree well with the Quantum Monte Carlo solutions, and the computation time is considerably less than with the latter method. The access of the long-range order allows us to investigate the collective behavior of the electron system, e.g. spin wave excitations. (orig.)

  2. 4D Near-Field Source Localization Using Cumulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Feng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new cumulant-based algorithm to jointly estimate four-dimensional (4D source parameters of multiple near-field narrowband sources. Firstly, this approach proposes a new cross-array, and constructs five high-dimensional Toeplitz matrices using the fourth-order cumulants of some properly chosen sensor outputs; secondly, it forms a parallel factor (PARAFAC model in the cumulant domain using these matrices, and analyzes the unique low-rank decomposition of this model; thirdly, it jointly estimates the frequency, two-dimensional (2D directions-of-arrival (DOAs, and range of each near-field source from the matrices via the low-rank three-way array (TWA decomposition. In comparison with some available methods, the proposed algorithm, which efficiently makes use of the array aperture, can localize sources using sensors. In addition, it requires neither pairing parameters nor multidimensional search. Simulation results are presented to validate the performance of the proposed method.

  3. 4D Near-Field Source Localization Using Cumulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junying Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new cumulant-based algorithm to jointly estimate four-dimensional (4D source parameters of multiple near-field narrowband sources. Firstly, this approach proposes a new cross-array, and constructs five high-dimensional Toeplitz matrices using the fourth-order cumulants of some properly chosen sensor outputs; secondly, it forms a parallel factor (PARAFAC model in the cumulant domain using these matrices, and analyzes the unique low-rank decomposition of this model; thirdly, it jointly estimates the frequency, two-dimensional (2D directions-of-arrival (DOAs, and range of each near-field source from the matrices via the low-rank three-way array (TWA decomposition. In comparison with some available methods, the proposed algorithm, which efficiently makes use of the array aperture, can localize N−3 sources using N sensors. In addition, it requires neither pairing parameters nor multidimensional search. Simulation results are presented to validate the performance of the proposed method.

  4. Local field in LiD polarized target material

    CERN Document Server

    Kisselev, Yu V; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Doshita, N; Gautheron, F; Görtz, S; Horikawa, N; Koivuniemi, J H; Kondo, K; Magnon, A; Meyer, Werner T; Reicherz, G

    2004-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the first and the second moments of D, **6Li and **7Li (I greater than 1/2) NMR lines in a granulated LiD- target material as a function of nuclear polarizations and the data has been compared with a theory elaborated by Abragam, Roinel and Bouffard for monocrystalline samples. The experiments were carried out in the large COMPASS twin-target at CERN. The static local magnetic field of the polarized nuclei was measured by frequency shift between the NMR-signals in the two oppositely polarized cells and lead to the first moment, whereas the investigation of the second moment was done through Gaussian approximation. The average field magnitude in granulated material was estimated 20% larger than the value given by the calculations for monocrystalline samples of cylindrical shape. The second moment shows a qualitative agreement with the theory but it is slightly larger at the negative than at the positive polarization. In a polarized mode, the moments depend on the saturated microw...

  5. Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism in locally covariant field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejzner, Katarzyna Anna

    2011-12-15

    The present work contains a complete formulation of the Batalin-Vilkovisky (BV) formalism in the framework of locally covariant field theory. In the first part of the thesis the classical theory is investigated with a particular focus on the infinite dimensional character of the underlying structures. It is shown that the use of infinite dimensional differential geometry allows for a conceptually clear and elegant formulation. The construction of the BV complex is performed in a fully covariant way and we also generalize the BV framework to a more abstract level, using functors and natural transformations. In this setting we construct the BV complex for classical gravity. This allows us to give a homological interpretation to the notion of diffeomorphism invariant physical quantities in general relativity. The second part of the thesis concerns the quantum theory. We provide a framework for the BV quantization that doesn't rely on the path integral formalism, but is completely formulated within perturbative algebraic quantum field theory. To make such a formulation possible we first prove that the renormalized time-ordered product can be understood as a binary operation on a suitable domain. Using this result we prove the associativity of this product and provide a consistent framework for the renormalized BV structures. In particular the renormalized quantum master equation and the renormalized quantum BV operator are defined. To give a precise meaning to theses objects we make a use of the master Ward identity, which is an important structure in causal perturbation theory. (orig.)

  6. Behavioral Resilience and Sensitivity to Locally Restricted Cortical Migration Deficits Induced by In Utero Knockdown of Disabled-1 in the Adult Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomund, Sandra; de Souza Silva, M Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Korth, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    Irregular neuronal migration plays a causal role in mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and autism, but the very nature of the migration deficits necessary to evoke adult behavioral changes is unknown. Here, we used in utero electroporation (IUE) in rats to induce a locally restricted, cortical migration deficit by knockdown of disabled-1 (Dab1), an intracellular converging point of the reelin pathway. After birth, selection of successfully electroporated rats by detection of in vivo bioluminescence of a simultaneously electroporated luciferase gene correlated to and was thus predictive to the number of electroporated neurons in postmortem histochemistry at 6 months of age. Rat neurons silenced for Dab1 did not migrate properly and their number surprisingly decreased after E22. Behavioral tests at adult ages (P180) revealed increased sensitivity to amphetamine as well as decreased habituation, but no deficits in memory tasks or motor functions. The data suggest that even subtle migration deficits involving only ten-thousands of cortical neurons during neurodevelopment can lead to lasting behavioral and neuronal changes into adulthood in some very specific behavioral domains. On the other hand, the lack of effects on various memory-related tasks may indicate resilience and plasticity of cognitive functions critical for survival under these specific conditions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Local causal structures, Hadamard states and the principle of local covariance in quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio [Erwin Schroedinger Institut fuer Mathematische Physik, Wien (Austria); Pinamonti, Nicola [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Porrmann, Martin [KwaZulu-Natal Univ. (South Africa). Quantum Research Group, School of Physics; National Institute for Theoretical Physics, Durban (South Africa)

    2010-01-15

    In the framework of the algebraic formulation, we discuss and analyse some new features of the local structure of a real scalar quantum field theory in a strongly causal spacetime. In particular we use the properties of the exponential map to set up a local version of a bulk-to-boundary correspondence. The bulk is a suitable subset of a geodesic neighbourhood of any but fixed point p of the underlying background, while the boundary is a part of the future light cone having p as its own tip. In this regime, we provide a novel notion for the extended *-algebra of Wick polynomials on the said cone and, on the one hand, we prove that it contains the information of the bulk counterpart via an injective *-homomorphism while, on the other hand, we associate to it a distinguished state whose pull-back in the bulk is of Hadamard form. The main advantage of this point of view arises if one uses the universal properties of the exponential map and of the light cone in order to show that, for any two given backgrounds M and M{sup '} and for any two subsets of geodesic neighbourhoods of two arbitrary points, it is possible to engineer the above procedure such that the boundary extended algebras are related via a restriction homomorphism. This allows for the pull-back of boundary states in both spacetimes and, thus, to set up a machinery which permits the comparison of expectation values of local field observables in M and M{sup '}. (orig.)

  8. Local causal structures, Hadamard states and the principle of local covariance in quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio [Erwin Schroedinger Institut fuer Mathematische Physik, Wien (Austria); Pinamonti, Nicola [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Porrmann, Martin [KwaZulu-Natal Univ. (South Africa). Quantum Research Group, School of Physics; National Institute for Theoretical Physics, Durban (South Africa)

    2010-01-15

    In the framework of the algebraic formulation, we discuss and analyse some new features of the local structure of a real scalar quantum field theory in a strongly causal spacetime. In particular we use the properties of the exponential map to set up a local version of a bulk-to-boundary correspondence. The bulk is a suitable subset of a geodesic neighbourhood of any but fixed point p of the underlying background, while the boundary is a part of the future light cone having p as its own tip. In this regime, we provide a novel notion for the extended *-algebra of Wick polynomials on the said cone and, on the one hand, we prove that it contains the information of the bulk counterpart via an injective *-homomorphism while, on the other hand, we associate to it a distinguished state whose pull-back in the bulk is of Hadamard form. The main advantage of this point of view arises if one uses the universal properties of the exponential map and of the light cone in order to show that, for any two given backgrounds M and M{sup '} and for any two subsets of geodesic neighbourhoods of two arbitrary points, it is possible to engineer the above procedure such that the boundary extended algebras are related via a restriction homomorphism. This allows for the pull-back of boundary states in both spacetimes and, thus, to set up a machinery which permits the comparison of expectation values of local field observables in M and M{sup '}. (orig.)

  9. Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, Craig R [University at Albany, State University of New York; Santanello, Joseph A [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Gentine, Pierre [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This document presents initial analyses of the enhanced radiosonde observations obtained during the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies Field Campaign (ESLCS), which took place at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) from June 15 to August 31, 2015. During ESLCS, routine 4-times-daily radiosonde measurements at the ARM-SGP CF were augmented on 12 days (June 18 and 29; July 11, 14, 19, and 26; August 15, 16, 21, 25, 26, and 27) with daytime 1-hourly radiosondes and 10-minute ‘trailer’ radiosondes every 3 hours. These 12 intensive operational period (IOP) days were selected on the basis of prior-day qualitative forecasts of potential land-atmosphere coupling strength. The campaign captured 2 dry soil convection advantage days (June 29 and July 14) and 10 atmospherically controlled days. Other noteworthy IOP events include: 2 soil dry-down sequences (July 11-14-19 and August 21-25-26), a 2-day clear-sky case (August 15-16), and the passing of Tropical Storm Bill (June 18). To date, the ESLCS data set constitutes the highest-temporal-resolution sampling of the evolution of the daytime planetary boundary layer (PBL) using radiosondes at the ARM-SGP. The data set is expected to contribute to: 1) improved understanding and modeling of the diurnal evolution of the PBL, particularly with regard to the role of local soil wetness, and (2) new insights into the appropriateness of current ARM-SGP CF thermodynamic sampling strategies.

  10. Optimizing finite element predictions of local subchondral bone structural stiffness using neural network-derived density-modulus relationships for proximal tibial subchondral cortical and trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemi, S Majid; Amini, Morteza; Kontulainen, Saija A; Milner, Jaques S; Holdsworth, David W; Masri, Bassam A; Wilson, David R; Johnston, James D

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography based subject-specific finite element modeling has potential to clarify the role of subchondral bone alterations in knee osteoarthritis initiation, progression, and pain. However, it is unclear what density-modulus equation(s) should be applied with subchondral cortical and subchondral trabecular bone when constructing finite element models of the tibia. Using a novel approach applying neural networks, optimization, and back-calculation against in situ experimental testing results, the objective of this study was to identify subchondral-specific equations that optimized finite element predictions of local structural stiffness at the proximal tibial subchondral surface. Thirteen proximal tibial compartments were imaged via quantitative computed tomography. Imaged bone mineral density was converted to elastic moduli using multiple density-modulus equations (93 total variations) then mapped to corresponding finite element models. For each variation, root mean squared error was calculated between finite element prediction and in situ measured stiffness at 47 indentation sites. Resulting errors were used to train an artificial neural network, which provided an unlimited number of model variations, with corresponding error, for predicting stiffness at the subchondral bone surface. Nelder-Mead optimization was used to identify optimum density-modulus equations for predicting stiffness. Finite element modeling predicted 81% of experimental stiffness variance (with 10.5% error) using optimized equations for subchondral cortical and trabecular bone differentiated with a 0.5g/cm(3) density. In comparison with published density-modulus relationships, optimized equations offered improved predictions of local subchondral structural stiffness. Further research is needed with anisotropy inclusion, a smaller voxel size and de-blurring algorithms to improve predictions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bulk gauge fields in warped space and localized supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacko, Z.; Ponton, Eduardo

    2003-11-01

    We consider five dimensional supersymmetric warped scenarios in which the Standard Model quark and lepton fields are localized on the ultraviolet brane, while the Standard Model gauge fields propagate in the bulk. Supersymmetry is assumed to be broken on the infrared brane. The relative sizes of supersymmetry breaking effects are found to depend on the hierarchy between the infrared scale and the weak scale. If the infrared scale is much larger than the weak scale the leading supersymmetry breaking effect on the visible brane is given by gaugino mediation. The gaugino masses at the weak scale are proportional to the square of the corresponding gauge coupling, while the dominant contribution to the scalar masses arises from logarithmically enhanced radiative effects involving the gaugino mass that are cutoff at the infrared scale. While the LSP is the gravitino, the NLSP which is the stau is stable on collider time scales. If however the infrared scale is close to the weak scale then the effects of hard supersymmetry breaking operators on the scalar masses can become comparable to those from gaugino mediation. These operators alter the relative strengths of the couplings of gauge bosons and gauginos to matter, and give loop contributions to the scalar masses that are also cutoff at the infrared scale. The gaugino masses, while exhibiting a more complicated dependence on the corresponding gauge coupling, remain hierarchical and become proportional to the corresponding gauge coupling in the limit of strong supersymmetry breaking. The scalar masses are finite and a loop factor smaller than the gaugino masses. The LSP remains the gravitino.

  12. The Local Interstellar Magnetic Field Determined from the IBEX Ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirnstein, E.; Funsten, H. O.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2015-12-01

    As the solar wind plasma flows away from the Sun, it eventually collides with the local interstellar medium, creating the heliosphere. Neutral atoms from interstellar space travel inside the heliosphere and charge-exchange with the solar wind plasma, creating energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). Some of these ENAs travel outside the heliosphere, undergo two charge-exchange events, and travel back inside the heliosphere towards Earth, with the strongest intensity in directions perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field (IMF). It is widely believed that this process generates the "ribbon" of enhanced ENA intensity observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), and has been shown to explain many key features of the observations. IBEX observations of the ribbon are composed of a complex, line-of-sight integration of ENAs that come from different distances beyond the heliopause, and thus the ENAs detected by IBEX over a wide range of energies are uniquely coupled to the IMF draped around the heliosphere. We present a detailed analysis of the IBEX ribbon measurements using 3D simulations of the heliosphere and computations of the ribbon flux at Earth based on IBEX capabilities, and derive the magnitude and direction of the IMF required to reproduce the position of the IBEX ribbon in the sky. These results have potentially large implications for our understanding of the solar-interstellar environment.

  13. On holographic entanglement entropy of non-local field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Pang, Da-Wei

    2014-01-01

    We study holographic entanglement entropy of non-local field theories both at extremality and finite temperature. The gravity duals, constructed in arXiv:1208.3469 [hep-th], are characterized by a parameter $w$. Both the zero temperature backgrounds and the finite temperature counterparts are exact solutions of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. For the extremal case we consider the examples with the entangling regions being a strip and a sphere. We find that the leading order behavior of the entanglement entropy always exhibits a volume law when the size of the entangling region is sufficiently small. We also clarify the condition under which the next-to-leading order result is universal. For the finite temperature case we obtain the analytic expressions both in the high temperature limit and in the low temperature limit. In the former case the leading order result approaches the thermal entropy, while the finite contribution to the entanglement entropy at extremality can be extracted by taking the zero temper...

  14. Abnormal MEG oscillatory activity during visual processing in the prefrontal cortices and frontal eye-fields of the aging HIV brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony W Wilson

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Shortly after infection, HIV enters the brain and causes widespread inflammation and neuronal damage, which ultimately leads to neuropsychological impairments. Despite a large body of neuroscience and imaging studies, the pathophysiology of these HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND remains unresolved. Previous neuroimaging studies have shown greater activation in HIV-infected patients during strenuous tasks in frontal and parietal cortices, and less activation in the primary sensory cortices during rest and sensory stimulation. METHODS: High-density magnetoencephalography (MEG was utilized to evaluate the basic neurophysiology underlying attentive, visual processing in older HIV-infected adults and a matched non-infected control group. Unlike other neuroimaging methods, MEG is a direct measure of neural activity that is not tied to brain metabolism or hemodynamic responses. During MEG, participants fixated on a centrally-presented crosshair while intermittent visual stimulation appeared in their top-right visual-field quadrant. All MEG data was imaged in the time-frequency domain using beamforming. RESULTS: Uninfected controls had increased neuronal synchronization in the 6-12 Hz range within the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right frontal eye-fields, and the posterior cingulate. Conversely, HIV-infected patients exhibited decreased synchrony in these same neural regions, and the magnitude of these decreases was correlated with neuropsychological performance in several cortical association regions. CONCLUSIONS: MEG-based imaging holds potential as a noninvasive biomarker for HIV-related neuronal dysfunction, and may help identify patients who have or may develop HAND. Reduced synchronization of neural populations in the association cortices was strongly linked to cognitive dysfunction, and likely reflects the impact of HIV on neuronal and neuropsychological health.

  15. Localization of the cortical motor area by functional magnetic resonance imaging with gradient echo and echo-planar methods, using clinical 1.5 Tesla MR imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, K

    1997-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gradient echo and echo-planar sequences was applied to healthy volunteers and neurological patients to evaluate the feasibility of detecting and localizing the motor cortex. Time course of the change in signal intensity by an alternate repetition of motor task (squeezing hand) and rest periods was also examined. The motor cortex was localized as the area of signal increase in 88.9% of 45 healthy volunteers by gradient echo method, which mainly reflected the cortical vein, and 83.3% of 30 healthy volunteers by echo-planar method, which mainly reflected the cerebral gyrus. Among 21 volunteers who participated in the both studies, success rate in the localization for the motor cortex was 90.5% (21 volunteers) by gradient echo method and 81% (17 volunteers) by echo-planar method. It was also shown from the time course of the change in signal intensity that signal increase in the most significantly activated area generally corresponded with the periods of the motor task, and the latency between the onset of signal increase and the onset of motor task was usually about 4 seconds. In four of 6 patients with brain tumor, the motor cortex was localized, although activated areas were displaced or distorted. The results indicate that fMRI, either with gradient echo or echo-planar sequence, is a useful method for localizing the primary motor area activated during the motor task and clinically available for noninvasive evaluation of the anatomical relation between brain tumors and the motor area before surgical therapy.

  16. Sound identification in human auditory cortex: Differential contribution of local field potentials and high gamma power as revealed by direct intracranial recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourski, Kirill V; Steinschneider, Mitchell; Rhone, Ariane E; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A; McMurray, Bob

    2015-09-01

    High gamma power has become the principal means of assessing auditory cortical activation in human intracranial studies, albeit at the expense of low frequency local field potentials (LFPs). It is unclear whether limiting analyses to high gamma impedes ability of clarifying auditory cortical organization. We compared the two measures obtained from posterolateral superior temporal gyrus (PLST) and evaluated their relative utility in sound categorization. Subjects were neurosurgical patients undergoing invasive monitoring for medically refractory epilepsy. Stimuli (consonant-vowel syllables varying in voicing and place of articulation and control tones) elicited robust evoked potentials and high gamma activity on PLST. LFPs had greater across-subject variability, yet yielded higher classification accuracy, relative to high gamma power. Classification was enhanced by including temporal detail of LFPs and combining LFP and high gamma. We conclude that future studies should consider utilizing both LFP and high gamma when investigating the functional organization of human auditory cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Strong near-field optical localization on an array of gold nanodisks

    OpenAIRE

    Aigouy, Lionel; Prieto Vizán, Patricia; Vitrey, Alan; Anguita, José Virgilio; Cebollada, Alfonso; González Sagardoy, María Ujué

    2011-01-01

    By scanning near-field optical microscopy, we measured the localization of the electromagnetic field on an array of gold nanodisks illuminated in a transmission mode. We experimentally observed that the field is localized between the disks, with a pattern oriented along the incident polarization direction. We also observed that the electromagnetic field rapidly decays above the nanodisks, showing a strong vertical localization. The experimental results are in good agreement with numerical sim...

  18. Quantitative image analysis tool to study the plasma membrane localization of proteins and cortical actin in neuroendocrine cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurps, J.; Broeke, J.H.; Cijsouw, T.; Kompatscher, A.; Weering, J.R. van; Wit, H. de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adrenal chromaffin cells are a widely used model system to study regulated exocytosis and other membrane-associated processes. Alterations in the amount and localization of the proteins involved in these processes can be visualized with fluorescent probes that report the effect of differ

  19. Functional adaptation to mechanical loading in both cortical and cancellous bone is controlled locally and is confined to the loaded bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Price, Joanna S; Lanyon, Lance E

    2010-02-01

    In order to validate whether bones' functional adaptation to mechanical loading is a local phenomenon, we randomly assigned 21 female C57BL/6 mice at 19 weeks of age to one of three equal numbered groups. All groups were treated with isoflurane anesthesia three times a week for 2 weeks (approximately 7 min/day). During each anaesthetic period, the right tibiae/fibulae in the DYNAMIC+STATIC group were subjected to a peak dynamic load of 11.5 N (40 cycles with 10-s intervals between cycles) superimposed upon a static "pre-load" of 2.0 N. This total load of 13.5 N engendered peak longitudinal strains of approximately 1400 microstrain on the medial surface of the tibia at a middle/proximal site. The right tibiae/fibulae in the STATIC group received the static "pre-load" alone while the NOLOAD group received no artificial loading. After 2 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and both tibiae, fibulae, femora, ulnae and radii analyzed by three-dimensional high-resolution (5 mum) micro-computed tomography (microCT). In the DYNAMIC+STATIC group, the proximal trabecular percent bone volume and cortical bone volume at the proximal and middle levels of the right tibiae as well as the cortical bone volume at the middle level of the right fibulae were markedly greater than the left. In contrast, the left bones in the DYNAMIC+STATIC group showed no differences compared to the left or right bones in the NOLOAD or STATIC group. These microCT data were confirmed by two-dimensional examination of fluorochrome labels in bone sections which showed the predominantly woven nature of the new bone formed in the loaded bones. We conclude that the adaptive response in both cortical and trabecular regions of bones subjected to short periods of dynamic loading, even when this response is sufficiently vigorous to stimulate woven bone formation, is confined to the loaded bones and does not involve changes in other bones that are adjacent, contra-lateral or remote to them.

  20. When does this cortical area drop off? Principal component structuring of the EEG spectrum yields yes-or-no criteria of local sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putilov, Arcady A

    2014-06-22

    The traditional sleep scoring approach has been invented long before the recognition of strictly local nature of the sleep process. It considers sleep as a whole-organism behavior state, and, thus, it cannot be used for identification of sleep onset in a separate brain region. Therefore, this paper was aimed on testing whether the practically useful, simple and reliable yes-or-no criterion of sleep onset in a particular cortical region might be developed through applying principal component analysis to the electroencephalographic (EEG) spectra. The resting EEG was recorded with 2-hour intervals throughout 43-61-hour prolongation of wakefulness, and during 12 20-minute attempts to nap in the course of 24-hour wakefulness (15 and 18 adults, respectively). The EEG power spectra were averaged on 1-min intervals of each resting EEG record and on 1-min intervals of each napping attempt, respectively. Since we earlier demonstrated that scores on the first and second principal components of the EEG spectrum exhibit dramatic changes during the sleep onset period, a zero-crossing buildup of the first score and a zero-crossing decline of the second score were examined as possible yes-or-no markers of regional sleep onsets. The results suggest that, irrespective of electrode location, sleep onset criterion and duration of preceding wakefulness, a highly significant zero-crossing decline of the second principal component score always occurred within 1-minute interval of transition from wakefulness to sleep. Therefore, it was concluded that such zero-crossing decline can serve as a reliable, simple, and practically useful yes-or-no marker of drop off event in a given cortical area.

  1. An Amphiphysin-Like Domain in Fus2p Is Required for Rvs161p Interaction and Cortical Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Stein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell–cell fusion fulfils essential roles in fertilization, development and tissue repair. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fusion between two haploid cells of opposite mating type generates the diploid zygote. Fus2p is a pheromone-induced protein that regulates cell wall removal during mating. Fus2p shuttles from the nucleus to localize at the shmoo tip, bound to Rvs161p, an amphiphysin. However, Rvs161p independently binds a second amphiphysin, Rvs167p, playing an essential role in endocytosis. To understand the basis of the Fus2p–Rvs161p interaction, we analyzed Fus2p structural domains. A previously described N-terminal domain (NTD is necessary and sufficient to regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic trafficking of Fus2p. The Dbl homology domain (DBH binds GTP-bound Cdc42p; binding is required for cell fusion, but not localization. We identified an approximately 200 amino acid region of Fus2p that is both necessary and sufficient for Rvs161p binding. The Rvs161p binding domain (RBD contains three predicted alpha-helices; structural modeling suggests that the RBD adopts an amphiphysin-like structure. The RBD contains a 13-amino-acid region, conserved with Rvs161p and other amphiphysins, which is essential for binding. Mutations in the RBD, predicted to affect membrane binding, abolish cell fusion without affecting Rvs161p binding. We propose that Fus2p/Rvs161p form a novel heterodimeric amphiphysin required for cell fusion. Rvs161p binding is required but not sufficient for Fus2p localization. Mutations in the C-terminal domain (CTD of Fus2p block localization, but not Rvs161p binding, causing a significant defect in cell fusion. We conclude that the Fus2p CTD mediates an additional, Rvs161p-independent interaction at the shmoo tip.

  2. Amplified somatosensory and visual cortical projections to a core auditory area, the anterior auditory field, following early- and late-onset deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carmen; Chabot, Nicole; Kok, Melanie A; Lomber, Stephen G

    2015-09-01

    Cross-modal reorganization following the loss of input from a sensory modality can recruit sensory-deprived cortical areas to process information from the remaining senses. Specifically, in early-deaf cats, the anterior auditory field (AAF) is unresponsive to auditory stimuli but can be activated by somatosensory and visual stimuli. Similarly, AAF neurons respond to tactile input in adult-deafened animals. To examine anatomical changes that may underlie this functional adaptation following early or late deafness, afferent projections to AAF were examined in hearing cats, and cats with early- or adult-onset deafness. Unilateral deposits of biotinylated dextran amine were made in AAF to retrogradely label cortical and thalamic afferents to AAF. In early-deaf cats, ipsilateral neuronal labeling in visual and somatosensory cortices increased by 329% and 101%, respectively. The largest increases arose from the anterior ectosylvian visual area and the anterolateral lateral suprasylvian visual area, as well as somatosensory areas S2 and S4. Consequently, labeling in auditory areas was reduced by 36%. The age of deafness onset appeared to influence afferent connectivity, with less marked differences observed in late-deaf cats. Profound changes to visual and somatosensory afferent connectivity following deafness may reflect corticocortical rewiring affording acoustically deprived AAF with cross-modal functionality.

  3. Cosmological perturbations in SFT inspired non-local scalar field models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshelev, Alexey S. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Theoretische Natuurkunde, Brussels (Belgium); Vernov, Sergey Yu. [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (ICE/CSIC) and Institut d' Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Theoretical High Energy Physics Division, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15

    We study cosmological perturbations in models with a single non-local scalar field originating from the string field theory description of the rolling tachyon dynamics. We construct the equation for the energy density perturbations of the non-local scalar field and explicitly prove that for the free field it is identical to a system of local cosmological perturbation equations in a particular model with multiple (maybe infinitely many) local free scalar fields. We also show that vector and tensor perturbations are absent in this set-up. (orig.)

  4. Spatial Representations in Local Field Potential Activity of Primate Anterior Intraparietal Cortex (AIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Sebastian J; Scherberger, Hansjörg

    2015-01-01

    The execution of reach-to-grasp movements in order to interact with our environment is an important subset of the human movement repertoire. To coordinate such goal-directed movements, information about the relative spatial position of target and effector (in this case the hand) has to be continuously integrated and processed. Recently, we reported the existence of spatial representations in spiking-activity of the cortical fronto-parietal grasp network (Lehmann & Scherberger 2013), and in particular in the anterior intraparietal cortex (AIP). To further investigate the nature of these spatial representations, we explored in two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) how different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP) in AIP are modulated by grip type, target position, and gaze position, during the planning and execution of reach-to-grasp movements. We systematically varied grasp type, spatial target, and gaze position and found that both spatial and grasp information were encoded in a variety of frequency bands (1-13Hz, 13-30Hz, 30-60Hz, and 60-100Hz, respectively). Whereas the representation of grasp type strongly increased towards and during movement execution, spatial information was represented throughout the task. Both spatial and grasp type representations could be readily decoded from all frequency bands. The fact that grasp type and spatial (reach) information was found not only in spiking activity, but also in various LFP frequency bands of AIP, might significantly contribute to the development of LFP-based neural interfaces for the control of upper limb prostheses.

  5. Spatial Representations in Local Field Potential Activity of Primate Anterior Intraparietal Cortex (AIP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian J Lehmann

    Full Text Available The execution of reach-to-grasp movements in order to interact with our environment is an important subset of the human movement repertoire. To coordinate such goal-directed movements, information about the relative spatial position of target and effector (in this case the hand has to be continuously integrated and processed. Recently, we reported the existence of spatial representations in spiking-activity of the cortical fronto-parietal grasp network (Lehmann & Scherberger 2013, and in particular in the anterior intraparietal cortex (AIP. To further investigate the nature of these spatial representations, we explored in two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta how different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP in AIP are modulated by grip type, target position, and gaze position, during the planning and execution of reach-to-grasp movements. We systematically varied grasp type, spatial target, and gaze position and found that both spatial and grasp information were encoded in a variety of frequency bands (1-13Hz, 13-30Hz, 30-60Hz, and 60-100Hz, respectively. Whereas the representation of grasp type strongly increased towards and during movement execution, spatial information was represented throughout the task. Both spatial and grasp type representations could be readily decoded from all frequency bands. The fact that grasp type and spatial (reach information was found not only in spiking activity, but also in various LFP frequency bands of AIP, might significantly contribute to the development of LFP-based neural interfaces for the control of upper limb prostheses.

  6. Cortical network reorganization guided by sensory input features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgard, Michael P; Pandya, Pritesh K; Engineer, Navzer D; Moucha, Raluca

    2002-12-01

    Sensory experience alters the functional organization of cortical networks. Previous studies using behavioral training motivated by aversive or rewarding stimuli have demonstrated that cortical plasticity is specific to salient inputs in the sensory environment. Sensory experience associated with electrical activation of the basal forebrain (BasF) generates similar input specific plasticity. By directly engaging plasticity mechanisms and avoiding extensive behavioral training, BasF stimulation makes it possible to efficiently explore how specific sensory features contribute to cortical plasticity. This review summarizes our observations that cortical networks employ a variety of strategies to improve the representation of the sensory environment. Different combinations of receptive-field, temporal, and spectrotemporal plasticity were generated in primary auditory cortex neurons depending on the pitch, modulation rate, and order of sounds paired with BasF stimulation. Simple tones led to map expansion, while modulated tones altered the maximum cortical following rate. Exposure to complex acoustic sequences led to the development of combination-sensitive responses. This remodeling of cortical response characteristics may reflect changes in intrinsic cellular mechanisms, synaptic efficacy, and local neuronal connectivity. The intricate relationship between the pattern of sensory activation and cortical plasticity suggests that network-level rules alter the functional organization of the cortex to generate the most behaviorally useful representation of the sensory environment.

  7. Infinite-time average of local fields in an integrable quantum field theory after a quantum quench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussardo, G

    2013-09-06

    The infinite-time average of the expectation values of local fields of any interacting quantum theory after a global quench process are key quantities for matching theoretical and experimental results. For quantum integrable field theories, we show that they can be obtained by an ensemble average that employs a particular limit of the form factors of local fields and quantities extracted by the generalized Bethe ansatz.

  8. On the Optimization of the Geodesic Active Fields (GAF) for Image Registration: Application to multi-scale registration of cortical maps on the sphere

    OpenAIRE

    Ciller Ruiz, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] This work presents an analysis and optimization, both in terms of optimal parameters and speed, of the novel geodesic active fields framework for surface image registration on the sphere, presented by Zosso, Dominique in his PhD thesis at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. The relevance of surface registration to medical imaging is that there is a lot of anatomical information in the form of collected surface points, giving information about the cortical folding pattern. H...

