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Sample records for cortical laminar-electrode recordings

  1. Estimation of population firing rates and current source densities from laminar electrode recordings.

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    Pettersen, Klas H; Hagen, Espen; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2008-06-01

    This model study investigates the validity of methods used to interpret linear (laminar) multielectrode recordings. In computer experiments extracellular potentials from a synaptically activated population of about 1,000 pyramidal neurons are calculated using biologically realistic compartmental neuron models combined with electrostatic forward modeling. The somas of the pyramidal neurons are located in a 0.4 mm high and wide columnar cylinder, mimicking a stimulus-evoked layer-5 population in a neocortical column. Current-source density (CSD) analysis of the low-frequency part (estimates of the true underlying CSD. The high-frequency part (>750 Hz) of the potentials (multi-unit activity, MUA) is found to scale approximately as the population firing rate to the power 3/4 and to give excellent estimates of the underlying population firing rate for trial-averaged data. The MUA signal is found to decay much more sharply outside the columnar populations than the LFP.

  2. Cortical evoked potentials recorded from the guinea pig without averaging.

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    Walloch, R A

    1975-01-01

    Potentials evoked by tonal pulses and recorded with a monopolar electrode on the pial surface over the auditory cortex of the guinea pig are presented. These potentials are compared with average potentials recorded in previous studies with an electrode on the dura. The potentials recorded by these two techniques have similar waveforms, peak latencies and thresholds. They appear to be generated within the same region of the cerebral cortex. As can be expected, the amplitude of the evoked potentials recorded from the pial surface is larger than that recorded from the dura. Consequently, averaging is not needed to extract the evoked potential once the dura is removed. The thresholds for the evoked cortical potential are similar to behavioral thresholds for the guinea pig at high frequencies; however, evoked potential thresholds are eleveate over behavioral thresholds at low frequencies. The removal of the dura and the direct recording of the evoked potential appears most appropriate for acute experiments. The recording of an evoked potential with dura electrodes empploying averaging procedures appears most appropriate for chronic studies.

  3. Towards an optimal paradigm for simultaneously recording cortical and brainstem auditory evoked potentials.

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    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2015-02-15

    Simultaneous recording of brainstem and cortical event-related brain potentials (ERPs) may offer a valuable tool for understanding the early neural transcription of behaviorally relevant sounds and the hierarchy of signal processing operating at multiple levels of the auditory system. To date, dual recordings have been challenged by technological and physiological limitations including different optimal parameters necessary to elicit each class of ERP (e.g., differential adaptation/habitation effects and number of trials to obtain adequate response signal-to-noise ratio). We investigated a new stimulus paradigm for concurrent recording of the auditory brainstem frequency-following response (FFR) and cortical ERPs. The paradigm is "optimal" in that it uses a clustered stimulus presentation and variable interstimulus interval (ISI) to (i) achieve the most ideal acquisition parameters for eliciting subcortical and cortical responses, (ii) obtain an adequate number of trials to detect each class of response, and (iii) minimize neural adaptation/habituation effects. Comparison between clustered and traditional (fixed, slow ISI) stimulus paradigms revealed minimal change in amplitude or latencies of either the brainstem FFR or cortical ERP. The clustered paradigm offered over a 3× increase in recording efficiency compared to conventional (fixed ISI presentation) and thus, a more rapid protocol for obtaining dual brainstem-cortical recordings in individual listeners. We infer that faster recording of subcortical and cortical potentials might allow more complete and sensitive testing of neurophysiological function and aid in the differential assessment of auditory function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Procedure for recording the simultaneous activity of single neurons distributed across cortical areas during sensory discrimination

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    Hernández, Adrián; Nácher, Verónica; Luna, Rogelio; Alvarez, Manuel; Zainos, Antonio; Cordero, Silvia; Camarillo, Liliana; Vázquez, Yuriria; Lemus, Luis; Romo, Ranulfo

    2008-01-01

    We report a procedure for recording the simultaneous activity of single neurons distributed across five cortical areas in behaving monkeys. The procedure consists of a commercially available microdrive adapted to a commercially available neural data collection system. The critical advantage of this procedure is that, in each cortical area, a configuration of seven microelectrodes spaced 250–500 μm can be inserted transdurally and each can be moved independently in the z axis. For each microelectrode, the data collection system can record the activity of up to five neurons together with the local field potential (LFP). With this procedure, we normally monitor the simultaneous activity of 70–100 neurons while trained monkeys discriminate the difference in frequency between two vibrotactile stimuli. Approximately 20–60 of these neurons have response properties previously reported in this task. The neuronal recordings show good signal-to-noise ratio, are remarkably stable along a 1-day session, and allow testing several protocols. Microelectrodes are removed from the brain after a 1-day recording session, but are reinserted again the next day by using the same or different x-y microelectrode array configurations. The fact that microelectrodes can be moved in the z axis during the recording session and that the x-y configuration can be changed from day to day maximizes the probability of studying simultaneous interactions, both local and across distant cortical areas, between neurons associated with the different components of this task. PMID:18946031

  5. Chronic cortical and electromyographic recordings from a fully implantable device: preclinical experience in a nonhuman primate

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    Ryapolova-Webb, Elena; Afshar, Pedram; Stanslaski, Scott; Denison, Tim; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Starr, Philip A.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Analysis of intra- and perioperatively recorded cortical and basal ganglia local field potentials in human movement disorders has provided great insight into the pathophysiology of diseases such as Parkinson's, dystonia, and essential tremor. However, in order to better understand the network abnormalities and effects of chronic therapeutic stimulation in these disorders, long-term recording from a fully implantable data collection system is needed. Approach. A fully implantable investigational data collection system, the Activa® PC + S neurostimulator (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN), has been developed for human use. Here, we tested its utility for extended intracranial recording in the motor system of a nonhuman primate. The system was attached to two quadripolar paddle arrays: one covering sensorimotor cortex, and one covering a proximal forelimb muscle, to study simultaneous cortical field potentials and electromyography during spontaneous transitions from rest to movement. Main results. Over 24 months of recording, movement-related changes in physiologically relevant frequency bands were readily detected, including beta and gamma signals at approximately 2.5 μV/\\sqrtHz and 0.7 μV/\\sqrt{Hz}, respectively. The system architecture allowed for flexible recording configurations and algorithm triggered data recording. In the course of physiological analyses, sensing artifacts were observed (˜1 μVrms stationary tones at fixed frequency), which were mitigated either with post-processing or algorithm design and did not impact the scientific conclusions. Histological examination revealed no underlying tissue damage; however, a fibrous capsule had developed around the paddles, demonstrating a potential mechanism for the observed signal amplitude reduction. Significance. This study establishes the usefulness of this system in measuring chronic brain and muscle signals. Use of this system may potentially be valuable in human trials of chronic brain

  6. Noninvasive scalp recording of cortical auditory evoked potentials in the alert macaque monkey.

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    Itoh, Kosuke; Nejime, Masafumi; Konoike, Naho; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2015-09-01

    Scalp-recorded evoked potentials (EP) provide researchers and clinicians with irreplaceable means for recording stimulus-related neural activities in the human brain, due to its high temporal resolution, handiness, and, perhaps more importantly, non-invasiveness. This work recorded the scalp cortical auditory EP (CAEP) in unanesthetized monkeys by using methods that are essentially identical to those applied to humans. Young adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, 5-7 years old) were seated in a monkey chair, and their head movements were partially restricted by polystyrene blocks and tension poles placed around their head. Individual electrodes were fixated on their scalp using collodion according to the 10-20 system. Pure tone stimuli were presented while electroencephalograms were recorded from up to nineteen channels, including an electrooculogram channel. In all monkeys (n = 3), the recorded CAEP comprised a series of positive and negative deflections, labeled here as macaque P1 (mP1), macaque N1 (mN1), macaque P2 (mP2), and macaque N2 (mN2), and these transient responses to sound onset were followed by a sustained potential that continued for the duration of the sound, labeled the macaque sustained potential (mSP). mP1, mN2 and mSP were the prominent responses, and they had maximal amplitudes over frontal/central midline electrode sites, consistent with generators in auditory cortices. The study represents the first noninvasive scalp recording of CAEP in alert rhesus monkeys, to our knowledge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Improvement of the in vitro recordings in cortical slices by using customized flexible neuroprobes

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    Xavi Illa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We have explored the feasibility of improving the quality of multiple recordings from spontaneously oscillating cortical slices. With that purpose we have taken advantage of the advances performed in the development of flexible neuproprobes, either fabricated on polyimide, SU-8, PDMS or parylene (Hassler et al. 2011. With these materials the contact between the electrodes and the tissue is enhanced with respect to the neuroprobes fabricated on rigid substrates, such as silicon or pyrex. However, we had to find a compromise between the necessity to achieve a good contact between the electrode and the slice and the need to allow the flow of oxygenated solution to the slice to maintain its healthy state when using flexible neuroprobes. To overcome this limitation, we have designed, fabricated and characterized a 16-electrode flexible neuroprobe that allocates an array of holes in its sensing area. This neuroprobe has been developed using SU-8 negative photoresist as a substrate material in the clean room facilities of the IMB-CNM. In particular, the neuroprobes have been fabricated following the process described in a previous article from the authors (Guimerà et al. 2013; using silicon wafers with an aluminum sacrificial layer as a support for the fabrication process. Then, the neuroprobes were released from the wafer by an anodic dissolution of the aluminum layer (Metz et al. 2005. In order to validate the usability of the fabricated device, the neuroprobes were used to record spontaneous slow oscillations to study the wave propagation along the cortical networks while manipulating them by means of pharmacological drugs or electric fields. We conclude that the perforated devices provide substantial improvement in the adherence of the electrodes to the tissue, on the mechanical stability of the recordings, and in the healthiness of the slices.

  8. Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons

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    Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons P Valdivia1, M Martin2, WR LeFew3, D Hall3, J Ross1, K Houck2 and TJ Shafer3 1Axion Biosystems, Atlanta GA and 2NCCT, 3ISTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RT...

  9. Motor-language coupling: direct evidence from early Parkinson's disease and intracranial cortical recordings.

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    Ibáñez, Agustín; Cardona, Juan F; Dos Santos, Yamil Vidal; Blenkmann, Alejandro; Aravena, Pía; Roca, María; Hurtado, Esteban; Nerguizian, Mirna; Amoruso, Lucía; Gómez-Arévalo, Gonzalo; Chade, Anabel; Dubrovsky, Alberto; Gershanik, Oscar; Kochen, Silvia; Glenberg, Arthur; Manes, Facundo; Bekinschtein, Tristán

    2013-04-01

    Language and action systems are functionally coupled in the brain as demonstrated by converging evidence using Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and lesion studies. In particular, this coupling has been demonstrated using the action-sentence compatibility effect (ACE) in which motor activity and language interact. The ACE task requires participants to listen to sentences that described actions typically performed with an open hand (e.g., clapping), a closed hand (e.g., hammering), or without any hand action (neutral); and to press a large button with either an open hand position or closed hand position immediately upon comprehending each sentence. The ACE is defined as a longer reaction time (RT) in the action-sentence incompatible conditions than in the compatible conditions. Here we investigated direct motor-language coupling in two novel and uniquely informative ways. First, we measured the behavioural ACE in patients with motor impairment (early Parkinson's disease - EPD), and second, in epileptic patients with direct electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings. In experiment 1, EPD participants with preserved general cognitive repertoire, showed a much diminished ACE relative to non-EPD volunteers. Moreover, a correlation between ACE performance and action-verb processing (kissing and dancing test - KDT) was observed. Direct cortical recordings (ECoG) in motor and language areas (experiment 2) demonstrated simultaneous bidirectional effects: motor preparation affected language processing (N400 at left inferior frontal gyrus and middle/superior temporal gyrus), and language processing affected activity in movement-related areas (motor potential at premotor and M1). Our findings show that the ACE paradigm requires ongoing integration of preserved motor and language coupling (abolished in EPD) and engages motor-temporal cortices in a bidirectional way. In addition, both experiments

  10. Mismatch responses in the awake rat: evidence from epidural recordings of auditory cortical fields.

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    Fabienne Jung

    Full Text Available Detecting sudden environmental changes is crucial for the survival of humans and animals. In the human auditory system the mismatch negativity (MMN, a component of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs, reflects the violation of predictable stimulus regularities, established by the previous auditory sequence. Given the considerable potentiality of the MMN for clinical applications, establishing valid animal models that allow for detailed investigation of its neurophysiological mechanisms is important. Rodent studies, so far almost exclusively under anesthesia, have not provided decisive evidence whether an MMN analogue exists in rats. This may be due to several factors, including the effect of anesthesia. We therefore used epidural recordings in awake black hooded rats, from two auditory cortical areas in both hemispheres, and with bandpass filtered noise stimuli that were optimized in frequency and duration for eliciting MMN in rats. Using a classical oddball paradigm with frequency deviants, we detected mismatch responses at all four electrodes in primary and secondary auditory cortex, with morphological and functional properties similar to those known in humans, i.e., large amplitude biphasic differences that increased in amplitude with decreasing deviant probability. These mismatch responses significantly diminished in a control condition that removed the predictive context while controlling for presentation rate of the deviants. While our present study does not allow for disambiguating precisely the relative contribution of adaptation and prediction error processing to the observed mismatch responses, it demonstrates that MMN-like potentials can be obtained in awake and unrestrained rats.

  11. A time-frequency analysis of the dynamics of cortical networks of sleep spindles from MEG-EEG recordings

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    Younes eZerouali

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are a hallmark of NREM sleep. They result from a widespread thalamo-cortical loop and involve synchronous cortical networks that are still poorly understood. We investigated whether brain activity during spindles can be characterized by specific patterns of functional connectivity among cortical generators. For that purpose, we developed a wavelet-based approach aimed at imaging the synchronous oscillatory cortical networks from simultaneous MEG-EEG recordings. First, we detected spindles on the EEG and extracted the corresponding frequency-locked MEG activity under the form of an analytic ridge signal in the time-frequency plane (Zerouali et al., 2013. Secondly, we performed source reconstruction of the ridge signal within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean framework (Amblard et al., 2004, yielding a robust estimate of the cortical sources producing observed oscillations. Lastly, we quantified functional connectivity among cortical sources using phase-locking values. The main innovations of this methodology are 1 to reveal the dynamic behavior of functional networks resolved in the time-frequency plane and 2 to characterize functional connectivity among MEG sources through phase interactions. We showed, for the first time, that the switch from fast to slow oscillatory mode during sleep spindles is required for the emergence of specific patterns of connectivity. Moreover, we show that earlier synchrony during spindles was associated with mainly intra-hemispheric connectivity whereas later synchrony was associated with global long-range connectivity. We propose that our methodology can be a valuable tool for studying the connectivity underlying neural processes involving sleep spindles, such as memory, plasticity or aging.

  12. A time-frequency analysis of the dynamics of cortical networks of sleep spindles from MEG-EEG recordings.

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    Zerouali, Younes; Lina, Jean-Marc; Sekerovic, Zoran; Godbout, Jonathan; Dube, Jonathan; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Carrier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles are a hallmark of NREM sleep. They result from a widespread thalamo-cortical loop and involve synchronous cortical networks that are still poorly understood. We investigated whether brain activity during spindles can be characterized by specific patterns of functional connectivity among cortical generators. For that purpose, we developed a wavelet-based approach aimed at imaging the synchronous oscillatory cortical networks from simultaneous MEG-EEG recordings. First, we detected spindles on the EEG and extracted the corresponding frequency-locked MEG activity under the form of an analytic ridge signal in the time-frequency plane (Zerouali et al., 2013). Secondly, we performed source reconstruction of the ridge signal within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean framework (Amblard et al., 2004), yielding a robust estimate of the cortical sources producing observed oscillations. Lastly, we quantified functional connectivity among cortical sources using phase-locking values. The main innovations of this methodology are (1) to reveal the dynamic behavior of functional networks resolved in the time-frequency plane and (2) to characterize functional connectivity among MEG sources through phase interactions. We showed, for the first time, that the switch from fast to slow oscillatory mode during sleep spindles is required for the emergence of specific patterns of connectivity. Moreover, we show that earlier synchrony during spindles was associated with mainly intra-hemispheric connectivity whereas later synchrony was associated with global long-range connectivity. We propose that our methodology can be a valuable tool for studying the connectivity underlying neural processes involving sleep spindles, such as memory, plasticity or aging.

  13. A 32-channel fully implantable wireless neurosensor for simultaneous recording from two cortical regions.

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    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A; Patterson, William R; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2011-01-01

    We present a fully implantable, wireless, neurosensor for multiple-location neural interface applications. The device integrates two independent 16-channel intracortical microelectrode arrays and can simultaneously acquire 32 channels of broadband neural data from two separate cortical areas. The system-on-chip implantable sensor is built on a flexible Kapton polymer substrate and incorporates three very low power subunits: two cortical subunits connected to a common subcutaneous subunit. Each cortical subunit has an ultra-low power 16-channel preamplifier and multiplexer integrated onto a cortical microelectrode array. The subcutaneous epicranial unit has an inductively coupled power supply, two analog-to-digital converters, a low power digital controller chip, and microlaser-based infrared telemetry. The entire system is soft encapsulated with biocompatible flexible materials for in vivo applications. Broadband neural data is conditioned, amplified, and analog multiplexed by each of the cortical subunits and passed to the subcutaneous component, where it is digitized and combined with synchronization data and wirelessly transmitted transcutaneously using high speed infrared telemetry.

  14. Local domains of motor cortical activity revealed by fiber-optic calcium recordings in behaving nonhuman primates

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    Adelsberger, Helmuth; Zainos, Antonio; Alvarez, Manuel; Romo, Ranulfo; Konnerth, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Brain mapping experiments involving electrical microstimulation indicate that the primary motor cortex (M1) directly regulates muscle contraction and thereby controls specific movements. Possibly, M1 contains a small circuit “map” of the body that is formed by discrete local networks that code for specific movements. Alternatively, movements may be controlled by distributed, larger-scale overlapping circuits. Because of technical limitations, it remained unclear how movement-determining circuits are organized in M1. Here we introduce a method that allows the functional mapping of small local neuronal circuits in awake behaving nonhuman primates. For this purpose, we combined optic-fiber–based calcium recordings of neuronal activity and cortical microstimulation. The method requires targeted bulk loading of synthetic calcium indicators (e.g., OGB-1 AM) for the staining of neuronal microdomains. The tip of a thin (200 µm) optical fiber can detect the coherent activity of a small cluster of neurons, but is insensitive to the asynchronous activity of individual cells. By combining such optical recordings with microstimulation at two well-separated sites of M1, we demonstrate that local cortical activity was tightly associated with distinct and stereotypical simple movements. Increasing stimulation intensity increased both the amplitude of the movements and the level of neuronal activity. Importantly, the activity remained local, without invading the recording domain of the second optical fiber. Furthermore, there was clear response specificity at the two recording sites in a trained behavioral task. Thus, the results provide support for movement control in M1 by local neuronal clusters that are organized in discrete cortical domains. PMID:24344287

  15. Persistence of cortical sensory processing during absence seizures in human and an animal model: evidence from EEG and intracellular recordings.

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    Mathilde Chipaux

    Full Text Available Absence seizures are caused by brief periods of abnormal synchronized oscillations in the thalamocortical loops, resulting in widespread spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs in the electroencephalogram (EEG. SWDs are concomitant with a complete or partial impairment of consciousness, notably expressed by an interruption of ongoing behaviour together with a lack of conscious perception of external stimuli. It is largely considered that the paroxysmal synchronizations during the epileptic episode transiently render the thalamocortical system incapable of transmitting primary sensory information to the cortex. Here, we examined in young patients and in the Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS, a well-established genetic model of absence epilepsy, how sensory inputs are processed in the related cortical areas during SWDs. In epileptic patients, visual event-related potentials (ERPs were still present in the occipital EEG when the stimuli were delivered during seizures, with a significant increase in amplitude compared to interictal periods and a decrease in latency compared to that measured from non-epileptic subjects. Using simultaneous in vivo EEG and intracellular recordings from the primary somatosensory cortex of GAERS and non-epileptic rats, we found that ERPs and firing responses of related pyramidal neurons to whisker deflection were not significantly modified during SWDs. However, the intracellular subthreshold synaptic responses in somatosensory cortical neurons during seizures had larger amplitude compared to quiescent situations. These convergent findings from human patients and a rodent genetic model show the persistence of cortical responses to sensory stimulations during SWDs, indicating that the brain can still process external stimuli during absence seizures. They also demonstrate that the disruption of conscious perception during absences is not due to an obliteration of information transfer in the thalamocortical system

  16. Demonstration of a setup for chronic optogenetic stimulation and recording across cortical areas in non-human primates

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    Yazdan-Shahmorad, Azadeh; Diaz-Botia, Camilo; Hanson, Tim; Ledochowitsch, Peter; Maharabiz, Michel M.; Sabes, Philip N.

    2015-03-01

    Although several studies have shown the feasibility of using optogenetics in non-human primates (NHP), reliable largescale chronic interfaces have not yet been reported for such studies in NHP. Here we introduce a chronic setup that permits repeated, daily optogenetic stimulation and large-scale recording from the same sites in NHP cortex. The setup combines optogenetics with a transparent artificial dura (AD) and high-density micro-electrocorticography (μECoG). To obtain expression across large areas of cortex, we infused AAV5-CamKIIa-C1V1-EYFP viral vector using an infusion technique based on convection-enhanced delivery (CED) in primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices. By epifluorescent imaging through AD we were able to confirm high levels of expression covering about 110 mm2 of S1 and M1. We then incorporated a 192-channel μECoG array spanning 192 mm2 into the AD for simultaneous electrophysiological recording during optical stimulation. The array consists of patterned Pt-Au-Pt metal traces embedded in ~10 μm Parylene-C insulator. The parylene is sufficiently transparent to allow minimally attenuated optical access for optogenetic stimulation. The array was chronically implanted over the opsin-expressing areas in M1 and S1 for over two weeks. Optical stimulation was delivered via a fiber optic placed on the surface of the AD. With this setup, we recorded reliable evoked activity following light stimulation at several locations. Similar responses were recorded across tens of days, however a decline in the light-evoked signal amplitude was observed during this period due to the growth of dural tissue over the array. These results show the feasibility of a chronic interface for combined largescale optogenetic stimulation and cortical recordings across days.

  17. Virtual Electrode Recording Tool for EXtracellular potentials (VERTEX): comparing multi-electrode recordings from simulated and biological mammalian cortical tissue.

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    Tomsett, Richard J; Ainsworth, Matt; Thiele, Alexander; Sanayei, Mehdi; Chen, Xing; Gieselmann, Marc A; Whittington, Miles A; Cunningham, Mark O; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-07-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) sampled with extracellular electrodes are frequently used as a measure of population neuronal activity. However, relating such measurements to underlying neuronal behaviour and connectivity is non-trivial. To help study this link, we developed the Virtual Electrode Recording Tool for EXtracellular potentials (VERTEX). We first identified a reduced neuron model that retained the spatial and frequency filtering characteristics of extracellular potentials from neocortical neurons. We then developed VERTEX as an easy-to-use Matlab tool for simulating LFPs from large populations (>100,000 neurons). A VERTEX-based simulation successfully reproduced features of the LFPs from an in vitro multi-electrode array recording of macaque neocortical tissue. Our model, with virtual electrodes placed anywhere in 3D, allows direct comparisons with the in vitro recording setup. We envisage that VERTEX will stimulate experimentalists, clinicians, and computational neuroscientists to use models to understand the mechanisms underlying measured brain dynamics in health and disease.

  18. Virtual Electrode Recording Tool for EXtracellular potentials (VERTEX): Comparing multi-electrode recordings from simulated and biological mammalian cortical tissue

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) sampled with extracellular electrodes are frequently used as a measure of population neuronal activity. However, relating such measurements to underlying neuronal behaviour and connectivity is non-trivial. To help study this link, we developed the Virtual Electrode Recording Tool for EXtracellular potentials (VERTEX). We first identified a reduced neuron model that retained the spatial and frequency filtering characteristics of extracellular potentials from neoco...

  19. CORTICAL ENCODING OF SIGNALS IN NOISE: EFFECTS OF STIMULUS TYPE AND RECORDING PARADIGM

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    Billings, Curtis J.; Bennett, Keri O.; Molis, Michelle R.; Leek, Marjorie R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Perception-in-noise deficits have been demonstrated across many populations and listening conditions. Many factors contribute to successful perception of auditory stimuli in noise, including neural encoding in the central auditory system. Physiological measures such as cortical auditory evoked potentials can provide a view of neural encoding at the level of the cortex that may inform our understanding of listeners’ abilities to perceive signals in the presence of background noise. In order to understand signal-in-noise neural encoding better, we set out to determine the effect of signal type, noise type, and evoking paradigm on the P1-N1-P2 complex. Design Tones and speech stimuli were presented to nine individuals in quiet, and in three background noise types: continuous speech spectrum noise, interrupted speech spectrum noise, and four-talker babble at a signal-to-noise ratio of −3 dB. In separate sessions, cortical auditory evoked potentials were evoked by a passive homogenous paradigm (single repeating stimulus) and an active oddball paradigm. Results The results for the N1 component indicated significant effects of signal type, noise type, and evoking paradigm. While components P1 and P2 also had significant main effects of these variables, only P2 demonstrated significant interactions among these variables. Conclusions Signal type, noise type, and evoking paradigm all must be carefully considered when interpreting signal-in-noise evoked potentials. Furthermore, these data confirm the possible usefulness of CAEPs as an aid to understanding perception-in-noise deficits. PMID:20890206

  20. Extracellular recordings from locally dense microelectrode arrays coupled to dissociated cortical cultures.

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    Berdondini, L; Massobrio, P; Chiappalone, M; Tedesco, M; Imfeld, K; Maccione, A; Gandolfo, M; Koudelka-Hep, M; Martinoia, S

    2009-03-15

    High-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) enabled by recent developments of microelectronic circuits (CMOS-MEA) and providing spatial resolutions down to the cellular level open the perspective to access simultaneously local and overall neuronal network activities expressed by in vitro preparations. The short inter-electrode separation results in a gain of information on the micro-circuit neuronal dynamics and signal propagation, but requires the careful evaluation of the time resolution as well as the assessment of possible cross-talk artifacts. In this respect, we have realized and tested Pt high-density (HD)-MEAs featuring four local areas with 10microm inter-electrode spacing and providing a suitable noise level for the assessment of the high-density approach. First, simulated results show how possible artifacts (duplicated spikes) can be theoretically observed on nearby microelectrodes only for very high-shunt resistance values (e.g. R(sh)=50 kOmega generates up to 60% of false positives). This limiting condition is not compatible with typical experimental conditions (i.e. dense but not confluent cultures). Experiments performed on spontaneously active cortical neuronal networks show that spike synchronicity decreases by increasing the time resolution and analysis results show that the detected synchronous spikes on nearby electrodes are likely to be unresolved (in time) fast local propagations. Finally, functional connectivity analysis results show stronger local connections than long connections spread homogeneously over the whole network demonstrating the expected gain in detail provided by the spatial resolution.

  1. Cell-attached recordings of responses evoked by photorelease of GABA in the immature cortical neurons

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    Marat eMinlebaev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel non-invasive technique to measure the polarity of GABAergic responses based on cell-attached recordings of currents activated by laser-uncaging of GABA. For these recordings, a patch pipette was filled with a solution containing RuBi-GABA, and GABA was released from this complex by a laser beam conducted to the tip of the patch pipette via an optic fiber. In cell-attached recordings from neocortical and hippocampal neurons in postnatal days P2-5 rat brain slices in vitro, we found that laser-uncaging of GABA activates integral cell-attached currents mediated by tens of GABA(A channels. The initial response was inwardly directed, indicating a depolarizing response to GABA. The direction of the initial response was dependent on the pipette potential and analysis of its slope-voltage relationships revealed a depolarizing driving force of +11 mV for the currents through GABA channels. Initial depolarizing responses to GABA uncaging were inverted to hyperpolarizing in the presence of the NKCC1 blocker bumetanide. Current-voltage relationships of the currents evoked by Rubi-GABA uncaging using voltage-ramps at the peak of responses not only revealed a bumetanide-sensitive depolarizing reversal potential of the GABA(A receptor mediated responses, but also showed a strong voltage-dependent hysteresis. Upon desensitization of the uncaged-GABA response, current-voltage relationships of the currents through single GABA(A channels revealed depolarizing responses with the driving force values similar to those obtained for the initial response. Thus, cell-attached recordings of the responses evoked by local intrapipette GABA uncaging are suitable to assess the polarity of the GABA(A-Rs mediated signals in small cell compartments.

  2. Model validation of untethered, ultrasonic neural dust motes for cortical recording.

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    Seo, Dongjin; Carmena, Jose M; Rabaey, Jan M; Maharbiz, Michel M; Alon, Elad

    2015-04-15

    A major hurdle in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) is the lack of an implantable neural interface system that remains viable for a substantial fraction of the user's lifetime. Recently, sub-mm implantable, wireless electromagnetic (EM) neural interfaces have been demonstrated in an effort to extend system longevity. However, EM systems do not scale down in size well due to the severe inefficiency of coupling radio-waves at those scales within tissue. This paper explores fundamental system design trade-offs as well as size, power, and bandwidth scaling limits of neural recording systems built from low-power electronics coupled with ultrasonic power delivery and backscatter communication. Such systems will require two fundamental technology innovations: (1) 10-100 μm scale, free-floating, independent sensor nodes, or neural dust, that detect and report local extracellular electrophysiological data via ultrasonic backscattering and (2) a sub-cranial ultrasonic interrogator that establishes power and communication links with the neural dust. We provide experimental verification that the predicted scaling effects follow theory; (127 μm)(3) neural dust motes immersed in water 3 cm from the interrogator couple with 0.002064% power transfer efficiency and 0.04246 ppm backscatter, resulting in a maximum received power of ∼0.5 μW with ∼1 nW of change in backscatter power with neural activity. The high efficiency of ultrasonic transmission can enable the scaling of the sensing nodes down to 10s of micrometer. We conclude with a brief discussion of the application of neural dust for both central and peripheral nervous system recordings, and perspectives on future research directions.

  3. An implantable wireless neural interface for recording cortical circuit dynamics in moving primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable and effective. Approach. We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based microelectrode array via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1 Hz to 7.8 kHz, 200× gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) were transmitted by a wireless data link carried on a frequency-shift-key-modulated signal at 3.2 and 3.8 GHz to a receiver 1 m away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7 h continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2 MHz. Main results. Device verification and early validation were performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance. We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight into how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile

  4. Ketamine Dysregulates the Amplitude and Connectivity of High-Frequency Oscillations in Cortical-Subcortical Networks in Humans: Evidence From Resting-State Magnetoencephalography-Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Davide; Heidegger, Tonio; Scheller, Bertram; Sauer, Andreas; Schaum, Michael; Birkner, Katharina; Singer, Wolf; Wibral, Michael; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Hypofunctioning of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) has been prominently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (ScZ). The current study tested the effects of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and NMDA-R antagonist, on resting-state activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy volunteers. In a single-blind cross-over design, each participant (n = 12) received, on 2 different sessions, a subanesthetic dose of S-ketamine (0.006 mg/Kg) and saline injection. MEG-data were analyzed at sensor- and source-level in the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-90 Hz) frequency ranges. In addition, connectivity analysis at source-level was performed using transfer entropy (TE). Ketamine increased gamma-power while beta-band activity was decreased. Specifically, elevated 30-90 Hz activity was pronounced in subcortical (thalamus and hippocampus) and cortical (frontal and temporal cortex) regions, whilst reductions in beta-band power were localized to the precuneus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate, temporal and visual cortex. TE analysis demonstrated increased information transfer in a thalamo-cortical network after ketamine administration. The findings are consistent with the pronounced dysregulation of high-frequency oscillations following the inhibition of NMDA-R in animal models of ScZ as well as with evidence from electroencephalogram-data in ScZ-patients and increased functional connectivity during early illness stages. Moreover, our data highlight the potential contribution of thalamo-cortical connectivity patterns towards ketamine-induced neuronal dysregulation, which may be relevant for the understanding of ScZ as a disorder of disinhibition of neural circuits.

  5. Functional brain network organisation of children between 2 and 5 years derived from reconstructed activity of cortical sources of high-density EEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathelt, Joe; O'Reilly, Helen; Clayden, Jonathan D; Cross, J Helen; de Haan, Michelle

    2013-11-15

    There is increasing interest in applying connectivity analysis to brain measures (Rubinov and Sporns, 2010), but most studies have relied on fMRI, which substantially limits the participant groups and numbers that can be studied. High-density EEG recordings offer a comparatively inexpensive easy-to-use alternative, but require channel-level connectivity analysis which currently lacks a common analytic framework and is very limited in spatial resolution. To address this problem, we have developed a new technique for studies of network development that overcomes the spatial constraint and obtains functional networks of cortical areas by using EEG source reconstruction with age-matched average MRI templates (He et al., 1999). In contrast to previously reported channel-level analysis, this approach provides information about the cortical areas most likely to be involved in the network as well as their functional relationship (Babiloni et al., 2005; De Vico Fallani et al., 2007). In this study, we applied source reconstruction with age-matched templates to task-free high-density EEG recordings in typically-developing children between 2 and 6 years of age (O'Reilly, 2012). Graph theory was then applied to the association strengths of 68 cortical regions of interest based on the Desikan-Killiany atlas. We found linear increases of mean node degree, mean clustering coefficient and maximum betweenness centrality between 2 years and 6 years of age. Characteristic path length was negatively correlated with age. The correlation of the network measures with age indicates network development towards more closely integrated networks similar to reports from other imaging modalities (Fair et al., 2008; Power et al., 2010). We also applied eigenvalue decomposition to obtain functional modules (Clayden et al., 2013). Connection strength within these modules did not change with age, and the modules resembled hub networks previously described for MRI (Hagmann et al., 2010; Power et al

  6. A setup for administering TMS to medial and lateral cortical areas during whole-brain FMRI recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, A.D. de; Sommer, I.E.C.; Bakker, E.J.; Bloemendaal, M.; Bakker, C.J.; Klomp, D.W.J.; Bestmann, S.; Neggers, S.F.W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Stimulating brain areas with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) while concurrently and noninvasively recording brain activity changes through functional MRI enables a new range of investigations about causal interregional interactions in the human brain. However, standard head-coil arr

  7. Large-scale, high-resolution multielectrode-array recording depicts functional network differences of cortical and hippocampal cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ito

    Full Text Available Understanding the detailed circuitry of functioning neuronal networks is one of the major goals of neuroscience. Recent improvements in neuronal recording techniques have made it possible to record the spiking activity from hundreds of neurons simultaneously with sub-millisecond temporal resolution. Here we used a 512-channel multielectrode array system to record the activity from hundreds of neurons in organotypic cultures of cortico-hippocampal brain slices from mice. To probe the network structure, we employed a wavelet transform of the cross-correlogram to categorize the functional connectivity in different frequency ranges. With this method we directly compare, for the first time, in any preparation, the neuronal network structures of cortex and hippocampus, on the scale of hundreds of neurons, with sub-millisecond time resolution. Among the three frequency ranges that we investigated, the lower two frequency ranges (gamma (30-80 Hz and beta (12-30 Hz range showed similar network structure between cortex and hippocampus, but there were many significant differences between these structures in the high frequency range (100-1000 Hz. The high frequency networks in cortex showed short tailed degree-distributions, shorter decay length of connectivity density, smaller clustering coefficients, and positive assortativity. Our results suggest that our method can characterize frequency dependent differences of network architecture from different brain regions. Crucially, because these differences between brain regions require millisecond temporal scales to be observed and characterized, these results underscore the importance of high temporal resolution recordings for the understanding of functional networks in neuronal systems.

  8. Recording human electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals for neuroscientific research and real-time functional cortical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, N Jeremy; Gupta, Disha; Brunner, Peter; Gunduz, Aysegul; Adamo, Matthew A; Ritaccio, Anthony; Schalk, Gerwin

    2012-06-26

    Neuroimaging studies of human cognitive, sensory, and motor processes are usually based on noninvasive techniques such as electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography or functional magnetic-resonance imaging. These techniques have either inherently low temporal or low spatial resolution, and suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio and/or poor high-frequency sensitivity. Thus, they are suboptimal for exploring the short-lived spatio-temporal dynamics of many of the underlying brain processes. In contrast, the invasive technique of electrocorticography (ECoG) provides brain signals that have an exceptionally high signal-to-noise ratio, less susceptibility to artifacts than EEG, and a high spatial and temporal resolution (i.e., computer interfacing (BCI) technology for decoding a user's intentions to enhance or improve communication and control. Nevertheless, human ECoG data are often hard to obtain because of the risks and limitations of the invasive procedures involved, and the need to record within the constraints of clinical settings. Still, clinical monitoring to localize epileptic foci offers a unique and valuable opportunity to collect human ECoG data. We describe our methods for collecting recording ECoG, and demonstrate how to use these signals for important real-time applications such as clinical mapping and brain-computer interfacing. Our example uses the BCI2000 software platform and the SIGFRIED method, an application for real-time mapping of brain functions. This procedure yields information that clinicians can subsequently use to guide the complex and laborious process of functional mapping by electrical stimulation. PREREQUISITES AND PLANNING: Patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy may be candidates for resective surgery of an epileptic focus to minimize the frequency of seizures. Prior to resection, the patients undergo monitoring using subdural electrodes for two purposes: first, to localize the epileptic focus, and second, to identify

  9. [Cortical blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokron, S

    2014-02-01

    Cortical blindness refers to a visual loss induced by a bilateral occipital lesion. The very strong cooperation between psychophysics, cognitive psychology, neurophysiology and neuropsychology these latter twenty years as well as recent progress in cerebral imagery have led to a better understanding of neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness. It thus becomes possible now to propose an earlier diagnosis of cortical blindness as well as new perspectives for rehabilitation in children as well as in adults. On the other hand, studying complex neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness is a way to infer normal functioning of the visual system.

  10. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased visual ...

  11. Lack of Cortical Correlates of Response Inhibition in 6-Year-Olds Born Extremely Preterm – Evidence from a Go/NoGo Task in Magnetoencephalographic Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihko, Elina; Lönnberg, Piia; Lauronen, Leena; Wolford, Elina; Andersson, Sture; Lano, Aulikki; Metsäranta, Marjo; Nevalainen, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    Children born extremely preterm (EPT) may have difficulties in response inhibition, but the neural basis of such problems is unknown. We recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) during a somatosensory Go/NoGo task in 6-year-old children born EPT (n = 22) and in children born full term (FT; n = 21). The children received tactile stimuli randomly to their left little (target) and index (non-target) finger and were instructed to squeeze a soft toy with the opposite hand every time they felt a stimulus on the little finger. Behaviorally, the EPT children performed worse than the FT children, both in responding to the target finger stimulation and in refraining from responding to the non-target finger stimulation. In MEG, after the non-target finger stimulation (i.e., during the response inhibition), the sensorimotor alpha oscillation levels in the contralateral-to-squeeze hemisphere were elevated in the FT children when compared with a condition with corresponding stimulation but no task (instead the children were listening to a story and not attending to the fingers). This NoGo task effect was absent in the EPT children. Further, in the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the tactile stimulation, the post-stimulus suppression was less pronounced in the EPT than FT children. We suggest that the missing NoGo task effect and lower suppression of sensorimotor oscillations are markers of deficient functioning of the sensorimotor networks in the EPT children. PMID:28111544

  12. Cortical Source Localization of Infant Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, GD; Richards, JE

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission topography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been utilized with older children and adults to identify cortical sources of perceptual and cognitive processes. However, due to practical and ethical concerns, these techniques cannot be routinely applied to infant participants. An alternative to such neuroimaging techniques appropriate for use with infant participants is high-density EEG recording and cortical source loca...

  13. Face activated neurodynamic cortical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susac, Ana; Ilmoniemi, Risto J; Ranken, Doug; Supek, Selma

    2011-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have shown that complex visual stimuli, such as faces, activate multiple brain regions, yet little is known on the dynamics and complexity of the activated cortical networks during the entire measurable evoked response. In this study, we used simulated and face-evoked empirical MEG data from an oddball study to investigate the feasibility of accurate, efficient, and reliable spatio-temporal tracking of cortical pathways over prolonged time intervals. We applied a data-driven, semiautomated approach to spatio-temporal source localization with no prior assumptions on active cortical regions to explore non-invasively face-processing dynamics and their modulation by task. Simulations demonstrated that the use of multi-start downhill simplex and data-driven selections of time intervals submitted to the Calibrated Start Spatio-Temporal (CSST) algorithm resulted in improved accuracy of the source localization and the estimation of the onset of their activity. Locations and dynamics of the identified sources indicated a distributed cortical network involved in face processing whose complexity was task dependent. This MEG study provided the first non-invasive demonstration, agreeing with intracranial recordings, of an early onset of the activity in the fusiform face gyrus (FFG), and that frontal activation preceded parietal for responses elicited by target faces.

  14. Evolution of cortical neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Mannan, Omar; Cheung, Amanda F P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2008-03-18

    The neurons of the mammalian neocortex are organised into six layers. By contrast, the reptilian and avian dorsal cortices only have three layers which are thought to be equivalent to layers I, V and VI of mammals. Increased repertoire of mammalian higher cognitive functions is likely a result of an expanded cortical surface area. The majority of cortical cell proliferation in mammals occurs in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ), with a small number of scattered divisions outside the germinal zone. Comparative developmental studies suggest that the appearance of SVZ coincides with the laminar expansion of the cortex to six layers, as well as the tangential expansion of the cortical sheet seen within mammals. In spite of great variation and further compartmentalisation in the mitotic compartments, the number of neurons in an arbitrary cortical column appears to be remarkably constant within mammals. The current challenge is to understand how the emergence and elaboration of the SVZ has contributed to increased cortical cell diversity, tangential expansion and gyrus formation of the mammalian neocortex. This review discusses neurogenic processes that are believed to underlie these major changes in cortical dimensions in vertebrates.

  15. Cortical Lewy Body Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. G. Gibb

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In cortical Lewy body dementia the distribution of Lewy bodies in the nervous system follows that of Parkinson's disease, except for their greater profusion in the cerebral cortex. The cortical tangles and plaques of Alzheimer pathology are often present, the likely explanation being that Alzheimer pathology provokes dementia in many patients. Pure cortical Lewy body dementia without Alzheimer pathology is uncommon. The age of onset reflects that of Parkinson's disease, and clinical features, though not diagnostic, include aphasias, apraxias, agnosias, paranoid delusions and visual hallucinations. Parkinsonism may present before or after the dementia, and survival duration is approximately half that seen in Parkinson's disease without dementia.

  16. Human cortical responses to slow and fast binaural beats reveal multiple mechanisms of binaural hearing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ross, Bernhard; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Thompson, Jessica; Jamali, Shahab; Fujioka, Takako

    2014-01-01

    .... To examine the neural representations underlying these different perceptions, we recorded neuromagnetic cortical responses while participants listened to binaural beats at a continuously varying rate...

  17. Focal cortical dysplasia - review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults.Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed - from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized.Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe.Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes.New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life.Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias.THE MOST COMMON FINDINGS ON MRI IMAGING INCLUDE: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also in both types

  18. Postpartum cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Shakeel Ahmed

    2008-09-01

    A 30-years-old third gravida with previous normal pregnancies and an unremarkable prenatal course had an emergency lower segment caesarean section at a periphery hospital for failure of labour to progress. She developed bilateral cortical blindness immediately after recovery from anesthesia due to cerebral angiopathy shown by CT and MR scan as cortical infarct cerebral angiopathy, which is a rare complication of a normal pregnancy.

  19. Cortical source localization of infant cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Greg D; Richards, John E

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission topography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been utilized with older children and adults to identify cortical sources of perceptual and cognitive processes. However, due to practical and ethical concerns, these techniques cannot be routinely applied to infant participants. An alternative to such neuroimaging techniques appropriate for use with infant participants is high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) recording and cortical source localization techniques. The current article provides an overview of a method developed for such analyses. The method consists of four steps: (1) recording high-density (e.g., 128-channel) EEG. (2) Analysis of individual participant raw segmented data with independent component analysis (ICA). (3) Estimation of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) that represent cortical sources for the observed ICA component clusters. (4) Calculation of component activations in relation to experimental factors. We discuss an example of research applying this technique to investigate the development of visual attention and recognition memory. We also describe the application of "realistic head modeling" to address some of the current limitations of infant cortical source localization.

  20. The Estimation of Cortical Activity for Brain-Computer Interface: Applications in a Domotic Context

    OpenAIRE

    Babiloni, F.; Cincotti, F; M. Marciani; Salinari, S.; Astolfi, L.; A. Tocci; Aloise, F.; De Mattia, D.; De Vico Fallani, F.; Bufalari, S.

    2007-01-01

    In order to analyze whether the use of the cortical activity, estimated from noninvasive EEG recordings, could be useful to detect mental states related to the imagination of limb movements, we estimate cortical activity from high-resolution EEG recordings in a group of healthy subjects by using realistic head models. Such cortical activity was estimated in region of interest associated with the subject's Brodmann areas by using a depth-weighted minimum norm...

  1. Cortical activity in tinnitus patients and its modification by phonostimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pawlak-Osińska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to observe spontaneous cortical activity and cortical activity modulated by tinnitus-matched sound in tinnitus patients and healthy subjects with no otoneurologic symptoms. METHOD: Data were prospectively collected from 50 tinnitus patients and 25 healthy subjects. Cortical activity was recorded in all subjects with eyes closed and open and during photostimulation, hyperventilation and acoustic stimulation using 19-channel quantitative electroencephalography. The sound applied in the tinnitus patients was individually matched with the ability to mask or equal the tinnitus. The maximal and mean amplitude of the delta, theta, alpha and beta waves and the type and amount of the pathologic EEG patterns were noted during each recording. Differences in cortical localization and the influence of sound stimuli on spontaneous cortical activity were evaluated between the groups. RESULTS: The tinnitus group exhibited decreased delta activity and increased alpha and beta activity. Hyperventilation increased the intensity of the differences. The tinnitus patients had more sharp-slow waves and increased slow wave amplitude. Sound stimuli modified the EEG recordings; the delta and beta wave amplitudes were increased, whereas the alpha-1 wave amplitude was decreased. Acoustic stimulation only slightly affected the temporal region. CONCLUSION: Cortical activity in the tinnitus patients clearly differed from that in healthy subjects, i.e., tinnitus is not a “phantom” sign. The changes in cortical activity included decreased delta wave amplitudes, increased alpha-1, beta-1 and beta-h wave amplitudes and pathologic patterns. Cortical activity modifications occurred predominantly in the temporal region. Acoustic stimulation affected spontaneous cortical activity only in tinnitus patients, and although the applied sound was individually matched, the pathologic changes were only slightly improved.

  2. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Thom, M; Ellison, DW; Wilkins, P; Barnes, D; Thompson, PD; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. Background: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  3. Cortical Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Grey-matter abnormalities at the cortical surface and regional brain size were mapped by high-resolution MRI and surface-based, computational image analytical techniques in a group of 27 children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and 46 controls, matched by age and sex, at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  4. Cortical mechanisms of mirror therapy after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Holly E; Borrelli, Mimi R; Borchert, Robin J; Bradbury, David; Ward, Nick S

    2015-06-01

    Mirror therapy is a new form of stroke rehabilitation that uses the mirror reflection of the unaffected hand in place of the affected hand to augment movement training. The mechanism of mirror therapy is not known but is thought to involve changes in cerebral organization. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure changes in cortical activity during mirror training after stroke. In particular, we examined movement-related changes in the power of cortical oscillations in the beta (15-30 Hz) frequency range, known to be involved in movement. Ten stroke patients with upper limb paresis and 13 healthy controls were recorded using MEG while performing bimanual hand movements in 2 different conditions. In one, subjects looked directly at their affected hand (or dominant hand in controls), and in the other, they looked at a mirror reflection of their unaffected hand in place of their affected hand. The movement-related beta desynchronization was calculated in both primary motor cortices. Movement-related beta desynchronization was symmetrical during bilateral movement and unaltered by the mirror condition in controls. In the patients, movement-related beta desynchronization was generally smaller than in controls, but greater in contralesional compared to ipsilesional motor cortex. This initial asymmetry in movement-related beta desynchronization between hemispheres was made more symmetrical by the presence of the mirror. Mirror therapy could potentially aid stroke rehabilitation by normalizing an asymmetrical pattern of movement-related beta desynchronization in primary motor cortices during bilateral movement. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Modulation of Cortical Oscillations by Low-Frequency Direct Cortical Stimulation Is State-Dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaraleengam Alagapan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical oscillations play a fundamental role in organizing large-scale functional brain networks. Noninvasive brain stimulation with temporally patterned waveforms such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS have been proposed to modulate these oscillations. Thus, these stimulation modalities represent promising new approaches for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses in which these oscillations are impaired. However, the mechanism by which periodic brain stimulation alters endogenous oscillation dynamics is debated and appears to depend on brain state. Here, we demonstrate with a static model and a neural oscillator model that recurrent excitation in the thalamo-cortical circuit, together with recruitment of cortico-cortical connections, can explain the enhancement of oscillations by brain stimulation as a function of brain state. We then performed concurrent invasive recording and stimulation of the human cortical surface to elucidate the response of cortical oscillations to periodic stimulation and support the findings from the computational models. We found that (1 stimulation enhanced the targeted oscillation power, (2 this enhancement outlasted stimulation, and (3 the effect of stimulation depended on behavioral state. Together, our results show successful target engagement of oscillations by periodic brain stimulation and highlight the role of nonlinear interaction between endogenous network oscillations and stimulation. These mechanistic insights will contribute to the design of adaptive, more targeted stimulation paradigms.

  6. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Ramalho Romero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma.

  7. [Posterior cortical atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyga, Volker Moræus; Western, Elin; Solheim, Hanne; Hassel, Bjørnar; Kerty, Emilia

    2015-06-02

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a neurodegenerative condition with atrophy of posterior parts of the cerebral cortex, including the visual cortex and parts of the parietal and temporal cortices. It presents early, in the 50s or 60s, with nonspecific visual disturbances that are often misinterpreted as ophthalmological, which can delay the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to present current knowledge about symptoms, diagnostics and treatment of this condition. The review is based on a selection of relevant articles in PubMed and on the authors' own experience with the patient group. Posterior cortical atrophy causes gradually increasing impairment in reading, distance judgement, and the ability to perceive complex images. Examination of higher visual functions, neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging contribute to diagnosis. In the early stages, patients do not have problems with memory or insight, but cognitive impairment and dementia can develop. It is unclear whether the condition is a variant of Alzheimer's disease, or whether it is a separate disease entity. There is no established treatment, but practical measures such as the aid of social care workers, telephones with large keypads, computers with voice recognition software and audiobooks can be useful. Currently available treatment has very limited effect on the disease itself. Nevertheless it is important to identify and diagnose the condition in its early stages in order to be able to offer patients practical assistance in their daily lives.

  8. Early development of synchrony in cortical activations in the human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolen, N; Dereymaeker, A; Räsänen, O; Jansen, K; Vervisch, J; Matic, V; Naulaers, G; De Vos, M; Van Huffel, S; Vanhatalo, S

    2016-05-13

    Early intermittent cortical activity is thought to play a crucial role in the growth of neuronal network development, and large scale brain networks are known to provide the basis for higher brain functions. Yet, the early development of the large scale synchrony in cortical activations is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the early intermittent cortical activations seen in the human scalp EEG show a clear developmental course during the last trimester of pregnancy, the period of intensive growth of cortico-cortical connections. We recorded scalp EEG from altogether 22 premature infants at post-menstrual age between 30 and 44 weeks, and the early cortical synchrony was quantified using recently introduced activation synchrony index (ASI). The developmental correlations of ASI were computed for individual EEG signals as well as anatomically and mathematically defined spatial subgroups. We report two main findings. First, we observed a robust and statistically significant increase in ASI in all cortical areas. Second, there were significant spatial gradients in the synchrony in fronto-occipital and left-to-right directions. These findings provide evidence that early cortical activity is increasingly synchronized across the neocortex. The ASI-based metrics introduced in our work allow direct translational comparison to in vivo animal models, as well as hold promise for implementation as a functional developmental biomarker in future research on human neonates.

  9. Cortical control of anticipatory postural adjustments prior to stepping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, J P; Merino, D M; Beyer, K B; McIlroy, W E

    2016-01-28

    Human bipedal balance control is achieved either reactively or predictively by a distributed network of neural areas within the central nervous system with a potential role for cerebral cortex. While the role of the cortex in reactive balance has been widely explored, only few studies have addressed the cortical activations related to predictive balance control. The present study investigated the cortical activations related to the preparation and execution of anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) that precede a step. This study also examined whether the preparatory cortical activations related to a specific movement is dependent on the context of control (postural component vs. focal component). Ground reaction forces and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded from 14 healthy adults while they performed lateral weight shift and lateral stepping with and without initially preloading their weight to the stance leg. EEG analysis revealed that there were distinct movement-related potentials (MRPs) with concurrent event-related desynchronization (ERD) of mu and beta rhythms prior to the onset of APA and also to the onset of foot-off during lateral stepping in the fronto-central cortical areas. Also, the MRPs and ERD prior to the onset of APA and onset of lateral weight shift were not significantly different suggesting the comparable cortical activations for the generation of postural and focal movements. The present study reveals the occurrence of cortical activation prior to the execution of an APA that precedes a step. Importantly, this cortical activity appears independent of the context of the movement.

  10. Assessing cortical network properties using TMS-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogasch, Nigel C; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2013-07-01

    The past decade has seen significant developments in the concurrent use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to directly assess cortical network properties such as excitability and connectivity in humans. New hardware solutions, improved EEG amplifier technology, and advanced data processing techniques have allowed substantial reduction of the TMS-induced artifact, which had previously rendered concurrent TMS-EEG impossible. Various physiological artifacts resulting from TMS have also been identified, and methods are being developed to either minimize or remove these sources of artifact. With these developments, TMS-EEG has unlocked regions of the cortex to researchers that were previously inaccessible to TMS. By recording the TMS-evoked response directly from the cortex, TMS-EEG provides information on the excitability, effective connectivity, and oscillatory tuning of a given cortical area, removing the need to infer such measurements from indirect measures. In the following review, we investigate the different online and offline methods for reducing artifacts in TMS-EEG recordings and the physiological information contained within the TMS-evoked cortical response. We then address the use of TMS-EEG to assess different cortical mechanisms such as cortical inhibition and neural plasticity, before briefly reviewing studies that have utilized TMS-EEG to explore cortical network properties at rest and during different functional brain states.

  11. UP states protect ongoing cortical activity from thalamic inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendon O Watson

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vitro and in vivo fluctuate spontaneously between two stable membrane potentials: a depolarized UP state and a hyperpolarized DOWN state. UP states temporally correspond with multineuronal firing sequences which may be important for information processing. To examine how thalamic inputs interact with ongoing cortical UP state activity, we used calcium imaging and targeted whole-cell recordings of activated neurons in thalamocortical slices of mouse somatosensory cortex. Whereas thalamic stimulation during DOWN states generated multineuronal, synchronized UP states, identical stimulation during UP states had no effect on the subthreshold membrane dynamics of the vast majority of cells or on ongoing multineuronal temporal patterns. Both thalamocortical and corticocortical PSPs were significantly reduced and neuronal input resistance was significantly decreased during cortical UP states -- mechanistically consistent with UP state insensitivity. Our results demonstrate that cortical dynamics during UP states are insensitive to thalamic inputs.

  12. Cortical excitability differences between flexor pollicis longus and APB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong Seok; Menon, Parvathi; Mioshi, Eneida; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2013-04-29

    Although abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) share a common peripheral nerve supply, these muscles subserve different functions and may be differently affected in neurodegenerative disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). As a consequence, differences in cortical excitability may potentially develop in relation to these functional differences. Cortical excitability was assessed using the threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique in 15 healthy controls with motor responses recorded over the APB and FPL using surface electrode recordings. Short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was significantly reduced from the FPL compared to APB (SICIFPL 6.9±1.8%; SICIAPB 10.7±1.4%, P<0.01). In addition, the FPL motor evoked potential amplitude (MEPFPL 14.7±2.3%; MEPAPB 21.7±3.9%; P<0.01) and cortical silent period duration (CSPFPL 174.7±6.7ms; CSPAPB 205.4±3.9ms, P<0.01) were significantly smaller. The findings in the present study indicate that cortical inhibition and corticomotoneuronal output is reduced when recording over the FPL. The differences in cortical excitability may develop as a consequence of varied function and could potentially explain the dissociated muscle atrophy evident in ALS.

  13. Evaluating mandibular cortical index quantitatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Fusun; Akgunlu, Faruk

    2008-10-01

    The aim was to assess whether Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity analysis can discriminate patients having different mandibular cortical shape. Panoramic radiographs of 52 patients were evaluated for mandibular cortical index. Weighted Kappa between the observations were varying between 0.718-0.805. These radiographs were scanned and converted to binary images. Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity were calculated from the regions where best represents the cortical morphology. It was found that there were statistically significant difference between the Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 1 and Cl 2 (Fractal Dimension P:0.000; Lacunarity P:0.003); and Cl 1 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:0.008; Lacunarity P:0.001); but there was no statistically significant difference between Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 2 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:1.000; Lacunarity P:0.758). FD and L can differentiate Cl 1 mandibular cortical shape from both Cl 2 and Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape but cannot differentiate Cl 2 from Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape on panoramic radiographs.

  14. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per E Roland

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available IIn principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG, and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review.

  15. Modeling cortical circuits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  16. Cortical and spinal assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, I W; Gram, Mikkel; Hansen, T M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standardized objective methods to assess the analgesic effects of opioids, enable identification of underlying mechanisms of drug actions in the central nervous system. Opioids may exert their effect on both cortical and spinal levels. In this study actions of morphine at both levels...... subjects was included in the data analysis. There was no change in the activity in resting EEG (P>0.05) after morphine administration as compared to placebo. During cold pressor stimulation, morphine significantly lowered the relative activity in the delta (1-4Hz) band (P=0.03) and increased the activity...... morphine administration (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Cold pressor EEG and the nociceptive reflex were more sensitive to morphine analgesia than resting EEG and can be used as standardized objective methods to assess opioid effects. However, no correlation between the analgesic effect of morphine on the spinal...

  17. Hiperostosis cortical infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina; Orelvis Pérez Duerto

    2015-01-01

    La enfermedad de Caffey, o hiperostosis cortical infantil, es una rara enfermedad ósea autolimitada, que aparece de preferencia en lactantes con signos inespecíficos sistémicos; el más relevante es la reacción subperióstica e hiperostosis en varios huesos del cuerpo, con predilección en el 75-80 % de los casos por la mandíbula. Su pronóstico es bueno, la mayoría no deja secuelas. El propósito del presente trabajo es describir las características clínicas, presentes en un lactante de cinco mes...

  18. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  19. Cortical plasticity and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moucha, Raluca; Kilgard, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    The brain is constantly adapting to environmental and endogenous changes (including injury) that occur at every stage of life. The mechanisms that regulate neural plasticity have been refined over millions of years. Motivation and sensory experience directly shape the rewiring that makes learning and neurological recovery possible. Guiding neural reorganization in a manner that facilitates recovery of function is a primary goal of neurological rehabilitation. As the rules that govern neural plasticity become better understood, it will be possible to manipulate the sensory and motor experience of patients to induce specific forms of plasticity. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding factors that regulate cortical plasticity, illustrates specific forms of reorganization induced by control of each factor, and suggests how to exploit these factors for clinical benefit.