  9. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, Ivan I.; Kozlov, Gleb G.; Smirnov, Dmitrii S.; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Efimov, Yurii P.; Eliseev, Sergei A.; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Kavokin, Kirill V.; Kavokin, Alexey V.; Zapasskii, Valerii S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new – magnetometric – potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This “optical field” is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates. PMID:26882994

  10. Driving Human Motor Cortical Oscillations Leads to Behaviorally Relevant Changes in Local GABAA Inhibition: A tACS-TMS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Magdalena; Hinson, Emily; van Ede, Freek; Pogosyan, Alek; Guerra, Andrea; Quinn, Andrew; Brown, Peter; Stagg, Charlotte J

    2017-04-26

    Beta and gamma oscillations are the dominant oscillatory activity in the human motor cortex (M1). However, their physiological basis and precise functional significance remain poorly understood. Here, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine the physiological basis and behavioral relevance of driving beta and gamma oscillatory activity in the human M1 using transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). tACS was applied using a sham-controlled crossover design at individualized intensity for 20 min and TMS was performed at rest (before, during, and after tACS) and during movement preparation (before and after tACS). We demonstrated that driving gamma frequency oscillations using tACS led to a significant, duration-dependent decrease in local resting-state GABAA inhibition, as quantified by short interval intracortical inhibition. The magnitude of this effect was positively correlated with the magnitude of GABAA decrease during movement preparation, when gamma activity in motor circuitry is known to increase. In addition, gamma tACS-induced change in GABAA inhibition was closely related to performance in a motor learning task such that subjects who demonstrated a greater increase in GABAA inhibition also showed faster short-term learning. The findings presented here contribute to our understanding of the neurophysiological basis of motor rhythms and suggest that tACS may have similar physiological effects to endogenously driven local oscillatory activity. Moreover, the ability to modulate local interneuronal circuits by tACS in a behaviorally relevant manner provides a basis for tACS as a putative therapeutic intervention.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Gamma oscillations have a vital role in motor control. Using a combined tACS-TMS approach, we demonstrate that driving gamma frequency oscillations modulates GABAA inhibition in the human motor cortex. Moreover, there is a clear relationship between the change in magnitude of GABAA inhibition induced

  11. Distributional Dimension of Fractal Sets in Local Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua QIU; Wei Yi SU

    2008-01-01

    The distributional dimension of fractal sets in Rn has been systematically studied by Triebel by virtue of the theory of function spaces.In this paper,we .rst discuss some important properties about the B type spaces and the F type spaces on local .elds,then we give the de .nition of the distributional dimension dim D in local .elds and study the relations between distributional dimension and Hausdor .dimension.Moreover,the analysis expression of the Hausdor .dimension is given.Lastly,we de .ne the Fourier dimension in local .elds,and obtain the relations among all the three dimensions.

  12. Relativistic local quantum field theory for m=0 particles; Campos cuanticos locales relativos a particulas de masa no nula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales Villasevil, A.

    1965-07-01

    A method is introduced ta deal with relativistic quantum field theory for particles with m=0. Two mappings I and J, giving rise respectively to particle and anti particle states, are defined between a test space and the physical Hilbert space. The intrinsic field operator is then defined as the minimal causal linear combinations of operators belonging to the annihilation-creation algebra associated to the germ and antigerm parts of the element. Local elements are introduced as improper test elements and local field operators are constructed in the same way as the intrinsic ones. Commutation rules are given. (Author) 17 refs.

  13. Magnetic field modeling with a set of individual localized coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A

    2010-06-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand.

  14. Differential cortical processing of local and global motion information in biological motion: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Masahiro; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2008-12-15

    To reveal the neural dynamics underlying biological motion processing, we introduced a novel golf-swing point-light motion (PLM) stimulus with an adaptation paradigm and measured event-related potentials (ERPs). In the adaptation phase, PLM and scrambled PLM (sPLM) stimuli were presented; a static point-lights stimulus was also presented as a control condition. In the subsequent test phase, PLM or sPLM stimuli were presented. We measured ERPs from the onset of the test phase. Two negative components were observed and modulated differently: the amplitude of the N1 component was significantly attenuated by PLM and sPLM adaptation stimuli compared with the static point-light adaptation stimulus, whereas the amplitude of the N2 component in response to the PLM test stimulus was significantly attenuated only by the PLM adaptation stimulus. The amplitude of the N2 component in response to the PLM test stimulus was significantly larger than that in response to the sPLM test stimulus when a sPLM or static adaptation stimulus was used. These findings indicate that the N1 component is sensitive to local motion information while the N2 component is sensitive to the presence of a coherent form conveyed by global motion.

  15. Sub-10 nm near-field localization by plasmonic metal nanoaperture arrays with ultrashort light pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hongki; Kim, Chulhong; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-12-02

    Near-field localization by ultrashort femtosecond light pulses has been investigated using simple geometrical nanoapertures. The apertures employ circular, rhombic, and triangular shapes to localize the distribution of surface plasmon. To understand the geometrical effect on the localization, aperture length and period of the nanoapertures were varied. Aperture length was shown to affect the performance more than aperture period due mainly to intra-aperture coupling of near-fields. Triangular apertures provided the strongest spatial localization below 10 nm in size as well as the highest enhancement of field intensity by more than 7000 times compared to the incident light pulse. Use of ultrashort pulses was found to allow much stronger light localization than with continuous-wave light. The results can be used for super-localization sensing and imaging applications where spatially localized fields can break through the limits in achieving improved sensitivity and resolution.

  16. Growth of a localized seed magnetic field in a turbulent medium

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence dynamo deals with amplification of a seed magnetic field in a turbulent medium and has been studied mostly for uniform or spatially homogeneous seed magnetic fields. However, some astrophysical processes (e.g. jets from active galaxies, galactic winds, or ram-pressure stripping in galaxy clusters) can provide localized seed magnetic fields. In this paper, we numerically study amplification of localized seed magnetic fields in a turbulent medium. Throughout the paper, we assume that...

  17. Prearcuate cortex in the Cebus monkey has cortical and subcortical connections like the macaque frontal eye field and projects to fastigial-recipient oculomotor-related brainstem nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichnetz, G R; Gonzalo-Ruiz, A

    1996-01-01

    The cortical and subcortical connections of the prearcuate cortex were studied in capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella, albifrons) using the anterograde and retrograde transport capabilities of the horseradish peroxidase technique. The findings demonstrate remarkable similarities to those of the macaque frontal eye field and strongly support their homology. The report then focuses on specific prearcuate projections to oculomotor-related brainstem nuclei that were shown in a companion experiment to entertain connections with the caudal oculomotor portion of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus. The principal corticocortical connections of the cebus prearcuate cortex were with dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, lateral intraparietal sulcal cortex, posterior medial parietal cortex, and superior temporal sulcal cortex, which were for the most part reciprocal and columnar in organization. The connections of the dorsal prearcuate region were heavier to the dorsomedial prefrontal and posterior medial parietal cortices, and those of the ventral region were heavier to the superior temporal sulcal cortex. The prearcuate cortex projects to several brainstem areas which also receive projections from the caudal fastigial nucleus, including the supraoculomotor periaqueductal gray matter, superior colliculus, medial nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis, dorsomedial basilar pontine nucleus, dorsolateral basilar pontine nucleus, nucleus reticularis pontis caudalis, pontine raphe, and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi. The findings define a neuroanatomical framework within which convergence of prearcuate (putative frontal eye field) and caudal fastigial nucleus connections might occur, facilitating their potential interaction in saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movement.

  18. Localization from near-source quasi-static electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    A wide range of research has been published on the problem of estimating the parameters of electromagnetic and acoustical sources from measurements of signals measured at an array of sensors. In the quasi-static electromagnetic cases examined here, the signal variation from a point source is relatively slow with respect to the signal propagation and the spacing of the array of sensors. As such, the location of the point sources can only be determined from the spatial diversity of the received signal across the array. The inverse source localization problem is complicated by unknown model order and strong local minima. The nonlinear optimization problem is posed for solving for the parameters of the quasi-static source model. The transient nature of the sources can be exploited to allow subspace approaches to separate out the signal portion of the spatial correlation matrix. Decomposition techniques are examined for improved processing, and an adaptation of MUtiple SIgnal Characterization (MUSIC) is presented for solving the source localization problem. Recent results on calculating the Cramer-Rao error lower bounds are extended to the multidimensional problem here. This thesis focuses on the problem of source localization in magnetoencephalography (MEG), with a secondary application to thunderstorm source localization. Comparisons are also made between MEG and its electrical equivalent, electroencephalography (EEG). The error lower bounds are examined in detail for several MEG and EEG configurations, as well as localizing thunderstorm cells over Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center. Time-eigenspectrum is introduced as a parsing technique for improving the performance of the optimization problem.

  19. Embeddings of maximal tori in classical groups over local and global fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer-Fluckiger, E.; Lee, T.-Y.; Parimala, R.

    2016-08-01

    Embeddings of maximal tori in classical groups over fields of characteristic not 2 are the subject matter of several recent papers. The aim of the present paper is to give necessary and sufficient conditions for such an embedding to exist, when the base field is a local field, or the field of real numbers. This completes the results of [3], where a complete criterion is given for the Hasse principle to hold when the base field is a global field.

  20. Field localization and rescattering in tip-enhanced photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalunin, Sergey V.; Herink, Georg; Solli, Daniel R.; Ropers, Claus [Courant Research Centre Physics and Materials Physics Institute, Goettingen Univ. (Germany); Krueger, Michael; Hommelhoff, Peter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany); Diehn, Manuel; Munk, Axel [Institute for Mathematical Stochastics, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Goettingen Univ. (Germany); MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    This article presents a quantum mechanical treatment of strong-field photoelectron emission from nanostructures. The effects of a spatial inhomogeneity of the optical near-field are identified. Furthermore, the importance of electron scattering at the surface is elucidated by contrasting simulations with and without backscattering. Convincing agreement with experimental data under various conditions is demonstrated. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-12-31

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities.

  2. Geometrical parameters effects on local electric field enhancement of silver-dielectric-silver multilayer nanoshell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah 67144-15111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The local electric field enhancement at different points of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell is investigated using quasi-static theory. Because of the symmetric and anti-symmetric coupling between surface plasmon of inner silver core and outer silver shell, the local electric field spectrum of silver-dielectric-silver has two distinct peaks at resonance wavelengths. The silver core size and middle dielectric thickness affect the local electric field enhancement at different points of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell. Increasing the silver core radius always leads to blue shift of shorter resonance wavelength and red shift of longer resonance wavelength. We observed two distinct local electric field peaks, which are corresponded to the symmetric and anti-symmetric coupling between inner and outer surface plasmons. In a system with thick silver shell, local electric field enhancement is greater than a system with thin silver shell. However, the local electric field variations as a function of silver core radius in both systems are different at different points of nanoshell. The effects of the dielectric thickness variations on local electric field are different from those from silver core size variations. As the dielectric thickness is about 3 nm, the highest local electric field enhancement occurs at the surface of the inner silver core, where the symmetric and anti-symmetric modes are mixed together.

  3. Multimodal Sensory Responses of Nucleus Reticularis Gigantocellularis and the Responses' Relation to Cortical and Motor Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Eugene M.; Pavlides, Constantine; Pfaff, Donald

    2010-01-01

    The connectivity of large neurons of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) in the medullary reticular formation potentially allows both for the integration of stimuli, in several modalities, that would demand immediate action, and for coordinated activation of cortical and motoric activity. We have simultaneously recorded cortical local field potentials, neck muscle electromyograph (EMG), and the neural activity of medullary NRGc neurons in unrestrained, unanesthetized rats to dete...

  4. Cosmic Ray Small Scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    López-Barquero, Vanessa; Xu, S; Desiati, P; Lazarian, A

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic ray anisotropy is observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments. However, a comprehensive and satisfactory explanation has been elusive for over a decade now. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays on Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium and small angular scale structure could be an effect of non diffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation of the observed small scale anisotropy observed at TeV energy scale, may come from the effect of particle scattering in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-$\\beta$ compressible mag...

  5. Locality and entanglement in bandlimited quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pye, Jason; Kempf, Achim

    2015-01-01

    We consider a model for a Planck scale ultraviolet cutoff which is based on Shannon sampling. Shannon sampling originated in information theory, where it expresses the equivalence of continuous and discrete representations of information. When applied to quantum field theory, Shannon sampling expresses a hard ultraviolet cutoff in the form of a bandlimitation. This introduces nonlocality at the cutoff scale in a way that is more subtle than a simple discretization of space: quantum fields can then be represented as either living on continuous space or, entirely equivalently, as living on any one lattice whose average spacing is sufficiently small. We explicitly calculate vacuum entanglement entropies in 1+1 dimension and we find a transition between logarithmic and linear scaling of the entropy, which is the expected 1+1 dimensional analog of the transition from an area to a volume law. We also use entanglement entropy and mutual information as measures to probe in detail the localizability of the field degre...

  6. Locally covariant quantum field theory with external sources

    CERN Document Server

    Fewster, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of the classical and quantized theory of a multiplet of inhomogeneous Klein-Gordon fields, which couple to the spacetime metric and also to an external source term; thus the solutions form an affine space. Following the formulation of affine field theories in terms of presymplectic vector spaces as proposed in [Annales Henri Poincare 15, 171 (2014)], we determine the relative Cauchy evolution induced by metric as well as source term perturbations and compute the automorphism group of natural isomorphisms of the presymplectic vector space functor. Two pathological features of this formulation are revealed: the automorphism group contains elements that cannot be interpreted as global gauge transformations of the theory; moreover, the presymplectic formulation does not respect a natural requirement on composition of subsystems. We therefore propose a systematic strategy to improve the original description of affine field theories at the classical and quantized level, first passing ...

  7. Fermion localization on asymmetric two-field thick branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Zhenhua; Liu Yuxiao; Li Haitao, E-mail: zhaozhh09@lzu.c, E-mail: liuyx@lzu.edu.c, E-mail: liht07@lzu.c [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-09-21

    In this paper we investigate the localization of fermions on asymmetric thick branes generated by two scalars {phi} and {chi}. In order to trap fermions on the asymmetric branes with kink-like warp factors, the couplings with the background scalars {eta}{Psi}-barF({chi},{phi}){Psi} are introduced, where F({chi}, {phi}) is a function of {phi} and {chi}. We find that the coupling {eta}{Psi}-bar{sub {chi}{phi}{Psi}} does not support the localization of four-dimensional fermions on the branes. While, for the case {eta}{Psi}-bar{sub {chi}{Psi}} +{eta}'{Psi}-bar{sub {phi}{Psi}} , which is the kink-fermion coupling corresponding to one-scalar-generated brane scenarios, the zero mode of left-handed fermions could be trapped on the branes under some conditions.

  8. Extended Riemannian Geometry I: Local Double Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Deser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present an extended version of Riemannian geometry suitable for the description of current formulations of double field theory (DFT). This framework is based on graded manifolds and it yields extended notions of symmetries, dynamical data and constraints. In special cases, we recover general relativity with and without 1-, 2- and 3-form gauge potentials as well as DFT. We believe that our extended Riemannian geometry helps to clarify the role of various constructions in DFT. For example, it leads to a covariant form of the strong section condition. Furthermore, it should provide a useful step towards global and coordinate invariant descriptions of T- and U-duality invariant field theories.

  9. Green's function formalism in semi-infinite composites: an investigation of local field distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Gu, Ying; Dai, Bing; Gong, Qi-Huang

    2004-11-01

    In the resonant composites, the formerly developed Green's function formalism (GFF) can be used to compute the local field distribution near resonance. In this paper, we extend the GFF in the infinite network to the semi-infinite networks by the method of image. Using the formalism, we investigate the local field distribution near resonance for the impurity clusters with admittance epsilon0 embedded in one semi-infinite network with epsilon1. With varying the admittance epsilon2 of another semi-infinite network, we find that the local fields in the boundary experience great changes, especially at epsilon2 = -epsilon1. The existence of the boundary enhances the localization of the fields within and around the metallic clusters. Therefore, the intensity of local field is influenced by the arrangement of impurity metallic bonds and its distance from the boundary.

  10. Green's function formalism in semi-infinite composites:an investigation of local field distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Chen; Gu Ying; Dai Bing; Gong Qi-Huang

    2004-01-01

    In the resonant composites, the formerly developed Green's function formalism (GFF) can be used to compute the local field distribution near resonance. In this paper, we extend the GFF in the infinite network to the semi-infinite networks by the method of image. Using the formalism, we investigate the local field distribution near resonance for the impurity clusters with admittance ∈0 embedded in one semi-infinite network with ∈1. With varying the admittance ∈2 of another semi-infinite network, we find that the local fields in the boundary experience great changes, especially at ∈2= -∈1. The existence of the boundary enhances the localization of the fields within and around the metallic clusters.Therefore, the intensity of local field is influenced by the arrangement of impurity metallic bonds and its distance from the boundary.

  11. Field-Line Localized Destabilization of Ballooning Modes in Three-Dimensional Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willensdorfer, M.; Cote, T. B.; Hegna, C. C.; Suttrop, W.; Zohm, H.; Dunne, M.; Strumberger, E.; Birkenmeier, G.; Denk, S. S.; Mink, F.; Vanovac, B.; Luhmann, L. C.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-08-01

    Field-line localized ballooning modes have been observed at the edge of high confinement mode plasmas in ASDEX Upgrade with rotating 3D perturbations induced by an externally applied n =2 error field and during a moderate level of edge localized mode mitigation. The observed ballooning modes are localized to the field lines which experience one of the two zero crossings of the radial flux surface displacement during one rotation period. The localization of the ballooning modes agrees very well with the localization of the largest growth rates from infinite-n ideal ballooning stability calculations using a realistic 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium. This analysis predicts a lower stability with respect to the axisymmetric case. The primary mechanism for the local lower stability is the 3D distortion of the local magnetic shear.

  12. The stability of source localization in a whole-head magnetoencephalography system demonstrated by auditory evoked field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuen-Lin; Yang, Hong-Chang; Tsai, Sung-Ying; Liu, Yu-Wei; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kwon, Hyukchan

    2011-10-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), which is a very sensitive magnetic sensor, has been widely used to detect the ultra-small magnetic signals in many different territories, especially in the biomagnetic measurement. In this study, a 128-channel SQUID first-order axial gradiometer system for whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements was setup to characterize the auditory evoked magnetic fields (AEFs). A 500 Hz monaural pure tone persisting 425 ms with the sound pressure level of 80 dB was randomly applied to the left ear of subject with the inter-stimulus interval of 1.5 ˜ 2.8 s to prevent fatigue of nerves. We demonstrated the characteristic waveforms of AEFs can be accurately recorded and analyzed. Using source localization processes, the origins of AEFs were successfully calculated to be at the auditory cortices which are brain areas known for responsive to sound stimulus. A phantom experiment also proved the good localization accuracy of the established MEG system and measurement procedures. The validated performance of the SQUID system suggests that this technique can also be employed in other brain research.

  13. LOCALIZATION OF NMDA AND AMPA RECEPTORS IN RAT BARREL FIELD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JAARSMA, D; SEBENS, JB; KORF, J

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to asses the distribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-S-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in the barrel field of rat primary somatosensory (SI) cortex using light-microscopic in vitro autoradiography. NMDA receptors were labeled

  14. The geochemical Phenomenon-Local geochemical fields in a glacier (scientific note)

    OpenAIRE

    V. N., Makarov

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical fields in alpine cold and warm glaciers were studied. Local geochemical fields of typomorphic elements were found to form in the ice and on the surface of glaciers overlying ore bodies and endogenic geochemical haloes. The formation of local cryogenic geochemical fields in the glaciers results from sharp geochemical heterogeneity and geochemical processes in underlying rocks which cause cryogenic migration of chemical elements and compounds in the glacier. The thickness of geochem...

  15. The geochemical Phenomenon-Local geochemical fields in a glacier (scientific note)

    OpenAIRE

    V. N., Makarov

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical fields in alpine cold and warm glaciers were studied. Local geochemical fields of typomorphic elements were found to form in the ice and on the surface of glaciers overlying ore bodies and endogenic geochemical haloes. The formation of local cryogenic geochemical fields in the glaciers results from sharp geochemical heterogeneity and geochemical processes in underlying rocks which cause cryogenic migration of chemical elements and compounds in the glacier. The thickness of geochem...

  16. Normic Continued Fractions in Totally and Tamely Ramified Extensions of Local Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-13

    Normic continued fractions in totally and tamely ramified extensions of local fields Pantelimon Stănică∗ Naval Postgraduate School Applied...constructing continued fractions in a Galois, totally and tamely ramified extension of local fields. We take a set of elements of a special form using...the norm of that extension and we show that the set such defined is dense in the field by the means of continued fractions . 1 Introduction A ring A is

  17. Localization of virtual objects in the near visual field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S R; Menges, B M

    1998-09-01

    We examined errors in the localization of nearby virtual objects presented via see-through helmet-mounted displays as a function of viewing conditions and scene content in four experiments using a total of 38 participants. Monocular, biocular, and stereoscopic presentation of the virtual objects, accommodation (required focus), participants' age, and the position of physical surfaces were examined. Nearby physical surfaces were found to introduce localization errors that differ depending on the other experimental factors. These errors apparently arise from the occlusion of the physical background by the optically superimposed virtual objects, but they are modified by participants' accommodative competence and specific viewing conditions. The apparent physical size and transparency of the virtual objects and physical surfaces, respectively, are influenced by their relative position when superimposed. The design implications of the findings are discussed in a concluding section. Head-mounted displays of virtual objects are currently being evaluated as aids for mechanical assembly and equipment maintenance. Other applications include telesurgery, surgical planning, telerobotics, and visualization aids for robotic programming.

  18. Relation between functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and single neuron, local field potential (LFP) and electrocorticography (ECoG) activity in human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojemann, George A; Ojemann, Jeffrey; Ramsey, Nick F

    2013-01-01

    The relation between changes in the blood oxygen dependent metabolic changes imaged by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and neural events directly recorded from human cortex from single neurons, local field potentials (LFPs) and electrocorticogram (ECoG) is critically reviewed, based on the published literature including findings from the authors' laboratories. All these data are from special populations, usually patients with medically refractory epilepsy, as this provides the major opportunity for direct cortical neuronal recording in humans. For LFP and ECoG changes are often sought in different frequency bands, for single neurons in frequency of action potentials. Most fMRI studies address issues of functional localization. The relation of those findings to localized changes in neuronal recordings in humans has been established in several ways. Only a few studies have directly compared changes in activity from the same sites in the same individual, using the same behavioral measure. More often the comparison has been between fMRI and electrophysiologic changes in populations recorded from the same functional anatomic system as defined by lesion effects; in a few studies those systems have been defined by fMRI changes such as the "default" network. The fMRI-electrophysiologic relationships have been evaluated empirically by colocalization of significant changes, and by quantitative analyses, often multiple linear regression. There is some evidence that the fMRI-electrophysiology relationships differ in different cortical areas, particularly primary motor and sensory cortices compared to association cortex, but also within areas of association cortex. Although crucial for interpretation of fMRI changes as reflecting neural activity in human cortex, controversy remains as to these relationships. Supported by: Dutch Technology Foundation and University of Utrecht Grant UGT7685, ERC-Advanced grant 320708 (NR) and NIH grant NS065186 (JO).

  19. Vortex Identification from Local Properties of the Vorticity Field

    CERN Document Server

    Elsas, J H

    2016-01-01

    A number of systematic procedures for the identification of coherent structures have been developed as a way to address their possible kinematical and dynamical roles in structural formulations of turbulence. It has been broadly acknowledged, however, that vortex detection algorithms, usually based on linear-algebraic properties of the velocity gradient tensor, are plagued with severe shortcomings and are also dependent on the choice of subjective threshold parameters in their implementations. In two-dimensions, a large class of standard vortex identification prescriptions turn out to be equivalent to the "swirling strength criterion", which is critically revisited in this work. We classify the instances where the $\\lambda_{ci}$-criterion blatantly fails and propose an alternative vortex detection scheme based on the local curvature properties of the vorticity graph -- the "vorticity curvature criterion" -- which improves over the results obtained with the $\\lambda_{ci}$-criterion in controlled Monte-Carlo te...

  20. Moderate Cortical Cooling Eliminates Thalamocortical Silent States during Slow Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-09-23

    Reduction in temperature depolarizes neurons by a partial closure of potassium channels but decreases the vesicle release probability within synapses. Compared with cooling, neuromodulators produce qualitatively similar effects on intrinsic neuronal properties and synapses in the cortex. We used this similarity of neuronal action in ketamine-xylazine-anesthetized mice and non-anesthetized mice to manipulate the thalamocortical activity. We recorded cortical electroencephalogram/local field potential (LFP) activity and intracellular activities from the somatosensory thalamus in control conditions, during cortical cooling and on rewarming. In the deeply anesthetized mice, moderate cortical cooling was characterized by reversible disruption of the thalamocortical slow-wave pattern rhythmicity and the appearance of fast LFP spikes, with frequencies ranging from 6 to 9 Hz. These LFP spikes were correlated with the rhythmic IPSP activities recorded within the thalamic ventral posterior medial neurons and with depolarizing events in the posterior nucleus neurons. Similar cooling of the cortex during light anesthesia rapidly and reversibly eliminated thalamocortical silent states and evoked thalamocortical persistent activity; conversely, mild heating increased thalamocortical slow-wave rhythmicity. In the non-anesthetized head-restrained mice, cooling also prevented the generation of thalamocortical silent states. We conclude that moderate cortical cooling might be used to manipulate slow-wave network activity and induce neuromodulator-independent transition to activated states. Significance statement: In this study, we demonstrate that moderate local cortical cooling of lightly anesthetized or naturally sleeping mice disrupts thalamocortical slow oscillation and induces the activated local field potential pattern. Mild heating has the opposite effect; it increases the rhythmicity of thalamocortical slow oscillation. Our results demonstrate that slow oscillation can be

  1. Estimation of Temperature Fields in Local Tissues During Intracavitary Hyperthermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NanQun; HuZhengjun; 等

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a heat transfer model for the hyperthermia treatment of cervix cancer using a intracavitary microwave applicator and based on which the 3-D finite element simulation of the temperature fields have done,Before then the specific absorption rate(SAR) distribution for the transvaginal probe have been measured in a phantom.The variations of the parameters have been investigated.Too,for optimization.At last,the rsults of simulation are compared to that measured in the phantom and some instructive conclusions are presented for critical application.

  2. Evaluation of local electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation with an extracephalic reference electrode based on realistic 3D body modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hye; Shim, Miseon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-04-01

    In this study, local electric field distributions generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with an extracephalic reference electrode were evaluated to address extracephalic tDCS safety issues. To this aim, we generated a numerical model of an adult male human upper body and applied the 3D finite element method to electric current conduction analysis. In our simulations, the active electrode was placed over the left primary motor cortex (M1) and the reference electrode was placed at six different locations: over the right temporal lobe, on the right supraorbital region, on the right deltoid, on the left deltoid, under the chin, and on the right buccinator muscle. The maximum current density and electric field intensity values in the brainstem generated by the extracephalic reference electrodes were comparable to, or even less than, those generated by the cephalic reference electrodes. These results suggest that extracephalic reference electrodes do not lead to unwanted modulation of the brainstem cardio-respiratory and autonomic centers, as indicated by recent experimental studies. The volume energy density was concentrated at the neck area by the use of deltoid reference electrodes, but was still smaller than that around the active electrode locations. In addition, the distributions of elicited cortical electric fields demonstrated that the use of extracephalic reference electrodes might allow for the robust prediction of cortical modulations with little dependence on the reference electrode locations.

  3. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per E Roland

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available IIn principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG, and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review.

  4. Inverse Scattering and Locality in Integrable Quantum Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Alazzawi, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    We present a solution method for the inverse scattering problem for integrable two-dimensional relativistic quantum field theories, specified in terms of a given massive single particle spectrum and a factorizing S-matrix. An arbitrary number of massive particles transforming under an arbitrary compact global gauge group is allowed, thereby generalizing previous constructions of scalar theories. The two-particle S-matrix $S$ is assumed to be an analytic solution of the Yang-Baxter equation with standard properties, including unitarity, TCP invariance, and crossing symmetry. Using methods from operator algebras and complex analysis, we identify sufficient criteria on $S$ that imply the solution of the inverse scattering problem. These conditions are shown to be satisfied in particular by so-called diagonal S-matrices, but presumably also in other cases such as the $O(N)$-invariant nonlinear $\\sigma$-models.

  5. GROWTH OF A LOCALIZED SEED MAGNETIC FIELD IN A TURBULENT MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jungyeon; Yoo, Hyunju, E-mail: jcho@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-10

    Turbulence dynamo deals with the amplification of a seed magnetic field in a turbulent medium and has been studied mostly for uniform or spatially homogeneous seed magnetic fields. However, some astrophysical processes (e.g., jets from active galaxies, galactic winds, or ram-pressure stripping in galaxy clusters) can provide localized seed magnetic fields. In this paper, we numerically study amplification of localized seed magnetic fields in a turbulent medium. Throughout the paper, we assume that the driving scale of turbulence is comparable to the size of the system. Our findings are as follows. First, turbulence can amplify a localized seed magnetic field very efficiently. The growth rate of magnetic energy density is as high as that for a uniform seed magnetic field. This result implies that magnetic field ejected from an astrophysical object can be a viable source of a magnetic field in a cluster. Second, the localized seed magnetic field disperses and fills the whole system very fast. If turbulence in a system (e.g., a galaxy cluster or a filament) is driven at large scales, we expect that it takes a few large-eddy turnover times for the magnetic field to fill the whole system. Third, growth and turbulence diffusion of a localized seed magnetic field are also fast in high magnetic Prandtl number turbulence. Fourth, even in decaying turbulence, a localized seed magnetic field can ultimately fill the whole system. Although the dispersal rate of the magnetic field is not fast in purely decaying turbulence, it can be enhanced by an additional forcing.

  6. Local field corrections to the spontaneous emission in arrays of Si nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Poddubny, Alexander N

    2014-01-01

    We present a theory of the local field corrections to the spontaneous emission rate for the array of silicon nanocrystals in silicon dioxide. An analytical result for the Purcell factor is obtained. We demonstrate that the local-field corrections are sensitive to the volume fill factor of the nanocrystals in the sample and are suppressed for large values of the fill factor. The local-field corrections and the photonic density of states are shown to be described by two different effective permittivities: the harmonic mean between the nanocrystal and the matrix permittivities and the Maxwell-Garnett permittivity.

  7. Synthetic Dimensions with Magnetic Fields and Local Interactions in Photonic Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-01-06

    We discuss how one can realize a photonic device that combines synthetic dimensions and synthetic magnetic fields with spatially local interactions. Using an array of ring cavities, the angular coordinate around each cavity spans the synthetic dimension. The synthetic magnetic field arises as the intercavity photon hopping is associated with a change of angular momentum. Photon-photon interactions are local in the periodic angular coordinate around each cavity. Experimentally observable consequences of the synthetic magnetic field and of the local interactions are pointed out.

  8. Synthetic dimensions with magnetic fields and local interactions in photonic lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Ozawa, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how one can realize a photonic device that combines synthetic dimensions and synthetic magnetic fields with spatially local interactions. Using an array of ring resonators, the angular coordinate around each resonator spans the synthetic dimension and the synthetic magnetic field arises as the inter-cavity photon hopping is associated to a change of angular momentum. Photon-photon interactions due to the non-linearity of the cavity material are local in the periodic angular coordinate around each ring resonator. Experimentally observable consequences of the synthetic magnetic field and of the local interactions are pointed out.

  9. Enhancement of local electromagnetic fields in plasmonic crystals of coaxial metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Masanobu; Ikeda, Naoki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2012-01-01

    We have experimentally and numerically examined resonant modes in plasmonic crystals (PlCs) of coaxial metallic nanostructures. Resonance enhancements of local electromagnetic (EM) fields were evaluated quantitatively. We clarified that a local mode induced in the coaxial metallic structure shows the most significant field enhancement. The enhancement factors are comprehensively discussed by comparison with other PlCs, indicating that the coaxial PlC provides a locally intense electric field and EM power flux in the annular slit of 50-nm metallic gaps.