  20. Motor cortical function and the precision grip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Menon, Parvathi; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-12-01

    While task-dependent changes in motor cortical outputs have been previously reported, the issue of whether such changes are specific for complex hand tasks remains unresolved. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cortical inhibitory tone and cortical output were greater during precision grip and power grip. Motor cortex excitability was undertaken by using the transcranial magnetic stimulation threshold tracking technique in 15 healthy subjects. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) responses were recorded over the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), with the hand in the following positions: (1) rest, (2) precision grip and (3) power grip. The MEP amplitude (MEP amplitude REST 23.6 ± 3.3%; MEP amplitude PRECISION GRIP 35.2 ± 5.6%; MEP amplitude POWER GRIP 19.6 ± 3.4%, F = 2.4, P < 0.001) and stimulus-response gradient (SLOPEREST 0.06 ± 0.01; SLOPEPRCISION GRIP 0.15 ± 0.04; SLOPE POWER GRIP 0.07 ± 0.01, P < 0.05) were significantly increased during precision grip. Short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was significantly reduced during the precision grip (SICI REST 15.0 ± 2.3%; SICI PRECISION GRIP 9.7 ± 1.5%, SICI POWER GRIP 15.9 ± 2.7%, F = 2.6, P < 0.05). The present study suggests that changes in motor cortex excitability are specific for precision grip, with functional coupling of descending corticospinal pathways controlling thumb and finger movements potentially forming the basis of these cortical changes.

  1. Regional cerebral blood flow in focal cortical epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristina Dupont; Oikawa, T; Sveinsdottir, E

    1976-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in ten patients with focal cortical epilepsy. The blood flow was measured by the intra-arterial injection of xenon 133 (133Xe), and the isotope clearance was recorded by a multidetector scintillation camera with 254 detectors. Three patients were st...

  2. Relating Cortical Wave Dynamics to Learning and Remembering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mercado III

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical waves propagate across sensory and motor cortices in stereotypical patterns. These waves have been described as potentially facilitating sensory processing when they travel through sensory cortex, as guiding movement preparation and performance when they travel across motor cortex, and as possibly promoting synaptic plasticity and the consolidation of memory traces, especially during sleep. Here, an alternative theoretical framework is suggested that integrates Pavlovian hypotheses about learning and cortical function with concepts from contemporary proceduralist theories of memory. The proposed framework postulates that sensory-evoked cortical waves are gradually modified across repeated experiences such that the waves more effectively differentiate sensory events, and so that the waves are more likely to reverberate. It is argued that the qualities of cortical waves—their origins, form, intensity, speed, periodicity, extent, and trajectories —are a function of both the structural organization of neural circuits and ongoing reverberations resulting from previously experienced events. It is hypothesized that experience-dependent cortical plasticity, both in the short- and long-term, modulates the qualities of cortical waves, thereby enabling individuals to make progressively more precise distinctions between complex sensory events, and to reconstruct components of previously experienced events. Unlike most current neurobiological theories of learning and memory mechanisms, this hypothesis does not assume that synaptic plasticity, or any other form of neural plasticity, serves to store physical records of previously experienced events for later reactivation. Rather, the reorganization of cortical circuits may alter the potential for certain wave patterns to arise and persist. Understanding what factors determine the spatiotemporal dynamics of cortical waves, how structural changes affect their qualities, and how wave dynamics

  3. Cholinergic Neurons Excite Cortically Projecting Basal Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; McKenna, James T.; Zant, Janneke C.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in the control of cortical activation and attention. Understanding the modulation of BF neuronal activity is a prerequisite to treat disorders of cortical activation involving BF dysfunction, such as Alzheimer's disease. Here we reveal the interaction between cholinergic neurons and cortically projecting BF GABAergic neurons using immunohistochemistry and whole-cell recordings in vitro. In GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, BF cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) neurons were intermingled with GABAergic (GFP+) neurons. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that cholinergic fibers apposed putative cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing parvalbumin (PV). In coronal BF slices from GAD67-GFP knock-in or PV-tdTomato mice, pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors with bath application of carbachol increased the firing rate of large (>20 μm diameter) BF GFP+ and PV (tdTomato+) neurons, which exhibited the intrinsic membrane properties of cortically projecting neurons. The excitatory effect of carbachol was blocked by antagonists of M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors in two subpopulations of BF GABAergic neurons [large hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and small Ih, respectively]. Ion substitution experiments and reversal potential measurements suggested that the carbachol-induced inward current was mediated mainly by sodium-permeable cation channels. Carbachol also increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic neurons/fibers caused a mecamylamine- and atropine-sensitive inward current in putative GABAergic neurons. Thus, cortically projecting, BF GABAergic/PV neurons are excited by neighboring BF and/or brainstem cholinergic neurons. Loss of cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease may impair cortical activation, in part, through disfacilitation of BF cortically

  4. Cortical language mapping using electrical cortical stimulation for Mandarin-speaking patients with epilepsy: a report of six case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Yu, Tao; Sun, Wei; Ni, Duanyu; Li, Yongjie

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this study was to summarize the results of language cortex mapping using electrical cortical stimulation with modified language tasks for Mandarin-speaking patients with epilepsy. Electrical currents were delivered through implanted subdural electrodes to six Mandarin-speaking patients before epilepsy surgery. The current intensities inducing any language disturbance during comprehension, repetition, and speech tasks were recorded, and individual cortical mapping was completed to guide subsequent resection, with the distance between mapped language sites and resected zones kept at a minimum of 0.5 cm. Language function was reassessed and followed up after surgery. Language cortices were successfully identified in three patients, but demonstrated great variability in distribution. There seemed to be no difference in the intensity threshold that induced language interference. None of the six patients exhibited language deficits postsurgery. Electrical cortical stimulation with modified language tasks is valid for identification of cortices underlying Mandarin processing. The great variability in language cortex distribution enhances the necessity of individual language cortical mapping in epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Axonal bleb recording

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenqin Hu; Yousheng Shu

    2012-01-01

    Patch-clamp recording requires direct accessibility of the cell membrane to patch pipettes and allows the investigation of ion channel properties and functions in specific cellular compartments.The cell body and relatively thick dendrites are the most accessible compartments of a neuron,due to their large diameters and therefore great membrane surface areas.However,axons are normally inaccessible to patch pipettes because of their thin structure; thus studies of axon physiology have long been hampered by the lack of axon recording methods.Recently,a new method of patchclamp recording has been developed,enabling direct and tight-seal recording from cortical axons.These recordings are performed at the enlarged structure (axonal bleb) formed at the cut end of an axon after slicing procedures.This method has facilitated studies of the mechanisms underlying the generation and propagation of the main output signal,the action potential,and led to the finding that cortical neurons communicate not only in action potential-mediated digital mode but also in membrane potential-dependent analog mode.

  6. Cortical potentials associated with voluntary mandibular movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K; Kaji, R; Hamano, T; Kohara, N; Kimura, J; Shibasaki, H; Iizuka, T

    2000-07-01

    Movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) are negative potentials over the scalp, which gradually increase prior to voluntary movements, and might be applied to elucidate the cortical efferent function of the mandibular movements. We compared the MRCPs accompanying various mandibular movements to study the motor control mechanism underlying these movements. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded from 11 electrodes placed over the scalp (F3, Fz, F4, T3, C3, Cz, C4, T4, P3, Pz, and P4), according to the International 10-20 System, and electromyograms (EMGs) were obtained from surface electrodes over the masseter muscle and the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. Ten healthy subjects were requested to make brisk and self-paced mandibular movements in 4 different directions (mouth-opening and -closing, and left and right lateral movements). We obtained MRCPs by averaging the EEG, using the visually determined EMG onset as a trigger signal. In all the movements, a slowly increasing, bilaterally widespread negativity starting 1.5 to 2.0 sec before the EMG onset (Bereitschaftspotential, or BP proper) was observed, with the maximum over the vertex region. The negative slope (NS') occurred about 300 to 700 msec before the EMG onset. The cortical maps of BP/NS' (BP and NS' combined), immediately prior to the mouth-opening and closing, showed a symmetrical distribution, whereas that for the lateral movements showed a tendency of predominance over the hemisphere ipsilateral to the direction of the movement. BP/NS' amplitudes at the onset of movement differed significantly or tended to do so between open, close, and lateral movements, suggesting that MRCP recordings may thus provide a means to explore the role of the cerebral cortex in the control of mandibular movements.

  7. Leading role of thalamic over cortical neurons during postinhibitory rebound excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, F.; Timofeev, I.; Steriade, M.

    1998-01-01

    The postinhibitory rebound excitation is an intrinsic property of thalamic and cortical neurons that is implicated in a variety of normal and abnormal operations of neuronal networks, such as slow or fast brain rhythms during different states of vigilance as well as seizures. We used dual simultaneous intracellular recordings of thalamocortical neurons from the ventrolateral nucleus and neurons from the motor cortex, together with thalamic and cortical field potentials, to investigate the temporal relations between thalamic and cortical events during the rebound excitation that follows prolonged periods of stimulus-induced inhibition. Invariably, the rebound spike-bursts in thalamocortical cells occurred before the rebound depolarization in cortical neurons and preceded the peak of the depth-negative, rebound field potential in cortical areas. Also, the inhibitory-rebound sequences were more pronounced and prolonged in cortical neurons when elicited by thalamic stimuli, compared with cortical stimuli. The role of thalamocortical loops in the rebound excitation of cortical neurons was shown further by the absence of rebound activity in isolated cortical slabs. However, whereas thalamocortical neurons remained hyperpolarized after rebound excitation, because of the prolonged spike-bursts in inhibitory thalamic reticular neurons, the rebound depolarization in cortical neurons was prolonged, suggesting the role of intracortical excitatory circuits in this sustained activity. The role of intrathalamic events in triggering rebound cortical activity should be taken into consideration when analyzing information processes at the cortical level; at each step, corticothalamic volleys can set into action thalamic inhibitory neurons, leading to rebound spike-bursts that are transferred back to the cortex, thus modifying cortical activities. PMID:9811903

  8. Focal cortical dysplasia – review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults. Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed – from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized. Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe. Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes. New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life. Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias. The most common findings on MRI imaging include: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also

  9. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  10. Hiperostosis cortical infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Caffey, o hiperostosis cortical infantil, es una rara enfermedad ósea autolimitada, que aparece de preferencia en lactantes con signos inespecíficos sistémicos; el más relevante es la reacción subperióstica e hiperostosis en varios huesos del cuerpo, con predilección en el 75-80 % de los casos por la mandíbula. Su pronóstico es bueno, la mayoría no deja secuelas. El propósito del presente trabajo es describir las características clínicas, presentes en un lactante de cinco meses de edad, atendido en el Hospital Pediátrico Provincial “Mártires de Las Tunas” con este diagnóstico, quien ingresó en el servicio de miscelánea B por una celulitis facial. Presentaba aumento de volumen en la región geniana izquierda, febrícola e inapetencia. Se impuso tratamiento con cefazolina y se egresó a los siete días. Acudió nuevamente con tumefacción blanda y difusa de ambas hemicaras, irritabilidad y fiebre. Se interconsultó con cirugía maxilofacial, se indicaron estudios sanguíneos y radiológicos. Se diagnosticó como enfermedad de Caffey, basado en la edad del niño, tumefacción facial sin signos inflamatorios agudos e hiperostosis en ambas corticales mandibulares a la radiografía AP mandíbula; unido a anemia ligera, leucocitosis y eritrosedimentación acelerada. El paciente se trató sintomáticamente y con antinflamatorios no esteroideos. Esta rara entidad se debe tener presente en casos de niños y lactantes con irritabilidad y fiebre inespecífica

  11. INTRAOPERATIVE LOCALIZATION OF CORTICAL MOTOR EVOKED POTENTIALS IN CENTRAL SULCUS LESIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study direct cortical electrical stimulation technique for the recording of motor evoked potentials under general anesthesia in central sulcus lesions. Methods The largest N20-P25 response was recorded from postcentral gyrus by intraoperative monitoring of cortical motor evoked potentials in 10 patients with intracranial lesions near or in the central area. The muscles of upper extremity in all patients were activated by delivering stimulus to cortical areas continuously. Moving the cortical electrodes forward, the largest P20-N25 response, SEP phase reversal,was obtained as a motor center stimulus. In this site of cortex, a short train stimulation elicited reproducible muscle action potentials that could be observed from the oscilloscope without averaging.Results MEPs can be recorded, pre- and post-operatively, without motor deficits of upper limbs in all patients.Conclusion This technique seems to be preferable for intraoperative localization of motor evoked potentials in central sulcus lesions under total intravenous anesthesia.

  12. Moderate Cortical Cooling Eliminates Thalamocortical Silent States during Slow Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-09-23

    Reduction in temperature depolarizes neurons by a partial closure of potassium channels but decreases the vesicle release probability within synapses. Compared with cooling, neuromodulators produce qualitatively similar effects on intrinsic neuronal properties and synapses in the cortex. We used this similarity of neuronal action in ketamine-xylazine-anesthetized mice and non-anesthetized mice to manipulate the thalamocortical activity. We recorded cortical electroencephalogram/local field potential (LFP) activity and intracellular activities from the somatosensory thalamus in control conditions, during cortical cooling and on rewarming. In the deeply anesthetized mice, moderate cortical cooling was characterized by reversible disruption of the thalamocortical slow-wave pattern rhythmicity and the appearance of fast LFP spikes, with frequencies ranging from 6 to 9 Hz. These LFP spikes were correlated with the rhythmic IPSP activities recorded within the thalamic ventral posterior medial neurons and with depolarizing events in the posterior nucleus neurons. Similar cooling of the cortex during light anesthesia rapidly and reversibly eliminated thalamocortical silent states and evoked thalamocortical persistent activity; conversely, mild heating increased thalamocortical slow-wave rhythmicity. In the non-anesthetized head-restrained mice, cooling also prevented the generation of thalamocortical silent states. We conclude that moderate cortical cooling might be used to manipulate slow-wave network activity and induce neuromodulator-independent transition to activated states. Significance statement: In this study, we demonstrate that moderate local cortical cooling of lightly anesthetized or naturally sleeping mice disrupts thalamocortical slow oscillation and induces the activated local field potential pattern. Mild heating has the opposite effect; it increases the rhythmicity of thalamocortical slow oscillation. Our results demonstrate that slow oscillation can be

  13. Muscle synergy patterns as physiological markers of motor cortical damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Vincent C K; Turolla, Andrea; Agostini, Michela; Silvoni, Stefano; Bennis, Caoimhe; Kasi, Patrick; Paganoni, Sabrina; Bonato, Paolo; Bizzi, Emilio

    2012-09-04

    The experimental findings herein reported are aimed at gaining a perspective on the complex neural events that follow lesions of the motor cortical areas. Cortical damage, whether by trauma or stroke, interferes with the flow of descending signals to the modular interneuronal structures of the spinal cord. These spinal modules subserve normal motor behaviors by activating groups of muscles as individual units (muscle synergies). Damage to the motor cortical areas disrupts the orchestration of the modules, resulting in abnormal movements. To gain insights into this complex process, we recorded myoelectric signals from multiple upper-limb muscles in subjects with cortical lesions. We used a factorization algorithm to identify the muscle synergies. Our factorization analysis revealed, in a quantitative way, three distinct patterns of muscle coordination-including preservation, merging, and fractionation of muscle synergies-that reflect the multiple neural responses that occur after cortical damage. These patterns varied as a function of both the severity of functional impairment and the temporal distance from stroke onset. We think these muscle-synergy patterns can be used as physiological markers of the status of any patient with stroke or trauma, thereby guiding the development of different rehabilitation approaches, as well as future physiological experiments for a further understanding of postinjury mechanisms of motor control and recovery.

  14. Decoding of covert vowel articulation using electroencephalography cortical currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsue eYoshimura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the goal of providing assistive technology for the communication impaired, we proposed electroencephalography (EEG cortical currents as a new approach for EEG-based brain-computer interface spellers. EEG cortical currents were estimated with a variational Bayesian method that uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data as a hierarchical prior. EEG and fMRI data were recorded from ten healthy participants during covert articulation of Japanese vowels /a/ and /i/, as well as during a no-imagery control task. Applying a sparse logistic regression (SLR method to classify the three tasks, mean classification accuracy using EEG cortical currents was significantly higher than that using EEG sensor signals and was also comparable to accuracies in previous studies using electrocorticography. SLR weight analysis revealed vertices of EEG cortical currents that were highly contributive to classification for each participant, and the vertices showed discriminative time series signals according to the three tasks. Furthermore, functional connectivity analysis focusing on the highly contributive vertices revealed positive and negative correlations among areas related to speech processing. As the same findings were not observed using EEG sensor signals, our results demonstrate the potential utility of EEG cortical currents not only for engineering purposes such as brain-computer interfaces but also for neuroscientific purposes such as the identification of neural signaling related to language processing.

  15. Lateral thinking, from the Hopfield model to cortical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, Athena; Russo, Eleonora; Treves, Alessandro

    2012-01-24

    Self-organizing attractor networks may comprise the building blocks for cortical dynamics, providing the basic operations of categorization, including analog-to-digital conversion, association and auto-association, which are then expressed as components of distinct cognitive functions depending on the contents of the neural codes in each region. To assess the viability of this scenario, we first review how a local cortical patch may be modeled as an attractor network, in which memory representations are not artificially stored as prescribed binary patterns of activity as in the Hopfield model, but self-organize as continuously graded patterns induced by afferent input. Recordings in macaques indicate that such cortical attractor networks may express retrieval dynamics over cognitively plausible rapid time scales, shorter than those dominated by neuronal fatigue. A cortical network encompassing many local attractor networks, and incorporating a realistic description of adaptation dynamics, may be captured by a Potts model. This network model has the capacity to engage long-range associations into sustained iterative attractor dynamics at a cortical scale, in what may be regarded as a mathematical model of spontaneous lateral thought. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neural Coding.

  16. Decoding of Covert Vowel Articulation Using Electroencephalography Cortical Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Natsue; Nishimoto, Atsushi; Belkacem, Abdelkader Nasreddine; Shin, Duk; Kambara, Hiroyuki; Hanakawa, Takashi; Koike, Yasuharu

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of providing assistive technology for the communication impaired, we proposed electroencephalography (EEG) cortical currents as a new approach for EEG-based brain-computer interface spellers. EEG cortical currents were estimated with a variational Bayesian method that uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data as a hierarchical prior. EEG and fMRI data were recorded from ten healthy participants during covert articulation of Japanese vowels /a/ and /i/, as well as during a no-imagery control task. Applying a sparse logistic regression (SLR) method to classify the three tasks, mean classification accuracy using EEG cortical currents was significantly higher than that using EEG sensor signals and was also comparable to accuracies in previous studies using electrocorticography. SLR weight analysis revealed vertices of EEG cortical currents that were highly contributive to classification for each participant, and the vertices showed discriminative time series signals according to the three tasks. Furthermore, functional connectivity analysis focusing on the highly contributive vertices revealed positive and negative correlations among areas related to speech processing. As the same findings were not observed using EEG sensor signals, our results demonstrate the potential utility of EEG cortical currents not only for engineering purposes such as brain-computer interfaces but also for neuroscientific purposes such as the identification of neural signaling related to language processing. PMID:27199638

  17. Speech identification and cortical potentials in individuals with auditory neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanaja CS

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Present study investigated the relationship between speech identification scores in quiet and parameters of cortical potentials (latency of P1, N1, and P2; and amplitude of N1/P2 in individuals with auditory neuropathy. Methods Ten individuals with auditory neuropathy (five males and five females and ten individuals with normal hearing in the age range of 12 to 39 yr participated in the study. Speech identification ability was assessed for bi-syllabic words and cortical potentials were recorded for click stimuli. Results Results revealed that in individuals with auditory neuropathy, speech identification scores were significantly poorer than that of individuals with normal hearing. Individuals with auditory neuropathy were further classified into two groups, Good Performers and Poor Performers based on their speech identification scores. It was observed that the mean amplitude of N1/P2 of Poor Performers was significantly lower than that of Good Performers and those with normal hearing. There was no significant effect of group on the latency of the peaks. Speech identification scores showed a good correlation with the amplitude of cortical potentials (N1/P2 complex but did not show a significant correlation with the latency of cortical potentials. Conclusion Results of the present study suggests that measuring the cortical potentials may offer a means for predicting perceptual skills in individuals with auditory neuropathy.

  18. Cortical activity influences geniculocortical spike efficacy in the macaque monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farran Briggs

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Thalamocortical communication is a dynamic process influenced by both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. In this study, we recorded single-unit responses from cortical neurons that received direct input from the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN to address the question of whether prior patterns of cortical activity affect the ability of LGN inputs to drive cortical responses. By examining the ongoing activity that preceded the arrival of electrically evoked spikes from the LGN, we identified a number of activity patterns that were predictive of suprathreshold communication. Namely, cortical neurons were more likely to respond to LGN stimulation when their activity levels increased to 30-40Hz and/or their activity displayed rhythmic patterns (30 ms intervals with increased power in the gamma frequency band. Cortical neurons were also more likely to respond to LGN stimulation when their activity increased 30-40 ms prior to stimulation, suggesting that the phase of gamma activity also contributes to geniculocortical communication. Based on these results, we conclude that ongoing activity in the cortex is not random, but rather organized in a manner that can influence the dynamics of thalamocortical communication.

  19. Cortical Correlates of Fitts’ Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eIfft

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fitts' law describes the fundamental trade-off between movement accuracy and speed: It states that the duration of reaching movements is a function of target size and distance. While Fitts' law has been extensively studied in ergonomics and has guided the design of human-computer interfaces, there have been few studies on its neuronal correlates. To elucidate sensorimotor cortical activity underlying Fitts’ law, we implanted two monkeys with multielectrode arrays in the primary motor (M1 and primary somatosensory (S1 cortices. The monkeys performed reaches with a joystick-controlled cursor towards targets of different size. The reaction time, movement time and movement velocity changed with target size, and M1 and S1 activity reflected these changes. Moreover, modifications of cortical activity could not be explained by changes of movement parameters alone, but required target size as an additional parameter. Neuronal representation of target size was especially prominent during the early reaction time period where it influenced the slope of the firing rate rise preceding movement initiation. During the movement period, cortical activity was mostly correlated with movement velocity. Neural decoders were applied to simultaneously decode target size and motor parameters from cortical modulations. We suggest using such classifiers to improve neuroprosthetic control.

  20. Subdural electrode recording of generalized photoepileptic responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mukundan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the spatiotemporal distribution of photic driving (PDR, photoparoxysmal (PPR, and photoconvulsive (PCR responses recorded by intracranial electrodes (ic-EEG in a patient with generalized photosensitivity and right frontal lobe cortical dysplasia. Intermittent light stimulation (ILS was performed thirteen times in nine days. Cortical responses to ILS recorded by ic-EEG were reviewed and classified as PDRs, PPRs, and PCRs. Photic driving responses were restricted to the occipital lobe at ILS frequencies below 9 Hz, spreading to the parietal and central regions at >9 Hz. Photoparoxysmal responses commonly presented as focal, medial occipital, and parietal interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs, the latter propagating to the sensorimotor cortices. Generalized IEDs were also generated in the setting of PPRs. Photoconvulsive responses, characterized by repetitive bilateral upper extremity myoclonus sustained until the end of the stimulus, were associated with propagation of the medial parieto-occipital discharge to the primary sensorimotor and supplementary area cortices, while generalized myoclonic seizures were associated with a generalized spike-and-wave discharge with an interhemispheric posterior cingulate onset sparing the sensorimotor cortices. Both types of PCR could occur during the same stimulus. Regardless of the pathway, PCRs only occurred when PDRs involved the parietal cortices. While there may be more than one pathway underlying PCRs, parietal lobe association cortices appear to be critical to their generation.

  1. Relating normalization to neuronal populations across cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Douglas A; Alberts, Joshua J; Cohen, Marlene R

    2016-09-01

    Normalization, which divisively scales neuronal responses to multiple stimuli, is thought to underlie many sensory, motor, and cognitive processes. In every study where it has been investigated, neurons measured in the same brain area under identical conditions exhibit a range of normalization, ranging from suppression by nonpreferred stimuli (strong normalization) to additive responses to combinations of stimuli (no normalization). Normalization has been hypothesized to arise from interactions between neuronal populations, either in the same or different brain areas, but current models of normalization are not mechanistic and focus on trial-averaged responses. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying normalization, we examined interactions between neurons that exhibit different degrees of normalization. We recorded from multiple neurons in three cortical areas while rhesus monkeys viewed superimposed drifting gratings. We found that neurons showing strong normalization shared less trial-to-trial variability with other neurons in the same cortical area and more variability with neurons in other cortical areas than did units with weak normalization. Furthermore, the cortical organization of normalization was not random: neurons recorded on nearby electrodes tended to exhibit similar amounts of normalization. Together, our results suggest that normalization reflects a neuron's role in its local network and that modulatory factors like normalization share the topographic organization typical of sensory tuning properties.

  2. Cortical disinhibition in diabetic patients with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, N; Altun, B U

    2009-12-01

    Motor cortex disinhibition has a role in the mechanism of neuropathic pain. The duration of the cortical silent period (CSP) is used as a measure of excitability in cortical inhibitory circuits. We investigated cortical disinhibition in diabetic patients with and without neuropathic pain. We studied diabetic patients with (n = 20) and without (n = 50) neuropathic pain, and control subjects (n = 30). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was performed on the right hemisphere at rest, and surface electromyography was recorded from the left first dorsal interosseous muscle for evaluation of motor evoked potential (MEP) latency and amplitude. CSP was recorded from the left FDI, and TMS was then delivered while the subject was performing a voluntary contraction. We showed a low resting motor threshold, a short CSP duration, and a low CSP duration/MEP amplitude ratio in patients with neuropathic pain (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001). Our findings demonstrate that diabetic patients with neuropathic pain have a cortical disinhibition.

  3. In vivo models of cortical acquired epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Soltani, Sara; Seigneur, Josée; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The neocortex is the site of origin of several forms of acquired epilepsy. Here we provide a brief review of experimental models that were recently developed to study neocortical epileptogenesis as well as some major results obtained with these methods. Most of neocortical seizures appear to be nocturnal and it is known that neuronal activities reveal high levels of synchrony during slow-wave sleep. Therefore, we start the review with a description of mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and major forms of synchronized normal and pathological activities. Then, we describe three experimental models of seizures and epileptogenesis: ketamine-xylazine anesthesia as feline seizure triggered factor, cortical undercut as cortical penetrating wound model and neocortical kindling. Besides specific technical details describing these models we also provide major features of pathological brain activities recorded during epileptogenesis and seizures. The most common feature of all models of neocortical epileptogenesis is the increased duration of network silent states that up-regulates neuronal excitability and eventually leads to epilepsy. PMID:26343530

  4. In vivo models of cortical acquired epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Soltani, Sara; Seigneur, Josée; Timofeev, Igor

    2016-02-15

    The neocortex is the site of origin of several forms of acquired epilepsy. Here we provide a brief review of experimental models that were recently developed to study neocortical epileptogenesis as well as some major results obtained with these methods. Most of neocortical seizures appear to be nocturnal and it is known that neuronal activities reveal high levels of synchrony during slow-wave sleep. Therefore, we start the review with a description of mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and major forms of synchronized normal and pathological activities. Then, we describe three experimental models of seizures and epileptogenesis: ketamine-xylazine anesthesia as feline seizure triggered factor, cortical undercut as cortical penetrating wound model and neocortical kindling. Besides specific technical details describing these models we also provide major features of pathological brain activities recorded during epileptogenesis and seizures. The most common feature of all models of neocortical epileptogenesis is the increased duration of network silent states that up-regulates neuronal excitability and eventually leads to epilepsy.

  5. Cortical myoclonus in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P D; Bhatia, K P; Brown, P; Davis, M B; Pires, M; Quinn, N P; Luthert, P; Honovar, M; O'Brien, M D; Marsden, C D

    1994-11-01

    We describe three patients with Huntington's disease, from two families, in whom myoclonus was the predominant clinical feature. The diagnosis was confirmed at autopsy in two cases and by DNA analysis in all three. These patients all presented before the age of 30 years and were the offspring of affected fathers. Neurophysiological studies documented generalised and multifocal action myoclonus of cortical origin that was strikingly stimulus sensitive, without enlargement of the cortical somatosensory evoked potential. The myoclonus improved with piracetam therapy in one patient and a combination of sodium valproate and clonazepam in the other two. Cortical reflex myoclonus is a rare but disabling component of the complex movement disorder of Huntington's disease, which may lead to substantial diagnostic difficulties.

  6. Grid cells and cortical representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Edvard I; Roudi, Yasser; Witter, Menno P; Kentros, Clifford; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Moser, May-Britt

    2014-07-01

    One of the grand challenges in neuroscience is to comprehend neural computation in the association cortices, the parts of the cortex that have shown the largest expansion and differentiation during mammalian evolution and that are thought to contribute profoundly to the emergence of advanced cognition in humans. In this Review, we use grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex as a gateway to understand network computation at a stage of cortical processing in which firing patterns are shaped not primarily by incoming sensory signals but to a large extent by the intrinsic properties of the local circuit.

  7. Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia : Cortical or non-cortical origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strien, Teun W.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Hilgevoord, Anthony A. J.; Linssen, Wim H. J. P.; Groffen, Alexander J. A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is characterized by involuntary dystonia and/or chorea triggered by a sudden movement. Cases are usually familial with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of PKD focus on the controversy whether PKD has a cortical or non-co

  8. Neural correlate of subjective sensory experience gradually builds up across cortical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lafuente, Victor; Romo, Ranulfo

    2006-01-01

    When a sensory stimulus is presented, many cortical areas are activated, but how does the representation of a sensory stimulus evolve in time and across cortical areas during a perceptual judgment? We investigated this question by analyzing the responses from single neurons, recorded in several cortical areas of parietal and frontal lobes, while trained monkeys reported the presence or absence of a mechanical vibration of varying amplitude applied to the skin of one fingertip. Here we show that the strength of the covariations between neuronal activity and perceptual judgments progressively increases across cortical areas as the activity is transmitted from the primary somatosensory cortex to the premotor areas of the frontal lobe. This finding suggests that the neuronal correlates of subjective sensory experience gradually build up across somatosensory areas of the parietal lobe and premotor cortices of the frontal lobe. PMID:16924098

  9. Influence of bromazepam on cortical interhemispheric coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Isabel; Puga, Fernanda; Veiga, Heloisa; Cagy, Maurício; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2007-03-01

    Benzodiazepines are among the most commonly prescribed medications due to their therapeutic efficacy in reducing anxiety and inducing sleep. Consequently, they have been widely employed in the pharmacological treatment of several disorders. Nevertheless, few studies have analyzed the effects of bromazepam in electroencephalographic activity (EEG). The present study aimed at investigating the modulatory effects of this drug on brain dynamics. Specifically, the effects of bromazepam (3mg) on EEG coherence were tested in a double-blind experiment. The sample, consisting of 10 healthy subjects (5 male and 5 female), was submitted to ten minutes of EEG recording. The electrophysiological measure (coherence) was analyzed across three experimental conditions: bromazepam, placebo 1, and placebo 2. Results indicate that bromazepam significantly increases cortical interhemispheric coherence.

  10. Effects of alprazolam on cortical activity and tremors in patients with essential tremor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Ibáñez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Essential tremor (ET is characterised by postural and action tremors with a frequency of 4-12 Hz. Previous studies suggest that the tremor activity originates in the cerebello-thalamocortical pathways. Alprazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that attenuates tremors in ET. The mechanisms that mediate the therapeutic action of alprazolam are unknown; however, in healthy subjects, benzodiazepines increase cortical beta activity. In this study, we investigated the effect of alprazolam both on beta and tremor-related cortical activity and on alterations in tremor presentation in ET patients. Therefore, we characterised the dynamics of tremor and cortical activity in ET patients after alprazolam intake. METHODS: We recorded hand tremors and contralateral cortical activity in four recordings before and after a single dose of alprazolam. We then computed the changes in tremors, cortico-muscular coherence, and cortical activity at the tremor frequency and in the beta band. RESULTS: Alprazolam significantly attenuated tremors (EMG: 76.2 ± 22.68%, decreased cortical activity in the tremor frequency range and increased cortical beta activity in all patients (P<0.05. At the same time, the cortico-muscular coherence at the tremor frequency became non-significant (P<0.05. We also found a significant correlation (r = 0.757, P<0.001 between the reduction in tremor severity and the increased ratio of cortical activity in the beta band to the activity observed in the tremor frequency range. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first quantitative analysis of tremor reduction following alprazolam intake. We observed that the tremor severity decreased in association with an increased ratio of beta to tremor-related cortical activity. We hypothesise that the increase in cortical beta activity may act as a blocking mechanism and may dampen the pathological oscillatory activity, which in turn attenuates the observed tremor.

  11. Detecting a cortical fingerprint of Parkinson’s disease for closed-loop neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eKern

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that deep brain stimulation (DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN in Parkinson’s disease (PD mediates its clinical effects by modulating cortical oscillatory activity, presumably via a direct cortico-subthalamic connection. This observation might pave the way for novel closed-loop approaches comprising a cortical sensor. Enhanced beta oscillations (13-35 Hz have been linked to the pathophysiology of PD and may serve as such a candidate marker to localize a cortical area reliably modulated by DBS. However, beta-oscillations are widely distributed over the cortical surface, necessitating an additional signal source for spotting the cortical area linked to the pathologically synchronized cortico-subcortical motor network.In this context, both cortico-subthalamic coherence and cortico-muscular coherence (CMC have been studied in PD patients. Whereas the former requires invasive recordings, the latter allows for non-invasive detection, but displays a rather distributed cortical synchronization pattern in motor tasks. This distributed cortical representation may conflict with the goal of detecting a cortical localization with robust biomarker properties which is detectable on a single subject basis. We propose that this limitation could be overcome when recording CMC at rest. We hypothesized that – unlike healthy subjects – PD would show CMC at rest owing to the enhanced beta oscillations observed in PD. By performing source space analysis of beta CMC recorded during resting-state magnetoencephalography, we provide preliminary evidence in one patient for a cortical hot spot that is modulated most strongly by subthalamic DBS. Such a spot would provide a prominent target region either for direct neuromodulation or for placing a potential sensor in closed-loop DBS approaches, a proposal that requires investigation in a larger cohort of PD patients.

  12. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry; McCormick, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two o...

  13. Altered cortical causality after remifentanil administration in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khodayari-Rostamabad, Ahmad; Graversen, Carina; Olesen, Soren S;

    2014-01-01

    being reproducible between the two baseline recordings, several PSI features were altered by remifentanil administration in comparison to placebo. Furthermore, several of the PSI features altered by remifentanil were correlated to changes in both CRT and pain scores. The results indicate...... that remifentanil administration influence the information flow between several brain areas. Hence, the EEG causality approach offers the potential to assist in deciphering the cortical effects of remifentanil administration....

  14. Effects of Parecoxib and Fentanyl on nociception-induced cortical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ying-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analgesics, including opioids and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs reduce postoperative pain. However, little is known about the quantitative effects of these drugs on cortical activity induced by nociceptive stimulation. The aim of the present study was to determine the neural activity in response to a nociceptive stimulus and to investigate the effects of fentanyl (an opioid agonist and parecoxib (a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor on this nociception-induced cortical activity evoked by tail pinch. Extracellular recordings (electroencephalogram and multi-unit signals were performed in the area of the anterior cingulate cortex while intracellular recordings were made in the primary somatosensory cortex. The effects of parecoxib and fentanyl on induced cortical activity were compared. Results Peripheral nociceptive stimulation in anesthetized rats produced an immediate electroencephalogram (EEG desynchronization resembling the cortical arousal (low-amplitude, fast-wave activity, while the membrane potential switched into a persistent depolarization state. The induced cortical activity was abolished by fentanyl, and the fentanyl's effect was reversed by the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. Parecoxib, on the other hand, did not significantly affect the neural activity. Conclusion Cortical activity was modulated by nociceptive stimulation in anesthetized rats. Fentanyl showed a strong inhibitory effect on the nociceptive-stimulus induced cortical activity while parecoxib had no significant effect.

  15. Wireless Cortical Brain-Machine Interface for Whole-Body Navigation in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajangam, Sankaranarayani; Tseng, Po-He; Yin, Allen; Lehew, Gary; Schwarz, David; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2016-03-01

    Several groups have developed brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs) that allow primates to use cortical activity to control artificial limbs. Yet, it remains unknown whether cortical ensembles could represent the kinematics of whole-body navigation and be used to operate a BMI that moves a wheelchair continuously in space. Here we show that rhesus monkeys can learn to navigate a robotic wheelchair, using their cortical activity as the main control signal. Two monkeys were chronically implanted with multichannel microelectrode arrays that allowed wireless recordings from ensembles of premotor and sensorimotor cortical neurons. Initially, while monkeys remained seated in the robotic wheelchair, passive navigation was employed to train a linear decoder to extract 2D wheelchair kinematics from cortical activity. Next, monkeys employed the wireless BMI to translate their cortical activity into the robotic wheelchair’s translational and rotational velocities. Over time, monkeys improved their ability to navigate the wheelchair toward the location of a grape reward. The navigation was enacted by populations of cortical neurons tuned to whole-body displacement. During practice with the apparatus, we also noticed the presence of a cortical representation of the distance to reward location. These results demonstrate that intracranial BMIs could restore whole-body mobility to severely paralyzed patients in the future.

  16. Maximizing Sensory Dynamic Range by Tuning the Cortical State to Criticality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shree Hari Gautam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of interactions among neurons can manifest as dramatic changes in the state of population dynamics in cerebral cortex. How such transitions in cortical state impact the information processing performed by cortical circuits is not clear. Here we performed experiments and computational modeling to determine how somatosensory dynamic range depends on cortical state. We used microelectrode arrays to record ongoing and whisker stimulus-evoked population spiking activity in somatosensory cortex of urethane anesthetized rats. We observed a continuum of different cortical states; at one extreme population activity exhibited small scale variability and was weakly correlated, the other extreme had large scale fluctuations and strong correlations. In experiments, shifts along the continuum often occurred naturally, without direct manipulation. In addition, in both the experiment and the model we directly tuned the cortical state by manipulating inhibitory synaptic interactions. Our principal finding was that somatosensory dynamic range was maximized in a specific cortical state, called criticality, near the tipping point midway between the ends of the continuum. The optimal cortical state was uniquely characterized by scale-free ongoing population dynamics and moderate correlations, in line with theoretical predictions about criticality. However, to reproduce our experimental findings, we found that existing theory required modifications which account for activity-dependent depression. In conclusion, our experiments indicate that in vivo sensory dynamic range is maximized near criticality and our model revealed an unanticipated role for activity-dependent depression in this basic principle of cortical function.

  17. Maximizing Sensory Dynamic Range by Tuning the Cortical State to Criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Shree Hari; Hoang, Thanh T.; McClanahan, Kylie; Grady, Stephen K.; Shew, Woodrow L.

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of interactions among neurons can manifest as dramatic changes in the state of population dynamics in cerebral cortex. How such transitions in cortical state impact the information processing performed by cortical circuits is not clear. Here we performed experiments and computational modeling to determine how somatosensory dynamic range depends on cortical state. We used microelectrode arrays to record ongoing and whisker stimulus-evoked population spiking activity in somatosensory cortex of urethane anesthetized rats. We observed a continuum of different cortical states; at one extreme population activity exhibited small scale variability and was weakly correlated, the other extreme had large scale fluctuations and strong correlations. In experiments, shifts along the continuum often occurred naturally, without direct manipulation. In addition, in both the experiment and the model we directly tuned the cortical state by manipulating inhibitory synaptic interactions. Our principal finding was that somatosensory dynamic range was maximized in a specific cortical state, called criticality, near the tipping point midway between the ends of the continuum. The optimal cortical state was uniquely characterized by scale-free ongoing population dynamics and moderate correlations, in line with theoretical predictions about criticality. However, to reproduce our experimental findings, we found that existing theory required modifications which account for activity-dependent depression. In conclusion, our experiments indicate that in vivo sensory dynamic range is maximized near criticality and our model revealed an unanticipated role for activity-dependent depression in this basic principle of cortical function. PMID:26623645

  18. Chronic imaging of cortical sensory map dynamics using a genetically encoded calcium indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minderer, Matthias; Liu, Wenrui; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Kügler, Sebastian; Helmchen, Fritjof; Margolis, David J

    2012-01-01

    In vivo optical imaging can reveal the dynamics of large-scale cortical activity, but methods for chronic recording are limited. Here we present a technique for long-term investigation of cortical map dynamics using wide-field ratiometric fluorescence imaging of the genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) Yellow Cameleon 3.60. We find that wide-field GECI signals report sensory-evoked activity in anaesthetized mouse somatosensory cortex with high sensitivity and spatiotemporal precision, and furthermore, can be measured repeatedly in separate imaging sessions over multiple weeks. This method opens new possibilities for the longitudinal study of stability and plasticity of cortical sensory representations.

  19. Control of Somatosensory Cortical Processing by Thalamic Posterior Medial Nucleus: A New Role of Thalamus in Cortical Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Castejon

    Full Text Available Current knowledge of thalamocortical interaction comes mainly from studying lemniscal thalamic systems. Less is known about paralemniscal thalamic nuclei function. In the vibrissae system, the posterior medial nucleus (POm is the corresponding paralemniscal nucleus. POm neurons project to L1 and L5A of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1 in the rat brain. It is known that L1 modifies sensory-evoked responses through control of intracortical excitability suggesting that L1 exerts an influence on whisker responses. Therefore, thalamocortical pathways targeting L1 could modulate cortical firing. Here, using a combination of electrophysiology and pharmacology in vivo, we have sought to determine how POm influences cortical processing. In our experiments, single unit recordings performed in urethane-anesthetized rats showed that POm imposes precise control on the magnitude and duration of supra- and infragranular barrel cortex whisker responses. Our findings demonstrated that L1 inputs from POm imposed a time and intensity dependent regulation on cortical sensory processing. Moreover, we found that blocking L1 GABAergic inhibition or blocking P/Q-type Ca2+ channels in L1 prevents POm adjustment of whisker responses in the barrel cortex. Additionally, we found that POm was also controlling the sensory processing in S2 and this regulation was modulated by corticofugal activity from L5 in S1. Taken together, our data demonstrate the determinant role exerted by the POm in the adjustment of somatosensory cortical processing and in the regulation of cortical processing between S1 and S2. We propose that this adjustment could be a thalamocortical gain regulation mechanism also present in the processing of information between cortical areas.

  20. Control of Somatosensory Cortical Processing by Thalamic Posterior Medial Nucleus: A New Role of Thalamus in Cortical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejon, Carlos; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Current knowledge of thalamocortical interaction comes mainly from studying lemniscal thalamic systems. Less is known about paralemniscal thalamic nuclei function. In the vibrissae system, the posterior medial nucleus (POm) is the corresponding paralemniscal nucleus. POm neurons project to L1 and L5A of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in the rat brain. It is known that L1 modifies sensory-evoked responses through control of intracortical excitability suggesting that L1 exerts an influence on whisker responses. Therefore, thalamocortical pathways targeting L1 could modulate cortical firing. Here, using a combination of electrophysiology and pharmacology in vivo, we have sought to determine how POm influences cortical processing. In our experiments, single unit recordings performed in urethane-anesthetized rats showed that POm imposes precise control on the magnitude and duration of supra- and infragranular barrel cortex whisker responses. Our findings demonstrated that L1 inputs from POm imposed a time and intensity dependent regulation on cortical sensory processing. Moreover, we found that blocking L1 GABAergic inhibition or blocking P/Q-type Ca2+ channels in L1 prevents POm adjustment of whisker responses in the barrel cortex. Additionally, we found that POm was also controlling the sensory processing in S2 and this regulation was modulated by corticofugal activity from L5 in S1. Taken together, our data demonstrate the determinant role exerted by the POm in the adjustment of somatosensory cortical processing and in the regulation of cortical processing between S1 and S2. We propose that this adjustment could be a thalamocortical gain regulation mechanism also present in the processing of information between cortical areas. PMID:26820514

  1. Chronic imaging of cortical sensory map dynamics using a genetically encoded calcium indicator

    OpenAIRE

    Minderer, M; Liu, W.; Sumanovski, L. T.; Kügler, S; Helmchen, F; Margolis, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract  In vivo optical imaging can reveal the dynamics of large-scale cortical activity, but methods for chronic recording are limited. Here we present a technique for long-term investigation of cortical map dynamics using wide-field ratiometric fluorescence imaging of the genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) Yellow Cameleon 3.60. We find that wide-field GECI signals report sensory-evoked activity in anaesthetized mouse somatosensory cortex with high sensitivity and spatiotemporal ...

  2. Multimodal Sensory Responses of Nucleus Reticularis Gigantocellularis and the Responses' Relation to Cortical and Motor Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Eugene M.; Pavlides, Constantine; Pfaff, Donald

    2010-01-01

    The connectivity of large neurons of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) in the medullary reticular formation potentially allows both for the integration of stimuli, in several modalities, that would demand immediate action, and for coordinated activation of cortical and motoric activity. We have simultaneously recorded cortical local field potentials, neck muscle electromyograph (EMG), and the neural activity of medullary NRGc neurons in unrestrained, unanesthetized rats to dete...

  3. Mapping the motor and sensory cortices: a historical look and a current case study in sensorimotor localization and direct cortical motor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Justin

    2012-03-01

    The utilization of cortical mapping during craniotomies for epilepsy and brain tumor resection is extremely important. Cortical mapping can guide the surgical team intraoperatively with regards to the layout of important anatomical structures and their function to prevent post-operative deficits. Electroneurophysiological methods employed include sensorimotor localization recorded directly from the surface of the brain when stimulated from a peripheral nerve and direct cortical stimulation (DCS) of the motor cortex to elicit a distal muscle response. This paper presents a case, in which a paradigm of neurophysiological modalities is utilized to assist the surgeon in creating a topographic map of the motor cortex and with localizing the sensory and motor cortices, in addition to a historical review of functional localization.

  4. Records Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — All Federal Agencies are required to prescribe an appropriate records maintenance program so that complete records are filed or otherwise preserved, records can be...

  5. Motor cortical thresholds and cortical silent periods in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Ozkiziltan, Safa; Baklan, Baris

    2004-10-01

    We studied motor cortical thresholds (TIs) and cortical silent periods (SPs) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in 110 epileptic patients. Sixty-two had primary generalised, 48 had partial type seizures. Fifteen out 110 patients were analysed both before and after anticonvulsant medication. Our aims were to evaluate the TI levels and the duration of SPs in patients with epilepsy and to determine the reliability of TMS in patients with epilepsy. There was no negative effect of TMS on the clinical status and EEG findings in patients with epilepsy. TIs obtained from patients with partial epilepsy were higher than those obtained from both controls and primary epileptics. The duration of SP in patients with primary epileptics was more prolonged than those obtained from controls. There was no correlation between EEG lateralisation and both SP duration and TI values. In de novo patient group, SP duration was significantly prolonged after anticonvulsant medication. We concluded that TMS is a reliable electrophysiological investigation in patients with epilepsy. The analysis of SP duration may be an appropriate investigation in monitoring the effect of anticonvulsant medication on the cortical inhibitory activity.

  6. Functional Doppler optical coherence tomography for cortical blood flow imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Liu, Gangjun; Nguyen, Elaine; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    Optical methods have been widely used in basic neuroscience research to study the cerebral blood flow dynamics in order to overcome the low spatial resolution associated with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. Although laser Doppler imaging and laser speckle imaging can map out en face cortical hemodynamics and columns, depth resolution is not available. Two-photon microscopy has been used for mapping cortical activity. However, flow measurement requires fluorescent dye injection, which can be problematic. The noninvasive and high resolution tomographic capabilities of optical coherence tomography make it a promising technique for mapping depth resolved cortical blood flow. Here, we present a functional Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging modality for quantitative evaluation of cortical blood flow in a mouse model. Fast, repeated, Doppler OCT scans across a vessel of interest were performed to record flow dynamic information with a high temporal resolution of the cardiac cycles. Spectral Doppler analysis of continuous Doppler images demonstrates how the velocity components and longitudinally projected flow-volume-rate change over time, thereby providing complementary temporal flow information to the spatially distributed flow information of Doppler OCT. The proposed functional Doppler OCT imaging modality can be used to diagnose vessel stenosis/blockage or monitor blood flow changes due to pharmacological agents/neuronal activities. Non-invasive in-vivo mice experiments were performed to verify the capabilities of function Doppler OCT.

  7. Environmental enrichment modulates cortico-cortical interactions in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Di Garbo

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment (EE is an experimental protocol based on a complex sensorimotor stimulation that dramatically affects brain development. While it is widely believed that the effects of EE result from the unique combination of different sensory and motor stimuli, it is not known whether and how cortico-cortical interactions are shaped by EE. Since the primary visual cortex (V1 is one of the best characterized targets of EE, we looked for direct cortico-cortical projections impinging on V1, and we identified a direct monosynaptic connection between motor cortex and V1 in the mouse brain. To measure the interactions between these areas under standard and EE rearing conditions, we used simultaneous recordings of local field potentials (LFPs in awake, freely moving animals. LFP signals were analyzed by using different methods of linear and nonlinear analysis of time series (cross-correlation, mutual information, phase synchronization. We found that EE decreases the level of coupling between the electrical activities of the two cortical regions with respect to the control group. From a functional point of view, our results indicate, for the first time, that an enhanced sensorimotor experience impacts on the brain by affecting the functional crosstalk between different cortical areas.

  8. Homeostatic responses by surviving cortical pyramidal cells in neurodegenerative tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimins, Johanna L; Rocher, Anne B; Peters, Alan; Shultz, Penny; Lewis, Jada; Luebke, Jennifer I

    2011-11-01

    Cortical neuron death is prevalent by 9 months in rTg(tau(P301L))4510 tau mutant mice (TG) and surviving pyramidal cells exhibit dendritic regression and spine loss. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to investigate the impact of these marked structural changes on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) of layer 3 pyramidal cells in frontal cortical slices from behaviorally characterized TG and non-transgenic (NT) mice at this age. Frontal lobe function of TG mice was intact following a short delay interval but impaired following a long delay interval in an object recognition test, and cortical atrophy and cell loss were pronounced. Surviving TG cells had significantly reduced dendritic diameters, total spine density, and mushroom spines, yet sEPSCs were increased and sIPSCs were unchanged in frequency. Thus, despite significant regressive structural changes, synaptic responses were not reduced in TG cells, indicating that homeostatic compensatory mechanisms occur during progressive tauopathy. Consistent with this idea, surviving TG cells were more intrinsically excitable than NT cells, and exhibited sprouting of filopodia and axonal boutons. Moreover, the neuropil in TG mice showed an increased density of asymmetric synapses, although their mean size was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that during progressive tauopathy, cortical pyramidal cells compensate for loss of afferent input by increased excitability and establishment of new synapses. These compensatory homeostatic mechanisms may play an important role in slowing the progression of neuronal network dysfunction during neurodegenerative tauopathies.

  9. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Timme

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree or sends out (out-degree. To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to

  10. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Cortical sensorimotor integration: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuev, A S

    1989-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed that neocortex is constructed from structural neuronal modules (columns and rings). Each module is considered as unit for cortical sensorimotor integration. Complex functional relationships between modules can be arranged by intracortical inhibition participation. High pronounced neocortical plasticity ensures the process of continuous formation of various dominating operative constellations comprising stable neuronal modules whose component structure and distributive characteristic are determined by the dominant motivation and the central motor program.

  12. [Parietal Cortices and Body Information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Eiichi; Amemiya, Kaoru; Morita, Tomoyo

    2016-11-01

    Proprioceptive signals originating from skeletal muscles and joints contribute to the formation of both the human body schema and the body image. In this chapter, we introduce various types of bodily illusions that are elicited by proprioceptive inputs, and we discuss distinct functions implemented by different parietal cortices. First, we illustrate the primary importance of the motor network in the processing of proprioceptive (kinesthetic) signals originating from muscle spindles. Next, we argue that the right inferior parietal cortex, in concert with the inferior frontal cortex (both regions connected by the inferior branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus-SLF III), may be involved in the conscious experience of body image. Further, we hypothesize other functions of distinct parietal regions: the association between internal hand motor representation with external object representation in the left inferior parietal cortex, visuo-kinesthetic processing in the bilateral posterior parietal cortices, and the integration of somatic signals from different body parts in the higher-order somatosensory parietal cortices. Our results indicate that a distinct parietal region, in concert with its anatomically and functionally connected frontal regions, probably plays specialized roles in the processing of body-related information.

  13. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the development of neural network activity using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multi-well MEA plates (mwMEAs) over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures made from postnatal rats, action potential spiking activity was essentially absent on DIV 2 and developed rapidly between DIV 5 and 12. Spiking activity was primarily sporadic and unorganized at early DIV, and became progressively more organized with time in culture, with bursting parameters, synchrony and network bursting increasing between DIV 5 and 12. We selected 12 features to describe network activity and principal components analysis using these features demonstrated a general segregation of data by age at both the well and plate levels. Using a combination of random forest classifiers and Support Vector Machines, we demonstrated that 4 features (CV of within burst ISI, CV of IBI, network spike rate and burst rate) were sufficient to predict the age (either DIV 5, 7, 9 or 12) of each well recording with >65% accuracy. When restricting the classification problem to a binary decision, we found that classification improved dramatically, e.g. 95% accuracy for discriminating DIV 5 vs DIV 12 wells. Further, we present a novel resampling approach to determine the number of wells that might be needed for conducting comparisons of different treatments using mwMEA plates. Overall, these results demonstrate that network development on mwMEA plates is similar to

  14. Cortical hyperexcitability and the split-hand plus phenomenon: pathophysiological insights in ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong Seok; Menon, Parvathi; Mioshi, Eneida; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-06-01

    Preferential involvement of thenar muscles compared to flexor pollicis longus (FPL), termed 'the split-hand plus sign', appears to be a clinical feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In an attempt to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this clinical phenomenon, threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques were utilized to assess whether cortical mechanisms may be a significant contributing influence. Cortical excitability studies were undertaken on 17 ALS patients, with motor evoked potentials (MEP) recorded from thenar muscles and FPL. Split-hand plus index (SHPI) was derived by dividing motor amplitudes recorded over APB with those recorded over FPL. Results showed the SHPI was significantly reduced in ALS (SHPIALS 0.87 ± 0.12; SHPICONTROLS 1.7 ± 0.2, p < 0.001). Cortical studies disclosed significant increases in MEP amplitudes recorded over thenar muscles (p < 0.05) but not FPL (p = 0.11), and were significantly correlated with the SHPI (R = -0.83, p < 0.01). The cortical silent period duration was reduced from thenar muscles (p < 0.01). Although there was a ubiquitous reduction in short-interval intracortical inhibition (APB, p < 0.01; FPL < 0.05), this reduction was more prominent over the thenar muscles. In conclusion, findings from the present study suggest that cortical dysfunction in the form of hyperexcitability contributes to the pathophysiological basis of the split-hand plus sign in ALS.

  15. Endocannabinoid modulation of cortical up-states and NREM sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Pava

    Full Text Available Up-/down-state transitions are a form of network activity observed when sensory input into the cortex is diminished such as during non-REM sleep. Up-states emerge from coordinated signaling between glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses and are modulated by systems that affect the balance between inhibition and excitation. We hypothesized that the endocannabinoid (EC system, a neuromodulatory system intrinsic to the cortical microcircuitry, is an important regulator of up-states and sleep. To test this hypothesis, up-states were recorded from layer V/VI pyramidal neurons in organotypic cultures of wild-type or CB1R knockout (KO mouse prefrontal cortex. Activation of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1 with exogenous agonists or by blocking metabolism of endocannabinoids, anandamide or 2-arachidonoyl glycerol, increased up-state amplitude and facilitated action potential discharge during up-states. The CB1 agonist also produced a layer II/III-selective reduction in synaptic GABAergic signaling that may underlie its effects on up-state amplitude and spiking. Application of CB1 antagonists revealed that an endogenous EC tone regulates up-state duration. Paradoxically, the duration of up-states in CB1 KO cultures was increased suggesting that chronic absence of EC signaling alters cortical activity. Consistent with increased cortical excitability, CB1 KO mice exhibited increased wakefulness as a result of reduced NREM sleep and NREM bout duration. Under baseline conditions, NREM delta (0.5-4 Hz power was not different in CB1 KO mice, but during recovery from forced sleep deprivation, KO mice had reduced NREM delta power and increased sleep fragmentation. Overall, these findings demonstrate that the EC system actively regulates cortical up-states and important features of NREM sleep such as its duration and low frequency cortical oscillations.

  16. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area.

  17. Self-organizing model of motor cortical activities during drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Siming H.; Si, Jennie; Schwartz, Andrew B.

    1996-05-01

    The population vector algorithm has been developed to combine the simultaneous direction- related activities of a population of motor cortical neurons to predict the trajectory of the arm movement. In our study, we consider a self-organizing model of a neural representation of the arm trajectory based on neuronal discharge rates. Self-organizing feature mapping (SOFM) is used to select the optimal set of weights in the model to determine the contribution of individual neuron to the overall movement. The correspondence between the movement directions and the discharge patterns of the motor cortical neurons is established in the output map. The topology preserving property of the SOFM is used to analyze real recorded data of a behavior monkey. The data used in this analysis were taken while the monkey was drawing spirals and doing the center out movement. Using such a statistical model, the monkey's arm moving directions could be well predicted based on the motor cortex neuronal firing information.

  18. The unimodal distribution of sub-threshold, ongoing activity in cortical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat eYaron-Jakoubovitch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of the subthreshold, ongoing-activity in cortical neurons has been the focus of numerous studies. This activity, described as spontaneous slow waves in membrane potential, has been observed in a span of species in diverse cortical and subcortical areas. We here characterized membrane potential fluctuations in motor and the frontal association cortices cortical neurons of ketamine-xylazine anesthetized rats. We recorded from 95 neurons from a range of cortical depths to unravel the network and cellular mechanisms that shape the subthreshold ongoing spontaneous activity of these neurons. We define a unitary event that generates the sub-threshold ongoing activity: Giant Synaptic Potentials (GSPs. These events have a duration of 87 ± 50 ms and an amplitude of 19 ± 6.4 mV. They occur at a frequency of 3.7 ± 0.8 Hz and involve an increase in conductance change of 22 ± 21%. GSPs are mainly due to excitatory activity that occurs throughout all cortical layers, unaffected by the intrinsic properties of the cells. Indeed, blocking the GABAA receptors, a procedure that had a profound effect on cortical activity, did not alter these unitary events. We propose that this unitary event is composed of individual, excitatory synaptic potentials that appear at different levels of synchrony and that the level of synchrony determines the shape of the subthreshold activity.

  19. Cortical modulation of short-latency TMS-evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica eVeniero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation - electroencephalogram (TMS-EEG co-registration offers the opportunity to test reactivity of brain areas across distinct conditions through TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs. Several TEPs have been described, their functional meaning being largely unknown. In particular, short-latency potentials peaking at 5 (P5 and 8 (N8 ms after the TMS pulse have been recently described, but because of their huge amplitude, the problem of whether their origin is cortical or not has been opened. To gain information about these components, we employed a protocol that modulates primary motor cortex excitability (MI through an exclusively cortical phenomena: low frequency stimulation of premotor area (PMC. TMS was applied simultaneously with EEG recording from 70 electrodes. Amplitude of TEPs evoked by 200 single-pulses TMS delivered over MI at 110% of resting motor threshold was measured before and after applying 900 TMS conditioning stimuli to left premotor cortex with 1 Hz repetition rate. Single subject analyses showed reduction in TEPs amplitude after PMC conditioning in a sample of participants and increase in TEPs amplitude in two subjects. No effects were found on corticospinal excitability as recorded by motor evoked potentials (MEPs. Furthermore, correlation analysis showed an inverse relation between the effects of the conditioning protocol on P5-N8 complex amplitude and MEPs amplitude. Because the effects of the used protocol have been ascribed to a cortical interaction between premotor area and MI, we suggest that despite the sign of P5-N8 amplitude modulation is not consistent across participant, this modulation could indicate, at least in part, their cortical origin. We conclude that with an accurate experimental procedure early-latency components can be used to evaluate the reactivity of the stimulated cortex.

  20. Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton on cortical surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y; Thompson, P M; Dinov, I; Toga, A W

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to construct graphical representations of cortical folding patterns by computing skeletons on triangulated cortical surfaces. In our approach, a cortical surface is first partitioned into sulcal and gyral regions via the solution of a variational problem using graph cuts, which can guarantee global optimality. After that, we extend the method of Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton [1] to subsets of triangulated surfaces, together with a geometrically intuitive pruning process that can trade off between skeleton complexity and the completeness of representing folding patterns. Compared with previous work that uses skeletons of 3-D volumes to represent sulcal patterns, the skeletons on cortical surfaces can be easily decomposed into branches and provide a simpler way to construct graphical representations of cortical morphometry. In our experiments, we demonstrate our method on two different cortical surface models, its ability of capturing major sulcal patterns and its application to compute skeletons of gyral regions.

  1. Disorders of cortical formation: MR imaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razek, A A K; Kandell, A Y; Elsorogy, L G; Elmongy, A; Basett, A A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the embryologic stages of the cerebral cortex, illustrate the classification of disorders of cortical formation, and finally describe the main MR imaging features of these disorders. Disorders of cortical formation are classified according to the embryologic stage of the cerebral cortex at which the abnormality occurred. MR imaging shows diminished cortical thickness and sulcation in microcephaly, enlarged dysplastic cortex in hemimegalencephaly, and ipsilateral focal cortical thickening with radial hyperintense bands in focal cortical dysplasia. MR imaging detects smooth brain in classic lissencephaly, the nodular cortex with cobblestone cortex with congenital muscular dystrophy, and the ectopic position of the gray matter with heterotopias. MR imaging can detect polymicrogyria and related syndromes as well as the types of schizencephaly. We concluded that MR imaging is essential to demonstrate the morphology, distribution, and extent of different disorders of cortical formation as well as the associated anomalies and related syndromes.

  2. Cortical stimulation and tooth pulp evoked potentials in rats: a model of direct anti-nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusina, Robert; Barek, Stephane; Vaculin, Simon; Azérad, Jean; Rokyta, Richard

    2010-01-01

    While the effect of cortex stimulation on pain control is widely accepted, its physiological basis remains poorly understood. We chose an animal model of pain to study the influence of sensorimotor cortex stimulation on tooth pulp stimulation evoked potentials (TPEPs). Fifteen awake rats implanted with tooth pulp, cerebral cortex, and digastric muscle electrodes were divided into three groups, receiving 60 Hz, 40 Hz and no cortical stimulation, respectively. TPEPs were recorded before, one, three and five hours after continuous stimulation. We observed an inverse relationship between TPEP amplitude and latency with increasing tooth pulp stimulation. The amplitudes of the early components of TPEPs increased and their latency decreased with increasing tooth pulp stimulation intensity. Cortical stimulation decreased the amplitude of TPEPs; however, neither the latencies of TPEPs nor the jaw-opening reflex were changed after cortical stimulation. The decrease in amplitude of TPEPs after cortical stimulation may reflect its anti-nociceptive effect.

  3. Thalamo-cortical projections to the posterior parietal cortex in the monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Ryuichi; Kyuhou, Shin-ichi; Matsuura-Nakao, Kazuko; Gemba, Hisae

    2004-01-23

    Thalamo-cortical projections to the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) were investigated electrophysiologically in the monkey. Cortical field potentials evoked by the thalamic stimulation were recorded with electrodes chronically implanted on the cortical surface and at a 2.0-3.0 mm cortical depth in the PPC. The stimulation of the nucleus lateralis posterior (LP), nucleus ventralis posterior lateralis pars caudalis (VPLc), and nucleus pulvinaris lateralis (Pul.l) and medialis (Pul.m) induced surface-negative, depth-positive potentials in the PPC. The LP and VPLc projected mainly to the superior parietal lobule (SPL) and the anterior bank of the intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and the Pul.m mainly to the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and the posterior bank of the IPS. The Pul.l had projections to all of the SPL, the IPL and both the banks. The significance of the projections is discussed in connection with motor functions.

  4. A Rare Hydrocephalus Complication: Cortical Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Emre; Göçmen, Rahşan; Işıkay, Ayşe İlksen; Tekşam, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Cortical blindness related to bilateral occipital lobe infarction is an extremely rare complication of hydrocephalus. Compression of the posterior cerebral artery, secondary to tentorial herniation, is the cause of occipital infarction. Particularly in children and mentally ill patients, cortical blindness may be missed. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is important. We present herein a child of ventricular shunt malfunction complicated by cortical blindness.

  5. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  6. Decreased cortical inhibition and yet cerebellar pathology in 'familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; Bour, Lo J.; Edwards, Mark J.; Brown, Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Rozemuller-Kwakkel, Johanna M.; Koehler, Peter J.; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Rothwell, John C.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Cortical hyperexcitability is a feature of "familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy" (FCMTE). However, neuropathological investigations in a single FCMTE patient showed isolated cerebellar pathology. Pathological investigations in a second FCMTE patient, reported here, confirmed cerebellar

  7. Negative Correlations in Visual Cortical Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chelaru, Mircea I; Dragoi, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    .... Whereas positive noise correlations have been extensively studied using experimental and theoretical tools, the functional role of negative correlations in cortical circuits has remained elusive...

  8. Rich-Club Organization in Effective Connectivity among Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimono, Masanori; Ito, Shinya; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Timme, Nicholas; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Lapish, Christopher C.; Tosi, Zachary; Hottowy, Pawel; Smith, Wesley C.; Masmanidis, Sotiris C.; Litke, Alan M.; Sporns, Olaf; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of complex networks, like the brain, depends on how effectively their elements communicate. Despite the importance of communication, it is virtually unknown how information is transferred in local cortical networks, consisting of hundreds of closely spaced neurons. To address this, it is important to record simultaneously from hundreds of neurons at a spacing that matches typical axonal connection distances, and at a temporal resolution that matches synaptic delays. We used a 512-electrode array (60 μm spacing) to record spontaneous activity at 20 kHz from up to 500 neurons simultaneously in slice cultures of mouse somatosensory cortex for 1 h at a time. We applied a previously validated version of transfer entropy to quantify information transfer. Similar to in vivo reports, we found an approximately lognormal distribution of firing rates. Pairwise information transfer strengths also were nearly lognormally distributed, similar to reports of synaptic strengths. Some neurons transferred and received much more information than others, which is consistent with previous predictions. Neurons with the highest outgoing and incoming information transfer were more strongly connected to each other than chance, thus forming a “rich club.” We found similar results in networks recorded in vivo from rodent cortex, suggesting the generality of these findings. A rich-club structure has been found previously in large-scale human brain networks and is thought to facilitate communication between cortical regions. The discovery of a small, but information-rich, subset of neurons within cortical regions suggests that this population will play a vital role in communication, learning, and memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many studies have focused on communication networks between cortical brain regions. In contrast, very few studies have examined communication networks within a cortical region. This is the first study to combine such a large number of neurons (several

  9. Gyrification from constrained cortical expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Biggins, John S; Mahadevan, L

    2015-01-01

    The exterior of the mammalian brain - the cerebral cortex - has a conserved layered structure whose thickness varies little across species. However, selection pressures over evolutionary time scales have led to cortices that have a large surface area to volume ratio in some organisms, with the result that the brain is strongly convoluted into sulci and gyri. Here we show that the gyrification can arise as a nonlinear consequence of a simple mechanical instability driven by tangential expansion of the gray matter constrained by the white matter. A physical mimic of the process using a layered swelling gel captures the essence of the mechanism, and numerical simulations of the brain treated as a soft solid lead to the formation of cusped sulci and smooth gyri similar to those in the brain. The resulting gyrification patterns are a function of relative cortical expansion and relative thickness (compared with brain size), and are consistent with observations of a wide range of brains, ranging from smooth to highl...

  10. Cortical control of facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müri, René M

    2016-06-01

    The present Review deals with the motor control of facial expressions in humans. Facial expressions are a central part of human communication. Emotional face expressions have a crucial role in human nonverbal behavior, allowing a rapid transfer of information between individuals. Facial expressions can be either voluntarily or emotionally controlled. Recent studies in nonhuman primates and humans have revealed that the motor control of facial expressions has a distributed neural representation. At least five cortical regions on the medial and lateral aspects of each hemisphere are involved: the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area on the medial wall, and the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex. The results of studies in humans and nonhuman primates suggest that the innervation of the face is bilaterally controlled for the upper part and mainly contralaterally controlled for the lower part. Furthermore, the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area are essential for the voluntary control of facial expressions. In contrast, the cingulate cortical areas are important for emotional expression, because they receive input from different structures of the limbic system.

  11. SLEEP AND OLFACTORY CORTICAL PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eBarnes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many systems, sleep plays a vital role in memory consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. These processes together help store information of biological significance and reset synaptic circuits to facilitate acquisition of information in the future. In this review, we describe recent evidence of sleep-dependent changes in olfactory system structure and function which contribute to odor memory and perception. During slow-wave sleep, the piriform cortex becomes hypo-responsive to odor stimulation and instead displays sharp-wave activity similar to that observed within the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and other cortical and limbic regions is enhanced during slow-wave sleep compared to waking. This combination of conditions may allow odor memory consolidation to occur during a state of reduced external interference and facilitate association of odor memories with stored hedonic and contextual cues. Evidence consistent with sleep-dependent odor replay within olfactory cortical circuits is presented. These data suggest that both the strength and precision of odor memories is sleep-dependent. The work further emphasizes the critical role of synaptic plasticity and memory in not only odor memory but also basic odor perception. The work also suggests a possible link between sleep disturbances that are frequently co-morbid with a wide range of pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression and the known olfactory impairments associated with those disorders.

  12. Oscillatory Hierarchy Controlling Cortical Excitability and Stimulus Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; McGinnis, T.; O'Connell, N.; Mills, A.; Knuth, K. H.; Chen, C.; Karmos, G.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Cortical gamma band oscillations have been recorded in sensory cortices of cats and monkeys, and are thought to aid in perceptual binding. Gamma activity has also been recorded in the rat hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, where it has been shown, that field gamma power is modulated at theta frequency. Since the power of gamma activity in the sensory cortices is not constant (gamma-bursts). we decided to examine the relationship between gamma power and the phase of low frequency oscillation in the auditory cortex of the awake macaque. Macaque monkeys were surgically prepared for chronic awake electrophysiological recording. During the time of the experiments. linear array multielectrodes were inserted in area AI to obtain laminar current source density (CSD) and multiunit activity profiles. Instantaneous theta and gamma power and phase was extracted by applying the Morlet wavelet transformation to the CSD. Gamma power was averaged for every 1 degree of low frequency oscillations to calculate power-phase relation. Both gamma and theta-delta power are largest in the supragranular layers. Power modulation of gamma activity is phase locked to spontaneous, as well as stimulus-related local theta and delta field oscillations. Our analysis also revealed that the power of theta oscillations is always largest at a certain phase of delta oscillation. Auditory stimuli produce evoked responses in the theta band (Le., there is pre- to post-stimulus addition of theta power), but there is also indication that stimuli may cause partial phase re-setting of spontaneous delta (and thus also theta and gamma) oscillations. We also show that spontaneous oscillations might play a role in the processing of incoming sensory signals by 'preparing' the cortex.

  13. Intraoperative imaging of cortical cerebral perfusion by time-resolved thermography and multivariate data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Gerald; Sobottka, Stephan B.; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to cortical perfusion imaging is demonstrated using high-sensitivity thermography in conjunction with multivariate statistical data analysis. Local temperature changes caused by a cold bolus are imaged and transferred to a false color image. A cold bolus of 10 ml saline at ice temperature is injected systemically via a central venous access. During the injection, a sequence of 735 thermographic images are recorded within 2 min. The recorded data cube is subjected to a principal component analysis (PCA) to select slight changes of the cortical temperature caused by the cold bolus. PCA reveals that 11 s after injection the temperature of blood vessels is shortly decreased followed by an increase to the temperature before the cold bolus is injected. We demonstrate the potential of intraoperative thermography in combination with multivariate data analysis to image cortical cerebral perfusion without any markers. We provide the first in vivo application of multivariate thermographic imaging.

  14. Impact of spinal manipulation on cortical drive to upper and lower limb muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavik, Heidi; Niazi, Imran Khan; Jochumsen, Mads;

    2017-01-01

    different days. During two separate days, lower limb TMS I/O curves and MRCPs were recorded from tibialis anterior muscle (TA) pre and post spinal manipulation. Dependent measures were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance, with p set at 0.05. Spinal manipulation resulted in a 54.5% ± 93...... (PN). The results of this study show that spinal manipulation leads to changes in cortical excitability, as measured by significantly larger MEPmax for TMS induced input-output curves for both an upper and lower limb muscle, and with larger amplitudes of MRCP component post manipulation. No changes......This study investigates whether spinal manipulation leads to changes in motor control by measuring the recruitment pattern of motor units in both an upper and lower limb muscle and to see whether such changes may at least in part occur at the cortical level by recording movement related cortical...

  15. Broadband cortical desynchronization underlies the human psychedelic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Moran, Rosalyn J; Brookes, Matthew J; Williams, Tim M; Errtizoe, David; Sessa, Ben; Papadopoulos, Andreas; Bolstridge, Mark; Singh, Krish D; Feilding, Amanda; Friston, Karl J; Nutt, David J

    2013-09-18

    Psychedelic drugs produce profound changes in consciousness, but the underlying neurobiological mechanisms for this remain unclear. Spontaneous and induced oscillatory activity was recorded in healthy human participants with magnetoencephalography after intravenous infusion of psilocybin--prodrug of the nonselective serotonin 2A receptor agonist and classic psychedelic psilocin. Psilocybin reduced spontaneous cortical oscillatory power from 1 to 50 Hz in posterior association cortices, and from 8 to 100 Hz in frontal association cortices. Large decreases in oscillatory power were seen in areas of the default-mode network. Independent component analysis was used to identify a number of resting-state networks, and activity in these was similarly decreased after psilocybin. Psilocybin had no effect on low-level visually induced and motor-induced gamma-band oscillations, suggesting that some basic elements of oscillatory brain activity are relatively preserved during the psychedelic experience. Dynamic causal modeling revealed that posterior cingulate cortex desynchronization can be explained by increased excitability of deep-layer pyramidal neurons, which are known to be rich in 5-HT2A receptors. These findings suggest that the subjective effects of psychedelics result from a desynchronization of ongoing oscillatory rhythms in the cortex, likely triggered by 5-HT2A receptor-mediated excitation of deep pyramidal cells.

  16. Global Neuromagnetic Cortical Fields Have Non-Zero Velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Alexander

    Full Text Available Globally coherent patterns of phase can be obscured by analysis techniques that aggregate brain activity measures across-trials, whether prior to source localization or for estimating inter-areal coherence. We analyzed, at single-trial level, whole head MEG recorded during an observer-triggered apparent motion task. Episodes of globally coherent activity occurred in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands of the signal in the form of large-scale waves, which propagated with a variety of velocities. Their mean speed at each frequency band was proportional to temporal frequency, giving a range of 0.06 to 4.0 m/s, from delta to beta. The wave peaks moved over the entire measurement array, during both ongoing activity and task-relevant intervals; direction of motion was more predictable during the latter. A large proportion of the cortical signal, measurable at the scalp, exists as large-scale coherent motion. We argue that the distribution of observable phase velocities in MEG is dominated by spatial filtering considerations in combination with group velocity of cortical activity. Traveling waves may index processes involved in global coordination of cortical activity.

  17. Motor-cortical interaction in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Franzkowiak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS increased activation of the primary motor cortex (M1 before and during movement execution followed by increased inhibition after movement termination was reported. The present study aimed at investigating, whether this activation pattern is due to altered functional interaction between motor cortical areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 10 GTS-patients and 10 control subjects performed a self-paced finger movement task while neuromagnetic brain activity was recorded using Magnetoencephalography (MEG. Cerebro-cerebral coherence as a measure of functional interaction was calculated. During movement preparation and execution coherence between contralateral M1 and supplementary motor area (SMA was significantly increased at beta-frequency in GTS-patients. After movement termination no significant differences between groups were evident. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present data suggest that increased M1 activation in GTS-patients might be due to increased functional interaction between SMA and M1 most likely reflecting a pathophysiological marker of GTS. The data extend previous findings of motor-cortical alterations in GTS by showing that local activation changes are associated with alterations of functional networks between premotor and primary motor areas. Interestingly enough, alterations were evident during preparation and execution of voluntary movements, which implies a general theme of increased motor-cortical interaction in GTS.

  18. Robert Recorde

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The 16th-Century intellectual Robert Recorde is chiefly remembered for introducing the equals sign into algebra, yet the greater significance and broader scope of his work is often overlooked. This book presents an authoritative and in-depth analysis of the man, his achievements and his historical importance. This scholarly yet accessible work examines the latest evidence on all aspects of Recorde's life, throwing new light on a character deserving of greater recognition. Topics and features: presents a concise chronology of Recorde's life; examines his published works; describes Recorde's pro

  19. Regional cerebral blood flow in focal cortical epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristina Dupont; Oikawa, T; Sveinsdottir, E

    1976-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in ten patients with focal cortical epilepsy. The blood flow was measured by the intra-arterial injection of xenon 133 (133Xe), and the isotope clearance was recorded by a multidetector scintillation camera with 254 detectors. Three patients were....... This finding accords with earlier studies. All nine patients studied in the interictal phase showed, either spontaneously or during activation by intermittent light, focal flow increases in areas presumed to comprise the epileptic focus. These interictal hyperemic foci probably reflect subictal neuronal...

  20. Cortical myoclonus during IV thrombolysis for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bentes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with an acute middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke developing subtle involuntary movements of the paretic upper limb with cortical origin during rt-PA perfusion. Despite the multiple potential pathophysiological mechanisms for the relationship between thrombolysis and epileptic activity, seizures during this procedure are scarcely reported. Our hypothesis is that subtle and transient clinical seizures, like those described in our patient, may not be detected or are misdiagnosed as nonepileptic involuntary movements. We aimed to draw attention to the recognition challenge of this paroxysmal motor behavior, highlighting this clinical and neurophysiological identification using video recording and back-average analysis of the EEG.

  1. Cortical control of whisker movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Carl C H

    2014-01-01

    Facial muscles drive whisker movements, which are important for active tactile sensory perception in mice and rats. These whisker muscles are innervated by cholinergic motor neurons located in the lateral facial nucleus. The whisker motor neurons receive synaptic inputs from premotor neurons, which are located within the brain stem, the midbrain, and the neocortex. Complex, distributed neural circuits therefore regulate whisker movement during behavior. This review focuses specifically on cortical whisker motor control. The whisker primary motor cortex (M1) strongly innervates brain stem reticular nuclei containing whisker premotor neurons, which might form a central pattern generator for rhythmic whisker protraction. In a parallel analogous pathway, the whisker primary somatosensory cortex (S1) strongly projects to the brain stem spinal trigeminal interpolaris nucleus, which contains whisker premotor neurons innervating muscles for whisker retraction. These anatomical pathways may play important functional roles, since stimulation of M1 drives exploratory rhythmic whisking, whereas stimulation of S1 drives whisker retraction.

  2. The origin of cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Parnavelas

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex comprise two broad classes: pyramidal neurons, which project to distant targets, and the inhibitory nonpyramidal cells, the cortical interneurons. Pyramidal neurons are generated in the germinal ventricular zone, which lines the lateral ventricles, and migrate along the processes of radial glial cells to their positions in the developing cortex in an `inside-out' sequence. The GABA-containing nonpyramidal cells originate for the most part in the ganglionic eminence, the primordium of the basal ganglia in the ventral telencephalon. These cells follow tangential migratory routes to enter the cortex and are in close association with the corticofugal axonal system. Once they enter the cortex, they move towards the ventricular zone, possibly to obtain positional information, before they migrate radially in the direction of the pial surface to take up their positions in the developing cortex. The mechanisms that guide interneurons throughout these long and complex migratory routes are currently under investigation.

  3. Cortical cartography and Caret software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Essen, David C

    2012-08-15

    Caret software is widely used for analyzing and visualizing many types of fMRI data, often in conjunction with experimental data from other modalities. This article places Caret's development in a historical context that spans three decades of brain mapping--from the early days of manually generated flat maps to the nascent field of human connectomics. It also highlights some of Caret's distinctive capabilities. This includes the ease of visualizing data on surfaces and/or volumes and on atlases as well as individual subjects. Caret can display many types of experimental data using various combinations of overlays (e.g., fMRI activation maps, cortical parcellations, areal boundaries), and it has other features that facilitate the analysis and visualization of complex neuroimaging datasets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features.

  5. Towards a 'canonical' agranular cortical microcircuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F. Beul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on regularities in the intrinsic microcircuitry of cortical areas, variants of a 'canonical' cortical microcircuit have been proposed and widely adopted, particularly in computational neuroscience and neuroinformatics. However, this circuit is founded on striate cortex, which manifests perhaps the most extreme instance of cortical organization, in terms of a very high density of cells in highly differentiated cortical layers. Most other cortical regions have a less well differentiated architecture, stretching in gradients from the very dense eulaminate primary cortical areas to the other extreme of dysgranular and agranular areas of low density and poor laminar differentiation. It is unlikely for the patterns of inter- and intra-laminar connections to be uniform in spite of strong variations of their structural substrate. This assumption is corroborated by reports of divergence in intrinsic circuitry across the cortex. Consequently, it remains an important goal to define local microcircuits for a variety of cortical types, in particular, agranular cortical regions. As a counterpoint to the striate microcircuit, which may be anchored in an exceptional cytoarchitecture, we here outline a tentative microcircuit for agranular cortex. The circuit is based on a synthesis of the available literature on the local microcircuitry in agranular cortical areas of the rodent brain, investigated by anatomical and electrophysiological approaches. A central observation of these investigations is a weakening of interlaminar inhibition as cortical cytoarchitecture becomes less distinctive. Thus, our study of agranular microcircuitry revealed deviations from the well-known 'canonical' microcircuit established for striate cortex, suggesting variations in the intrinsic circuitry across the cortex that may be functionally relevant.

  6. Multilevel cortical processing of somatosensory novelty: a magnetoencephalography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles eNaeije

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using magnetoencephalography (MEG, this study investigates the spatio-temporal dynamics of the multilevel cortical processing of somatosensory change detection. Neuromagnetic signals of sixteen healthy adult subjects (7 females and 9 males, mean age 29 +/-3 y were recorded using whole-scalp-covering MEG while they underwent an oddball paradigm based on simple standard (right index fingertip tactile stimulation and deviant (simultaneous right index fingertip and middle phalanx tactile stimulation stimuli gathered into sequences to create and then deviate from stimulus patterns at multiple (local versus global levels of complexity. Five healthy adult subjects (3 females and 2 males, mean age 31,6 +/-2 y also underwent a similar oddball paradigm in which standard and deviant stimuli were flipped.Local deviations led to a somatosensory mismatch response peaking at 55-130 ms post-stimulus onset with a cortical generator located at the contralateral secondary somatosensory cortex. The mismatch response was independent of the deviant stimuli physical characteristics. Global deviants led to a P300 response with cortical sources located bilaterally at temporo-parietal junction (TPJ and supplementary motor area (SMA. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC and the SMA were found to generate a contingent magnetic variation (CMV attributed to top-down expectations. Amplitude of mismatch responses were modulated by top-down expectations and correlated with both the magnitude of the CMV and the P300 amplitude at the right TPJ. These results provide novel empirical evidence for a unified sensory novelty detection system in the human brain by linking detection of salient sensory stimuli in personal and extra-personal spaces to a common framework of multilevel cortical processing.

  7. TDCS increases cortical excitability: direct evidence from TMS-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Lauro, Leonor J; Rosanova, Mario; Mattavelli, Giulia; Convento, Silvia; Pisoni, Alberto; Opitz, Alexander; Bolognini, Nadia; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Despite transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is increasingly used in experimental and clinical settings, its precise mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. At a neuronal level, tDCS modulates the resting membrane potential in a polarity-dependent fashion: anodal stimulation increases cortical excitability in the stimulated region, while cathodal decreases it. So far, the neurophysiological underpinnings of the immediate and delayed effects of tDCS, and to what extent the stimulation of a given cerebral region may affect the activity of anatomically connected regions, remain unclear. In the present study, we used a combination of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and Electroencephalography (EEG) in order to explore local and global cortical excitability modulation during and after active and sham tDCS. Single pulse TMS was delivered over the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC), before, during, and after 15 min of tDCS over the right PPC, while EEG was recorded from 60 channels. For each session, indexes of global and local cerebral excitability were obtained, computed as global and local mean field power (Global Mean Field Power, GMFP and Local Mean Field Power, LMFP) on mean TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) for three temporal windows: 0-50, 50-100, and 100-150 msec. The global index was computed on all 60 channels. The local indexes were computed in six clusters of electrodes: left and right in frontal, parietal and temporal regions. GMFP increased, compared to baseline, both during and after active tDCS in the 0-100 msec temporal window. LMFP increased after the end of stimulation in parietal and frontal clusters bilaterally, while no difference was found in the temporal clusters. In sum, a diffuse rise of cortical excitability occurred, both during and after active tDCS. This evidence highlights the spreading of the effects of anodal tDCS over remote cortical regions of stimulated and contralateral hemispheres.

  8. Electrophysiological Data and the Biophysical Modelling of Local Cortical Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Pinotsis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how recordings of gamma oscillations – under different experimental conditions or from different subjects – can be combined with a class of population models called neural fields and dynamic causal modeling (DCM to distinguish among alternative hypotheses regarding cortical structure and function. This approach exploits inter-subject variability and trial-specific effects associated with modulations in the peak frequency of gamma oscillations. It draws on the computational power of Bayesian model inversion, when applied to neural field models of cortical dynamics. Bayesian model comparison allows one to adjudicate among different mechanistic hypotheses about cortical excitability, synaptic kinetics and the cardinal topographic features of local cortical circuits. It also provides optimal parameter estimates that quantify neuromodulation and the spatial dispersion of axonal connections or summation of receptive fields in the visual cortex. This paper provides an overview of a family of neural field models that have been recently implemented using the DCM toolbox of the academic freeware Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM. The SPM software is a popular platform for analyzing neuroimaging data, used by several neuroscience communities worldwide. DCM allows for a formal (Bayesian statistical analysis of cortical network connectivity, based upon realistic biophysical models of brain responses. It is this particular feature of DCM – the unique combination of generative models with optimization techniques based upon (variational Bayesian principles – that furnishes a novel way to characterize functional brain architectures. In particular, it provides answers to questions about how the brain is wired and how it responds to different experimental manipulations. For a review of the general role of neural fields in SPM the reader can consult e.g. see [1]. Neural fields have a long and illustrious history in mathematical

  9. Estimation of cortical connectivity from EEG using state-space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Bing Leung Patrick; Riedner, Brady Alexander; Tononi, Giulio; Van Veen, Barry D

    2010-09-01

    A state-space formulation is introduced for estimating multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) models of cortical connectivity from noisy, scalp-recorded EEG. A state equation represents the MVAR model of cortical dynamics, while an observation equation describes the physics relating the cortical signals to the measured EEG and the presence of spatially correlated noise. We assume that the cortical signals originate from known regions of cortex, but the spatial distribution of activity within each region is unknown. An expectation-maximization algorithm is developed to directly estimate the MVAR model parameters, the spatial activity distribution components, and the spatial covariance matrix of the noise from the measured EEG. Simulation and analysis demonstrate that this integrated approach is less sensitive to noise than two-stage approaches in which the cortical signals are first estimated from EEG measurements, and next, an MVAR model is fit to the estimated cortical signals. The method is further demonstrated by estimating conditional Granger causality using EEG data collected while subjects passively watch a movie.

  10. Spatiotemporal analysis of the cortical sources of the steady-state visual evoked potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Russo, Francesco; Pitzalis, Sabrina; Aprile, Teresa; Spitoni, Grazia; Patria, Fabiana; Stella, Alessandra; Spinelli, Donatella; Hillyard, Steven A

    2007-04-01

    This study aimed to characterize the neural generators of the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) to repetitive, 6 Hz pattern-reversal stimulation. Multichannel scalp recordings of SSVEPs and dipole modeling techniques were combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and retinotopic mapping in order to estimate the locations of the cortical sources giving rise to the SSVEP elicited by pattern reversal. The time-varying SSVEP scalp topography indicated contributions from two major cortical sources, which were localized in the medial occipital and mid-temporal regions of the contralateral hemisphere. Colocalization of dipole locations with fMRI activation sites indicated that these two major sources of the SSVEP were located in primary visual cortex (V1) and in the motion sensitive (MT/V5) areas, respectively. Minor contributions from mid-occipital (V3A) and ventral occipital (V4/V8) areas were also considered. Comparison of SSVEP phase information with timing information collected in a previous transient VEP study (Di Russo et al. [2005] Neuroimage 24:874-886) suggested that the sequence of cortical activation is similar for steady-state and transient stimulation. These results provide a detailed spatiotemporal profile of the cortical origins of the SSVEP, which should enhance its use as an efficient clinical tool for evaluating visual-cortical dysfunction as well as an investigative probe of the cortical mechanisms of visual-perceptual processing.

  11. Cortical Response Variability as a Developmental Index of Selective Auditory Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Dana L.; Slater, Jessica; Abecassis, Victor; Kraus, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Attention induces synchronicity in neuronal firing for the encoding of a given stimulus at the exclusion of others. Recently, we reported decreased variability in scalp-recorded cortical evoked potentials to attended compared with ignored speech in adults. Here we aimed to determine the developmental time course for this neural index of auditory…

  12. Heterotopias, cortical dysplasias and glioneural tumors participate in cognitive processing in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschstein, T.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Grunwald, T.; Pezer, N.; Urbach, H.; Blumcke, I.; Roost, D. van; Lehnertz, K.; Elger, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    Focal brain lesions such as cortical dysplasia and glioneural tumors generate epileptic activity and thus may be synaptically connected with normal cortex. To test this hypothesis, we compared event-related potentials recorded directly from the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and a dysplastic lesion in e

  13. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network Development in Multiwell Microelectrode Array Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the development of neural network activity using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multi-well MEA plates (mwMEAs) over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures made from postnatal rats, action potential spiking activity was essentiall...

  14. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network Development in Multiwell Microelectrode Array Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the development of neural network activity using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multi-well MEA plates (mwMEAs) over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures made from postnatal rats, action potential spiking activity was essentiall...

  15. Implied Motion Activation in Cortical Area MT Can Be Explained by Visual Low-level Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, Jeannette A.M.; Barraclough, Nick E.; Jellema, Tjeerd; Raemaekers, Mathijs; Duijnhouwer, Jacob; Xiao, Dengke; Oram, Mike W.; Lankheet, Martin J.M.; Perrett, David I.; van Wezel, Richard Jack Anton

    To investigate form-related activity in motion-sensitive cortical areas, we recorded cell responses to animate implied motion in macaque middle temporal (MT) and medial superior temporal (MST) cortex and investigated these areas using fMRI in humans. In the single-cell studies, we compared responses

  16. Temporo-spacial correlations between cortical and subcortical EEG spike-wave complexes of the Idiopathic Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, M; Velasco, F; Velasco, A L

    1997-01-01

    All-night EEG recordings of the interictal 2/s spike-wave complexes (SKW) from different cortical and subcortical regions were performed in 5 patients with atypical absences of the Idiopathic Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (ILGS), in whom multicontact depth electrodes were implanted in the centromedian thalamic region as a part of a neuroaugmentive procedure for seizure control. Since during slow wave sleep III cortical spike (S2) and subcortical negative spike (NSK) consisting of simple monophasic negative potentials appeared together with a ratio of almost 1:1 and with fixed temporal relations, it was possible to determine visually the differences in peak-to-peak intervals of S2 and NSK, as well as their amplitude distribution in different cortical and subcortical structures. It was found that the peak of subcortical NSK preceded by 35 ms that of cortical S2. In addition, subcortical NSK and cortical S2 potentials attained maximal amplitude at the mesencephalic-thalamic reticular and frontal cortical regions, respectively, from which amplitude of NSK and S2 decreased with distance to other subcortical and cortical regions. These data suggest that interictal 2/s SKW of the ILGS result from ascending reticular impulses impinging upon the frontal cortical neurons.

  17. Dynamics of Electrocorticographic (ECoG) Activity in Human Temporal and Frontal Cortical Areas During Music Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-14

    REPORT Dynamics of electrocorticographic (ECoG) activity in human temporal and frontal cortical areas during music listening 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...information about the sound intensity of music . ECoG activity in the high gamma band recorded from the posterior part of the superior temporal 1. REPORT...ECoG) activity in human temporal and frontal cortical areas during music listening Report Title ABSTRACT Previous studies demonstrated that brain

  18. Cortical dysfunction underlies the development of the split-hand in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Parvathi; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The split-hand phenomenon, a specific feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), refers to preferential wasting of abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) with relative preservation of abductor digiti minimi (ADM). The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the split-hand phenomenon remain elusive and resolution of this issue would provide unique insights into ALS pathophysiology. Consequently, the present study dissected out the relative contribution of cortical and peripheral processes in development of the split-hand phenomenon in ALS. Cortical and axonal excitability studies were undertaken on 26 ALS patients, with motor responses recorded over the APB, FDI and ADM muscles. Results were compared to 21 controls. Short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), a biomarker of cortical excitability, was significantly reduced across the range of intrinsic hand muscles (APB(SICI ALS) 0.3±2.0%, APB(SICI controls) 16.0±1.9%, P<0.0001; FDI(SICI ALS) 2.7±1.7%, FDI(SICI controls) 14.8±1.9%, P<0.0001; ADM(SICI ALS) 2.6±1.5%, ADM(SICI controls) 9.7±2.2%, P<0.001), although the reduction was most prominent when recorded over APB/FDI. Changes in SICI were accompanied by a significant increase in motor evoked potential amplitude and reduction of cortical silent period duration, all indicative of cortical hyperexcitability, and these were most prominent from the APB/FDI. At a peripheral level, a significant increase in strength-duration time constant and reduction in depolarising threshold electrotonus were evident in ALS, although these changes did not follow a split-hand distribution. Cortical dysfunction contributed to development of the split-hand in ALS, thereby implying an importance of cortical hyperexcitability in ALS pathogenesis.

  19. Cortical dysfunction underlies the development of the split-hand in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathi Menon

    Full Text Available The split-hand phenomenon, a specific feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, refers to preferential wasting of abductor pollicis brevis (APB and first dorsal interosseous (FDI with relative preservation of abductor digiti minimi (ADM. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the split-hand phenomenon remain elusive and resolution of this issue would provide unique insights into ALS pathophysiology. Consequently, the present study dissected out the relative contribution of cortical and peripheral processes in development of the split-hand phenomenon in ALS. Cortical and axonal excitability studies were undertaken on 26 ALS patients, with motor responses recorded over the APB, FDI and ADM muscles. Results were compared to 21 controls. Short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI, a biomarker of cortical excitability, was significantly reduced across the range of intrinsic hand muscles (APB(SICI ALS 0.3±2.0%, APB(SICI controls 16.0±1.9%, P<0.0001; FDI(SICI ALS 2.7±1.7%, FDI(SICI controls 14.8±1.9%, P<0.0001; ADM(SICI ALS 2.6±1.5%, ADM(SICI controls 9.7±2.2%, P<0.001, although the reduction was most prominent when recorded over APB/FDI. Changes in SICI were accompanied by a significant increase in motor evoked potential amplitude and reduction of cortical silent period duration, all indicative of cortical hyperexcitability, and these were most prominent from the APB/FDI. At a peripheral level, a significant increase in strength-duration time constant and reduction in depolarising threshold electrotonus were evident in ALS, although these changes did not follow a split-hand distribution. Cortical dysfunction contributed to development of the split-hand in ALS, thereby implying an importance of cortical hyperexcitability in ALS pathogenesis.

  20. Correlation between Cortical State and Locus Coeruleus Activity: Implications for Sensory Coding in Rat Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab eFazlali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical state modulates the background activity of cortical neurons, and their evoked response to sensory stimulation. Multiple mechanisms are involved in switching between cortical states including various neuromodulatory systems. Locus Coeruleus (LC is one of the major neuromodulatory nuclei in the brainstem with widespread projections throughout the brain and modulates the activity of cells and networks. Here, we quantified the link between the LC spontaneous activity, cortical state and sensory processing in the rat vibrissal somatosensory barrel cortex (BC. We simultaneously recorded unit activity from LC and BC along with prefrontal EEG while presenting brief whisker deflections under urethane anesthesia. The ratio of low to high frequency components of EEG (referred to as the L/H ratio was employed to identify cortical state. We found that the spontaneous activity of LC units exhibited a negative correlation with the L/H ratio. Cross-correlation analysis revealed that changes in LC firing preceded changes in the cortical state: the correlation of the LC firing profile with the L/H ratio was maximal at an average lag of -1.2 s. We further quantified BC neuronal responses to whisker stimulation during the synchronized and desynchronized states. In the desynchronized state, BC neurons showed lower stimulus detection threshold, higher response fidelity, and shorter response latency. The most prominent change was observed in the late phase of BC evoked activity (100-400 ms post stimulus onset: almost every BC unit exhibited a greater late response during the desynchronized state. Categorization of the BC evoked responses based on LC activity (into high and low LC discharge rates resulted in highly similar response profiles compared to categorization based on the cortical state (low and high L/H ratios. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of the LC neuromodulatory system in desynchronization of cortical state and the consequent

  1. Prospective detection of cortical dysplasia on clinical MRI in pediatric intractable epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Leach, James L.; Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mangano, Francesco T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rozhkov, Leonid; Greiner, Hansel M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Comprehensive Epilepsy Treatment Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Miles, Lili [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Cortical dysplasia is the most common cause of pediatric refractory epilepsy. MRI detection of epileptogenic lesion is associated with good postsurgical outcome. Additional electrophysiological information is suggested to be helpful in localization of cortical dysplasia. Educational measures were taken to increase the awareness of cortical dysplasia at our institution in the context of a recent International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE 2011) classification of cortical dysplasia. To determine changes in the rate of prospective identification of cortical dysplasia on an initial radiology report and also evaluate the benefit of MRI review as part of a multidisciplinary epilepsy conference in identifying previously overlooked MRI findings. We retrospectively evaluated surgically treated children with refractory epilepsy from 2007 to 2014 with cortical dysplasia on histopathology. We analyzed the initial radiology report, preoperative MRI interpretation at multidisciplinary epilepsy conference and subsequent retrospective MRI review with knowledge of the resection site. We recorded additional electrophysiological data and the presence of lobar concordance with the MRI findings. Of 78 children (44 MRI lesional) evaluated, 18 had initially overlooked MRI findings. Comparing 2007-2010 to 2011-2014, there was improvement in the rate of overlooked findings on the initial radiology report (54% vs. 13% of lesional cases, respectively; P = 0.008). The majority (72%) were identified at a multidisciplinary conference with lobar concordance of findings with at least one additional electrophysiological investigation in 89%. Awareness of current classification schemes of cortical dysplasia and image review in the context of a multidisciplinary conference can lead to improved MRI detection of cortical dysplasia in children. (orig.)

  2. Two-dimensional map of direction selectivity in cortical visual area MT of Cebus monkey

    OpenAIRE

    ANTONIA CINIRA M. DIOGO; Soares, Juliana G. M.; Albright, Thomas D.; RICARDO GATTASS

    2002-01-01

    We studied the spatial organization of direction of motion in visual area MT of the Cebus apella monkey. We used arrays of 6 (700 µm apart) parallel electrodes in penetrations tangential to the cortical layers to record multi-unit responses to moving bars, at 200 µm steps. We determined the direction selectivity at each recording site. The data from single penetrations showed cyclic and gradual changes in the direction selectivity of clusters of cells, intermixed with abrupt 180º discontinuit...

  3. Organisation of Xenopus oocyte and egg cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P; Pérez-Mongiovi, D; Houliston, E

    1999-03-15

    The division of the Xenopus oocyte cortex into structurally and functionally distinct "animal" and "vegetal" regions during oogenesis provides the basis of the organisation of the early embryo. The vegetal region of the cortex accumulates specific maternal mRNAs that specify the development of the endoderm and mesoderm, as well as functionally-defined "determinants" of dorso-anterior development, and recognisable "germ plasm" determinants that segregate into primary germ cells. These localised elements on the vegetal cortex underlie both the primary animal-vegetal polarity of the egg and the organisation of the developing embryo. The animal cortex meanwhile becomes specialised for the events associated with fertilisation: sperm entry, calcium release into the cytoplasm, cortical granule exocytosis, and polarised cortical contraction. Cortical and subcortical reorganisations associated with meiotic maturation, fertilisation, cortical rotation, and the first mitotic cleavage divisions redistribute the vegetal cortical determinants, contributing to the specification of dorso-anterior axis and segregation of the germ line. In this article we consider what is known about the changing organisation of the oocyte and egg cortex in relation to the mechanisms of determinant localisation, anchorage, and redistribution, and show novel ultrastructural views of cortices isolated at different stages and processed by the rapid-freeze deep-etch method. Cortical organisation involves interactions between the different cytoskeletal filament systems and internal membranes. Associated proteins and cytoplasmic signals probably modulate these interactions in stage-specific ways, leaving much to be understood.

  4. Contrast-induced transient cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parth R; Yohendran, Jayshan; Parker, Geoffrey D; McCluskey, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    We present a case of transient cortical blindness secondary to contrast medium toxicity. A 58-year-old man had successful endovascular coiling of a right posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm but became confused and unable to see after the procedure. His visual acuity was no light perception bilaterally. Clinically, there was no new intra-ocular pathology. An urgent non-contrast computed tomography scan of the brain showed cortical hyperdensity in both parieto-occipital cortices, consistent with contrast medium leakage through the blood-brain barrier from the coiling procedure. The man remained completely blind for 72 hours, after which his visual acuity improved gradually back to his baseline level.

  5. Reversible cortical blindness: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Das, Somnath; Gupta, Anindya; Biswas, Jaya; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Biswas, Gautam

    2010-11-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as visual failure with preserved pupillary reflexes in structurally intact eyes due to bilateral lesions affecting occipital cortex. Bilateral oedema and infarction of the posterior and middle cerebral arterial territory, trauma, glioma and meningioma of the occipital cortex are the main causes of cortical blindness. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to the reversible subtype of cortical blindness and is usually associated with hypertension, diabetes, immunosuppression, puerperium with or without eclampsia. Here, 3 cases of PRES with complete or partial visual recovery following treatment in 6-month follow-up are reported.

  6. Tibial cortical lesions: A multimodality pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, P.A., E-mail: philippa.tyler@rnoh.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Mohaghegh, P., E-mail: pegah1000@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Foley, J., E-mail: jfoley1@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, 16 Alexandra Parade, Glasgow G31 2ES (United Kingdom); Isaac, A., E-mail: amandaisaac@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, King' s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Zavareh, A., E-mail: ali.zavareh@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, North Bristol NHS Trust, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1LE (United Kingdom); Thorning, C., E-mail: cthorning@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, East Surrey Hospital, Canada Avenue, Redhill, Surrey RH1 5RH (United Kingdom); Kirwadi, A., E-mail: anandkirwadi@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9WL (United Kingdom); Pressney, I., E-mail: ipressney@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Amary, F., E-mail: fernanda.amary@rnoh.nhs.uk [Department of Histopathology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Rajeswaran, G., E-mail: grajeswaran@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, 369 Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Multimodality imaging plays an important role in the investigation and diagnosis of shin pain. • We review the multimodality imaging findings of common cortically based tibial lesions. • We also describe the rarer pathologies of tibial cortical lesions. - Abstract: Shin pain is a common complaint, particularly in young and active patients, with a wide range of potential diagnoses and resulting implications. We review the natural history and multimodality imaging findings of the more common causes of cortically-based tibial lesions, as well as the rarer pathologies less frequently encountered in a general radiology department.

  7. Phenological Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phenology is the scientific study of periodic biological phenomena, such as flowering, breeding, and migration, in relation to climatic conditions. The few records...

  8. The impact of cortical deafferentation on the neocortical slow oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Maxime; Chen, Jen-Yung; Lonjers, Peter; Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-04-16

    Slow oscillation is the main brain rhythm observed during deep sleep in mammals. Although several studies have demonstrated its neocortical origin, the extent of the thalamic contribution is still a matter of discussion. Using electrophysiological recordings in vivo on cats and computational modeling, we found that the local thalamic inactivation or the complete isolation of the neocortical slabs maintained within the brain dramatically reduced the expression of slow and fast oscillations in affected cortical areas. The slow oscillation began to recover 12 h after thalamic inactivation. The slow oscillation, but not faster activities, nearly recovered after 30 h and persisted for weeks in the isolated slabs. We also observed an increase of the membrane potential fluctuations recorded in vivo several hours after thalamic inactivation. Mimicking this enhancement in a network computational model with an increased postsynaptic activity of long-range intracortical afferents or scaling K(+) leak current, but not several other Na(+) and K(+) intrinsic currents was sufficient for recovering the slow oscillation. We conclude that, in the intact brain, the thalamus contributes to the generation of cortical active states of the slow oscillation and mediates its large-scale synchronization. Our study also suggests that the deafferentation-induced alterations of the sleep slow oscillation can be counteracted by compensatory intracortical mechanisms and that the sleep slow oscillation is a fundamental and intrinsic state of the neocortex.

  9. COMMUNICATION: Electrophysiological response dynamics during focal cortical infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiganos, Terry C., Jr.; Jensen, Winnie; Rousche, Patrick J.

    2006-12-01

    While the intracellular processes of hypoxia-induced necrosis and the intercellular mechanisms of post-ischemic neurotoxicity associated with stroke are well documented, the dynamic electrophysiological (EP) response of neurons within the core or periinfarct zone remains unclear. The present study validates a method for continuous measurement of the local EP responses during focal cortical infarction induced via photothrombosis. Single microwire electrodes were acutely implanted into the primary auditory cortex of eight rats. Multi-unit neural activity, evoked via a continuous 2 Hz click stimulus, was recorded before, during and after infarction to assess neuronal function in response to local, permanent ischemia. During sham infarction, the average stimulus-evoked peak firing rate over 20 min remained stable at 495.5 ± 14.5 spikes s-1, indicating temporal stability of neural function under normal conditions. Stimulus-evoked peak firing was reliably reduced to background levels (firing frequency in the absence of stimulus) following initiation of photothrombosis over a period of 439 ± 92 s. The post-infarction firing patterns exhibited unique temporal degradation of the peak firing rate, suggesting a variable response to ischemic challenge. Despite the inherent complexity of cerebral ischemia secondary to microvascular occlusion, complete loss of EP function consistently occurred 300-600 s after photothrombosis. The results suggest that microwire recording during photothrombosis provides a simple and highly efficacious strategy for assessing the electrophysiological dynamics of cortical infarction.

  10. Superresolution improves MRI cortical segmentation with FACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Manjón, José V.; Coupé, Pierrick

    Brain cortical surface extraction from MRI has applications for measurement of gray matter (GM) atrophy, functional mapping, source localization and preoperative neurosurgical planning. Accurate cortex segmentation requires high resolution morphological images and several methods for extracting...

  11. Perceptual incongruence influences bistability and cortical activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, G.J.; Tong, F.; Hagoort, P.; van Ee, R.

    2009-01-01

    We employed a parametric psychophysical design in combination with functional imaging to examine the influence of metric changes in perceptual incongruence on perceptual alternation rates and cortical responses. Subjects viewed a bistable stimulus defined by incongruent depth cues; bistability

  12. Transient cortical blindness after coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, B N; Bozbuğa, N; Tuncer, M A; Yakut, C

    2009-01-01

    Transient cortical blindness is rarely encountered after angiography of native coronary arteries or bypass grafts. This paper reports a case of transient cortical blindness that occurred 72 h after coronary angiography in a 56-year old patient. This was the patient's fourth exposure to contrast medium. Neurological examination demonstrated cortical blindness and the absence of any focal neurological deficit. A non-contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan of the brain revealed bilateral contrast enhancement in the occipital lobes and no evidence of cerebral haemorrhage, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed no pathology. Sight returned spontaneously within 4 days and his vision gradually improved. A search of the current literature for reported cases of transient cortical blindness suggested that this is a rarely encountered complication of coronary angiography.

  13. Reversible cortical blindness after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knower, Mark T; Pethke, Scott D; Valentine, Vincent G

    2003-06-01

    Cyclosporine (CYA) is a calcineurin inhibitor widely used in immunosuppressive regimens after organ transplantation. Several neurologic side effects are frequently associated with CYA use; however, reversible cortical blindness is a rare manifestation of CYA toxicity traditionally seen after liver and bone marrow transplantation. This report presents a case of reversible cortical blindness after lung transplantation, then details the risk factors and clinical course of 28 previously well-documented cases of CYA-induced cortical blindness after transplantation. Identification of known risk factors, clinical clues, and typical radiographic findings may aid in the diagnosis of CYA-induced cortical blindness, since reduction in CYA dose or cessation of CYA therapy usually permits resolution of the neurologic effects.

  14. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, F-E; Lubrano, V; Lauwers-Cances, V; Giussani, C; Démonet, J-F

    2008-01-15

    Distinct functional pathways for processing words and numbers have been hypothesized from the observation of dissociated impairments of these categories in brain-damaged patients. We aimed to identify the cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading process in patients operated on for various brain lesions. Direct cortical electrostimulation was prospectively used in 60 brain mappings. We used object naming and two reading tasks: alphabetic script (sentences and number words) and Arabic number reading. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading were identified according to location, type of interference, and distinctness from areas associated with other language tasks. Arabic number reading was sustained by small cortical areas, often extremely well localized (area (Brodmann area 45), the anterior part of the dominant supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40; p area (Brodmann area 37; p areas.

  15. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki eKubota

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their IPSP size is not uniform. Thus cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit.

  16. Biomechanical in vitro validation of intramedullary cortical button fixation for distal biceps tendon repair: a new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenlist, Sebastian; Lenich, Andreas; Buchholz, Arne; Martetschläger, Frank; Eichhorn, Stefan; Heinrich, Petra; Fingerle, Alexander; Doebele, Stefan; Sandmann, Gunther H; Millett, Peter J; Stöckle, Ulrich; Elser, Florian

    2011-08-01

    Extramedullary cortical button-based fixation for distal biceps tendon ruptures exhibits maximum load to failure in vitro but cannot restore the anatomic footprint and has the potential risk for injury to the posterior interosseous nerve. Double intramedullary cortical button fixation repair provides superior fixation strength to the bone when compared with single extramedullary cortical button-based repair. Controlled laboratory study. The technique of intramedullary cortical button fixation with 1 or 2 buttons was compared with single extramedullary cortical button-based repair using 12 paired human cadaveric elbows. All specimens underwent computed tomography analysis to determine intramedullary dimensions of the radial tuberosity as well as the thickness of the anterior and posterior cortices before biomechanical testing. Maximum load to failure and failure modes were recorded. For baseline measurements, the native tendon was tested for maximum load to failure. The intramedullary area of the radial tuberosity provides sufficient space for single or double intramedullary cortical button implantation. The mean thickness of the anterior cortex was 1.13 ± 0.15 mm, and for the posterior cortex it was 1.97 ± 0.48 mm (P button fixation with a mean load to failure of 455 ± 103 N, versus 275 ± 44 N for single intramedullary cortical button fixation (P button-based technique (P = .003). There were no statistically significant differences between single intramedullary and single extramedullary button fixation repair (P = .081). The mean load to failure for the native tendon was 379 ± 87 N. Double intramedullary cortical button fixation provides the highest load to failure in the specimens tested. Double intramedullary cortical button fixation provides reliable fixation strength to the bone for distal biceps tendon repair and potentially minimizes the risk of posterior interosseous nerve injury. Further, based on a 2-point-fixation, this method may offer a wider, more

  17. CLADA: cortical longitudinal atrophy detection algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kunio; Fox, Robert; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of changes in brain cortical thickness is useful for the assessment of regional gray matter atrophy in neurodegenerative conditions. A new longitudinal method, called CLADA (cortical longitudinal atrophy detection algorithm), has been developed for the measurement of changes in cortical thickness in magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired over time. CLADA creates a subject-specific cortical model which is longitudinally deformed to match images from individual time points. The algorithm was designed to work reliably for lower resolution images, such as the MRIs with 1×1×5 mm(3) voxels previously acquired for many clinical trials in multiple sclerosis (MS). CLADA was evaluated to determine reproducibility, accuracy, and sensitivity. Scan-rescan variability was 0.45% for images with 1mm(3) isotropic voxels and 0.77% for images with 1×1×5 mm(3) voxels. The mean absolute accuracy error was 0.43 mm, as determined by comparison of CLADA measurements to cortical thickness measured directly in post-mortem tissue. CLADA's sensitivity for correctly detecting at least 0.1mm change was 86% in a simulation study. A comparison to FreeSurfer showed good agreement (Pearson correlation=0.73 for global mean thickness). CLADA was also applied to MRIs acquired over 18 months in secondary progressive MS patients who were imaged at two different resolutions. Cortical thinning was detected in this group in both the lower and higher resolution images. CLADA detected a higher rate of cortical thinning in MS patients compared to healthy controls over 2 years. These results show that CLADA can be used for reliable measurement of cortical atrophy in longitudinal studies, even in lower resolution images.

  18. Cortical Neural Computation by Discrete Results Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejon, Carlos; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in neuroscience is to understand how the cortex performs computations. There is increasing evidence that the power of the cortical processing is produced by populations of neurons forming dynamic neuronal ensembles. Theoretical proposals and multineuronal experimental studies have revealed that ensembles of neurons can form emergent functional units. However, how these ensembles are implicated in cortical computations is still a mystery. Although cell ensembles have been associated with brain rhythms, the functional interaction remains largely unclear. It is still unknown how spatially distributed neuronal activity can be temporally integrated to contribute to cortical computations. A theoretical explanation integrating spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing is still lacking. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we propose a new functional theoretical framework to explain the computational roles of these ensembles in cortical processing. We suggest that complex neural computations underlying cortical processing could be temporally discrete and that sensory information would need to be quantized to be computed by the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, we propose that cortical processing is produced by the computation of discrete spatio-temporal functional units that we have called “Discrete Results” (Discrete Results Hypothesis). This hypothesis represents a novel functional mechanism by which information processing is computed in the cortex. Furthermore, we propose that precise dynamic sequences of “Discrete Results” is the mechanism used by the cortex to extract, code, memorize and transmit neural information. The novel “Discrete Results” concept has the ability to match the spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing. We discuss the possible neural underpinnings of these functional computational units and describe the empirical evidence supporting our hypothesis. We propose that fast

  19. Mean field methods for cortical network dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, J.; Lerchner, Alexander; Ahmadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    We review the use of mean field theory for describing the dynamics of dense, randomly connected cortical circuits. For a simple network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate- and-fire neurons, we can show how the firing irregularity, as measured by the Fano factor, increases with the stren...... cortex. Finally, an extension of the model to describe an orientation hypercolumn provides understanding of how cortical interactions sharpen orientation tuning, in a way that is consistent with observed firing statistics...

  20. Cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortical gray matter in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong-Kha Truong

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625 × 0.625 × 3 mm and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo.

  1. Cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortical gray matter in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Guidon, Arnaud; Song, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625 × 0.625 × 3 mm) and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i) a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii) a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo.

  2. The cortical and sub-cortical network of sensory evoked response in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraman, M; Hellriegel, H; Groppa, S; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find the cortical and sub-cortical network responsible for the sensory evoked coherence in healthy subjects during electrical stimulation of right median nerve at wrist. The multitaper method was used to estimate the power and coherence spectrum followed by the source analysis method dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) to find the highest coherent source for the basic frequency 3 Hz and the complete cortical and sub-cortical network responsible for the sensory evoked coherence in healthy subjects. The highest coherent source for the basic frequency was in the posterior parietal cortex for all the subjects. The cortical and sub-cortical network comprised of the primary sensory motor cortex (SI), secondary sensory motor cortex (SII), frontal cortex and medial pulvinar nucleus in the thalamus. The cortical and sub-cortical network responsible for the sensory evoked coherence was found successfully with a 64-channel EEG system. The sensory evoked coherence is involved with a thalamo-cortical network in healthy subjects.

  3. Cortical thinning in former professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerte, Inga K; Mayinger, Michael; Muehlmann, Marc; Kaufmann, David; Lin, Alexander P; Steffinger, Denise; Fisch, Barbara; Rauchmann, Boris-Stephan; Immler, Stefanie; Karch, Susanne; Heinen, Florian R; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Reiser, Maximilian; Stern, Robert A; Zafonte, Ross; Shenton, Martha E

    2016-09-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world. Soccer players are at high risk for repetitive subconcussive head impact when heading the ball. Whether this leads to long-term alterations of the brain's structure associated with cognitive decline remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate cortical thickness in former professional soccer players using high-resolution structural MR imaging. Fifteen former male professional soccer players (mean age 49.3 [SD 5.1] years) underwent high-resolution structural 3 T MR imaging, as well as cognitive testing. Fifteen male, age-matched former professional non-contact sport athletes (mean age 49.6 [SD 6.4] years) served as controls. Group analyses of cortical thickness were performed using voxel-based statistics. Soccer players demonstrated greater cortical thinning with increasing age compared to controls in the right inferolateral-parietal, temporal, and occipital cortex. Cortical thinning was associated with lower cognitive performance as well as with estimated exposure to repetitive subconcussive head impact. Neurocognitive evaluation revealed decreased memory performance in the soccer players compared to controls. The association of cortical thinning and decreased cognitive performance, as well as exposure to repetitive subconcussive head impact, further supports the hypothesis that repetitive subconcussive head impact may play a role in early cognitive decline in soccer players. Future studies are needed to elucidate the time course of changes in cortical thickness as well as their association with impaired cognitive function and possible underlying neurodegenerative process.

  4. Cortical swallowing processing in early subacute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Maren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia is a major complication in hemispheric as well as brainstem stroke patients causing aspiration pneumonia and increased mortality. Little is known about the recovery from dysphagia after stroke. The aim of the present study was to determine the different patterns of cortical swallowing processing in patients with hemispheric and brainstem stroke with and without dysphagia in the early subacute phase. Methods We measured brain activity by mean of whole-head MEG in 37 patients with different stroke localisation 8.2 +/- 4.8 days after stroke to study changes in cortical activation during self-paced swallowing. An age matched group of healthy subjects served as controls. Data were analyzed by means of synthetic aperture magnetometry and group analyses were performed using a permutation test. Results Our results demonstrate strong bilateral reduction of cortical swallowing activation in dysphagic patients with hemispheric stroke. In hemispheric stroke without dysphagia, bilateral activation was found. In the small group of patients with brainstem stroke we observed a reduction of cortical activation and a right hemispheric lateralization. Conclusion Bulbar central pattern generators coordinate the pharyngeal swallowing phase. The observed right hemispheric lateralization in brainstem stroke can therefore be interpreted as acute cortical compensation of subcortically caused dysphagia. The reduction of activation in brainstem stroke patients and dysphagic patients with cortical stroke could be explained in terms of diaschisis.

  5. Neuromagnetic fields reveal cortical plasticity when learning an auditory discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, S; Williamson, S J

    1997-08-01

    Auditory evoked neuromagnetic fields of the primary and association auditory cortices were recorded while subjects learned to discriminate small differences in frequency and intensity between two consecutive tones. When discrimination was no better than chance, evoked field patterns across the scalp manifested no significant differences between correct and incorrect responses. However, when performance was correct on at least 75% of the trials, the spatial pattern of magnetic field differed significantly between correct and incorrect responses during the first 70 ms following the onset of the second tone. In this respect, the magnetic field pattern predicted when the subject would make an incorrect judgment more than 100 ms prior to indicating the judgment by a button press. One subject improved discrimination for much smaller differences between stimuli after 200 h of training. Evidence of cortical plasticity with improved discrimination is provided by an accompanying decrease of the relative magnetic field amplitude of the 100 ms response components in the primary and association auditory cortices.

  6. Student Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Another topic involving privacy has attracted considerable attention in recent months--the "student unit record" issue. The U.S. Department of Education concluded in March that it would be feasible to help address lawmakers' concerns about accountability in higher education by constructing a database capable of tracking students from institution…

  7. Record dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robe, Dominic M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    -facto irreversible and become increasingly harder to achieve. Thus, a progression of record-sized dynamical barriers are traversed in the approach to equilibration. Accordingly, the statistics of the events is closely described by a log-Poisson process. Originally developed for relaxation in spin glasses...