  10. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  11. Local electric fields and molecular properties in heterogeneous environments through polarizable embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    (1PA and 2PA, respectively) properties of PRODAN-methanol clusters as well as the fluorescent protein DsRed. Our results demonstrate the necessity of accounting for both the dynamical reaction field and effective external field contributions to the local field in order to reproduce full quantum......In spectroscopies, the local field experienced by a molecule embedded in an environment will be different from the externally applied electromagnetic field, and this difference may significantly alter the response and transition properties of the molecule. The polarizable embedding (PE) model has...... previously been developed to model the local field contribution stemming from the direct molecule-environment coupling of the electromagnetic response properties of molecules in solution as well as in heterogeneous environments, such as proteins. Here we present an extension of this approach to address...

  12. Local geometry of electromagnetic fields and its role in molecular multipole transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields with complex spatial variation routinely arise in Nature. We study the response of a small molecule to monochromatic fields of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. First, we consider the allowed configurations of the fields and field gradients at a single point in space. Many configurations cannot be generated from a single plane wave, regardless of polarization, but any allowed configuration can be generated by superposition of multiple plane waves. There is no local configuration of the fields and gradients that requires near-field effects. Second, we derive a set of local electromagnetic quantities, where each couples to a particular multipole transition. These quantities are small or zero in plane waves, but can be large in regions of certain superpositions of plane waves. Our findings provide a systematic framework for designing far-field and near-field experiments to drive multipole transitions. The proposed experiments provide information on molecular structure that is inaccessi...

  13. The lure of local SETI: Fifty years of field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailleris, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    With the commemoration in October 2007 of the Sputnik launch, space exploration celebrated its 50th anniversary. Despite impressive technological and scientific achievements the fascination for space has weakened during the last decades. One contributing factor has been the gradual disappearance of mankind's hope of discovering extraterrestrial life within its close neighbourhood. In striking contrast and since the middle of the 20th century, a non-negligible proportion of the population have already concluded that intelligent beings from other worlds do exist and visit Earth through space vehicles popularly called Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs). In light of the continuous public interest for the UFO enigma symbolized by the recent widely diffused media announcements on the release of French and English governmental files; and considering the approach of broadening the strategies of the "Active SETI" approach and the existence of a rich multi-disciplinary UFO documentation of potential interest for SETI; this paper describes some past scientific attempts to demonstrate the physical reality of the phenomena and potentially the presence on Earth of probes of extraterrestrial origin. Details of the different instrumented field studies deployed by scientists and organizations during the period 1950-1990 in the USA, Canada and Europe are provided. In conclusion it will be argued that while continuing the current radio/optical SETI searches, there is the necessity to maintain sustaining attention to the topic of anomalous aerospace phenomena and to develop new rigorous research approaches.

  14. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Azo Dye Monolayers : The Effect of Tilt Angle on the Local Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Gerard; Drabe, Karel E.; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Schoondorp, Monique A.; Schouten, Arend Jan; Hulshof, Johannes; Feringa, Ben L.

    1993-01-01

    We report on the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility chi(2)(2omega,omega,omega) of dye-doped Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers. Chi(2) is found to exhibit a nonlinear dependence on surface density, which is attributed to microscopic local-fields. In order to calculate the microscopic local-fiel

  15. Precise Localization and Control of Catalytic Janus Micromotors using Weak Magnetic Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, Islam S. M.; Magdanz, Veronika; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Misra, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the precise localization of spherical Pt-Silica Janus micromotors (diameter 5 mu m) under the influence of controlled magnetic fields. First, we control the motion of the Janus micromotors in two-dimensional (2D) space. The control system achieves precise localization w

  16. Growth of a localized seed magnetic field in a turbulent medium

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence dynamo deals with amplification of a seed magnetic field in a turbulent medium and has been studied mostly for uniform or spatially homogeneous seed magnetic fields. However, some astrophysical processes (e.g. jets from active galaxies, galactic winds, or ram-pressure stripping in galaxy clusters) can provide localized seed magnetic fields. In this paper, we numerically study amplification of localized seed magnetic fields in a turbulent medium. Throughout the paper, we assume that driving scale of turbulence is comparable to the size of the system. Our findings are as follows. First, turbulence can amplify a localized seed magnetic field very efficiently. The growth rate of magnetic energy density is as high as that for a uniform seed magnetic field. This result implies that a magnetic field ejected from an astrophysical object can be a viable source of magnetic field in a cluster. Second, the localized seed magnetic field disperses and fills the whole system very fast. If turbulence in a system (...

  17. Measurements of simultaneously recorded spike and local field potentials suggest that spatial selection emerges in the frontal eye field

    OpenAIRE

    Monosov, Ilya E.; Trageser, Jason C.; Thompson, Kirk G.

    2008-01-01

    The frontal eye field (FEF) participates in selecting the location of behaviorally relevant stimuli for guiding attention and eye movements. We simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFPs) and spiking activity in the FEF of monkeys performing memory-guided saccade and covert visual search tasks. We compared visual latencies and the time course of spatially selective responses in LFPs and spiking activity. Consistent with the view that LFPs represent synaptic input, visual responses a...

  18. Sedation agents differentially modulate cortical and subcortical blood oxygenation: evidence from ultra-high field MRI at 17.2 T.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Uhrig

    Full Text Available Sedation agents affect brain hemodynamic and metabolism leading to specific modifications of the cerebral blood oxygenation level. We previously demonstrated that ultra-high field (UHF MRI detects changes in cortical blood oxygenation following the administration of sedation drugs commonly used in animal research. Here we applied the UHF-MRI method to study clinically relevant sedation drugs for their effects on cortical and subcortical (thalamus, striatum oxygenation levels.We acquired T2*-weighted images of Sprague-Dawley rat brains at 17.2T in vivo. During each MRI session, rats were first anesthetized with isoflurane, then with a second sedative agent (sevoflurane, propofol, midazolam, medetomidine or ketamine-xylazine after stopping isoflurane. We computed a T2*-oxygenation-ratio that aimed at estimating cerebral blood oxygenation level for each sedative agent in each region of interest: cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and striatum.The T2*-oxygenation-ratio was consistent across scan sessions. This ratio was higher with inhalational agents than with intravenous agents. Under sevoflurane and medetomidine, T2*-oxygenation-ratio was homogenous across the brain regions. Intravenous agents (except medetomidine induced a T2*-oxygenation-ratio imbalance between cortex and subcortical regions: T2*-oxygenation-ratio was higher in the cortex than the subcortical areas under ketamine-xylazine; T2*-oxygenation-ratio was higher in subcortical regions than in the cortex under propofol or midazolam.Preclinical UHF MRI is a powerful method to monitor the changes in cerebral blood oxygenation level induced by sedative agents across brain structures. This approach also allows for a classification of sedative agents based on their differential effects on cerebral blood oxygenation level.

  19. TDCS increases cortical excitability: direct evidence from TMS-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Lauro, Leonor J; Rosanova, Mario; Mattavelli, Giulia; Convento, Silvia; Pisoni, Alberto; Opitz, Alexander; Bolognini, Nadia; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Despite transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is increasingly used in experimental and clinical settings, its precise mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. At a neuronal level, tDCS modulates the resting membrane potential in a polarity-dependent fashion: anodal stimulation increases cortical excitability in the stimulated region, while cathodal decreases it. So far, the neurophysiological underpinnings of the immediate and delayed effects of tDCS, and to what extent the stimulation of a given cerebral region may affect the activity of anatomically connected regions, remain unclear. In the present study, we used a combination of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and Electroencephalography (EEG) in order to explore local and global cortical excitability modulation during and after active and sham tDCS. Single pulse TMS was delivered over the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC), before, during, and after 15 min of tDCS over the right PPC, while EEG was recorded from 60 channels. For each session, indexes of global and local cerebral excitability were obtained, computed as global and local mean field power (Global Mean Field Power, GMFP and Local Mean Field Power, LMFP) on mean TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) for three temporal windows: 0-50, 50-100, and 100-150 msec. The global index was computed on all 60 channels. The local indexes were computed in six clusters of electrodes: left and right in frontal, parietal and temporal regions. GMFP increased, compared to baseline, both during and after active tDCS in the 0-100 msec temporal window. LMFP increased after the end of stimulation in parietal and frontal clusters bilaterally, while no difference was found in the temporal clusters. In sum, a diffuse rise of cortical excitability occurred, both during and after active tDCS. This evidence highlights the spreading of the effects of anodal tDCS over remote cortical regions of stimulated and contralateral hemispheres.

  20. Non-locality in quantum field theory due to general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier; Croon, Djuna; Fritz, Christopher [University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    We show that general relativity coupled to a quantum field theory generically leads to non-local effects in the matter sector. These non-local effects can be described by non-local higher dimensional operators which remarkably have an approximate shift symmetry. When applied to inflationary models, our results imply that small non-Gaussianities are a generic feature of models based on general relativity coupled to matter fields. However, these effects are too small to be observable in the cosmic microwave background. (orig.)

  1. Non-locality in quantum field theory due to general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier, E-mail: x.calmet@sussex.ac.uk; Croon, Djuna, E-mail: d.croon@sussex.ac.uk; Fritz, Christopher, E-mail: c.fritz@sussex.ac.uk [Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9QH, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-19

    We show that general relativity coupled to a quantum field theory generically leads to non-local effects in the matter sector. These non-local effects can be described by non-local higher dimensional operators which remarkably have an approximate shift symmetry. When applied to inflationary models, our results imply that small non-Gaussianities are a generic feature of models based on general relativity coupled to matter fields. However, these effects are too small to be observable in the cosmic microwave background.

  2. Localization and the interface between quantum mechanics, quantum field theory and quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]|[Freie Univ., Berlin (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik]. E-mail: schroer@cbpf.br

    2007-07-01

    We show that there are significant conceptual differences between QM and QFT which make it difficult to view QFT as just a relativistic extension of the principles of QM. The root of this is a fundamental distinction between Born-localization in QM (which in the relativistic context changes its name to Newton-Wigner localization) and modular localization which is the localization underlying QFT, after one liberates it from its standard presentation in terms of field coordinates. The first comes with a probability notion and projection operators, whereas the latter describes causal propagation in QFT and leads to thermal aspects. Taking these significant differences serious has not only repercussions for the philosophy of science, but also leads to a new structural properties as a consequence of vacuum polarization: the area law for localization entropy near the the causal localization horizon and a more realistic cutoff independent setting for the cosmological vacuum energy density which is compatible with local covariance. (author)

  3. The third homology of SL_2 of higher-dimensional local fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We calculate, for certain higher-dimensional local fields F, the third homology of SL_2(F) with coefficients in Z[1/2]. The answer is expressed as a direct sum of abelian groups, the first term being the indecomposable K_3 of F and all others being pre-Bloch groups of intermediate residue fields.

  4. Spin Filter Effect in Organic Polymers in the Presence of Local Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yong-Hong; CHEN Mei-Juan; WU Chang-Qin

    2006-01-01

    @@ Using a nonadiabatic evolution method, we investigate the spin filter effect in organic polymers in the presence of a local magnetic field. Through a spin-dependent magnetic field, polarons (charge carrier) with different spins will feel repulsive or attractive force determined by their spins.

  5. The frequency modulated auditory evoked response (FMAER, a technical advance for study of childhood language disorders: cortical source localization and selected case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy Frank H

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Language comprehension requires decoding of complex, rapidly changing speech streams. Detecting changes of frequency modulation (FM within speech is hypothesized as essential for accurate phoneme detection, and thus, for spoken word comprehension. Despite past demonstration of FM auditory evoked response (FMAER utility in language disorder investigations, it is seldom utilized clinically. This report's purpose is to facilitate clinical use by explaining analytic pitfalls, demonstrating sites of cortical origin, and illustrating potential utility. Results FMAERs collected from children with language disorders, including Developmental Dysphasia, Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD and also normal controls - utilizing multi-channel reference-free recordings assisted by discrete source analysis - provided demonstratrions of cortical origin and examples of clinical utility. Recordings from inpatient epileptics with indwelling cortical electrodes provided direct assessment of FMAER origin. The FMAER is shown to normally arise from bilateral posterior superior temporal gyri and immediate temporal lobe surround. Childhood language disorders associated with prominent receptive deficits demonstrate absent left or bilateral FMAER temporal lobe responses. When receptive language is spared, the FMAER may remain present bilaterally. Analyses based upon mastoid or ear reference electrodes are shown to result in erroneous conclusions. Serial FMAER studies may dynamically track status of underlying language processing in LKS. FMAERs in ASD with language impairment may be normal or abnormal. Cortical FMAERs can locate language cortex when conventional cortical stimulation does not. Conclusion The FMAER measures the processing by the superior temporal gyri and adjacent cortex of rapid frequency modulation within an auditory stream. Clinical disorders associated with receptive deficits are shown to demonstrate absent

  6. Simultaneous low extinction and high local field enhancement in Ag nanocubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Fei; Liu Ye; Li Zhi-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically investigate surface plasmon resonance properties in Au and Ag cubic nanoparticles and find a novel plasmonic mode that exhibits simultaneous low extinction and high local field enhancement properties. We analyse this mode from different aspects by looking at the distribution patterns of local field intensity, energy flux, absorption and charge density. We find that in the mode the polarized charge is highly densified in a very limited volume around the corner of the nanocube and results in very strong local field enhancement. Perturbations of the incident energy flux and light absorption are also strongly localized in this small volume of the corner region, leading to both low absorption and low scattering cross section. As a result, the extinction is low for the mode. Metal nanoparticles involving such peculiar modes may be useful for constructing nonlinear compound materials with low linear absorption and high nonlinearity.

  7. The Design and Implementation of Indoor Localization System Using Magnetic Field Based on Smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Jiang, C.; Shi, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Sufficient signal nodes are mostly required to implement indoor localization in mainstream research. Magnetic field take advantage of high precision, stable and reliability, and the reception of magnetic field signals is reliable and uncomplicated, it could be realized by geomagnetic sensor on smartphone, without external device. After the study of indoor positioning technologies, choose the geomagnetic field data as fingerprints to design an indoor localization system based on smartphone. A localization algorithm that appropriate geomagnetic matching is designed, and present filtering algorithm and algorithm for coordinate conversion. With the implement of plot geomagnetic fingerprints, the indoor positioning of smartphone without depending on external devices can be achieved. Finally, an indoor positioning system which is based on Android platform is successfully designed, through the experiments, proved the capability and effectiveness of indoor localization algorithm.

  8. Including gauge symmetry in the localization mechanism of massive vector fields

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, Rommel

    2013-01-01

    On the four-dimensional sector of an AdS$_5$ warped geometry the standard electromagnetic interaction can be simulated by massive vector fields via the Ghoroku - Nakamura localization mechanism. We incorporate gauge symmetry to this theory by finding the required interaction terms between the vector bosons and the gravitational field of the scenario. The four-dimensional effective theory defined by a Maxwell term and a tower of Stueckelberg fields is obtained after expanding the vector fields on a massive eigenstates basis where the zero mode is uncoupled from the rest of the spectrum. The corrections generated by the massive gauge fields set to the electrostatic potential are also calculated.

  9. Selective domain wall depinning by localized Oersted fields and Joule heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgaz, Dennis; Kläui, Mathias; Heyne, Lutz; Boulle, Olivier; Zinser, Fabian; Krzyk, Stephen; Fonin, Mikhail; Rüdiger, Ulrich; Backes, Dirk; Heyderman, Laura J.

    2008-09-01

    Using low temperature magnetoresistance measurements, the possibility to selectively move a domain wall locally by applying current pulses through a Au nanowire adjacent to a permalloy element is studied. We find that the domain wall depinning field is drastically modified with increasing current density due to the Joule heating and the Oersted field of the current, and controlled motion due to the Oersted field without any externally applied fields is achieved. By placing the domain wall at various distances from the Au wire, we determine the range of the Joule heating and the Oersted field and both effects can be separated.

  10. Magnetic-field-driven localization of light in a cold-atom gas

    CERN Document Server

    Skipetrov, S E

    2014-01-01

    We discover a transition from extended to localized quasi-modes for light in a gas of immobile two-level atoms in a magnetic field. The transition takes place either upon increasing the number density of atoms in a strong field or upon increasing the field at a high enough density. It has many characteristic features of a disorder-driven (Anderson) transition but is strongly influenced by near-field interactions between atoms and the anisotropy of the atomic medium induced by the magnetic field.

  11. Stochastic locality and master-field simulations of very large lattices arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Lüscher, Martin

    In lattice QCD and other field theories with a mass gap, the field variables in distant regions of a physically large lattice are only weakly correlated. Accurate stochastic estimates of the expectation values of local observables may therefore be obtained from a single representative field. Such master-field simulations potentially allow very large lattices to be simulated, but require various conceptual and technical issues to be addressed. In this talk, an introduction to the subject is provided and some encouraging results of master-field simulations of the SU(3) gauge theory are reported.

  12. Controlling electron localization of H$_2^+$ by intense plasmon-enhanced laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Yavuz, I; Chacón, A; Altun, Z; Lewenstein, M

    2015-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the wave packet dynamics of the H$_2^+$ molecular ion in plasmon-enhanced laser fields. Such fields may be produced, for instance, when metallic nano-structures are illuminated by a laser pulse of moderated intensity. Their main property is that they vary in space on nanometer scales. We demonstrate that the spatial inhomogeneous character of these plasmonic fields leads to an enhancement of electron localization, an instrumental phenomenon that controls molecular fragmentation. We suggest that the charge-imbalance induced by the surface-plasmon resonance near the metallic nano-structures is the origin of the increase in the electron localization.

  13. Prevention of brittle fracture of steel structures by controlling the local stress and strain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyseychik Evgeniy Alekseevich

    Full Text Available In the article the author offers a classification of the methods to increase the cold resistance of steel structural shapes with a focus on the regulation of local fields of internal stresses and strains to prevent brittle fracture of steel structures. The need of a computer thermography is highlighted not only for visualization of temperature fields on the surface, but also to control the fields of residual stresses and strains in a controlled element.

  14. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased visual ...

  15. Impact of mask CDU and local CD variation on intra-field CDU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Junji; Mouraille, Orion; Finders, Jo; Higuchi, Masaru; Kojima, Yosuke; Sato, Shunsuke; Morimoto, Hiroaki

    2012-11-01

    The control of critical dimension uniformity (CDU), especially intra-field CDU, is an important aspect for advanced lithography, and this property must be controlled very tightly since it affects all of the exposure fields. It is well known that the influence of the mask CDU on the wafer intra-field CDU is becoming dominant because the mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) is quite high for low-k1 lithography. Additionally, the abovementioned factors impact the CDU through global (field-level) and local (grating-level) variations. In this paper, we analyze in detail CDU budgets by clarifying the impact of local CD variation. The 50-nm staggered hole features using Att-PSM showed a mask global CDU of 1.64 nm (3sigma at the mask level) and a wafer intra-field CDU of 2.30 nm, indicating that the mask global CDU was a major part of the intra-field CDU. By compensating for the contribution of the mask CD, the wafer intra-field CDU can be reduced to 0.986 nm. We analyzed the budgets of wafer intra-field CDU, which is caused by local CD variation (mask and process) and measurement noise. We determined that a primary cause of the wafer intra-field CDU after applying a mask CD correction was these local CD variations, which might disturb the proper use of dose correction for the mask CD. We demonstrated that the impact of mask local CD variation on the correction flow can be greatly reduced by averaging multiple point measurements within a small area, and therefore discuss the optimum conditions allowing for an accurate intra-field CDU determination. We also consider optimization of the CD sampling scheme in order to apply a dose correction on an exposure system to compensate for the mask CDU.

  16. On localization of universal scalar fields in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Furlong, Alfonso; Linares, Roman; Mora-Luna, Refugio Rigel; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A

    2014-01-01

    Braneworld models may yield interesting effects ranging from high-energy physics to cosmology, or even some low-energy physics. Their mode structure modifies standard results in these physical realms that can be tested and used to set bounds on the models parameters. Now, to define braneworld deviations from standard 4D physics, a notion of matter and gravity localization on the brane is crucial. In this work we investigate the localization of universal massive scalar fields in a de Sitter thick tachyonic braneworld generated by gravity coupled to a tachyonic bulk scalar field. This braneworld possesses a 4D de Sitter induced metric and is asymptotically flat despite the presence of a negative bulk cosmological constant, a novel and interesting peculiarity that contrasts with previously known models. Universal scalar fields can be localized in this expanding braneworld if their bulk mass obeys an upper bound, otherwise they delocalize: The dynamics of the scalar field is governed by a Schroedinger equation wi...

  17. Nonperturbative renormalization group for scalar fields in de Sitter space: beyond the local potential approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Guilleux, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Nonperturbative renormalization group techniques have recently proven a powerful tool to tackle the nontrivial infrared dynamics of light scalar fields in de Sitter space. In the present article, we develop the formalism beyond the local potential approximation employed in earlier works. In particular, we consider the derivative expansion, a systematic expansion in powers of field derivatives, appropriate for long wavelength modes, that we generalize to the relevant case of a curved metric with Lorentzian signature. The method is illustrated with a detailed discussion of the so-called local potential approximation prime which, on the top of the full effective potential, includes a running (but field-independent) field renormalization. We explicitly compute the associated anomalous dimension for O(N) theories. We find that it can take large values along the flow, leading to sizable differences as compared to the local potential approximation. However, it does not prevent the phenomenon of gravitationally induc...

  18. Magnon localization and Bloch oscillations in finite Heisenberg spin chains in an inhomogeneous magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yuriy A; Gann, Vladimir V

    2013-06-19

    We study the localization of magnon states in finite defect-free Heisenberg spin-1/2 ferromagnetic chains placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field with a constant spatial gradient. Continuous transformation from the extended magnon states to the localized Wannier-Zeeman states in a finite spin chain placed in an inhomogeneous field is described both analytically and numerically. We describe for the first time the non-monotonic dependence of the energy levels of magnons, both long and short wavelength, on the magnetic field gradient, which is a consequence of magnon localization in a finite spin chain. We show that, in contrast to the destruction of the magnon band and the establishment of the Wannier-Stark ladder in a vanishingly small field gradient in an infinite chain, the localization of magnon states at the chain ends preserves the memory of the magnon band. Essentially, the localization at the lower- or higher-field chain end resembles the localization of the positive- or negative-effective-mass band quasiparticles. We also show how the beat dynamics of coherent superposition of extended spin waves in a finite chain in a homogeneous or weakly inhomogeneous field transforms into magnon Bloch oscillations of the superposition of localized Wannier-Zeeman states in a strongly inhomogeneous field. We provide a semiclassical description of the magnon Bloch oscillations and show that the correspondence between the quantum and semiclassical descriptions is most accurate for Bloch oscillations of the magnon coherent states, which are built from a coherent superposition of a large number of the nearest-neighbour Wannier-Zeeman states.

  19. Full-field, high-spatial-resolution detection of local structural damage from low-resolution random strain field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Sun, Peng; Nagarajaiah, Satish; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Weisman, R. Bruce

    2017-07-01

    Structural damage is typically a local phenomenon that initiates and propagates within a limited area. As such high spatial resolution measurement and monitoring is often needed for accurate damage detection. This requires either significantly increased costs from denser sensor deployment in the case of global simultaneous/parallel measurements, or increased measurement time and labor in the case of global sequential measurements. This study explores the feasibility of an alternative approach to this problem: a computational solution in which a limited set of randomly positioned, low-resolution global strain measurements are used to reconstruct the full-field, high-spatial-resolution, two-dimensional (2D) strain field and rapidly detect local damage. The proposed approach exploits the implicit low-rank and sparse data structure of the 2D strain field: it is highly correlated without many edges and hence has a low-rank structure, unless damage-manifesting itself as sparse local irregularity-is present and alters such a low-rank structure slightly. Therefore, reconstruction of the full-field, high-spatial-resolution strain field from a limited set of randomly positioned low-resolution global measurements is modeled as a low-rank matrix completion framework and damage detection as a sparse decomposition formulation, enabled by emerging convex optimization techniques. Numerical simulations on a plate structure are conducted for validation. The results are discussed and a practical iterative global/local procedure is recommended. This new computational approach should enable the efficient detection of local damage using limited sets of strain measurements.

  20. Evolution of magnetotelluric, total magnetic field, and VLF field parameters in Central Italy. Relations to local seismic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meloni, A.; Di Mauro, D.; Mele, G.; Palangio, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Ernst, T.; Teisseyre, R. [Institute of Geophysics, Warszawa (Poland)

    2001-04-01

    Magnetotelluric data were collected at Collemeluccio (41.72{sup 0}N, 14.37{sup 0}E) in Central Italy from summer 1991 to spring 1998. Analyzed by means of tensor decomposition on the geoelectric potential and robust estimation on the geomagnetic field, this set of data allowed the investigation of the electromagnetic induction, is presented here in its time evolution and compared to local and regional seismic activity. Tecto magnetic field observations from absolute magnetic field level in Central Italy were also made on data simultaneously recorded at four magnetometer stations, using L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory as a reference for differentiation. Recent results gathered from a system of two VLF search coil wide-band antennas, installed in the L'Aquila Observatory, are also discussed in relation to local seismic activity.

  1. Impact of Neuronal Membrane Damage on the Local Field Potential in a Large-Scale Simulation of Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Boothe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Within multiscale brain dynamics, the structure–function relationship between cellular changes at a lower scale and coordinated oscillations at a higher scale is not well understood. This relationship may be particularly relevant for understanding functional impairments after a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI when current neuroimaging methods do not reveal morphological changes to the brain common in moderate to severe TBI such as diffuse axonal injury or gray matter lesions. Here, we created a physiology-based model of cerebral cortex using a publicly released modeling framework (GEneral NEural SImulation System to explore the possibility that performance deficits characteristic of blast-induced mTBI may reflect dysfunctional, local network activity influenced by microscale neuronal damage at the cellular level. We operationalized microscale damage to neurons as the formation of pores on the neuronal membrane based on research using blast paradigms, and in our model, pores were simulated by a change in membrane conductance. We then tracked changes in simulated electrical activity. Our model contained 585 simulated neurons, comprised of 14 types of cortical and thalamic neurons each with its own compartmental morphology and electrophysiological properties. Comparing the functional activity of neurons before and after simulated damage, we found that simulated pores in the membrane reduced both action potential generation and local field potential (LFP power in the 1–40 Hz range of the power spectrum. Furthermore, the location of damage modulated the strength of these effects: pore formation on simulated axons reduced LFP power more strongly than did pore formation on the soma and the dendrites. These results indicate that even small amounts of cellular damage can negatively impact functional activity of larger scale oscillations, and our findings suggest that multiscale modeling provides a promising avenue to elucidate these relationships.

  2. Quasi locality of the GGE in interacting-to-free quenches in relativistic field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianello, Alvise; Sotiriadis, Spyros

    2017-02-01

    We study the quench dynamics in continuous relativistic quantum field theory, more specifically the locality properties of the large time stationary state. After a quantum quench in a one-dimensional integrable model, the expectation values of local observables are expected to relax to a generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE), constructed out of the conserved charges of the model. Quenching to a free bosonic theory, it has been shown that the system indeed relaxes to a GGE described by the momentum mode occupation numbers. We first address the question whether the latter can be written directly in terms of local charges and we find that, in contrast to the lattice case, this is not possible in continuous field theories. We then investigate the less stringent requirement of the existence of a sequence of truncated local GGEs that converges to the correct steady state, in the sense of the expectation values of the local observables. While we show that such a sequence indeed exists, in order to unequivocally determine the so-defined GGE, we find that information about the expectation value of the recently discovered quasi-local charges is in the end necessary, the latter being the suitable generalization of the local charges while passing from the lattice to the continuum. Lastly, we study the locality properties of the GGE and show that the latter is completely determined by the knowledge of the expectation value of a countable set of suitably defined quasi-local charges.

  3. Local Heat Transfer to an Evaporating Sessile Droplet in an Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, M. J.; Howe, C. M.; Di Marco, P.; Robinson, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    Local heat transfer of an evaporating sessile droplet under a static electric field is an underdeveloped topic. In this research an 80 μl water droplet is placed in the centre of a 25 μm thick stainless steel substrate. A static electric field is applied by an electrode positioned 10 mm above the substrate. A high speed thermal imaging camera is placed below the substrate to capture the thermal footprint of the evaporating droplet. Four electric fields were characterised; 0, 5, 10 and 11 kV/cm. As the electric field is increased the contact angle was observed to decrease. The local heat flux profile, peak and radial location of this peek were observed to be independent of the applied electric field for all test points for this working fluid and surface combination.

  4. Localization and quasilocalization of a spin-1 /2 fermion field on a two-field thick braneworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Heng; Xie, Qun-Ying; Fu, Chun-E.

    2015-11-01

    Localization of a spin-1 /2 fermion on the braneworld is an important and interesting problem. It is well known that a five-dimensional free massless fermion Ψ minimally coupled to gravity cannot be localized on the Randall-Sundrum braneworld. In order to trap such a fermion, the coupling between the fermion and bulk scalar fields should be introduced. In this paper, localization and quasilocalization of a bulk fermion on the thick braneworld generated by two scalar fields (a kink scalar ϕ and a dilaton scalar π ) are investigated. Two types of couplings between the fermion and two scalars are considered. One coupling is the usual Yukawa coupling -η Ψ ¯ϕ Ψ between the fermion and kink scalar, another one is λ Ψ ¯ΓM∂Mπ γ5Ψ between the fermion and dilaton scalar. The left-chiral fermion zero mode can be localized on the brane, and both the left- and right-chiral fermion massive Kaluza-Klein modes may be localized or quasilocalized. Hence the four-dimensional massless left-chiral fermion and massive Dirac fermions, whose lifetime is infinite or finite, can be obtained on the brane.

  5. Effects of the local structure dependence of evaporation fields on field evaporation behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Lan; Marquis, Emmanuelle A., E-mail: emarq@umich.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Withrow, Travis; Restrepo, Oscar D.; Windl, Wolfgang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Accurate three dimensional reconstructions of atomic positions and full quantification of the information contained in atom probe microscopy data rely on understanding the physical processes taking place during field evaporation of atoms from needle-shaped specimens. However, the modeling framework for atom probe microscopy has only limited quantitative justification. Building on the continuum field models previously developed, we introduce a more physical approach with the selection of evaporation events based on density functional theory calculations. This model reproduces key features observed experimentally in terms of sequence of evaporation, evaporation maps, and depth resolution, and provides insights into the physical limit for spatial resolution.

  6. Effects of the local structure dependence of evaporation fields on field evaporation behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Lan; Restrepo, Oscar D; Windl, Wolfgang; Marquis, Emmanuelle A

    2015-01-01

    Accurate three dimensional reconstructions of atomic positions, and full quantification of the information contained in atom probe tomography data relies on understanding the physical processes taking place during field evaporation of atoms from needle-shaped specimens. However, the modeling framework for atom probe tomography has remained qualitative at best. Building on the continuum field models previously developed, we introduce a more physical approach with the selection of evaporation events based on density functional theory calculations. This new model reproduces key features observed experimentally in terms of sequence of evaporation, desorption maps, and depth resolution, and provides insights into the physical limit for spatial resolution.

  7. Local high-resolution crustal magnetic field analysis from satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Alain; Simons, Frederik J.

    2016-04-01

    Planetary crustal magnetic fields are key to understanding a planet or moon's structure and history. Due to satellite orbit parameters such as aerobraking (Mars) or only partial coverage (Mercury), or simply because of the strongly heterogeneous crustal field strength, satellite data of planetary magnetic fields vary regionally in their signal-to noise ratio and data coverage. To take full advantage of data quality within one region of a planet or moon without diluting the data with lower quality measurements outside of that region we resort to local methods. Slepian functions are linear combinations of spherical harmonics that provide local sensitivity to structure. Here we present a selection of crustal magnetic field models obtained from vector-valued variable-altitude satellite observations using an altitude-cognizant gradient-vector Slepian approach. This method is based on locally maximizing energy concentration within the region of data availability while simultaneously bandlimiting the model in terms of its spherical-harmonic degree and minimizing noise amplification due to downward continuation. For simple regions such as spherical caps, our method is computationally efficient and allows us to calculate local crustal magnetic field solutions beyond spherical harmonic degree 800, if the data permit. We furthermore discuss extensions of the method that are optimized for the analysis and separation of internal and external magnetic fields.