  8. Relationships between behavior, brainstem and cortical encoding of seen and heard speech in musicians and non-musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchia, Gabriella; Strait, Dana; Kraus, Nina

    2008-07-01

    Musicians have a variety of perceptual and cortical specializations compared to non-musicians. Recent studies have shown that potentials evoked from primarily brainstem structures are enhanced in musicians, compared to non-musicians. Specifically, musicians have more robust representations of pitch periodicity and faster neural timing to sound onset when listening to sounds or both listening to and viewing a speaker. However, it is not known whether musician-related enhancements at the subcortical level are correlated with specializations in the cortex. Does musical training shape the auditory system in a coordinated manner or in disparate ways at cortical and subcortical levels? To answer this question, we recorded simultaneous brainstem and cortical evoked responses in musician and non-musician subjects. Brainstem response periodicity was related to early cortical response timing across all subjects, and this relationship was stronger in musicians. Peaks of the brainstem response evoked by sound onset and timbre cues were also related to cortical timing. Neurophysiological measures at both levels correlated with musical skill scores across all subjects. In addition, brainstem and cortical measures correlated with the age musicians began their training and the years of musical practice. Taken together, these data imply that neural representations of pitch, timing and timbre cues and cortical response timing are shaped in a coordinated manner, and indicate corticofugal modulation of subcortical afferent circuitry.

  9. Motor Cortical Plasticity to Training Started in Childhood: The Example of Piano Players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Chieffo

    Full Text Available Converging evidence suggest that motor training is associated with early and late changes of the cortical motor system. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS offers the possibility to study plastic rearrangements of the motor system in physiological and pathological conditions. We used TMS to characterize long-term changes in upper limb motor cortical representation and interhemispheric inhibition associated with bimanual skill training in pianists who started playing in an early age. Ipsilateral silent period (iSP and cortical TMS mapping of hand muscles were obtained from 30 strictly right-handed subjects (16 pianists, 14 naïve controls, together with electromyographic recording of mirror movements (MMs to voluntary hand movements. In controls, motor cortical representation of hand muscles was larger on the dominant (DH than on the non-dominant hemisphere (NDH. On the contrary, pianists showed symmetric cortical output maps, being their DH less represented than in controls. In naïve subjects, the iSP was smaller on the right vs left abductor pollicis brevis (APB indicating a weaker inhibition from the NDH to the DH. In pianists, interhemispheric inhibition was more symmetric as their DH was better inhibited than in controls. Electromyographic MMs were observed only in naïve subjects (7/14 and only to voluntary movement of the non-dominant hand. Subjects with MM had a lower iSP area on the right APB compared with all the others. Our findings suggest a more symmetrical motor cortex organization in pianists, both in terms of muscle cortical representation and interhemispheric inhibition. Although we cannot disentangle training-related from preexisting conditions, it is possible that long-term bimanual practice may reshape motor cortical representation and rebalance interhemispheric interactions, which in naïve right-handed subjects would both tend to favour the dominant hemisphere.

  10. Motor Cortical Plasticity to Training Started in Childhood: The Example of Piano Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieffo, Raffaella; Straffi, Laura; Inuggi, Alberto; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier J; Spagnolo, Francesca; Coppi, Elisabetta; Nuara, Arturo; Houdayer, Elise; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Converging evidence suggest that motor training is associated with early and late changes of the cortical motor system. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility to study plastic rearrangements of the motor system in physiological and pathological conditions. We used TMS to characterize long-term changes in upper limb motor cortical representation and interhemispheric inhibition associated with bimanual skill training in pianists who started playing in an early age. Ipsilateral silent period (iSP) and cortical TMS mapping of hand muscles were obtained from 30 strictly right-handed subjects (16 pianists, 14 naïve controls), together with electromyographic recording of mirror movements (MMs) to voluntary hand movements. In controls, motor cortical representation of hand muscles was larger on the dominant (DH) than on the non-dominant hemisphere (NDH). On the contrary, pianists showed symmetric cortical output maps, being their DH less represented than in controls. In naïve subjects, the iSP was smaller on the right vs left abductor pollicis brevis (APB) indicating a weaker inhibition from the NDH to the DH. In pianists, interhemispheric inhibition was more symmetric as their DH was better inhibited than in controls. Electromyographic MMs were observed only in naïve subjects (7/14) and only to voluntary movement of the non-dominant hand. Subjects with MM had a lower iSP area on the right APB compared with all the others. Our findings suggest a more symmetrical motor cortex organization in pianists, both in terms of muscle cortical representation and interhemispheric inhibition. Although we cannot disentangle training-related from preexisting conditions, it is possible that long-term bimanual practice may reshape motor cortical representation and rebalance interhemispheric interactions, which in naïve right-handed subjects would both tend to favour the dominant hemisphere.

  11. The effect of binaural beats on verbal working memory and cortical connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchene, Christine; Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A.; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Synchronization in activated regions of cortical networks affect the brain’s frequency response, which has been associated with a wide range of states and abilities, including memory. A non-invasive method for manipulating cortical synchronization is binaural beats. Binaural beats take advantage of the brain’s response to two pure tones, delivered independently to each ear, when those tones have a small frequency mismatch. The mismatch between the tones is interpreted as a beat frequency, which may act to synchronize cortical oscillations. Neural synchrony is particularly important for working memory processes, the system controlling online organization and retention of information for successful goal-directed behavior. Therefore, manipulation of synchrony via binaural beats provides a unique window into working memory and associated connectivity of cortical networks. Approach. In this study, we examined the effects of different acoustic stimulation conditions during an N-back working memory task, and we measured participant response accuracy and cortical network topology via EEG recordings. Six acoustic stimulation conditions were used: None, Pure Tone, Classical Music, 5 Hz binaural beats, 10 Hz binaural beats, and 15 Hz binaural beats. Main results. We determined that listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during an N-Back working memory task increased the individual participant’s accuracy, modulated the cortical frequency response, and changed the cortical network connection strengths during the task. Only the 15 Hz binaural beats produced significant change in relative accuracy compared to the None condition. Significance. Listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during the N-back task activated salient frequency bands and produced networks characterized by higher information transfer as compared to other auditory stimulation conditions.

  12. Estimation of neural dynamics from MEG/EEG cortical current density maps: application to the reconstruction of large-scale cortical synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Olivier; Garnero, Line; Cosmelli, Diego; Varela, Francisco J

    2002-09-01

    There is a growing interest in elucidating the role of specific patterns of neural dynamics--such as transient synchronization between distant cell assemblies--in brain functions. Magnetoencephalography (MEG)/electroencephalography (EEG) recordings consist in the spatial integration of the activity from large and multiple remotely located populations of neurons. Massive diffusive effects and poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) preclude the proper estimation of indices related to cortical dynamics from nonaveraged MEG/EEG surface recordings. Source localization from MEG/EEG surface recordings with its excellent time resolution could contribute to a better understanding of the working brain. We propose a robust and original approach to the MEG/EEG distributed inverse problem to better estimate neural dynamics of cortical sources. For this, the surrogate data method is introduced in the MEG/EEG inverse problem framework. We apply this approach on nonaveraged data with poor SNR using the minimum norm estimator and find source localization results weakly sensitive to noise. Surrogates allow the reduction of the source space in order to reconstruct MEG/EEG data with reduced biases in both source localization and time-series dynamics. Monte Carlo simulations and results obtained from real MEG data indicate it is possible to estimate non invasively an important part of cortical source locations and dynamic and, therefore, to reveal brain functional networks.

  13. Cortical differentiation of speech and nonspeech sounds at 100 ms: implications for dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Tiina; Helenius, Päivi; Salmelin, Riitta

    2005-07-01

    Neurophysiological measures indicate cortical sensitivity to speech sounds by 150 ms after stimulus onset. In this time window dyslexic subjects start to show abnormal cortical processing. We investigated whether phonetic analysis is reflected in the robust auditory cortical activation at approximately 100 ms (N100m), and whether dyslexic subjects show abnormal N100m responses to speech or nonspeech sounds. We used magnetoencephalography to record auditory responses of 10 normally reading and 10 dyslexic adults. The speech stimuli were synthetic Finnish speech sounds (/a/, /u/, /pa/, /ka/). The nonspeech stimuli were complex nonspeech sounds and simple sine wave tones, composed of the F1+F2+F3 and F2 formant frequencies of the speech sounds, respectively. All sounds evoked a prominent N100m response in the bilateral auditory cortices. The N100m activation was stronger to speech than nonspeech sounds in the left but not in the right auditory cortex, in both subject groups. The leftward shift of hemispheric balance for speech sounds is likely to reflect analysis at the phonetic level. In dyslexic subjects the overall interhemispheric amplitude balance and timing were altered for all sound types alike. Dyslexic individuals thus seem to have an unusual cortical organization of general auditory processing in the time window of speech-sensitive analysis.

  14. Human cortical responses to slow and fast binaural beats reveal multiple mechanisms of binaural hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Bernhard; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Thompson, Jessica; Jamali, Shahab; Fujioka, Takako

    2014-10-15

    When two tones with slightly different frequencies are presented to both ears, they interact in the central auditory system and induce the sensation of a beating sound. At low difference frequencies, we perceive a single sound, which is moving across the head between the left and right ears. The percept changes to loudness fluctuation, roughness, and pitch with increasing beat rate. To examine the neural representations underlying these different perceptions, we recorded neuromagnetic cortical responses while participants listened to binaural beats at a continuously varying rate between 3 Hz and 60 Hz. Binaural beat responses were analyzed as neuromagnetic oscillations following the trajectory of the stimulus rate. Responses were largest in the 40-Hz gamma range and at low frequencies. Binaural beat responses at 3 Hz showed opposite polarity in the left and right auditory cortices. We suggest that this difference in polarity reflects the opponent neural population code for representing sound location. Binaural beats at any rate induced gamma oscillations. However, the responses were largest at 40-Hz stimulation. We propose that the neuromagnetic gamma oscillations reflect postsynaptic modulation that allows for precise timing of cortical neural firing. Systematic phase differences between bilateral responses suggest that separate sound representations of a sound object exist in the left and right auditory cortices. We conclude that binaural processing at the cortical level occurs with the same temporal acuity as monaural processing whereas the identification of sound location requires further interpretation and is limited by the rate of object representations. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Integrated mechanisms of anticipation and rate-of-change computations in cortical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccini, Gabriel D; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V; Compte, Albert

    2007-05-01

    Local neocortical circuits are characterized by stereotypical physiological and structural features that subserve generic computational operations. These basic computations of the cortical microcircuit emerge through the interplay of neuronal connectivity, cellular intrinsic properties, and synaptic plasticity dynamics. How these interacting mechanisms generate specific computational operations in the cortical circuit remains largely unknown. Here, we identify the neurophysiological basis of both the rate of change and anticipation computations on synaptic inputs in a cortical circuit. Through biophysically realistic computer simulations and neuronal recordings, we show that the rate-of-change computation is operated robustly in cortical networks through the combination of two ubiquitous brain mechanisms: short-term synaptic depression and spike-frequency adaptation. We then show how this rate-of-change circuit can be embedded in a convergently connected network to anticipate temporally incoming synaptic inputs, in quantitative agreement with experimental findings on anticipatory responses to moving stimuli in the primary visual cortex. Given the robustness of the mechanism and the widespread nature of the physiological machinery involved, we suggest that rate-of-change computation and temporal anticipation are principal, hard-wired functions of neural information processing in the cortical microcircuit.

  16. Integrated mechanisms of anticipation and rate-of-change computations in cortical circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel D Puccini

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Local neocortical circuits are characterized by stereotypical physiological and structural features that subserve generic computational operations. These basic computations of the cortical microcircuit emerge through the interplay of neuronal connectivity, cellular intrinsic properties, and synaptic plasticity dynamics. How these interacting mechanisms generate specific computational operations in the cortical circuit remains largely unknown. Here, we identify the neurophysiological basis of both the rate of change and anticipation computations on synaptic inputs in a cortical circuit. Through biophysically realistic computer simulations and neuronal recordings, we show that the rate-of-change computation is operated robustly in cortical networks through the combination of two ubiquitous brain mechanisms: short-term synaptic depression and spike-frequency adaptation. We then show how this rate-of-change circuit can be embedded in a convergently connected network to anticipate temporally incoming synaptic inputs, in quantitative agreement with experimental findings on anticipatory responses to moving stimuli in the primary visual cortex. Given the robustness of the mechanism and the widespread nature of the physiological machinery involved, we suggest that rate-of-change computation and temporal anticipation are principal, hard-wired functions of neural information processing in the cortical microcircuit.

  17. Surround suppression and sparse coding in visual and barrel cortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N S Sachdev

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During natural vision the entire retina is stimulated. Likewise, during natural tactile behaviors, spatially extensive regions of the somatosensory surface are co-activated. The large spatial extent of naturalistic stimulation means that surround suppression, a phenomenon whose neural mechanisms remain a matter of debate, must arise during natural behavior. To identify common neural motifs that might instantiate surround suppression across modalities, we review models of surround suppression and compare the evidence supporting the competing ideas that surround suppression has either cortical or sub-cortical origins in visual and barrel cortex. In the visual system there is general agreement lateral inhibitory mechanisms contribute to surround suppression, but little direct experimental evidence that intracortical inhibition plays a major role. Two intracellular recording studies of V1, one using naturalistic stimuli (Haider et al., 2010, the other sinusoidal gratings (Ozeki et al., 2009, sought to identify the causes of reduced activity in V1 with increasing stimulus size, a hallmark of surround suppression. The former attributed this effect to increased inhibition, the latter to largely balanced withdrawal of excitation and inhibition. In rodent primary somatosensory barrel cortex, multi-whisker responses are generally weaker than single whisker responses, suggesting multi-whisker stimulation engages similar surround suppressive mechanisms. The origins of suppression in S1 remain elusive: studies have implicated brainstem lateral/internuclear interactions and both thalamic and cortical inhibition. Although the anatomical organization and instantiation of surround suppression in the visual and somatosensory systems differ, we consider the idea that one common function of surround suppression, in both modalities, is to remove the statistical redundancies associated with natural stimuli by increasing the sparseness or selectivity of sensory

  18. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials from 2005 until this past month are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the Trigger-Aware Analysis Tutorial by Monika Wielers on March 23 and the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal.Feedback WelcomeOur group is making arrangements now to record plenary sessions, tutorials, and other important ATLAS events for 2007. Your suggestions for potential recording, as well as your feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you.Enjoy the Lectures!

  19. Quantitative radiology: radiogrammetry of cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dequeker, J

    1976-11-01

    Based on personal experience and data in the literature, an overview is given of radiogrammetry of cortical bone of the second metacarpal. There is a within- and between-observer error which amounts respectively to 1.2 and 1.5% for the outer diameter and 4.8 and 6.4% for the inner diameter. The systematic + or-- trend between observers indicates that one observer working according to certain defined rules obtains the most reliable results. There is a large variability in amount of bone within one age and sex group which is partly due to skeletal size differences, are insufficient since skeletal size differences still exist. The variability is reduced when the data are divided into strata of skeletal size. Since cortical area shows the best correlation with outer diameter within each age group and since cortical area represents best the ash content of the bones the values of this index are most suited to be grouped according to outer diameter. In differentiating pathological from physiological bone loss this procedure is an improvement on the previously published indices of amount of bone. When comparing different populations this method has advantages since skeletal size differences are eliminated. Comparing seven populations it was found that populations living in the United States of America have more bone for a given skeletal size than populations in Europe or Nigeria. Bone loss with age is a general phenomenon but differences in rate of loss are observed between the sexes and between ethnic different populations. The decrease of bone mass is faster after the age of 50 years in woman than in men. Blacks living in the United States loose less bone with age than whites. Radiogrammetry of cortical bone in groups gives useful information on bond remodelling during ageing and in pathological conditions. At an individual level, however, it is difficult to evaluate changes on a short term basis with radiogrammetry. Radiogrammetry of cortical bone is a simple and

  20. Cortical hierarchy governs rat claustrocortical circuit organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael G; Cody, Patrick A; Bubser, Michael; Wang, Hui-Dong; Deutch, Ariel Y; Mathur, Brian N

    2017-04-15

    The claustrum is a telencephalic gray matter structure with various proposed functions, including sensory integration and attentional allocation. Underlying these concepts is the reciprocal connectivity of the claustrum with most, if not all, areas of the cortex. What remains to be elucidated to inform functional hypotheses further is whether a pattern exists in the strength of connectivity between a given cortical area and the claustrum. To this end, we performed a series of retrograde neuronal tract tracer injections into rat cortical areas along the cortical processing hierarchy, from primary sensory and motor to frontal cortices. We observed that the number of claustrocortical projections increased as a function of processing hierarchy; claustrum neurons projecting to primary sensory cortices were scant and restricted in distribution across the claustrum, whereas neurons projecting to the cingulate cortex were densely packed and more evenly distributed throughout the claustrum. This connectivity pattern suggests that the claustrum may preferentially subserve executive functions orchestrated by the cingulate cortex. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1347-1362, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Pre-SMA actively engages in conflict processing in human: a combined study of epicortical ERPs and direct cortical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Kiyohide; Matsumoto, Riki; Kunieda, Takeharu; Shimotake, Akihiro; Matsuhashi, Masao; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2013-04-01

    Previous non-invasive studies have proposed that the deeply seated region of the medial frontal cortex engages in conflict processing in humans, but its core region has remained to be elucidated. By means of direct cortical stimulation, which excels other techniques in temporal and spatial resolutions and in the capacity of producing transient, functional impairment even in the deeply located cortices, we attempted to obtain direct evidence that the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) actively engages in conflict processing. Subject was a patient with right frontal lobe epilepsy who underwent invasive presurgical evaluation with subdural electrodes placed on the medial and lateral frontal cortices. During a conflict task--modified Eriksen flanker task, direct cortical stimulation was delivered time-locked to the task at the inferior part of the medial superior frontal gyrus (inferior medial SFG), the superior part of the medial SFG, and the middle frontal gyrus. By adopting the session of sham stimulation that was employed as a within-block control, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from the medial and lateral frontal cortices. The inferior medial SFG showed a significant ERP difference between trials with more and less conflict, while the other frontal cortices did not. Among the three stimulus sites, only stimulation of the inferior medial SFG significantly prolonged reaction time in trials with more conflict. Anatomically, the inferior medial SFG corresponded with the pre-SMA (Brodmann area 8). It was located 1-2 cm rostral to the vertical anterior commissure line where cortical stimulation elicited arrest of motion (the supplementary negative motor area). Functionally, this area corresponded to the dorso-rostral portion of the activation loci in previous neuroimaging studies focusing on conflict processing. By combining epicortical ERP recording and direct cortical stimulation in a human brain, this study, for the first time, presented one direct

  2. Axono-cortical evoked potentials: A proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandonnet, E; Dadoun, Y; Poisson, I; Madadaki, C; Froelich, S; Lozeron, P

    2016-04-01

    Awake surgery is currently considered the best method to tailor intraparenchymatous resections according to functional boundaries. However, the exact mechanisms by which electrical stimulation disturbs behavior remain largely unknown. In this case report, we describe a new method to explore the propagation toward cortical sites of a brief pulse applied to an eloquent white matter pathway. We present a patient, operated on in awake condition for removal of a cavernoma of the left ventral premotor cortex. At the end of the resection, the application of 60Hz stimulation in the white matter of the operculum induced anomia. Stimulating the same site at a frequency of 1Hz during 70seconds allowed to record responses on electrodes put over Broca's area and around the inferior part of central sulcus. Axono-cortical evoked potentials were then obtained by averaging unitary responses, time-locked to the stimulus. We then discuss the origin of these evoked axono-cortical potentials and the likely pathway connecting the stimulation site to the recorded cortical sites.

  3. Differential representation of arm movement direction in relation to cortical anatomy and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Tonio; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Aertsen, Ad; Mehring, Carsten

    2009-02-01

    Information about arm movement direction in neuronal activity of the cerebral cortex can be used for movement control mediated by a brain-machine interface (BMI). Here we provide a topographic analysis of the information related to arm movement direction that can be extracted from single trials of electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals recorded from the human frontal and parietal cortex based on a precise assignment of ECoG recording channels to the subjects' individual cortical anatomy and function. To this aim, each electrode contact was identified on structural MRI scans acquired while the electrodes were implanted and was thus related to the brain anatomy of each patient. Cortical function was assessed by direct cortical electrical stimulation. We show that activity from the primary motor cortex, in particular from the region showing hand and arm motor responses upon electrical stimulation, carries most directional information. The premotor, posterior parietal and lateral prefrontal cortex contributed gradually less, but still significant information. This gradient was observed for decoding from movement-related potentials, and from spectral amplitude modulations in low frequencies and in the high gamma band. Our findings thus demonstrate a close topographic correlation between cortical functional anatomy and direction-related information in humans that might be used for brain-machine interfacing.

  4. The Estimation of Cortical Activity for Brain-Computer Interface: Applications in a Domotic Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Babiloni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze whether the use of the cortical activity, estimated from noninvasive EEG recordings, could be useful to detect mental states related to the imagination of limb movements, we estimate cortical activity from high-resolution EEG recordings in a group of healthy subjects by using realistic head models. Such cortical activity was estimated in region of interest associated with the subject's Brodmann areas by using a depth-weighted minimum norm technique. Results showed that the use of the cortical-estimated activity instead of the unprocessed EEG improves the recognition of the mental states associated to the limb movement imagination in the group of normal subjects. The BCI methodology presented here has been used in a group of disabled patients in order to give them a suitable control of several electronic devices disposed in a three-room environment devoted to the neurorehabilitation. Four of six patients were able to control several electronic devices in this domotic context with the BCI system.

  5. The estimation of cortical activity for brain-computer interface: applications in a domotic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, F; Cincotti, F; Marciani, M; Salinari, S; Astolfi, L; Tocci, A; Aloise, F; De Vico Fallani, F; Bufalari, S; Mattia, D

    2007-01-01

    In order to analyze whether the use of the cortical activity, estimated from noninvasive EEG recordings, could be useful to detect mental states related to the imagination of limb movements, we estimate cortical activity from high-resolution EEG recordings in a group of healthy subjects by using realistic head models. Such cortical activity was estimated in region of interest associated with the subject's Brodmann areas by using a depth-weighted minimum norm technique. Results showed that the use of the cortical-estimated activity instead of the unprocessed EEG improves the recognition of the mental states associated to the limb movement imagination in the group of normal subjects. The BCI methodology presented here has been used in a group of disabled patients in order to give them a suitable control of several electronic devices disposed in a three-room environment devoted to the neurorehabilitation. Four of six patients were able to control several electronic devices in this domotic context with the BCI system.

  6. Evaluating interhemispheric cortical responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in chronic stroke: A TMS-EEG investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borich, Michael R; Wheaton, Lewis A; Brodie, Sonia M; Lakhani, Bimal; Boyd, Lara A

    2016-04-01

    TMS-evoked cortical responses can be measured using simultaneous electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) to directly quantify cortical connectivity in the human brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interhemispheric cortical connectivity between the primary motor cortices (M1s) in participants with chronic stroke and controls using TMS-EEG. Ten participants with chronic stroke and four controls were tested. TMS-evoked responses were recorded at rest and during a typical TMS assessment of transcallosal inhibition (TCI). EEG recordings from peri-central gyral electrodes (C3 and C4) were evaluated using imaginary phase coherence (IPC) analyses to quantify levels of effective interhemispheric connectivity. Significantly increased TMS-evoked beta (15-30Hz frequency range) IPC was observed in the stroke group during ipsilesional M1 stimulation compared to controls during TCI assessment but not at rest. TMS-evoked beta IPC values were associated with TMS measures of transcallosal inhibition across groups. These results suggest TMS-evoked EEG responses can index abnormal effective interhemispheric connectivity in chronic stroke.

  7. Somatosensory cortical representation in the Australian ghost bat, Macroderma gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, L Z; Pettigrew, J D; Calford, M B

    1986-06-08

    Bats of the two suborders Microchiroptera and Megachiroptera have a modified hand in which the digits of the forelimb are caudally oriented to form the wing. In a previous study of a megachiropteran species, this modification of body plan was found to be reflected in the somatosensory cortical representation such that the orientation of the digit representation was reversed compared with walking mammals. This finding suggests that the precise details of arrangement of topographical maps are functionally significant and do not merely reflect an order imposed by peripheral innervation. Recent evidence for separate origins of Microchiroptera and Megachiroptera raises the question of whether the cortical somatosensory representation in Microchiroptera will also have a reversal of digit orientation compared with walking mammals. We recorded multiunit activity from the somatosensory cortex of a microchiropteran bat, Macroderma gigas. We found two orderly representations of the body surface, SI and SII, in both of which the digit orientation was opposite to the head orientation in accordance with adaptation for flight, and reversed with respect to equivalent maps in other mammals. We also found minor variations in body surface representation compared with Megachiroptera, in line with their proposed independent evolution.

  8. Far cortical locking screws in distal femur fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, John D; Tanner, Stephanie L; Jeray, Kyle J

    2015-03-01

    Distal femur fractures routinely heal by secondary bone healing, which relies on interfragmentary motion. Periarticular locking plates are commonly used for fixation in distal femur fractures but are associated with a high nonunion rate, likely due to the stiffness of the constructs. Far cortical locking (FCL) screws are designed to allow micromotion at the near cortex while maintaining purchase in only the far cortex. Although clinical data are limited, these screws have been shown in biomechanical studies to provide excellent interfragmentary motion, and animal models have shown increased callus formation compared with traditional locking screws. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical effects that FCL screws have on healing in distal femur fractures treated with locked constructs. In this retrospective case series, 15 patients with a distal femur fracture treated with MotionLoc screws (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana) were analyzed. Serial radiographs were evaluated for callus presence and time to union. All fractures were either 33-A3 or 33-C2 according to the AO classification system, and 5 (33%) were open. Bone loss was recorded in 2 patients. There were no nonunions, and average time to union was 24 weeks. There were no implant failures, and all 5 open fractures, including the 2 with bone loss, healed without intervention. There was 1 reoperation due to painful hardware. Although this is a small case series, these results are promising. Far cortical locking screws may provide the answer to the high nonunion rate associated with distal femur fractures treated with traditional locked constructs.

  9. Interhemispheric interactions between the human primary somatosensory cortices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Ragert

    Full Text Available In the somatosensory domain it is still unclear at which processing stage information reaches the opposite hemispheres. Due to dense transcallosal connections, the secondary somatosensory cortex (S2 has been proposed to be the key candidate for interhemispheric information transfer. However, recent animal studies showed that the primary somatosensory cortex (S1 might as well account for interhemispheric information transfer. Using paired median nerve somatosensory evoked potential recordings in humans we tested the hypothesis that interhemispheric inhibitory interactions in the somatosensory system occur already in an early cortical processing stage such as S1. Conditioning right S1 by electrical median nerve (MN stimulation of the left MN (CS resulted in a significant reduction of the N20 response in the target (left S1 relative to a test stimulus (TS to the right MN alone when the interstimulus interval between CS and TS was between 20 and 25 ms. No such changes were observed for later cortical components such as the N20/P25, N30, P40 and N60 amplitude. Additionally, the subcortically generated P14 response in left S1 was also not affected. These results document the existence of interhemispheric inhibitory interactions between S1 in human subjects in the critical time interval of 20-25 ms after median nerve stimulation.

  10. Functional Cortical Network in Alpha Band Correlates with Social Bargaining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeke, Pablo; Zamorano, Francisco; Chavez, Mario; Cosmelli, Diego; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Solving demanding tasks requires fast and flexible coordination among different brain areas. Everyday examples of this are the social dilemmas in which goals tend to clash, requiring one to weigh alternative courses of action in limited time. In spite of this fact, there are few studies that directly address the dynamics of flexible brain network integration during social interaction. To study the preceding, we carried out EEG recordings while subjects played a repeated version of the Ultimatum Game in both human (social) and computer (non-social) conditions. We found phase synchrony (inter-site-phase-clustering) modulation in alpha band that was specific to the human condition and independent of power modulation. The strength and patterns of the inter-site-phase-clustering of the cortical networks were also modulated, and these modulations were mainly in frontal and parietal regions. Moreover, changes in the individuals’ alpha network structure correlated with the risk of the offers made only in social conditions. This correlation was independent of changes in power and inter-site-phase-clustering strength. Our results indicate that, when subjects believe they are participating in a social interaction, a specific modulation of functional cortical networks in alpha band takes place, suggesting that phase synchrony of alpha oscillations could serve as a mechanism by which different brain areas flexibly interact in order to adapt ongoing behavior in socially demanding contexts. PMID:25286240

  11. Statistics of natural scenes and the cortical representation of color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, G. A.; Rao, A. R.; Xiao, Y.; Kaplan, E.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the spatial correlational structure of orientation and color information in natural images. We compare these with the spatial correlation structure of optical recordings of macaque monkey primary visual cortex, in response to oriented and color stimuli. We show that the correlation of orientation falls off rapidly over increasing distance. By using a color metric based on the a-b coordinates in the CIE-Lab color space, we show that color information, on the other hand, is more highly correlated over larger distances. We also show that orientation and color information are statistically independent in natural images. We perform a similar spatial correlation analysis of the cortical responses to orientation and color. We observe a similar behavior to that of natural images, in that the correlation of orientation-specific responses falls off; more rapidly than the correlation of color-specific responses. Our findings suggest that: (a) orientation and color information should be processed in separate channels, and (b) the organization of cortical color responses at a lower spatial frequency compared to orientation is a reflection of the statistical structure of visual world.

  12. Altered Cortical Ensembles in Mouse Models of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jordan P; Peterka, Darcy S; Gogos, Joseph A; Yuste, Rafael

    2017-04-05

    In schizophrenia, brain-wide alterations have been identified at the molecular and cellular levels, yet how these phenomena affect cortical circuit activity remains unclear. We studied two mouse models of schizophrenia-relevant disease processes: chronic ketamine (KET) administration and Df(16)A(+/-), modeling 22q11.2 microdeletions, a genetic variant highly penetrant for schizophrenia. Local field potential recordings in visual cortex confirmed gamma-band abnormalities similar to patient studies. Two-photon calcium imaging of local cortical populations revealed in both models a deficit in the reliability of neuronal coactivity patterns (ensembles), which was not a simple consequence of altered single-neuron activity. This effect was present in ongoing and sensory-evoked activity and was not replicated by acute ketamine administration or pharmacogenetic parvalbumin-interneuron suppression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that schizophrenia is an "attractor" disease and demonstrate that degraded neuronal ensembles are a common consequence of diverse genetic, cellular, and synaptic alterations seen in chronic schizophrenia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Fearful faces heighten the cortical representation of contextual threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Matthias J; Keil, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Perception of facial expressions is typically investigated by presenting isolated face stimuli. In everyday life, however, faces are rarely seen without a surrounding visual context that affects perception and interpretation of the facial expression. Conversely, fearful faces may act as a cue, heightening the sensitivity of the visual system to effectively detect potential threat in the environment. In the present study, we used steady-state visually evoked potentials (ssVEPs) to examine the mutual effects of facial expressions (fearful, neutral, happy) and affective visual context (pleasant, neutral, threat). By assigning two different flicker frequencies (12 vs. 15Hz) to the face and the visual context scene, cortical activity to the concurrent stimuli was separated, which represents a novel approach to independently tracking the cortical processes associated with the face and the context. Twenty healthy students viewed flickering faces overlaid on flickering visual scenes, while performing a simple change-detection task at fixation, and high-density EEG was recorded. Arousing background scenes generally drove larger ssVEP amplitudes than neutral scenes. Importantly, background and expression interacted: When viewing fearful facial expressions, the ssVEP in response to threat context was amplified compared to other backgrounds. Together, these findings suggest that fearful faces elicit vigilance for potential threat in the visual periphery. © 2013.

  14. Neurodynamics of somatosensory cortices studied by magnetoencephelography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Kuniharu

    2013-09-01

    From the viewpoint of statistical inverse problems, identification of transfer functions in feedback models is applied for neurodynamics of somatosensory cortices, and brain communication among active regions can be expressed in terms of transfer functions. However, brain activities have been investigated mainly by averaged waveforms in the conventional magnetoencephalography analysis, and thus brain communication among active regions has not yet been identified. It is shown that brain communication among two more than three brain regions is determined, when fluctuations related to concatenate averaged waveforms can be obtained by using a suitable blind source separation method. In blind identification of feedback model, some transfer functions or their impulse responses between output variables of current dipoles corresponding to active regions are identified from reconstructed time series data of fluctuations by the method of inverse problem. Neurodynamics of somatosensory cortices in 5 Hz median nerve stimuli can be shown by cerebral communication among active regions of somatosensory cortices in terms of impulse responses of feedback model.

  15. The ontogeny of the cortical language network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeide, Michael A; Friederici, Angela D

    2016-05-01

    Language-processing functions follow heterogeneous developmental trajectories. The human embryo can already distinguish vowels in utero, but grammatical complexity is usually not fully mastered until at least 7 years of age. Examining the current literature, we propose that the ontogeny of the cortical language network can be roughly subdivided into two main developmental stages. In the first stage extending over the first 3 years of life, the infant rapidly acquires bottom-up processing capacities, which are primarily implemented bilaterally in the temporal cortices. In the second stage continuing into adolescence, top-down processes emerge gradually with the increasing functional selectivity and structural connectivity of the left inferior frontal cortex.

  16. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. O'Rourke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD and discuss the literature on this topic.

  17. Cortical activation elicited by unrecognized stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badgaiyan Rajendra D

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unclear whether a stimulus that cannot be recognized consciously, could elicit a well-processed cognitive response. Methods We used functional imaging to examine the pattern of cortical activation elicited by unrecognized stimuli during memory processing. Subjects were given a recognition task using recognizable and non-recognizable subliminal stimuli. Results Unrecognized stimuli activated the cortical areas that are associated with retrieval attempt (left prefrontal, and novelty detection (left hippocampus. This indicates that the stimuli that were not consciously recognized, activated neural network associated with aspects of explicit memory processing. Conclusion Results suggest that conscious recognition of stimuli is not necessary for activation of cognitive processing.

  18. Elemental mercury poisoning probably causes cortical myoclonus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragothaman, Mona; Kulkarni, Girish; Ashraf, Valappil V; Pal, Pramod K; Chickabasavaiah, Yasha; Shankar, Susarla K; Govindappa, Srikanth S; Satishchandra, Parthasarthy; Muthane, Uday B

    2007-10-15

    Mercury toxicity causes postural tremors, commonly referred to as "mercurial tremors," and cerebellar dysfunction. A 23-year woman, 2 years after injecting herself with elemental mercury developed disabling generalized myoclonus and ataxia. Electrophysiological studies confirmed the myoclonus was probably of cortical origin. Her deficits progressed over 2 years and improved after subcutaneous mercury deposits at the injection site were surgically cleared. Myoclonus of cortical origin has never been described in mercury poisoning. It is important to ask patients presenting with jerks about exposure to elemental mercury even if they have a progressive illness, as it is a potentially reversible condition as in our patient.

  19. Posterior cortical atrophy: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Howard S; Lavin, Patrick J M

    2006-11-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a striking clinical syndrome in which a dementing illness begins with visual symptoms. Initially, the problem may seem to be loss of elementary vision, but over time the patient develops features of visual agnosia, topographical difficulty, optic ataxia, simultanagnosia, ocular apraxia (Balint's syndrome), alexia, acalculia, right-left confusion, and agraphia (Gerstmann's syndrome), and later a more generalized dementia. Occasional patients have visual hallucinations and signs of Parkinson's disease or Lewy body dementia. A number of different neuropathologic disorders are associated with posterior cortical atrophy.

  20. Record club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record club

    2010-01-01

      Bonjour a tous, Voici les 24 nouveaux DVD de Juillet disponibles depuis quelques jours, sans oublier les 5 CD Pop musique. Découvrez la saga du terroriste Carlos, la vie de Gainsbourg et les aventures de Lucky Luke; angoissez avec Paranormal Activity et évadez vous sur Pandora dans la peau d’Avatar. Toutes les nouveautés sont à découvrir directement au club. Pour en connaître la liste complète ainsi que le reste de la collection du Record Club, nous vous invitons sur notre site web: http://cern.ch/crc. Toutes les dernières nouveautés sont dans la rubrique « Discs of the Month ». Rappel : le club est ouvert les Lundis, Mercredis, Vendredis de 12h30 à 13h00 au restaurant n°2, bâtiment 504. A bientôt chers Record Clubbers.  

  1. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2011-01-01

    http://cern.ch/Record.Club November  Selections Just in time for the holiday season, we have added a number of new CDs and DVDs into the Club. You will find the full lists at http://cern.ch/record.club; select the "Discs of the Month" button on the left side on the left panel of the web page and then Nov 2011. New films include the all 5 episodes of Fast and Furious, many of the most famous films starring Jean-Paul Belmondo and those of Louis de Funes and some more recent films such as The Lincoln Lawyer and, according to some critics, Woody Allen’s best film for years – Midnight in Paris. For the younger generation there is Cars 2 and Kung Fu Panda 2. New CDs include the latest releases by Adele, Coldplay and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. We have also added the new Duets II CD featuring Tony Bennett singing with some of today’s pop stars including Lady Gaga, Amy Winehouse and Willy Nelson. The Club is now open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday ...

  2. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeremy Herr; Homer A. Neal; Mitch McLachlan

    The University of Michigan Web Archives for the 2006 ATLAS Week Plenary Sessions, as well as the first of 2007, are now online. In addition, there are a wide variety of Software and Physics Tutorial sessions, recorded over the past couple years, to chose from. All ATLAS-specific archives are accessible here.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Shaping Collaboration 2006The Michigan group is happy to announce a complete set of recordings from the Shaping Collaboration conference held last December at the CICG in Geneva.The event hosted a mix of Collaborative Tool experts and LHC Users, and featured presentations by the CERN Deputy Director General, Prof. Jos Engelen, the President of Internet2, and chief developers from VRVS/EVO, WLAP, and other tools...

  3. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2011-01-01

    http://cern.ch/Record.Club Nouveautés été 2011 Le club de location de CDs et de DVDs vient d’ajouter un grand nombre de disques pour l’été 2011. Parmi eux, Le Discours d’un Roi, oscar 2011 du meilleur film et Harry Potter les reliques de la mort (1re partie). Ce n’est pas moins de 48 DVDs et 10 CDs nouveaux qui vous sont proposés à la location. Il y en a pour tous les genres. Alors n’hésitez pas à consulter notre site http://cern.ch/record.club, voir Disc Catalogue, Discs of the month pour avoir la liste complète. Le club est ouvert tous les Lundi, Mercredi, Vendredi de 12h30 à 13h dans le bâtiment du restaurent N°2 (Cf. URL: http://www.cern.ch/map/building?bno=504) A très bientôt.  

  4. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2011-01-01

    http://cern.ch/Record.Club June Selections We have put a significant number of new CDs and DVDs into the Club You will find the full lists at http://cern.ch/record.club and select the «Discs of the Month» button on the left side on the left panel of the web page and then June 2011. New films include the latest Action, Suspense and Science Fiction film hits, general drama movies including the Oscar-winning The King’s Speech, comedies including both chapter of Bridget Jones’s Diary, seven films for children and a musical. Other highlights include the latest Harry Potter release and some movies from the past you may have missed including the first in the Terminator series. New CDs include the latest releases by Michel Sardou, Mylene Farmer, Jennifer Lopez, Zucchero and Britney Spears. There is also a hits collection from NRJ. Don’t forget that the Club is now open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday lunchtimes from 12h30 to 13h00 in Restaurant 2, Building 504. (C...

  5. Independent measurement of femoral cortical thickness and cortical bone density using clinical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treece, G M; Gee, A H

    2015-02-01

    The local structure of the proximal femoral cortex is of interest since both fracture risk, and the effects of various interventions aimed at reducing that risk, are associated with cortical properties focused in particular regions rather than dispersed over the whole bone. Much of the femoral cortex is less than 3mm thick, appearing so blurred in clinical CT that its actual density is not apparent in the data, and neither thresholding nor full-width half-maximum techniques are capable of determining its width. Our previous work on cortical bone mapping showed how to produce more accurate estimates of cortical thickness by assuming a fixed value of the cortical density for each hip. However, although cortical density varies much less over the proximal femur than thickness, what little variation there is leads to errors in thickness measurement. In this paper, we develop the cortical bone mapping technique by exploiting local estimates of imaging blur to correct the global density estimate, thus providing a local density estimate as well as more accurate estimates of thickness. We also consider measurement of cortical mass surface density and the density of trabecular bone immediately adjacent to the cortex. Performance is assessed with ex vivo clinical QCT scans of proximal femurs, with true values derived from high resolution HRpQCT scans of the same bones. We demonstrate superior estimation of thickness than is possible with alternative techniques (accuracy 0.12 ± 0.39 mm for cortices in the range 1-3mm), and that local cortical density estimation is feasible for densities >800 mg/cm(3).

  6. Memories of attachment hamper EEG cortical connectivity in dissociative patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Benedetto; Speranza, Anna Maria; Dittoni, Serena; Gnoni, Valentina; Trentini, Cristina; Vergano, Carola Maggiora; Liotti, Giovanni; Brunetti, Riccardo; Testani, Elisa; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated cortical connectivity modifications by electroencephalography (EEG) lagged coherence analysis, in subjects with dissociative disorders and in controls, after retrieval of attachment memories. We asked thirteen patients with dissociative disorders and thirteen age- and sex-matched healthy controls to retrieve personal attachment-related autobiographical memories through adult attachment interviews (AAI). EEG was recorded in the closed eyes resting state before and after the AAI. EEG lagged coherence before and after AAI was compared in all subjects. In the control group, memories of attachment promoted a widespread increase in EEG connectivity, in particular in the high-frequency EEG bands. Compared to controls, dissociative patients did not show an increase in EEG connectivity after the AAI. Conclusions: These results shed light on the neurophysiology of the disintegrative effect of retrieval of traumatic attachment memories in dissociative patients.

  7. Sparse cortical source localization using spatio-temporal atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korats, Gundars; Ranta, Radu; Le Cam, Steven; Louis-Dorr, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of sparse localization of cortical sources from scalp EEG recordings. Localization algorithms use propagation model under spatial and/or temporal constraints, but their performance highly depends on the data signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this work we propose a dictionary based sparse localization method which uses a data driven spatio-temporal dictionary to reconstruct the measurements using Single Best Replacement (SBR) and Continuation Single Best Replacement (CSBR) algorithms. We tested and compared our methods with the well-known MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC algorithms on simulated realistic data. Tests were carried out for different noise levels. The results show that our method has a strong advantage over MUSIC-type methods in case of synchronized sources.

  8. RECORD CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2010-01-01

    DVD James Bond – Series Complete To all Record Club Members, to start the new year, we have taken advantage of a special offer to add copies of all the James Bond movies to date, from the very first - Dr. No - to the latest - Quantum of Solace. No matter which of the successive 007s you prefer (Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan or Daniel Craig), they are all there. Or perhaps you have a favourite Bond Girl, or even perhaps a favourite villain. Take your pick. You can find the full selection listed on the club web site http://cern.ch/crc; use the panel on the left of the page “Discs of the Month” and select Jan 2010. We remind you that we are open on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 12:30 to 13:00 in Restaurant 2 (Bldg 504).

  9. Record breakers

    CERN Document Server

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    In the sixties, CERN’s Fellows were but a handful of about 50 young experimentalists present on site to complete their training. Today, their number has increased to a record-breaking 500. They come from many different fields and are spread across CERN’s different activity areas.   “Diversifying the Fellowship programme has been the key theme in recent years,” comments James Purvis, Head of the Recruitment, Programmes and Monitoring group in the HR Department. “In particular, the 2005 five-yearly review introduced the notion of ‘senior’ and ‘junior’ Fellowships, broadening the target audience to include those with Bachelor-level qualifications.” Diversification made CERN’s Fellowship programme attractive to a wider audience but the number of Fellows on site could not have increased so much without the support of EU-funded projects, which were instrumental in the growth of the programme. ...

  10. Human Temporal Cortical Single Neuron Activity during Language: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Ojemann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Findings from recordings of human temporal cortical single neuron activity during several measures of language, including object naming and word reading are reviewed and related to changes in activity in the same neurons during recent verbal memory and verbal associative learning measures, in studies conducted during awake neurosurgery for the treatment of epilepsy. The proportion of neurons changing activity with language tasks was similar in either hemisphere. Dominant hemisphere activity was characterized by relative inhibition, some of which occurred during overt speech, possibly to block perception of one’s own voice. However, the majority seems to represent a dynamic network becoming active with verbal memory encoding and especially verbal learning, but inhibited during performance of overlearned language tasks. Individual neurons are involved in different networks for different aspects of language, including naming or reading and naming in different languages. The majority of the changes in activity were tonic sustained shifts in firing. Patterned phasic activity for specific language items was very infrequently recorded. Human single neuron recordings provide a unique perspective on the biologic substrate for language, for these findings are in contrast to many of the findings from other techniques for investigating this.

  11. Familial cortical tremor with epilepsy and cerebellar pathological findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, AF; Aronica, E; Steur, ENHJ; Rozemuller-Kwakkel, JM; de Vos, RAI; Tijssen, MAJ

    The clinical and neuropathological findings in a patient with familial cortical tremor with epilepsy (FCTE) are described. Clinically, the patient showed cortical myoclonus, tremor, and generalized seizures. Pathological investigation showed cerebellar degeneration and somal sprouting and loss of

  12. Relationship Between White Matter Hyperintensities, Cortical Thickness, and Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, Anil M.; Norris, David Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are associated with clinically heterogeneous symptoms that cannot be explained by these lesions alone. It is hypothesized that these lesions are associated with distant cortical atrophy and cortical thickness network measures, which can

  13. A case of cortical deafness and anarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaga, Kimitaka; Nakamura, Masako; Takayama, Yoshihiro; Momose, Hiromitsu

    2004-03-01

    Generally, cortical deafness is not complicated by anarthria and cortical anarthria does not affect auditory perception. We report a case of simultaneous progressive cortical deafness and anarthria. At the age of 70 years, the patient, a woman, noticed hearing problems when using the telephone, which worsened rapidly over the next 2 years. She was then referred to our hospital for further examinations of her hearing problems. Auditory tests revealed threshold elevation in the low and middle frequencies on pure-tone audiometry, a maximum speech discrimination of 25% and normal otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem, middle- and long-latency responses. An articulation test revealed abnormal pronunciation. Because of these problems only written and not verbal communication was possible; her ability to read and write was unimpaired. She showed no other neurological problems. Brain MRI demonstrated atrophic changes of the auditory cortex and Wernicke's language center and PET suggested low uptake of (18F) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose around the Sylvian fissures in both hemispheres. Neurologically, the patient was suspected of having progressive aphasia or frontotemporal dementia. Her cortical deafness and anarthria are believed to be early signs of this entity.

  14. Cortical motor contributions to language understanding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.M.; Hagoort, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Here we review evidence from cognitive neuroscience for a tight relation between language and action in the brain. We focus on two types of relation between language and action. First, we investigate whether the perception of speech and speech sounds leads to activation of parts of the cortical

  15. Cortical correlates of acquired deafness to dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattico, Elvira; Tervaniemi, Mari; Valimaki, Vesa; Van Zuijen, Titia; Peretz, Isabelle

    2003-11-01

    Patient I.R., who had bilateral lesions in the auditory cortex but intact hearing, did not distinguish dissonant from consonant musical excerpts in behavioral testing. We additionally found that the electrical brain responses did not differentiate musical intervals in terms of their dissonance/consonance, consistent with the idea that this phenomenon depends on the integrity of cortical functions.

  16. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and Cortical Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at Normandy University, and Rouen and Brest Universities, France studied the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the cortical microvascular and the action of alcohol, glutamate, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF on activity, plasticity, and survival of microvessels in mice.

  17. Central cortical cleanup and zonular deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Antonios, Rafic S; Ahmed, Iqbal Ike K

    2016-01-01

    Background Complete removal of the cortex has been advocated to prevent posterior capsular opacification but carries the risk of zonular dehiscence, hence there is a need for a safe maximal cortical cleanup technique in eyes with severe diffuse zonulopathy in subjects above age 90. Methods We used bimanual central cortical cleaning by elevating central fibers and aspirating them toward the periphery. Peripheral cortical fibers were removed passively only when they became loose due to copious irrigation. A one-piece foldable implant was inserted without a capsular tension ring. Postoperative corticosteroid drops were used. Results This technique was safely performed in a dozen eyes with severe pseudo-exfoliation or brunescent cataract with weak zonules. Posterior capsular rupture, iritis, vitreous loss, and lens subluxation were not observed. Moderate capsular phimosis occurred but with maintained central vision. Conclusion The dogma of “complete cortical cleanup” in severe zonulopathy needs to be revisited in favor of a clear visual axis with maximal preservation of the damaged zonules. This technique is ideal in patients above age 90 where posterior capsular opacification and late dislocation of intraocular lens–capsule bag complex are unlikely to occur until several years postoperatively. PMID:27784979

  18. Central cortical cleanup and zonular deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour AM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad M Mansour,1,2 Rafic S Antonios,1 Iqbal Ike K Ahmed3 1Department of Ophthalmology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Rafic Hariri University Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon; 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Complete removal of the cortex has been advocated to prevent posterior capsular opacification but carries the risk of zonular dehiscence, hence there is a need for a safe maximal cortical cleanup technique in eyes with severe diffuse zonulopathy in subjects above age 90. Methods: We used bimanual central cortical cleaning by elevating central fibers and aspirating them toward the periphery. Peripheral cortical fibers were removed passively only when they became loose due to copious irrigation. A one-piece foldable implant was inserted without a capsular tension ring. Postoperative corticosteroid drops were used. Results: This technique was safely performed in a dozen eyes with severe pseudo-exfoliation or brunescent cataract with weak zonules. Posterior capsular rupture, iritis, vitreous loss, and lens subluxation were not observed. Moderate capsular phimosis occurred but with maintained central vision. Conclusion: The dogma of “complete cortical cleanup” in severe zonulopathy needs to be revisited in favor of a clear visual axis with maximal preservation of the damaged zonules. This technique is ideal in patients above age 90 where posterior capsular opacification and late dislocation of intraocular lens–capsule bag complex are unlikely to occur until several years postoperatively. Keywords: brunescent cataract, cortex aspiration, phacoemulsification, pseudo-exfoliation, weak zonules

  19. Cortical Thickness Changes Associated with Photoparoxysmal Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Groppa, Stanislav A; Deuschl, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is an EEG trait of spike and spike-wave discharges in response to photic stimulation that is closely linked to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). In our previous studies we showed that PPR is associated with functional alterations in the occipital and frontal co......) and compared these groups with a group of PPR-negative-healthy-controls (HC, n = 17; 15.3 ± 3.6 years; 6 males). Our results revealed an increase of cortical thickness in the occipital, frontal and parietal cortices bilaterally in PPR-positive-subjects in comparison to HC. Moreover PPR......-positive-subjects presented a significant decrease of cortical thickness in the temporal cortex in the same group contrast. IGE patients exhibited lower cortical thickness in the temporal lobe bilaterally and in the right paracentral region in comparison to PPR-positive-subjects. Our study demonstrates structural changes...... in the occipital lobe, frontoparietal regions and temporal lobe, which also show functional changes associated with PPR. Patients with epilepsy present changes in the temporal lobe and supplementary motor area....

  20. A revised view of sensory cortical parcellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Mark T.; Ramachandran, Ramnarayan; Stein, Barry E.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional cortical parcellation schemes have emphasized the presence of sharply defined visual, auditory, and somatosensory domains populated exclusively by modality-specific neurons (i.e., neurons responsive to sensory stimuli from a single sensory modality). However, the modality-exclusivity of this scheme has recently been challenged. Observations in a variety of species suggest that each of these domains is subject to influences from other senses. Using the cerebral cortex of the rat as a model, the present study systematically examined the capability of individual neurons in visual, auditory, and somatosensory cortex to be activated by stimuli from other senses. Within the major modality-specific domains, the incidence of inappropriate (i.e., nonmatching) and/or multisensory neurons was very low. However, at the borders between each of these domains a concentration of multisensory neurons was found whose modality profile matched the representations in neighboring cortices and that were able to integrate their cross-modal inputs to give rise to enhanced and/or depressed responses. The results of these studies are consistent with some features of both the traditional and challenging views of cortical organization, and they suggest a parcellation scheme in which modality-specific cortical domains are separated from one another by transitional multisensory zones. PMID:14766982

  1. Malformations of cortical development and neocortical focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Kilb, Werner; Clusmann, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Developmental neocortical malformations resulting from abnormal neurogenesis, disturbances in programmed cell death, or neuronal migration disorders may cause a long-term hyperexcitability. Early generated Cajal-Retzius and subplate neurons play important roles in transient cortical circuits, and structural/functional disorders in early cortical development may induce persistent network disturbances and epileptic disorders. In particular, depolarizing GABAergic responses are important for the regulation of neurodevelopmental events, like neurogenesis or migration, while pathophysiological alterations in chloride homeostasis may cause epileptic activity. Although modern imaging techniques may provide an estimate of the structural lesion, the site and extent of the cortical malformation may not correlate with the epileptogenic zone. The neocortical focus may be surrounded by widespread molecular, structural, and functional disturbances, which are difficult to recognize with imaging technologies. However, modern imaging and electrophysiological techniques enable focused hypotheses of the neocortical epileptogenic zone, thus allowing more specific epilepsy surgery. Focal cortical malformation can be successfully removed with minimal rim, close to or even within eloquent cortex with a promising risk-benefit ratio.

  2. The effect of a concurrent cognitive task on cortical potentials evoked by unpredictable balance perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staines W Richard

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although previous studies suggest that postural control requires attention and other cognitive resources, the central mechanisms responsible for this relationship remain unclear. To address this issue, we examined the effects of altered attention on cortical activity and postural responses following mechanical perturbations to upright stance. We hypothesized that cortical activity would be attenuated but not delayed when mechanical perturbations were applied during a concurrent performance of a cognitive task (i.e. when attention was directed away from the perturbation. We also hypothesized that these cortical changes would be accompanied by alterations in the postural response, as evidenced by increases in the magnitude of anteroposterior (AP centre of pressure (COP peak displacements and tibialis anterior (TA muscle activity. Healthy young adults (n = 7 were instructed to continuously track (cognitive task or not track (control task a randomly moving visual target using a hand-held joystick. During each of these conditions, unpredictable translations of a moving floor evoked cortical and postural responses. Scalp-recorded cortical activity, COP, and TA electromyographic (EMG measures were collected. Results Results revealed a significant decrease in the magnitude of early cortical activity (the N1 response, the first negative peak after perturbation onset during the tracking task compared to the control condition. More pronounced AP COP peak displacements and EMG magnitudes were also observed for the tracking task and were possibly related to changes in the N1 response. Conclusion Based on previous notions that the N1 response represents sensory processing of the balance disturbance, we suggest that the attenuation of the N1 response is an important central mechanism that may provide insight into the relationship between attention and postural control.

  3. Cortical control for prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew B.; Kipke, D. W.; Perepelkin, P. D.

    1996-05-01

    The work presented in this session is part of a project to develop an arm-control system based on neuronal activity recorded from the cerebral cortex. This will make it possible for amputees or paralyzed individuals to move a prosthetic arm or, using functional neural stimulation, their own limbs as effortlessly and with as much skill as intact individuals. We are developing and testing this system in monkeys and hope to have a prototype working in the next couple of years. This project has been made more feasible because we have been able, in the last 15 years to extract, from the brain, a signal that represents arm trajectory accurately. In this paper, we describe how this technique was developed and how we use this as the basis for our control signal. An alternative approach using a self-organizing feature map, an algorithm to deduce arm configuration given an endpoint trajectory and the development of a telemetry system to transmit the neuronal data is described in subsequent papers.

  4. Assessment of cortical maturation with prenatal MRI. Part I: normal cortical maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogliarini, Celine [Faculte Timone, Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale, Marseille (France); Chaumoitre, Katia [Hopital Nord, Department of Radiology, Marseille (France); Chapon, Frederique; Levrier, Olivier; Girard, Nadine [Hopital Timone, Department of Neuroradiology, Marseille Cedex 5 (France); Fernandez, Carla; Figarella-Branger, Dominique [Hopital Timone, Department of Pathology, Marseille (France)

    2005-08-01

    Cortical maturation, especially gyral formation, follows a temporospatial schedule and is a good marker of fetal maturation. Although ultrasonography is still the imaging method of choice to evaluate fetal anatomy, MRI has an increasingly important role in the detection of brain abnormalities, especially of cortical development. Knowledge of MRI techniques in utero with the advantages and disadvantages of some sequences is necessary, in order to try to optimize the different magnetic resonance sequences to be able to make an early diagnosis. The different steps of cortical maturation known from histology represent the background necessary for the understanding of maturation in order to be then able to evaluate brain maturation through neuroimaging. Illustrations of the normal cortical maturation are given for each step accessible to MRI for both the cerebral hemispheres and the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  5. Unimodal primary sensory cortices are directly connected by long-range horizontal projections in the rat sensory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy eStehberg

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Research based on functional imaging and neuronal recordings in the barrel cortex subdivision of primary somatosensory cortex (SI of the adult rat has revealed novel aspects of structure-function relationships in this cortex. Specifically, it has demonstrated that single whisker stimulation evokes subthreshold neuronal activity that spreads symmetrically within gray matter from the appropriate barrel area, crosses cytoarchitectural borders of SI and reaches deeply into other unimodal primary cortices such as primary auditory (AI and primary visual (VI. It was further demonstrated that this spread is supported by a spatially matching underlying diffuse network of border-crossing, long-range projections that could also reach deeply into AI and VI. Here we seek to determine whether such a network of border-crossing, long-range projections is unique to barrel cortex or characterizes also other primary, unimodal sensory cortices and therefore could directly connect them. Using anterograde (BDA and retrograde (CTb tract-tracing techniques, we demonstrate that such diffuse horizontal networks directly and mutually connect VI, AI and SI. These findings suggest that diffuse, border-crossing axonal projections connecting directly primary cortices are an important organizational motif common to all major primary sensory cortices in the rat. Potential implications of these findings for topics including cortical structure-function relationships, multisensory integration, functional imaging and cortical parcellation are discussed.

  6. ERK is involved in the reorganization of somatosensory cortical maps in adult rats submitted to hindlimb unloading.

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    Erwan Dupont

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor restriction by a 14-day period of hindlimb unloading (HU in the adult rat induces a reorganization of topographic maps and receptive fields. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Interest was turned towards a possible implication of intracellular MAPK signaling pathway since Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 is known to play a significant role in the control of synaptic plasticity. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying cortical plasticity in adult rats submitted to a sensorimotor restriction, we analyzed the time-course of ERK1/2 activation by immunoblot and of cortical reorganization by electrophysiological recordings, on rats submitted to hindlimb unloading over four weeks. Immunohistochemistry analysis provided evidence that ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in layer III neurons of the somatosensory cortex. This increase was transient, and parallel to the changes in hindpaw cortical map area (layer IV. By contrast, receptive fields were progressively enlarged from 7 to 28 days of hindlimb unloading. To determine whether ERK1/2 was involved in cortical remapping, we administered a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD-98059 through osmotic mini-pump in rats hindlimb unloaded for 14 days. Results demonstrate that focal inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway prevents cortical reorganization, but had no effect on receptive fields. These results suggest that ERK1/2 plays a role in the induction of cortical plasticity during hindlimb unloading.

  7. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

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    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  8. Caffeine/nutrition interaction in the rat brain: Influence on latent inhibition and cortical spreading depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Márlison José Lima; de Aguiar, Cilene Rejane Ramos Alves; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2011-01-10

    Caffeine, like malnutrition, can produce behavioral and electrophysiological alterations. However, the interaction of both factors remains unclear. Here this interaction has been studied in male Wistar rats previously malnourished during the lactation period by feeding their dams the "regional basic diet" of Northeast Brazil, containing about 8% protein, predominantly from vegetable sources (RBD(8)). At 70-75days of life, a subset of the pups was treated intraperitoneally with 30mg/kg caffeine for 4days while being tested according to the behavioral model of latent inhibition. Another group was subjected to an electrophysiological recording of the phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression, and the effects of caffeine injected during the recording session were evaluated. Caffeine did not affect cortical spreading depression, but antagonized latent inhibition in both the RBD(8)-malnourished rats and in the well-nourished control group fed a chow diet with 22% protein. This effect of caffeine was not seen in malnourished rats fed a protein-supplemented RBD (protein increased to 22% by increasing the proportion of foodstuffs from vegetable origin; RBD(22) group), suggesting that the amino acid imbalance of this diet may modulate the caffeine effects on latent inhibition. The results indicate a differential effect of caffeine in the latent inhibition behavioral model, as compared to the cortical spreading depression phenomenon, and this effect is influenced by the early nutritional status of the animal. We suggest that caffeine may modulate dopaminergic subcortical receptors participating in attention processes, but does not interact at the cortical level, in a way that would affect cortical spreading depression.

  9. Evidence of functional connectivity between auditory cortical areas revealed by amplitude modulation sound processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguin, Marie; Le Bouquin-Jeannès, Régine; Faucon, Gérard; Chauvel, Patrick; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2007-02-01

    The human auditory cortex includes several interconnected areas. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in auditory cortical functions requires a detailed knowledge of neuronal connectivity between functional cortical regions. In human, it is difficult to track in vivo neuronal connectivity. We investigated the interarea connection in vivo in the auditory cortex using a method of directed coherence (DCOH) applied to depth auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). This paper presents simultaneous AEPs recordings from insular gyrus (IG), primary and secondary cortices (Heschl's gyrus and planum temporale), and associative areas (Brodmann area [BA] 22) with multilead intracerebral electrodes in response to sinusoidal modulated white noises in 4 epileptic patients who underwent invasive monitoring with depth electrodes for epilepsy surgery. DCOH allowed estimation of the causality between 2 signals recorded from different cortical sites. The results showed 1) a predominant auditory stream within the primary auditory cortex from the most medial region to the most lateral one whatever the modulation frequency, 2) unidirectional functional connection from the primary to secondary auditory cortex, 3) a major auditory propagation from the posterior areas to the anterior ones, particularly at 8, 16, and 32 Hz, and 4) a particular role of Heschl's sulcus dispatching information to the different auditory areas. These findings suggest that cortical processing of auditory information is performed in serial and parallel streams. Our data showed that the auditory propagation could not be associated to a unidirectional traveling wave but to a constant interaction between these areas that could reflect the large adaptive and plastic capacities of auditory cortex. The role of the IG is discussed.

  10. Prediction of cortical responses to simultaneous electrical stimulation of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halupka, Kerry J.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Cloherty, Shaun L.; Grayden, David B.; Wong, Yan T.; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Meffin, Hamish

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Simultaneous electrical stimulation of multiple electrodes has shown promise in diversifying the responses that can be elicited by retinal prostheses compared to interleaved single electrode stimulation. However, the effects of interactions between electrodes are not well understood and clinical trials with simultaneous stimulation have produced inconsistent results. We investigated the effects of multiple electrode stimulation of the retina by developing a model of cortical responses to retinal stimulation. Approach. Electrical stimuli consisting of temporally sparse, biphasic current pulses, with amplitudes sampled from a bi-dimensional Gaussian distribution, were simultaneously delivered to the retina across a 42-channel electrode array implanted in the suprachoroidal space of anesthetized cats. Visual cortex activity was recorded using penetrating microelectrode arrays. These data were used to identify a linear-nonlinear model of cortical responses to retinal stimulation. The ability of the model to generalize was tested by predicting responses to non-white patterned stimuli. Main results. The model accurately predicted two cortical activity measures: multi-unit neural responses and evoked potential responses to white noise stimuli. The model also provides information about electrical receptive fields, including the relative effects of each stimulating electrode on every recording site. Significance. We have demonstrated a simple model that accurately describes cortical responses to simultaneous stimulation of a suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis. Overall, our results demonstrate that cortical responses to simultaneous multi-electrode stimulation of the retina are repeatable and predictable, and that interactions between electrodes during simultaneous stimulation are predominantly linear. The model shows promise for determining optimal stimulation paradigms for exploiting interactions between electrodes to shape neural activity, thereby improving

  11. Common cortical responses evoked by appearance, disappearance and change of the human face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kida Tetsuo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To segregate luminance-related, face-related and non-specific components involved in spatio-temporal dynamics of cortical activations to a face stimulus, we recorded cortical responses to face appearance (Onset, disappearance (Offset, and change (Change using magnetoencephalography. Results Activity in and around the primary visual cortex (V1/V2 showed luminance-dependent behavior. Any of the three events evoked activity in the middle occipital gyrus (MOG at 150 ms and temporo-parietal junction (TPJ at 250 ms after the onset of each event. Onset and Change activated the fusiform gyrus (FG, while Offset did not. This FG activation showed a triphasic waveform, consistent with results of intracranial recordings in humans. Conclusion Analysis employed in this study successfully segregated four different elements involved in the spatio-temporal dynamics of cortical activations in response to a face stimulus. The results show the responses of MOG and TPJ to be associated with non-specific processes, such as the detection of abrupt changes or exogenous attention. Activity in FG corresponds to a face-specific response recorded by intracranial studies, and that in V1/V2 is related to a change in luminance.

  12. Deep sensibility of the mystacial pad in the rat and its cortical representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, O; Antal, A; Toldi, J; Wolff, J R

    1993-01-01

    The cortical representation of the rat's mystacial pad was examined with the aid of evoked field potentials and recording of single cell activity. Mechanical bending of the vibrissae activated the well-known area within the somato-sensory cortex. Electrical stimulation of the mystacial pad with inserted needle electrodes, bi- and monopolarly, caused a widespread activation extending practically to the whole exposed cortex, including visual, acoustic and motor areas (MSS potentials). The evoked field potentials were accompanied by well-recordable unit activity, mainly in the upper 1000 microns of the cortical depth. Capsaicin, injected into the mystacial pad on the 8th-10th postnatal day heavily impaired the MSS potentials as recorded at 2 months of age, and only moderately acted on the mechanically evoked potentials. So did also the acutely injected capsaicin. Peak latency of the MSS potentials seemed to be in correlation with the distance from the punctum maximum. The latencies of unit potentials, however, did not show such dependence, they were between 8 and 10 ms. MSS potentials are thought to represent cortical projection mainly of thermo- and nociceptive fibers, which play an important role in the early postnatal life.

  13. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2012-01-01

      March  Selections By the time this appears, we will have added a number of new CDs and DVDs into the Club. You will find the full lists at http://cern.ch/record.club; select the "Discs of the Month" button on the left panel of the web page and then Mar 2012. New films include recent releases such as Johnny English 2, Bad Teacher, Cowboys vs Aliens, and Super 8. We are also starting to acquire some of the classic films we missed when we initiated the DVD section of the club, such as appeared in a recent Best 100 Films published by a leading UK magazine; this month we have added Spielberg’s Jaws and Scorsese’s Goodfellas. If you have your own ideas on what we are missing, let us know. For children we have no less than 8 Tin-Tin DVDs. And if you like fast moving pop music, try the Beyonce concert DVD. New CDs include the latest releases from Paul McCartney, Rihanna and Amy Winehouse. There is a best of Mylene Farmer, a compilation from the NRJ 201...

  14. Social Suppressive Behavior Is Organized by the Spatiotemporal Integration of Multiple Cortical Regions in the Japanese Macaque.

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    Naoya Oosugi

    Full Text Available Under social conflict, monkeys develop hierarchical positions through social interactions. Once the hierarchy is established, the dominant monkey dominates the space around itself and the submissive monkey tries not to violate this space. Previous studies have shown the contributions of the frontal and parietal cortices in social suppression, but the contributions of other cortical areas to suppressive functions remain elusive. We recorded neural activity in large cortical areas using electrocorticographic (ECoG arrays while monkeys performed a social food-grab task in which a target monkey was paired with either a dominant or a submissive monkey. If the paired monkey was dominant, the target monkey avoided taking food in the shared conflict space, but not in other areas. By contrast, when the paired monkey was submissive, the target monkey took the food freely without hesitation. We applied decoding analysis to the ECoG data to see when and which cortical areas contribute to social behavioral suppression. Neural information discriminating the social condition was more evident when the conflict space was set in the area contralateral to the recording hemisphere. We found that the information increased as the social pressure increased during the task. Before food presentation, when the pressure was relatively low, the parietal and somatosensory-motor cortices showed sustained discrimination of the social condition. After food presentation, when the monkey faced greater pressure to make a decision as to whether it should take the food, the prefrontal and visual cortices started to develop buildup responses. The social representation was found in a sustained form in the parietal and somatosensory-motor regions, followed by additional buildup form in the visual and prefrontal cortices. The representation was less influenced by reward expectation. These findings suggest that social adaptation is achieved by a higher-order self-regulation process

  15. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

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    Pau eCelada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT, acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by 1 modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and 2 varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3 and inhibitory (5-HT1A receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the

  16. Relaxed genetic control of cortical organization in human brains compared with chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D; Schapiro, Steven J; Sherwood, Chet C

    2015-12-01

    The study of hominin brain evolution has focused largely on the neocortical expansion and reorganization undergone by humans as inferred from the endocranial fossil record. Comparisons of modern human brains with those of chimpanzees provide an additional line of evidence to define key neural traits that have emerged in human evolution and that underlie our unique behavioral specializations. In an attempt to identify fundamental developmental differences, we have estimated the genetic bases of brain size and cortical organization in chimpanzees and humans by studying phenotypic similarities between individuals with known kinship relationships. We show that, although heritability for brain size and cortical organization is high in chimpanzees, cerebral cortical anatomy is substantially less genetically heritable than brain size in humans, indicating greater plasticity and increased environmental influence on neurodevelopment in our species. This relaxed genetic control on cortical organization is especially marked in association areas and likely is related to underlying microstructural changes in neural circuitry. A major result of increased plasticity is that the development of neural circuits that underlie behavior is shaped by the environmental, social, and cultural context more intensively in humans than in other primate species, thus providing an anatomical basis for behavioral and cognitive evolution.

  17. Flexible Neural Electrode Array Based-on Porous Graphene for Cortical Microstimulation and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yichen; Lyu, Hongming; Richardson, Andrew G.; Lucas, Timothy H.; Kuzum, Duygu

    2016-09-01

    Neural sensing and stimulation have been the backbone of neuroscience research, brain-machine interfaces and clinical neuromodulation therapies for decades. To-date, most of the neural stimulation systems have relied on sharp metal microelectrodes with poor electrochemical properties that induce extensive damage to the tissue and significantly degrade the long-term stability of implantable systems. Here, we demonstrate a flexible cortical microelectrode array based on porous graphene, which is capable of efficient electrophysiological sensing and stimulation from the brain surface, without penetrating into the tissue. Porous graphene electrodes show superior impedance and charge injection characteristics making them ideal for high efficiency cortical sensing and stimulation. They exhibit no physical delamination or degradation even after 1 million biphasic stimulation cycles, confirming high endurance. In in vivo experiments with rodents, same array is used to sense brain activity patterns with high spatio-temporal resolution and to control leg muscles with high-precision electrical stimulation from the cortical surface. Flexible porous graphene array offers a minimally invasive but high efficiency neuromodulation scheme with potential applications in cortical mapping, brain-computer interfaces, treatment of neurological disorders, where high resolution and simultaneous recording and stimulation of neural activity are crucial.

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with early cortical dementia: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gregor Issac

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The diagnostic accuracy of the currently available tools carries poor sensitivity resulting in significant delay in specific diagnosis of cortical dementias. Considering the properties of default mode networking of the brain it is highly probable that specific changes may be seen in frontotemporal dementias (FTDs and Alzheimer′s disease sufficiently early. Aim: The aim of this study is to look for changes in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS in cortical dementia. Materials and Methods: Evaluated with a single pulse TMS with the figure of eight coil and recorded from right first dorsal interossei (FDI. Resting Motor Threshold (RMT was estimated on the opposite motor cortex (T1. Second site of stimulation was cervical spine at C7-T2. Central motor conduction time (CMCT is equal toT1-T2.Silent Period (SP identified by applying TMS pulse to contracting FDI. Conclusions: RMT was reduced in seven out of eight Alzheimer′s dementias. CMCT was in the upper limit of normal in both patients with FTD. The most consistent observation was that SP was reduced and there were escape discharges noticed during the SP suggesting increased cortical excitability and decreased cortical inhibition. This suggests probable early asymptomatic changes in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA nergic and cholinergic system is taking place. This if confirmed may give some insight into early diagnosis and therapeutic role of GABA agonists in these disorders.

  19. Cortical hypoexcitation defines neuronal responses in the immediate aftermath of traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Philippa Anne Johnstone

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI from a blow to the head is often associated with complex patterns of brain abnormalities that accompany deficits in cognitive and motor function. Previously we reported that a long-term consequence of TBI, induced with a closed-head injury method modelling human car and sporting accidents, is neuronal hyper-excitation in the rat sensory barrel cortex that receives tactile input from the face whiskers. Hyper-excitation occurred only in supra-granular layers and was stronger to complex than simple stimuli. We now examine changes in the immediate aftermath of TBI induced with same injury method. At 24 hours post-trauma significant sensorimotor deficits were observed and characterisation of the cortical population neuronal responses at that time revealed a depth-dependent suppression of neuronal responses, with reduced responses from supragranular layers through to input layer IV, but not in infragranular layers. In addition, increased spontaneous firing rate was recorded in cortical layers IV and V. We postulate that this early post-injury suppression of cortical processing of sensory input accounts for immediate post-trauma sensory morbidity and sets into train events that resolve into long-term cortical hyper-excitability in upper sensory cortex layers that may account for long-term sensory hyper-sensitivity in humans with TBI.

  20. Dynamics of vocalization-induced modulation of auditory cortical activity at mid-utterance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaocong Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent research has addressed the suppression of cortical sensory responses to altered auditory feedback that occurs at utterance onset regarding speech. However, there is reason to assume that the mechanisms underlying sensorimotor processing at mid-utterance are different than those involved in sensorimotor control at utterance onset. The present study attempted to examine the dynamics of event-related potentials (ERPs to different acoustic versions of auditory feedback at mid-utterance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects produced a vowel sound while hearing their pitch-shifted voice (100 cents, a sum of their vocalization and pure tones, or a sum of their vocalization and white noise at mid-utterance via headphones. Subjects also passively listened to playback of what they heard during active vocalization. Cortical ERPs were recorded in response to different acoustic versions of feedback changes during both active vocalization and passive listening. The results showed that, relative to passive listening, active vocalization yielded enhanced P2 responses to the 100 cents pitch shifts, whereas suppression effects of P2 responses were observed when voice auditory feedback was distorted by pure tones or white noise. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The present findings, for the first time, demonstrate a dynamic modulation of cortical activity as a function of the quality of acoustic feedback at mid-utterance, suggesting that auditory cortical responses can be enhanced or suppressed to distinguish self-produced speech from externally-produced sounds.

  1. Evaluation of the Cortical Silent Period of the Laryngeal Motor Cortex in Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Summers, Rebekah L. S.; Goding, George S.; Samargia, Sharyl; Ludlow, Christy L.; Prudente, Cecília N.; Kimberley, Teresa J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This work aimed to evaluate the cortical silent period (cSP) of the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC) using the bilateral thyroarytenoid (TA) muscles with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods: In 11 healthy participants, fine-wire electromyography (EMG) was used to record bilateral TA muscle responses to single pulse TMS delivered to the LMC in both hemispheres. Peripheral responses to stimulation over the mastoid, where the vagus nerve exits the skull, were collected to verify the central origin of the cortical stimulation responses by comparing the latencies. Results: The cSP duration ranged from 41.7 to 66.4 ms. The peripherally evoked motor-evoked potential (MEP) peak occurred 5–9 ms earlier than the cortical responses (for both sides of TAs: p < 0.0001) with no silent period. The right TA MEP latencies were earlier than the left TA responses for both peripheral and cortical measures (p ≤ 0.0001). Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cSP of LMC based on intrinsic laryngeal muscles responses during vocalization in healthy volunteers. Significance: The technique could be used to study the pathophysiology of neurological disorders that affect TA muscles, such as spasmodic dysphonia. Further, the methodology has application to other muscles of the head and neck not accessible using surface electrodes. PMID:28326007

  2. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Elena; Gomez-Dominguez, Daniel; Martin-Lopez, David; Gal, Beatriz; Laurent, François; Ibarz, Jose M.; Francis, Fiona; Menendez de la Prida, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e., the multiple-hit hypothesis). However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1); including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders. PMID:24782720

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with early cortical dementia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Thomas Gregor; Chandra, S R; Nagaraju, B C

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of the currently available tools carries poor sensitivity resulting in significant delay in specific diagnosis of cortical dementias. Considering the properties of default mode networking of the brain it is highly probable that specific changes may be seen in frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) and Alzheimer's disease sufficiently early. The aim of this study is to look for changes in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in cortical dementia. Evaluated with a single pulse TMS with the figure of eight coil and recorded from right first dorsal interossei (FDI). Resting Motor Threshold (RMT) was estimated on the opposite motor cortex (T1). Second site of stimulation was cervical spine at C7-T2. Central motor conduction time (CMCT) is equal toT1-T2. Silent Period (SP) identified by applying TMS pulse to contracting FDI. RMT was reduced in seven out of eight Alzheimer's dementias. CMCT was in the upper limit of normal in both patients with FTD. The most consistent observation was that SP was reduced and there were escape discharges noticed during the SP suggesting increased cortical excitability and decreased cortical inhibition. This suggests probable early asymptomatic changes in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) nergic and cholinergic system is taking place. This if confirmed may give some insight into early diagnosis and therapeutic role of GABA agonists in these disorders.

  4. Inhibitory stabilization and visual coding in cortical circuits with multiple interneuron subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Rosenbaum, Robert; Doiron, Brent

    2016-03-01

    Recent anatomical and functional characterization of cortical inhibitory interneurons has highlighted the diverse computations supported by different subtypes of interneurons. However, most theoretical models of cortex do not feature multiple classes of interneurons and rather assume a single homogeneous population. We study the dynamics of recurrent excitatory-inhibitory model cortical networks with parvalbumin (PV)-, somatostatin (SOM)-, and vasointestinal peptide-expressing (VIP) interneurons, with connectivity properties motivated by experimental recordings from mouse primary visual cortex. Our theory describes conditions under which the activity of such networks is stable and how perturbations of distinct neuronal subtypes recruit changes in activity through recurrent synaptic projections. We apply these conclusions to study the roles of each interneuron subtype in disinhibition, surround suppression, and subtractive or divisive modulation of orientation tuning curves. Our calculations and simulations determine the architectural and stimulus tuning conditions under which cortical activity consistent with experiment is possible. They also lead to novel predictions concerning connectivity and network dynamics that can be tested via optogenetic manipulations. Our work demonstrates that recurrent inhibitory dynamics must be taken into account to fully understand many properties of cortical dynamics observed in experiments.

  5. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eCid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e. the multiple-hit hypothesis. However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1; including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders.

  6. Auditory cortical and hippocampal-system mismatch responses to duration deviants in urethane-anesthetized rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Ruusuvirta

    Full Text Available Any change in the invariant aspects of the auditory environment is of potential importance. The human brain preattentively or automatically detects such changes. The mismatch negativity (MMN of event-related potentials (ERPs reflects this initial stage of auditory change detection. The origin of MMN is held to be cortical. The hippocampus is associated with a later generated P3a of ERPs reflecting involuntarily attention switches towards auditory changes that are high in magnitude. The evidence for this cortico-hippocampal dichotomy is scarce, however. To shed further light on this issue, auditory cortical and hippocampal-system (CA1, dentate gyrus, subiculum local-field potentials were recorded in urethane-anesthetized rats. A rare tone in duration (deviant was interspersed with a repeated tone (standard. Two standard-to-standard (SSI and standard-to-deviant (SDI intervals (200 ms vs. 500 ms were applied in different combinations to vary the observability of responses resembling MMN (mismatch responses. Mismatch responses were observed at 51.5-89 ms with the 500-ms SSI coupled with the 200-ms SDI but not with the three remaining combinations. Most importantly, the responses appeared in both the auditory-cortical and hippocampal locations. The findings suggest that the hippocampus may play a role in (cortical manifestation of MMN.

  7. Modelling Human Cortical Network in Real Brain Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-Bai; FENG Hong-Bo; TANG Yi-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Highly specific structural organization is of great significance in the topology of cortical networks.We introduce a human cortical network model.taking the specific cortical structure into account,in which nodes are brain sites placed in the actual positions of cerebral cortex and the establishment of edges depends on the spatial path length rather than the linear distance.The resulting network exhibits the essential features of cortical connectivity,properties of small-world networks and multiple clusters structure.Additionally.assortative mixing is also found in this roodel.All of these findings may be attributed to the spedtic cortical architecture.

  8. Eclamptogenic Gerstmann's syndrome in combination with cortical agnosia and cortical diplopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käsmann, B; Ruprecht, K W

    1995-07-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as a loss of vision due to bilateral retrogeniculate lesions (geniculocalcarine blindness). Gerstmann's syndrome is a combination of disorientation for left and right, finger agnosia, and profound agraphia, alexia, and acalculia. It is due to a lesion in the left angular gyrus, situated at the confluence of the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes. We report on a patient who suffered from severe underdiagnosed eclampsia and who developed bilateral extensive medial temporal, parietal, and calcarine ischemic infarctions during an eclamptic fit. In addition, ischemia destroyed the left angular gyrus. The combination of these lesions led to Gerstmann's syndrome with additional cortical agnosia and cortical diplopia. For the first few months following the ischemic insult, the patient had been cortically blind. Thereafter, the patient slowly regained a visual acuity of 0.1 in both eyes. She then experienced monocular and binocular diplopia. Her ocular motility was normal; there was no phoria or tropia. Monocular and binocular diplopia slowly became less severe over the following year. Now, 2 years after the incident, the patient has a visual acuity of 0.2 in both eyes and no double vision. However, the handicapping symptoms of Gerstmann's syndrome, which make leading a normal life impossible, have persisted--the patient still cannot cope alone, mainly due to the severe disorientation for left and right. The picture of cortical agnosia, cortical diplopia, and Gerstmann's syndrome is a very rare combination. Visual recovery and rehabilitation in cortical blindness are severely affected and made difficult by the symptoms of Gerstmann's syndrome. In our case the reason for such a dramatic clinical picture was eclampsia, whose prodomes had not been diagnosed in time.

  9. Control and amplification of cortical neurodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljenstroem, Hans; Aronsson, P.

    1999-03-01

    We investigate different mechanisms for the control and amplification of cortical neurodynamics, using a neural network model of a three layered cortical structure. We show that different dynamical states can be obtained by changing a control parameter of the input-output relation, or by changing the noise level. Point attractor, limit cycle, and strange attractor dynamics occur at different values of the control parameter. For certain, optimal noise levels, system performance is maximized, analogous to stochastic resonance phenomena. Noise can also be used to induce different dynamical states. A few noisy network units distributed in a network layer can result in global synchronous oscillations, or waves of activity moving across the network. We further demonstrate that fast synchronization of network activity can be obtained by implementing electromagnetic interactions between network units.

  10. Perceptual incongruence influences bistability and cortical activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijs Joost Brouwer

    Full Text Available We employed a parametric psychophysical design in combination with functional imaging to examine the influence of metric changes in perceptual incongruence on perceptual alternation rates and cortical responses. Subjects viewed a bistable stimulus defined by incongruent depth cues; bistability resulted from incongruence between binocular disparity and monocular perspective cues that specify different slants (slant rivalry. Psychophysical results revealed that perceptual alternation rates were positively correlated with the degree of perceived incongruence. Functional imaging revealed systematic increases in activity that paralleled the psychophysical results within anterior intraparietal sulcus, prior to the onset of perceptual alternations. We suggest that this cortical activity predicts the frequency of subsequent alternations, implying a putative causal role for these areas in initiating bistable perception. In contrast, areas implicated in form and depth processing (LOC and V3A were sensitive to the degree of slant, but failed to show increases in activity when these cues were in conflict.

  11. Localization of cortical areas activated by thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roland, P E; Friberg, L

    1985-01-01

    These experiments were undertaken to demonstrate that pure mental activity, thinking, increases the cerebral blood flow and that different types of thinking increase the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in different cortical areas. As a first approach, thinking was defined as brain work...... study was taken with the subjects at rest. Then the rCBF was measured during three different simple algorithm tasks, each consisting of retrieval of a specific memory followed by a simple operation on the retrieved information. Once started, the information processing went on in the brain without any...... that they started at their front door and then walked alternatively to the left or the right each time they reached a corner. The rCBF increased only in homotypical cortical areas during thinking. The areas in the superior prefrontal cortex increased their rCBF equivalently during the three types of thinking...

  12. Relearning to See in Cortical Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Michael D; Tadin, Duje; Huxlin, Krystel R

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of cortically induced blindness is increasing as our population ages. The major cause of cortically induced blindness is stroke affecting the primary visual cortex. While the impact of this form of vision loss is devastating to quality of life, the development of principled, effective rehabilitation strategies for this condition lags far behind those used to treat motor stroke victims. Here we summarize recent developments in the still emerging field of visual restitution therapy, and compare the relative effectiveness of different approaches. We also draw insights into the properties of recovered vision, its limitations and likely neural substrates. We hope that these insights will guide future research and bring us closer to the goal of providing much-needed rehabilitation solutions for this patient population.

  13. Permanent cortical blindness after bronchial artery embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Colette S; De Boo, Diederick W; Weersink, Els J M; van Delden, Otto M; Reekers, Jim A; van Lienden, Krijn P

    2013-12-01

    A 35-year-old female with a known medical history of cystic fibrosis was admitted to our institution for massive hemoptysis. CTA depicted a hypertrophied bronchial artery to the right upper lobe and showed signs of recent bleeding at that location. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) was performed with gelfoam slurry, because pronounced shunting to the pulmonary artery was present. Immediately after BAE, the patient developed bilateral cortical blindness. Control angiography showed an initially not opacified anastomosis between the embolized bronchial artery and the right subclavian artery, near to the origin of the right vertebral artery. Cessation of outflow in the bronchial circulation reversed the flow through the anastomosis and allowed for spill of embolization material into the posterior circulation. Unfortunately the cortical blindness presented was permanent.

  14. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-03-15

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills.

  15. Permanent Cortical Blindness After Bronchial Artery Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doorn, Colette S. van, E-mail: cvandoorn@gmail.com; De Boo, Diederick W., E-mail: d.w.deboo@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Weersink, Els J. M., E-mail: e.j.m.weersink@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Pulmonology (Netherlands); Delden, Otto M. van, E-mail: o.m.vandelden@amc.uva.nl; Reekers, Jim A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl; Lienden, Krijn P. van, E-mail: k.p.vanlienden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    A 35-year-old female with a known medical history of cystic fibrosis was admitted to our institution for massive hemoptysis. CTA depicted a hypertrophied bronchial artery to the right upper lobe and showed signs of recent bleeding at that location. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) was performed with gelfoam slurry, because pronounced shunting to the pulmonary artery was present. Immediately after BAE, the patient developed bilateral cortical blindness. Control angiography showed an initially not opacified anastomosis between the embolized bronchial artery and the right subclavian artery, near to the origin of the right vertebral artery. Cessation of outflow in the bronchial circulation reversed the flow through the anastomosis and allowed for spill of embolization material into the posterior circulation. Unfortunately the cortical blindness presented was permanent.

  16. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari N. Maia da Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions.

  17. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Mari N. Maia; Millington, Rebecca S.; Bridge, Holly; James-Galton, Merle; Plant, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical) visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions. PMID:28861031

  18. Extensive cortical involvement in leptomeningeal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayzenberg, I; Börnke, C; Tönnes, C; Ziebarth, W; Lavrov, A; Lukas, C

    2012-12-01

    We present a 77-year-old previously well patient with facial asymmetry and progressive weakness of the lower extremities. An initial MRI revealed slight contrast enhancement of the meninges. Three consecutive cerebrospinal fluid examinations demonstrated low glucose concentration, marked elevation of total protein and moderate pleocytosis. No tumor cells, fungi, acid-fast bacilli or mycobacterial DNA were found. The patient's level of consciousness deteriorated dramatically, and follow-up MRI showed widespread extensive cortical hyperintensities. The lesions showed restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted images as well as low values on the corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient maps, the changes consistent with diffuse cytotoxic edema. Neuropathological examination findings were of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) with diffuse continuous infiltration of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and spinal cord. The autopsy revealed a subcentimetre adenocarcinoma of the lung. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating extensive cortical involvement in adenocarcinomatous LMC.

  19. Guidance cue for cortical radial migration discovered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The regulatory mechanism for neuronal migration in the developing cortex is a major unsolved problem in developmental neurobiology. It is generally accepted that the migration of newborn pyramidal neurons from the ventricular zone toward upper cortical layers is guided by radial glial fibers in the developing cortex, and that the laminar structure of the cortex is formed through regulated attachment and detachment of migrating neurons with radial glial fibers.

  20. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2013-09-04

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG) thalamocortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1), which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID), the plasticity protocol used, medication, and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g., brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism), emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic, and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  1. Transient cortical blindness after coronary artery angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlecki, Michał; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Rajzer, Marek; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Bazan-Socha, Stanisława; Bryniarski, Leszek; Czarnecka, Danuta

    2013-01-01

    Coronary angiography is the current gold standard for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease and therefore the prevalence of percutaneous coronary procedures such as angiography and angioplasty is high. The occurrence of cerebral complications after coronary angiography and coronary angioplasty is low and it mainly includes transient ischemic attack and stroke. The prevalence of transient cortical blindness after X-ray contrast media is low and it is usually seen after cerebral angiography. Until now only a few cases of transient cortical blindness have been described after coronary artery angiography. Regarding the spread of coronary angiography worldwide and in Poland this complication is uniquely rare. A 32-year-old man with multiple extrasystolic ventricular arrhythmia suggesting Brugada syndrome diagnosis according to morphology of the left bundle branch block and with decreased left ventricular ejection fraction was admitted to the First Department of Cardiology and Hypertension, Medical College of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow. Coronary angiography was performed in order to exclude ischemic etiology of the observed abnormalities. No arteriosclerotic lesions were found in coronary arteries. Transient cortical blindness was observed directly after angiography which may have been caused by the neurotoxic effect of the used X-ray contrast medium. In ophthalmologic and neurologic examination as well as in the cerebral computed tomography scan no pathologies were found. Visual impairment disappeared totally within several hours.

  2. Functional rehabilitation of partial cortical blindness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoerig, Petra

    2008-01-01

    The current doctrine regards fields of partial cortical blindness as permanent once a temporally restricted window for spontaneous recovery has passed. Accordingly, neuropsychological rehabilitation mainly applies compensatory procedures that train patients to make better use of their sighted field. The more ambitious goal of functional recovery depends on the survival of pathways that continue to transmit retinal information from the blind field. Although wide-spread antero- and retrograde degeneration follows lesions that destroy or denervate the primary visual cortex and cause partial cortical blindness, several retinofugal pathways survive in cats, monkeys, and humans. In all three species, they subserve a variety of visual functions which develop and improve with practice. Post lesion plasticity is greater when the lesion occurs early in life, but changes in behavioural performance and brain responses have also been demonstrated in late lesion subjects. Although the extent of functional improvement is variable, and the most effective approaches still need to be established across cohorts, the evidence for perceptual learning in fields of cortical blindness indicates that the visual processes mediated by the surviving parts of the visual system can be harnessed to improve functional outcome.

  3. Focal cortical dysplasia: long term seizure outcome after surgical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, T; von Lehe, M; Podlogar, M; Clusmann, H; Süßmann, P; Kurthen, M; Becker, A; Urbach, H; Schramm, J

    2007-01-01

    Background Studies of long term outcome after epilepsy surgery for cortical malformations are rare. In this study, we report our experience with surgical treatment and year to year long term outcome for a subgroup of patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Methods We retrospectively analysed the records of 49 patients (females n = 26; males n = 23; mean age 25 (11) years) with a mean duration of epilepsy of 18 years (range 1–45). Preoperative MRI, histological results based on the Palmini classification and clinical year to year follow‐up according to the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification were available in all patients. Results 98% of patients had a lesion on preoperative MRI. In addition to lobectomy (n = 9) or lesionectomy (n = 40), 14 patients had multiple subpial transections of the eloquent cortex. The resected tissue was classified as FCD type II b in 41 cases with an extratemporal (88%) and FCD type II a in 8 cases with a temporal localisation (100%). After a mean follow‐up of 8.1 (4.5) years, 37 patients (76%) were seizure free, a subgroup of 23 patients (47%) had been completely seizure free since surgery (ILAE class 1a) and 4 patients (8%) had only auras (ILAE class 2). Over a 10 year follow‐up, the proportion of satisfactory outcomes decreased, mainly within the first 3 years. During long term follow‐up, 48% stopped antiepileptic drug treatment, 34% received a driver's license and 57% found a job or training. Conclusion Surgical treatment of epilepsy with FCD is not only successful in the short term but also has a satisfying long term outcome which remains constant after 3 years of follow‐up but is not associated with better employment status or improvement in daily living. PMID:17287239

  4. Late cortical disinhibition in relaxed versus active hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caux-Dedeystère, A; Derambure, P; Devanne, H

    2015-07-09

    Recent research suggests that long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) is followed by a transitory period of late cortical disinhibition (LCD) that can even lead to a net increase in cortical excitability. The relationship between LICI/LCD and voluntary drive remains poorly understood. Our study aims at investigating the influence of index abduction on LICI and LCD in an actively engaged muscle and a neighboring muscle, while varying the intensity of the conditioning stimulus (CS). Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles in 13 subjects. Paired-pulses were delivered with 10 different interstimulus intervals (ranging from 60 to 290 ms). Whatever the condition (relaxed or active FDI), the test stimulus was set to evoke an MEP of 1mV. The time course of conditioned MEP amplitude was compared for relaxed and active conditions when the CS intensity was set to (i) 130% of the rest motor threshold (RMT) or (ii) to evoke the same size of MEP under both conditions. LICI lasted longer (i.e. disinhibition occurred later) at rest than during abduction when evoked either by similar or matched conditioning stimuli. No post-LICI facilitation was observed at rest - even when the CS intensity was set to 160% RMT. In contrast, long-interval intracortical facilitation (LICF) was observed in the quiescent ADM when FDI was active. LICF may then be associated with voluntary activity albeit with lack of topographic specificity. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Locus coeruleus stimulation recruits a broad cortical neuronal network and increases cortical perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussay, Xavier; Basu, Kaustuv; Lacoste, Baptiste; Hamel, Edith

    2013-02-20

    The locus coeruleus (LC), the main source of brain noradrenalin (NA), modulates cortical activity, cerebral blood flow (CBF), glucose metabolism, and blood-brain barrier permeability. However, the role of the LC-NA system in the regulation of cortical CBF has remained elusive. This rat study shows that similar proportions (∼20%) of cortical pyramidal cells and GABA interneurons are contacted by LC-NA afferents on their cell soma or proximal dendrites. LC stimulation induced ipsilateral activation (c-Fos upregulation) of pyramidal cells and of a larger proportion (>36%) of interneurons that colocalize parvalbumin, somatostatin, or nitric oxide synthase compared with pyramidal cells expressing cyclooxygenase-2 (22%, p interneurons (16%, p BK, -52%, p < 0.05), and inward-rectifier (Kir, -40%, p < 0.05) K+ channels primarily impaired the hyperemic response. The data demonstrate that LC stimulation recruits a broad network of cortical excitatory and inhibitory neurons resulting in increased cortical activity and that K+ fluxes and EET signaling mediate a large part of the hemodynamic response.

  6. Cortical excitability differences in hand muscles follow a split-hand pattern in healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Parvathi; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-06-01

    Differences in cortical and axonal excitability may underlie preferential atrophy of abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, termed the split-hand. Consequently, this study aimed to determine whether differences in excitability follow a split-hand pattern across the intrinsic hand muscles. Excitability studies were undertaken using threshold tracking techniques in 26 healthy controls with responses recorded over APB, FDI, and abductor digiti minimi. Short interval intracortical inhibition was significantly greater from the APB and FDI. In addition, motor evoked potential amplitude was greater, while cortical silent period was longer from APB and FDI. At a peripheral level, the strength-duration time constant was greater when recorded over APB. This study establishes that differences in cortical excitability follow the split-hand pattern in healthy controls, a finding potentially explained by evolution of specialized activity of APB/FDI in complex hand tasks. Muscle Nerve 49: 836-844, 2014. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Classification of motor imagery by means of cortical current density estimation and Von Neumann entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamousi, Baharan; Amini, Ali Nasiri; He, Bin

    2007-06-01

    The goal of the present study is to employ the source imaging methods such as cortical current density estimation for the classification of left- and right-hand motor imagery tasks, which may be used for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. The scalp recorded EEG was first preprocessed by surface Laplacian filtering, time-frequency filtering, noise normalization and independent component analysis. Then the cortical imaging technique was used to solve the EEG inverse problem. Cortical current density distributions of left and right trials were classified from each other by exploiting the concept of Von Neumann entropy. The proposed method was tested on three human subjects (180 trials each) and a maximum accuracy of 91.5% and an average accuracy of 88% were obtained. The present results confirm the hypothesis that source analysis methods may improve accuracy for classification of motor imagery tasks. The present promising results using source analysis for classification of motor imagery enhances our ability of performing source analysis from single trial EEG data recorded on the scalp, and may have applications to improved BCI systems.

  8. Antiretroviral therapy effects on sources of cortical rhythms in HIV subjects: responders vs. mild responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, Claudio; Pennica, Alfredo; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Onorati, Paolo; Muratori, Chiara; Ferracuti, Stefano; Roma, Paolo; Donato, Nicole; Noce, Giuseppe; Del Percio, Claudio; Bonacci, Cristiano; Di Campli, Francesco; Gianserra, Laura; Teti, Elisabetta; Aceti, Antonio; Soricelli, Andrea; Viscione, Magdalena; Rossini, Paolo M; Andreoni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that 5months of combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART) affect cortical sources of resting state cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms in naïve HIV subjects. Eyes-closed resting state EEG data were recorded at baseline (i.e. pre-treatment; T0), T1 (after 4weeks of cART), T2 (after 8weeks of cART), and T5 (after 5months of cART) in 38 naïve HIV subjects. EEG data were also recorded in 40 age-matched cognitively normal subjects for control purposes. EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4Hz), theta (4-8Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13Hz), beta 1 (13-20Hz), and beta 2 (20-30Hz). Cortical EEG sources were estimated by LORETA software. Compared to the control group, the HIV group at T0 showed greater delta sources and lower widespread alpha sources. cART induced a global improvement of biological (viral load, CD4 count) and EEG (delta, alpha) markers, remarkable even after 4weeks. Compared to HIV Responders (>100cells/μl at 5-month follow up), the HIV Mild Responders (rhythms. The present EEG markers may be useful secondary neurophysiological end points for pharmacological clinical trials in naïve HIV subjects. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cortical GABAergic neurons are more severely impaired by alkalosis than acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Acid–base imbalance in various metabolic disturbances leads to human brain dysfunction. Compared with acidosis, the patients suffered from alkalosis demonstrate more severe neurological signs that are difficultly corrected. We hypothesize a causative process that the nerve cells in the brain are more vulnerable to alkalosis than acidosis. Methods The vulnerability of GABAergic neurons to alkalosis versus acidosis was compared by analyzing their functional changes in response to the extracellular high pH and low pH. The neuronal and synaptic functions were recorded by whole-cell recordings in the cortical slices. Results The elevation or attenuation of extracellular pH impaired these GABAergic neurons in terms of their capability to produce spikes, their responsiveness to excitatory synaptic inputs and their outputs via inhibitory synapses. Importantly, the dysfunction of these active properties appeared severer in alkalosis than acidosis. Conclusions The severer impairment of cortical GABAergic neurons in alkalosis patients leads to more critical neural excitotoxicity, so that alkalosis-induced brain dysfunction is difficultly corrected, compared to acidosis. The vulnerability of cortical GABAergic neurons to high pH is likely a basis of severe clinical outcomes in alkalosis versus acidosis. PMID:24314112

  10. Age Effects on Cortical Thickness in Cognitively Normal Elderly Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Hurtz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Atrophy in both grey and white matter is found in normal aging. The prefrontal cortex and the frontal lobe white matter are thought to be the most affected regions. Our aim was to examine the effects of normal aging on cortical grey matter using a 3D quantitative cortical mapping method. Methods: We analyzed 1.5-tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 44 cognitively normal elderly subjects using cortical pattern matching and cortical thickness analyses. Linear regression analysis was used to study the effect of age on cortical thickness. 3D map-wide correction for multiple comparisons was conducted with permutation analyses using a threshold of p Results: We found a significant negative association between age and cortical thickness in the right hemisphere (pcorrected = 0.009 and a trend level association in the left hemisphere (pcorrected = 0.081. Age-related changes were greatest in the sensorimotor, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate and supplementary motor cortices, and the right posterior middle and inferior frontal gyri. Age effects greater in the medial than lateral visual association cortices were also seen bilaterally. Conclusion: Our novel method further validates that normal aging results in diffuse cortical thinning that is most pronounced in the frontal and visual association cortices.

  11. Cortical thickness abnormalities in late adolescence with online gaming addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yuan

    Full Text Available Online gaming addiction, as the most popular subtype of Internet addiction, had gained more and more attention from the whole world. However, the structural differences in cortical thickness of the brain between adolescents with online gaming addiction and healthy controls are not well unknown; neither was its association with the impaired cognitive control ability. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from late adolescence with online gaming addiction (n = 18 and age-, education- and gender-matched controls (n = 18 were acquired. The cortical thickness measurement method was employed to investigate alterations of cortical thickness in individuals with online gaming addiction. The color-word Stroop task was employed to investigate the functional implications of the cortical thickness abnormalities. Imaging data revealed increased cortical thickness in the left precentral cortex, precuneus, middle frontal cortex, inferior temporal and middle temporal cortices in late adolescence with online gaming addiction; meanwhile, the cortical thicknesses of the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, insula, lingual gyrus, the right postcentral gyrus, entorhinal cortex and inferior parietal cortex were decreased. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of the left precentral cortex, precuneus and lingual gyrus correlated with duration of online gaming addiction and the cortical thickness of the OFC correlated with the impaired task performance during the color-word Stroop task in adolescents with online gaming addiction. The findings in the current study suggested that the cortical thickness abnormalities of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of online gaming addiction.

  12. Cortical thickness abnormalities in late adolescence with online gaming addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai; Cheng, Ping; Dong, Tao; Bi, Yanzhi; Xing, Lihong; Yu, Dahua; Zhao, Limei; Dong, Minghao; von Deneen, Karen M; Liu, Yijun; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Online gaming addiction, as the most popular subtype of Internet addiction, had gained more and more attention from the whole world. However, the structural differences in cortical thickness of the brain between adolescents with online gaming addiction and healthy controls are not well unknown; neither was its association with the impaired cognitive control ability. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from late adolescence with online gaming addiction (n = 18) and age-, education- and gender-matched controls (n = 18) were acquired. The cortical thickness measurement method was employed to investigate alterations of cortical thickness in individuals with online gaming addiction. The color-word Stroop task was employed to investigate the functional implications of the cortical thickness abnormalities. Imaging data revealed increased cortical thickness in the left precentral cortex, precuneus, middle frontal cortex, inferior temporal and middle temporal cortices in late adolescence with online gaming addiction; meanwhile, the cortical thicknesses of the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), insula, lingual gyrus, the right postcentral gyrus, entorhinal cortex and inferior parietal cortex were decreased. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of the left precentral cortex, precuneus and lingual gyrus correlated with duration of online gaming addiction and the cortical thickness of the OFC correlated with the impaired task performance during the color-word Stroop task in adolescents with online gaming addiction. The findings in the current study suggested that the cortical thickness abnormalities of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of online gaming addiction.

  13. Heterotopic neurogenesis in a rat with cortical heterotopia.

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    Lee, K S; Collins, J L; Anzivino, M J; Frankel, E A; Schottler, F

    1998-11-15

    Early cellular development was studied in the neocortex of the tish rat. This neurological mutant is seizure-prone and displays cortical heterotopia similar to those observed in certain epileptic patients. The present study demonstrates that a single cortical preplate is formed in a typical superficial position of the developing tish neocortex. In contrast, two cortical plates are formed: one in a normotopic position and a second in a heterotopic position in the intermediate zone. As the normotopic cortical plate is formed, it characteristically separates the subplate cells from the superficial Cajal-Retzius cells. In contrast, the heterotopic cortical plate is not intercalated between the preplate cells because of its deeper position in the developing cortex. Cellular proliferation occurs in two zones of the developing tish cortex. One proliferative zone is located in a typical position in the ventricular/subventricular zone. A second proliferative zone is located in a heterotopic position in the superficial intermediate zone, i.e., between the two cortical plates. This misplaced proliferative zone may contribute cells to both the normotopic and heterotopic cortical plates. Taken together, these findings indicate that misplaced cortical plate cells, but not preplate cells, comprise the heterotopia of the tish cortex. Heterotopic neurogenesis is an early developmental event that is initiated before the migration of most cortical plate cells. It is concluded that misplaced cellular proliferation, in addition to disturbed neuronal migration, can play a key role in the formation of large cortical heterotopia.

  14. The investigation of cortical auditory evoked potentials responses in young adults having musical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Zahra; Ataş, Ahmet

    2014-12-01

    In the literature, music education has been shown to enhance auditory perception for children and young adults. When compared to young adult non-musicians, young adult musicians demonstrate increased auditory processing, and enhanced sensitivity to acoustic changes. The evoked response potentials associated with the interpretation of sound are enhanced in musicians. Studies show that training also changes sound perception and cortical responses. The earlier training appears to lead to larger changes in the auditory cortex. Most cortical studies in the literature have used pure tones or musical instrument sounds as stimuli signals. The aim of those studies was to investigate whether musical education would enhance auditory cortical responses when speech signals were used. In this study, the speech sounds extracted from running speech were used as sound stimuli. Non-randomized controlled study. The experimental group consists of young adults up to 21 years-old, all with a minimum of 4 years of musical education. The control group was selected from young adults of the same age without any musical education. The experiments were conducted by using a cortical evoked potential analyser and /m/, /t/ /g/ sound stimulation at the level of 65 dB SPL. In this study, P1 / N1 / P2 amplitude and latency values were measured. Significant differences were found in the amplitude values of P1 and P2 (p0.05). The results obtained in our study indicate that musical experience has an effect on the nervous system and this can be seen in cortical auditory evoked potentials recorded when the subjects hear speech.

  15. Movement-related dynamics of cortical oscillations in Parkinson's disease and essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondylis, Efstathios D; Randazzo, Michael J; Alhourani, Ahmad; Lipski, Witold J; Wozny, Thomas A; Pandya, Yash; Ghuman, Avniel S; Turner, Robert S; Crammond, Donald J; Richardson, R M

    2016-08-01

    Recent electrocorticography data have demonstrated excessive coupling of beta-phase to gamma-amplitude in primary motor cortex and that deep brain stimulation facilitates motor improvement by decreasing baseline phase-amplitude coupling. However, both the dynamic modulation of phase-amplitude coupling during movement and the general cortical neurophysiology of other movement disorders, such as essential tremor, are relatively unexplored. To clarify the relationship of these interactions in cortical oscillatory activity to movement and disease state, we recorded local field potentials from hand sensorimotor cortex using subdural electrocorticography during a visually cued, incentivized handgrip task in subjects with Parkinson's disease (n = 11), with essential tremor (n = 9) and without a movement disorder (n = 6). We demonstrate that abnormal coupling of the phase of low frequency oscillations to the amplitude of gamma oscillations is not specific to Parkinson's disease, but also occurs in essential tremor, most prominently for the coupling of alpha to gamma oscillations. Movement kinematics were not significantly different between these groups, allowing us to show for the first time that robust alpha and beta desynchronization is a shared feature of sensorimotor cortical activity in Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, with the greatest high-beta desynchronization occurring in Parkinson's disease and the greatest alpha desynchronization occurring in essential tremor. We also show that the spatial extent of cortical phase-amplitude decoupling during movement is much greater in subjects with Parkinson's disease and essential tremor than in subjects without a movement disorder. These findings suggest that subjects with Parkinson's disease and essential tremor can produce movements that are kinematically similar to those of subjects without a movement disorder by reducing excess sensorimotor cortical phase-amplitude coupling that is characteristic of these

  16. Underarousal in Adult ADHD: How Are Peripheral and Cortical Arousal Related?

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    Mayer, Kerstin; Wyckoff, Sarah Nicole; Strehl, Ute

    2016-07-01

    In children and adults with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a general slowing of spontaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) brain activity and a decrease of event-related potential amplitudes such as the contingent negative variation (CNV) are observed. Additionally, some studies have reported decreased skin conductance level (SCL) in this clinical population leading to the hypothesis of a peripheral hypoarousal, which may be a target of biofeedback treatment in addition to or instead of neurofeedback. To our knowledge, the relationship between SCL and CNV has not been simultaneously investigated in one experiment. Using the theoretical background of the hypoarousal model, this article aims to gain more insight into the differences and correlations of cortical (CNV) and peripheral (SCL) arousal in adults with ADHD. A sample of 23 adults with ADHD and 22 healthy controls underwent an auditory Go-NoGo task with simultaneous 22-channel EEG and SCL recordings. Reaction time (RT) and reaction time variability (RTV) were also measured to assess task performance. Significantly decreased CNV amplitude and significantly higher RTV were observed in the ADHD group, reflecting cortical underarousal and problems with sustained attention. No significant correlation between peripheral underarousal and cortical underarousal was observed in the ADHD group or the control group. The observed cortical underarousal reflected in the decreased CNV supports the notion of a reduced CNV amplitude as a possible biomarker for ADHD. However, the connection between cortical and peripheral arousal is not as clear as is suggested in previous research investigating both separately. Implications of these results for new treatment options for ADHD such as biofeedback are discussed.

  17. Cegueira cortical: relato de dois casos clínicos Cortical blindness: report of two cases

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    Raquel de Lima e Silva

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é relatar dois casos de cegueira cortical atendidos no serviço de urgência da Clínica de Olhos da Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte. A cegueira cortical é uma condição clínica rara e bilateral, de causa isquêmica, caracterizada por lesão no córtex cerebral. Nos presentes casos, o diagnóstico foi feito pela sintomatologia clínica, pelos achados oftalmológicos e pelas alterações obtidas por imagem. Em ambos houve evolução rápida da doença, com perda visual súbita importante. O acompanhamento oftalmológico não revelou melhora significativa da acuidade visual final. A baixa acuidade visual é um sinal importante em oftalmologia e deve ser avaliada com cautela e atenção, visto que pode ser causada pela cegueira cortical, condição rara, grave e ainda pouco estudada no nosso meio.The aim of this work is to report two cases of cortical blindness, evaluated at an ophthalmologic service (Clínica de Olhos da Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte. Cortical blindness is a rare, usually ischemic, bilateral retrogeniculate lesion. The two diagnoses were based on patient complaints, ophthalmologic data and image signs. Both patients suddenly lost their visual function. None presented a significant improvement in their final vision acuity during the evolution. Subnormal visual acuity is an important ophthalmologic sign that must be seen with concern and attention since it may be caused by cortical blindness, a rare and serious condition not yet well studied in our Country.

  18. Variation in the topography of the speech production cortex verified by cortical stimulation and high gamma activity.

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    Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Narayana, Shalini; Choudhri, Asim F; Fulton, Stephen P; Boop, Frederick A; Wheless, James W; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2014-12-17

    In this study, we have addressed the question of functional brain reorganization for language in the presence and absence of anatomical lesions in two patients with epilepsy using cortical stimulation mapping and high gamma (HG) activity in subdural grid recordings. In both, the expressive language cortex was defined as the cortical patch below the electrode(s) that when stimulated resulted in speech arrest, and during speech expression tasks generated HG activity. This patch fell within the borders of Broca's area, as defined anatomically, in the case of the patient with a lesion, but outside that area in the other, lesion-free patient. Such results highlight the necessity for presurgical language mapping in all cases of surgery involving the language-dominant hemisphere and suggest that HG activity during expressive language tasks can be informative and helpful in conjunction with cortical stimulation mapping for expressive language mapping.

  19. Self-organized criticality in cortical assemblies occurs in concurrent scale-free and small-world networks.

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    Massobrio, Paolo; Pasquale, Valentina; Martinoia, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    The spontaneous activity of cortical networks is characterized by the emergence of different dynamic states. Although several attempts were accomplished to understand the origin of these dynamics, the underlying factors continue to be elusive. In this work, we specifically investigated the interplay between network topology and spontaneous dynamics within the framework of self-organized criticality (SOC). The obtained results support the hypothesis that the emergence of critical states occurs in specific complex network topologies. By combining multi-electrode recordings of spontaneous activity of in vitro cortical assemblies with theoretical models, we demonstrate that different 'connectivity rules' drive the network towards different dynamic states. In particular, scale-free architectures with different degree of small-worldness account better for the variability observed in experimental data, giving rise to different dynamic states. Moreover, in relationship with the balance between excitation and inhibition and percentage of inhibitory hubs, the simulated cortical networks fall in a critical regime.

  20. Using an Artificial Neural Bypass to Restore Cortical Control of Rhythmic Movements in a Human with Quadriplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Friedenberg, David A.; Annetta, Nicholas; Glenn, Bradley; Bockbrader, Marcie; Majstorovic, Connor; Domas, Stephanie; Mysiw, W. Jerry; Rezai, Ali; Bouton, Chad

    2016-09-01

    Neuroprosthetic technology has been used to restore cortical control of discrete (non-rhythmic) hand movements in a paralyzed person. However, cortical control of rhythmic movements which originate in the brain but are coordinated by Central Pattern Generator (CPG) neural networks in the spinal cord has not been demonstrated previously. Here we show a demonstration of an artificial neural bypass technology that decodes cortical activity and emulates spinal cord CPG function allowing volitional rhythmic hand movement. The technology uses a combination of signals recorded from the brain, machine-learning algorithms to decode the signals, a numerical model of CPG network, and a neuromuscular electrical stimulation system to evoke rhythmic movements. Using the neural bypass, a quadriplegic participant was able to initiate, sustain, and switch between rhythmic and discrete finger movements, using his thoughts alone. These results have implications in advancing neuroprosthetic technology to restore complex movements in people living with paralysis.

  1. More sensitivity of cortical GABAergic neurons than glutamatergic neurons in response to acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Li, Fang; Wang, Chunyan; Su, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-25

    Acidosis impairs brain functions. Neuron-specific mechanisms underlying acidosis-induced brain dysfunction remain elusive. We studied the sensitivity of cortical GABAergic neurons and glutamatergic neurons to acidosis by whole-cell recording in brain slices. The acidification to the neurons was induced by perfusing artificial cerebral spinal fluid with lower pH. This acidification impairs excitability and synaptic transmission in the glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Acidosis impairs spiking capacity in the GABAergic neurons more than in the glutamatergic neurons. Acidosis also strengthens glutamatergic synaptic transmission and attenuates GABAergic synaptic transmission on the GABAergic neurons more than the glutamatergic neurons, which results in the functional impairment of these GABAergic neurons. This acidosis-induced dysfunction predominantly in the cortical GABAergic neurons drives the homeostasis of neuronal networks toward overexcitation and exacerbates neuronal impairment.

  2. Math anxiety: Brain cortical network changes in anticipation of doing mathematics.

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    Klados, Manousos A; Pandria, Niki; Micheloyannis, Sifis; Margulies, Daniel; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2017-05-05

    Following our previous work regarding the involvement of math anxiety (MA) in math-oriented tasks, this study tries to explore the differences in the cerebral networks' topology between self-reported low math-anxious (LMA) and high math-anxious (HMA) individuals, during the anticipation phase prior to a mathematical related experiment. For this reason, multichannel EEG recordings were adopted, while the solution of the inverse problem was applied in a generic head model, in order to obtain the cortical signals. The cortical networks have been computed for each band separately, using the magnitude square coherence metric. The main graph theoretical parameters, showed differences in segregation and integration in almost all EEG bands of the HMAs in comparison to LMAs, indicative of a great influence of the anticipatory anxiety prior to mathematical performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of lexical statistics on temporal lobe cortical dynamics during spoken word listening

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    Cibelli, Emily S.; Leonard, Matthew K.; Johnson, Keith; Chang, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    Neural representations of words are thought to have a complex spatio-temporal cortical basis. It has been suggested that spoken word recognition is not a process of feed-forward computations from phonetic to lexical forms, but rather involves the online integration of bottom-up input with stored lexical knowledge. Using direct neural recordings from the temporal lobe, we examined cortical responses to words and pseudowords. We found that neural populations were not only sensitive to lexical status (real vs. pseudo), but also to cohort size (number of words matching the phonetic input at each time point) and cohort frequency (lexical frequency of those words). These lexical variables modulated neural activity from the posterior to anterior temporal lobe, and also dynamically as the stimuli unfolded on a millisecond time scale. Our findings indicate that word recognition is not purely modular, but relies on rapid and online integration of multiple sources of lexical knowledge. PMID:26072003

  4. Do Male And Female Cyclists' Cortical Activity Differ Before and During Cycling Exercise?

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    Ludyga, Sebastian; Gronwald, Thomas; Hottenrott, Kuno

    2015-12-01

    Although men and women are suggested to vary in resistance to fatigue, possible sex difference in its central component have rarely been investigated via electroencephalography (EEG). Therefore, we examined differences in cortical activity between male and female cyclists (n = 26) during cycling exercise. Participants performed an incremental test to derive the anaerobic threshold from the lactate power curve. In addition, cyclists' cortical activity was recorded with EEG before and during cycling exercise. Whereas women showed higher frontal alpha and beta activity at rest, no sex-specific differences of relative EEG spectral power occurred during cycling at higher intensity. Women and men's brains respond similarly during submaximal cycling, as both sexes show an inverted U-shaped curve of alpha power. Therefore, sex differences observable at rest vanish after the onset of exercise.

  5. Changes in Mice Brain Spontaneous Electrical Activity during Cortical Spreading Depression due to Mobile Phone Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Samera M.; Mohamed, Ehab I.; Dawood, Abdel-Fattah B.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate changes in spontaneous EEG activity during cortical spreading depression (CSD) in mice brain. The cortical region of anaesthetized mice were exposed to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs) emitted from a mobile phone (MP, 935.2-960.2 MHz, 41.8 mW/cm2). The effect of EMFs on EEG was investigated before and after exposure to different stimuli (MP, 2% KCl, and MP & 2% KCl). The records of brain spontaneous EEG activity, slow potential changes (SPC), and spindle shaped firings were obtained through an interfaced computer. The results showed increases in the amplitude of evoked spindles by about 87%, 17%, and 226% for MP, 2% KCl, and MP & 2% KCl; respectively, as compared to values for the control group. These results showed that the evoked spindle is a more sensitive indicator of the effect of exposure to EMFs from MP. PMID:23675079

  6. Effect of Synaptic Connectivity on Long-Range Synchronization of Fast Cortical Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, M.; Rulkov, N. F.; Timofeev, I.