  8. Single-Field Inflation and the Local Ansatz: Distinguishability and Consistency

    CERN Document Server

    de Putter, Roland; Green, Daniel; Meyers, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The single-field consistency conditions and the local ansatz have played separate but important roles in characterizing the non-Gaussian signatures of single- and multifield inflation respectively. We explore the precise relationship between these two approaches and their predictions. We demonstrate that the predictions of the single-field consistency conditions can never be satisfied by a general local ansatz with deviations necessarily arising at order $(n_s-1)^2$. This implies that there is, in principle, a minimum difference between single- and (fully local) multifield inflation in observables sensitive to the squeezed limit such as scale-dependent halo bias. We also explore some potential observational implications of the consistency conditions and its relationship to the local ansatz. In particular, we propose a new scheme to test the consistency relations. In analogy with delensing of the cosmic microwave background, one can deproject the coupling of the long wavelength modes with the short wavelength ...

  9. A dark-field scanning spectroscopy platform for localized scatter and fluorescence imaging of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Laughney, Ashley M.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-03-01

    Tissue ultra-structure and molecular composition provide native contrast mechanisms for discriminating across pathologically distinct tissue-types. Multi-modality optical probe designs combined with spatially confined sampling techniques have been shown to be sensitive to this type of contrast but their extension to imaging has only been realized recently. A modular scanning spectroscopy platform has been developed to allow imaging localized morphology and molecular contrast measures in breast cancer surgical specimens. A custom designed dark-field telecentric scanning spectroscopy system forms the core of this imaging platform. The system allows imaging localized elastic scatter and fluorescence measures over fields of up to 15 mm x 15 mm at 100 microns resolution in tissue. Results from intralipid and blood phantom measurements demonstrate the ability of the system to quantify localized scatter parameters despite significant changes in local absorption. A co-registered fluorescence spectroscopy mode is also demonstrated in a protophorphyrin-IX phantom.

  10. Localized heating on silicon field effect transistors: device fabrication and temperature measurements in fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elibol, Oguz H; Reddy, Bobby; Nair, Pradeep R; Dorvel, Brian; Butler, Felice; Ahsan, Zahab S; Bergstrom, Donald E; Alam, Muhammad A; Bashir, Rashid

    2009-10-07

    We demonstrate electrically addressable localized heating in fluid at the dielectric surface of silicon-on-insulator field-effect transistors via radio-frequency Joule heating of mobile ions in the Debye layer. Measurement of fluid temperatures in close vicinity to surfaces poses a challenge due to the localized nature of the temperature profile. To address this, we developed a localized thermometry technique based on the fluorescence decay rate of covalently attached fluorophores to extract the temperature within 2 nm of any oxide surface. We demonstrate precise spatial control of voltage dependent temperature profiles on the transistor surfaces. Our results introduce a new dimension to present sensing systems by enabling dual purpose silicon transistor-heaters that serve both as field effect sensors as well as temperature controllers that could perform localized bio-chemical reactions in Lab on Chip applications.

  11. Quasi locality of the GGE in interacting-to-free quenches in relativistic field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Bastianello, Alvise

    2016-01-01

    We study the quench dynamics in continuous relativistic quantum field theory, more specifically the locality properties of the large time stationary state. After a quantum quench in a one-dimensional integrable model, the expectation values of local observables are expected to relax to a Generalised Gibbs Ensemble (GGE), constructed out of the conserved charges of the model. Quenching to a free bosonic theory, it has been shown that the system indeed relaxes to a GGE described by the momentum mode occupation numbers. Here we address the question whether the latter can be equivalently described by a GGE constructed with only local charges. We show that, in marked contrast to the lattice case, this is always impossible in continuous field theories and instead the recently discovered quasilocal charges are necessary. In particular we show that the discrepancy between the exact steady state and the local GGE is clearly manifested as a difference in the large distance behaviour of the two point correlation functio...

  12. Locality and Efficient Evaluation of Lattice Composite Fields: Overlap-Based Gauge Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandru, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel general approach to locality of lattice composite fields, which in case of QCD involves locality in both quark and gauge degrees of freedom. The method is applied to gauge operators based on the overlap Dirac matrix elements, showing for the first time their local nature on realistic path-integral backgrounds. The framework entails a method for efficient evaluation of such non-ultralocal operators, whose computational cost is volume-indepenent at fixed accuracy, and only grows logarithmically as this accuracy approaches zero. This makes computation of useful operators, such as overlap-based topological density, practical. The key notion underlying these features is that of exponential insensitivity to distant fields, made rigorous by introducing the procedure of statistical regularization. The scales associated with insensitivity property are useful characteristics of non-local continuum operators.

  13. Unmasking local activity within local field potentials (LFPs) by removing distal electrical signals using independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Nathan W; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2016-05-15

    Local field potentials (LFPs) are commonly thought to reflect the aggregate dynamics in local neural circuits around recording electrodes. However, we show that when LFPs are recorded in awake behaving animals against a distal reference on the skull as commonly practiced, LFPs are significantly contaminated by non-local and non-neural sources arising from the reference electrode and from movement-related noise. In a data set with simultaneously recorded LFPs and electroencephalograms (EEGs) across multiple brain regions while rats perform an auditory oddball task, we used independent component analysis (ICA) to identify signals arising from electrical reference and from volume-conducted noise based on their distributed spatial pattern across multiple electrodes and distinct power spectral features. These sources of distal electrical signals collectively accounted for 23-77% of total variance in unprocessed LFPs, as well as most of the gamma oscillation responses to the target stimulus in EEGs. Gamma oscillation power was concentrated in volume-conducted noise and was tightly coupled with the onset of licking behavior, suggesting a likely origin of muscle activity associated with body movement or orofacial movement. The removal of distal signal contamination also selectively reduced correlations of LFP/EEG signals between distant brain regions but not within the same region. Finally, the removal of contamination from distal electrical signals preserved an event-related potential (ERP) response to auditory stimuli in the frontal cortex and also increased the coupling between the frontal ERP amplitude and neuronal activity in the basal forebrain, supporting the conclusion that removing distal electrical signals unmasked local activity within LFPs. Together, these results highlight the significant contamination of LFPs by distal electrical signals and caution against the straightforward interpretation of unprocessed LFPs. Our results provide a principled approach to

  14. Localization of periodic orbits of polynomial vector fields of even degree by linear functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, Konstantin E. [CITEDI-IPN, Av. del Parque 1310, Mesa de Otay, Tijuana, BC (Mexico)] e-mail: konst@citedi.mx

    2005-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the localization problem of periodic orbits of polynomial vector fields of even degree by using linear functions. Conditions of the localization of all periodic orbits in sets of a simple structure are obtained. Our results are based on the solution of the conditional extremum problem and the application of homogeneous polynomial forms of even degrees. As examples, the Lanford system, the jerky system with one quadratic monomial and a quartically perturbed harmonic oscillator are considered.

  15. Changes in cortical field potentials during learning processes of go/no-go reaction time hand movement with tone discrimination in the monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemba, H

    1993-09-03

    Field potentials were recorded with electrodes implanted in various cortical areas while a monkey acquired a task of go/no-go reaction time hand movement with discrimination between tone stimuli of different frequencies. After a few weeks of training, a surface-negative, depth-positive (s-N, d-P) potential (no-go potential) emerged in the dorsal bank of the principal sulcus. As the potential increased in size in 1-3 months, the monkey gradually discriminated between go and no-go stimuli. The no-go potential is considered to be related to judgement not to move and suppression of motor execution. In the superior temporal gyrus, a s-N, d-P potential at a shorter latency than the no-go potential augmented in size on both go and no-go trials, as the monkey learned the discrimination task. The s-N, d-P potential in this gyrus may reflect an information processing prior to the discrimination in the prefrontal cortex.

  16. NEAR-FIELD SOURCE LOCALIZATION METHOD AND APPLICATION USING THE TIME REVERSAL MIRROR TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yongqing; Jiang Yulei; Liu Zhanya

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop the acoustic keyboard for Personal Computer (PC),it is necessary to seek high-precision near-field source localization algorithm for identifying the keyboard characters.First of all,the focusing property of Time Reversal Mirror (TRM) is introduced,and then a mathematical model of microphone array receiving typing sound is established according to the realization of acoustic keyboard from which the TRM localization algorithm is carried out.The results through computer simulation show that the localization Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) performance of the algorithm can reach 10-3,which demonstrates that the algorithm possesses a high accuracy for the actual near-field acoustic source localization,with potential of developing the computer acoustic keyboard.Furthermore,for the purpose of testing its effect on actual near-field source localization,we organize three experiments for acoustic keyboard characters localization.The experiment results show that the positioning error of TRM algorithm is less than 1 cm within a provided acoustic keyboard region.This will provide theoretical guidance for the further research of computer acoustic keyboard.

  17. Local field distribution and configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on the nanostructure platinum surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xiao-Jing; He Su-Zhen; Wu Chen-Xu

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows that the local electric field distribution near the nanostructure metallic surface is obtained by solving the Laplace equation, and furthermore, the configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on a Pt nanoparticle surface is obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation. It is found that the uneven local electric field distribution induced by the nanostructure surface can influence the configuration of carbon monoxide (CO) molecules by a force, which drags the adsorbates to the poles of the nanoparticles. This result, together with our results obtained before, may explain the experimental results that the nanostructure metallic surface can lead to abnormal phenomena such as anti-absorption infrared effects.

  18. Localization of Matter Fields in the 5D Standing Wave Braneworld

    CERN Document Server

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the localization problem of matter fields within the 5D standing wave braneworld. In this model the brane emits anisotropic waves into the bulk with different amplitudes along different spatial dimensions. We show that in the case of increasing warp factor there exist the pure gravitational localization of all kinds of quantum and classical particles on the brane. For classical particles the anisotropy of the background metric is hidden, brane fields exhibit standard Lorentz symmetry in spite of anisotropic nature of the primordial 5D metric.

  19. Imaging local electric fields produced upon synchrotron X-ray exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmar, Christopher M; Newman, Justin A; Toth, Scott J; Becker, Michael; Fischetti, Robert F; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-01-20

    Electron-hole separation following hard X-ray absorption during diffraction analysis of soft materials under cryogenic conditions produces substantial local electric fields visualizable by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photoelectron trajectories suggest the formation of substantial local electric fields in the regions adjacent to those exposed to X-rays, indicating a possible electric-field-induced SHG (EFISH) mechanism for generating the observed signal. In studies of amorphous vitreous solvents, analysis of the SHG spatial profiles following X-ray microbeam exposure was consistent with an EFISH mechanism. Within protein crystals, exposure to 12-keV (1.033-Å) X-rays resulted in increased SHG in the region extending ∼ 3 μm beyond the borders of the X-ray beam. Moderate X-ray exposures typical of those used for crystal centering by raster scanning through an X-ray beam were sufficient to produce static electric fields easily detectable by SHG. The X-ray-induced SHG activity was observed with no measurable loss for longer than 2 wk while maintained under cryogenic conditions, but disappeared if annealed to room temperature for a few seconds. These results provide direct experimental observables capable of validating simulations of X-ray-induced damage within soft materials. In addition, X-ray-induced local fields may potentially impact diffraction resolution through localized piezoelectric distortions of the lattice.

  20. Matrix method for the solution of RF field perturbations due to local frequency shifts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-Rui; PENG Jun; FU Shi-Nian

    2009-01-01

    To tune the accelerating field to the design value in a periodical radio frequency accelerating structure, Slater's perturbation theorem is commonly used. This theorem solves a second-order differential equation to obtain the electrical field variation due to a local frequency shift. The solution becomes very difficult for a complex distribution of the local frequency shifts. Noticing the similarity between the field perturbation equation and the equation describing the transverse motion of a particle in a quadrupole channel, we propose in this paper a new method in which the transfer matrix method is applied to the field calculation instead of directly solving the differential equation. The advantage of the matrix method is illustrated in examples.

  1. Central Limit Theorems for Cavity and Local Fields of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    One of the remarkable applications of the cavity method is to prove the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) system of equations in the high temperature analysis of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model. This naturally leads us to the important study of the limit laws for cavity and local fields. The first quantitative results for both fields based on Stein's method were studied by Chatterjee. Although Stein's method provides us an efficient search for the limiting distributions, the nature of this method in some way restricts the exploration for optimal and general results. In this paper, our study based on Gaussian interpolation obtains the CLT for cavity fields. With the help of this result, we conclude the CLT for local fields. In both cases, better quantitative results are given.

  2. Large field-of-view and depth-specific cortical microvascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-02-01

    Ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify of blood flow, blood vessel morphology, oxygenation and tissue morphology is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of various neurovascular disorders, e.g., stroke. Currently, no imaging technique is available that can satisfactorily extract these parameters from in vivo microcirculatory tissue beds, with large field of view and sufficient resolution at defined depth without any harm to the tissue. In order for more effective therapeutics, we need to determine the area of brain that is damaged but not yet dead after focal ischemia. Here we develop an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which SDW-LSCI (synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle imaging) is used as a guiding tool for OMAG (optical microangiography) to investigate the fine detail of tissue hemodynamics, such as vessel flow, profile, and flow direction. We determine the utility of the integrated system for serial monitoring afore mentioned parameters in experimental stroke, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice. For 90 min MCAO, onsite and 24 hours following reperfusion, we use SDW-LSCI to determine distinct flow and oxygenation variations for differentiation of the infarction, peri-infarct, reduced flow and contralateral regions. The blood volumes are quantifiable and distinct in afore mentioned regions. We also demonstrate the behaviors of flow and flow direction in the arterials connected to MCA play important role in the time course of MCAO. These achievements may improve our understanding of vascular involvement under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitate clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases, such as ischemic stroke.

  3. Experimental investigation of local properties and statistics of optical vortices in random wave fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Miyamoto, Y.;

    2005-01-01

    We present the first direct experimental evidence of the local properties of optical vortices in a random laser speckle field. We have observed the Berry anisotropy ellipse describing the anisotropic squeezing of phase lines close to vortex cores and quantitatively verified the Dennis angular...... momentum rule for its phase. Some statistics associated with vortices, such as density, anisotropy ellipse eccentricity, and its relation to zero crossings of real and imaginary parts of the random field, are also investigated by experiments....

  4. Non-local form factors for curved-space antisymmetric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Netto, Tiberio de Paula

    2016-01-01

    In the recent paper Buchbinder, Kirillova and Pletnev presented formal arguments concerning quantum equivalence of free massive antisymmetric tensor fields of second and third rank to the free Proca theory and massive scalar field with minimal coupling to gravity, respectively. We confirm this result using explicit covariant calculations of non-local form factors based on the heart-kernel technique, and discuss the discontinuity of quantum contributions in the massless limit.

  5. Fourth order phase-field model for local max-ent approximants applied to crack propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Amiri, Fatemeh; Millán, Daniel; Arroyo Balaguer, Marino; Silani, Mohammad; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-01-01

    We apply a fourth order phase-field model for fracture based on local maximum entropy (LME) approximants. The higher order continuity of the meshfree LME approximants allows to directly solve the fourth order phase-field equations without splitting the fourth order differential equation into two second order differential equations. We will first show that the crack surface can be captured more accurately in the fourth order model. Furthermore, less nodes are needed for the fourth order model ...

  6. A method of analysis of distributions of local electric fields in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, V. I.; Yakovlev, V. B.; Bardushkin, V. V.; Lavrov, I. V.; Sychev, A. P.; Yakovleva, E. N.

    2016-03-01

    A method of prediction of distributions of local electric fields in composite media based on analysis of the tensor operators of the concentration of intensity and induction is proposed. Both general expressions and the relations for calculating these operators are obtained in various approximations. The analytical expressions are presented for the operators of the concentration of electric fields in various types of inhomogeneous structures obtained in the generalized singular approximation.

  7. In Vitro Developmental Neurotoxicity Following Chronic Exposure to 50 Hz Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields in Primary Rat Cortical Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Martje W G D M; van Kleef, Regina G D M; de Groot, Aart; Westerink, Remco H S

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to 50-60 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) has increased considerably over the last decades. Several epidemiological studies suggested that ELF-EMF exposure is associated with adverse health effects, including neurotoxicity. However, these studies are debated as results are often contradictory and the possible underlying mechanisms are unknown. Since the developing nervous system is particularly vulnerable to insults, we investigate effects of chronic, developmental ELF-EMF exposure in vitro. Primary rat cortical neurons received 7 days developmental exposure to 50 Hz block-pulsed ELF-EMF (0-1000 μT) to assess effects on cell viability (Alamar Blue/CFDA assay), calcium homeostasis (single cell fluorescence microscopy), neurite outgrowth (β(III)-Tubulin immunofluorescent staining), and spontaneous neuronal activity (multi-electrode arrays). Our data demonstrate that cell viability is not affected by developmental ELF-EMF (0-1000 μT) exposure. Depolarization- and glutamate-evoked increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) are slightly increased at 1 μT, whereas both basal and stimulation-evoked [Ca(2+)]i show a modest inhibition at 1000 μT. Subsequent morphological analysis indicated that neurite length is unaffected up to 100 μT, but increased at 1000 μT. However, neuronal activity appeared largely unaltered following chronic ELF-EMF exposure up to 1000 μT. The effects of ELF-EMF exposure were small and largely restricted to the highest field strength (1000 μT), ie, 10 000 times above background exposure and well above current residential exposure limits. Our combined data therefore indicate that chronic ELF-EMF exposure has only limited (developmental) neurotoxic potential in vitro.

  8. The magnetic field of Betelgeuse: a local dynamo from giant convection cells?

    CERN Document Server

    Auriere, M; Konstantinova-Antova, R; Perrin, G; Petit, P; Roudier, T

    2010-01-01

    Betelgeuse is an M supergiant with a complex and extended atmosphere, which also harbors spots and giant granules at its surface. A possible magnetic field could contribute to the mass loss and to the heating of the outer atmosphere. We observed Betelgeuse, to directly study and infer the nature of its magnetic field. We used the new-generation spectropolarimeter NARVAL and the least square deconvolution (LSD) method to detect circular polarization within the photospheric absorption lines of Betelgeuse. We have unambiguously detected a weak Stokes V signal in the spectral lines of Betelgeuse, and measured the related surface-averaged longitudinal magnetic field Bl at 6 different epochs over one month. The detected longitudinal field is about one Gauss and is apparently increasing on the time scale of our observations. This work presents the first direct detection of the magnetic field of Betelgeuse. This magnetic field may be associated to the giant convection cells that could enable a "local dynamo:.

  9. Lateral entorhinal modulation of piriform cortical activity and fine odor discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Julie; Cohen, Yaniv; He, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zhijan; Jin, Sen; Xu, Fuqiang; Wilson, Donald A

    2013-08-14

    The lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) receives direct input from olfactory bulb mitral cells and piriform cortical pyramidal cells and is the gateway for olfactory input to the hippocampus. However, the LEC also projects back to the piriform cortex and olfactory bulb. Activity in the LEC is shaped by input from the perirhinal cortices, hippocampus, and amygdala, and thus could provide a rich contextual modulation of cortical odor processing. The present study further explored LEC feedback to anterior piriform cortex by examining how LEC top-down input modulates anterior piriform cortex odor evoked activity in rats. Retrograde viral tracing confirmed rich LEC projections to both the olfactory bulb and piriform cortices. In anesthetized rats, reversible lesions of the ipsilateral LEC increased anterior piriform cortical single-unit spontaneous activity. In awake animals performing an odor discrimination task, unilateral LEC reversible lesions enhanced ipsilateral piriform cortical local field potential oscillations during odor sampling, with minimal impact on contralateral activity. Bilateral LEC reversible lesions impaired discrimination performance on a well learned, difficult odor discrimination task, but had no impact on a well learned simple odor discrimination task. The simple discrimination task was impaired by bilateral reversible lesions of the anterior piriform cortex. Given the known function of LEC in working memory and multisensory integration, these results suggest it may serve as a powerful top-down modulator of olfactory cortical function and odor perception. Furthermore, the results provide potential insight into how neuropathology in the entorhinal cortex could contribute to early olfactory deficits seen in Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Local geometry of electromagnetic fields and its role in molecular multipole transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Cohen, Adam E

    2011-05-12

    Electromagnetic fields with complex spatial variation routinely arise in Nature. We study the response of a small molecule to monochromatic fields of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. First, we consider the allowed configurations of the fields and field gradients at a single point in space. Many configurations cannot be generated from a single plane wave, regardless of polarization, but any allowed configuration can be generated by superposition of multiple plane waves. There is no local configuration of the fields and gradients that requires near-field effects. Second, we derive a set of local electromagnetic quantities, each of which couples to a particular multipole transition. These quantities are small or zero in plane waves, but can be large in regions of certain superpositions of plane waves. Our findings provide a systematic framework for designing far-field and near-field experiments to drive multipole transitions. The proposed experiments provide information on molecular structure that is inaccessible to other spectroscopic techniques and open the possibility for new types of optical control of molecules.

  11. Superresolution improves MRI cortical segmentation with FACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Manjón, José V.; Coupé, Pierrick

    Brain cortical surface extraction from MRI has applications for measurement of gray matter (GM) atrophy, functional mapping, source localization and preoperative neurosurgical planning. Accurate cortex segmentation requires high resolution morphological images and several methods for extracting...

  12. Grid cells and cortical representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Edvard I; Roudi, Yasser; Witter, Menno P; Kentros, Clifford; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Moser, May-Britt

    2014-07-01

    One of the grand challenges in neuroscience is to comprehend neural computation in the association cortices, the parts of the cortex that have shown the largest expansion and differentiation during mammalian evolution and that are thought to contribute profoundly to the emergence of advanced cognition in humans. In this Review, we use grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex as a gateway to understand network computation at a stage of cortical processing in which firing patterns are shaped not primarily by incoming sensory signals but to a large extent by the intrinsic properties of the local circuit.

  13. Local-field approach to the interaction of an ultracold dense Bose gas with a light field

    CERN Document Server

    Krutitsky, K V; Audretsch, J

    1999-01-01

    The propagation of the electromagnetic field of a laser through a dense Bose gas is examined and nonlinear operator equations for the motion of the center of mass of the atoms are derived. The goal is to present a self-consistent set of coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations for atomic and electromagnetic fields generalized to include the atomic center-of-mass motion. Two effects are considered: The ultracold gas forms a medium for the Maxwell field which modifies its propagation properties. Combined herewith is the influence of the dipole-dipole interaction between atoms which leads to a density dependent shift of the atomic transition frequency. It is expressed in a position dependent detuning and is the reason for the nonlinearity. This results in a direct and physically transparent way from the quantum field theoretical version of the local-field approach to electrodynamics in quantum media. The equations for the matter fields are general. Previously published nonlinear equations are obtained as limiting cases. ...

  14. Almost everywhere convergence of sequences of multiplier operators on local fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑世骏; 郑维行

    1997-01-01

    Let Kn be the n -dimensional vector space over a local field K . Two maximal multiplier theorems on Lp(Kn) are proved for certain multiplier operator sequences associated with regularization and dilation respectively Consequently the a. e. convergence of such multiplier operator sequences is obtained This sharpens Taibleson’s main result and applies to several important singular integral operators on Kn.

  15. Quantum Gravity from the Point of View of Locally Covariant Quantum Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Romeo; Fredenhagen, Klaus; Rejzner, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    We construct perturbative quantum gravity in a generally covariant way. In particular our construction is background independent. It is based on the locally covariant approach to quantum field theory and the renormalized Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism. We do not touch the problem of nonrenormalizability and interpret the theory as an effective theory at large length scales.

  16. Locally varying particle masses due to a scalar fifth-force field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Yasunori (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Physics)

    1991-02-14

    If a scalar field mediates a fifth force, masses of elementary particles will be affected locally by massive sources, resulting in a change of size of macroscopic objects. The effect is shown to be testable by using an ultra-sensitive laser interferometric technique when it is fully developed for the use in gravity-wave detectors. (orig.).

  17. Two-photon mapping of localized field enhancements in thin nanostrip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, I.; Novikov, S.M.; Søndergaard, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Resonant scattering and local field enhancements by 11-nm-thin gold nanostrip antennas due to constructive interference of counter propagating slow surface plasmon polaritons is investigated. We characterize nanostrips of widths between 50-530 nm using both reflection spectroscopy and nonlinear...

  18. Nonperturbative renormalization group for scalar fields in de Sitter space: Beyond the local potential approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilleux, Maxime; Serreau, Julien

    2017-02-01

    Nonperturbative renormalization group techniques have recently proven a powerful tool to tackle the nontrivial infrared dynamics of light scalar fields in de Sitter space. In the present article, we develop the formalism beyond the local potential approximation employed in earlier works. In particular, we consider the derivative expansion, a systematic expansion in powers of field derivatives, appropriate for long wavelength modes, that we generalize to the relevant case of a curved metric with Lorentzian signature. The method is illustrated with a detailed discussion of the so-called local potential approximation prime which, on top of the full effective potential, includes a running (but field-independent) field renormalization. We explicitly compute the associated anomalous dimension for O (N ) theories. We find that it can take large values along the flow, leading to sizable differences as compared to the local potential approximation. However, it does not prevent the phenomenon of gravitationally induced dimensional reduction pointed out in previous studies. We show that, as a consequence, the effective potential at the end of the flow is unchanged as compared to the local potential approximation, the main effect of the running anomalous dimension being merely to slow down the flow. We discuss some consequences of these findings.

  19. NONLINEAR OPTICAL-PROPERTIES OF LANGMUIR-BLODGETT MONOLAYERS - LOCAL-FIELD EFFECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CNOSSEN, G; DRABE, KE; WIERSMA, DA

    1992-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the macroscopic second-order optical nonlinearity chi(2) (2-omega,omega,omega) of Langmuir-Blodgett dye-doped monolayers are reported. The observed deviations from a linear behavior of chi-(2) with increasing surface density are shown to be due to local-field effects. In ord

  20. Nonlinear optical properties of Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers : Local-field effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Gerard; Drabe, Karel E.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the macroscopic second-order optical nonlinearity chi(2) (2-omega,omega,omega) of Langmuir-Blodgett dye-doped monolayers are reported. The observed deviations from a linear behavior of chi-(2) with increasing surface density are shown to be due to local-field effects. In ord

  1. Coulomb's law corrections and fermion field localization in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld

    CERN Document Server

    Cartas-Fuentevilla, R; Germán, Gabriel; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Mora-Luna, Refugio Rigel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, following recent studies which show that it is possible to localize gravity as well as scalar and gauge vector fields in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld, we investigate the localization of fermion fields in this model. In order to achieve this aim we consider the Yukawa interaction term between the fermions and the tachyonic condensate scalar field MF(T)barPsiPsi in the action and analyze four different cases corresponding to distinct tachyonic functions F(T(w)). The only condition that this function must satisfy in order to yield 4D chiral fermions upon dimensional reduction is to be odd in the extra dimension w. These functions lead to a different structure of the respective fermionic mass spectrum. In particular, localization of the massless left-chiral fermion zero mode is possible for three of these cases. We further analyze the phenomenology of the Yukawa interaction among fermion fields and gauge bosons localized on the brane and obtain the crucial and necessary information to comp...

  2. Measuring Earth's Local Magnetic Field Using a Helmholtz Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I present a low-cost interactive experiment for measuring the strength of Earth's local magnetic field. This activity can be done in most high schools or two-year physics laboratories with limited resources, yet will have a tremendous learning impact. This experiment solidifies the three-dimensional nature of Earth's…

  3. A data-driven approach to local gravity field modelling using spherical radial basis functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klees, R.; Tenzer, R.; Prutkin, I.; Wittwer, T.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a methodology for local gravity field modelling from gravity data using spherical radial basis functions. The methodology comprises two steps: in step 1, gravity data (gravity anomalies and/or gravity disturbances) are used to estimate the disturbing potential using least-squares techniqu

  4. Imaging Localized Electric Fields with Nanometer Precision through Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattarai, Ashish; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.

    2017-07-07

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) can be used to image plasmon-enhanced local electric field variations with extremely high spatial resolution under ambient conditions. This is illustrated through TERS images recorded using a silver atomic force microscope tip coated with strategically selected molecular reporters and used to image a sputtered silver film.

  5. Modeling of nonlinear microscopy of localized field enhancements in random metal nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Coello, Victor

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear microscopy of localized field enhancements in random metal nanostructures with a tightly focused laser beam scanning over a sample surface is modeled by making use of analytic representations of the Green dyadic in the near- and far-field regions, with the latter being approximated...... by the part describing the scattering via excitation of surface plasmon polaritons. The developed approach is applied to scanning second-harmonic (SH) microscopy of small gold spheres placed randomly on a gold surface. We calculate self-consistent fundamental harmonic (FH) and SH field distributions...

  6. An Improved Analytical Model of the Local Interstellar Magnetic Field: The Extension to Compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleimann, Jens; Röken, Christian; Fichtner, Horst

    2017-03-01

    A previously published analytical magnetohydrodynamic model for the local interstellar magnetic field in the vicinity of the heliopause (Röken et al. 2015) is extended from incompressible to compressible, yet predominantly subsonic flow, considering both isothermal and adiabatic equations of state. Exact expressions and suitable approximations for the density and the flow velocity are derived and discussed. In addition to the stationary induction equation, these expressions also satisfy the momentum balance equation along stream lines. The practical usefulness of the corresponding, still exact, analytical magnetic field solution is assessed by comparing it quantitatively to results from a fully self-consistent magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interstellar magnetic field draping around the heliopause.

  7. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-06-25

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements.

  8. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Parr

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF Radiofrequency Identification (RFID setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements.

  9. Underground localization using dual magnetic field sequence measurement and pose graph SLAM for directional drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeolteo; Myung, Hyun

    2014-12-01

    With the development of unconventional gas, the technology of directional drilling has become more advanced. Underground localization is the key technique of directional drilling for real-time path following and system control. However, there are problems such as vibration, disconnection with external infrastructure, and magnetic field distortion. Conventional methods cannot solve these problems in real time or in various environments. In this paper, a novel underground localization algorithm using a re-measurement of the sequence of the magnetic field and pose graph SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) is introduced. The proposed algorithm exploits the property of the drilling system that the body passes through the previous pass. By comparing the recorded measurement from one magnetic sensor and the current re-measurement from another magnetic sensor, the proposed algorithm predicts the pose of the drilling system. The performance of the algorithm is validated through simulations and experiments.

  10. Field Effect and Strongly Localized Carriers in the Metal-Insulator Transition Material VO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, K; Jeong, J W; Aetukuri, N; Rettner, C; Shukla, N; Freeman, E; Esfahani, D N; Peeters, F M; Topuria, T; Rice, P M; Volodin, A; Douhard, B; Vandervorst, W; Samant, M G; Datta, S; Parkin, S S P

    2015-11-06

    The intrinsic field effect, the change in surface conductance with an applied transverse electric field, of prototypal strongly correlated VO(2) has remained elusive. Here we report its measurement enabled by epitaxial VO(2) and atomic layer deposited high-κ dielectrics. Oxygen migration, joule heating, and the linked field-induced phase transition are precluded. The field effect can be understood in terms of field-induced carriers with densities up to ∼5×10(13)  cm(-2) which are trongly localized, as shown by their low, thermally activated mobility (∼1×10(-3)  cm(2)/V s at 300 K). These carriers show behavior consistent with that of Holstein polarons and strongly impact the (opto)electronics of VO(2).

  11. Symmetron Fields: Screening Long-Range Forces Through Local Symmetry Restoration

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterbichler, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel screening mechanism that allows a scalar field to mediate a long range ~Mpc force of gravitational strength in the cosmos while satisfying local tests of gravity. The mechanism hinges on local symmetry restoration in the presence of matter. In regions of sufficiently high matter density, the field is drawn towards \\phi = 0 where its coupling to matter vanishes and the \\phi->-\\phi symmetry is restored. In regions of low density, however, the symmetry is spontaneously broken, and the field couples to matter with gravitational strength. We predict deviations from general relativity in the solar system that are within reach of next-generation experiments, as well as astrophysically observable violations of the equivalence principle. The model can be distinguished experimentally from Brans-Dicke gravity, chameleon theories and brane-world modifications of gravity.

  12. Dynamic Localization of a One-Dimensional Quantum Dot Array in an ac Electric Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗莹; 段素青; 范文斌; 赵宪庚; 王立民; 马本堃

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of two interaction electrons confined to one-dimensional quantum dot array in an acelectric field. We find that initially localized electrons will remain localized in the absence of Coulomb interactionif the ratio of the ac field magnitude to the frequency is a root of the ordinary zero-order Bessel function. Incontrast to the case without Coulomb interaction, no matter what the value is, the electrons are delocalized andthe delocalization effect depends on the ratio U/ω and eaE/ω, where U is the strength of Coulomb interaction,a is the lattice constant, and E and ω are the ac field amplitude and frequency, respectively.

  13. Non-linear non-local molecular electrodynamics with nano-optical fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyak, Vladimir Y; Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-10-28

    The interaction of optical fields sculpted on the nano-scale with matter may not be described by the dipole approximation since the fields may vary appreciably across the molecular length scale. Rather than incrementally adding higher multipoles, it is advantageous and more physically transparent to describe the optical process using non-local response functions that intrinsically include all multipoles. We present a semi-classical approach for calculating non-local response functions based on the minimal coupling Hamiltonian. The first, second, and third order response functions are expressed in terms of correlation functions of the charge and the current densities. This approach is based on the gauge invariant current rather than the polarization, and on the vector potential rather than the electric and magnetic fields.

  14. Dust Grain Alignment and Magnetic Field Strength in the Wall of the Local Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Medan, Ilija

    2017-01-01

    We use archival data on polarization (Berdyugin 2014) and extinction in the wall of the Local Bubble to study the grain alignment efficiency and the magnetic field strength. We find that the grain alignment efficiency variations can be directly tied to the location of the known OB-associations within 200pc from the Sun, strongly supporting modern, radiation-driven dust grain alignment. Based on the Davis-Chandrasekhar-Fermi method, we find a bimodal magnetic field-strength distribution, where the locations of the strongest fields correlate with the directions towards the near-by OB associations. We hypothesize that this strengthening is due to compression of the bubble wall by the opposing outflows in the Local Bubble and from the surrounding OB associations.

  15. Dynamical localization effect in a coupled quantum dot array driven by an AC magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Jun-Jie; Nie Yi-Hang

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the transport properties of a ring-coupled quantum dot array driven by an AC magnetic field,which is connected to two leads,and we give the response of the transport current to the dynamical localization. We found that when the ratio of the magnetic flux to the total quantum dots number is a root of the zeroth order Bessel function,dynamical localization and collapse of quasi-energy occurs and importantly,the transport current displays a dip which is the signal of dynamical localization. The dynamical localization effect is strengthened as a result of the increase of the quantum dot number,and it is weakened on account of the increase of the dots-lead hopping rate.

  16. THE NECESSITY OF IMPLEMENTING REFORMS IN THE FIELD OF LOCAL PUBLIC FINANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vezure Oana Sabina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties faced by local authorities as a result of the austerity conditions in which they work, the elements inherited from the previous regime, the need for additional resources to optimize public finance to meet the needs, optimally, if possible, citizens, require the design and continue the reform of public finances at the local level that correspond to these requirements. Optimization of the reform process in local public finances depend to a great extent on the use of financial levers of fiscal efficiency, fulfilment of the functions of public finance, the way resources are provided and how their administration for economic and social development. The uneven development of economic weakness of the assembly reflect and are unacceptable because, in their turn, become a source of economic and political instability. Responsibility for ensuring sufficient local revenue must not belong to a large measure, the central authorities, the context in which local authorities should prioritize finding solutions to supplement the local budget and obtain funds from the central budget. At the same time, cannot be intended directions of reform in the field of public administration without taking into account the financial implications reflected in the budgets for each level of Government, pyramid-shaped, from central to local level.

  17. Neural response dynamics of spiking and local field potential activity depend on CRT monitor refresh rate in the tree shrew primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Julia; Bhattacharyya, Anwesha; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor

    2011-11-01

    Entrainment of neural activity to luminance impulses during the refresh of cathode ray tube monitor displays has been observed in the primary visual cortex (V1) of humans and macaque monkeys. This entrainment is of interest because it tends to temporally align and thus synchronize neural responses at the millisecond timescale. Here we show that, in tree shrew V1, both spiking and local field potential activity are also entrained at cathode ray tube refresh rates of 120, 90, and 60 Hz, with weakest but still significant entrainment even at 120 Hz, and strongest entrainment occurring in cortical input layer IV. For both luminance increments ("white" stimuli) and decrements ("black" stimuli), refresh rate had a strong impact on the temporal dynamics of the neural response for subsequent luminance impulses. Whereas there was rapid, strong attenuation of spikes and local field potential to prolonged visual stimuli composed of luminance impulses presented at 120 Hz, attenuation was nearly absent at 60-Hz refresh rate. In addition, neural onset latencies were shortest at 120 Hz and substantially increased, by ∼15 ms, at 60 Hz. In terms of neural response amplitude, black responses dominated white responses at all three refresh rates. However, black/white differences were much larger at 60 Hz than at higher refresh rates, suggesting a mechanism that is sensitive to stimulus timing. Taken together, our findings reveal many similarities between V1 of macaque and tree shrew, while underscoring a greater temporal sensitivity of the tree shrew visual system.

  18. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Foong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs. Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison.

  19. Quantification of local geometric distortion in structural magnetic resonance images: Application to ultra-high fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jonathan C; Khan, Ali R; Zeng, Tony Y; MacDougall, Keith W; Parrent, Andrew G; Peters, Terry M

    2017-01-06

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior visualization of brain structures compared to lower fields, but images may be prone to severe geometric inhomogeneity. We propose to quantify local geometric distortion at ultra-high fields in in vivo datasets of human subjects scanned at both ultra-high field and lower fields. By using the displacement field derived from nonlinear image registration between images of the same subject, focal areas of spatial uncertainty are quantified. Through group and subject-specific analysis, we were able to identify regions systematically affected by geometric distortion at air-tissue interfaces prone to magnetic susceptibility, where the gradient coil non-linearity occurs in the occipital and suboccipital regions, as well as with distance from image isocenter. The derived displacement maps, quantified in millimeters, can be used to prospectively evaluate subject-specific local spatial uncertainty that should be taken into account in neuroimaging studies, and also for clinical applications like stereotactic neurosurgery where accuracy is critical. Validation with manual fiducial displacement demonstrated excellent correlation and agreement. Our results point to the need for site-specific calibration of geometric inhomogeneity. Our methodology provides a framework to permit prospective evaluation of the effect of MRI sequences, distortion correction techniques, and scanner hardware/software upgrades on geometric distortion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  1. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-08-12

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison.

  2. Relative Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks for Measurement of Electric Fields under HVDC Transmission Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cui

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the wireless sensor networks (WSNs for electric field measurement system under the High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC transmission lines, it is necessary to obtain the electric field distribution with multiple sensors. The location information of each sensor is essential to the correct analysis of measurement results. Compared with the existing approach which gathers the location information by manually labelling sensors during deployment, the automatic localization can reduce the workload and improve the measurement efficiency. A novel and practical range-free localization algorithm for the localization of one-dimensional linear topology wireless networks in the electric field measurement system is presented. The algorithm utilizes unknown nodes’ neighbor lists based on the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI values to determine the relative locations of nodes. The algorithm is able to handle the exceptional situation of the output permutation which can effectively improve the accuracy of localization. The performance of this algorithm under real circumstances has been evaluated through several experiments with different numbers of nodes and different node deployments in the China State Grid HVDC test base. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieves an accuracy of over 96% under different conditions.

  3. Relative localization in wireless sensor networks for measurement of electric fields under HVDC transmission lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Wang, Qiusheng; Yuan, Haiwen; Song, Xiao; Hu, Xuemin; Zhao, Luxing

    2015-02-04

    In the wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for electric field measurement system under the High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission lines, it is necessary to obtain the electric field distribution with multiple sensors. The location information of each sensor is essential to the correct analysis of measurement results. Compared with the existing approach which gathers the location information by manually labelling sensors during deployment, the automatic localization can reduce the workload and improve the measurement efficiency. A novel and practical range-free localization algorithm for the localization of one-dimensional linear topology wireless networks in the electric field measurement system is presented. The algorithm utilizes unknown nodes' neighbor lists based on the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) values to determine the relative locations of nodes. The algorithm is able to handle the exceptional situation of the output permutation which can effectively improve the accuracy of localization. The performance of this algorithm under real circumstances has been evaluated through several experiments with different numbers of nodes and different node deployments in the China State Grid HVDC test base. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieves an accuracy of over 96% under different conditions.

  4. Local field enhancement on demand based on hybrid plasmonic-dielectric directional coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhem, Kholod; Avrutsky, Ivan

    2016-03-21

    The concept of local field enhancement using conductor-gap-dielectric-substrate (CGDS) waveguide structure is proposed. The dispersion equation is derived analytically and solved numerically. The solution of the dispersion equation reveals the anti-crossing behavior of coupled modes. the optimal gap layer thickness and the coupling length of the guided modes are obtained. The mechanism of the CGDS works as follows: Light waves are guided by conventional low-loss dielectric waveguides and, upon demand, they are transformed into highly confined plasmonic modes with strong local field enhancement, and get transformed back into low-loss dielectric modes. As an example, in a representative CGDS structure, the optimal plasmonic gap size is 17 nm, the local light intensity is found to be more than one order of magnitude stronger than the intensity of the dielectric mode at the film surface. The coupling length is only 2.1 μm at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. Such a local field confinement on demand is expected to facilitate efficient light-matter interaction in integrated photonic devices while minimizing losses typical for plasmonic structures.

  5. AdS/CFT and local renormalization group with gauge fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Ken

    2015-01-01

    We revisit a study of local renormalization group (RG) with background gauge fields incorporated using the AdS/CFT correspondence. Starting with a $(d+1)$-dimensional bulk gravity coupled to scalars and gauge fields, we derive a local RG equation by working with the Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of the bulk theory. The Gauss's law constraint associated with gauge symmetry plays an important role. RG flows of the background gauge fields are governed by vector $\\beta$-functions, and some interesting properties of them are known to follow. We give a systematic rederivation of them on the basis of the HJ formulation. Fixing an ambiguity of local counterterms in such a manner that is natural from the viewpoint of the HJ formulation, we determine all the coefficients uniquely appearing in the trace of the stress tensor for $d=4$. A relation between a choice of schemes and a Virial current is discussed. As a consistency check, these are found to satisfy the integrability conditions of local RG transformations. From th...

  6. AdS/CFT and local renormalization group with gauge fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ken; Sakai, Tadakatsu

    2016-03-01

    We revisit a study of local renormalization group (RG) with background gauge fields incorporated using the AdS/CFT correspondence. Starting with a (d+1)-dimensional bulk gravity coupled to scalars and gauge fields, we derive a local RG equation from a flow equation by working in the Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of the bulk theory. The Gauss's law constraint associated with gauge symmetry plays an important role. RG flows of the background gauge fields are governed by vector β -functions, and some of their interesting properties are known to follow. We give a systematic rederivation of them on the basis of the flow equation. Fixing an ambiguity of local counterterms in such a manner that is natural from the viewpoint of the flow equation, we determine all the coefficients uniquely appearing in the trace of the stress tensor for d=4. A relation between a choice of schemes and a virial current is discussed. As a consistency check, these are found to satisfy the integrability conditions of local RG transformations. From these results, we are led to a proof of a holographic c-theorem by determining a full family of schemes where a trace anomaly coefficient is related with a holographic c-function.

  7. Effects of reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy boundary measurements on localization of active neural source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui-min; Lee, Kok-Meng; Hu, Liang; Foong, Shaohui; Fu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Localization of active neural source (ANS) from measurements on head surface is vital in magnetoencephalography. As neuron-generated magnetic fields are extremely weak, significant uncertainties caused by stochastic measurement interference complicate its localization. This paper presents a novel computational method based on reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy measurements for enhanced ANS localization by suppressing effects of unrelated noise. In this approach, the magnetic flux density (MFD) in the nearby current-free space outside the head is reconstructed from measurements through formulating the infinite series solution of the Laplace's equation, where boundary condition (BC) integrals over the entire measurements provide "smooth" reconstructed MFD with the decrease in unrelated noise. Using a gradient-based method, reconstructed MFDs with good fidelity are selected for enhanced ANS localization. The reconstruction model, spatial interpolation of BC, parametric equivalent current dipole-based inverse estimation algorithm using reconstruction, and gradient-based selection are detailed and validated. The influences of various source depths and measurement signal-to-noise ratio levels on the estimated ANS location are analyzed numerically and compared with a traditional method (where measurements are directly used), and it was demonstrated that gradient-selected high-fidelity reconstructed data can effectively improve the accuracy of ANS localization.

  8. Place as a social space: fields of encounter relating to the local sustainability process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumreicher, Heidi; Kolb, Bettina

    2008-04-01

    The paper shows how sustainability questions relate to the local space. The local place is not a static entity, but a dynamic one, undergoing constant changes, and it is the rapid social and material processes within the given local situation that is a challenge for the Chinese villages and their integrity. The following article considers the cohesion between the dwellers' emotional co-ownership of their local space and the sustainability process as a driving force in social, economic and ecological development. We bring together the classification of the seven fields of encounter, which were developed out of the empirical data of the Chinese case study villages, and sustainability oriented management considerations for all levels of this concept. We do not pretend to know the solutions, but describe a set of interrelated fields that can be anchor points for placing the solutions and show in which fields action and intervention is possible. In our concept of sustainability, every spatial field has its special meaning, needs special measures and policies and has different connotations to concepts like responsibility, family values or communication systems. We see the social sustainability process as a support for the empowerment of the local dwellers, and the SUCCESS research has encouraged the villages to find suitable sustainability oriented solutions for their natural and societal situation. Before entering the discussion about the chances and potential of a sustainability approach for the Chinese villages, it is first necessary to accept the fact that rural villages play a primordial role in Chinese society and that their potential can strengthen future pathways for China.

  9. Stress fields and energy of disclination-type defects in zones of localized elastic distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Ivan I.; Tyumentsev, Alexander N.; Ditenberg, Ivan A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper studies theoretically the elastically deformed state and analyzes deformation mechanisms in nanocrystals in the zones of localized elastic distortions and related disclination-type defects, such as dipole, quadrupole and multipole of partial disclinations. Significant differences in the energies of quadrupole and multipole configurations in comparison with nanodipole are revealed. The mechanism of deformation localization in the field of elastic distortions is proposed, which is a quasi-periodic sequence of formation and relaxation of various disclination ensembles with a periodic change in the energy of the defect.

  10. Field Localization and Enhancement of Phase Locked Second and Third Harmonic Generation in Absorbing Semiconductor Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Roppo, V; Raineri, F; D'Aguanno, G; Trull, J; Halioua, Y; Raj, R; Sagnes, I; Vilaseca, R; Scalora, M

    2009-01-01

    We predict and experimentally observe the enhancement by three orders of magnitude of phase mismatched second and third harmonic generation in a GaAs cavity at 650nm and 433nm, respectively, well above the absorption edge. Phase locking between the pump and the harmonics changes the effective dispersion of the medium and inhibits absorption. Despite hostile conditions the harmonics become localized inside the cavity leading to relatively large conversion efficiencies. Field localization plays a pivotal role and ushers in a new class of semiconductor-based devices in the visible and UV ranges.

  11. Coulomb's law corrections and fermion field localization in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartas-Fuentevilla, Roberto; Escalante, Alberto; Germán, Gabriel; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Rigel Mora-Luna, Refugio

    2016-05-01

    Following recent studies which show that it is possible to localize gravity as well as scalar and gauge vector fields in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld, we investigate the solution of the gauge hierarchy problem, the localization of fermion fields in this model, the recovering of the Coulomb law on the non-relativistic limit of the Yukawa interaction between bulk fermions and gauge bosons localized in the brane, and confront the predicted 5D corrections to the photon mass with its upper experimental/observational bounds, finding the model physically viable since it passes these tests. In order to achieve the latter aims we first consider the Yukawa interaction term between the fermionic and the tachyonic scalar fields MF(T)ΨΨ̅ in the action and analyze four distinct tachyonic functions F(T) that lead to four different structures of the respective fermionic mass spectra with different physics. In particular, localization of the massless left-chiral fermion zero mode is possible for three of these cases. We further analyze the phenomenology of these Yukawa interactions among fermion fields and gauge bosons localized on the brane and obtain the crucial and necessary information to compute the corrections to Coulomb's law coming from massive KK vector modes in the non-relativistic limit. These corrections are exponentially suppressed due to the presence of the mass gap in the mass spectrum of the bulk gauge vector field. From our results we conclude that corrections to Coulomb's law in the thin brane limit have the same form (up to a numerical factor) as far as the left-chiral massless fermion field is localized on the brane. Finally we compute the corrections to the Coulomb's law for an arbitrarily thick brane scenario which can be interpreted as 5D corrections to the photon mass. By performing consistent estimations with brane phenomenology, we found that the predicted corrections to the photon mass, which are well bounded by the experimentally observed or

  12. Coulomb’s law corrections and fermion field localization in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartas-Fuentevilla, Roberto; Escalante, Alberto [Instituto de Física, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla,Apdo. postal J-48, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Germán, Gabriel [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México,Apdo. Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road,Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo [Instituto de Física, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla,Apdo. postal J-48, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Institutode Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo,Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, CP 58040, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Mora-Luna, Refugio Rigel [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México,Apdo. Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2016-05-11

    Following recent studies which show that it is possible to localize gravity as well as scalar and gauge vector fields in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld, we investigate the solution of the gauge hierarchy problem, the localization of fermion fields in this model, the recovering of the Coulomb law on the non-relativistic limit of the Yukawa interaction between bulk fermions and gauge bosons localized in the brane, and confront the predicted 5D corrections to the photon mass with its upper experimental/observational bounds, finding the model physically viable since it passes these tests. In order to achieve the latter aims we first consider the Yukawa interaction term between the fermionic and the tachyonic scalar fields MF(T)ΨΨ-bar in the action and analyze four distinct tachyonic functions F(T) that lead to four different structures of the respective fermionic mass spectra with different physics. In particular, localization of the massless left-chiral fermion zero mode is possible for three of these cases. We further analyze the phenomenology of these Yukawa interactions among fermion fields and gauge bosons localized on the brane and obtain the crucial and necessary information to compute the corrections to Coulomb’s law coming from massive KK vector modes in the non-relativistic limit. These corrections are exponentially suppressed due to the presence of the mass gap in the mass spectrum of the bulk gauge vector field. From our results we conclude that corrections to Coulomb’s law in the thin brane limit have the same form (up to a numerical factor) as far as the left-chiral massless fermion field is localized on the brane. Finally we compute the corrections to the Coulomb’s law for an arbitrarily thick brane scenario which can be interpreted as 5D corrections to the photon mass. By performing consistent estimations with brane phenomenology, we found that the predicted corrections to the photon mass, which are well bounded by the experimentally

  13. Active control of edge localized modes with a low n perturbation fields in the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Y., E-mail: y.liang@fz-juelich.d [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Energy Research IEF-4: Plasma Physics, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Jachmich, S. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Koninklijke Militaire School - Ecole Royale Militaire, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Koslowski, H.R. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Energy Research IEF-4: Plasma Physics, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Nardon, E. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); Alfier, A. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Consorzio RFX Padova (Italy); Baranov, Y. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); De La Luna, E. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Vries, P. de [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); Eich, T. [Association EURATOM-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Esser, H.G.; Harting, D. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Inst. of Energy Research IEF-4: Plasma Physics, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Kiptily, V. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); Kreter, A. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Inst. of Energy Research IEF-4: Plasma Physics, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Gerasimov, S.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Howell, D. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); Sergienko, G. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Inst. of Energy Research IEF-4: Plasma Physics, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Active control of edge localized modes (ELMs) by using static external magnetic perturbation fields with low toroidal mode number, n, has been demonstrated for both, ITER baseline (q{sub 95}approx3) and high beta advanced tokamak scenarios at the JET tokamak. During the application of the low n field the ELM frequency increased by a factor up to approx4-5. Reduction in carbon erosion and ELM peak heat fluxes on the divertor target by roughly the same factor as the increase of the ELM frequency has been observed. The frequency of the mitigated ELMs using a low n field is found to increase proportional to the total input heating power. Compensation of the density pump-out effect observed when the external low n field is applied has been achieved by gas fueling in low triangularity plasmas.

  14. Education and Training Needs in the Field of Local Development in the Lower Danube Macro Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurenţiu Tăchiciu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is the result of an effort made by the authors to explore the needs of education and training in the field of local development, according to the situation in Romanian and Bulgarian Danube bordering regions, aiming at designing joint projects to address such needs between the universities to which authors are affiliated. Local development is here understood as a deliberately induced process of improving the welfare of local communities, which should be democratic, inclusive and sustainable, in particular with regard to creating competitive local economies, stimulating economic growth and ensuring better living conditions for the inhabitants. Local development is an important part of a governance process which involves complex interactions at various territorially defined levels: local, regional, national, cross-national, international. In the case of the regions considered in the present paper a historical opportunity is provided for them by the so called European Union Strategy for the Danube Region. In order to fully exploit this opportunity, the capacity to address local development issues should be strengthened in both countries, especially by well designed education and training programmes. This is why local development was considered a priority topic for the cooperation between the two universities. In the same framework, taking into consideration the challenges which are specific to the Lower Danube Region, other topics of interest were considered: logistics, tourism, consumer affairs or rural development. The authors of the present paper had to avoid overlapping with the work of the other teams. In particular, there are many common points between local development and rural development, because in both countries the regions on the border of Danube are predominately rural and significantly dependent on agriculture. Therefore, here, the needs for education and training are defined in strict correlation with the required

  15. Face activated neurodynamic cortical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susac, Ana; Ilmoniemi, Risto J; Ranken, Doug; Supek, Selma

    2011-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have shown that complex visual stimuli, such as faces, activate multiple brain regions, yet little is known on the dynamics and complexity of the activated cortical networks during the entire measurable evoked response. In this study, we used simulated and face-evoked empirical MEG data from an oddball study to investigate the feasibility of accurate, efficient, and reliable spatio-temporal tracking of cortical pathways over prolonged time intervals. We applied a data-driven, semiautomated approach to spatio-temporal source localization with no prior assumptions on active cortical regions to explore non-invasively face-processing dynamics and their modulation by task. Simulations demonstrated that the use of multi-start downhill simplex and data-driven selections of time intervals submitted to the Calibrated Start Spatio-Temporal (CSST) algorithm resulted in improved accuracy of the source localization and the estimation of the onset of their activity. Locations and dynamics of the identified sources indicated a distributed cortical network involved in face processing whose complexity was task dependent. This MEG study provided the first non-invasive demonstration, agreeing with intracranial recordings, of an early onset of the activity in the fusiform face gyrus (FFG), and that frontal activation preceded parietal for responses elicited by target faces.

  16. A practical alternative to conventional five-field irradiation postmastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, R A; Thomadsen, B R; Hansen, H; Phromratanapongse, P; Paliwal, B R

    1994-01-01

    A combination of electron and photon beams has been used as an alternative for the conventional five-field method to irradiate patients postmastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer. Anterior and posterior opposed photon beams treat in continuity the lateral chest wall, axilla, and supraclavicular lymph nodes. An adjacent anterior electron beam is used at an energy matched to the depth of the internal mammary nodes. It includes the anterior chest wall, but bolus is used in the lateral aspect to spare underlying lung. This electron beam eliminates the diverging junction between the internal mammary and medial tangential fields used in the conventional five-field technique. Overlaps along the junction between the photon and electron beams are minimized by placing the center of the photon field along its medial border. Measurements with an Alderson-Rando phantom show dose-distribution advantages for this technique over the conventional five-field approach. There is less chance of underdosing tumor cells or of overdosing normal tissue along beam junctions. Clinical studies on 29 patients treated by this technique between July 1985 and December 1989 show increased rates of acute skin reactions, but otherwise similar side effects compared with 57 breast cancer patients treated with the five-field technique over the same time period. Local recurrence rates and patient survival rates were similar for the two groups. Given the dose-distribution advantages of this technique and its simple adaptation to accommodate unusual surgical scars or cancer recurrences, its use should be considered for postmastectomy patients with locally advanced breast cancer in well-equipped cancer treatment centers.

  17. Local switching of two-dimensional superconductivity using the ferroelectric field effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K. S.; Gabay, M.; Jaccard, D.; Shibuya, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Lippmaa, M.; Triscone, J.-M.

    2006-05-01

    Correlated oxides display a variety of extraordinary physical properties including high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance. In these materials, strong electronic correlations often lead to competing ground states that are sensitive to many parameters-in particular the doping level-so that complex phase diagrams are observed. A flexible way to explore the role of doping is to tune the electron or hole concentration with electric fields, as is done in standard semiconductor field effect transistors. Here we demonstrate a model oxide system based on high-quality heterostructures in which the ferroelectric field effect approach can be studied. We use a single-crystal film of the perovskite superconductor Nb-doped SrTiO3 as the superconducting channel and ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 as the gate oxide. Atomic force microscopy is used to locally reverse the ferroelectric polarization, thus inducing large resistivity and carrier modulations, resulting in a clear shift in the superconducting critical temperature. Field-induced switching from the normal state to the (zero resistance) superconducting state was achieved at a well-defined temperature. This unique system could lead to a field of research in which devices are realized by locally defining in the same material superconducting and normal regions with `perfect' interfaces, the interface being purely electronic. Using this approach, one could potentially design one-dimensional superconducting wires, superconducting rings and junctions, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) or arrays of pinning centres.

  18. Independent constraints on local non-Gaussianity from the peculiar velocity and density fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Yin-Zhe; Scott, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Primordial, non-Gaussian perturbations can generate scale-dependent bias in the galaxy distribution. This in turn will modify correlations between galaxy positions and peculiar velocities at late times, since peculiar velocities reflect the underlying matter distribution, whereas galaxies are a biased tracer of the same. We study this effect, and show that non-Gaussianity can be constrained by comparing the observed peculiar velocity field to a model velocity field reconstructed from the galaxy density field assuming linear bias. The amplitude of the spatial correlations in the residual map obtained after subtracting one velocity field from the other is directly proportional to the strength of the primordial non-Gaussianity. We construct the corresponding likelihood function use it to constrain the amplitude of the linear flow $\\beta$ and the amplitude of local non-Gaussianity $f^{NL}_{local}$. Applying our method to two observational data sets, the Type-Ia supernovae (A1SN) and Spiral Field \\textit{I}-band (...

  19. A photonic-crystal optical antenna for extremely large local-field enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Se-Heon; Lee, Yong-Hee; Kartalov, Emil P; Scherer, Axel

    2010-11-08

    We propose a novel design of an all-dielectric optical antenna based on photonic-band-gap confinement. Specifically, we have engineered the photonic-crystal dipole mode to have broad spectral response (Q~70) and well-directed vertical-radiation by introducing a plane mirror below the cavity. Considerably large local electric-field intensity enhancement~4,500 is expected from the proposed design for a normally incident planewave. Furthermore, an analytic model developed based on coupled-mode theory predicts that the electric-field intensity enhancement can easily be over 100,000 by employing reasonably high-Q (~10,000) resonators.

  20. A Single Field Inflation Model with Large Local Non-Gaussianity

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xingang; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein; Sasaki, Misao

    2013-01-01

    A detection of large local form non-Gaussianity is considered to be able to rule out all single field inflation models. This statement is based on a single field consistency condition. Despite the awareness of some implicit assumptions in the derivation of this condition and the demonstration of corresponding examples that illustrate these caveats, to date there is still no explicit and self-consistent model which can serve as a counterexample to this statement. We present such a model in this Letter.

  1. Local terahertz field enhancement for time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozina, M.; /SLAC; Pancaldi, M.; /CIC nanoGUNE /Stockholm U.; Bernhard, C.; /Fribourg U.; Driel, T.van; Glownia, J.M.; /SLAC; Marsik, P.; /Fribourg U.; Radovic, M.; Vaz, C.A.F.; /PLS, SLS; Zhu, D.; /SLAC; Bonetti, S.; /Stockholm U.; Staub, U.; /PLS, SLS; Hoffmann, M.C.; /SLAC

    2017-02-20

    We report local field strength enhancement of single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses in an ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment. We show that patterning the sample with gold microstructures increases the THz field without changing the THz pulse shape or drastically affecting the quality of the x-ray diffraction pattern. We find a five-fold increase in THz-induced x-ray diffraction intensity change in the presence of microstructures on a SrTiO3 thin-film sample.

  2. Environmental enrichment modulates cortico-cortical interactions in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Di Garbo

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment (EE is an experimental protocol based on a complex sensorimotor stimulation that dramatically affects brain development. While it is widely believed that the effects of EE result from the unique combination of different sensory and motor stimuli, it is not known whether and how cortico-cortical interactions are shaped by EE. Since the primary visual cortex (V1 is one of the best characterized targets of EE, we looked for direct cortico-cortical projections impinging on V1, and we identified a direct monosynaptic connection between motor cortex and V1 in the mouse brain. To measure the interactions between these areas under standard and EE rearing conditions, we used simultaneous recordings of local field potentials (LFPs in awake, freely moving animals. LFP signals were analyzed by using different methods of linear and nonlinear analysis of time series (cross-correlation, mutual information, phase synchronization. We found that EE decreases the level of coupling between the electrical activities of the two cortical regions with respect to the control group. From a functional point of view, our results indicate, for the first time, that an enhanced sensorimotor experience impacts on the brain by affecting the functional crosstalk between different cortical areas.

  3. Squeezed bispectrum in the δ N formalism: local observer effect in field space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Yuichiro; Vennin, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    The prospects of future galaxy surveys for non-Gaussianity measurements call for the development of robust techniques for computing the bispectrum of primordial cosmological perturbations. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to the calculation of the squeezed bispectrum in multiple-field inflation. With use of the δ N formalism, our framework sheds new light on the recently pointed out difference between the squeezed bispectrum for global observers and that for local observers, while allowing one to calculate both. For local observers in particular, the squeezed bispectrum is found to vanish in single-field inflation. Furthermore, our framework allows one to go beyond the near-equilateral ("small hierarchy") limit, and to automatically include intrinsic non-Gaussianities that do not need to be calculated separately. The explicit computational programme of our method is given and illustrated with a few examples.

  4. Scaling of high-field transport and localized heating in graphene transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Myung-Ho; Islam, Sharnali; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric

    2011-10-25

    We use infrared thermal imaging and electrothermal simulations to find that localized Joule heating in graphene field-effect transistors on SiO(2) is primarily governed by device electrostatics. Hot spots become more localized (i.e., sharper) as the underlying oxide thickness is reduced, such that the average and peak device temperatures scale differently, with significant long-term reliability implications. The average temperature is proportional to oxide thickness, but the peak temperature is minimized at an oxide thickness of ∼90 nm due to competing electrostatic and thermal effects. We also find that careful comparison of high-field transport models with thermal imaging can be used to shed light on velocity saturation effects. The results shed light on optimizing heat dissipation and reliability of graphene devices and interconnects.

  5. Squeezed Bispectrum in the $\\delta N$ Formalism: Local Observer Effect in Field Space

    CERN Document Server

    Tada, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    The prospects of future galaxy surveys for non-Gaussianity measurements call for the development of robust techniques for computing the bispectrum of primordial cosmological perturbations. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to the calculation of the squeezed bispectrum in multiple-field inflation. With use of the $\\delta N$ formalism, our framework sheds new light on the recently pointed out difference between the squeezed bispectrum for global observers and that for local observers, while allowing one to calculate both. For local observers in particular, the squeezed bispectrum is found to vanish in single-field inflation. Furthermore, our framework allows one to go beyond the near-equilateral ("small hierarchy") limit, and to automatically include intrinsic non-Gaussianities that do not need to be calculated separately. The explicit computational programme of our method is given and illustrated with a few examples.

  6. Single domain wall manipulation in curved nanowires using a mobile, local, circular field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortt, Madeline; Bickel, Jessica; Khan, Mina; Tuominen, Mark; Aidala, Katherine

    2014-03-01

    Ferromagnetic nanostructures present exciting physics with a range of potential applications in data storage devices, such as magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM). These proposals require precise control and understanding of domain wall (DW) movement and interactions. We developed a technique that generates a local circular Oersted field at a precise location by applying current through the tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM). We previously used this technique to control DW motion in nanorings. We extend this method to control individual DW movement in curved nanowires by placing the tip near a 180 DW at the vertex of a curved wire and generating a local field. In this way, we can examine the motion of domain walls through regions with different curvature and the effects of pinning. This work was supported in part by NSF DMR-1207924 and the UMass Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing, NSF CMMI-1025020.