    2008-01-01

    Cortical gamma oscillations in the 20- to 80-Hz range are associated with attentiveness and sensory perception and have strong connections to both cognitive processing and temporal binding of sensory stimuli. These gamma oscillations become synchronized within a few milliseconds over distances spanning a few millimeters in spite of synaptic delays. In this study using in vivo recordings and large-scale cortical network models, we reveal a critical role played by the network geometry in achieving precise long-range synchronization in the gamma frequency band. Our results indicate that the presence of many independent synaptic pathways in a two-dimensional network facilitate precise phase synchronization of fast gamma band oscillations with nearly zero phase delays between remote network sites. These findings predict a common mechanism of precise oscillatory synchronization in neuronal networks. PMID:18632897

  7. Biomechanical performance of subpectoral biceps tenodesis: a comparison of interference screw fixation, cortical button fixation, and interference screw diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Paul M; Rajaram, Arun; Beitzel, Knut; Hackett, Thomas R; Chowaniec, David M; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2013-04-01

    Subpectoral biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation allows reproducible positioning of the tendon to help maintain the length-tension relationship. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of cortical button fixation in isolation or as an augment to interference screw fixation and to determine if the diameter of the interference screw affected fixation strength. Thirty-two cadaveric shoulders were dissected and randomized to 1 of 4 groups: (1) 7-mm interference screw and cortical button, (2) cortical button alone, (3) 7-mm interference screw, or (4) 8-mm interference screw. Testing was performed on a materials testing system with a 100-N load cycled at 1 Hz for 5000 cycles, followed by an axial load to failure test. Cyclic displacement, ultimate load to failure, and site of failure were recorded for each specimen. The mean ultimate failure loads were 7-mm interference screw with cortical button augmentation, 237.8 ± 120.4 N; cortical button alone, 99.4 ± 16.9 N; 7-mm interference screw, 275.5 ± 56 N; 8-mm interference screw, 277.1 ± 42.1 N. All specimens failed through tendon failure at the screw-tendon-bone interface. The biomechanical performance of subpectoral biceps tenodesis with interference screw fixation was not improved with cortical button augmentation. In addition, cortical button fixation alone yielded a significantly lower ultimate load to failure compared with interference screws. Finally, the biomechanical performance of smaller-diameter interference screws with matching bone tunnels was not affected by interference screw diameter. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Low and High-Frequency Field Potentials of Cortical Networks ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural networks grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have become an important, high content in vitro assay for assessing neuronal function. MEA experiments typically examine high- frequency (HF) (>200 Hz) spikes, and bursts which can be used to discriminate between different pharmacological agents/chemicals. However, normal brain activity is additionally composed of integrated low-frequency (0.5-100 Hz) field potentials (LFPs) which are filtered out of MEA recordings. The objective of this study was to characterize the relationship between HF and LFP neural network signals, and to assess the relative sensitivity of LFPs to selected neurotoxicants. Rat primary cortical cultures were grown on glass, single-well MEA chips. Spontaneous activity was sampled at 25 kHz and recorded (5 min) (Multi-Channel Systems) from mature networks (14 days in vitro). HF (spike, mean firing rate, MFR) and LF (power spectrum, amplitude) components were extracted from each network and served as its baseline (BL). Next, each chip was treated with either 1) a positive control, bicuculline (BIC, 25μM) or domoic acid (DA, 0.3μM), 2) or a negative control, acetaminophen (ACE, 100μM) or glyphosate (GLY, 100μM), 3) a solvent control (H2O or DMSO:EtOH), or 4) a neurotoxicant, (carbaryl, CAR 5, 30μM ; lindane, LIN 1, 10μM; permethrin, PERM 25, 50μM; triadimefon, TRI 5, 65μM). Post treatment, 5 mins of spontaneous activity was recorded and analyzed. As expected posit

  9. Cortical evoked potentials to an auditory illusion: binaural beats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Hillel; Starr, Arnold; Michalewski, Henry J; Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Bleich, Naomi; Mittelman, Nomi

    2009-08-01

    To define brain activity corresponding to an auditory illusion of 3 and 6Hz binaural beats in 250Hz or 1000Hz base frequencies, and compare it to the sound onset response. Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded in response to unmodulated tones of 250 or 1000Hz to one ear and 3 or 6Hz higher to the other, creating an illusion of amplitude modulations (beats) of 3Hz and 6Hz, in base frequencies of 250Hz and 1000Hz. Tones were 2000ms in duration and presented with approximately 1s intervals. Latency, amplitude and source current density estimates of ERP components to tone onset and subsequent beats-evoked oscillations were determined and compared across beat frequencies with both base frequencies. All stimuli evoked tone-onset P(50), N(100) and P(200) components followed by oscillations corresponding to the beat frequency, and a subsequent tone-offset complex. Beats-evoked oscillations were higher in amplitude with the low base frequency and to the low beat frequency. Sources of the beats-evoked oscillations across all stimulus conditions located mostly to left lateral and inferior temporal lobe areas in all stimulus conditions. Onset-evoked components were not different across stimulus conditions; P(50) had significantly different sources than the beats-evoked oscillations; and N(100) and P(200) sources located to the same temporal lobe regions as beats-evoked oscillations, but were bilateral and also included frontal and parietal contributions. Neural activity with slightly different volley frequencies from left and right ear converges and interacts in the central auditory brainstem pathways to generate beats of neural activity to modulate activities in the left temporal lobe, giving rise to the illusion of binaural beats. Cortical potentials recorded to binaural beats are distinct from onset responses. Brain activity corresponding to an auditory illusion of low frequency beats can be recorded from the scalp.

  10. Cross-approximate entropy of cortical local field potentials quantifies effects of anesthesia - a pilot study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Cornelius

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anesthetics dose-dependently shift electroencephalographic (EEG activity towards high-amplitude, slow rhythms, indicative of a synchronization of neuronal activity in thalamocortical networks. Additionally, they uncouple brain areas in higher (gamma frequency ranges possibly underlying conscious perception. It is currently thought that both effects may impair brain function by impeding proper information exchange between cortical areas. But what happens at the local network level? Local networks with strong excitatory interconnections may be more resilient towards global changes in brain rhythms, but depend heavily on locally projecting, inhibitory interneurons. As anesthetics bias cortical networks towards inhibition, we hypothesized that they may cause excessive synchrony and compromise information processing already on a small spatial scale. Using a recently introduced measure of signal independence, cross-approximate entropy (XApEn, we investigated to what degree anesthetics synchronized local cortical network activity. We recorded local field potentials (LFP from the somatosensory cortex of three rats chronically implanted with multielectrode arrays and compared activity patterns under control (awake state with those at increasing concentrations of isoflurane, enflurane and halothane. Results Cortical LFP signals were more synchronous, as expressed by XApEn, in the presence of anesthetics. Specifically, XApEn was a monotonously declining function of anesthetic concentration. Isoflurane and enflurane were indistinguishable; at a concentration of 1 MAC (the minimum alveolar concentration required to suppress movement in response to noxious stimuli in 50% of subjects both volatile agents reduced XApEn by about 70%, whereas halothane was less potent (50% reduction. Conclusions The results suggest that anesthetics strongly diminish the independence of operation of local cortical neuronal populations, and that the

  11. Alterations of cortical excitability and central motor conduction time in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhunjhunwala, Ketan; Prashanth, D K; Netravathi, M; Nagaraju, B C; Pal, Pramod Kr

    2013-10-11

    Wilson's disease (WD) leads to widespread structural alterations of central nervous system and our objectives were to determine the cortical excitability changes in WD by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Thirteen patients with WD, diagnosed by the presence of Kayser-Fleischer ring and biochemical tests, were studied. TMS was performed using a figure-of-eight coil attached to Magstim 200 stimulator. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were recorded from right first dorsal interosseous at rest. Resting motor threshold (RMT) was determined using standard techniques and central motor conduction time (CMCT) by 'F' wave method. Comparison was made with control data of our laboratory. Dysarthria was the presenting symptom in 5 patients (38.5%) and chorea, tremors, dystonia and abnormal gait in 2 patients each (15.4%). RMT was recordable in 10 patients and not recordable in 3. Compared to controls, patients in whom RMT was recordable, had significantly higher mean RMT (80.9 ± 14.8 vs. 41.1 ± 7, pRMT, MEP could be obtained with active contraction. CMCT in these 2 patients was also prolonged. Patients with WD have reduced cortical excitability and prolonged CMCT which may be due to the intracortical presynaptic motor dysfunction.

  12. The dynamics of sensorimotor cortical oscillations during the observation of hand movements: an EEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Avanzini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The observation of action done by others determines a desynchronization of the rhythms recorded from cortical central regions. Here, we examined whether the observation of different types of hand movements (target directed, non-target directed, cyclic and non-cyclic elicits different EEG cortical temporal patterns. METHODOLOGY: Video-clips of four types of hand movements were shown to right-handed healthy participants. Two were target directed (grasping and pointing motor acts; two were non-target directed (supinating and clenching movements. Grasping and supinating were performed once, while pointing and clenching twice (cyclic movements. High-density EEG was recorded and analyzed by means of wavelet transform, subdividing the time course in time bins of 200 ms. The observation of all presented movements produced a desynchronization of alpha and beta rhythms in central and parietal regions. The rhythms desynchronized as soon as the hand movement started, the nadir being reached around 700 ms after movement onset. At the end of the movement, a large power rebound occurred for all bands. Target and non-target directed movements produced an alpha band desynchronization in the central electrodes at the same time, but with a stronger desynchronization and a prolonged rebound for target directed motor acts. Most interestingly, there was a clear correlation between the velocity profile of the observed movements and beta band modulation. SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that the observation of motor acts determines a modulation of cortical rhythm analogous to that occurring during motor act execution. In particular, the cortical motor system closely follows the velocity of the observed movements. This finding provides strong evidence for the presence in humans of a mechanism (mirror mechanism mapping action observation on action execution motor programs.

  13. Mapping the fine structure of cortical activity with different micro-ECoG electrode array geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Gkogkidis, C. Alexis; Iljina, Olga; Fiederer, Lukas D. J.; Henle, Christian; Mader, Irina; Kaminsky, Jan; Stieglitz, Thomas; Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Ball, Tonio

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Innovations in micro-electrocorticography (µECoG) electrode array manufacturing now allow for intricate designs with smaller contact diameters and/or pitch (i.e. inter-contact distance) down to the sub-mm range. The aims of the present study were: (i) to investigate whether frequency ranges up to 400 Hz can be reproducibly observed in µECoG recordings and (ii) to examine how differences in topographical substructure between these frequency bands and electrode array geometries can be quantified. We also investigated, for the first time, the influence of blood vessels on signal properties and assessed the influence of cortical vasculature on topographic mapping. Approach. The present study employed two µECoG electrode arrays with different contact diameters and inter-contact distances, which were used to characterize neural activity from the somatosensory cortex of minipigs in a broad frequency range up to 400 Hz. The analysed neural data were recorded in acute experiments under anaesthesia during peripheral electrical stimulation. Main results. We observed that µECoG recordings reliably revealed multi-focal cortical somatosensory response patterns, in which response peaks were often less than 1 cm apart and would thus not have been resolvable with conventional ECoG. The response patterns differed by stimulation site and intensity, they were distinct for different frequency bands, and the results of functional mapping proved independent of cortical vascular. Our analysis of different frequency bands exhibited differences in the number of activation peaks in topographical substructures. Notably, signal strength and signal-to-noise ratios differed between the two electrode arrays, possibly due to their different sensitivity for variations in spatial patterns and signal strengths. Significance. Our findings that the geometry of µECoG electrode arrays can strongly influence their recording performance can help to make informed decisions that maybe

  14. Late onset reversible cortical blindness following electrocution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Bhumir; Philip, Vivek J; Shankar, Udaya C

    2015-12-01

    An elderly gentleman presented with acute onset of bilateral visual blurring and generalized headache after 1 week post electrocution injury. Clinically, the symptoms were attributed to cortical lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain revealed bilaterally symmetrical diffusion restriction in parietal and occipital areas. Treatment with intravenous steroids resulted in remarkable improvement in symptoms. Neurological injury secondary to electrocution is a well described entity having a variety of clinical presentation. We put forward our experience with this unique case presenting as post electrocution delayed onset of visual symptoms. Discussion and review of literature related to this clinical entity will also be presented.

  15. Extrapontine myelinolysis resulting in transient cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Jennifer E; Wilson, William G; Raghavan, Prashant; Rust, Robert S; Goodkin, Howard P

    2010-02-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis and extrapontine myelinolysis are characterized by symmetric demyelination subsequent to rapid shifts in serum osmolality. Described here is a novel case of transient cortical blindness in association with imaging features of extrapontine myelinolysis, which occurred in a child with carbamoyl phosphate synthetase deficiency after rapid correction of hyperammonemia. Serum sodium levels were within normal limits at presentation and throughout the period of ammonia correction. A potential pathogenic mechanism of osmotic demyelination in the setting of acute treatment for hyperammonemia in a patient with a urea cycle abnormality includes disruption of the blood-brain barrier and re-equilibration of organic osmolytes, particularly glutamine.

  16. Cortical visual impairment: Characteristics and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić, Vesna; Anđelković, Marija; Jablan, Branka; Žigić, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    According to the latest studies, Cortical visual impairment – CVI is one of the most common causes of problems and difficulties in visual functioning. It results from the impairment of the central part of visual system, i.e. visual cortex, posterior visual pathway, or both. The diagnosis is usually made in the first three years of life. The aim of this paper is to present the characteristics of children with CVI, and the strategies used for treatment. CVI has a negative impact on almost all d...

  17. Mean field methods for cortical network dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, J.; Lerchner, Alexander; Ahmadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    We review the use of mean field theory for describing the dynamics of dense, randomly connected cortical circuits. For a simple network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate- and-fire neurons, we can show how the firing irregularity, as measured by the Fano factor, increases...... with the strength of the synapses in the network and with the value to which the membrane potential is reset after a spike. Generalizing the model to include conductance-based synapses gives insight into the connection between the firing statistics and the high- conductance state observed experimentally in visual...

  18. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, E.J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); El-Khoury, G.Y. [Dept. of Radiology and Orthopaedics, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  19. Colovesical fistula demonstrated on renal cortical scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathaki, Maria; Vamvakas, Lampros; Papadaki, Emmanouela; Papadimitraki, Elisavet; Tsaroucha, Angeliki; Karkavitsas, Nikolaos

    2012-11-01

    A 70-year-old man with a history of weight loss, changes in bowel habits, and hematochezia had rectal adenocarcinoma. He was palliated with diverting colostomy, followed by radiochemotherapy. Bilateral hydronephrosis was found incidentally on lower abdominal CT scan. He underwent 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid scan prior to percutaneous nephrostomy tube placement. Apart from the renal cortex, scintigraphy showed activity in the ascending colon continuous to the activity of the bladder. This indicated urine extravasation on account of a colovesical fistula, complicating postoperative radiation treatment. Here we highlight the contribution of renal cortical scintigraphy in the detection of colovesical fistulas.

  20. Effect of mescaline on single cortical neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, C M; Roberts, M H; Szabadi, E

    1971-12-01

    The effects of mescaline upon single cortical neurones were studied, using the microiontophoretic technique. Mescaline elicited excitatory and depressant responses similar to those evoked by noradrenaline (NA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HI). The responses to NA and mescaline were usually in the same direction, the neurone being either excited by both drugs or depressed by both drugs. The correlation between the effects of mescaline and 5-HT, however, was less consistent. The beta-adrenoceptor blocking agent MJ-1999 and the 5-HT antagonist methysergide were both effective in antagonizing mescaline responses.

  1. Cortical visual impairment: Characteristics and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić Vesna; Anđelković Marija; Jablan Branka; Žigić Vesna

    2014-01-01

    According to the latest studies, Cortical visual impairment – CVI is one of the most common causes of problems and difficulties in visual functioning. It results from the impairment of the central part of visual system, i.e. visual cortex, posterior visual pathway, or both. The diagnosis is usually made in the first three years of life. The aim of this paper is to present the characteristics of children with CVI, and the strategies used for treatment. CVI has a negative impact on almost all d...

  2. Comparative aspects of cortical neurogenesis in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Amanda F P; Pollen, Alexander A; Tavare, Aniket; DeProto, Jamin; Molnár, Zoltán

    2007-08-01

    The mammalian neocortex consists of six layers. By contrast, the reptilian and avian cortices have only three, which are believed to be equivalent to layers I, V and VI of mammals. In mammals, the majority of cortical cell proliferation occurs in the ventricular and subventricular zones, but there are a small number of scattered individual divisions throughout the cortex. Neurogenesis in the cortical subventricular zone is believed to contribute to the supragranular layers. To estimate the proportions of different forms of divisions in reptiles and birds, we examined the site of proliferation in embryonic turtle (stages 18-25) and chick (embryonic days 8-15) brains using phospho-histone H3 (a G2 and M phase marker) immunohistochemistry. In turtle, only few scattered abventricular H3-immunoreactive cells were found outside the ventricular zone; the majority of the H3-immunoreactive cells were located in the ventricular zone throughout the entire turtle brain. Ventricular zone cell proliferation peaks at stages 18 and 20, before an increase of abventricular proliferation at stages 23 and 25. In turtle cortex, however, abventricular proliferation at any given stage never exceeded 17.5+/-2.47% of the total division and the mitotic profiles did not align parallel to the ventricular zone. Phospho-histone H3 immunoreactivity in embryonic chick brains suggests the lack of subventricular zone in the dorsal cortex, but the presence of subventricular zone in the ventral telencephalon. We were able to demonstrate that the avian subventricular zone is present in both pallial and subpallial regions of the ventral telencephalon during embryonic development, and we characterize the spatial and temporal organization of the subventricular zone. Comparative studies suggest that the subventricular zone was involved in the laminar expansion of the cortex to six layers in mammals from the three-layered cortex found in reptiles and birds. Within mammals, the number of neurons in a

  3. Primary cortical brain cells influence osteoblast activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anissian, Lucas; Kirby, Michael; Stark, André

    2009-12-18

    The presence of neuropeptides and neuroreceptors in the bone have been reported in several studies. Bone turn-over seems to be controlled by the nervous system. The actual pathway or the control mechanism is still under investigation. In this study we investigate the changes in osteoblast cells if they are in co-culture with primary cortical brain cells. After seven days in co-culture with the primary fetal brain cells the osteoblast cells exhibited hypertrophic morphological changes and showed stronger ALP activity.

  4. Hiperactivacion cortical y deterioro cognitivo en esquizofrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Suazo Bonnelly, Vanessa Johanna

    2014-01-01

    [ES] En este trabajo se estudió la actividad cerebral desorganizada y el deterioro cognitivo adjudicado a pacientes con esquizofrenia. Para estudiar la actividad cerebral se empleó una medida electroencefalográfica de ruido cortical (actividad promediada de fondo no ligada a la tarea) durante el desarrollo de una tarea sencilla (P300) en dos de las bandas oscilatorias (gamma y theta) más asociadas a la organización de la actividad cerebral según la literatura. Se utilizó una medida estructura...

  5. Regional vulnerability of longitudinal cortical association connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ceschin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preterm born children with spastic diplegia type of cerebral palsy and white matter injury or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL, are known to have motor, visual and cognitive impairments. Most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies performed in this group have demonstrated widespread abnormalities using averaged deterministic tractography and voxel-based DTI measurements. Little is known about structural network correlates of white matter topography and reorganization in preterm cerebral palsy, despite the availability of new therapies and the need for brain imaging biomarkers. Here, we combined novel post-processing methodology of probabilistic tractography data in this preterm cohort to improve spatial and regional delineation of longitudinal cortical association tract abnormalities using an along-tract approach, and compared these data to structural DTI cortical network topology analysis. DTI images were acquired on 16 preterm children with cerebral palsy (mean age 5.6 ± 4 and 75 healthy controls (mean age 5.7 ± 3.4. Despite mean tract analysis, Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS and voxel-based morphometry (VBM demonstrating diffusely reduced fractional anisotropy (FA reduction in all white matter tracts, the along-tract analysis improved the detection of regional tract vulnerability. The along-tract map-structural network topology correlates revealed two associations: (1 reduced regional posterior–anterior gradient in FA of the longitudinal visual cortical association tracts (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, optic radiation, posterior thalamic radiation correlated with reduced posterior–anterior gradient of intra-regional (nodal efficiency metrics with relative sparing of frontal and temporal regions; and (2 reduced regional FA within frontal–thalamic–striatal white matter pathways (anterior limb/anterior thalamic radiation, superior longitudinal fasciculus and cortical spinal tract

  6. Transient cortical blindness post angiography--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, T R; Johnson, P; Webster, D; Gilbert, D T; Barton, E N

    2011-06-01

    A 56-year old female reported having had a fall two weeks prior to presentation. Computed Tomography (CT) scan showed an acute right-sided convexity subdural haematoma. A computed tomography angiogram revealed no vascular anomaly. One hour post procedure she had bilateral cortical blindness. Her vision subsequently was fully restored. A diagnosis of transient cortical blindness was made. Transient cortical blindness is a rare but recognized complication ofintra-arterial injection of iodinated contrast agents.

  7. Consistent Reconstruction of Cortical Surfaces from Longitudinal Brain MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gang; Nie, Jingxin; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and consistent reconstruction of cortical surfaces from longitudinal human brain MR images is of great importance in studying subtle morphological changes of the cerebral cortex. This paper presents a new deformable surface method for consistent and accurate reconstruction of inner, central and outer cortical surfaces from longitudinal MR images. Specifically, the cortical surfaces of the group-mean image of all aligned longitudinal images of the same subject are first reconstructed ...

  8. Consistent Reconstruction of Cortical Surfaces from Longitudinal Brain MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gang; Nie, Jingxin; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Yaping; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and consistent reconstruction of cortical surfaces from longitudinal human brain MR images is of great importance in studying longitudinal subtle change of the cerebral cortex. This paper presents a novel deformable surface method for consistent and accurate reconstruction of inner, central and outer cortical surfaces from longitudinal brain MR images. Specifically, the cortical surfaces of the group-mean image of all aligned longitudinal images of the same subject are first reconstr...

  9. Effects of polar cortical cytoskeleton and unbalanced cortical surface tension on intercellular bridge thinning during cytokinesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Mei-Wen An; Xiao-Na Li; Fang Yang; Yang Liu

    2011-01-01

    To probe the contributions of polar cortical cytoskeleton and the surface tension of daughter cells to intercellular bridgethinning dynamics during cytokinesis,we applied cytochalasin D (CD) or colchicine (COLC) in a highly localized manner to polar regions of dividing normal rat kidney (NRK) cells.We observed cellular morphological changes and analyzed the intercellular bridge thinning trajectories of dividing cells with different polar cortical characteristics.Global blebbistatin (BS) application was used to obtain cells losing active contractile force groups.Our results show that locally released CD or colchicine at the polar region caused inhibition of cytokinesis before ingression.Similar treatment at phases after ingression allowed completion of cytokinesis but dramatically influenced the trajectories of intercellular bridge thinning.Disturbing single polar cortical actin induced transformation of the intercellular bridge thinning process,and polar cortical tension controlled deformation time of intercellular bridges.Our study provides a feasible framework to induce and analyze the effects of local changes in mechanical properties of cellular components on single cellular cytokinesis.

  10. Cortical versus non-cortical lesions affect expression of Babinski sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ting; Jia, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Tong; Guo, Dongmei; Yang, Ling

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the pattern of pathological plantar response (Babinski sign), and the focus of the lesions of pyramidal tract. We examined 107 subjects with definite lesions of the pyramidal tract recruited from inpatients at the Neurology Department of the Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University (Beijing, China). We found that patients with sub-cortical lesions (corona radiata to spinal cord) showed different patterns of Babinski sign than those with lesions within the primary motor cortex. Specifically, dorsiflexion of the big toe without recruitment of the other toes was seen in 71.4 % of patients with cortical pyramidal tract lesions, while 93 patients with lesions lower than cortex (corona radiata to spinal cord) showed movement of other toes in addition to the big toe, which showed movement due to contraction of the extensor hallucis longus tendon in all patients. There were no differences in patterns of Babinski sign between the different sub-cortical lesion foci. We conclude that the patterns of Babinski sign can be used to predict cortical lesions of the pyramidal tract.

  11. Basic visual function and cortical thickness patterns in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Manja; Barnes, Josephine; Ridgway, Gerard R; Wattam-Bell, John; Warrington, Elizabeth K; Fox, Nick C; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2011-09-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is characterized by a progressive decline in higher-visual object and space processing, but the extent to which these deficits are underpinned by basic visual impairments is unknown. This study aimed to assess basic and higher-order visual deficits in 21 PCA patients. Basic visual skills including form detection and discrimination, color discrimination, motion coherence, and point localization were measured, and associations and dissociations between specific basic visual functions and measures of higher-order object and space perception were identified. All participants showed impairment in at least one aspect of basic visual processing. However, a number of dissociations between basic visual skills indicated a heterogeneous pattern of visual impairment among the PCA patients. Furthermore, basic visual impairments were associated with particular higher-order object and space perception deficits, but not with nonvisual parietal tasks, suggesting the specific involvement of visual networks in PCA. Cortical thickness analysis revealed trends toward lower cortical thickness in occipitotemporal (ventral) and occipitoparietal (dorsal) regions in patients with visuoperceptual and visuospatial deficits, respectively. However, there was also a lot of overlap in their patterns of cortical thinning. These findings suggest that different presentations of PCA represent points in a continuum of phenotypical variation.

  12. Extraction of the cerebral cortical boundaries from MRI for measurement of cortical thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskildsen, Simon F.; Uldahl, Mark; Ostergaard, Lasse R.

    2005-04-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, cause atrophy of the cerebral cortex. Measurements of cerebral cortical thickness and volume are used in the quantification and localization of atrophy. It is possible to measure the thickness of the cerebral cortex manually from magnetic resonance imaging, but partial volume effects, orthogonality problems, large amounts of manual labor and operator bias makes it difficult to conduct measurements on large patient populations. Automatic quantification and localization of atrophy is a highly desirable goal, as it facilitates the study of early anatomical changes and track disease progression on large populations. The first step in achieving this goal is to develop robust and accurate methods for measuring cortical thickness and volume automatically. We have developed a new method, capable of both extracting surface representations of the cortical boundaries from magnetic resonance imaging and measuring the cortical thickness. Experiments show that the developed method is robust and performs well on datasets of both healthy subjects and subjects suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Extensive cortical remyelination in patients with chronic multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Monika; Antel, Jack; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies revealed prominent cortical demyelination in patients with chronic multiple sclerosis (MS). Demyelination in white matter lesions is frequently accompanied by remyelination. This repair process, however, often remains incomplete and restricted to the lesion border. In the present study, we examined the frequency and extent of remyelination in cortical and white matter lesions in autopsy brain tissue of 33 patients with chronic MS. The majority of patients (29 of 33) harbored cortical demyelination. Remyelination of cortical lesions was identified light microscopically by the presence of thin and irregularly arranged myelin sheaths, and confirmed by electron microscopy. Extensive remyelination was found in 18%, remyelination restricted to the lesion border in 54%, and no remyelination in 28% of cortical lesions. A direct comparison of the extent of remyelination in white matter and cortical lesions of the same patients revealed that remyelination of cortical lesions was consistently more extensive. In addition, g-ratios of fibers in areas of "normal appearing cortex" yielded values consistent with remyelination. Our data confirm the high prevalence of cortical demyelination in chronic MS and imply that the propensity to remyelinate is high in cortical MS lesions.

  14. Overweight is not associated with cortical thickness alterations in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Jane Sharkey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSeveral studies report an association between body mass index (BMI and cortical thickness in adults. Some studies demonstrate diffuse cortical thinning in obesity, while others report effects in areas that are associated with self-regulation, such as lateral prefrontal cortex. MethodsThis study used multilevel modelling of data from the NIH Pediatric MRI Data Repository, a mixed longitudinal and cross-sectional database, to examine the relationship between cortical thickness and body weight in children. Cortical thickness was computed at 81,942 vertices of 716 MRI scans from 378 children aged between 4 and 18 years. Body mass index Z score for age was computed for each participant. We preformed vertex-wise statistical analysis of the relationship between cortical thickness and BMI, accounting for age and gender. In addition, cortical thickness was extracted from regions of interest in prefrontal cortex and insula.ResultsNo significant association between cortical thickness and BMI was found, either by statistical parametric mapping or by region of interest analysis. Results remained negative when the analysis was restricted to children aged 12-18.ConclusionsThe correlation between BMI and cortical thickness was not found in this large pediatric sample. The association between BMI and cortical thinning develops after adolescence. This has implications for the nature of the relationship between brain anatomy and weight gain.

  15. Meningeal and cortical grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh Popescu Bogdan F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although historically considered a disease primarily affecting the white matter of the central nervous system, recent pathological and imaging studies have established that cortical demyelination is common in multiple sclerosis and more extensive than previously appreciated. Subpial, intracortical and leukocortical lesions are the three cortical lesion types described in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices of patients with multiple sclerosis. Cortical demyelination may be the pathological substrate of progression, and an important pathologic correlate of irreversible disability, epilepsy and cognitive impairment. Cortical lesions of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis patients are characterized by a dominant effector cell population of microglia, by the absence of macrophagic and leukocytic inflammatory infiltrates, and may be driven in part by organized meningeal inflammatory infiltrates. Cortical demyelination is also present and common in early MS, is topographically associated with prominent meningeal inflammation and may even precede the appearance of classic white matter plaques in some MS patients. However, the pathology of early cortical lesions is different than that of chronic MS in the sense that early cortical lesions are highly inflammatory, suggesting that neurodegeneration in MS occurs on an inflammatory background and raising interesting questions regarding the role of cortical demyelination and meningeal inflammation in initiating and perpetuating the disease process in early MS.

  16. Cortical Polarity of the RING Protein PAR-2 Is Maintained by Exchange Rate Kinetics at the Cortical-Cytoplasmic Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinobu Arata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell polarity arises through the spatial segregation of polarity regulators. PAR proteins are polarity regulators that localize asymmetrically to two opposing cortical domains. However, it is unclear how the spatially segregated PAR proteins interact to maintain their mutually exclusive partitioning. Here, single-molecule detection analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos reveals that cortical PAR-2 diffuses only short distances, and, as a result, most PAR-2 molecules associate and dissociate from the cortex without crossing into the opposing domain. Our results show that cortical PAR-2 asymmetry is maintained by the local exchange reactions that occur at the cortical-cytoplasmic boundary. Additionally, we demonstrate that local exchange reactions are sufficient to maintain cortical asymmetry in a parameter-free mathematical model. These findings suggest that anterior and posterior PAR proteins primarily interact through the cytoplasmic pool and not via cortical diffusion.

  17. Cortical Polarity of the RING Protein PAR-2 Is Maintained by Exchange Rate Kinetics at the Cortical-Cytoplasmic Boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Yukinobu; Hiroshima, Michio; Pack, Chan-Gi; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Motegi, Fumio; Nakazato, Kenichi; Shindo, Yuki; Wiseman, Paul W; Sawa, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Brandão, Hugo B; Shibata, Tatsuo; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-08-23

    Cell polarity arises through the spatial segregation of polarity regulators. PAR proteins are polarity regulators that localize asymmetrically to two opposing cortical domains. However, it is unclear how the spatially segregated PAR proteins interact to maintain their mutually exclusive partitioning. Here, single-molecule detection analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos reveals that cortical PAR-2 diffuses only short distances, and, as a result, most PAR-2 molecules associate and dissociate from the cortex without crossing into the opposing domain. Our results show that cortical PAR-2 asymmetry is maintained by the local exchange reactions that occur at the cortical-cytoplasmic boundary. Additionally, we demonstrate that local exchange reactions are sufficient to maintain cortical asymmetry in a parameter-free mathematical model. These findings suggest that anterior and posterior PAR proteins primarily interact through the cytoplasmic pool and not via cortical diffusion.

  18. Crowding: a cortical constraint on object recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelli, Denis G

    2008-08-01

    The external world is mapped retinotopically onto the primary visual cortex (V1). We show here that objects in the world, unless they are very dissimilar, can be recognized only if they are sufficiently separated in visual cortex: specifically, in V1, at least 6mm apart in the radial direction (increasing eccentricity) or 1mm apart in the circumferential direction (equal eccentricity). Objects closer together than this critical spacing are perceived as an unidentifiable jumble. This is called 'crowding'. It severely limits visual processing, including speed of reading and searching. The conclusion about visual cortex rests on three findings. First, psychophysically, the necessary 'critical' spacing, in the visual field, is proportional to (roughly half) the eccentricity of the objects. Second, the critical spacing is independent of the size and kind of object. Third, anatomically, the representation of the visual field on the cortical surface is such that the position in V1 (and several other areas) is the logarithm of eccentricity in the visual field. Furthermore, we show that much of this can be accounted for by supposing that each 'combining field', defined by the critical spacing measurements, is implemented by a fixed number of cortical neurons.

  19. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10762.001 PMID:26976813

  20. Thermographic stress analysis in cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderby, R; Kohles, S S

    1991-11-01

    Under adiabatic (or near adiabatic) conditions a volumetric change in an elastic material will produce a corresponding change in temperature. Based upon this principle, thermographic stress analysis (TSA) measures changes in surface heat flux (which are related to changes in surface temperature) and relates them to a coupled form of strains or stresses. To demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique for biomechanical applications, we thermographically measured heat flux from loaded specimens of cortical bone and correlated the results with strain gage data. Regular parallelepipeds were cut from the cortex of bovine femora and loaded sinusoidally at 20 Hz. At this rate of loading, mechanically induced changes in surface temperature could be sampled (via heat flux) prior to a measureable attenuation of the thermoelastic effect. Correlation coefficients demonstrated a significant linear relationship between TSA and measured and computed mechanical parameters (stress, strain, first strain invariant, and strain energy density). TSA therefore appears to be a promising technology for experimental stress analysis in cortical bone.

  1. Phonological Processing In Human Auditory Cortical Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Woods

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We used population-based cortical-surface analysis of functional magnetic imaging (fMRI data to characterize the processing of consonant-vowel-consonant syllables (CVCs and spectrally-matched amplitude-modulated noise bursts (AMNBs in human auditory cortex as subjects attended to auditory or visual stimuli in an intermodal selective attention paradigm. Average auditory cortical field (ACF locations were defined using tonotopic mapping in a previous study. Activations in auditory cortex were defined by two stimulus-preference gradients: (1 Medial belt ACFs preferred AMNBs and lateral belt and parabelt fields preferred CVCs. This preference extended into core ACFs with medial regions of primary auditory cortex (A1 and rostral field (R preferring AMNBs and lateral regions preferring CVCs. (2 Anterior ACFs showed smaller activations but more clearly defined stimulus preferences than did posterior ACFs. Stimulus preference gradients were unaffected by auditory attention suggesting that different ACFs are specialized for the automatic processing of different spectrotemporal sound features.

  2. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy.

  3. Cortical bone total ossicular replacement prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Malhotra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Evaluate an autologous cortical bone total ossicular replacement prosthesis (B TORP made of cortical bone for cost effective and sustainable hearing results. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken in the patients who underwent tympanoplasty with new B-TORP from January 2011 to December 2011. All patients had an absent superstructure of the stapes and long process of the incus due to chronic otitis media. Totally 40 patients were evaluated. Hearing results were evaluated using four-frequency average pure tone air conduction and air-bone gap (ABG measured at 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz after a period of 12 months. Pre- and post-operative continuous variables were compared using a paired t-test and data from unequal groups were assessed for significant differences using unpaired t-test. Results: Successful rehabilitation of the ABG to 20 dB or less was achieved in 95% of patients. Overall mean improvement in ABG was 25.8 ± 5.6 dB, which was statistically significant (t = 26.8, P 0.5. Conclusion: The new autologous B-TORP provides sustainable hearing improvement and is bio-compatible, stable, and magnetic resonance imaging compatible.

  4. Object recognition by artificial cortical maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebe, Alessio; Domenella, Rosaria Grazia

    2007-09-01

    Object recognition is one of the most important functions of the human visual system, yet one of the least understood, this despite the fact that vision is certainly the most studied function of the brain. We understand relatively well how several processes in the cortical visual areas that support recognition capabilities take place, such as orientation discrimination and color constancy. This paper proposes a model of the development of object recognition capability, based on two main theoretical principles. The first is that recognition does not imply any sort of geometrical reconstruction, it is instead fully driven by the two dimensional view captured by the retina. The second assumption is that all the processing functions involved in recognition are not genetically determined or hardwired in neural circuits, but are the result of interactions between epigenetic influences and basic neural plasticity mechanisms. The model is organized in modules roughly related to the main visual biological areas, and is implemented mainly using the LISSOM architecture, a recent neural self-organizing map model that simulates the effects of intercortical lateral connections. This paper shows how recognition capabilities, similar to those found in brain ventral visual areas, can develop spontaneously by exposure to natural images in an artificial cortical model.

  5. Cable energy function of cortical axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Huiwen; Hines, Michael L; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of action potential (AP)-related metabolic cost is essential for understanding energetic constraints on brain connections and signaling processes. Most previous energy estimates of the AP were obtained using the Na(+)-counting method, which seriously limits accurate assessment of metabolic cost of ionic currents that underlie AP conduction along the axon. Here, we first derive a full cable energy function for cortical axons based on classic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuronal equations and then apply the cable energy function to precisely estimate the energy consumption of AP conduction along axons with different geometric shapes. Our analytical approach predicts an inhomogeneous distribution of metabolic cost along an axon with either uniformly or nonuniformly distributed ion channels. The results show that the Na(+)-counting method severely underestimates energy cost in the cable model by 20-70%. AP propagation along axons that differ in length may require over 15% more energy per unit of axon area than that required by a point model. However, actual energy cost can vary greatly depending on axonal branching complexity, ion channel density distributions, and AP conduction states. We also infer that the metabolic rate (i.e. energy consumption rate) of cortical axonal branches as a function of spatial volume exhibits a 3/4 power law relationship.

  6. Cortical cartography reveals political and physical maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, David W; Gaillard, William Davis; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Meador, Kimford J; Ojemann, Jeffrey G

    2014-05-01

    Advances in functional imaging have provided noninvasive techniques to probe brain organization of multiple constructs including language and memory. Because of high overall rates of agreements with older techniques, including Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping (CSM), some have proposed that those approaches should be largely abandoned because of their invasiveness, and replaced with noninvasive functional imaging methods. High overall agreement, however, is based largely on concordant language lateralization in series dominated by cases of typical cerebral dominance. Advocating a universal switch from Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) ignores the differences in specific expertise across epilepsy centers, many of which often have greater skill with one approach rather than the other, and that Wada, CSM, fMRI, and MEG protocols vary across institutions resulting in different outcomes and reliability. Specific patient characteristics also affect whether Wada or CSM might influence surgical management, making it difficult to accept broad recommendations against currently useful clinical tools. Although the development of noninvasive techniques has diminished the frequency of more invasive approaches, advocating their use to replace Wada testing and CSM across all epilepsy surgery programs without consideration of the different skills, protocols, and expertise at any given center site is ill-advised. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Short-term memory in networks of dissociated cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranias, Mark R; Ju, Han; Rajaram, Ezhilarasan; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2013-01-30

    Short-term memory refers to the ability to store small amounts of stimulus-specific information for a short period of time. It is supported by both fading and hidden memory processes. Fading memory relies on recurrent activity patterns in a neuronal network, whereas hidden memory is encoded using synaptic mechanisms, such as facilitation, which persist even when neurons fall silent. We have used a novel computational and optogenetic approach to investigate whether these same memory processes hypothesized to support pattern recognition and short-term memory in vivo, exist in vitro. Electrophysiological activity was recorded from primary cultures of dissociated rat cortical neurons plated on multielectrode arrays. Cultures were transfected with ChannelRhodopsin-2 and optically stimulated using random dot stimuli. The pattern of neuronal activity resulting from this stimulation was analyzed using classification algorithms that enabled the identification of stimulus-specific memories. Fading memories for different stimuli, encoded in ongoing neural activity, persisted and could be distinguished from each other for as long as 1 s after stimulation was terminated. Hidden memories were detected by altered responses of neurons to additional stimulation, and this effect persisted longer than 1 s. Interestingly, network bursts seem to eliminate hidden memories. These results are similar to those that have been reported from similar experiments in vivo and demonstrate that mechanisms of information processing and short-term memory can be studied using cultured neuronal networks, thereby setting the stage for therapeutic applications using this platform.

  8. Modeling of cortical signals using echo state networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hanying; Wang, Yongji; Huang, Jiangshuai

    2009-10-01

    Diverse modeling frameworks have been utilized with the ultimate goal of translating brain cortical signals into prediction of visible behavior. The inputs to these models are usually multidimensional neural recordings collected from relevant regions of a monkey's brain while the outputs are the associated behavior which is typically the 2-D or 3-D hand position of a primate. Here our task is to set up a proper model in order to figure out the move trajectories by input the neural signals which are simultaneously collected in the experiment. In this paper, we propose to use Echo State Networks (ESN) to map the neural firing activities into hand positions. ESN is a newly developed recurrent neural network(RNN) model. Besides its dynamic property and short term memory just as other recurrent neural networks have, it has a special echo state property which endows it with the ability to model nonlinear dynamic systems powerfully. What distinguished it from transitional recurrent neural networks most significantly is its special learning method. In this paper we train this net with a refined version of its typical training method and get a better model.

  9. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Neil P M; Paillard, Aurore C; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin.

  10. Stochastic transitions into silence cause noise correlations in cortical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochol, Gabriela; Hermoso-Mendizabal, Ainhoa; Sakata, Shuzo; Harris, Kenneth D; de la Rocha, Jaime

    2015-03-17

    The spiking activity of cortical neurons is highly variable. This variability is generally correlated among nearby neurons, an effect commonly interpreted to reflect the coactivation of neurons due to anatomically shared inputs. Recent findings, however, indicate that correlations can be dynamically modulated, suggesting that the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that correlations are dominated by neuronal coinactivation: the occurrence of brief silent periods during which all neurons in the local network stop firing. We recorded spiking activity from large populations of neurons in the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats across different brain states. During spontaneous activity, the reduction of correlation accompanying brain state desynchronization was largely explained by a decrease in the density of the silent periods. The presentation of a stimulus caused an initial drop of correlations followed by a rebound, a time course that was mimicked by the instantaneous silence density. We built a rate network model with fluctuation-driven transitions between a silent and an active attractor and assumed that neurons fired Poisson spike trains with a rate following the model dynamics. Variations of the network external input altered the transition rate into the silent attractor and reproduced the relation between correlation and silence density found in the data, both in spontaneous and evoked conditions. This suggests that the observed changes in correlation, occurring gradually with brain state variations or abruptly with sensory stimulation, are due to changes in the likeliness of the microcircuit to transiently cease firing.

  11. Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 regulates cortical neuronal network development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart Martens, Marijn; Frega, Monica; Classen, Jessica; Epping, Lisa; Bijvank, Elske; Benevento, Marco; van Bokhoven, Hans; Tiesinga, Paul; Schubert, Dirk; Nadif Kasri, Nael

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations or deletions in the human Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1) gene cause Kleefstra syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by autistic-like features and severe intellectual disability (ID). Neurodevelopmental disorders including ID and autism may be related to deficits in activity-dependent wiring of brain circuits during development. Although Kleefstra syndrome has been associated with dendritic and synaptic defects in mice and Drosophila, little is known about the role of EHMT1 in the development of cortical neuronal networks. Here we used micro-electrode arrays and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to investigate the impact of EHMT1 deficiency at the network and single cell level. We show that EHMT1 deficiency impaired neural network activity during the transition from uncorrelated background action potential firing to synchronized network bursting. Spontaneous bursting and excitatory synaptic currents were transiently reduced, whereas miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents were not affected. Finally, we show that loss of function of EHMT1 ultimately resulted in less regular network bursting patterns later in development. These data suggest that the developmental impairments observed in EHMT1-deficient networks may result in a temporal misalignment between activity-dependent developmental processes thereby contributing to the pathophysiology of Kleefstra syndrome. PMID:27767173

  12. Post-anesthetic cortical blindness in cats: twenty cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, J; Weil, A B; Packer, R A; Lantz, G C

    2012-08-01

    The medical records of 20 cats with post-anesthetic cortical blindness were reviewed. Information collected included signalment and health status, reason for anesthesia, anesthetic protocols and adverse events, post-anesthetic visual and neurological abnormalities, clinical outcome, and risk factors. The vascular anatomy of the cat brain was reviewed by cadaver dissections. Thirteen cats were anaesthetised for dentistry, four for endoscopy, two for neutering procedures and one for urethral obstruction. A mouth gag was used in 16/20 cats. Three cats had had cardiac arrest, whereas in the remaining 17 cases, no specific cause of blindness was identified. Seventeen cats (85%) had neurological deficits in addition to blindness. Fourteen of 20 cats (70%) had documented recovery of vision, whereas four (20%) remained blind. Two cats (10%) were lost to follow up while still blind. Ten of 17 cats (59%) with neurological deficits had full recovery from neurological disease, two (12%) had mild persistent deficits and one (6%) was euthanased as it failed to recover. Four cats (23%) without documented resolution of neurological signs were lost to follow up. Mouth gags were identified as a potential risk factor for cerebral ischemia and blindness in cats.

  13. Cortical sequence of word perception in beginning readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Tiina; Helenius, Päivi; Poskiparta, Elisa; Niemi, Pekka; Salmelin, Riitta

    2006-05-31

    Efficient analysis of written words in normal reading is likely to reflect use of neural circuits formed by experience during childhood rather than an innate process. We investigated the cortical sequence of word perception in first-graders (7-8 years old), with special emphasis on occipitotemporal cortex in which, in adults, letter-string-sensitive responses are detected at 150 ms after stimulus. To identify neural activation that is sensitive to either the amount of basic visual features or specifically to letter strings, we recorded whole-head magnetoencephalography responses to words embedded in three different levels of noise and to symbol strings. As was shown previously in adults, activation reflecting stimulus nonspecific visual feature analysis was localized to occipital cortex in children. It was followed by letter-string-sensitive activation in the left occipitotemporal cortex and, subsequently, in the temporal cortex. These processing stages were correlated in timing and activation strength. Compared with adults, however, the timing of activation was clearly delayed in children, and the delay was progressively increased from occipital to occipitotemporal and further to temporal areas. This finding is likely to reflect increasing immaturity of the underlying neural generators when advancing from low-level visual analysis to higher-order areas involved in written word perception. When a salient occipitotemporal letter-string-sensitive activation was detected (10 of 18 children), its strength was correlated with phonological skills, in line with the known relevance of phonological awareness in reading acquisition.

  14. Processing of Feature Selectivity in Cortical Networks with Specific Connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadra Sadeh

    Full Text Available Although non-specific at the onset of eye opening, networks in rodent visual cortex attain a non-random structure after eye opening, with a specific bias for connections between neurons of similar preferred orientations. As orientation selectivity is already present at eye opening, it remains unclear how this specificity in network wiring contributes to feature selectivity. Using large-scale inhibition-dominated spiking networks as a model, we show that feature-specific connectivity leads to a linear amplification of feedforward tuning, consistent with recent electrophysiological single-neuron recordings in rodent neocortex. Our results show that optimal amplification is achieved at an intermediate regime of specific connectivity. In this configuration a moderate increase of pairwise correlations is observed, consistent with recent experimental findings. Furthermore, we observed that feature-specific connectivity leads to the emergence of orientation-selective reverberating activity, and entails pattern completion in network responses. Our theoretical analysis provides a mechanistic understanding of subnetworks' responses to visual stimuli, and casts light on the regime of operation of sensory cortices in the presence of specific connectivity.

  15. A cognitive neuroprosthetic that uses cortical stimulation for somatosensory feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaes, Christian; Shi, Ying; Kellis, Spencer; Minxha, Juri; Revechkis, Boris; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Present day cortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have made impressive advances using decoded brain signals to control extracorporeal devices. Although BMIs are used in a closed-loop fashion, sensory feedback typically is visual only. However medical case studies have shown that the loss of somesthesis in a limb greatly reduces the agility of the limb even when visual feedback is available. Approach. To overcome this limitation, this study tested a closed-loop BMI that utilizes intracortical microstimulation to provide ‘tactile’ sensation to a non-human primate. Main result. Using stimulation electrodes in Brodmann area 1 of somatosensory cortex (BA1) and recording electrodes in the anterior intraparietal area, the parietal reach region and dorsal area 5 (area 5d), it was found that this form of feedback can be used in BMI tasks. Significance. Providing somatosensory feedback has the poyential to greatly improve the performance of cognitive neuroprostheses especially for fine control and object manipulation. Adding stimulation to a BMI system could therefore improve the quality of life for severely paralyzed patients.

  16. Alteration of cortical excitability in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhalla, Alaa; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi; Baudic, Sophie; Perrot, Serge; Bouhassira, Didier

    2010-06-01

    We assessed cortical excitability and intracortical modulation systematically, by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex, in patients with fibromyalgia. In total 46 female patients with fibromyalgia and 21 normal female subjects, matched for age, were included in this study. TMS was applied to the hand motor area of both hemispheres and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded for the first interosseous muscle of the contralateral hand. Single-pulse stimulation was used for measurements of the rest motor threshold (RMT) and suprathreshold MEP. Paired-pulse stimulation was used to assess short intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF). Putative correlations were sought between changes in electrophysiological parameters and major clinical features of fibromyalgia, such as pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression and catastrophizing. The RMT on both sides was significantly increased in patients with fibromyalgia and suprathreshold MEP was significantly decreased bilaterally. However, these alterations, suggesting a global decrease in corticospinal excitability, were not correlated with clinical features. Patients with fibromyalgia also had lower ICF and SICI on both sides, than controls, these lower values being correlated with fatigue, catastrophizing and depression. These neurophysiological alterations were not linked to medication, as similar changes were observed in patients with or without psychotropic treatment. In conclusion, fibromyalgia is associated with deficits in intracortical modulation involving both GABAergic and glutamatergic mechanisms, possibly related to certain aspects of the pathophysiology of this chronic pain syndrome. Our data add to the growing body of evidence for objective and quantifiable changes in brain function in fibromyalgia.

  17. Accommodative response and cortical activity during sustained attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltavski, Dmitri V; Biberdorf, David; Petros, Thomas V

    2012-06-15

    Greater accommodative lag and vergence deficits have been linked to attentional deficits similar to those observed in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of accommodative-vergence stress on a measure of sustained attention (Conners CPT) used in the diagnosis of ADHD. Twenty-seven normal non-ADHD adults completed the Conners CPT twice: wearing -2.00 D lenses and normally (without the -2.00 D lenses) in a counterbalanced order with at least 24 h between the sessions. Simultaneous recording of participants' dynamic accommodative responses was performed from the right eye using the Grand Seiko WAM-5500 auto-refractor and electroencephalographic activity (EEG) in the left prefrontal region using the Neurosky Mindset headset. The results demonstrated a significantly greater accommodative lag in the -2.00 D stress condition and a significantly poorer performance on the Conners CPT as indexed by slower reaction time, greater standard error of hit reaction time, grater response variability, poorer stimulus detectability and a greater number of perseverations. No differences were observed on measures of EEG in the theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), and beta (12-20 Hz) bands. Moreover, when directly juxtaposed with each EEG band in multiple linear regression analyses, greater accommodative lag in the stress condition was significantly associated with a greater probability of clinical classification on the Conners CPT, and was also marginally predictive of the number of omissions recorded in the stress condition. The results demonstrated that sustained attention can be influenced by such factors as accommodative-vergence stress and suggest that bottom-up processes can contribute to and potentially exacerbate attentional problems in individuals with ADHD. The study also showed that cortical dysfunction (while sufficient) may not be a necessary condition for attentional deficits.

  18. Increased Cortical Extracellular Adenosine Correlates with Seizure Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gompel, Jamie J.; Bower, Mark R.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Stead, Matt; Chang, Su-Youne; Goerss, Stephan J.; Kim, Inyong; Bennet, Kevin E.; Meyer, Fredric B.; Marsh, W. Richard; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Seizures are currently defined by their electrographic features. However, neuronal networks are intrinsically dependent upon neurotransmitters of which little is known regarding their peri-ictal dynamics. Evidence supports adenosine as having a prominent role in seizure termination, as its administration can terminate and reduce seizures in animal models. Further, microdialysis studies in humans suggest adenosine is elevated peri-ictally, but the relationship to the seizure is obscured by its temporal measurement limitations. Because electrochemical techniques can provide vastly superior temporal resolution, we test the hypothesis that extracellular adenosine concentrations rise during seizure termination in an animal model and humans using electrochemistry. Methods White farm swine (n=45) were used in an acute cortical model of epilepsy and 10 human epilepsy patients were studied during intraoperative electrocorticography (Ecog). Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) based fast scan cyclic voltametry (FSCV) and fixed potential amperometry were obtained utilizing an adenosine specific triangular waveform or biosensors respectively. Results Simultaneous Ecog and electrochemistry demonstrated an average adenosine rise of 260% compared to baseline at 7.5 ± 16.9 seconds with amperometry (n=75 events) and 2.6 ± 11.2 seconds with FSCV (n=15 events) prior to electrographic seizure termination. In agreement with these animal data, adenosine elevation prior to seizure termination in a human patient utilizing FSCV was also seen. Significance Simultaneous Ecog and electrochemical recording supports the hypothesis that adenosine rises prior to seizure termination, suggesting that adenosine itself may be responsible for seizure termination. Future work using intraoperative WINCS based FSCV recording may help to elucidate the precise relationship between adenosine and seizure termination. PMID:24483230

  19. Human temporal cortical single neuron activity during working memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Leona; Corina, David; Ojemann, George

    2016-06-01

    The Working Memory model of human memory, first introduced by Baddeley and Hitch (1974), has been one of the most influential psychological constructs in cognitive psychology and human neuroscience. However the neuronal correlates of core components of this model have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we present data from two studies where human temporal cortical single neuron activity was recorded during tasks differentially affecting the maintenance component of verbal working memory. In Study One we vary the presence or absence of distracting items for the entire period of memory storage. In Study Two we vary the duration of storage so that distractors filled all, or only one-third of the time the memory was stored. Extracellular single neuron recordings were obtained from 36 subjects undergoing awake temporal lobe resections for epilepsy, 25 in Study one, 11 in Study two. Recordings were obtained from a total of 166 lateral temporal cortex neurons during performance of one of these two tasks, 86 study one, 80 study two. Significant changes in activity with distractor manipulation were present in 74 of these neurons (45%), 38 Study one, 36 Study two. In 48 (65%) of those there was increased activity during the period when distracting items were absent, 26 Study One, 22 Study Two. The magnitude of this increase was greater for Study One, 47.6%, than Study Two, 8.1%, paralleling the reduction in memory errors in the absence of distracters, for Study One of 70.3%, Study Two 26.3% These findings establish that human lateral temporal cortex is part of the neural system for working memory, with activity during maintenance of that memory that parallels performance, suggesting it represents active rehearsal. In 31 of these neurons (65%) this activity was an extension of that during working memory encoding that differed significantly from the neural processes recorded during overt and silent language tasks without a recent memory component, 17 Study one, 14 Study two

  20. Estimation of the effective and functional human cortical connectivity with structural equation modeling and directed transfer function applied to high-resolution EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, Laura; Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Salinari, Serenella; Babiloni, Claudio; Basilisco, Alessandra; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Ding, Lei; Ni, Ying; He, Bin; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Babiloni, Fabio

    2004-12-01

    Different brain imaging devices are presently available to provide images of the human functional cortical activity, based on hemodynamic, metabolic or electromagnetic measurements. However, static images of brain regions activated during particular tasks do not convey the information of how these regions are interconnected. The concept of brain connectivity plays a central role in the neuroscience, and different definitions of connectivity, functional and effective, have been adopted in literature. While the functional connectivity is defined as the temporal coherence among the activities of different brain areas, the effective connectivity is defined as the simplest brain circuit that would produce the same temporal relationship as observed experimentally among cortical sites. The structural equation modeling (SEM) is the most used method to estimate effective connectivity in neuroscience, and its typical application is on data related to brain hemodynamic behavior tested by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), whereas the directed transfer function (DTF) method is a frequency-domain approach based on both a multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) modeling of time series and on the concept of Granger causality. This study presents advanced methods for the estimation of cortical connectivity by applying SEM and DTF on the cortical signals estimated from high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) recordings, since these signals exhibit a higher spatial resolution than conventional cerebral electromagnetic measures. To estimate correctly the cortical signals, we used a subject's multicompartment head model (scalp, skull, dura mater, cortex) constructed from individual MRI, a distributed source model and a regularized linear inverse source estimates of cortical current density. Before the application of SEM and DTF methodology to the cortical waveforms estimated from high-resolution EEG data, we performed a simulation study, in which different main factors

  1. Cortical blindness in a child with acute glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarthigeyan, K; Vijayalakshmi, A M

    2012-01-01

    The association between hypertensive encephalopathy and cortical blindness in children with acute glomerulonephritis is extremely rare. We report the case of a 9-year old girl who presented with headache, seizures, altered sensorium, hematuria, and transient cortical blindness as a complication of hypertensive encephalopathy which showed complete reversal following normalization of blood pressure and an underlying post-infectious acute glomerulonephritis was revealed.

  2. The Cortically Blind Infant: Educational Guidelines and Suggestions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverrain, Ann

    Cortical blindness is defined and its diagnosis is explained. Guidelines and sample activities are presented for use in a cognitive/visual/multi-sensory stimulation program to produce progress in cortically blind infants. The importance of using the eyes from birth through early development in order to form the nerve pathways responsible for…

  3. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocker, Laurens J.L. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kliniek Sint-Jan Radiologie, Brussels (Belgium); Compter, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Worp, H.B. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Luijten, P.R.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are a newly recognised entity associated with atherothromboembolic cerebrovascular disease and worse physical functioning. We aimed to investigate the relationship of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia and with vascular risk factors. We evaluated the MR images of 46 patients with a recent vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke and a symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis ≥50 % from the Vertebral Artery Stenting Trial (VAST) for the presence of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities ≤1.5 cm. At inclusion in VAST, data were obtained on age, sex, history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, and vascular risk factors. Adjusted risk ratios were calculated with Poisson regression analyses for the relation between cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vascular risk factors. Sixteen out of 46 (35 %) patients showed cerebellar cortical infarct cavities on the initial MRI, and only one of these 16 patients was known with a previous vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke. In patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia, risk factor profiles of patients with cerebellar cortical infarct cavities were not different from patients without these cavities. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are seen on MRI in as much as one third of patients with recently symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis. Since patients usually have no prior history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, cerebellar cortical infarct cavities should be added to the spectrum of common incidental brain infarcts visible on routine MRI. (orig.)

  4. Increased Cortical Thickness in Professional On-Line Gamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Gi Jung; Shin, Yong Wook; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Jin, Seong Nam

    2013-01-01

    Objective The bulk of recent studies have tested whether video games change the brain in terms of activity and cortical volume. However, such studies are limited by several factors including cross-sectional comparisons, co-morbidity, and short-term follow-up periods. In the present study, we hypothesized that cognitive flexibility and the volume of brain cortex would be correlated with the career length of on-line pro-gamers. Methods High-resolution magnetic resonance scans were acquired in twenty-three pro-gamers recruited from StarCraft pro-game teams. We measured cortical thickness in each individual using FreeSurfer and the cortical thickness was correlated with the career length and the performance of the pro-gamers. Results Career length was positively correlated with cortical thickness in three brain regions: right superior frontal gyrus, right superior parietal gyrus, and right precentral gyrus. Additionally, increased cortical thickness in the prefrontal cortex was correlated with winning rates of the pro-game league. Increased cortical thickness in the prefrontal and parietal cortices was also associated with higher performance of Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion Our results suggest that in individuals without pathologic conditions, regular, long-term playing of on-line games is associated with volume changes in the prefrontal and parietal cortices, which are associated with cognitive flexibility. PMID:24474988

  5. Cortical Network for Reading Linear Words in an Alphasyllabary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tanusree; Bapi, Raju S.; Padakannaya, Prakash; Singh, Nandini C.

    2011-01-01

    Functional imaging studies have established cortical networks for reading alphabetic, syllabic and logographic scripts. There is little information about the different cortical areas that participate in reading an alphasyllabary. We use functional brain imaging to study the reading network for Devanagari, an alphasyllabary. Similar to syllabic…

  6. Thalamic Bursts Down-regulate Cortical Theta and Nociceptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Brian W; Cross, Brent; Smith, Kelsey A; Roach, Catherine; Xia, Jimmy; Chao, Yu-Chieh; Levitt, Joshua; Koyama, Suguru; Moore, Christopher I; Saab, Carl Y

    2017-05-30

    We tested the relation between pain behavior, theta (4-8 Hz) oscillations in somatosensory cortex and burst firing in thalamic neurons in vivo. Optically-induced thalamic bursts attenuated cortical theta and mechanical allodynia. It is proposed that thalamic bursts are an adaptive response to pain that de-synchronizes cortical theta and decreases sensory salience.