  7. Local and global impacts on the fair-weather electric field in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Roy; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Katz, Shai

    2016-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of the vertical electric field (Ez or potential gradient) during fair weather days in the Negev desert, southern Israel are presented for the period June 2013-July 2015. We show results of the diurnal variation of Ez on seasonal and annual time scales, and make comparisons with the well-known Carnegie curve. We show a positive correlation between the diurnal Ez values and the number of global thunderstorm clusters on the same days. However, the diurnal Ez curves observed in the Negev desert show a local morning peak (8-10 UT) that is missing from the Carnegie Curve, but observed in other land-based Ez data from around the world. The morning peak is assumed to be a local effect and shown to correlate with a peak in the local aerosol loading in the lower atmosphere due to the increase in turbulence and mixing caused by solar heating in the morning hours.

  8. Field measurement of local ice pressures on the ARAON in the Beaufort Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Tak-Kee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study conducted four field measurements of local ice pressure during the icebreaking voyage of the icebreaking research vessel “ARAON” in the Chukchi and Beaufort seas from July to August of 2010. For measurements, 14 strain gauges, including 8 strain gauge rosettes, were set on the bow of the port side. Influence coefficients were determined using a finite element model of the instrumented area and they were used to convert the measured strains on the hull structure to local ice pressures. The converted maximum pressure was calculated as 2.12 MPa on an area of 0.28 m2. Pressure-area curves were developed from the surveyed pressure data and the results were compared with previously measured data. The study results are expected to provide an understanding of local ice pressures and thus be useful in the structural design of ice class ships.

  9. Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium-Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0023 (NII) - Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium-Porphyrin and NHC- Gold Catalysts MATTHEW KANAN LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV...Effects on Rhodium-Porphyrin and NHC- Gold Catalysts Principal Investigator: Matthew W. Kanan Project Publications: 1. “An Electric Field–Induced Change...electrostatic effects on catalytic reactions, a novel reaction vessel called the “parallel plate cell” was designed and fabricated. The cell is composed

  10. Leadership and influence: Evidence from an artefactual field experiment on local public good provision

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of leadership on the level and evolution of pro-social behavior using an artefactual field experiment on local public good provision. Participants decide how much to contribute to an actual conservation project. They can then revise their donations after being randomly matched in pairs on the basis of their authority and having observed each other’s contributions. Authority is measured through a social ranking exercise identifying formal and moral leaders within ...

  11. Investigation of the Potts model of a diluted magnet by local field averaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkin, S. V.; Smagin, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    Averaging of the local interatomic interaction fields has been applied to the Potts model of a diluted magnet. A self-consistent equation for the magnetization and an equation for the phase transition temperature have been derived. The temperature and magnetic atom density dependences of the spontaneous magnetization have been found for the lattices with the coordination numbers 3 and 4 and various numbers of spin states.

  12. Localization and Classification of Paddy Field Pests using a Saliency Map and Deep Convolutional Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyi; Gao, Junfeng; Yang, Guoguo; Zhang, Huan; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We present a pipeline for the visual localization and classification of agricultural pest insects by computing a saliency map and applying deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) learning. First, we used a global contrast region-based approach to compute a saliency map for localizing pest insect objects. Bounding squares containing targets were then extracted, resized to a fixed size, and used to construct a large standard database called Pest ID. This database was then utilized for self-learning of local image features which were, in turn, used for classification by DCNN. DCNN learning optimized the critical parameters, including size, number and convolutional stride of local receptive fields, dropout ratio and the final loss function. To demonstrate the practical utility of using DCNN, we explored different architectures by shrinking depth and width, and found effective sizes that can act as alternatives for practical applications. On the test set of paddy field images, our architectures achieved a mean Accuracy Precision (mAP) of 0.951, a significant improvement over previous methods.

  13. Evolution of localized states in Lieb lattices under time-dependent magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, J. D.; Maceira, I. A.; Dias, R. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the slow time evolution of localized states of the open-boundary Lieb lattice when a magnetic flux is applied perpendicularly to the lattice and increased linearly in time. In this system, Dirac cones periodically disappear, reappear, and touch the flat band as the flux increases. We show that the slow time evolution of a localized state in this system is analogous to that of a zero-energy state in a three-level system whose energy levels intersect periodically and that this evolution can be mapped into a classical precession motion with a precession axis that rotates as times evolves. Beginning with a localized state of the Lieb lattice, as the magnetic flux is increased linearly and slowly, the evolving state precesses around a state with a small itinerant component and the amplitude of its localized component oscillates around a constant value (below but close to 1), except at multiples of the flux quantum where it may vary sharply. This behavior reflects the existence of an electric field (generated by the time-dependent magnetic field) which breaks the C4 symmetry of the constant flux Hamiltonian.

  14. General properties of the n-point functions in local quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, H; Stora, Raymond Félix

    1976-01-01

    One of the most satisfactory aspects of relativistic local quantum field theory is the asymptotic theory of Haag and Ruelle: starting from a few simple hypotheses (locality, relativistic invariance, and spectrum, including the explicit exclusion of zero-mass states) the existence of the scattering operator S and of scattering amplitudes is established: these amplitudes can then be expressed through the 'reduction formulae' of L.S.Z. (rigorously proved in the framework of the Haag-Ruelle theory by Hepp for Wightman fields, and by Araki for bounded local observables) as the restrictions to the mass-shell of the Fourier transforms of (amputated) chronological functions. The latter, through the interplay of locality and spectrum, can be shown to be boundary values of certain analytic functions (Green functions), and this is the origin of analyticity properties of the scattering amplitudes. The purpose of these lectures is to set the scene for the study of such analyticity properties by giving a description of the...

  15. Local electric field and configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on a nanostructured surface with nanocones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Rong-Yi; Huang Xiao-Jing

    2009-01-01

    Based on the nanostructured surface model that the (platinum,Pt) nanocones grow out symmetrically from a plane substrate,the local electric field near the conical nanoparticle surface is computed and discussed. On the basis of these results,the adsorbed CO molecules are modelled as dipoles,and three kinds of interactions,I.e. Interactions between dipoles and local electric field,between dipoles and dipoles,as well as between dipoles and nanostructured substrate,are taken into account. The spatial configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on the nanocone surface is then given by Monte-Carlo simulation. Our results show that the CO molecules adsorbed on the nanocone surface cause local agglomeration under the action of an external electric field,and this agglomeration becomes more compact with decreasing conical angle,which results in a stronger interaction among molecules. These results serve as a basis for explaining abnormal phenomena such as the abnormal infrared effect (AIRE),which was found when CO molecules were adsorbed on the nancetructured transition-metal surface.

  16. Localization of bulk matter fields on a pure de Sitter thick braneworld

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Heng; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Malagon-Morejon, Dagoberto; Mora-Luna, Refugio Rigel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the localization and mass spectra of various matter fields with spin 0, 1 and 1/2 on a thick brane generated by pure 4D and 5D positive cosmological constants without bulk scalar fields. For spin 0 scalar and spin 1 vector fields, the potentials of the Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes in the corresponding Schroedinger equations are modified Poeschl-Teller potentials, which lead to the localization of the scalar and vector zero modes on the brane as well as to mass gaps in the mass spectra. For spin 1/2 fermions, we introduce the bulk mass term MF(z)\\bar{\\Psi}\\Psi in the action and four different cases are investigated. Localization of the massless left-chiral fermion zero mode is feasible for just two cases of F(z). In the first one we obtain Schroedinger equations with modified Poeschl-Teller potentials with the corresponding mass gaps for both left- and right-chiral fermions, the number of massive KK bound states is finite (determined by the ratio M/b) and is the same for left- and right...

  17. DRIFT-FREE INDOOR NAVIGATION USING SIMULTANEOUS LOCALIZATION AND MAPPING OF THE AMBIENT HETEROGENEOUS MAGNETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. K. Chow

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of external reference position information (e.g. surveyed targets or Global Navigation Satellite Systems Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM has proven to be an effective method for indoor navigation. The positioning drift can be reduced with regular loop-closures and global relaxation as the backend, thus achieving a good balance between exploration and exploitation. Although vision-based systems like laser scanners are typically deployed for SLAM, these sensors are heavy, energy inefficient, and expensive, making them unattractive for wearables or smartphone applications. However, the concept of SLAM can be extended to non-optical systems such as magnetometers. Instead of matching features such as walls and furniture using some variation of the Iterative Closest Point algorithm, the local magnetic field can be matched to provide loop-closure and global trajectory updates in a Gaussian Process (GP SLAM framework. With a MEMS-based inertial measurement unit providing a continuous trajectory, and the matching of locally distinct magnetic field maps, experimental results in this paper show that a drift-free navigation solution in an indoor environment with millimetre-level accuracy can be achieved. The GP-SLAM approach presented can be formulated as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem and it can naturally perform loop-detection, feature-to-feature distance minimization, global trajectory optimization, and magnetic field map estimation simultaneously. Spatially continuous features (i.e. smooth magnetic field signatures are used instead of discrete feature correspondences (e.g. point-to-point as in conventional vision-based SLAM. These position updates from the ambient magnetic field also provide enough information for calibrating the accelerometer bias and gyroscope bias in-use. The only restriction for this method is the need for magnetic disturbances (which is typically not an issue for indoor environments; however

  18. Towards a 'canonical' agranular cortical microcircuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F. Beul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on regularities in the intrinsic microcircuitry of cortical areas, variants of a 'canonical' cortical microcircuit have been proposed and widely adopted, particularly in computational neuroscience and neuroinformatics. However, this circuit is founded on striate cortex, which manifests perhaps the most extreme instance of cortical organization, in terms of a very high density of cells in highly differentiated cortical layers. Most other cortical regions have a less well differentiated architecture, stretching in gradients from the very dense eulaminate primary cortical areas to the other extreme of dysgranular and agranular areas of low density and poor laminar differentiation. It is unlikely for the patterns of inter- and intra-laminar connections to be uniform in spite of strong variations of their structural substrate. This assumption is corroborated by reports of divergence in intrinsic circuitry across the cortex. Consequently, it remains an important goal to define local microcircuits for a variety of cortical types, in particular, agranular cortical regions. As a counterpoint to the striate microcircuit, which may be anchored in an exceptional cytoarchitecture, we here outline a tentative microcircuit for agranular cortex. The circuit is based on a synthesis of the available literature on the local microcircuitry in agranular cortical areas of the rodent brain, investigated by anatomical and electrophysiological approaches. A central observation of these investigations is a weakening of interlaminar inhibition as cortical cytoarchitecture becomes less distinctive. Thus, our study of agranular microcircuitry revealed deviations from the well-known 'canonical' microcircuit established for striate cortex, suggesting variations in the intrinsic circuitry across the cortex that may be functionally relevant.

  19. Hidden local symmetry of Eu{sup 3+} in xenotime-like crystals revealed by high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yibo; Ma, Zongwei; Zhang, Junpei; Wang, Junfeng; Du, Guihuan; Xia, Zhengcai; Han, Junbo, E-mail: junbo.han@mail.hust.edu.cn; Li, Liang [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yu, Xuefeng [Department of Physics, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nanostructures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2015-02-07

    The excellent optical properties of europium-doped crystals in visible and near infrared wavelength regions enable them to have broad applications in optoelectronics, laser crystals and sensing devices. The local site crystal fields can affect the intensities and peak positions of the photo-emission lines strongly, but they are usually difficult to be clarified due to magnetically degenerate 4f electronic levels coupling with the crystal fields. Here, we provide an effective way to explore the hidden local symmetry of the Eu{sup 3+} sites in different hosts by taking photoluminescence measurements under pulsed high magnetic fields up to 46 T. The zero-field photoluminescence peaks split further at high magnetic fields when the Zeeman splitting energy is comparable to or larger than that of the crystal field induced zero-field splitting. In particular, a magnetic field induced crossover of the local crystal fields has been observed in the GdVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} crystal, which resulted from the alignment of Gd{sup 3+} magnetic moment in high magnetic fields; and a hexagonally symmetric local crystal fields was observed in the YPO{sub 4} nanocrystals at the Eu{sup 3+} sites characterized by the special axial and rhombic crystal field terms. These distinct Zeeman splitting behaviors uncover the crystal fields-related local symmetry of luminescent Eu{sup 3+} centers in different hosts or magnetic environments, which are significant for their applications in optics and optoelectronics.

  20. Tailored Fano resonance and localized electromagnetic field enhancement in Ag gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaozhu; Klopf, J. Michael; Wang, Lei; Yang, Kaida; Lukaszew, Rosa A.

    2017-01-01

    Metallic gratings can support Fano resonances when illuminated with EM radiation, and their characteristic reflectivity versus incident angle lineshape can be greatly affected by the surrounding dielectric environment and the grating geometry. By using conformal oblique incidence thin film deposition onto an optical grating substrate, it is possible to increase the grating amplitude due to shadowing effects, thereby enabling tailoring of the damping processes and electromagnetic field couplings of the Fano resonances, hence optimizing the associated localized electric field intensity. To investigate these effects we compare the optical reflectivity under resonance excitation in samples prepared by oblique angle deposition (OAD) and under normal deposition (ND) onto the same patterned surfaces. We observe that by applying OAD method, the sample exhibits a deeper and narrower reflectivity dip at resonance than that obtained under ND. This can be explained in terms of a lower damping of Fano resonance on obliquely deposited sample and leads to a stronger localized electric field. This approach opens a fabrication path for applications where tailoring the electromagnetic field induced by Fano resonance can improve the figure of merit of specific device characteristics, e.g. quantum efficiency (QE) in grating-based metallic photocathodes. PMID:28290545

  1. Spectral conditions for strong local nondeterminism and exact Hausdorff measure of ranges of Gaussian random fields

    CERN Document Server

    Luan, Nana

    2011-01-01

    Let $X= \\{X(t), t \\in \\R^N\\}$ be a Gaussian random field with values in $\\R^d$ defined by \\[ X(t) = \\big(X_1(t),..., X_d(t)\\big),\\qquad t \\in \\R^N, \\] where $X_1, ..., X_d$ are independent copies of a real-valued, centered, anisotropic Gaussian random field $X_0$ which has stationary increments and the property of strong local nondeterminism. In this paper we determine the exact Hausdorff measure function for the range $X([0, 1]^N)$. We also provide a sufficient condition for a Gaussian random field with stationary increments to be strongly locally nondeterministic. This condition is given in terms of the spectral measures of the Gaussian random fields which may contain either an absolutely continuous or discrete part. This result strengthens and extends significantly the related theorems of Berman (1973, 1988), Pitt (1978) and Xiao (2007, 2009), and will have wider applicability beyond the scope of the present paper.

  2. Extremely local electric field enhancement and light confinement in dielectric waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Qijing; Zou, Chang-Ling

    2013-01-01

    The extremely local electric field enhancement and light confinement is demonstrated in dielectric waveguide with corner and gap geometry. The numerical results reveal the local electric field enhancement in the vicinity of the apex of fan-shaped waveguide. Classical electromagnetic theory predicts that the field enhancement and confinement abilities increase with decreasing radius of rounded corner ($r$) and gap ($g$), and show singularity for infinitesimal $r$ and $g$. For practical parameters with $r=g=10\\,\\mathrm{nm}$, the mode area of opposing apex-to-apex fan-shaped waveguides can be as small as $4\\times10^{-3}A_{0}$ ($A_{0}=\\lambda^{2}/4$), far beyond the diffraction limit. This way of breaking diffraction limit with no loss outperforms plasmonic waveguides, where light confinement is realized at the cost of huge intrinsic loss in the metal. Furthermore, we propose a structure with dielectric bow-tie antenna on a silicon-on-insulator waveguide, whose field enhancement increases by one order. The lossle...

  3. A domain decomposition approach for full-field measurements based identification of local elastic parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles

    2015-03-01

    We propose a domain decomposition formalism specifically designed for the identification of local elastic parameters based on full-field measurements. This technique is made possible by a multi-scale implementation of the constitutive compatibility method. Contrary to classical approaches, the constitutive compatibility method resolves first some eigenmodes of the stress field over the structure rather than directly trying to recover the material properties. A two steps micro/macro reconstruction of the stress field is performed: a Dirichlet identification problem is solved first over every subdomain, the macroscopic equilibrium is then ensured between the subdomains in a second step. We apply the method to large linear elastic 2D identification problems to efficiently produce estimates of the material properties at a much lower computational cost than classical approaches.

  4. Local circular polarizations in nanostructures induced by linear polarization via optical near-fields

    CERN Document Server

    Naruse, Makoto; Inoue, Tetsuya; Yasuda, Hideki; Hori, Hirokazu; Naya, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported [Naruse, et al. Sci. Rep. 4, 6077, 2014] that the geometrical randomness of disk-shaped silver nanoparticles, which exhibit high reflection at near-infrared wavelengths, serves as the origin of a particle-dependent localization and hierarchical distribution of optical near-fields in the vicinity of the nanostructure. In this study, we show that the induced polarizations are circular, particularly at resonant wavelengths. We formulate optical near-field processes between nanostructures, accounting for their polarizations and geometries, and attribute circular polarization to the layout-dependent phase difference between the electrical susceptibilities associated with longitudinal and transverse-electric components. This study clarifies the fundamental optical properties of random nanostructured matter and offers generic theoretical concepts for implementing nanoscale polarizations of optical near-fields.

  5. Image dipoles approach to the local field enhancement in nanostructured Ag-Au hybrid devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Christin; Richter, Marten; Knorr, Andreas; Weidinger, Inez M; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2010-01-14

    We have investigated the plasmonic enhancement in the radiation field at various nanostructured multilayer devices that may be applied in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. We apply an image dipole method to describe the effect of surface morphology on the field enhancement in a quasistatic limit. In particular, we compare the performance of a nanostructured silver surface and a layered silver-gold hybrid device. It is found that localized surface plasmon states provide a high field enhancement in silver-gold hybrid devices, where symmetry breaking due to surface defects is a supporting factor. These results are compared to those obtained for multishell nanoparticles of spherical symmetry. Calculated enhancement factors are discussed on the background of recent experimental data.

  6. Local equilibria and state transfer of charged classical particles on a helix in an electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Plettenberg, J; Zampetaki, A V; Schmelcher, P

    2016-01-01

    We explore the effects of a homogeneous external electric field on the static properties and dynamical behavior of two charged particles confined to a helix. In contrast to the field-free setup which provides a separation of the center-of-mass and relative motion, the existence of an external force perpendicular to the helix axis couples the center-of-mass to the relative degree of freedom leading to equilibria with a localized center of mass. By tuning the external field various fixed points are created and/or annihilated through different bifurcation scenarios. We provide a detailed analysis of these bifurcations based on which we demonstrate a robust state transfer between essentially arbitrary equilibrium configurations of the two charges that can be induced by making the external force time-dependent.

  7. Randomness in highly reflective silver nanoparticles and their localized optical fields

    CERN Document Server

    Naruse, Makoto; Yasuda, Hideki; Tate, Naoya; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Naya, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Reflection of near-infrared light is important for preventing heat transfer in energy saving applications. A large-area, mass-producible reflector that contains randomly distributed disk-shaped silver nanoparticles and that exhibits high reflection at near-infrared wavelengths was demonstrated. Although resonant coupling between incident light and the nanostructure of the reflector plays some role, what is more important is the geometrical randomness of the nanoparticles, which serves as the origin of a particle-dependent localization and hierarchical distribution of optical near-fields in the vicinity of the nanostructure. Here we show and clarified the unique optical near-field processes associated with the randomness seen in experimentally fabricated silver nanostructures by adapting a rigorous theory of optical near-fields based on an angular spectrum and detailed electromagnetic calculations.

  8. Boosting Local Field Enhancement by on-Chip Nanofocusing and Impedance-Matched Plasmonic Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenin, Vladimir A.; Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu;

    2015-01-01

    Strongly confined surface plasmon-polariton modes can be used for efficiently delivering the electromagnetic energy to nanosized volumes by reducing the cross sections of propagating modes far beyond the diffraction limit, that is, by nanofocusing. This process results in significant local-field...... of efficient nanofocusing and nanoantenna resonant excitation realized in our experiments offers a major boost to the field intensity enhancement up to ∼12000, with the enhanced field being evenly distributed over the gap volume of 30 × 30 × 10 nm3, and promises thereby a variety of useful on......-fire geometry at telecom wavelengths. Numerical and experimental evidence of the efficient excitation of dipole and quadrupole (dark) antenna modes are provided, revealing underlying physical mechanisms and analogies with the operation of plane-wave Fabry-Pérot interferometers. The unique combination...

  9. Local thermal behaviour of a massive scalar field near a reflecting wall

    CERN Document Server

    De Lorenci, V A; Moreira, E S

    2014-01-01

    The mean square fluctuation and the expectation value of the stress-energy-momentum tensor of a neutral massive scalar field at finite temperature are determined near an infinite plane Dirichlet wall. The flat background has an arbitrary number of dimensions and the field is arbitrarily coupled to the vanishing curvature. It is shown that, unlike vacuum contributions, thermal contributions are free from boundary divergences. The study reveals a local version of dimensional reduction, namely, corrections to familiar blackbody expressions are linear in the temperature, with the corresponding coefficients given only in terms of vacuum expectation values in a background with one less dimension. It is shown that such corrections are "classical" (i.e., not dependent on Planck's constant) only if the scalar field is massless.

  10. Local field distribution near corrugated interfaces: Green function formalism versus effective medium theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, C. W.; Xiao, J. J.; Yu, K. W.

    2007-05-01

    The recent Green function formalism (GFF) has been used to study the local field distribution near a periodic interface separating two homogeneous media of different dielectric constants. In the GFF, the integral equations can be solved conveniently because of the existence of an analytic expression for the kernel (Greenian). However, due to a severe singularity in the Greenian, the formalism was formerly applied to compute the electric fields away from the interface region. In this work, we have succeeded in extending the GFF to compute the electric field inside the interface region by taking advantage of a sum rule. To our surprise, the strengths of the electric fields are quite similar in both media across the interface, despite of the large difference in dielectric constants. Moreover, we propose a simple effective medium approximation (EMA) to compute the electric field inside the interface region. We show that the EMA can indeed give an excellent description of the electric field, except near a surface plasmon resonance.

  11. Narrow band perfect absorber for maximum localized magnetic and electric field enhancement and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Zhengdong; Zhang, Senlin; Gong, Chensheng; He, Sailing

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonics offer an exciting way to mediate the interaction between light and matter, allowing strong field enhancement and confinement, large absorption and scattering at resonance. However, simultaneous realization of ultra-narrow band perfect absorption and electromagnetic field enhancement is challenging due to the intrinsic high optical losses and radiative damping in metals. Here, we propose an all-metal plasmonic absorber with an absorption bandwidth less than 8 nm and polarization insensitive absorptivity exceeding 99%. Unlike traditional Metal-Dielectric-Metal configurations, we demonstrate that the narrowband perfect absorption and field enhancement are ascribed to the vertical gap plasmonic mode in the deep subwavelength scale, which has a high quality factor of 120 and mode volume of about 10-4 × (λres/n)3. Based on the coupled mode theory, we verify that the diluted field enhancement is proportional to the absorption, and thus perfect absorption is critical to maximum field enhancement. In addition, the proposed perfect absorber can be operated as a refractive index sensor with a sensitivity of 885 nm/RIU and figure of merit as high as 110. It provides a new design strategy for narrow band perfect absorption and local field enhancement, and has potential applications in biosensors, filters and nonlinear optics.

  12. CALCULUS ON FRACTALS BASED UPON LOCAL FIELDS In memory of Founding Editor Professor M. T. Cheng with great respect and deep sorrow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The main contents in this note are: 1. introduction; 2. locally compact groups and local fields ; 3. calcaius on fractals based upon local fields; 4. fractional calculus and fractals; 5. fractal function spaces and PDE on fractals.

  13. Derivation of a non-local interfacial model for 3D wetting in an external field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardino, N R [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Parry, A O [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Rascon, C [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, E-28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Romero-Enrique, J M [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado de Correos 1065, E-41080 Seville (Spain)

    2009-11-18

    We extend recent studies of 3D short-ranged wetting transitions by deriving an interfacial Hamiltonian in the presence of an arbitrary external field. The binding potential functional, describing the interaction of the interface and the substrate, can still be written in a diagrammatic form, but now includes new classes of diagrams due to the coupling to the external potential, which are determined exactly. Applications to systems with long-ranged (algebraically decaying) and short-ranged (exponentially decaying) external potentials are considered at length. We show how the familiar 'sharp-kink' approximation to the binding potential emerges, and determine the corrections to this arising from interactions between bulk-like fluctuations and the external field. A connection is made with earlier local effective interfacial Hamiltonian approaches. It is shown that, for the case of an exponentially decaying potential, non-local effects have a particularly strong influence on the approach to the critical regime at second-order wetting transitions, even when they appear to be sub-dominant. This is confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation studies of a discretized version of a non-local interfacial model.

  14. Cosmic-Ray Small-scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barquero, V.; Farber, R.; Xu, S.; Desiati, P.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic-ray anisotropy has been observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments over the past decade. However, no comprehensive or satisfactory explanation has been put forth to date. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays at Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium- and small-scale angular structure could be an effect of nondiffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation for the observed small-scale anisotropy observed at the TeV energy scale may be the effect of particle propagation in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-β compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence to study how the cosmic rays’ arrival direction distribution is perturbed when they stream along the local turbulent magnetic field. We utilize Liouville’s theorem for obtaining the anisotropy at Earth and provide the theoretical framework for the application of the theorem in the specific case of cosmic-ray arrival distribution. In this work, we discuss the effects on the anisotropy arising from propagation in this inhomogeneous and turbulent interstellar magnetic field.

  15. Localization and mass spectrum of q-form fields on branes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chun-E.; Zhong, Yuan; Xie, Qun-Ying; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate localization of a bulk massless q-form field on codimension-one branes by using a new Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposition, for which there are two types of KK modes for the bulk q-form field, the q-form and (q - 1)-form modes. The first modes may be massive or massless while the second ones are all massless. These two types of KK modes satisfy two Schrödinger-like equations. For a five-dimensional brane model with a finite extra dimension, the spectrum of a bulk 3-form field on the brane consists of some massive bound 3-form KK modes as well as some massless bound 2-form ones with different configuration along the extra dimension. These 2-form modes are different from those obtained from a bulk 2-form field. For a five-dimensional degenerated Bloch brane model with an infinite extra dimension, some massive 3-form resonant KK modes and corresponding massless 2-form resonant ones are obtained for a bulk 3-form field.

  16. Comparison of local infiltration of adrenalized lidocaine with adrenaline alone in operative field bleeding in Rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Yari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many head and neck surgeries, operative field bleeding plays an important role in the success of surgery and reducing the time of operation. The current study was conducted to compare local infiltration of adrenalized lidocaine with adrenaline alone in operative field bleeding in Rhinoplasty. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 56 candidate patients aged15-45 years for Rhinoplasty with ASA class I and II were randomly divided into two groups of lidocaine and control. Group 1 was administered lidocaine 2% with adrenaline and group 2 was administered normal saline with adrenaline , Operative field bleeding was then recorded and compared between groups. Results: There was not a significant difference between groups in preoperative systolic BP and diastolic BP, postoperative (15 min systolic BP and diastolic BP , preoperative heart rate and postoperative (15 minheart rate , operative field bleeding and bleeding scale. Conclusion: the effect of lidocaine 2% in operative field bleeding is the same as that of normal saline. Hence, adrenaline along with normal saline can be used in Rhinoplasty.

  17. Inductive heat property of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in AC magnetic field for local hyperthermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Donglin; ZENG Xianwei; XIA Qisheng; TANG Jintian

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with different magnetic properties were prepared by coprecipitation of Fe3+ and Fe2+ with aqueous NaOH solution.The inductive heat properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in an alternating current (AC) magnetic field were investigated for local hyperthermia. The maximum saunder the optimum conditions of Fe3+:Fe2+ molar ratio at 1.8:1. The Ms of Fe3O4 nanoparticles decreased as the Fe3+ /Fe2+ molar ratio increased. But the coercivity Hc increases with the increasing of Fe3+ /Fe2+ molar ratio. Exposed in the AC magnetic field for 29 min, the temperatures of physiological saline suspension containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles were 42-97.5 ℃.The inductive heat property of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in AC magnetic field decreases as Hc increases, but increases with the increasing of Ms. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles would be useful as good thermoseeds for localized hyperthermia treatment of cancers.

  18. Regional estimation of geomagnetically induced currents based on the local magnetic or electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viljanen Ari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated a close relationship between the time derivative of the horizontal geomagnetic field vector (dH/dt and geomagnetically induced currents (GIC at a nearby location in a power grid. Similarly, a high correlation exists between GIC and the local horizontal geoelectric field (E, typically modelled from a measured magnetic field. Considering GIC forecasting, it is not feasible to assume that detailed prediction of time series will be possible. Instead, other measures summarising the activity level over a given period are preferable. In this paper, we consider the 30-min maximum of dH/dt or E as a local activity indicator (|dH/dt|30 or |E|30. Concerning GIC, we use the sum of currents through the neutral leads at substations and apply its 30-min maximum as a regional activity measure (GIC30. We show that |dH/dt|30 at a single point yields a proxy for GIC activity in a larger region. A practical consequence is that if |dH/dt|30 can be predicted at some point then it is also possible to assess the expected GIC level in the surrounding area. As is also demonstrated, |E|30 and GIC30 depend linearly on |dH/dt|30, so there is no saturation with increasing geomagnetic activity contrary to often used activity indices.

  19. Generalized local-frame-transformation theory for excited species in external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakeas, P.; Greene, Chris H.; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-07-01

    A rigorous theoretical framework is developed for a generalized local-frame-transformation theory (GLFT). The GLFT is applicable to the following systems: Rydberg atoms or molecules in an electric field and negative ions in any combination of electric and/or magnetic fields. A first test application to the photoionization spectra of Rydberg atoms in an external electric field demonstrates dramatic improvement over the first version of the local-frame-transformation theory developed initially by U. Fano [Phys. Rev. A 24, 619 (1981), 10.1103/PhysRevA.24.619] and D. A. Harmin [Phys. Rev. A 26, 2656 (1982), 10.1103/PhysRevA.26.2656]. This revised GLFT theory yields nontrivial corrections because it now includes the full on-shell Hilbert space without adopting the truncations in the original theory. Comparisons of the semianalytical GLFT Stark spectra with ab initio numerical simulations yield errors in the range of a few tens of MHz, an improvement over the original Fano-Harmin theory, whose errors are 10-100 times larger. Our analysis provides a systematic pathway to precisely describe the corresponding photoabsorption spectra that should be accurate enough to meet most modern experimental standards.

  20. Surround modulation characteristics of local field potential and spiking activity in primary visual cortex of cat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available In primary visual cortex, spiking activity that evoked by stimulus confined in receptive field can be modulated by surround stimulus. This center-surround interaction is hypothesized to be the basis of visual feature integration and segregation. Spiking output has been extensively reported to be surround suppressive. However, less is known about the modulation properties of the local field potential (LFP, which generally reflects synaptic inputs. We simultaneously recorded spiking activity and LFP in the area 17 of anesthetized cats to examine and compare their modulation characteristics. When the stimulus went beyond the classical receptive field, LFP exhibited decreased power along the gamma band (30-100 Hz in most of our recording sites. Further investigation revealed that suppression of the LFP gamma mean power (gLFP depended on the angle between the center and surround orientations. The strongest suppression was induced when center and surround orientations were parallel. Moreover, the surround influence of the gLFP exhibited an asymmetric spatial organization. These results demonstrate that the gLFP has similar but not identical surround modulation properties, as compared to the spiking activity. The spatiotemporal integration of LFP implies that the oscillation and synchronization of local synaptic inputs may have important functions in surround modulation.