  7. Increased cortical thickness in professional on-line gamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Gi Jung; Shin, Yong Wook; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Jin, Seong Nam; Han, Doug Hyun

    2013-12-01

    The bulk of recent studies have tested whether video games change the brain in terms of activity and cortical volume. However, such studies are limited by several factors including cross-sectional comparisons, co-morbidity, and short-term follow-up periods. In the present study, we hypothesized that cognitive flexibility and the volume of brain cortex would be correlated with the career length of on-line pro-gamers. High-resolution magnetic resonance scans were acquired in twenty-three pro-gamers recruited from StarCraft pro-game teams. We measured cortical thickness in each individual using FreeSurfer and the cortical thickness was correlated with the career length and the performance of the pro-gamers. CAREER LENGTH WAS POSITIVELY CORRELATED WITH CORTICAL THICKNESS IN THREE BRAIN REGIONS: right superior frontal gyrus, right superior parietal gyrus, and right precentral gyrus. Additionally, increased cortical thickness in the prefrontal cortex was correlated with winning rates of the pro-game league. Increased cortical thickness in the prefrontal and parietal cortices was also associated with higher performance of Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Our results suggest that in individuals without pathologic conditions, regular, long-term playing of on-line games is associated with volume changes in the prefrontal and parietal cortices, which are associated with cognitive flexibility.

  8. Sensory cortical population dynamics uniquely track behavior across learning and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anan; Katz, Donald B

    2014-01-22

    Neural responses in many cortical regions encode information relevant to behavior: information that necessarily changes as that behavior changes with learning. Although such responses are reasonably theorized to be related to behavior causation, the true nature of that relationship cannot be clarified by simple learning studies, which show primarily that responses change with experience. Neural activity that truly tracks behavior (as opposed to simply changing with experience) will not only change with learning but also change back when that learning is extinguished. Here, we directly probed for this pattern, recording the activity of ensembles of gustatory cortical single neurons as rats that normally consumed sucrose avidly were trained first to reject it (i.e., conditioned taste aversion learning) and then to enjoy it again (i.e., extinction), all within 49 h. Both learning and extinction altered cortical responses, consistent with the suggestion (based on indirect evidence) that extinction is a novel form of learning. But despite the fact that, as expected, postextinction single-neuron responses did not resemble "naive responses," ensemble response dynamics changed with learning and reverted with extinction: both the speed of stimulus processing and the relationships among ensemble responses to the different stimuli tracked behavioral relevance. These data suggest that population coding is linked to behavior with a fidelity that single-neuron coding is not.

  9. Impact of acetazolamide and CPAP on cortical activity in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Stadelmann

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVES: 1 To investigate the impact of acetazolamide, a drug commonly prescribed for altitude sickness, on cortical oscillations in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. 2 To examine alterations in the sleep EEG after short-term discontinuation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy. DESIGN: Data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized cross-over design studies were analyzed. SETTING: Polysomnographic recordings in sleep laboratory at 490 m and at moderate altitudes in the Swiss Alps: 1630 or 1860 m and 2590 m. PATIENTS: Study 1: 39 OSAS patients. Study 2: 41 OSAS patients. INTERVENTIONS: Study 1: OSAS patients withdrawn from treatment with CPAP. Study 2: OSAS patients treated with autoCPAP. Treatment with acetazolamide (500-750 mg or placebo at moderate altitudes. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: An evening dose of 500 mg acetazolamide reduced slow-wave activity (SWA; approximately 10% and increased spindle activity (approximately 10% during non-REM sleep. In addition, alpha activity during wake after lights out was increased. An evening dose of 250 mg did not affect these cortical oscillations. Discontinuation of CPAP therapy revealed a reduction in SWA (5-10% and increase in beta activity (approximately 25%. CONCLUSIONS: The higher evening dose of 500 mg acetazolamide showed the "spectral fingerprint" of Benzodiazepines, while 250 mg acetazolamide had no impact on cortical oscillations. However, both doses had beneficial effects on oxygen saturation and sleep quality.

  10. Dynamics of cortical neuronal ensembles transit from decision making to storage for later report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Nácher, Verónica; Luna, Rogelio; Riehle, Alexa; Romo, Ranulfo

    2012-08-29

    Decisions based on sensory evaluation during single trials may depend on the collective activity of neurons distributed across brain circuits. Previous studies have deepened our understanding of how the activity of individual neurons relates to the formation of a decision and its storage for later report. However, little is known about how decision-making and decision maintenance processes evolve in single trials. We addressed this problem by studying the activity of simultaneously recorded neurons from different somatosensory and frontal lobe cortices of monkeys performing a vibrotactile discrimination task. We used the hidden Markov model to describe the spatiotemporal pattern of activity in single trials as a sequence of firing rate states. We show that the animal's decision was reliably maintained in frontal lobe activity through a selective state sequence, initiated by an abrupt state transition, during which many neurons changed their activity in a concomitant way, and for which both latency and variability depended on task difficulty. Indeed, transitions were more delayed and more variable for difficult trials compared with easy trials. In contrast, state sequences in somatosensory cortices were weakly decision related, had less variable transitions, and were not affected by the difficulty of the task. In summary, our results suggest that the decision process and its subsequent maintenance are dynamically linked by a cascade of transient events in frontal lobe cortices.

  11. Increasing cortical excitability: a possible explanation for the proconvulsant role of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Anna; Desiato, Maria Teresa; Gigli, Gian Luigi; Romigi, Andrea; Tombini, Mario; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Izzi, Francesca; Placidi, Fabio

    2006-12-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) is known to facilitate both seizures and interictal epileptiform abnormalities. For this reason, it is often used in the routine diagnostic workup of epileptic patients as an activating procedure for eliciting epileptiform and/or seizure patterns in their EEGs. In order to evaluate the effects of SD on cortical excitability, we studied the effects of sleep loss on healthy subjects by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Seven normal subjects underwent TMS examination in baseline condition and after total sleep deprivation. The TMS investigation included two protocols: a) the evaluation of motor evoked potential and silent period parameters recorded in response to single-pulse magnetic stimulation; and b) the evaluation of the time course of intracortical motor activity tested with paired-pulse TMS applied at inter-stimulus intervals of 1-6 ms. Clinical neurophysiology laboratory in a general hospital. None. After SD, the principal finding observed using single-pulse TMS was a decrease of the silent period duration, whereas a reduction of the intracortical inhibition, in particular at inter-stimulus intervals 1 and 2 ms, was found, using the paired-pulse TMS. Our findings suggest that SD may modify cortical excitability, seen as the balance between inhibitory and excitatory cortical phenomena, which could reduce the epileptic threshold.

  12. Increased cortical atrophy in patients with Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biessels, G J; De Leeuw, F‐E; Lindeboom, J; Barkhof, F; Scheltens, P

    2006-01-01

    Background The risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increased in type 2 diabetes (DM2). This increased risk has been attributed to vascular comorbidity, but other mechanisms, such as accelerated ageing of the brain, have also been implicated. Objective To determine whether AD in patients with DM2 is associated with an increased occurrence of vascular lesions in the brain, by increased cerebral atrophy, or a combination of both. Methods In total, 29 patients with AD and DM2 and 58 patients with AD and without DM2 were included in the study. Clinical characteristics were recorded, and a neuropsychological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan were performed. MRI scans were rated for cortical and subcortical atrophy, medial temporal lobe atrophy, white matter lesions, and infarcts. Results The neuropsychological profiles of the two groups were identical. Patients with AD and DM2 had increased cortical atrophy on MRI (p<0.05) compared with the non‐DM2 group. In addition, infarcts were more common (odds ratio 2.4; 95% CI 0.8 to 7.8), but this effect did not account for the increased atrophy. The other MR measures did not differ between the groups. Conclusion The results suggest that non‐vascular mechanisms, leading to increased cortical atrophy, are also involved in the increased risk of AD in DM2. PMID:16484636

  13. Monitoring transcranial direct current stimulation induced changes in cortical excitability during the serial reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrus, Géza Gergely; Chaieb, Leila; Stilling, Roman; Rothkegel, Holger; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2016-03-11

    The measurement of the motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a common method to observe changes in motor cortical excitability. The level of cortical excitability has been shown to change during motor learning. Conversely, motor learning can be improved by using anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In the present study, we aimed to monitor cortical excitability changes during an implicit motor learning paradigm, a version of the serial reaction time task (SRTT). Responses from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and forearm flexor (FLEX) muscles were recorded before, during and after the performance of the SRTT. Online measurements were combined with anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS for the duration of the SRTT. Negative correlations between the amplitude of online FDI MEPs and SRTT reaction times (RTs) were observed across the learning blocks in the cathodal condition (higher average MEP amplitudes associated with lower RTs) but no significant differences in the anodal and sham conditions. tDCS did not have an impact on SRTT performance, as would be predicted based on previous studies. The offline before-after SRTT MEP amplitudes showed an increase after anodal and a tendency to decrease after cathodal stimulation, but these changes were not significant. The combination of different interventions during tDCS might result in reduced efficacy of the stimulation that in future studies need further attention.

  14. Spatiotemporal memory is an intrinsic property of networks of dissociated cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Han; Dranias, Mark R; Banumurthy, Gokulakrishna; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-03-04

    The ability to process complex spatiotemporal information is a fundamental process underlying the behavior of all higher organisms. However, how the brain processes information in the temporal domain remains incompletely understood. We have explored the spatiotemporal information-processing capability of networks formed from dissociated rat E18 cortical neurons growing in culture. By combining optogenetics with microelectrode array recording, we show that these randomly organized cortical microcircuits are able to process complex spatiotemporal information, allowing the identification of a large number of temporal sequences and classification of musical styles. These experiments uncovered spatiotemporal memory processes lasting several seconds. Neural network simulations indicated that both short-term synaptic plasticity and recurrent connections are required for the emergence of this capability. Interestingly, NMDA receptor function is not a requisite for these short-term spatiotemporal memory processes. Indeed, blocking the NMDA receptor with the antagonist APV significantly improved the temporal processing ability of the networks, by reducing spontaneously occurring network bursts. These highly synchronized events have disastrous effects on spatiotemporal information processing, by transiently erasing short-term memory. These results show that the ability to process and integrate complex spatiotemporal information is an intrinsic property of generic cortical networks that does not require specifically designed circuits. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354040-12$15.00/0.

  15. Resting state cortical electroencephalographic rhythms in subjects with normal and abnormal body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Lizio, Roberta; Valenzano, Anna; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Petito, Annamaria; Bellomo, Antonello; Lecce, Brunello; Mundi, Ciro; Soricelli, Andrea; Limatola, Cristina; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Del Percio, Claudio

    2011-09-15

    It is well known that resting state regional cerebral blood flow is abnormal in obese when compared to normal-weight subjects but the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are poorly known. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that amplitude of resting state cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms differ among underweight, normal-weight, and overweight/obese subjects as a reflection of the relationship between cortical neural synchronization and regulation of body weight. Eyes-closed resting state EEG data were recorded in 16 underweight subjects, 25 normal-weight subjects, and 18 overweight/obese subjects. All subjects were psychophysically healthy (no eating disorders or major psychopathologies). EEG rhythms of interest were delta (2-4Hz), theta (4-8Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13Hz), beta 1 (13-20Hz), beta 2 (20-30Hz), and gamma (30-40Hz). EEG cortical sources were estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Statistical results showed that parietal and temporal alpha 1 sources fitted the pattern underweight>normal-weight>overweight/obese (punderweight>overweight/obese (prhythms and fluctuation of global brain arousal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Speech perception in the child brain: cortical timing and its relevance to literacy acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Tiina; Helenius, Päivi; Poskiparta, Elisa; Niemi, Pekka; Salmelin, Riitta

    2011-12-01

    Speech processing skills go through intensive development during mid-childhood, providing basis also for literacy acquisition. The sequence of auditory cortical processing of speech has been characterized in adults, but very little is known about the neural representation of speech sound perception in the developing brain. We used whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) to record neural responses to speech and nonspeech sounds in first-graders (7-8-year-old) and compared the activation sequence to that in adults. In children, the general location of neural activity in the superior temporal cortex was similar to that in adults, but in the time domain the sequence of activation was strikingly different. Cortical differentiation between sound types emerged in a prolonged response pattern at about 250 ms after sound onset, in both hemispheres, clearly later than the corresponding effect at about 100 ms in adults that was detected specifically in the left hemisphere. Better reading skills were linked with shorter-lasting neural activation, speaking for interdependence of the maturing neural processes of auditory perception and developing linguistic skills. This study uniquely utilized the potential of MEG in comparing both spatial and temporal characteristics of neural activation between adults and children. Besides depicting the group-typical features in cortical auditory processing, the results revealed marked interindividual variability in children.

  17. Decisional impairments in cocaine addiction, reward bias, and cortical oscillation “unbalance”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balconi M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Michela Balconi, Roberta Finocchiaro Research Unit in Affective and Social Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan, Italy Abstract: A vast amount of research has suggested that subjects with substance use disorder (SUD might have difficulty making advantageous decisions that opt in favor of a longer-term, larger reward than an immediate, smaller reward. The current research explored the impact of reward bias and cortical frontal asymmetry (left lateralization effect in SUD in response to a decisional task (Iowa Gambling Task. Fifty SUD participants and 40 controls (CG were tested using the Iowa Gambling Task. Electrophysiology (electroencephalography recording was performed during task execution. We measured left and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex power activity. Behavioral responses (gain/loss options; frequency band modulation (asymmetry index for delta, theta, alpha, and beta band; and cortical source localization (standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography were considered. The SUD group opted in favor of the immediate reward option (loss more frequently than the long-term option (gain when compared to the CG. Secondly, SUD showed increased left-hemisphere activation in response to losing (with immediate reward choices in comparison with the CG. The left hemispheric unbalance effect and the “reward bias” were adduced to explain the decisional impairment in SUD. Keywords: drug addiction, cortical brain oscillations, left lateralization effect, reward mechanism, Iowa Gambling Task

  18. The Effect of Binaural Beats on Visuospatial Working Memory and Cortical Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchene, Christine; Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A; Leonessa, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Binaural beats utilize a phenomenon that occurs within the cortex when two different frequencies are presented separately to each ear. This procedure produces a third phantom binaural beat, whose frequency is equal to the difference of the two presented tones and which can be manipulated for non-invasive brain stimulation. The effects of binaural beats on working memory, the system in control of temporary retention and online organization of thoughts for successful goal directed behavior, have not been well studied. Furthermore, no studies have evaluated the effects of binaural beats on brain connectivity during working memory tasks. In this study, we determined the effects of different acoustic stimulation conditions on participant response accuracy and cortical network topology, as measured by EEG recordings, during a visuospatial working memory task. Three acoustic stimulation control conditions and three binaural beat stimulation conditions were used: None, Pure Tone, Classical Music, 5Hz binaural beats, 10Hz binaural beats, and 15Hz binaural beats. We found that listening to 15Hz binaural beats during a visuospatial working memory task not only increased the response accuracy, but also modified the strengths of the cortical networks during the task. The three auditory control conditions and the 5Hz and 10Hz binaural beats all decreased accuracy. Based on graphical network analyses, the cortical activity during 15Hz binaural beats produced networks characteristic of high information transfer with consistent connection strengths throughout the visuospatial working memory task.

  19. Cortical hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current takes part in the generation of focal paroxysmal activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence; Steriade, Mircea

    2002-01-01

    During paroxysmal neocortical oscillations, sudden depolarization leading to the next cycle occurs when the majority of cortical neurons are hyperpolarized. Both the Ca2+-dependent K+ currents (IK(Ca)) and disfacilitation play critical roles in the generation of hyperpolarizing potentials. In vivo experiments and computational models are used here to investigate whether the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (Ih) in cortical neurons also contributes to the generation of paroxysmal onsets. Hyperpolarizing current pulses revealed a depolarizing sag in ≈20% of cortical neurons. Intracellular recordings from glial cells indirectly indicated an increase in extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) during paroxysmal activities, leading to a positive shift in the reversal potential of K+-mediated currents, including Ih. In the paroxysmal neocortex, ≈20% of neurons show repolarizing potentials originating from hyperpolarizations associated with depth-electroencephalogram positive waves of spike-wave complexes. The onset of these repolarizing potentials corresponds to maximal [K+]o as estimated from dual simultaneous impalements from neurons and glial cells. Computational models showed how, after the increased [K+]o, the interplay between Ih, IK(Ca), and a persistent Na+ current, INa(P), could organize paroxysmal oscillations at a frequency of 2–3 Hz. PMID:12089324

  20. Cortical Up states induce the selective weakening of subthreshold synaptic inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Julian; Kahn, Martin C; Tuohy, Simon; Paulsen, Ole; Wilson, Tony; Mann, Edward O

    2017-09-22

    Slow-wave sleep is thought to be important for retuning cortical synapses, but the cellular mechanisms remain unresolved. During slow-wave activity, cortical neurons display synchronized transitions between depolarized Up states and hyperpolarized Down states. Here, using recordings from LIII pyramidal neurons from acute slices of mouse medial entorhinal cortex, we find that subthreshold inputs arriving during the Up state undergo synaptic weakening. This does not reflect a process of global synaptic downscaling, as it is dependent on presynaptic spiking, with network state encoded in the synaptically evoked spine Ca(2+) responses. Our data indicate that the induction of synaptic weakening is under postsynaptic control, as it can be prevented by correlated postsynaptic spiking activity, and depends on postsynaptic NMDA receptors and GSK3β activity. This provides a mechanism by which slow-wave activity might bias synapses towards weakening, while preserving the synaptic connections within active neuronal assemblies.Slow oscillations between cortical Up and Down states are a defining feature of deep sleep, but their function is not well understood. Here the authors study Up/Down states in acute slices of entorhinal cortex, and find that Up states promote the weakening of subthreshold synaptic inputs, while suprathreshold inputs are preserved or strengthened.

  1. Subcortical cerebral blood flow and metabolic changes elicited by cortical spreading depression in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mraovitch, S.; Calando, Y.; Goadsby, P.J.; Seylaz, J. (Laboratoire de Recherches Cerebrovasculaire, Paris (France))

    1992-06-01

    Changes in cerebral cortical perfusion (CBF{sub LDF}), local cerebral blood flow (lCBF) and local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) elicited by unilateral cortical spreading depression (SD) were monitored and measured in separate groups of rats anesthetized with {alpha}-chloralose. CBF{sub LDF} was recorded with laser Doppler flowmetry, while lCBF and lCGU were measured by the quantitative autoradiographic ({sup 14}C)iodoantipyrine and ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose methods, respectively. SD elicited a wave of hyperemia after a latency of 2 to 3 min followed by an oligemic phase. Ninety minutes following the onset of SD cortical lCBF and lCGU were essentially the same as on the contralateral side and in sham-treated rats. However, alteration in the lCBF and lCGU in upper and lower brainstem persisted. The present results demonstrate that long-lasting cerebrovascular and metabolic alterations take place within the subcortical regions following SD. These regions provide an attractive site to integrate observations in man concerning spreading depression and the aura of migraine with the other features of the syndrome. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Cortical field potentials preceding self-paced forelimb movements and influences of cerebellectomy upon them in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Hiroko; Ichikawa, Jun; Matsuzaki, Ryuichi; Kyuhou, Shin ichi; Matsuura-Nakao, Kazuko; Seki, Tomomi; Gemba, Hisae

    2003-11-27

    Seven rats were well trained to move lever to the left by right forelimb at self-pace (self-paced forelimb movements). Cortical field potentials associated with self-paced forelimb movements were recorded by electrodes implanted chronically on the surface and at a 2.0 mm depth in the forelimb motor cortex on the left side. A surface-negative, depth-positive potential starting about 1.0 s prior to the movement was recorded in the rostral part of the forelimb motor cortex. Further we found that the premovement potential was eliminated by the cerebellar hemispherectomy on the right side. This suggests the participation of the cerebellar hemisphere in preparing the activity of the motor cortex before self-paced forelimb movements in rats, by cerebello-thalamo-cortical projections.

  3. Biomechanical comparison of intramedullary cortical button fixation and interference screw technique for subpectoral biceps tenodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Arne; Martetschläger, Frank; Siebenlist, Sebastian; Sandmann, Gunther H; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Lenich, Andreas; Millett, Peter J; Stöckle, Ulrich; Elser, Florian

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to biomechanically evaluate a new technique of intramedullary cortical button fixation for subpectoral biceps tenodesis and to compare it with the interference screw technique. We compared intramedullary unicortical button fixation (BicepsButton; Arthrex, Naples, FL) with interference screw fixation (Bio-Tenodesis screw; Arthrex) for subpectoral biceps tenodesis using 10 pairs of human cadaveric shoulders and ovine superficial digital flexor tendons. After computed tomography analysis, the specimens were mounted in a testing machine. Cyclic loading was performed (preload, 5 N; 5 to 70 N at 1.5 Hz for 500 cycles), recording the displacement of the tendon. Load to failure and stiffness were subsequently evaluated with a load-to-failure test (1 mm/s). Cyclic loading showed a displacement of 11.3 ± 2.8 mm for intramedullary cortical button fixation and 9 ± 1.7 mm for interference screw fixation (P = .112). All specimens within the cortical button group passed the cyclic loading test, whereas 3 of 10 specimens within the interference screw group failed by tendon slippage at the screw-tendon-bone interface after a mean of 252 cycles (P = .221). Load-to-failure testing showed a mean load to failure of 218.8 ± 40 N and stiffness of 27.2 ± 7.2 N/mm for the intramedullary cortical button technique. For the interference screw, the mean load to failure was 212.1 ± 28.3 N (P = .625) and stiffness was 40.4 ± 13 N/mm (P = .056). We could not find any major differences in load to failure when comparing the tested techniques for subpectoral biceps tenodesis. Intramedullary cortical button fixation showed no failure during cyclic testing. However, we found a 30% failure rate (3 of 10) for the interference screw fixation. Intramedullary cortical button fixation provides an alternative technique for subpectoral biceps tenodesis with comparable and, during cyclic loading, even superior biomechanical properties to interference screw fixation

  4. Presidential Electronic Records Library

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — PERL (Presidential Electronic Records Library) used to ingest and provide internal access to the Presidential electronic Records of the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton...

  5. UARS spacecraft recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The objective was the design, development, and fabrication of UARS spacecraft recorders. The UARS recorder is a tailored configuration of the RCA Standard Tape recorder STR-108. The specifications and requirements are reviewed.

  6. CMS Records Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Records Schedule provides disposition authorizations approved by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for CMS program-related records...

  7. Cortical evoked potentials in response to rapid balloon distension of the rectum and anal canal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, S; Brock, C; Krogh, K

    healthy women received 30 RBDs in the rectum and the anal canal at intensities corresponding to sensory and unpleasantness thresholds, and response was recorded as cortical evoked potentials (CEPs) in 64-channels. The anal canal stimulations at unpleasantness level were repeated after 4 min to test...... showed reproducibility with ICCs for all bands >0.8 and corresponding CVs potentials evoked from the anal canal are challenged by latency jitter likely related to variability in muscle tone due to the distensions. Using single-sweep analysis, anal CEPs proved...

  8. Increased brain cortical thickness associated with visceral fat in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saute, R L; Soder, R B; Alves Filho, J O; Baldisserotto, M; Franco, A R

    2016-10-27

    There has been a growing amount of evidence indicating that excess visceral fat is associated with alterations in brain structure and function, including brain cortical thinning in adults. This study aims to investigate the relationship between brain cortical thickness with obesity assessments, in adolescents. In this study, we measured three different obesity assessments within an adolescent population (aged 15 - 18 years): body mass index (BMI), visceral fat ratio measured with an MRI and hepatorenal gradient measured with an ultrasound. Volunteers also underwent an MRI scan to measure brain structure. Results indicated that there was no relationship of BMI or hepatorenal gradient with brain cortical dimensions. However, there was a significant association between visceral fat ratio and an increase of cortical thickness throughout the brain. These results suggest that visceral fat, but not BMI, is correlated with cortical thickening in adolescence. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  9. Malformations of cortical development: genetic mechanisms and diagnostic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development are rare congenital anomalies of the cerebral cortex, wherein patients present with intractable epilepsy and various degrees of developmental delay. Cases show a spectrum of anomalous cortical formations with diverse anatomic and morphological abnormalities, a variety of genetic causes, and different clinical presentations. Brain magnetic resonance imaging has been of great help in determining the exact morphologies of cortical malformations. The hypothetical mechanisms of malformation include interruptions during the formation of cerebral cortex in the form of viral infection, genetic causes, and vascular events. Recent remarkable developments in genetic analysis methods have improved our understanding of these pathological mechanisms. The present review will discuss normal cortical development, the current proposed malformation classifications, and the diagnostic approach for malformations of cortical development. PMID:28203254

  10. Lineage-specific laminar organization of cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Gabriele; Dehorter, Nathalie; Sols, Ignasi; Huang, Z Josh; Maravall, Miguel; Marín, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    In the cerebral cortex, pyramidal cells and interneurons are generated in distant germinal zones, and so the mechanisms that control their precise assembly into specific microcircuits remain an enigma. Here we report that cortical interneurons labeled at the clonal level do not distribute randomly but rather have a strong tendency to cluster in the mouse neocortex. This behavior is common to different classes of interneurons, independently of their origin. Interneuron clusters are typically contained within one or two adjacent cortical layers, are largely formed by isochronically generated neurons and populate specific layers, as revealed by unbiased hierarchical clustering methods. Our results suggest that different progenitor cells give rise to interneurons populating infra- and supragranular cortical layers, which challenges current views of cortical neurogenesis. Thus, specific lineages of cortical interneurons seem to be produced to primarily mirror the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex, rather than its columnar organization.

  11. Jealousy increased by induced relative left frontal cortical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Nicholas J; Eastwick, Paul W; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Schmeichel, Brandon J

    2015-10-01

    Asymmetric frontal cortical activity may be one key to the process linking social exclusion to jealous feelings. The current research examined the causal role of asymmetric frontal brain activity in modulating jealousy in response to social exclusion. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex to manipulate asymmetric frontal cortical activity was combined with a modified version of the Cyberball paradigm designed to induce jealousy. After receiving 15 min of tDCS, participants were excluded by a desired partner and reported how jealous they felt. Among individuals who were excluded, tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity caused greater levels of self-reported jealousy compared to tDCS to increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham stimulation. Limitations concerning the specificity of this effect and implications for the role of the asymmetric prefrontal cortical activity in motivated behaviors are discussed.

  12. Contextual control of audiovisual integration in low-level sensory cortices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Atteveldt, N.; Peterson, Bradley S; Schroeder, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    Potential sources of multisensory influences on low-level sensory cortices include direct projections from sensory cortices of different modalities, as well as more indirect feedback inputs from higher order multisensory cortical regions. These multiple architectures may be functionally complementar

  13. Changes in cortical activity when subjects scan memory for tones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, L; Curtis, S; Wang, J Z; Williamson, S J

    1992-04-01

    The magnetoencephalogram (MEG) was used to detect regional changes in spontaneous cortical activity accompanying short-term memory search. This method was chosen because magnetic fields are detectable only within a few centimeters of the projections of their sources onto the scalp. The specific hypothesis that auditory cortex is involved in scanning memory for tones was tested by sensing the field of the magnetic counterpart to N100 (N100m) which is known to originate in auditory cortex. N100m was measured at many different positions and the spontaneous cortical rhythms in the alpha bandwidth (8-12 Hz) were measured at the same places. These rhythms were found to be suppressed while subjects scanned memory for musical tones in a Sternberg paradigm. For 3 subjects, both the MEG suppression time (ST) and reaction time (RT) increased linearly with memory set size. The correlation between ST measured over the left hemisphere and set size was significant for two subjects but not significant for the third, and the slopes of the regression lines relating ST to set size were too shallow to be related to the time required to scan memory. However, the correlation between ST of the right hemisphere and set size was highly significant for all subjects, and the slopes of the regression lines were comparable to those relating RT to set size. The electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded with midline electrodes failed to reveal a significant relationship between suppression time and set size for 2 of the subjects, thus ruling out global alpha blockage and generalized arousal as the basis for the task-related suppression duration. The electric N100, measured at Cz, decreased significantly in amplitude with set size for 2 subjects, but it increased significantly in amplitude for the third subject. In contrast, RT increased with set size for all subjects. N100m measured over the right hemisphere was similar to the behavior of N100, while N100m measured over the left hemisphere showed

  14. Loss of Consciousness Is Associated with Stabilization of Cortical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovey, Guillermo; Alonso, Leandro M; Yanagawa, Toru; Fujii, Naotaka; Magnasco, Marcelo O; Cecchi, Guillermo A; Proekt, Alex

    2015-07-29

    What aspects of neuronal activity distinguish the conscious from the unconscious brain? This has been a subject of intense interest and debate since the early days of neurophysiology. However, as any practicing anesthesiologist can attest, it is currently not possible to reliably distinguish a conscious state from an unconscious one on the basis of brain activity. Here we approach this problem from the perspective of dynamical systems theory. We argue that the brain, as a dynamical system, is self-regulated at the boundary between stable and unstable regimes, allowing it in particular to maintain high susceptibility to stimuli. To test this hypothesis, we performed stability analysis of high-density electrocorticography recordings covering an entire cerebral hemisphere in monkeys during reversible loss of consciousness. We show that, during loss of consciousness, the number of eigenmodes at the edge of instability decreases smoothly, independently of the type of anesthetic and specific features of brain activity. The eigenmodes drift back toward the unstable line during recovery of consciousness. Furthermore, we show that stability is an emergent phenomenon dependent on the correlations among activity in different cortical regions rather than signals taken in isolation. These findings support the conclusion that dynamics at the edge of instability are essential for maintaining consciousness and provide a novel and principled measure that distinguishes between the conscious and the unconscious brain. What distinguishes brain activity during consciousness from that observed during unconsciousness? Answering this question has proven difficult because neither consciousness nor lack thereof have universal signatures in terms of most specific features of brain activity. For instance, different anesthetics induce different patterns of brain activity. We demonstrate that loss of consciousness is universally and reliably associated with stabilization of cortical dynamics

  15. Cortical spreading depression occurs during elective neurosurgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Andrew P; William Shuttleworth, C; Mead, Brittany; Burlbaw, Brittany; Krasberg, Mark; Yonas, Howard

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cortical spreading depression (CSD) has been observed with relatively high frequency in the period following human brain injury, including traumatic brain injury and ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke. These events are characterized by loss of ionic gradients through massive cellular depolarization, neuronal dysfunction (depression of electrocorticographic [ECoG] activity) and slow spread (2-5 mm/min) across the cortical surface. Previous data obtained in animals have suggested that even in the absence of underlying injury, neurosurgical manipulation can induce CSD and could potentially be a modifiable factor in neurosurgical injury. The authors report their initial experience with direct intraoperative ECoG monitoring for CSD. METHODS The authors prospectively enrolled patients undergoing elective craniotomy for supratentorial lesions in cases in which the surgical procedure was expected to last > 2 hours. These patients were monitored for CSD from the time of dural opening through the time of dural closure, using a standard 1 × 6 platinum electrode coupled with an AC or full-spectrum DC amplifier. The data were processed using standard techniques to evaluate for slow potential changes coupled with suppression of high-frequency ECoG propagating across the electrodes. Data were compared with CSD validated in previous intensive care unit (ICU) studies, to evaluate recording conditions most likely to permit CSD detection, and identify likely events during the course of neurosurgical procedures using standard criteria. RESULTS Eleven patients underwent ECoG monitoring during elective neurosurgical procedures. During the periods of monitoring, 2 definite CSDs were observed to occur in 1 patient and 8 suspicious events were detected in 4 patients. In other patients, either no events were observed or artifact limited interpretation of the data. The DC-coupled amplifier system represented an improvement in stability of data compared with AC-coupled systems. Compared

  16. Osteocyte lacunar properties in rat cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach-Gansmo, Fiona Linnea; Weaver, James C.; Jensen, Mads Hartmann

    2015-01-01

    to osteocyte function, osteocyte lacunar properties such as volume, shape, orientation, and density are now frequently reported in studies investigating osteocyte activity. Despite this increasing interest in lacunar morphometrics, many studies show a large spread in such values, suggesting a large inter......-species but also inter-site variation in lacunar properties. Here, osteocyte lacunae in rat cortical bone have been studied using synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SR μCT) and backscattered electron (BE) microscopy. Quantitative lacunar geometric characteristics are reported based on the synchrotron...... radiation data, differentiating between circumferential lamellar bone and a central, more disordered bone type. From these studies, no significant differences were found in lacunar volumes between lamellar and central bone, whereas significant differences in lacunar orientation, shape and density values...

  17. Magnetoencephalography from signals to dynamic cortical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Aine, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    "Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides a time-accurate view into human brain function. The concerted action of neurons generates minute magnetic fields that can be detected---totally noninvasively---by sensitive multichannel magnetometers. The obtained millisecond accuracycomplements information obtained by other modern brain-imaging tools. Accurate timing is quintessential in normal brain function, often distorted in brain disorders. The noninvasiveness and time-sensitivityof MEG are great assets to developmental studies, as well. This multiauthored book covers an ambitiously wide range of MEG research from introductory to advanced level, from sensors to signals, and from focal sources to the dynamics of cortical networks. Written by active practioners of this multidisciplinary field, the book contains tutorials for newcomers and chapters of new challenging methods and emerging technologies to advanced MEG users. The reader will obtain a firm grasp of the possibilities of MEG in the study of audition, vision...

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-03-18

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca(2+) activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively.

  19. Cortical sensory loss in a patient with posterior cortical atrophy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jung-Lung; Chen, Wei-Hung; Chiu, Hou-Chang

    2004-02-01

    Patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) who present with initial symptoms of higher visual function deficits eventually develop alexia, aphasia, and components of Balint's syndrome or Gerstmann's syndrome. Recently, pathological findings were reported for these patients that are generally suggestive of Alzheimer's disease even though Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) was presumed as an alternative cause of some autopsy-diagnosed PCA cases. Here, we report a case with a four-year progression of cognitive and higher visual function deterioration, and with features not described in previously reported PCA cases (i.e., a distinct sensory complaint and early frontal lobe involvement). To summarize, this case belongs to perceptual-motor syndrome of asymmetric cortical degeneration and the underlying neuropathology is more suggestive of Alzheimer's disease than of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  20. The myokine irisin increases cortical bone mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaianni, Graziana; Cuscito, Concetta; Mongelli, Teresa; Pignataro, Paolo; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Liu, Peng; Lu, Ping; Sartini, Loris; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Mori, Giorgio; Di Benedetto, Adriana; Brunetti, Giacomina; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Reseland, Janne E.; Colucci, Silvia; New, Maria I.; Zaidi, Mone; Cinti, Saverio; Grano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear how physical activity stimulates new bone synthesis. We explored whether irisin, a newly discovered myokine released upon physical activity, displays anabolic actions on the skeleton. Young male mice were injected with vehicle or recombinant irisin (r-irisin) at a low cumulative weekly dose of 100 µg kg−1. We observed significant increases in cortical bone mass and strength, notably in cortical tissue mineral density, periosteal circumference, polar moment of inertia, and bending strength. This anabolic action was mediated primarily through the stimulation of bone formation, but with parallel notable reductions in osteoclast numbers. The trabecular compartment of the same bones was spared, as were vertebrae from the same mice. Higher irisin doses (3,500 µg kg−1 per week) cause browning of adipose tissue; this was not seen with low-dose r-irisin. Expectedly, low-dose r-irisin modulated the skeletal genes, Opn and Sost, but not Ucp1 or Pparγ expression in white adipose tissue. In bone marrow stromal cell cultures, r-irisin rapidly phosphorylated Erk, and up-regulated Atf4, Runx2, Osx, Lrp5, β-catenin, Alp, and Col1a1; this is consistent with a direct receptor-mediated action to stimulate osteogenesis. We also noted that, although the irisin precursor Fndc5 was expressed abundantly in skeletal muscle, other sites, such as bone and brain, also expressed Fndc5, albeit at low levels. Furthermore, muscle fibers from r-irisin–injected mice displayed enhanced Fndc5 positivity, and irisin induced Fdnc5 mRNA expression in cultured myoblasts. Our data therefore highlight a previously unknown action of the myokine irisin, which may be the molecular entity responsible for muscle–bone connectivity. PMID:26374841

  1. Functional properties of human auditory cortical fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Woods

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available While auditory cortex in non-human primates has been subdivided into multiple functionally-specialized auditory cortical fields (ACFs, the boundaries and functional specialization of human ACFs have not been defined. In the current study, we evaluated whether a widely accepted primate model of auditory cortex could explain regional tuning properties of fMRI activations on the cortical surface to attended and nonattended tones of different frequency, location, and intensity. The limits of auditory cortex were defined by voxels that showed significant activations to nonattended sounds. Three centrally-located fields with mirror-symmetric tonotopic organization were identified and assigned to the three core fields of the primate model while surrounding activations were assigned to belt fields following procedures similar to those used in macaque fMRI studies. The functional properties of core, medial belt, and lateral belt field groups were then analyzed. Field groups were distinguished by tonotopic organization, frequency selectivity, intensity sensitivity, contralaterality, binaural enhancement, attentional modulation, and hemispheric asymmetry. In general, core fields showed greater sensitivity to sound properties than did belt fields, while belt fields showed greater attentional modulation than core fields. Significant distinctions in intensity sensitivity and contralaterality were seen between adjacent core fields A1 and R, while multiple differences in tuning properties were evident at boundaries between adjacent core and belt fields. The reliable differences in functional properties between fields and field groups suggest that the basic primate pattern of auditory cortex organization is preserved in humans. A comparison of the sizes of functionally-defined ACFs in humans and macaques reveals a significant relative expansion in human lateral belt fields implicated in the processing of speech.

  2. Digital Audio Legal Recorder

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Digital Audio Legal Recorder (DALR) provides the legal recording capability between air traffic controllers, pilots and ground-based air traffic control TRACONs...

  3. Keeping the Records Straight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Phil; Keynes, Milton

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines are given regarding keeping and using educational records for exceptional children in Great Britain. Procedures related to anecdotal records, observation inventories, and rating scales are delineated. (CL)

  4. CNTF-Treated Astrocyte Conditioned Medium Enhances Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Activity in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-08-01

    Seizure activity is linked to astrocyte activation as well as dysfunctional cortical neuron excitability produced from changes in calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channel function. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) can be used to investigate the peripheral effects of activated astrocytes upon cortical neurons. However, CNTF-ACM's effect upon KCa channel activity in cultured cortical neurons has not yet been investigated. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed in rat cortical neurons to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon charybdotoxin-sensitive large-conductance KCa (BK) channel currents and apamin-sensitive small-conductance KCa (SK) channel current. Biotinylation and RT-PCR were applied to assess CNTF-ACM's effects upon the protein and mRNA expression, respectively, of the SK channel subunits SK2 and SK3 and the BK channel subunits BKα1 and BKβ3. An anti-fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) monoclonal neutralizing antibody was used to assess the effects of the FGF-2 component of CNTF-ACM. CNTF-ACM significantly increased KCa channel current density, which was predominantly attributable to gains in BK channel activity (p ACM produced a significant increase in BKα1 and BKβ3 expression (p  0.05). Blocking FGF-2 produced significant reductions in KCa channel current density (p > 0.05) as well as BKα1 and BKβ3 expression in CNTF-ACM-treated neurons (p > 0.05). CNTF-ACM significantly enhances BK channel activity in rat cortical neurons and that FGF-2 is partially responsible for these effects. CNTF-induced astrocyte activation results in secretion of neuroactive factors which may affect neuronal excitability and resultant seizure activity in mammalian cortical neurons.

  5. Fracture reduction with positive medial cortical support: a key element in stability reconstruction for the unstable pertrochanteric hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shi-Min; Zhang, Ying-Qi; Ma, Zhuo; Li, Qing; Dargel, Jens; Eysel, Peer

    2015-06-01

    To introduce the concept of fracture reduction with positive medial cortical support and its clinical and radiological correlation in geriatric unstable pertrochanteric fractures. A retrospective analysis of 127 patients (32 men and 95 women, with mean age 78.7 years) with AO/OTA 31A2.2 and 2.3 hip fractures treated with cephalomedullary nail (PFNA-II or Gamma-3) between July 2010 and June 2013 was performed. They were classified into three groups according the grade of medial cortical support in postoperative fracture reduction (positive, neutral, and negative). The positive cortex support was defined that the medial cortex of the head-neck fragment displaced and located a little bit superomedially to the medial cortex of the shaft. If the neck cortex is located laterally to the shaft, it is negative with no cortical buttress, and if the two cortices contact smoothly, it is in neutral position. The demographic baseline, postoperative radiographic femoral neck-shaft angle and neck length, rehabilitation progress and functional recovery scores of each group were recorded and compared. There were 89 cases (70 %) in positive, 26 in neutral, and 12 in negative support. No statistical differences were found between the three groups among patient age, sex ratio, prefracture score of activity of daily living, walking ability score, ASA physical risk score, number of medical comorbidities, osteoporosis Singh index, fracture reduction quality (Garden alignments), and the position of lag screw or helical blade in femoral head (TAD). In follow-up, patients in positive medial cortical support reduction group had the least loss in neck-shaft angle and neck length, and got ground-walking much earlier than negative reduction group, with good functional outcomes and less hip-thigh pain presence. Fracture reduction with nonanatomic positive medial cortical support allows limited sliding of the head-neck fragment to contact with the femur shaft and achieve secondary stability

  6. Neural correlates of cognitive impairment in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Aurélie; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Samri, Dalila; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Lacomblez, Lucette; Kalafat, Michel; Migliaccio, Raffaella; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Cohen, Laurent; Dubois, Bruno; Habert, Marie-Odile; Sarazin, Marie

    2011-05-01

    With the prospect of disease-modifying drugs that will target the physiopathological process of Alzheimer's disease, it is now crucial to increase the understanding of the atypical focal presentations of Alzheimer's disease, such as posterior cortical atrophy. This study aimed to (i) characterize the brain perfusion profile in posterior cortical atrophy using regions of interest and a voxel-based approach; (ii) study the influence of the disease duration on the clinical and imaging profiles; and (iii) explore the correlations between brain perfusion and cognitive deficits. Thirty-nine patients with posterior cortical atrophy underwent a specific battery of neuropsychological tests, mainly targeting visuospatial functions, and a brain perfusion scintigraphy with 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer. The imaging analysis included a comparison with a group of 24 patients with Alzheimer's disease, matched for age, disease duration and Mini-Mental State Examination, and 24 healthy controls. The single-photon emission computed tomography profile in patients with posterior cortical atrophy was characterized by extensive and severe hypoperfusion in the occipital, parietal, posterior temporal cortices and in a smaller cortical area corresponding to the frontal eye fields (Brodmann areas 6/8). Compared with patients with Alzheimer's disease, the group with posterior cortical atrophy showed more severe occipitoparietal hypoperfusion and higher perfusion in the frontal, anterior cingulate and mesiotemporal regions. When considering the disease duration, the functional changes began and remained centred on the posterior lobes, even in the late stage. Correlation analyses of brain perfusion and neuropsychological scores in posterior cortical atrophy highlighted the prominent role of left inferior parietal damage in acalculia, Gerstmann's syndrome, left-right indistinction and limb apraxia, whereas damage to the bilateral dorsal occipitoparietal regions appeared to be involved in B

  7. Effects of acute nicotine on somatosensory change-related cortical responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, M; Wasaka, T; Motomura, E; Tanii, H; Inui, K; Kakigi, R

    2013-01-15

    Nicotine is known to have enhancing effects on some aspects of attention and cognition. As for the pre-attentive processes of detecting sensory changes, nicotine has significant effects on the auditory and visual systems implying that its pre-attentive effect is common among sensory modalities. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate whether acute nicotine administration has enhancing effects in the somatosensory system. Change-related cortical activity in response to an abrupt increase in stimulus intensity was recorded using magnetoencephalography. The test stimulus consisted of standard electrical pulses at 100 Hz for 500 ms applied to the dorsum of the left hand followed by 0.7-mA stronger pulses for 300 ms. Nicotine was administered in a gum (4 mg of nicotine). Eleven healthy nonsmokers were tested with a double-blind and placebo-controlled design. Effects of nicotine on the cortical response in the primary (S1) and secondary (S2) somatosensory cortices were investigated. Results showed that nicotine failed to affect the S1 response while it significantly increased the amplitude of S2 activity in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulation, and shortened the peak latency of S2 activity in both hemispheres. Since cortical responses in the present study represent a pre-attentive automatic process to encode new somatosensory events, the results suggest that nicotine can exert beneficial cognitive effects without a direct impact on attention and that the effect of nicotine on the automatic change-detecting system is common across sensory modalities. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Decoding a wide range of hand configurations from macaque motor, premotor, and parietal cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffelhofer, Stefan; Agudelo-Toro, Andres; Scherberger, Hansjörg

    2015-01-21

    Despite recent advances in decoding cortical activity for motor control, the development of hand prosthetics remains a major challenge. To reduce the complexity of such applications, higher cortical areas that also represent motor plans rather than just the individual movements might be advantageous. We investigated the decoding of many grip types using spiking activity from the anterior intraparietal (AIP), ventral premotor (F5), and primary motor (M1) cortices. Two rhesus monkeys were trained to grasp 50 objects in a delayed task while hand kinematics and spiking activity from six implanted electrode arrays (total of 192 electrodes) were recorded. Offline, we determined 20 grip types from the kinematic data and decoded these hand configurations and the grasped objects with a simple Bayesian classifier. When decoding from AIP, F5, and M1 combined, the mean accuracy was 50% (using planning activity) and 62% (during motor execution) for predicting the 50 objects (chance level, 2%) and substantially larger when predicting the 20 grip types (planning, 74%; execution, 86%; chance level, 5%). When decoding from individual arrays, objects and grip types could be predicted well during movement planning from AIP (medial array) and F5 (lateral array), whereas M1 predictions were poor. In contrast, predictions during movement execution were best from M1, whereas F5 performed only slightly worse. These results demonstrate for the first time that a large number of grip types can be decoded from higher cortical areas during movement preparation and execution, which could be relevant for future neuroprosthetic devices that decode motor plans.

  9. Baicalein reverts L-valine-induced persistent sodium current up-modulation in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caioli, Silvia; Candelotti, Elena; Pedersen, Jens Z; Saba, Luana; Antonini, Alessia; Incerpi, Sandra; Zona, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    L-valine is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) largely used as dietary integrator by athletes and involved in some inherited rare diseases such as maple syrup urine disease. This pathology is caused by an altered BCAA metabolism with the accumulation of toxic keto acids in tissues and body fluids with consequent severe neurological symptoms. In animal models of BCAA accumulation, increased oxidative stress levels and lipid peroxidation have been reported. The aim of this study was to analyze both whether high BCAA concentrations in neurons induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and whether, by performing electrophysiological recordings, the neuronal functional properties are modified. Our results demonstrate that in primary cortical cultures, a high dose of valine increases ROS production and provokes neuronal hyperexcitability because the action potential frequencies and the persistent sodium current amplitudes increase significantly compared to non-treated neurons. Since Baicalein, a flavone obtained from the Scutellaria root, has been shown to act as a strong antioxidant with neuroprotective effects, we evaluated its possible antioxidant activity in primary cortical neurons chronically exposed to L-valine. The preincubation of cortical neurons with Baicalein prevents the ROS production and is able to revert both the neuronal hyperexcitability and the increase of the persistent sodium current, indicating a direct correlation between the ROS production and the altered physiological parameters. In conclusion, our data show that the electrophysiological alterations of cortical neurons elicited by high valine concentration are due to the increase in ROS production, suggesting much caution in the intake of BCAA dietary integrators.

  10. Effects of deuterium oxide and galvanic vestibular stimulation on visual cortical cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinis, S.; Landolt, J.P.; Weiss, D.S.; Money, K.E.

    1984-03-01

    The spontaneous and evoked unit activities of complex visual cortical cells were recorded from Brodmann's area 18 in immobilized, unanesthetized cats before, during, and after stimulation of the vestibular system. The vestibular system was stimulated by intravenous injection of deuterium oxide (D2O)--a noted nystagmogenic agent--or by direct galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth. Measures of the receptive-field areas, poststimulus time histograms, directional preferences, and the optimal speed of the light bar stimulating the cell were obtained before and after the application of D2O. Directional preferences were determined in a novel manner, using a method derived from a hierarchical clustering technique. Data were collected and analyzed from a) visual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths, b) visual cortical cells in cats following bilateral labrinthectomies, and c) nonvisual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths. The other cellular characteristics were also altered by the D2O. Galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth resembles, in its effects, the injection of D2O. In labyrinth-intact cats, the time course of area 18 spontaneous activity dramatically increased 30 min or more after D2O was administered. It peaked 2-3 h later and still had not returned to preinjection levels even 7 h after the D2O administration. In bilaterally labyrinthectomized cats, the spontaneous activity of the visual cells did not change following D2O administration. In nonvisual cells from labyrinth-intact cats, the spontaneous activity demonstrated a slight but significant decrease over time after D2O injection. In pilot studies, the cats were injected with D2O. Within 8-10 min afterward, signs of positional nystagmus commenced; and within 30 min, problems in maintaining balance were noted. This continued for 7-8 h before disappearing. In the labyrinthectomized animals, such effects were not observed.

  11. Cortical organization of language pathways in children with non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Richard Eugene; Liederman, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Children with a history of epilepsy are almost six times more likely than their unaffected siblings to be referred for speech or language therapy. However, the abnormalities in neural pathway that cause these delays are poorly understood. We recorded evoked fields using whole-head magnetoencephalography during real and non-word visual and auditory rhyme tasks in 15 children with non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy. Basic phonological and orthographic language skills were assessed using Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement subtests. Dynamic statistical parameter mapping was used with individual participant magnetic resonance images. Significant cortical activity was visualized on average and performance weighted maps. For the auditory rhyme tasks, bilateral primary and secondary auditory cortices, the superior temporal sulcus, and insular cortex were activated early with later increases in left hemisphere activity. Visual rhyme tasks evoked early bilateral primary and secondary occipital cortical and angular gyri activity followed by later activation of the planum temporale and supramarginal gyri and the left ventral occipitotemporal area. For the auditory rhyme tasks, performance weighted maps demonstrated that early right hemisphere activation was associated with poorer reading skills while later activity was associated with better reading skills; for the left hemisphere, greater early activation of the secondary auditory cortex, including the planum temporale, was related to better reading skills while relatively later activation of these areas was associated with poorer reading skills. For the visual rhyme tasks, greater activity in the bilateral ventral occipitotemporal and insular areas and angular and supramarginal gyri were associated with better performance. These data suggest that spatiotemporal cortical activation patterns are associated with variations in language performance in non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy.

  12. Cortical organization of language pathways in children with non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eugene Frye

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Children with a history of epilepsy are almost six-times more likely than their unaffected siblings to be referred for speech or language therapy. However, the abnormalities in neural pathway that cause these delays are poorly understood. We recorded evoked fields using whole-head magnetoencephalography during real and non-word visual and auditory rhyme tasks in 15 children with non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy. Basic phonological and orthographic language skills were assessed using Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement subtests. Dynamic statistical parameter mapping was used with individual participant magnetic resonance images. Significant cortical activity was visualized on average and performance weighted maps. For the auditory rhyme tasks, bilateral primary and secondary auditory cortices, the superior temporal sulcus and insular cortex were activated early with later increases in left hemisphere activity. Visual rhyme tasks evoked early bilateral primary and secondary occipital cortical and angular gyri activity followed by later activation of the planum temporale and supramarginal gyri and the left ventral occipitotemporal area. For the auditory rhyme tasks, performance weighted maps demonstrated that early right hemisphere activation was associated with poorer reading skills while later activity was associated with better reading skills; for the left hemisphere, greater early activation of the secondary auditory cortex, including the planum temporale, was related to better reading skills while relatively later activation of these areas was associated with poorer reading skills. For the visual rhyme tasks, greater activity in the bilateral ventral occipitotemporal and insular areas and angular and supramarginal gyri were associated with better performance. These data suggest that spatiotemporal cortical activation patterns are associated with variations in language performance in non-localized cryptogenic epilepsy.

  13. Graph properties of synchronized cortical networks during visual working memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palva, Satu; Monto, Simo; Palva, J Matias

    2010-02-15

    Oscillatory synchronization facilitates communication in neuronal networks and is intimately associated with human cognition. Neuronal activity in the human brain can be non-invasively imaged with magneto- (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG), but the large-scale structure of synchronized cortical networks supporting cognitive processing has remained uncharacterized. We combined simultaneous MEG and EEG (MEEG) recordings with minimum-norm-estimate-based inverse modeling to investigate the structure of oscillatory phase synchronized networks that were active during visual working memory (VWM) maintenance. Inter-areal phase-synchrony was quantified as a function of time and frequency by single-trial phase-difference estimates of cortical patches covering the entire cortical surfaces. The resulting networks were characterized with a number of network metrics that were then compared between delta/theta- (3-6 Hz), alpha- (7-13 Hz), beta- (16-25 Hz), and gamma- (30-80 Hz) frequency bands. We found several salient differences between frequency bands. Alpha- and beta-band networks were more clustered and small-world like but had smaller global efficiency than the networks in the delta/theta and gamma bands. Alpha- and beta-band networks also had truncated-power-law degree distributions and high k-core numbers. The data converge on showing that during the VWM-retention period, human cortical alpha- and beta-band networks have a memory-load dependent, scale-free small-world structure with densely connected core-like structures. These data further show that synchronized dynamic networks underlying a specific cognitive state can exhibit distinct frequency-dependent network structures that could support distinct functional roles.

  14. Behavioral detection of intra-cortical microstimulation in the primary and secondary auditory cortex of cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenling eZhao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although neural responses to sound stimuli have been thoroughly investigated in various areas of the auditory cortex, the results electrophysiological recordings cannot establish a causal link between neural activation and brain function. Electrical microstimulation, which can selectively perturb neural activity in specific parts of the nervous system, is an important tool for exploring the organization and function of brain circuitry. To date, the studies describing the behavioral effects of electrical stimulation have largely been conducted in the primary auditory cortex. In this study, to investigate the potential differences in the effects of electrical stimulation on different cortical areas, we measured the behavioral performance of cats in detecting intra-cortical microstimulation (ICMS delivered in the primary and secondary auditory fields (A1 and A2, respectively. After being trained to perform a Go/No-Go task cued by sounds, we found that cats could also learn to perform the task cued by ICMS; furthermore, the detection of the ICMS was similarly sensitive in A1 and A2. Presenting wideband noise together with ICMS substantially decreased the performance of cats in detecting ICMS in A1 and A2, consistent with a noise masking effect on the sensation elicited by the ICMS. In contrast, presenting ICMS with pure-tones in the spectral receptive field of the electrode-implanted cortical site reduced ICMS detection performance in A1 but not A2. Therefore, activation of A1 and A2 neurons may produce different qualities of sensation. Overall, our study revealed that ICMS-induced neural activity could be easily integrated into an animal’s behavioral decision process and had an implication for the development of cortical auditory prosthetics.

  15. Radiological and Clinical Evaluation of the Transosseous Cortical Button Technique in Distal Biceps Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caekebeke, Pieter; Vermeersch, Nicolas; Duerinckx, Joris; van Riet, Roger

    2016-12-01

    One of the options to repair a ruptured distal biceps tendon to the radial tuberosity is by means of a transosseous cortical button. Although excellent functional outcomes have been reported, no studies have been performed to quantify the effect of the transosseous fixation technique on the radius. Our study evaluated the clinical outcome and radiological outcome of this technique. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the radiographic evolution of the bone tunnel in the radius. Patients with an acute distal biceps tendon rupture treated with a transosseous cortical button were invited to take part in the study. Fourteen patients were included in the final analysis. All patients were evaluated both clinically and by computed tomography scanning of the proximal radius after a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Outcomes were recorded using the visual analog scale score for pain, the Mayo Elbow Performance Score, and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores. Bone tunnel volume was measured with semiautomated computed tomography segmentation using image-processing software. There were no failures of fixation in the patient group examined. Elbow mobility, arm, and forearm circumference were symmetric for all patients. Average visual analog scale for pain was less than 2. Mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score and Mayo Elbow Performance Score were 2.3 and 97.6, respectively. Computed tomography images showed an average closure of the radial bony tunnel of 64% of the initial volume. Biceps tendon repair with cortical button fixation only shows partial tunnel closure. This could reduce the risk of potential complications due to osteolysis, such as radius fracture or hardware failure. Functional results were excellent and comparable to other fixation methods. The role of interference screws in transosseous cortical button techniques to strengthen the repair and to avoid osteolysis may therefore be questioned. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2016

  16. Language mapping in multilingual patients: Electrocorticography and cortical stimulation during naming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenzie C Cervenka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Multilingual patients pose a unique challenge when planning epilepsy surgery near language cortex because the cortical representations of each language may be distinct. These distinctions may not be evident with routine electrocortical stimulation mapping (ESM. Electrocorticography (ECoG has recently been used to detect task-related spectral perturbations associated with functional brain activation. We hypothesized that using broadband high gamma augmentation (HGA, 60-150 Hertz as an index of cortical activation, ECoG would complement ESM in discriminating the cortical representations of first (L1 and second (L2 languages. We studied four adult patients for whom English was a second language, in whom subdural electrodes (a total of 358 were implanted to guide epilepsy surgery. Patients underwent ECoG recordings and electrocortical stimulation mapping (ESM while performing the same visual object naming task in L1 and L2. In three of four patients, ECoG found sites activated during naming in one language but not the other. These language-specific sites were not identified using ESM. In addition, ECoG HGA was observed at more sites during L2 versus L1 naming in two patients, suggesting that L2 processing required additional cortical resources compared to L1 processing in these individuals. Post-operative language deficits were identified in three patients (one in L2 only. These deficits were predicted by ECoG spectral mapping but not by ESM. These results suggest that pre-surgical mapping should include evaluation of all utilized languages to avoid post-operative functional deficits. Finally, this study suggests that ECoG spectral mapping may potentially complement the results of ESM of language.

  17. Shortened cortical silent period in adductor spasmodic dysphonia: evidence for widespread cortical excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samargia, Sharyl; Schmidt, Rebekah; Kimberley, Teresa Jacobson

    2014-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to compare cortical inhibition in the hand region of the primary motor cortex between subjects with focal hand dystonia (FHD), adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), and healthy controls. Data from 28 subjects were analyzed (FHD n=11, 53.25 ± 8.74 y; AdSD: n=8, 56.38 ± 7.5 y; and healthy controls: n=941.67 ± 10.85 y). All subjects received single pulse TMS to the left motor cortex to measure cortical silent period (CSP) in the right first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle. Duration of the CSP was measured and compared across groups. A one-way ANCOVA with age as a covariate revealed a significant group effect (p<0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed significantly longer CSP duration in the healthy group vs. AdSD group (p<0.001) and FHD group (p<0.001). These results suggest impaired intracortical inhibition is a neurophysiologic characteristic of FHD and AdSD. In addition, the shortened CSP in AdSD provides evidence to support a widespread decrease in cortical inhibition in areas of the motor cortex that represent an asymptomatic region of the body. These findings may inform future investigations of differential diagnosis as well as alternative treatments for focal dystonias.

  18. Recording, analysis, and interpretation of spreading depolarizations in neurointensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Jens P; Fabricius, Martin; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-01-01

    recorded during multimodal neuromonitoring in neurocritical care as a causal biomarker providing a diagnostic summary measure of metabolic failure and excitotoxic injury. Focal ischemia causes spreading depolarization within minutes. Further spreading depolarizations arise for hours to days due to energy...... electrocorticographic monitoring affords even remote detection of injury because spreading depolarizations propagate widely from ischemic or metabolically stressed zones; characteristic patterns, including temporal clusters of spreading depolarizations and persistent depression of spontaneous cortical activity, can...

  19. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Timothy J; Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Ryan, Natalie S; Schott, Jonathan M; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal 'visual dementia' and most common atypical Alzheimer's disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients' (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer's disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer's disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with 'sticky fixation'. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer's disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large saccadic intrusions

  20. Individual cortical current density reconstructions of the semantic N400 effect: using a generalized minimum norm model with different constraints (L1 and L2 norm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, H; Streb, J; Bien, S; Rösler, F

    2000-11-01

    Event-related brain potentials were recorded to study whether verbs and nouns activate topographically distinct cortical generators. Fifteen subjects performed a primed lexical decision task with verb/verb and noun/noun pairs. The relatedness between prime and target items was varied in three steps (unrelated, moderately, and strongly related) and the EEG was recorded from 124 scalp electrodes. The topography of cortical sources of the N400 effect was evaluated by standardized differences scores and by cortical current source estimates which were constrained by the individual MRI-determined cortex anatomy. A behavioral priming effect and a substantial N400 effect was found for both word categories. However, the topography of the grand average N400 effect of verbs and nouns did not differ, neither for raw nor for standardized amplitudes. Cortical current source estimates of the N400 effect revealed a very broad and scattered distribution of active locations with pronounced interindividual differences. Cortical current source estimates obtained with the L1-norm and L2-norm model, respectively, differed in the distribution of sources over the cortex but converged on the same "hot spots." The data give no indication that the N400 effect is generated by word category-specific networks which have a different topography. The marked individual differences are discussed with respect to the involved processes and the current source estimation procedures.