  1. Localization and the interface between quantum mechanics, quantum field theory and quantum gravity I. (The two antagonistic localizations and their asymptotic compatibility)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-02-15

    It is shown that there are significant conceptual differences between QM and QFT which make it difficult to view the latter as just a relativistic extension of the principles of QM. At the root of this is a fundamental distinction between Born localization in QM (which in the relativistic context changes its name to Newton- Wigner localization) and modular localization which is the localization underlying QFT, after one separates it from its standard presentation in terms of field coordinates. The first comes with a probability notion and projection operators, whereas the latter describes causal propagation in QFT and leads to thermal aspects of locally reduced finite energy states. The Born-Newton-Wigner localization in QFT is only applicable asymptotically and the covariant correlation between asymptotic in and out localization projectors is the basis of the existence of an invariant scattering matrix. In this first part of a two part essay the modular localization (the intrinsic content of field localization) and its philosophical consequences take the center stage. Important physical consequences of vacuum polarization will be the main topic of part II. The present division into two semi-autonomous essays is the result of a partition and extension of an originally one-part manuscript. (author)

  2. Emergence of Complex-Like Cells in a Temporal Product Network with Local Receptive Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gregor, Karo

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new neural architecture and an unsupervised algorithm for learning invariant representations from temporal sequence of images. The system uses two groups of complex cells whose outputs are combined multiplicatively: one that represents the content of the image, constrained to be constant over several consecutive frames, and one that represents the precise location of features, which is allowed to vary over time but constrained to be sparse. The architecture uses an encoder to extract features, and a decoder to reconstruct the input from the features. The method was applied to patches extracted from consecutive movie frames and produces orientation and frequency selective units analogous to the complex cells in V1. An extension of the method is proposed to train a network composed of units with local receptive field spread over a large image of arbitrary size. A layer of complex cells, subject to sparsity constraints, pool feature units over overlapping local neighborhoods, which causes the feat...

  3. Plasmonic plano-semi-cylindrical nanocavities with high-efficiency local-field confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feifei; Zhang, Xinping; Fang, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic nanocavity arrays were achieved by producing isolated silver semi-cylindrical nanoshells periodically on a continuous planar gold film. Hybridization between localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the Ag semi-cylindrical nanoshells (SCNS) and surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in the gold film was observed as split bonding and anti-bonding resonance modes located at different spectral positions. This led to strong local field enhancement and confinement in the plano-concave nanocavites. Narrow-band optical extinction with an amplitude as high as 1.5 OD, corresponding to 97% reduction in the transmission, was achieved in the visible spectrum. The resonance spectra of this hybrid device can be extended from the visible to the near infrared by adjusting the structural parameters. PMID:28074853

  4. Generalized local frame transformation theory for Rydberg atoms in external fields

    CERN Document Server

    Giannakeas, P; Robicheaux, F

    2016-01-01

    A rigorous theoretical framework is developed for a generalized local frame transformation theory (GLFT). A first test application to the photoionization spectra of Rydberg atoms in an external electric field demonstrates dramatic improvement over the first version of the local frame transformation theory developed initially by Fano and Harmin. This revised GLFT theory yields non-trivial corrections because it now includes the full on-shell Hilbert space without adopting the truncations in the original theory. Comparisons of the semi-analytical GLFT Stark spectra with {\\it ab initio} numerical simulations yields errors in the range of a few tens of MHz, an improvement over the original Fano-Harmin theory whose errors are 10-100 times larger. Our analysis provides a systematic pathway to precisely describe the corresponding photoabsorption spectra that should be accurate enough to meet most modern experimental standards.

  5. Resolving phase information of the optical local density of state with scattering near-field probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, R.; Vincent, R.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically discuss the link between the phase measured using a scattering optical scanning near-field microscopy (s-SNOM) and the local density of optical states (LDOS). A remarkable result is that the LDOS information is directly included in the phase of the probe. Therefore by monitoring the spatial variation of the trans-scattering phase, we locally measure the phase modulation associated with the probe and the optical paths. We demonstrate numerically that a technique involving two-phase imaging of a sample with two different sized tips should allow to obtain the image the pLDOS. For this imaging method, numerical comparison with extinction probe measurement shows crucial qualitative and quantitative improvement.

  6. Local-field effects and nanostructuring for controlling optical properties and enabling novel optical phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgaleva, Ksenia

    My Ph. D. thesis is devoted to the investigation of the methods of controlling and improving the linear and nonlinear optical properties of materials. Within my studies, two approaches are considered: nanostructuring and invoking local-field effects. These broad topics involve various projects that I have undertaken during my Ph. D. research. The first project is on composite laser gain media. It involves both nanostructuring and using local-field effects to control the basic laser parameters, such as the radiative lifetime, small-signal gain and absorption, and the saturation intensity. While being involved in this project, I have performed both theoretical and experimental studies of laser characteristics of composite materials. In particular, I have developed simple theoretical models for calculating the effective linear susceptibilities of layered and Maxwell Garnett composite materials with a gain resonance in one of their components. The analysis of the results given by the models suggests that local-field effects provide considerable freedom in controlling the optical properties of composite laser gain media. I have also experimentally measured the radiative lifetime of Nd:YAG nanopowder suspended in different liquids to extract information regarding local-field effects. The second project is devoted to the investigation of a not-well-known phenomenon that local-field effects can induce, which is microscopic cascading in nonlinear optics. This project involves the theoretical prediction of local-field-induced microscopic cascading effect in the fifth-order nonlinear response and its first experimental observation. This effect has been mostly overlooked or underestimated, but could prove useful in quantum optics. I have shown that, under certain conditions, the microscopic cascaded contribution can be a dominant effect in high-order nonlinearities. The third project is about characterization of laser performance of a new dye, oligofluorene, embedded into

  7. Thickness and local field effects on energy transfer rate in coupled quantum wells system: Linear regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazifehshenas, T.; Bahrami, B. [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-fard, T., E-mail: taha@udel.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    We investigate theoretically the dependence of energy transfer rate in Double-Quantum-Well system on the well thickness by using the balance equation formalism. Also, by including the local field correction in our calculations through the zero- and finite-temperature Hubbard approximations, we study the effect of the short-range interactions on the energy transfer phenomenon. Calculations consider both the static and dynamic screening approximations. Our numerical results predict that the energy transfer rate increases considerably by increasing the layers' thicknesses and by taking into account the short-range interactions, as well.

  8. Phase-Field Relaxation of Topology Optimization with Local Stress Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stainko, Roman; Burger, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a new relaxation scheme for structural topology optimization problems with local stress constraints based on a phase-field method. In the basic formulation we have a PDE-constrained optimization problem, where the finite element and design analysis are solved simultaneously...... parameter decreases to zero. A major advantage of this kind of relaxation opposed to standard approaches is a uniform constraint qualification that is satisfied for any positive value of the penalization parameter. The relaxation scheme yields a large-scale optimization problem with a high number of linear...

  9. Multipartite non-locality and entanglement signatures of a field-induced quantum phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batle, Josep; Alkhambashi, Majid; Farouk, Ahmed; Naseri, Mosayeb; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2017-02-01

    Quantum correlation measures are limited in practice to a few number of parties, since no general theory is still capable of reaching the thermodynamic limit. In the present work we study entanglement and non-locality for a cluster of spins belonging to a compound that displays a magnetocaloric effect. A quantum phase transition (QPT) is induced by an external magnetic field B, in such a way that the corresponding quantum fluctuations are reproduced at a much smaller scale than the experimental outcomes, and then described by means of the aforementioned quantum measures.

  10. Isotropic proton-detected local-field nuclear magnetic resonancein solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlin, Robert H.; Walls, Jamie D.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-08-04

    A new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method is presented which produces linear, isotropic proton-detected local-field spectra for InS spin systems in powdered samples. The method, HETeronuclear Isotropic Evolution (HETIE), refocuses the anisotropic portion of the heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies by evolving the system under a series of specially designed Hamiltonians and evolution pathways. The theory behind HETIE is represented along with experimental studies conducted on a powdered sample of ferrocene, demonstrating the methodology outlined in this paper. Applications of HETIE for structural determination in solid-state NMR are discussed.

  11. Manufacture of Locally Reinforced Composite Discs by Casting in the Alternating Electromagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Golak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a new method of obtaining local particle reinforcement in the composite discs. In this method, the liquid composite suspension is poured into a mould and then exposed to the alternating electromagnetic field. The Lorentz force acting on the liquid metal causes the reinforcement to move towards one or both surfaces of the manufactured disc. The paper presents the process theory, the methodology for the casting system design, and the results of an experimental manufacture of one-side and two-side reinforced composite discs made of aluminium alloy.

  12. Enhancement of Optical Nonlinearities in Composite Media and Structures via Local Fields and Electromagnetic Coupling Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.

    2002-01-01

    This talk will review the linear and nonlinear optical properties of metal nanoparticles and dielectric microparticles, with an emphasis on local field effects, and whispering gallery modes (WGMs), as well as the conjunction of these two effects for enhanced Raman. In particular, enhanced optical properties that result from electromagnetic coupling effects will be discussed in the context of Mie scattering from concentric spheres and bispheres. Predictions of mode splitting and photonic bandgaps in micro-spheres will be presented and will be shown to be analogous to effects that occur in coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROW). Slow and fast light in SCISSOR / CROW configurations will also be discussed.

  13. Cortical Polarity of the RING Protein PAR-2 Is Maintained by Exchange Rate Kinetics at the Cortical-Cytoplasmic Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinobu Arata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell polarity arises through the spatial segregation of polarity regulators. PAR proteins are polarity regulators that localize asymmetrically to two opposing cortical domains. However, it is unclear how the spatially segregated PAR proteins interact to maintain their mutually exclusive partitioning. Here, single-molecule detection analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos reveals that cortical PAR-2 diffuses only short distances, and, as a result, most PAR-2 molecules associate and dissociate from the cortex without crossing into the opposing domain. Our results show that cortical PAR-2 asymmetry is maintained by the local exchange reactions that occur at the cortical-cytoplasmic boundary. Additionally, we demonstrate that local exchange reactions are sufficient to maintain cortical asymmetry in a parameter-free mathematical model. These findings suggest that anterior and posterior PAR proteins primarily interact through the cytoplasmic pool and not via cortical diffusion.

  14. Cortical Polarity of the RING Protein PAR-2 Is Maintained by Exchange Rate Kinetics at the Cortical-Cytoplasmic Boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Yukinobu; Hiroshima, Michio; Pack, Chan-Gi; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Motegi, Fumio; Nakazato, Kenichi; Shindo, Yuki; Wiseman, Paul W; Sawa, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Brandão, Hugo B; Shibata, Tatsuo; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-08-23

    Cell polarity arises through the spatial segregation of polarity regulators. PAR proteins are polarity regulators that localize asymmetrically to two opposing cortical domains. However, it is unclear how the spatially segregated PAR proteins interact to maintain their mutually exclusive partitioning. Here, single-molecule detection analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos reveals that cortical PAR-2 diffuses only short distances, and, as a result, most PAR-2 molecules associate and dissociate from the cortex without crossing into the opposing domain. Our results show that cortical PAR-2 asymmetry is maintained by the local exchange reactions that occur at the cortical-cytoplasmic boundary. Additionally, we demonstrate that local exchange reactions are sufficient to maintain cortical asymmetry in a parameter-free mathematical model. These findings suggest that anterior and posterior PAR proteins primarily interact through the cytoplasmic pool and not via cortical diffusion.

  15. Massively parallel recording of unit and local field potentials with silicon-based electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csicsvari, Jozsef; Henze, Darrell A; Jamieson, Brian; Harris, Kenneth D; Sirota, Anton; Barthó, Péter; Wise, Kensall D; Buzsáki, György

    2003-08-01

    Parallel recording of neuronal activity in the behaving animal is a prerequisite for our understanding of neuronal representation and storage of information. Here we describe the development of micro-machined silicon microelectrode arrays for unit and local field recordings. The two-dimensional probes with 96 or 64 recording sites provided high-density recording of unit and field activity with minimal tissue displacement or damage. The on-chip active circuit eliminated movement and other artifacts and greatly reduced the weight of the headgear. The precise geometry of the recording tips allowed for the estimation of the spatial location of the recorded neurons and for high-resolution estimation of extracellular current source density. Action potentials could be simultaneously recorded from the soma and dendrites of the same neurons. Silicon technology is a promising approach for high-density, high-resolution sampling of neuronal activity in both basic research and prosthetic devices.

  16. Near-field optical microscopy of localized excitations on rough surfaces: influence of a probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the general principles of near-field optical microscopy. I consider the influence of a probe when being used to image localized dipolar excitations and suggest a way of evaluating the perturbation thus introduced. Using the rigorous microscopic (electric) point-dipole description, I...... calculate the self consistent field intensity at the site of a probe dipole scanning over resonantly interacting object dipoles and show that the intensity distribution deviates from that existing in the absence of a probe. I demonstrate that this difference increases with an increase in the polarizability...... of the probe dipole, resulting eventually in a completely different intensity distribution, The calculations also show that the perturbation of the intensity distribution due to the presence of a probe decreases with an increase in the probe-sample distance. In order to evaluate the degree of perturbation, I...

  17. Comprehensive simulation of SEM images taking into account local and global electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Sergey; Borisov, Sergey S.; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ivanchikov, Andrei; Matison, Dmitri; Militsin, Vladimir; Suzuki, Makoto

    2010-06-01

    We are reporting the development of a simulation tool with unique capabilities to comprehensively model an SEM signal. This includes electron scattering, charging, and detector settings, as well as modeling of the local and global electromagnetic fields and the electron trajectories in these fields. Experimental and simulated results were compared for SEM imaging of carbon nanofibers embedded into bulk material in the presence of significant charging, as well as for samples with applied potential on metal electrodes. The effect of the potentials applied to electrodes on the secondary emission was studied; the resulting SEM images were simulated. The image contrast depends strongly on the sign and the value of the potential. SEM imaging of nanofibers embedded into silicon dioxide resulted in the considerable change of the appeared dimensions of the fibers and as well as tone reversal when the beam voltage was varied. The results of the simulations are in agreement with experimental results.

  18. Characteristic of Secondary Flow Caused by Local Density Change in Standing Acoustic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonsho, Kazuyuki; Hirosawa, Takuya; Kusakawa, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Takuo; Tanabe, Mitsuaki

    Secondary flow is a flow which is caused by the interference between standing acoustic fields and local density change. The behavior of the secondary flow depends on the location of the given local density change in the standing acoustic fields. When the density change is given at the middle of a velocity node and the neighboring velocity anti-node (middle point) or when it is given at the velocity anti-node in standing acoustic fields, the secondary flow shows particular behavior. Characteristic of the secondary flow at the two positions was predicted by numerical simulations. It was examined from these simulations whether the driving mechanism of the flow can be explained by the kind of acoustic radiation force that has been proposed so far. The predicted secondary flow was verified by experiments. For both the simulations and experiments, the standing acoustic fields generated in a cylinder are employed. In the experiments, the acoustic fields are generated by two loud speakers that are vibrated in same phase in a chamber. The employed resonance frequency is about 1000 Hz. The chamber is filled with air of room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In the numerical simulations and experiments, the local density change is given by heating or cooling. Because the secondary flow is influenced by buoyancy, the numerical simulations were done without taking gravity force into account and a part of the experiments were done by the microgravity condition using a drop tower. As a result of the simulations, at the middle point, the heated air was blown toward the node and the cooled air was blown toward the anti-node. It is clarified that the secondary flow is driven by the expected kind of acoustic radiation force. At the anti-node, both the heated and cooled air expands perpendicular to the traveling direction of the sound wave. The driving mechanism of the secondary flow can not be explained by the acoustic radiation force, and a detailed analysis is done. Through the

  19. Rapid and efficient localization of depth electrodes and cortical labeling using free and open source medical software in epilepsy surgery candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princich, Juan Pablo; Wassermann, Demian; Latini, Facundo; Oddo, Silvia; Blenkmann, Alejandro Omar; Seifer, Gustavo; Kochen, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Depth intracranial electrodes (IEs) placement is one of the most used procedures to identify the epileptogenic zone (EZ) in surgical treatment of drug resistant epilepsy patients, about 20–30% of this population. IEs localization is therefore a critical issue defining the EZ and its relation with eloquent functional areas. That information is then used to target the resective surgery and has great potential to affect outcome. We designed a methodological procedure intended to avoid the need for highly specialized medical resources and reduce time to identify the anatomical location of IEs, during the first instances of intracranial EEG recordings. This workflow is based on established open source software; 3D Slicer and Freesurfer that uses MRI and Post-implant CT fusion for the localization of IEs and its relation with automatic labeled surrounding cortex. To test this hypothesis we assessed the time elapsed between the surgical implantation process and the final anatomical localization of IEs by means of our proposed method compared against traditional visual analysis of raw post-implant imaging in two groups of patients. All IEs were identified in the first 24 H (6–24 H) of implantation using our method in 4 patients of the first group. For the control group; all IEs were identified by experts with an overall time range of 36 h to 3 days using traditional visual analysis. It included (7 patients), 3 patients implanted with IEs and the same 4 patients from the first group. Time to localization was restrained in this group by the specialized personnel and the image quality available. To validate our method; we trained two inexperienced operators to assess the position of IEs contacts on four patients (5 IEs) using the proposed method. We quantified the discrepancies between operators and we also assessed the efficiency of our method to define the EZ comparing the findings against the results of traditional analysis. PMID:24427112

  20. Rapid and efficient localization of depth electrodes and cortical labeling using free and open source medical software in epilepsy surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princich, Juan Pablo; Wassermann, Demian; Latini, Facundo; Oddo, Silvia; Blenkmann, Alejandro Omar; Seifer, Gustavo; Kochen, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Depth intracranial electrodes (IEs) placement is one of the most used procedures to identify the epileptogenic zone (EZ) in surgical treatment of drug resistant epilepsy patients, about 20-30% of this population. IEs localization is therefore a critical issue defining the EZ and its relation with eloquent functional areas. That information is then used to target the resective surgery and has great potential to affect outcome. We designed a methodological procedure intended to avoid the need for highly specialized medical resources and reduce time to identify the anatomical location of IEs, during the first instances of intracranial EEG recordings. This workflow is based on established open source software; 3D Slicer and Freesurfer that uses MRI and Post-implant CT fusion for the localization of IEs and its relation with automatic labeled surrounding cortex. To test this hypothesis we assessed the time elapsed between the surgical implantation process and the final anatomical localization of IEs by means of our proposed method compared against traditional visual analysis of raw post-implant imaging in two groups of patients. All IEs were identified in the first 24 H (6-24 H) of implantation using our method in 4 patients of the first group. For the control group; all IEs were identified by experts with an overall time range of 36 h to 3 days using traditional visual analysis. It included (7 patients), 3 patients implanted with IEs and the same 4 patients from the first group. Time to localization was restrained in this group by the specialized personnel and the image quality available. To validate our method; we trained two inexperienced operators to assess the position of IEs contacts on four patients (5 IEs) using the proposed method. We quantified the discrepancies between operators and we also assessed the efficiency of our method to define the EZ comparing the findings against the results of traditional analysis.

  1. Rapid and efficient localization of depth electrodes and cortical labeling using free and open source medical software in epilepsy surgery candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Princich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Depth intracranial electrodes (IEs placement is one of the most used procedures to identify the epileptogenic zone (EZ in surgical treatment of drug resistant epilepsy patients, about 20-30% of this population. IEs localization is therefore a critical issue defining the EZ and its relation with eloquent functional areas. That information is then used to target the resective surgery and has great potential to affect outcome.We designed a methodological procedure intended to avoid the need for highly specialized medical resources and reduce time to identify the anatomical location of IEs, during the first instances of intracranial EEG recordings. This workflow is based on established open source software; 3D Slicer and Freesurfer that uses MRI and Post-implant CT fusion for the localization of IEs and its relation with automatic labeled surrounding cortex. To test this hypothesis we assessed the time elapsed between the surgical implantation process and the final anatomical localization of IEs by means of our proposed method compared against traditional visual analysis of raw post-implant imaging in two groups of patients.All IEs were identified in the first 24 Hs (6-24 Hs of implantation using our method in 4 patients of the first group. For the control group; all IEs were identified by experts with an overall time range of 36 h to 3 days using traditional visual analysis. It included (7 patients, 3 patients implanted with IEs and the same 4 patients from the first group. Time to localization was restrained in this group by the specialized personnel and the image quality available.To validate our method; we trained two inexperienced operators to assess the position of IEs contacts on four patients (5 intracranial electrodes using the proposed method. We quantified the discrepancies between operators and we also assessed the efficiency of our method to define the EZ comparing the findings against the results of traditional analysis.

  2. Enhancement of cortical network activity in vitro and promotion of GABAergic neurogenesis by stimulation with an electromagnetic field with a 150 MHz carrier wave pulsed with an alternating 10 and 16 Hz modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eGramowski-Voss

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, various stimuli were identified capable of enhancing neurogenesis, a process which is dysfunctional in the senescent brain and in neurodegenerative and certain neuropsychiatric diseases. Applications of electromagnetic fields to brain tissue have been shown to affect cellular properties and their importance for therapies in medicine is recognized.In this study, differentiating murine cortical networks on multiwell microelectrode arrays were repeatedly exposed to an extremely low electromagnetic field (ELEMF with alternating 10 and 16 Hz frequencies piggy-backed onto a 150 MHz carrier frequency. The ELEMF exposure stimulated the electrical network activity and intensified the structure of bursts. Further, the exposure with an electromagnetic field within the first 28 days of the differentiation the network activity induced also reorganization within the burst structure. This effect was already most pronounced at 14 days in vitro after 10 days of exposure. Overall, the development of cortical activity under these conditions was accelerated. These functional electrophysiological changes were accompanied by morphological ones. The percentage of neurons in the neuron glia co-culture was increased without affecting the total number of cells, indicating an enhancement of neurogenesis. The ELEMF exposure selectively promoted the proliferation of a particular population of neurons, evidenced by the increased proportion of GABAergic neurons. The results support the initial hypothesis that this kind of ELEMF stimulation is a treatment option for specific indications with promising potential for CNS applications, especially for degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

  3. Edge detection of potential field data using improved local phase filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    Edge detection is a requisite task in the interpretation of potential field data. There are many high-pass filters based on horizontal and vertical derivatives in use, such as total horizontal derivative, tilt angle, theta map, et al. In this paper, we present a new edge detection filter, which uses the combination of the different order horizontal derivatives to delineate the edges of the sources, called improved local phase (ILP) filter. The new filter is computationally stable, as it does not need the computation of the vertical derivatives of potential field data. The new filter is tested on synthetic and real potential field data. The resolving power of the ILP filter is tested by comparing the results with those obtained by the other filters. The advantage of the ILP filter in the edge detection of potential field data is due to the fact that it can display the edges of the causative sources more precisely and clearly, and can bring out more subtle details.

  4. Radiofrequency Field Distribution Assessment in Indoor Areas Covered by Wireless Local Area Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HELBET, R.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic environment becomes day by day more congested. Radio communication systems in the short range are now part of everyday life, and there is a need to also assess the pollution level due to their emission if we take into account human health and protection. There is consistent scientific evidence that environmental electromagnetic field may cause undesirable biological effects or even health hazards. Present paper aims at giving a view on exposure level due to wireless local area networks (WLAN emission solely, as part of environmental radiofrequency pollution. Highly accurate measurements were made indoor by using a frequency-selective measurement system and identifying the correct settings for an error-minimum assessment. We focused on analysis of the electric flux density distribution inside a room, in the far field of the emitting antennas, in case of a single network communication channel. We analyze the influence the network configuration parameters have on the field level. Distance from the source and traffic rate are also important parameters that affect the exposure level. Our measurements indicate that in the immediate vicinity of the WLAN stations the average field may reach as much as 13% from the present accepted reference levels given in the human exposure standards.

  5. Localization of gauge fields in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo [Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas, Ciudad Universitaria, Mesoamerican Centre for Theoretical Physics, Kilometro 4, Carretera Emiliano Zapata, Colonia Real del Bosque (Teran), Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Departamento de Fisica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Rojas, Alma D. [Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas, Ciudad Universitaria, Mesoamerican Centre for Theoretical Physics, Kilometro 4, Carretera Emiliano Zapata, Colonia Real del Bosque (Teran), Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); AHEP Group, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Paterna (Valencia) (Spain); Santos, Eli [Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas, Ciudad Universitaria, Mesoamerican Centre for Theoretical Physics, Kilometro 4, Carretera Emiliano Zapata, Colonia Real del Bosque (Teran), Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico)

    2014-04-15

    In this work we show that universal gauge vector fields can be localized on the recently proposed 5D thick tachyonic braneworld which involves a de Sitter cosmological background induced on the 3-brane. Namely, by performing a suitable decomposition of the vector field, the resulting 4D effective action corresponds to a massive gauge field, while the profile along the extra dimension obeys a Schroedinger-like equation with a Poeschl-Teller potential. It turns out that the massless zero mode of the gauge field is bound to the expanding 3-brane and allows us to recover the standard 4D electromagnetic phenomena of our world. Moreover, this zero mode is separated from the continuum of Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes by a mass gap determined by the scale of the expansion parameter. We also were able to analytically solve the corresponding Schroedinger-like equation for arbitrary mass, showing that KK massive modes asymptotically behave like plane waves, as expected. (orig.)

  6. Tissue heterogeneity as a mechanism for localized neural stimulation by applied electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, P C [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Correia, L [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Salvador, R [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Basser, P J [Section on Tissue Biophysics and Biomimetics, NICHD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-1428 (United States)

    2007-09-21

    We investigate the heterogeneity of electrical conductivity as a new mechanism to stimulate excitable tissues via applied electric fields. In particular, we show that stimulation of axons crossing internal boundaries can occur at boundaries where the electric conductivity of the volume conductor changes abruptly. The effectiveness of this and other stimulation mechanisms was compared by means of models and computer simulations in the context of transcranial magnetic stimulation. While, for a given stimulation intensity, the largest membrane depolarization occurred where an axon terminates or bends sharply in a high electric field region, a slightly smaller membrane depolarization, still sufficient to generate action potentials, also occurred at an internal boundary where the conductivity jumped from 0.143 S m{sup -1} to 0.333 S m{sup -1}, simulating a white-matter-grey-matter interface. Tissue heterogeneity can also give rise to local electric field gradients that are considerably stronger and more focal than those impressed by the stimulation coil and that can affect the membrane potential, albeit to a lesser extent than the two mechanisms mentioned above. Tissue heterogeneity may play an important role in electric and magnetic 'far-field' stimulation.

  7. Ultrahigh Enhancement of Electromagnetic Fields by Exciting Localized with Extended Surface Plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Anran; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Li, Shuzhou

    2015-01-01

    Excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) of metal nanoparticles (NPs) residing on a flat metal film has attracted great attentions recently due to the enhanced electromagnetic (EM) fields found to be higher than the case of NPs on a dielectric substrate. In the present work, it is shown that even much higher enhancement of EM fields is obtained by exciting the LSPs through extended surface plasmons (ESPs) generated at the metallic film surface using the Kretschmann-Raether configuration. We show that the largest EM field enhancement and the highest surface-enhanced fluorescence intensity are obtained when the incidence angle is the ESP resonance angle of the underlying metal film. The finite-difference time-domain simulations indicate that excitation of LSPs using ESPs can generate 1-3 orders higher EM field intensity than direct excitation of the LSPs using incidence from free space. The ultrahigh enhancement is attributed to the strong confinement of the ESP waves in the vertical direction. The drast...

  8. An elastic-network-based local molecular field analysis of zinc finger proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Purushottam D; Asthagiri, D

    2011-06-09

    We study two designed and one natural zinc finger peptide each with the Cys(2)His(2) (CCHH) type of metal binding motif. In the approach we have developed, we describe the role of the protein and solvent outside the Zn(II)-CCHH metal-residue cluster by a molecular field represented by generalized harmonic restraints. The strength of the field is adjusted to reproduce the binding energy distribution of the metal with the cluster obtained in a reference all-atom simulation with empirical potentials. The quadratic field allows us to investigate analytically the protein restraints on the binding site in terms of its eigenmodes. Examining these eigenmodes suggests, consistent with experimental observations, the importance of the first histidine (H) in the CCHH cluster in metal binding. Further, the eigenvalues corresponding to these modes also indicate that the designed proteins form a tighter complex with the metal. We find that the bulk protein and solvent response tends to destabilize metal binding, emphasizing that the favorable energetics of metal-residue interaction is necessary to drive folding in this system. The representation of the bulk protein and solvent response by a local field allows us to perform Monte Carlo simulations of the metal-residue cluster using quantum-chemical approaches, here using a semiempirical Hamiltonian. For configurations sampled from this simulation, we study the free energy of replacing Zn(2+) with Fe(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) using density functional theory. The calculated selectivities are in fair agreement with experimental results.

  9. Locally Resolved Electron Emission Area and Unified View of Field Emission in Nanodiamond Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubenko, Oksana; Baturin, Stanislav S.; Kovi, Kiran Kumar; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Baryshev, Sergey V.

    2017-09-01

    One of the common problems in case of field emission from polycrystalline diamond films, which typically have uniform surface morphology, is uncertainty in determining exact location of electron emission sites across the surface. Although several studies have suggested that grain boundaries are the main electron emission source, it is not particularly clear what makes some sites emit more than the others. It is also practically unclear how one could quantify the actual electron emission area and therefore field emission current per unit area. In this paper we study the effect of actual, locally resolved, field emission (FE) area on electron emission characteristics of uniform planar highly conductive nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond ((N)UNCD) field emitters. It was routinely found that field emission from as-grown planar (N)UNCD films is always confined to a counted number of discrete emitting centers across the surface which varied in size and electron emissivity. It was established that the actual FE area critically depends on the applied electric field, as well as that the actual FE area and the overall electron emissivity improve with sp2 fraction present in the film irrespectively of the original substrate roughness and morphology. To quantify the actual FE area and its dependence on the applied electric field, imaging experiments were carried out in a vacuum system in a parallel-plate configuration with a specialty anode phosphor screen. Electron emission micrographs were taken concurrently with I-V characteristics measurements. In addition, a novel automated image processing algorithm was developed to process extensive imaging datasets and calculate emission area per image. By doing so, it was determined that the emitting area was always significantly smaller than the FE cathode surface area. Namely, the actual FE area would change from 5×10-3 % to 1.5 % of the total cathode area with the applied electric field increased. Finally and most

  10. Independent measurement of femoral cortical thickness and cortical bone density using clinical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treece, G M; Gee, A H

    2015-02-01

    The local structure of the proximal femoral cortex is of interest since both fracture risk, and the effects of various interventions aimed at reducing that risk, are associated with cortical properties focused in particular regions rather than dispersed over the whole bone. Much of the femoral cortex is less than 3mm thick, appearing so blurred in clinical CT that its actual density is not apparent in the data, and neither thresholding nor full-width half-maximum techniques are capable of determining its width. Our previous work on cortical bone mapping showed how to produce more accurate estimates of cortical thickness by assuming a fixed value of the cortical density for each hip. However, although cortical density varies much less over the proximal femur than thickness, what little variation there is leads to errors in thickness measurement. In this paper, we develop the cortical bone mapping technique by exploiting local estimates of imaging blur to correct the global density estimate, thus providing a local density estimate as well as more accurate estimates of thickness. We also consider measurement of cortical mass surface density and the density of trabecular bone immediately adjacent to the cortex. Performance is assessed with ex vivo clinical QCT scans of proximal femurs, with true values derived from high resolution HRpQCT scans of the same bones. We demonstrate superior estimation of thickness than is possible with alternative techniques (accuracy 0.12 ± 0.39 mm for cortices in the range 1-3mm), and that local cortical density estimation is feasible for densities >800 mg/cm(3).

  11. Near-Field Sound Localization Based on the Small Profile Monaural Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngwoong Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic wave around a sound source in the near-field area presents unconventional properties in the temporal, spectral, and spatial domains due to the propagation mechanism. This paper investigates a near-field sound localizer in a small profile structure with a single microphone. The asymmetric structure around the microphone provides a distinctive spectral variation that can be recognized by the dedicated algorithm for directional localization. The physical structure consists of ten pipes of different lengths in a vertical fashion and rectangular wings positioned between the pipes in radial directions. The sound from an individual direction travels through the nearest open pipe, which generates the particular fundamental frequency according to the acoustic resonance. The Cepstral parameter is modified to evaluate the fundamental frequency. Once the system estimates the fundamental frequency of the received signal, the length of arrival and angle of arrival (AoA are derived by the designed model. From an azimuthal distance of 3–15 cm from the outer body of the pipes, the extensive acoustic experiments with a 3D-printed structure show that the direct and side directions deliver average hit rates of 89% and 73%, respectively. The closer positions to the system demonstrate higher accuracy, and the overall hit rate performance is 78% up to 15 cm away from the structure body.

  12. Computation of the initially unknown boundaries of flow fields generated by local exhaust hoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastas, M Y

    1991-09-01

    Local exhaust hoods are important in controlling contaminants in the workplace. To predict hood effectiveness, it is important to have knowledge of the airflow field that it generates. Currently, there are theoretical models adequate for predicting the flow fields of hoods with flanged openings. These models are solutions of Laplace's equation in terms of the velocity potential. Comparison of experimental and theoretical values of air velocities show good agreement. With the exception of the plain slot, no such models are available for plain hoods or other hoods with complex geometries. This paper explores the feasibility of approximating the equal air velocity contours for any local exhaust hood by assuming that these contours are also equipotential contours. A slot configuration, for which an analytical model is available, was used to evaluate the accuracy of the assumption. Starting with a good approximation for the 15% velocity contour, three other boundaries were generated. The procedure used in generating boundaries after the initial one involved solution of Laplace's equation, assuming constant potential along the boundary and adjustment of boundary location on the basis of differences between the calculated value of the normal derivative of the velocity potential at a point on the boundary and the specified value (15%). The next-to-last boundary generated by the procedure exhibited an oscillation in the values of the normal derivative, which was detrimental to the desired solution. Possible causes for this oscillation and possible refinements in the procedure are discussed.

  13. Computation of the initially unknown boundaries of flow fields generated by local exhaust hoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, M.Y. (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati OH (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Local exhaust hoods are important in controlling contaminants in the workplace. To predict hood effectiveness, it is important to have knowledge of the airflow field that it generates. Currently, there are theoretical models adequate for predicting the flow fields of hoods with flanged openings. These models are solutions of Laplace's equation in terms of the velocity potential. Comparison of experimental and theoretical values of air velocities show good agreement. With the exception of the plain slot, no such models are available for plain hoods or other hoods with complex geometries. This paper explores the feasibility of approximating the equal air velocity contours for any local exhaust hood by assuming that these contours are also equipotential contours. A slot configuration, for which an analytical model is available, was used to evaluate the accuracy of the assumption. Starting with a good approximation for the 15% velocity contour, three other boundaries were generated. The procedure used in generating boundaries after the initial one involved solution of Laplace's equation, assuming constant potential along the boundary and adjustment of boundary location on the basis of differences between the calculated value of the normal derivative of the velocity potential at a point on the boundary and the specified value (15%). The next-to-last boundary generated by the procedure exhibited an oscillation in the values of the normal derivative, which was detrimental to the desired solution. Possible causes for this oscillation and possible refinements in the procedure are discussed.

  14. Fault-tolerant design of local controller for the poloidal field converter control system on ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jun; Fu, Peng; Gao, Ge; He, Shiying; Huang, Liansheng, E-mail: huangls@ipp.ac.cn; Zhu, Lili; Chen, Xiaojiao

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The requirements on the Local Control Cubicles (LCC) for ITER Poloidal Field Converter are analyzed. • Decoupled service-based software architecture is proposed to make control loops on LCC running at varying cycle-time. • Fault detection and recovery methods for the LCC are developed to enhance the system. • The performance of the LCC with or without fault-tolerant feature is tested and compared. - Abstract: The control system for the Poloidal Field (PF) on ITER is a synchronously networked control system, which has several kinds of computational controllers. The Local Control Cubicles (LCC) play a critical role in the networked control system for they are the interface to all input and output signals. Thus, some additional work must be done to guarantee the LCCs proper operation under influence of faults. This paper mainly analyzes the system demands of the LCCs and faults which have been encountered recently. In order to handle these faults, decoupled service-based software architecture has been proposed. Based on this architecture, fault detection and system recovery methods, such as redundancy and rejuvenation, have been incorporated to achieve a fault-tolerant private network with the aid of QNX operating system. Unlike the conventional method, this method requires no additional hardware and can be achieved relatively easily. To demonstrate effectiveness the LCCs have been successfully tested during the recent PF Converter Unit performance tests for ITER.

  15. Local field potentials primarily reflect inhibitory neuron activity in human and monkey cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleńczuk, Bartosz; Dehghani, Nima; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Cash, Sydney S.; Halgren, Eric; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G.; Destexhe, Alain

    2017-01-01

    The local field potential (LFP) is generated by large populations of neurons, but unitary contribution of spiking neurons to LFP is not well characterised. We investigated this contribution in multi-electrode array recordings from human and monkey neocortex by examining the spike-triggered LFP average (st-LFP). The resulting st-LFPs were dominated by broad spatio-temporal components due to ongoing activity, synaptic inputs and recurrent connectivity. To reduce the spatial reach of the st-LFP and observe the local field related to a single spike we applied a spatial filter, whose weights were adapted to the covariance of ongoing LFP. The filtered st-LFPs were limited to the perimeter of 800 μm around the neuron, and propagated at axonal speed, which is consistent with their unitary nature. In addition, we discriminated between putative inhibitory and excitatory neurons and found that the inhibitory st-LFP peaked at shorter latencies, consistently with previous findings in hippocampal slices. Thus, in human and monkey neocortex, the LFP reflects primarily inhibitory neuron activity. PMID:28074856

  16. Determination of ductile damage parameters by local deformation fields: Measurement and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springmann, M. [Chair of Structural Mechanics and Vehicle Vibrational Technology, BTU Cottbus, Cottbus (Germany); Kuna, M. [Institute of Mechanics and Fluid Dynamics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    This work comprises the development, implementation and application of methods for the parameter identification of damage mechanical constitutive laws. Ductile damage is described on a continuum mechanical basis by extension of the von Mises yield condition with the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman as well as with the Rousselier model. The classical Rousselier model is complemented by accelerated void growth and void nucleation. The non-linear boundary and initial value problem is solved by the finite element system SPC-PMHP, which was developed in the frame of the special research program SFB393 for parallel computers. The material parameters are identified by locally measured displacement fields and measured force-displacement curves. For the material parameter identification a non-linear optimization algorithm is used, which renders the objective function to a minimum by means of a gradient based method. A useful strategy to identify the material parameters was found by careful numerical studies. Finally, using the object grating method the local displacement fields as well as the force-displacement curves are measured at notched flat bar tension specimens made of StE 690 and the parameters of the material are identified. (orig.)

  17. Decoding intravesical pressure from local field potentials in rat lumbosacral spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Changkyun; Park, Hae Yong; Koh, Chin Su; Ryu, Sang Baek; Seo, In Seok; Kim, Yong Jung; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Shin, Hyung-Cheul

    2016-10-01

    Chronic monitoring of intravesical pressure is required to detect the onset of intravesical hypertension and the progression of a more severe condition. Recent reports demonstrate the bladder state can be monitored from the spiking activity of the dorsal root ganglia or lumbosacral spinal cord. However, one of the most serious challenges for these methods is the difficulty of sustained spike signal acquisition due to the high-electrode-location-sensitivity of spikes or neuro-degeneration. Alternatively, it has been demonstrated that local field potential recordings are less affected by encapsulation reactions or electrode location changes. Here, we hypothesized that local field potential (LFP) from the lumbosacral dorsal horn may provide information concerning the intravesical pressure. LFP and spike activities were simultaneously recorded from the lumbosacral spinal cord of anesthetized rats during bladder filling. The results show that the LFP activities carry significant information about intravesical pressure along with spiking activities. Importantly, the intravesical pressure is decoded from the power in high-frequency bands (83.9-256 Hz) with a substantial performance similar to that of the spike train decoding. These findings demonstrate that high-frequency LFP activity can be an alternative intravesical pressure monitoring signal, which could lead to a proper closed loop system for urinary control.

  18. Consistent Feature Extraction From Vector Fields: Combinatorial Representations and Analysis Under Local Reference Frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Harsh [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This dissertation presents research on addressing some of the contemporary challenges in the analysis of vector fields—an important type of scientific data useful for representing a multitude of physical phenomena, such as wind flow and ocean currents. In particular, new theories and computational frameworks to enable consistent feature extraction from vector fields are presented. One of the most fundamental challenges in the analysis of vector fields is that their features are defined with respect to reference frames. Unfortunately, there is no single “correct” reference frame for analysis, and an unsuitable frame may cause features of interest to remain undetected, thus creating serious physical consequences. This work develops new reference frames that enable extraction of localized features that other techniques and frames fail to detect. As a result, these reference frames objectify the notion of “correctness” of features for certain goals by revealing the phenomena of importance from the underlying data. An important consequence of using these local frames is that the analysis of unsteady (time-varying) vector fields can be reduced to the analysis of sequences of steady (timeindependent) vector fields, which can be performed using simpler and scalable techniques that allow better data management by accessing the data on a per-time-step basis. Nevertheless, the state-of-the-art analysis of steady vector fields is not robust, as most techniques are numerical in nature. The residing numerical errors can violate consistency with the underlying theory by breaching important fundamental laws, which may lead to serious physical consequences. This dissertation considers consistency as the most fundamental characteristic of computational analysis that must always be preserved, and presents a new discrete theory that uses combinatorial representations and algorithms to provide consistency guarantees during vector field analysis along with the uncertainty

  19. Ultrafast electronic response of graphene to a strong and localized electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Elisabeth; Wilhelm, Richard A.; Pétuya, Rémi; Smejkal, Valerie; Kozubek, Roland; Hierzenberger, Anke; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Aldazabal, Iñigo; Kazansky, Andrey K.; Libisch, Florian; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Schleberger, Marika; Facsko, Stefan; Borisov, Andrei G.; Arnau, Andrés; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-12-01

    The way conduction electrons respond to ultrafast external perturbations in low dimensional materials is at the core of the design of future devices for (opto)electronics, photodetection and spintronics. Highly charged ions provide a tool for probing the electronic response of solids to extremely strong electric fields localized down to nanometre-sized areas. With ion transmission times in the order of femtoseconds, we can directly probe the local electronic dynamics of an ultrathin foil on this timescale. Here we report on the ability of freestanding single layer graphene to provide tens of electrons for charge neutralization of a slow highly charged ion within a few femtoseconds. With values higher than 1012 A cm-2, the resulting local current density in graphene exceeds previously measured breakdown currents by three orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, the passing ion does not tear nanometre-sized holes into the single layer graphene. We use time-dependent density functional theory to gain insight into the multielectron dynamics.

  20. Mycorrhizal symbiosis and local adaptation in Aster amellus: a field transplant experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Pánková

    Full Text Available Many plant populations have adapted to local soil conditions. However, the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is often overlooked in this context. Only a few studies have used reciprocal transplant experiments to study the relationships between soil conditions, mycorrhizal colonisation and plant growth. Furthermore, most of the studies were conducted under controlled greenhouse conditions. However, long-term field experiments can provide more realistic insights into this issue. We conducted a five-year field reciprocal transplant experiment to study the relationships between soil conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth in the obligate mycotrophic herb Aster amellus. We conducted this study in two regions in the Czech Republic that differ significantly in their soil nutrient content, namely Czech Karst (region K and Ceske Stredohori (region S. Plants that originated from region S had significantly higher mycorrhizal colonisation than plants from region K, indicating that the percentage of mycorrhizal colonisation has a genetic basis. We found no evidence of local adaptation in Aster amellus. Instead, plants from region S outperformed the plants from region K in both target regions. Similarly, plants from region S showed more mycorrhizal colonisation in all cases, which was likely driven by the lower nutrient content in the soil from that region. Thus, plant aboveground biomass and mycorrhizal colonisation exhibited corresponding differences between the two target regions and regions of origin. Higher mycorrhizal colonisation in the plants from region with lower soil nutrient content (region S in both target regions indicates that mycorrhizal colonisation is an adaptive trait. However, lower aboveground biomass in the plants with lower mycorrhizal colonisation suggests that the plants from region K are in fact maladapted by their low inherent mycorrhizal colonization. We conclude that including mycorrhizal symbiosis in local

  1. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger J

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B(pol) diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T(e), n(e), and B(parallel) along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n(e)B(parallel) product and higher n(e) and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  2. Field Dependence-Field Independence Cognitive Style, Gender, Career Choice and Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyekuru, Bruno Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    This is a descriptive study that investigated the relationships among field dependence-field independence cognitive style and gender, career choice and academic achievement of secondary school students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. From the initial sample of 320 senior secondary school one (SS1) students drawn from the…

  3. Strain localization in carbonate rocks experimentally deformed in the ductile field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.; Dresen, G.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation of rocks in the Earth's crust is often localized, varying from brittle fault gauges in shallow environments to mylonites in ductile shear zones at greater depth. A number of theoretical, experimental, and field studies focused on the evolution and extend of brittle fault zones, but little is known so far about initiation of ductile shear zones. Strain localization in rocks deforming at high temperature and pressure may be induced by several physical, chemical, or structurally-related mechanisms. We performed simple and pure shear deformation experiments on carbonate rocks containing structural inhomogenities in the ductile deformation regime. The results may help to gain insight into the evolution of high temperature shear zones. As starting material we used cylindrical samples of coarse-grained Carrara marble containing one or two 1 mm thin artificially prepared sheets of fine-grained Solnhofen limestone, which act as soft inclusions under the applied experimental conditions. Length and diameter of the investigated solid and hollow cylinders were 10-20 mm and 10-15 mm, respectively. Samples were deformed in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900° C temperature and confining pressures of 300 and 400 MPa. Three samples were deformed in axial compression at a bulk strain rate of 8x10-5 s-1to axial strains between 0.02 and 0.21 and 15 samples were twisted in torsion at a bulk shear strain rate of 2x10-4 s-1 to shear strains between 0.01 and 3.74. At low strain, specimens deformed axially and in torsion show minor strain hardening that is replaced by strain weakening at shear strains in excess of about 0.2. Peak shear stress at the imposed condition is about 20 MPa. Strain localized strongly within the weak inclusions as indicated by inhomogeneous bending of initially straight strain markers on sample jackets. Maximum strain concentration within inclusions with respect to the adjacent matrix was between 4 and 40, depending on total strain and

  4. A Modified Brain MR Image Segmentation and Bias Field Estimation Model Based on Local and Global Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the poor radio frequency coil uniformity and gradient-driven eddy currents, there is much noise and intensity inhomogeneity (bias in brain magnetic resonance (MR image, and it severely affects the segmentation accuracy. Better segmentation results are difficult to achieve by traditional methods; therefore, in this paper, a modified brain MR image segmentation and bias field estimation model based on local and global information is proposed. We first construct local constraints including image neighborhood information in Gaussian kernel mapping space, and then the complete regularization is established by introducing nonlocal spatial information of MR image. The weighting between local and global information is automatically adjusted according to image local information. At the same time, bias field information is coupled with the model, and it makes the model reduce noise interference but also can effectively estimate the bias field information. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has strong robustness to noise and bias field is well corrected.

  5. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, F-E; Lubrano, V; Lauwers-Cances, V; Giussani, C; Démonet, J-F

    2008-01-15

    Distinct functional pathways for processing words and numbers have been hypothesized from the observation of dissociated impairments of these categories in brain-damaged patients. We aimed to identify the cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading process in patients operated on for various brain lesions. Direct cortical electrostimulation was prospectively used in 60 brain mappings. We used object naming and two reading tasks: alphabetic script (sentences and number words) and Arabic number reading. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading were identified according to location, type of interference, and distinctness from areas associated with other language tasks. Arabic number reading was sustained by small cortical areas, often extremely well localized (area (Brodmann area 45), the anterior part of the dominant supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40; p area (Brodmann area 37; p areas.

  6. Estimating the correlation between bursty spike trains and local field potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaohui; Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Yao, Li; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-09-01

    To further understand rhythmic neuronal synchronization, an increasingly useful method is to determine the relationship between the spiking activity of individual neurons and the local field potentials (LFPs) of neural ensembles. Spike field coherence (SFC) is a widely used method for measuring the synchronization between spike trains and LFPs. However, due to the strong dependency of SFC on the burst index, it is not suitable for analyzing the relationship between bursty spike trains and LFPs, particularly in high frequency bands. To address this issue, we developed a method called weighted spike field correlation (WSFC), which uses the first spike in each burst multiple times to estimate the relationship. In the calculation, the number of times that the first spike is used is equal to the spike count per burst. The performance of this method was demonstrated using simulated bursty spike trains and LFPs, which comprised sinusoids with different frequencies, amplitudes, and phases. This method was also used to estimate the correlation between pyramidal cells in the hippocampus and gamma oscillations in rats performing behaviors. Analyses using simulated and real data demonstrated that the WSFC method is a promising measure for estimating the correlation between bursty spike trains and high frequency LFPs.

  7. Boosting Local Field Enhancement by on-Chip Nanofocusing and Impedance-Matched Plasmonic Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenin, Vladimir A; Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Radko, Ilya P; Volkov, Valentyn S; Gramotnev, Dmitri K; Lavrinenko, Andrei V; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2015-12-09

    Strongly confined surface plasmon-polariton modes can be used for efficiently delivering the electromagnetic energy to nanosized volumes by reducing the cross sections of propagating modes far beyond the diffraction limit, that is, by nanofocusing. This process results in significant local-field enhancement that can advantageously be exploited in modern optical nanotechnologies, including signal processing, biochemical sensing, imaging, and spectroscopy. Here, we propose, analyze, and experimentally demonstrate on-chip nanofocusing followed by impedance-matched nanowire antenna excitation in the end-fire geometry at telecom wavelengths. Numerical and experimental evidence of the efficient excitation of dipole and quadrupole (dark) antenna modes are provided, revealing underlying physical mechanisms and analogies with the operation of plane-wave Fabry-Pérot interferometers. The unique combination of efficient nanofocusing and nanoantenna resonant excitation realized in our experiments offers a major boost to the field intensity enhancement up to ∼12000, with the enhanced field being evenly distributed over the gap volume of 30 × 30 × 10 nm(3), and promises thereby a variety of useful on-chip functionalities within sensing, nonlinear spectroscopy and signal processing.

  8. Suppression of edge localized mode crashes by multi-spectral non-axisymmetric fields in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayhyun; Park, Gunyoung; Bae, Cheonho; Yoon, Siwoo; Han, Hyunsun; Yoo, Min-Gu; Park, Young-Seok; Ko, Won-Ha; Juhn, June-Woo; Na, Yong Su; The KSTAR Team

    2017-02-01

    Among various edge localized mode (ELM) crash control methods, only non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (NAMPs) yield complete suppression of ELM crashes beyond their mitigation, and thus attract more attention than others. No other devices except KSTAR, DIII-D, and recently EAST have successfully achieved complete suppression with NAMPs. The underlying physics mechanisms of these successful ELM crash suppressions in a non-axisymmetric field environment, however, still remain uncertain. In this work, we investigate the ELM crash suppression characteristics of the KSTAR ELMy H-mode discharges in a controlled multi-spectral field environment, created by both n=2 middle reference and n=1 top/bottom proxy in-vessel control coils. Interestingly, the attempts have produced a set of contradictory findings, one expected (ELM crash suppression enhancement with the addition of n  =  1 to the n  =  2 field at relatively low heating discharges) and another unexpected (ELM crash suppression degradation at relatively high heating discharges) from the earlier findings in DIII-D. This contradiction indicates the dependence of the ELM crash suppression characteristics on the heating level and the associated kink-like plasma responses. Preliminary linear resistive MHD plasma response simulation shows the unexpected suppression performance degradation to be likely caused by the dominance of kink-like plasma responses over the island gap-filling effects.

  9. The continuum intensity as a function of magnetic field II. Local magnetic flux and convective flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kobel, P; Borrero, J M

    2014-01-01

    To deepen our understanding of the role of small-scale magnetic fields in active regions (ARs) and in the quiet Sun (QS) on the solar irradiance, it is fundamental to investigate the physical processes underlying their continuum brightness. Previous results showed that magnetic elements in the QS reach larger continuum intensities than in ARs at disk center, but left this difference unexplained. We use Hinode/SP disk center data to study the influence of the local amount of magnetic flux on the vigour of the convective flows and the continuum intensity contrasts. The apparent (i.e. averaged over a pixel) longitudinal field strength and line-of-sight (LOS) plasma velocity were retrieved by means of Milne-Eddington inversions (VFISV code). We analyzed a series of boxes taken over AR plages and the QS, to determine how the continuum intensity contrast of magnetic elements, the amplitude of the vertical flows and the box-averaged contrast were affected by the mean longitudinal field strength in the box (which sca...

  10. Bistability of optical response of an ultra thin layer consisting of two-level atoms: account of the local field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval-Sergeeva, E. V.; Zaitsev, A. I.

    2008-03-01

    When describing the phenomenon of bistability of optical response of an ultra thin layer consisting of two-level atoms it is important to take into account the local field correction. The account of the correction results in the improvement of existence conditions of bistability. One more bistable region is formed starting with certain value of local field parameter. Both effects are induced by the dynamical frequency shift.

  11. NONLINEAR-OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF AZO-DYE MONOLAYERS - THE EFFECT OF TILT ANGLE ON THE LOCAL-FIELD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CNOSSEN, G; DRABE, KE; WIERSMA, DA; SCHOONDORP, MA; SCHOUTEN, AJ; HULSHOF, JBE; FERINGA, BL

    1993-01-01

    We report on the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility chi(2)(2omega,omega,omega) of dye-doped Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers. Chi(2) is found to exhibit a nonlinear dependence on surface density, which is attributed to microscopic local-fields. In order to calculate the microscopic local-fiel

  12. Effect of local environment in resonant domains of polydisperse plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates on optodynamic processes in pulsed laser fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. E. Ershov; A. P. Gavrilyuk; S. V. Karpov; P. N. Semina

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of pulsed laser radiation with resonance domains of multiparticle colloidal aggregates having an increas-ingly complex local environment are studied via an optodynamic model. The model is applied to the simplest configurations, such as single particles, dimers, and trimers consisting of mono-and polydisperse Ag nanoparticles. We analyze how the local environment and the associated local field enhancement by surrounding particles affect the optodynamic processes in domains, including their photomodification and optical properties.

  13. Tunneling of the 3rd Kind: A Test of the Effective Non-locality of Quantum Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, S. A.; Gies, H.; Jaeckel, J.; Wallace, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Integrating out virtual quantum fluctuations in an originally local quantum field theory results in an effective theory which is non-local. In this Letter we argue that tunneling of the 3rd kind - where particles traverse a barrier by splitting into a pair of virtual particles which recombine only after a finite distance - provides a direct test of this non-locality. We sketch a quantum-optical setup to test this effect, and investigate observable effects in a simple toy model.

  14. Combined DTI-fMRI Analysis for a Quantitative Assessment of Connections Between WM Bundles and Their Peripheral Cortical Fields in Verbal Fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaccianoce, Elisa; Laganà, Maria Marcella; Baglio, Francesca; Preti, Maria Giulia; Bergsland, Niels; Cecconi, Pietro; Clerici, Mario; Baselli, Giuseppe; Papadimitriou, George; Makris, Nikos

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are powerful techniques to elucidate the anatomical and functional aspects of brain connectivity. However, integrating these approaches to describe the precise link between structure and function within specific brain circuits remains challenging. In this study, a novel DTI-fMRI integration method is proposed, to provide the topographical characterization and the volumetric assessment of the functional and anatomical connections within the language circuit. In a group of 21 healthy elderly subjects (mean age 68.5 ± 5.8 years), the volume of connection between the cortical activity elicited by a verbal fluency task and the cortico-cortical fiber tracts associated with this function are mapped and quantified. An application of the method to a case study in neuro-rehabilitation context is also presented. Integrating structural and functional data within the same framework, this approach provides an overall view of white and gray matter when studying specific brain circuits.

  15. Quantum field theories coupled to supergravity. AdS/CFT and local couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, J.

    2006-08-03

    This dissertation is devoted to the investigation of the interplay of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories (SYM) and supergravity (SUGRA). The topic is studied from two points of view: Firstly from the point of view of AdS/CFT correspondence, which realises the coupling of four dimensional superconformal N=4 SYM theory and ten dimensional type IIB SUGRA in a holographic way. In order to arrive at theories that resemble quantum chromodynamics (QCD) more closely, fundamental fields are introduced using probe D7-branes and nontrivial background configuration are considered. In particular supergravity solutions that are only asymptotically anti-de Sitter and break supersymmetry are used. This allows the description of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking. The meson spectrum is calculated and the existence of an associated Goldstone mode is demonstrated. Moreover it is shown that highly radially excited mesons are not degenerate. Additionally instanton configurations on the D7-branes are investigated, which lead to a holographic description of the dual field theory's Higgs branch. Finally a holographic description of heavy-light mesons is developed, which are mesons consisting of quarks with a large mass difference, such that a treatment of B mesons can be achieved. The second approach to the topic of this thesis is the technique of socalled space-time dependent couplings (also known as ''local couplings''), where coupling constants are promoted to external sources. This allows to explore the conformal anomaly of quantum field theories coupled to a classical gravity background. The technique is extended to the superfield description of N=1 supergravity, a complete basis for the anomaly is given and the consistency conditions that arise from a cohomological treatment are calculated. Possible implications for an extension of Zamolodchikov's c-theorem to four dimensional supersymmetric quantum field theories are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Prediction of STN-DBS Electrode Implantation Track in Parkinson's Disease by Using Local Field Potentials

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    Telkes, Ilknur; Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Viswanathan, Ashwin; Abosch, Aviva; Ince, Nuri F.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal electrophysiological placement of the DBS electrode may lead to better long term clinical outcomes. Inter-subject anatomical variability and limitations in stereotaxic neuroimaging increase the complexity of physiological mapping performed in the operating room. Microelectrode single unit neuronal recording remains the most common intraoperative mapping technique, but requires significant expertise and is fraught by potential technical difficulties including robust measurement of the signal. In contrast, local field potentials (LFPs), owing to their oscillatory and robust nature and being more correlated with the disease symptoms, can overcome these technical issues. Therefore, we hypothesized that multiple spectral features extracted from microelectrode-recorded LFPs could be used to automate the identification of the optimal track and the STN localization. In this regard, we recorded LFPs from microelectrodes in three tracks from 22 patients during DBS electrode implantation surgery at different depths and aimed to predict the track selected by the neurosurgeon based on the interpretation of single unit recordings. A least mean square (LMS) algorithm was used to de-correlate LFPs in each track, in order to remove common activity between channels and increase their spatial specificity. Subband power in the beta band (11–32 Hz) and high frequency range (200–450 Hz) were extracted from the de-correlated LFP data and used as features. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method was applied both for the localization of the dorsal border of STN and the prediction of the optimal track. By fusing the information from these low and high frequency bands, the dorsal border of STN was localized with a root mean square (RMS) error of 1.22 mm. The prediction accuracy for the optimal track was 80%. Individual beta band (11–32 Hz) and the range of high frequency oscillations (200–450 Hz) provided prediction accuracies of 72 and 68% respectively. The best

  17. Estimating individual exposure to malaria using local prevalence of malaria infection in the field.

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    Ally Olotu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in malaria exposure complicates survival analyses of vaccine efficacy trials and confounds the association between immune correlates of protection and malaria infection in longitudinal studies. Analysis may be facilitated by taking into account the variability in individual exposure levels, but it is unclear how exposure can be estimated at an individual level. METHOD AND FINDINGS: We studied three cohorts (Chonyi, Junju and Ngerenya in Kilifi District, Kenya to assess measures of malaria exposure. Prospective data were available on malaria episodes, geospatial coordinates, proximity to infected and uninfected individuals and residence in predefined malaria hotspots for 2,425 individuals. Antibody levels to the malaria antigens AMA1 and MSP1(142 were available for 291 children from Junju. We calculated distance-weighted local prevalence of malaria infection within 1 km radius as a marker of individual's malaria exposure. We used multivariable modified Poisson regression model to assess the discriminatory power of these markers for malaria infection (i.e. asymptomatic parasitaemia or clinical malaria. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to assess the discriminatory power of the models. Local malaria prevalence within 1 km radius and AMA1 and MSP1(142 antibodies levels were independently associated with malaria infection. Weighted local malaria prevalence had an area under ROC curve of 0.72 (95%CI: 0.66-0.73, 0.71 (95%CI: 0.69-0.73 and 0.82 (95%CI: 0.80-0.83 among cohorts in Chonyi, Junju and Ngerenya respectively. In a small subset of children from Junju, a model incorporating weighted local malaria prevalence with AMA1 and MSP1(142 antibody levels provided an AUC of 0.83 (95%CI: 0.79-0.88. CONCLUSION: We have proposed an approach to estimating the intensity of an individual's malaria exposure in the field. The weighted local malaria prevalence can be used as individual marker of

  18. Earth Systems Field Work: Service Learning at Local and Global Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A.; Derry, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth & Environmental Systems (EES) Field Program engages students in hands-on exploration along the boundaries of the living earth, solid earth, ocean, and atmosphere. Based on Hawaíi Island, the semester-length program integrates scientific study with environmental stewardship and service learning. Each year EES students contribute 3000 hours of service to their host community. Throughout the semester students engage in different service activities. Most courses includes a service component - for example - study of the role of invasive species in native ecosystems includes an invasive species removal project. Each student completes a 4-week service internship with a local school, NGO, state or federal agency. Finally, the student group works to offset the carbon footprint of the program in collaboration with local conservation projects. This effort sequesters CO2 emissions while at the same time contributing to reforestation of degraded native ecosystems. Students learn that expertise is not confined to "the academy," and that wisdom and inspiration can be found in unexpected venues. Much of the service learning in the EES Program occurs in collaboration with local partners. Service internships require students to identify a partner and to design a tractable project. Students work daily with their sponsor and make a formal presentation of their project at the end of the internship period. This includes speaking to a non-technical community gathering as well as to a scientific audience. For many students the opportunity to work on a real problem, of interest in the real world, is a highlight of the semester. Beyond working in support of local community groups, the EES Prograḿs C-neutral project engages students with work in service to the global commons. Here the outcome is not measurable within the time frame of a semester, yet the intangible result makes the experience even more powerful. Students take responsibility for an important issue that is not

  19. Activity in a premotor cortical nucleus of zebra finches is locally organized and exhibits auditory selectivity in neurons but not in glia.

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    Michael H Graber

    Full Text Available Motor functions are often guided by sensory experience, most convincingly illustrated by complex learned behaviors. Key to sensory guidance in motor areas may be the structural and functional organization of sensory inputs and their evoked responses. We study sensory responses in large populations of neurons and neuron-assistive cells in the songbird motor area HVC, an auditory-vocal brain area involved in sensory learning and in adult song production. HVC spike responses to auditory stimulation display remarkable preference for the bird's own song (BOS compared to other stimuli. Using two-photon calcium imaging in anesthetized zebra finches we measure the spatio-temporal structure of baseline activity and of auditory evoked responses in identified populations of HVC cells. We find strong correlations between calcium signal fluctuations in nearby cells of a given type, both in identified neurons and in astroglia. In identified HVC neurons only, auditory stimulation decorrelates ongoing calcium signals, less for BOS than for other sound stimuli. Overall, calcium transients show strong preference for BOS in identified HVC neurons but not in astroglia, showing diversity in local functional organization among identified neuron and astroglia populations.

  20. Local field enhancement at the core of cylindrical nanoinclusions embedded in a linear dielectric host matrix

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    Y.A. Abbo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have discussed theoretical concepts and presented numerical results of local field enhancement at the core of different assemblages of metal/dielectric cylindrical nanoinclusions embedded in a linear dielectric host matrix. The obtained results show that for a composite with metal coated inclusions there exist two peak values of the enhancement factor at two different resonant frequencies. The existence of the second maxima becomes more important for a larger volume fraction of the metal part of the inclusion. For dielectric coated metal core inclusions and pure metal inclusions there is only one resonant frequency and one peak value of the enhancement factor. The enhancement of an electromagnetic wave is promising for the existence of nonlinear optical phenomena such as optical bistability which is important in optical communication and in optical computing such as optical switch and memory elements.