  1. Stimulating forebrain communications: Slow sinusoidal electric fields over frontal cortices dynamically modulate hippocampal activity and cortico-hippocampal interplay during slow-wave states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Anastasia; Whitten, Tara A; Dickson, Clayton T

    2016-06-01

    Slow-wave states are characterized by the most global physiological phenomenon in the mammalian brain, the large-amplitude slow oscillation (SO; ~1Hz) composed of alternating states of activity (ON/UP states) and silence (OFF/DOWN states) at the network and single cell levels. The SO is cortically generated and appears as a traveling wave that can propagate across the cortical surface and can invade the hippocampus. This cortical rhythm is thought to be imperative for sleep-dependent memory consolidation, potentially through increased interactions with the hippocampus. The SO is correlated with learning and its presumed enhancement via slow rhythmic electrical field stimulation improves subsequent mnemonic performance. However, the mechanism by which such field stimulation influences the dynamics of ongoing cortico-hippocampal communication is unknown. Here we show - using multi-site recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats - that sinusoidal electrical field stimulation applied to the frontal region of the cerebral cortex creates a platform for improved cortico-hippocampal communication. Moderate-intensity field stimulation entrained hippocampal slow activity (likely by way of the temporoammonic pathway) and also increased sharp-wave ripples, the signature memory replay events of the hippocampus, and further increased cortical spindles. Following cessation of high-intensity stimulation, SO interactions in the cortical-to-hippocampal direction were reduced, while the reversed hippocampal-to-cortical communication at both SO and gamma bandwidths was enhanced. Taken together, these findings suggest that cortical field stimulation may function to boost memory consolidation by strengthening cortico-hippocampal and hippocampo-cortical interplay at multiple nested frequencies in an intensity-dependent fashion.

  2. Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Electronic Health Records KidsHealth > For Teens > Electronic Health Records Print A A A What's in ... t happen overnight, they are coming. Understanding EHRs Electronic health records (EHR) — also called electronic medical records ( ...

  3. Your Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Your Medical Records KidsHealth > For Teens > Your Medical Records A ... Records? en español Tus historias clínicas What Are Medical Records? Each time you climb up on a ...

  4. Surgical medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15......A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15...

  5. Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Electronic Health Records KidsHealth > For Teens > Electronic Health Records A A A What's in this ... t happen overnight, they are coming. Understanding EHRs Electronic health records (EHR) — also called electronic medical records ( ...

  6. Spoken Records. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Helen

    Surveying 75 years of accomplishment in the field of spoken recording, this reference work critically evaluates commercially available recordings selected for excellence of execution, literary or historical merit, interest, and entertainment value. Some types of spoken records included are early recording, documentaries, lectures, interviews,…

  7. Severity of Cortical Thinning Correlates With Schizophrenia Spectrum Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Deanna; Shora, Lorie; Dillard-Broadnax, Diane; Gochman, Peter; Clasen, Liv S.; Berman, Rebecca A.; Rapoport, Judith L.; Gogtay, Nitin; Ordóñez, Anna E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the relationship between regional cortical gray matter thinning and symptoms of schizophrenia spectrum personality disorders (PDs) in siblings of patients with childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS). Method 66 siblings of patients with COS were assessed for symptoms of schizophrenia spectrum PDs (avoidant, paranoid, schizoid, schizotypal). Structural magnetic resonance images were obtained at approximately 2-year intervals from the siblings and from 62 healthy volunteers, matched for age, sex, ethnicity, and handedness. Cortical thickness measures were extracted. Mixed effect regression models were used to test the relationship between symptoms and cortical gray matter thickness. Cortical thinning was also tested longitudinally in healthy volunteers and siblings. Results Cortical thinning was found to correlate with symptoms of schizotypal and, to a lesser extent, schizoid PDs. Thinning was most pronounced in the left temporal and parietal lobes and right frontal and parietal regions. Gray matter loss was found to be continuous with that measured in COS. Longitudinal thinning trajectories were found not to differ between siblings and healthy volunteers. Conclusion The present investigation of cortical thinning in siblings of patients with COS indicates that symptoms of schizophrenia spectrum PDs correlate with regional gray matter loss. This finding supports the idea of cortical thinning as a schizophrenia endophenotype. PMID:26802780

  8. Cortical network reorganization guided by sensory input features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgard, Michael P; Pandya, Pritesh K; Engineer, Navzer D; Moucha, Raluca

    2002-12-01

    Sensory experience alters the functional organization of cortical networks. Previous studies using behavioral training motivated by aversive or rewarding stimuli have demonstrated that cortical plasticity is specific to salient inputs in the sensory environment. Sensory experience associated with electrical activation of the basal forebrain (BasF) generates similar input specific plasticity. By directly engaging plasticity mechanisms and avoiding extensive behavioral training, BasF stimulation makes it possible to efficiently explore how specific sensory features contribute to cortical plasticity. This review summarizes our observations that cortical networks employ a variety of strategies to improve the representation of the sensory environment. Different combinations of receptive-field, temporal, and spectrotemporal plasticity were generated in primary auditory cortex neurons depending on the pitch, modulation rate, and order of sounds paired with BasF stimulation. Simple tones led to map expansion, while modulated tones altered the maximum cortical following rate. Exposure to complex acoustic sequences led to the development of combination-sensitive responses. This remodeling of cortical response characteristics may reflect changes in intrinsic cellular mechanisms, synaptic efficacy, and local neuronal connectivity. The intricate relationship between the pattern of sensory activation and cortical plasticity suggests that network-level rules alter the functional organization of the cortex to generate the most behaviorally useful representation of the sensory environment.

  9. Impact of Spinal Manipulation on Cortical Drive to Upper and Lower Limb Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haavik, Heidi; Niazi, Imran Khan; Jochumsen, Mads; Sherwin, Diane; Flavel, Stanley; Türker, Kemal S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates whether spinal manipulation leads to changes in motor control by measuring the recruitment pattern of motor units in both an upper and lower limb muscle and to see whether such changes may at least in part occur at the cortical level by recording movement related cortical potential (MRCP) amplitudes. In experiment one, transcranial magnetic stimulation input–output (TMS I/O) curves for an upper limb muscle (abductor pollicus brevis; APB) were recorded, along with F waves before and after either spinal manipulation or a control intervention for the same subjects on two different days. During two separate days, lower limb TMS I/O curves and MRCPs were recorded from tibialis anterior muscle (TA) pre and post spinal manipulation. Dependent measures were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance, with p set at 0.05. Spinal manipulation resulted in a 54.5% ± 93.1% increase in maximum motor evoked potential (MEPmax) for APB and a 44.6% ± 69.6% increase in MEPmax for TA. For the MRCP data following spinal manipulation there were significant difference for amplitude of early bereitschafts-potential (EBP), late bereitschafts potential (LBP) and also for peak negativity (PN). The results of this study show that spinal manipulation leads to changes in cortical excitability, as measured by significantly larger MEPmax for TMS induced input–output curves for both an upper and lower limb muscle, and with larger amplitudes of MRCP component post manipulation. No changes in spinal measures (i.e., F wave amplitudes or persistence) were observed, and no changes were shown following the control condition. These results are consistent with previous findings that have suggested increases in strength following spinal manipulation were due to descending cortical drive and could not be explained by changes at the level of the spinal cord. Spinal manipulation may therefore be indicated for the patients who have lost tonus of their muscle and/or are

  10. Impact of Spinal Manipulation on Cortical Drive to Upper and Lower Limb Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Haavik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether spinal manipulation leads to changes in motor control by measuring the recruitment pattern of motor units in both an upper and lower limb muscle and to see whether such changes may at least in part occur at the cortical level by recording movement related cortical potential (MRCP amplitudes. In experiment one, transcranial magnetic stimulation input–output (TMS I/O curves for an upper limb muscle (abductor pollicus brevis; APB were recorded, along with F waves before and after either spinal manipulation or a control intervention for the same subjects on two different days. During two separate days, lower limb TMS I/O curves and MRCPs were recorded from tibialis anterior muscle (TA pre and post spinal manipulation. Dependent measures were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance, with p set at 0.05. Spinal manipulation resulted in a 54.5% ± 93.1% increase in maximum motor evoked potential (MEPmax for APB and a 44.6% ± 69.6% increase in MEPmax for TA. For the MRCP data following spinal manipulation there were significant difference for amplitude of early bereitschafts-potential (EBP, late bereitschafts potential (LBP and also for peak negativity (PN. The results of this study show that spinal manipulation leads to changes in cortical excitability, as measured by significantly larger MEPmax for TMS induced input–output curves for both an upper and lower limb muscle, and with larger amplitudes of MRCP component post manipulation. No changes in spinal measures (i.e., F wave amplitudes or persistence were observed, and no changes were shown following the control condition. These results are consistent with previous findings that have suggested increases in strength following spinal manipulation were due to descending cortical drive and could not be explained by changes at the level of the spinal cord. Spinal manipulation may therefore be indicated for the patients who have lost tonus of their muscle

  11. Patterns of cortical thinning in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Carme; Segura, Barbara; Baggio, Hugo Cesar; Abos, Alexandra; Marti, Maria Jose; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Compta, Yaroslau; Bargallo, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Clinical variability in the Parkinson's disease phenotype suggests the existence of disease subtypes. We investigated whether distinct anatomical patterns of atrophy can be identified in Parkinson's disease using a hypothesis‐free, data‐driven approach based on cortical thickness data. Methods T1‐weighted 3‐tesla MRI and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment were performed in a sample of 88 nondemented Parkinson's disease patients and 31 healthy controls. We performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of imaging data using Ward's linkage method. A general linear model with cortical thickness data was used to compare clustering groups. Results We observed 3 patterns of cortical thinning in patients when compared with healthy controls. Pattern 1 (n = 30, 34.09%) consisted of cortical atrophy in bilateral precentral gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, cuneus, posterior cingulate, and parahippocampal gyrus. These patients showed worse cognitive performance when compared with controls and the other 2 patterns. Pattern 2 (n = 29, 32.95%) consisted of cortical atrophy involving occipital and frontal as well as superior parietal areas and included patients with younger age at onset. Finally, in pattern 3 (n = 29, 32.95%), there was no detectable cortical thinning. Patients in the 3 patterns did not differ in disease duration, motor severity, dopaminergic medication doses, or presence of mild cognitive impairment. Conclusions Three cortical atrophy subtypes were identified in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients: (1) parieto‐temporal pattern of atrophy with worse cognitive performance, (2) occipital and frontal cortical atrophy and younger disease onset, and (3) patients without detectable cortical atrophy. These findings may help identify prognosis markers in Parkinson's disease. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement

  12. The changing roles of neurons in the cortical subplate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Friedlander

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons may serve different functions over the course of an organism’s life. Recent evidence suggests that cortical subplate neurons including those that reside in the white matter may perform longitudinal multi-tasking at different stages of development. These cells play a key role in early cortical development in coordinating thalamocortical reciprocal innervation. At later stages of development, they become integrated within the cortical microcircuitry. This type of longitudinal multi-tasking can enhance the capacity for information processing by populations of cells serving different functions over the lifespan. Subplate cells are initially derived when cells from the ventricular zone underlying the cortex migrate to the cortical preplate that is subsequently split by the differentiating neurons of the cortical plate with some neurons locating in the marginal zone and others settling below in the subplate (SP. While the cortical plate neurons form most of the cortical layers (layers 2-6, the marginal zone neurons form layer 1 and the SP neurons become interstitial cells of the white matter as well as forming a compact sublayer along the bottom of layer 6. After serving as transient innervation targets for thalamocortical axons, most of these cells die and layer 4 neurons become innervated by thalamic axons. However, 10-20% survives, remaining into adulthood along the bottom of layer 6 and as a scattered population of interstitial neurons in the white matter. Surviving subplate cells’ axons project throughout the overlying laminae, reaching layer 1 and issuing axon collaterals within white matter and in lower layer 6. This suggests that they participate in local synaptic networks, as well. Moreover, they receive excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs, potentially monitoring outputs from axon collaterals of cortical efferents, from cortical afferents and/or from each other. We explore our understanding of the functional connectivity of

  13. Stearic acid protects primary cultured cortical neurons against oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-jian WANG; Cui-ling LIANG; Guang-mei LI; Cai-yi YU; Ming YIN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effects of stearic acid against oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. Methods: Cortical neurons were exposed to glutamate,hydrogen peroxide (H202), or NaN3 insult in the presence or absence of stearic acid. Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by MTT assay and LDH release. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes activity[superoxide dismutases (SOD),glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation in cultured cortical neurons were evaluated using commercial kits. {3-[1(p-chloro-benzyl)-5-(isopropyl)-3-t-butylthiondol-2-yl]-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid, Na}[MK886; 5 pmol/L; a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR)α], bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; 100 μmol/L; an antagonist of PPARγ), and cycloheximide (CHX; 30 μmol/L, an inhibitor of protein synthesis)were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by stearic acid.Western blotting was used to determine the PPARγ protein level in cortical neurons.Results: Stearic acid dose-dependently protected cortical neurons against glutamate or H202 injury and increased glutamate uptake in cultured neurons.This protection was concomitant to the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and to the promotion activity of Cu/Zn SOD and CAT in cultured cortical neurons. Its neuroprotective effects were completely blocked by BADGE and CHX. After incubation with H2O2 for 24 h, the expression of the PPARγ protein decreased significantly (P<0.05), and the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on the expression of PPARγ can be attenuated by stearic acid. Conclusion: Stearic acid can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by boosting the internal antioxidant enzymes.Its neuroprotective effect may be mainly mediated by the activation of PPARγ and new protein synthesis in cortical neurons.

  14. Gamma Oscillations and Neural Field DCMs Can Reveal Cortical Excitability and Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Pinotsis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how gamma oscillations can be combined with neural population models and dynamic causal modeling (DCM to distinguish among alternative hypotheses regarding cortical excitability and microstructure. This approach exploits inter-subject variability and trial-specific effects associated with modulations in the peak frequency of gamma oscillations. Neural field models are used to evaluate model evidence and obtain parameter estimates using invasive and non-invasive gamma recordings. Our overview comprises two parts: in the first part, we use neural fields to simulate neural activity and distinguish the effects of post synaptic filtering on predicted responses in terms of synaptic rate constants that correspond to different timescales and distinct neurotransmitters. We focus on model predictions of conductance and convolution based field models and show that these can yield spectral responses that are sensitive to biophysical properties of local cortical circuits like synaptic kinetics and filtering; we also consider two different mechanisms for this filtering: a nonlinear mechanism involving specific conductances and a linear convolution of afferent firing rates producing post synaptic potentials. In the second part of this paper, we use neural fields quantitatively—to fit empirical data recorded during visual stimulation. We present two studies of spectral responses obtained from the visual cortex during visual perception experiments: in the first study, MEG data were acquired during a task designed to show how activity in the gamma band is related to visual perception, while in the second study, we exploited high density electrocorticographic (ECoG data to study the effect of varying stimulus contrast on cortical excitability and gamma peak frequency.

  15. Age of language acquisition and cortical language organization in multilingual patients undergoing awake brain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Coello, Alejandro; Havas, Viktória; Juncadella, Montserrat; Sierpowska, Joanna; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Gabarrós, Andreu

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Most knowledge regarding the anatomical organization of multilingualism is based on aphasiology and functional imaging studies. However, the results have still to be validated by the gold standard approach, namely electrical stimulation mapping (ESM) during awake neurosurgical procedures. In this ESM study the authors describe language representation in a highly specific group of 13 multilingual individuals, focusing on how age of acquisition may influence the cortical organization of language. METHODS Thirteen patients who had a high degree of proficiency in multiple languages and were harboring lesions within the dominant, left hemisphere underwent ESM while being operated on under awake conditions. Demographic and language data were recorded in relation to age of language acquisition (for native languages and early- and late-acquired languages), neuropsychological pre- and postoperative language testing, the number and location of language sites, and overlapping distribution in terms of language acquisition time. Lesion growth patterns and histopathological characteristics, location, and size were also recorded. The distribution of language sites was analyzed with respect to age of acquisition and overlap. RESULTS The functional language-related sites were distributed in the frontal (55%), temporal (29%), and parietal lobes (16%). The total number of native language sites was 47. Early-acquired languages (including native languages) were represented in 97 sites (55 overlapped) and late-acquired languages in 70 sites (45 overlapped). The overlapping distribution was 20% for early-early, 71% for early-late, and 9% for late-late. The average lesion size (maximum diameter) was 3.3 cm. There were 5 fast-growing and 7 slow-growing lesions. CONCLUSIONS Cortical language distribution in multilingual patients is not homogeneous, and it is influenced by age of acquisition. Early-acquired languages have a greater cortical representation than languages acquired

  16. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roxanne; Kim, David H; Millett, Peter J; Weissman, Barbara N

    2004-10-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed.

  17. Acute hepatic encephalopathy presenting as cortical laminar necrosis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Roh, Sook Young

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 55-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis who presented with status epilepticus. Laboratory analysis showed markedly elevated blood ammonia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed widespread cortical signal changes with restricted diffusion, involving both temporo-fronto-parietal cortex, while the perirolandic regions and occipital cortex were uniquely spared. A follow-up brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cortical atrophy with increased signals on T1-weighted images in both the basal ganglia and temporal lobe cortex, representing cortical laminar necrosis. We suggest that the brain lesions, in our case, represent a consequence of toxic effect of ammonia.

  18. Malformations of cortical development: 3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battal, Bilal; Ince, Selami; Akgun, Veysel; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ozcan, Emrah; Tasar, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development (MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images. PMID:26516429

  19. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff with cortical bone erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Roxanne; Kim, David H.; Millett, Peter J. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Weissman, Barbara N. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, Boston (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Calcifying tendinitis occurs most commonly in the rotator cuff tendons, particularly involving the supraspinatus tendon insertion, and is often asymptomatic. Cortical erosion secondary to calcifying tendinitis has been reported in multiple locations, including in the rotator cuff tendons. We present a pathologically proven case of symptomatic calcifying tendinitis involving the infraspinatus tendon with cortical erosion with correlative radiographic, CT, and MR findings. The importance of considering this diagnosis when evaluating lytic lesions of the humerus and the imaging differential diagnosis of calcifying tendinitis and cortical erosion are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Malformations of cortical development:3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bilal; Battal; Selami; Ince; Veysel; Akgun; Murat; Kocaoglu; Emrah; Ozcan; Mustafa; Tasar

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development(MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images.

  1. Bilateral Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia without Other Malformations: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Seok; Ahn Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Jin; Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Recent advances in MRI have revealed congenital brain malformations and subtle developmental abnormalities of the cerebral and cerebellar cortical architecture. Typical cerebellar cortical dysplasia as a newly categorized cerebellar malformation, has been seen in patients with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Cerebellar cortical dysplasia occurs at the embryonic stage and is often observed in healthy newborns. It is also incidentally and initially detected in adults without symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, cerebellar dysplasia without any related disorders is very rare. We describe the MRI findings in one patient with disorganized foliation of both cerebellar hemispheres without a related disorder or syndrome

  2. Acute hepatic encephalopathy presenting as cortical laminar necrosis: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Roh, Sook Young [Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Daejin Medical Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    We report on a 55-year-old man with alcoholic liver cirrhosis who presented with status epilepticus. Laboratory analysis showed markedly elevated blood ammonia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed widespread cortical signal changes with restricted diffusion, involving both temporo-fronto-parietal cortex, while the perirolandic regions and occipital cortex were uniquely spared. A follow-up brain MRI demonstrated diffuse cortical atrophy with increased signals on T1-weighted images in both the basal ganglia and temporal lobe cortex, representing cortical laminar necrosis. We suggest that the brain lesions, in our case, represent a consequence of toxic effect of ammonia.

  3. Cortical conditions for fused binocular vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, B D; Pritchard, R

    1968-07-01

    1. The behaviour of twenty-six single neurones has been studied in the visual cerebral cortex of the cat's neurologically isolated and unanaesthetized forebrain. In a separate series of experiments binocular vision was investigated in five human subjects.2. Units in the cat's brain were excited by two straight, light-dark edges, projected independently, one upon each retina; these edges were given identical, artificial saccadic movements. The average response of neurones was measured from the post-stimulus-histogram (P.S.H.), which provided the probability of unit-discharge at various times after the pattern movement.3. A district within either eye-field could usually be found, such that the saccadic movements of edges passing through this part of the field, caused maximal responses; this part of each field is termed the ;representative district'. The most exciting orientations of the stimulating patterns were similar for both eyes. A cell excited by similarly oriented patterns, ;aligned' through the representative districts for each eye, exhibited dramatic spatial summation. Mutual inhibition between retinal inputs was never seen.4. The response of cortical neurones to such aligned patterns was always greater than that when one pattern was misaligned by displacement in either direction from its representative district.5. When the pattern in one eye was inverted, the cell gave less response to aligned than to misaligned patterns.6. Human subjects, viewing similar inverted patterns through a mirror stereoscope, could only obtain stable fusion with a 5 min arc misalignment of the optic axes.7. In other experiments, one eye of each subject was presented with a white rectangular bar upon a black background, while the other eye was excited by a similar black bar upon a white background. Stable fusion was reported, providing percepts of either one single low contrast bar or two neighbouring bars of high contrast. There was a range of relative pattern positions over which

  4. Cortical field potentials associated with audio-initiated vocalization in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemba, H; Kyuhou, S; Matsuzaki, R; Amino, Y

    1999-09-03

    Five monkeys vocalizing at self-pace (self-paced vocalization) were well trained to vocalize in response to a monkey call (audio-initiated vocalization). Field potentials associated with audio-initiated vocalizations were recorded by using electrodes which were implanted chronically on the surface and at a 2.0-3.0 mm depth in various cortical areas. A surface-negative (s-N), depth-positive (d-P) potential (at about 70 ms latency after stimulus onset) was recorded in the rostral bank of the inferior limb of the arcuate sulcus in the left hemisphere, in which an insignificant potential was associated with self-paced vocalizations. An s-N, d-P slow potential which occurred in the motor and somatosensory cortices with a latency of about 300 ms after stimulus, started about 700 ms before vocalizations. The duration and amplitude of this potential was substantially the same with those of the potential which occurred with self-paced vocalizations. Reaction times from stimulus onset to vocalization start were variable, but were about 0.9s on the average. The findings were discussed in connection with reaction-time hand movements.

  5. Developing and Evaluating a Flexible Wireless Microcoil Array Based Integrated Interface for Epidural Cortical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke leads to serious long-term disability. Electrical epidural cortical stimulation has made significant improvements in stroke rehabilitation therapy. We developed a preliminary wireless implantable passive interface, which consists of a stimulating surface electrode, receiving coil, and single flexible passive demodulated circuit printed by flexible printed circuit (FPC technique and output pulse voltage stimulus by inductively coupling an external circuit. The wireless implantable board was implanted in cats’ unilateral epidural space for electrical stimulation of the primary visual cortex (V1 while the evoked responses were recorded on the contralateral V1 using a needle electrode. The wireless implantable board output stable monophasic voltage stimuli. The amplitude of the monophasic voltage output could be adjusted by controlling the voltage of the transmitter circuit within a range of 5–20 V. In acute experiment, cortico-cortical evoked potential (CCEP response was recorded on the contralateral V1. The amplitude of N2 in CCEP was modulated by adjusting the stimulation intensity of the wireless interface. These results demonstrated that a wireless interface based on a microcoil array can offer a valuable tool for researchers to explore electrical stimulation in research and the dura mater-electrode interface can effectively transmit electrical stimulation.

  6. Developing and Evaluating a Flexible Wireless Microcoil Array Based Integrated Interface for Epidural Cortical Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Chaudhry, Sharjeel A.; Hou, Wensheng; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Stroke leads to serious long-term disability. Electrical epidural cortical stimulation has made significant improvements in stroke rehabilitation therapy. We developed a preliminary wireless implantable passive interface, which consists of a stimulating surface electrode, receiving coil, and single flexible passive demodulated circuit printed by flexible printed circuit (FPC) technique and output pulse voltage stimulus by inductively coupling an external circuit. The wireless implantable board was implanted in cats’ unilateral epidural space for electrical stimulation of the primary visual cortex (V1) while the evoked responses were recorded on the contralateral V1 using a needle electrode. The wireless implantable board output stable monophasic voltage stimuli. The amplitude of the monophasic voltage output could be adjusted by controlling the voltage of the transmitter circuit within a range of 5–20 V. In acute experiment, cortico-cortical evoked potential (CCEP) response was recorded on the contralateral V1. The amplitude of N2 in CCEP was modulated by adjusting the stimulation intensity of the wireless interface. These results demonstrated that a wireless interface based on a microcoil array can offer a valuable tool for researchers to explore electrical stimulation in research and the dura mater-electrode interface can effectively transmit electrical stimulation. PMID:28165427

  7. Properties of persistent postnatal cortical subplate neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Reveron, Juan; Friedlander, Michael J

    2007-09-12

    Subplate (SP) neurons are important for the proper development of thalamocortical innervation. They are necessary for formation of ocular dominance and orientation columns in visual cortex. During the perinatal period, many SP neurons die. The surviving cohort forms interstitial cells in the white matter (WM) and a band of horizontally oriented cells below layer VI (layer VIb, layer VII, or subplate cells). Although the function of embryonic SP neurons has been well established, the functional roles of WM and postnatal SP cells are not known. We used a combination of anatomical, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological techniques to explore the dendritic morphology, neurotransmitter phenotype, intrinsic electrophysiological, and synaptic input properties of these surviving cells in the rat visual cortex. The density of SP and WM cells significantly decreases during the first month of life. Both populations express neuronal markers and have extensive dendritic arborizations within the SP, WM, and to the overlying visual cortex. Some intrinsic electrophysiological properties of SP and WM cells are similar: each generates high-frequency slowly adapting trains of action potentials in response to a sustained depolarization. However, SP cells exhibit greater frequency-dependent action potential broadening than WM neurons. Both cell types receive predominantly AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic input that undergoes paired-pulse facilitation as well as NMDA receptor and GABAergic input. Synaptic inputs to these cells can also undergo long-term synaptic plasticity. Thus, surviving SP and WM cells are functional electrogenic neurons integrated within the postnatal visual cortical circuit.

  8. "Apperceptive" alexia in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Mario F; Shapira, Jill S; Clark, David G

    2007-02-01

    The most common presenting complaint in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is reading difficulty. Although often described as an alexia without agraphia, alexia in PCA may have multiple causes, including a primary visuoperceptual etiology, attentional alexia, and central reading difficulty. This study evaluated 14 patients with early PCA and disturbances in reading ability in comparison to 14 normal controls. All 14 patients had a progressive disorder of complex visual functions and neuroimaging evidence of occipitoparietal dysfunction. They underwent a task requiring identification of single letters with and without flanking distractors. They also read single words consisting of regular English spelling or irregular grapheme-phoneme correspondence (irregular words) and pronounceable nonsense words (pseudowords). The PCA patients made errors in letter identification when letters were flanked by visually similar letters or numbers. They could read most single regular and irregular words but made visual errors and had particular trouble with pseudowords. They could not use a letter-by-letter reading strategy effectively. The PCA patients had similar difficulties on other visuoperceptual tests. These findings are consistent with an alexia manifested by perceptual and attentional difficulty on attempting serial visual processing of letters in the context of other letters. This "apperceptive alexia" results when the configuration of letters into words is impaired during letter-by-letter reading. Disproportionate difficulty reading pseudowords suggests an additional impairment in phonological processing. PCA patients have variable neuropathology and individual patients may have other contributions to their reading impairment.

  9. Possible Quantum Absorber Effects in Cortical Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Uwe

    The Wheeler-Feynman transactional "absorber" approach was proposed originally to account for anomalous resonance coupling between spatio-temporally distant measurement partners in entangled quantum states of so-called Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradoxes, e.g. of spatio-temporal non-locality, quantum teleportation, etc. Applied to quantum brain dynamics, however, this view provides an anticipative resonance coupling model for aspects of cortical synchronization and recurrent visual action control. It is proposed to consider the registered activation patterns of neuronal loops in so-called synfire chains not as a result of retarded brain communication processes, but rather as surface effects of a system of standing waves generated in the depth of visual processing. According to this view, they arise from a counterbalance between the actual input's delayed bottom-up data streams and top-down recurrent information-processing of advanced anticipative signals in a Wheeler-Feynman-type absorber mode. In the framework of a "time-loop" model, findings about mirror neurons in the brain cortex are suggested to be at least partially associated with temporal rather than spatial mirror functions of visual processing, similar to phase conjugate adaptive resonance-coupling in nonlinear optics.

  10. Canonical Coordinates for Retino-Cortical Magnification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Florack

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A geometric model for a biologically-inspired visual front-end is proposed, based on an isotropic, scale-invariant two-form field. The model incorporates a foveal property typical of biological visual systems, with an approximately linear decrease of resolution as a function of eccentricity, and by a physical size constant that measures the radius of the geometric foveola, the central region characterized by maximal resolving power. It admits a description in singularity-free canonical coordinates generalizing the familiar log-polar coordinates and reducing to these in the asymptotic case of negligibly-sized geometric foveola or, equivalently, at peripheral locations in the visual field. It has predictive power to the extent that quantitative geometric relationships pertaining to retino-cortical magnification along the primary visual pathway, such as receptive field size distribution and spatial arrangement in retina and striate cortex, can be deduced in a principled manner. The biological plausibility of the model is demonstrated by comparison with known facts of human vision.

  11. Cortical activity during rotational and linear transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J; Howard, R J; Senior, C; Brammer, M; Bullmore, E T; Simmons, A; Woodruff, P; David, A S

    2000-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of cortical activation during image transformation tasks have shown that mental rotation may rely on similar brain regions as those underlying visual perceptual mechanisms. The V5 complex, which is specialised for visual motion, is one region that has been implicated. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate rotational and linear transformation of stimuli. Areas of significant brain activation were identified for each of the primary mental transformation tasks in contrast to its own perceptual reference task which was cognitively matched in all respects except for the variable of interest. Analysis of group data for perception of rotational and linear motion showed activation in areas corresponding to V5 as defined in earlier studies. Both rotational and linear mental transformations activated Brodman Area (BA) 19 but did not activate V5. An area within the inferior temporal gyrus, representing an inferior satellite area of V5, was activated by both the rotational perception and rotational transformation tasks, but showed no activation in response to linear motion perception or transformation. The findings demonstrate the extent to which neural substrates for image transformation and perception overlap and are distinct as well as revealing functional specialisation within perception and transformation processing systems.

  12. Workbench surface editor of brain cortical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Douglas E.; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Serra, Luis

    1996-04-01

    We have developed a 3D reach-in tool to manually reconstruct 3D cortical surface patches from 2D brain atlas images. The first application of our cortex editor is building 3D functional maps, specifically Brodmann's areas. This tool may also be useful in clinical practice to adjust incorrectly mapped atlas regions due to the deforming effect of lesions. The cortex editor allows a domain expert to control the correlation of control points across slices. Correct correlation has been difficult for 3D reconstruction algorithms because the atlas slices are far apart and because of the complex topology of the cortex which differs so much from slice to slice. Also, higher precision of the resulting surfaces is demanded since these define 3D brain atlas features upon which future stereotactic surgery may be based. The cortex editor described in this paper provides a tool suitable for a domain expert to use in defining the 3D surface of a Brodmann's area.

  13. Lumbar pedicle cortical bone trajectory screw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Tengfei; Wellington K Hsu; Ye Tianwen

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the lumbar pedicle cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw fixation technique,a new fixation technique for lumbar surgery.Data sources The data analyzed in this review are mainly from articles reported in PubMed published from 1994 to 2014.Study selection Original articles and critical reviews relevant to CBT technique and lumbar pedicle fixation were selected.Results CBT technique was firstly introduced as a new fixation method for lumbar pedicle surgery in 2009.The concepts,morphometric study,biomechanical characteristics and clinical applications of CBT technique were reviewed.The insertional point of CBT screw is located at the lateral point of the pars interarticularis,and its trajectory follows a caudocephalad path sagittally and a laterally directed path in the transverse plane.CBT technique can be used for posterior fixation during lumbar fusion procedures.This technique is a minimally invasive surgery,which affords better biomechanical stability,fixation strength and surgical safety.Therefore,CBT technique has the greatest benefit in lumbar pedicle surgery for patients with osteoporosis and obesity.Conclusion CBT technique is a better alternative option of lumbar pedicle fixation,especially for patients with osteoporosis and obesity.

  14. Cortical visual impairment: Characteristics and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the latest studies, Cortical visual impairment – CVI is one of the most common causes of problems and difficulties in visual functioning. It results from the impairment of the central part of visual system, i.e. visual cortex, posterior visual pathway, or both. The diagnosis is usually made in the first three years of life. The aim of this paper is to present the characteristics of children with CVI, and the strategies used for treatment. CVI has a negative impact on almost all developmental domains, visual-perceptive skills, motor skills, cognitive skills, and social skills. In children with CVI, vision ranges from the total inability to see to minimal visual perceptive difficulties, while more than 50% have multiple disabilities. Due to the progress in understanding the patterns of neuron activity and neuroplasticity, as well as the intensive studies of strengths and weaknesses of children with CVI, special treatment has been designed and performed in the last few decades, which provides optimal visual functioning in everyday life for these children.

  15. The cortical dynamics of intelligible speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Alexander P; Schofield, Thomas M; Stephan, Klass E; Crinion, Jennifer T; Friston, Karl J; Price, Cathy J

    2008-12-03

    An important and unresolved question is how the human brain processes speech for meaning after initial analyses in early auditory cortical regions. A variety of left-hemispheric areas have been identified that clearly support semantic processing, although a systematic analysis of directed interactions among these areas is lacking. We applied dynamic causal modeling of functional magnetic resonance imaging responses and Bayesian model selection to investigate, for the first time, experimentally induced changes in coupling among three key multimodal regions that were activated by intelligible speech: the posterior and anterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS and aSTS, respectively) and pars orbitalis (POrb) of the inferior frontal gyrus. We tested 216 different dynamic causal models and found that the best model was a "forward" system that was driven by auditory inputs into the pSTS, with forward connections from the pSTS to both the aSTS and the POrb that increased considerably in strength (by 76 and 150%, respectively) when subjects listened to intelligible speech. Task-related, directional effects can now be incorporated into models of speech comprehension.

  16. Pathogenetic mechanisms of focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Guerrini, Renzo; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2014-07-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) constitute a prevalent cause of intractable epilepsy in children, and is one of the leading conditions requiring epilepsy surgery. Despite recent advances in the cellular and molecular biology of these conditions, the pathogenetic mechanisms of FCDs remain largely unknown. The purpose if this work is to review the molecular underpinnings of FCDs and to highlight potential therapeutic targets. A systematic review of the literature regarding the histologic, molecular, and electrophysiologic aspects of FCDs was conducted. Disruption of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling comprises a common pathway underlying the structural and electrical disturbances of some FCDs. Other mechanisms such as viral infections, prematurity, head trauma, and brain tumors are also posited. mTOR inhibitors (i.e., rapamycin) have shown positive results on seizure management in animal models and in a small cohort of patients with FCD. Encouraging progress has been achieved on the molecular and electrophysiologic basis of constitutive cells in the dysplastic tissue. Despite the promising results of mTOR inhibitors, large-scale randomized trials are in need to evaluate their efficacy and side effects, along with additional mechanistic studies for the development of novel, molecular-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Abnormal resting-state cortical coupling in chronic tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langguth Berthold

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subjective tinnitus is characterized by an auditory phantom perception in the absence of any physical sound source. Consequently, in a quiet environment, tinnitus patients differ from control participants because they constantly perceive a sound whereas controls do not. We hypothesized that this difference is expressed by differential activation of distributed cortical networks. Results The analysis was based on a sample of 41 participants: 21 patients with chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy control participants. To investigate the architecture of these networks, we used phase locking analysis in the 1–90 Hz frequency range of a minute of resting-state MEG recording. We found: 1 For tinnitus patients: A significant decrease of inter-areal coupling in the alpha (9–12 Hz band and an increase of inter-areal coupling in the 48–54 Hz gamma frequency range relative to the control group. 2 For both groups: an inverse relationship (r = -.71 of the alpha and gamma network coupling. 3 A discrimination of 83% between the patient and the control group based on the alpha and gamma networks. 4 An effect of manifestation on the distribution of the gamma network: In patients with a tinnitus history of less than 4 years, the left temporal cortex was predominant in the gamma network whereas in patients with tinnitus duration of more than 4 years, the gamma network was more widely distributed including more frontal and parietal regions. Conclusion In the here presented data set we found strong support for an alteration of long-range coupling in tinnitus. Long-range coupling in the alpha frequency band was decreased for tinnitus patients while long-range gamma coupling was increased. These changes discriminate well between tinnitus and control participants. We propose a tinnitus model that integrates this finding in the current knowledge about tinnitus. Furthermore we discuss the impact of this finding to tinnitus therapies using Transcranial

  18. Top-down interference and cortical responsiveness in face processing: a TMS-EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattavelli, Giulia; Rosanova, Mario; Casali, Adenauer G; Papagno, Costanza; Romero Lauro, Leonor J

    2013-08-01

    Neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have shown the involvement of a fronto-temporo-occipital network in face processing, but the functional relation among these areas remains unclear. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) to explore the local and global cortical excitability at rest and during two different face processing behavioral tasks. Single-pulse TMS was delivered (100 ms after face stimulus onset) over the right medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during a face identity or a face expression matching task, while continuous EEG was recorded using a 60-channel TMS-compatible amplifier. We examined TMS effects on the occipital face-specific ERP component and compared TMS-evoked potentials (TEPs) recorded during task performance and a passive point fixation control task. TMS reduced the P1-N1 component recorded at the occipital electrodes. Moreover, performing face tasks significantly modulated TEPs recorded at the occipital and temporal electrodes within the first 30 ms after right mPFC stimulation, with a specific increase of temporal TEPs in the right hemisphere for the facial expression task. Furthermore, in order to test the site-specificity of the reported effects, TMS was applied over the right premotor cortex (PMC) as a control site using the same experimental paradigm. Results showed that TMS over the right PMC did not affect ERP components in posterior regions during the face tasks and TEP amplitude did not change between task and no task condition, either at fronto-central electrodes near the stimulation or at temporal and occipital electrodes. These findings support the notion that the prefrontal cortex exerts a very early influence over the occipital cortex during face processing tasks and that excitability across right fronto-temporal cortical regions is significantly modulated during explicit facial expression processing.

  19. Attention-dependent early cortical suppression contributes to crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; He, Yingchen; Zhu, Ziyun; Zhou, Tiangang; Peng, Yujia; Zhang, Xilin; Fang, Fang

    2014-08-01

    Crowding, the identification difficulty for a target in the presence of nearby flankers, is ubiquitous in spatial vision and is considered a bottleneck of object recognition and visual awareness. Despite its significance, the neural mechanisms of crowding are still unclear. Here, we performed event-related potential and fMRI experiments to measure the cortical interaction between the target and flankers in human subjects. We found that the magnitude of the crowding effect was closely associated with an early suppressive cortical interaction. The cortical suppression was reflected in the earliest event-related potential component (C1), which originated in V1, and in the BOLD signal in V1, but not other higher cortical areas. Intriguingly, spatial attention played a critical role in the manifestation of the suppression. These findings provide direct and converging evidence that attention-dependent V1 suppression contributes to crowding at a very early stage of visual processing.

  20. Disorganized Cortical Patches Suggest Prenatal Origin of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 Disorganized cortical patches suggest prenatal origin of autism NIH-funded study shows disrupted cell layering process ... study suggests that brain irregularities in children with autism can be traced back to prenatal development. “While ...

  1. Cortical laminar necrosis in brain infarcts: chronological changes on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan); Yasui, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    We studied the MRI characteristics of cortical laminar necrosis in ischaemic stroke. We reviewed 13 patients with cortical laminar high signal on T1-weighted images to analyse the chronological changes in signal intensity and contrast enhancement. High-density cortical lesions began to appear on T1-weighted images about 2 weeks after the ictus. At 1-2 months they were prominent. They began to fade from 3 months but could be seen up to 11 months. These cortical lesions showed isointensity or high intensity on T2-weighted images and did not show low intensity at any stage. Contrast enhancement of the laminar lesions was prominent at 1-2 months and became less apparent from 3 months, but could be seen up to 8 months. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Bilaterally symmetric focal cortical dysplasia in a golden retriever dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, K M; Bollen, A W; Winger, K M; Vernau, K M; Dickinson, P J; Higgins, R J; Sisó, S

    2014-11-01

    A 10-year-old golden retriever dog was referred with a 24-h history of generalized seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain found no abnormalities on 3 mm transverse sections and the dog was subsequently humanely destroyed. Microscopically there was bilaterally symmetrical focal disorganization of cortical grey matter within the tips of the right and left suprasylvian gyri of the temporal cortex. The focal abnormal cortical lamination was characterized by loss of pyramidal neurons with abnormal, irregular, angular, remaining neurons occasionally forming clusters, surrounded by fibrillary astrogliosis and microgliosis and vascular proliferation. These histological findings are consistent with focal cortical dysplasia, a cerebral cortical malformation that causes seizures in people, but not reported previously in the dog.

  3. Time-coherent expansion of MEG/EEG cortical sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Olivier; Garnero, Line

    2002-11-01

    In this study we estimated the spatial extent of cortical areas of time-coherent activity using the inverse problem in magneto/electroencephalography (MEEG). The model discussed here uses classical regularization tools in order to force the inverse solution to be piecewise coherent. First, the cortex was seeded by focal dipolar sources. Then, a time-coherent expansion (TCE) onto the cortical surface was performed in order to obtain surface source models composed of patches with uniform current density. Patches represent extended cortical regions with one single time course per active area. Results obtained from synthetic data show that using the TCE method is relevant even with a low signal-to-noise ratio, although the final estimation is often slightly biased. We applied the TCE method to evoked magnetic fields obtained after electrical stimulation of fingers in order to estimate the somatotopic cortical maps of the primary somatosensory cortex.

  4. Imaging characteristics of two patients with isolated cortical venous thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shunchang Han; Hui Zhang; Guoguang Fan; Baohai Sun

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Over the past twenty years, improvements in neuroimaging have greatly improved the ability to diagnose cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, as well as isolated cortical venous thrombosis. Neuroimaging allows for variations to be detected in the cortical vein and venous sinus. Diagnosis of thromboses in the venous system should not depend entirely on angiography of undeveloped veins or venous sinus. Currently, the combination of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography is the gold standard for diagnosing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, rather than digital subtraction angiography. This article summarizes clinical manifestations, results from computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in two cases of isolated cortical venous thrombosis, analyzed relevant literature, and discussed the clinical and imaging characteristics of isolated cortical venous thromboses.

  5. Distinct recurrent versus afferent dynamics in cortical visual processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Kimberly; Lien, Anthony D; Scanziani, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    How intracortical recurrent circuits in mammalian sensory cortex influence dynamics of sensory representation is not understood. Previous methods could not distinguish the relative contributions of recurrent circuits and thalamic afferents to cortical dynamics. We accomplish this by optogenetically manipulating thalamus and cortex. Over the initial 40 ms of visual stimulation, excitation from recurrent circuits in visual cortex progressively increased to exceed direct thalamocortical excitation. Even when recurrent excitation exceeded thalamic excitation, upon silencing thalamus, sensory-evoked activity in cortex decayed rapidly, with a time constant of 10 ms, which is similar to a neuron's integration time window. In awake mice, this cortical decay function predicted the time-locking of cortical activity to thalamic input at frequencies thalamocortical synapses disrupted the fidelity of sensory transmission. Thus, we determine dynamics intrinsic to cortical recurrent circuits that transform afferent input in time.

  6. Assortment of GABAergic plasticity in the cortical interneuron melting pot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Pablo; Bacci, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Cortical structures of the adult mammalian brain are characterized by a spectacular diversity of inhibitory interneurons, which use GABA as neurotransmitter. GABAergic neurotransmission is fundamental for integrating and filtering incoming information and dictating postsynaptic neuronal spike timing, therefore providing a tight temporal code used by each neuron, or ensemble of neurons, to perform sophisticated computational operations. However, the heterogeneity of cortical GABAergic cells is associated to equally diverse properties governing intrinsic excitability as well as strength, dynamic range, spatial extent, anatomical localization, and molecular components of inhibitory synaptic connections that they form with pyramidal neurons. Recent studies showed that similarly to their excitatory (glutamatergic) counterparts, also inhibitory synapses can undergo activity-dependent changes in their strength. Here, some aspects related to plasticity and modulation of adult cortical and hippocampal GABAergic synaptic transmission will be reviewed, aiming at providing a fresh perspective towards the elucidation of the role played by specific cellular elements of cortical microcircuits during both physiological and pathological operations.

  7. Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type IIB and Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA tested the hypothesis that human papillomavirus type 16 oncoprotein E6 (HPV16 E6 is present in human focal cortical dysplasia type IIB (FCDIIB specimens.

  8. Cross-modal synaptic plasticity in adult primary sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Whitt, Jessica L

    2015-12-01

    Sensory loss leads to widespread adaptation of brain circuits to allow an organism to navigate its environment with its remaining senses, which is broadly referred to as cross-modal plasticity. Such adaptation can be observed even in the primary sensory cortices, and falls into two distinct categories: recruitment of the deprived sensory cortex for processing the remaining senses, which we term 'cross-modal recruitment', and experience-dependent refinement of the spared sensory cortices referred to as 'compensatory plasticity.' Here we will review recent studies demonstrating that cortical adaptation to sensory loss involves LTP/LTD and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Cross-modal synaptic plasticity is observed in adults, hence cross-modal sensory deprivation may be an effective way to promote plasticity in adult primary sensory cortices.

  9. Cortical desmoid of the humerus: radiographic and MRI correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Matthew; Counsel, Peter [Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Perth (Australia); Perth Radiological Clinic, Perth (Australia); Wood, David [Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Perth (Australia); Breidahl, William [Perth Radiological Clinic, Perth (Australia)

    2017-07-15

    Cortical desmoids are self-limiting fibro-osseous lesions commonly occurring at the medial supracondylar femur in active adolescents, at either the origin of the medial head of the gastrocnemius or at the insertion of the adductor magnus aponeurosis. Less commonly, in a similar demographic, cortical desmoids may occur in the proximal humerus medially at the insertion of the pectoralis major muscle or laterally at the insertion of the deltoid. The radiographic appearance of the proximal humerus cortical desmoid has been described previously, but not the MRI appearance. We present the radiographic and MRI appearances of a proximal humerus cortical desmoid in a young adolescent who presented for investigation of right shoulder pain. (orig.)

  10. Effects of deuterium oxide and galvanic vestibular stimulation on visual cortical cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinis, S; Landolt, J P; Weiss, D S; Money, K E

    1984-03-01

    /he spontaneous and evoked unit activities of complex visual cortical cells were recorded from Brodmann's area 18 in immobilized, unanesthetized cats before, during, and after stimulation of the vestibular system. The vestibular system was stimulated by intravenous injection of deuterium oxide (D2O)--a noted nystagmogenic agent (14)--or by direct galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth. Measures of the receptive-field areas, poststimulus time histograms, directional preferences, and the optimal speed of the light bar stimulating the cell were obtained before and after the application of D2O. Directional preferences were determined in a novel manner, using a method derived from a hierarchical clustering technique (19). Data were collected and analyzed from a) visual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths, b) visual cortical cells in cats following bilateral labrinthectomies, and c) nonvisual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths. In cats with intact labyrinths, D2O changed the optimal length of the light bar that was able to stimulate the cortical cell as well as the path on which it evoked the response of the cell. Both values, which constitute the receptive field of the cell, changed approximately proportionately. This effect usually lasts for less than 4.5 h. The other cellular characteristics were also altered by the D2O. Galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth resembles, in its effects, the injection of D2O. In labyrinth-intact cats, the time course of area 18 spontaneous activity dramatically increased 30 min or more after D2O was administered. It peaked 2-3 h later and still had not returned to preinjection levels even 7 h after the D2O administration. In bilaterally labyrinthectomized cats, the spontaneous activity of the visual cells (and the other cellular characteristics studied) did not change following D2O administration. In nonvisual cells from labyrinth-intact cats, the spontaneous activity demonstrated a slight but significant decrease

  11. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation modulates cortical neuronal activity in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eMarceglia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG showed that Alzheimer’s disease (AD is characterized by increased theta power, decreased alpha and beta power, and decreased coherence in the alpha and theta band in posterior regions. These abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas, death of cortical neurons, axonal pathology, and cholinergic deficits. Since transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS over the temporo-parietal area is thought to have beneficial effects in patients with AD, in this study we aimed to investigate whether tDCS benefits are related to tDCS-induced changes in cortical activity, as represented by qEEG.A weak anodal current (1.5 mA, 15 min was delivered bilaterally over the temporal-parietal lobe to 7 subjects with probable AD (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE score >20. EEG (21 electrodes, 10-20 international system was recorded for 5 minutes with eyes closed before (baseline, t0 and 30 minutes after anodal and cathodal tDCS ended (t1. At the same time points, patients performed a Word Recognition Task (WRT to assess working memory functions. The spectral power and the inter- and intra-hemispheric EEG coherence in different frequency bands (e.g., low frequencies, including delta and theta; high frequencies, including alpha and beta were calculated for each subject at t0 and t1. tDCS-induced changes in EEG neurophysiological markers were correlated with the performance of patients at the WRT.At baseline, qEEG features in AD patients confirmed that the decreased high frequency power was correlated with lower MMSE. After anodal tDCS, we observed an increase in the high-frequency power in the temporo-parietal area and an increase in the temporo-parieto-occipital coherence that correlated with the improvement at the WRT. In addition, cathodal tDCS produced a non-specific effect of decreased theta power all over the scalp that was not correlated with the clinical

  12. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Cortical Neuronal Activity in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceglia, Sara; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Rosa, Manuela; Ferrucci, Roberta; Mameli, Francesca; Vergari, Maurizio; Arlotti, Mattia; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Scarpini, Elio; Galimberti, Daniela; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) showed that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by increased theta power, decreased alpha and beta power, and decreased coherence in the alpha and theta band in posterior regions. These abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas, death of cortical neurons, axonal pathology, and cholinergic deficits. Since transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the temporo-parietal area is thought to have beneficial effects in patients with AD, in this study we aimed to investigate whether tDCS benefits are related to tDCS-induced changes in cortical activity, as represented by qEEG. A weak anodal current (1.5 mA, 15 min) was delivered bilaterally over the temporal-parietal lobe to seven subjects with probable AD (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE score >20). EEG (21 electrodes, 10-20 international system) was recorded for 5 min with eyes closed before (baseline, t0) and 30 min after anodal and cathodal tDCS ended (t1). At the same time points, patients performed a Word Recognition Task (WRT) to assess working memory functions. The spectral power and the inter- and intra-hemispheric EEG coherence in different frequency bands (e.g., low frequencies, including delta and theta; high frequencies, including alpha and beta) were calculated for each subject at t0 and t1. tDCS-induced changes in EEG neurophysiological markers were correlated with the performance of patients at the WRT. At baseline, qEEG features in AD patients confirmed that the decreased high frequency power was correlated with lower MMSE. After anodal tDCS, we observed an increase in the high-frequency power in the temporo-parietal area and an increase in the temporo-parieto-occipital coherence that correlated with the improvement at the WRT. In addition, cathodal tDCS produced a non-specific effect of decreased theta power all over the scalp that was not correlated with the clinical observation at the WRT

  13. Impaired consciousness in temporal lobe seizures: role of cortical slow activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J.; Yang, Li; Hamid, Hamada; Danielson, Nathan; Bai, Xiaoxiao; Marfeo, Anthony; Yu, Lissa; Gordon, Aliza; Purcaro, Michael J.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Agarwal, Ravi; Ellens, Damien J.; Golomb, Julie D.; Shamy, Michel C. F.; Zhang, Heping; Carlson, Chad; Doyle, Werner; Devinsky, Orrin; Vives, Kenneth; Spencer, Dennis D.; Spencer, Susan S.; Schevon, Catherine; Zaveri, Hitten P.

    2010-01-01

    Impaired consciousness requires altered cortical function. This can occur either directly from disorders that impair widespread bilateral regions of the cortex or indirectly through effects on subcortical arousal systems. It has therefore long been puzzling why focal temporal lobe seizures so often impair consciousness. Early work suggested that altered consciousness may occur with bilateral or dominant temporal lobe seizure involvement. However, other bilateral temporal lobe disorders do not impair consciousness. More recent work supports a ‘network inhibition hypothesis’ in which temporal lobe seizures disrupt brainstem–diencephalic arousal systems, leading indirectly to depressed cortical function and impaired consciousness. Indeed, prior studies show subcortical involvement in temporal lobe seizures and bilateral frontoparietal slow wave activity on intracranial electroencephalography. However, the relationships between frontoparietal slow waves and impaired consciousness and between cortical slowing and fast seizure activity have not been directly investigated. We analysed intracranial electroencephalography recordings during 63 partial seizures in 26 patients with surgically confirmed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Behavioural responsiveness was determined based on blinded review of video during seizures and classified as impaired (complex-partial seizures) or unimpaired (simple-partial seizures). We observed significantly increased delta-range 1–2 Hz slow wave activity in the bilateral frontal and parietal neocortices during complex-partial compared with simple-partial seizures. In addition, we confirmed prior work suggesting that propagation of unilateral mesial temporal fast seizure activity to the bilateral temporal lobes was significantly greater in complex-partial than in simple-partial seizures. Interestingly, we found that the signal power of frontoparietal slow wave activity was significantly correlated with the temporal lobe fast seizure

  14. Characterization of Cortical Networks and Corticocortical Functional Connectivity Mediating Arbitrary Visuomotor Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovelli, Andrea; Chicharro, Daniel; Badier, Jean-Michel; Wang, Huifang; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-09-16

    noninvasive recordings of human brain activity to reveal the cortical networks and corticocortical functional connectivity mediating visuomotor mappings. Parietal areas were found to play a driving role in the network, whereas premotor areas acted as relays from parietal to medial prefrontal cortices, which played a receiving role. Overall, our approach and results provide novel perspectives toward a better understanding of how distributed brain activity coordinates adaptive behaviors. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3512643-16$15.00/0.

  15. Neuroprotective effect of interleukin-6 regulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels of cortical neurons is time- and dose-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 has been shown to be involved in nerve injury and nerve regeneration, but the effects of long-term administration of high concentrations of interleukin-6 on neurons in the central nervous system is poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of 24 hour exposure of interleukin-6 on cortical neurons at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 5 and 10 ng/mL and the effects of 10 ng/mL interleukin-6 exposure to cortical neurons for various durations (2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours by studying voltage-gated Na + channels using a patch-clamp technique. Voltage-clamp recording results demonstrated that interleukin-6 suppressed Na + currents through its receptor in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but did not alter voltage-dependent activation and inactivation. Current-clamp recording results were consistent with voltage-clamp recording results. Interleukin-6 reduced the action potential amplitude of cortical neurons, but did not change the action potential threshold. The regulation of voltage-gated Na + channels in rat cortical neurons by interleukin-6 is time- and dose-dependent.

  16. Neuroprotective effect of interleukin-6 regulation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels of cortical neurons is time- and dose-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Peng, Guo-Yi; Sheng, Jiang-Tao; Zhu, Fang-Fang; Guo, Jing-Fang; Chen, Wei-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Interleukin-6 has been shown to be involved in nerve injury and nerve regeneration, but the effects of long-term administration of high concentrations of interleukin-6 on neurons in the central nervous system is poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of 24 hour exposure of interleukin-6 on cortical neurons at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 5 and 10 ng/mL) and the effects of 10 ng/mL interleukin-6 exposure to cortical neurons for various durations (2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours) by studying voltage-gated Na(+) channels using a patch-clamp technique. Voltage-clamp recording results demonstrated that interleukin-6 suppressed Na(+) currents through its receptor in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but did not alter voltage-dependent activation and inactivation. Current-clamp recording results were consistent with voltage-clamp recording results. Interleukin-6 reduced the action potential amplitude of cortical neurons, but did not change the action potential threshold. The regulation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels in rat cortical neurons by interleukin-6 is time- and dose-dependent.

  17. Neuroprotective effect of interleukin-6 regulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels of cortical neurons is time- and dose-dependent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xia; Guo-yi Peng; Jiang-tao Sheng; Fang-fang Zhu; Jing-fang Guo; Wei-qiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-6 has been shown to be involved in nerve injury and nerve regeneration, but the effects of long-term administration of high concentrations of interleukin-6 on neurons in the central nervous system is poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of 24 hour expo-sure of interleukin-6 on cortical neurons at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 5 and 10 ng/mL) and the effects of 10 ng/mL interleukin-6 exposure to cortical neurons for various durations (2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 hours) by studying voltage-gated Na+ channels using a patch-clamp technique. Volt-age-clamp recording results demonstrated that interleukin-6 suppressed Na+ currents through its receptor in a time- and dose-dependent manner, but did not alter voltage-dependent activation and inactivation. Current-clamp recording results were consistent with voltage-clamp recording results. Interleukin-6 reduced the action potential amplitude of cortical neurons, but did not change the action potential threshold. The regulation of voltage-gated Na+channels in rat corti-cal neurons by interleukin-6 is time- and dose-dependent.

  18. Cortical and medullary vascularity in renal allograft biopsies

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the relation between cortical and medullary peritubular capillaries (PTCs) and scarring. There are presently no studies about medullary PTCs in renal allograft biopsies. Materials and methods: Nonprotocol allograft biopsies were evaluated and 41 with adequate medullary and cortical tissues were selected. Vascular structures were counted separately at the medulla and cortex on anti-CD34 stained sections. Other histopathological and clinical findings were retrieved from the p...

  19. The Effects of Dopamine and Estrogen upon Cortical Parvalbumin Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    positive interneurons because studies indicate that the parvalbumin containing subclass of GABAergic neurons are contacted by mesocortical dopamine fibers...that both dopamine and estrogen enhance the maturation of cortical interneurons that express the calcium binding protein, parvalbumin , in the developing... parvalbumin expression in the deep cortical layers in the in vivo model. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are located on parvalbumin containing interneurons

  20. Transient cortical blindness after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhaneni, Raghuveer; Jim, Jeffrey; Derdeyn, Colin P; Sanchez, Luis A

    2011-05-01

    We report a patient who presented with transient cortical blindness 12 hours after completion of a thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair. Computed tomography of the brain demonstrated no acute findings. The patient's symptoms resolved spontaneously after 72 hours. To our knowledge, this is the first report of transient cortical blindness after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. This is an uncommon diagnosis that is important to recognize in a modern vascular surgery practice.

  1. Cortical contributions to the flail leg syndrome: Pathophysiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Parvathi; Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Yiannikas, Con; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperexcitability has been identified as an intrinsic feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Consequently, the aim of the present study was to determine whether cortical hyperexcitability formed the pathophysiological basis for the flail leg syndrome (FL), an atypical ALS variant. Cortical excitability studies were undertaken on 18 FL patients, using the threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technique, and results were compared to healthy controls, upper and lower limb-onset ALS as well as bulbar-onset and the flail arm variant ALS. Results showed that cortical hyperexcitability was a feature of FL and was heralded by a significant reduction of short-interval intracortical inhibition (FL 7.2 ± 1.8%; controls 13.2 ± 0.8%, p <0.01) and cortical silent period (CSP) duration (FL 181.7 ± 10.8ms; controls 209.8 ± 3.4ms; p <0.05) along with an increase in motor evoked potential amplitude (FL 29.2 ± 5.1%; controls 18.9 ± 1.2%, p <0.05). The degree of cortical hyperexcitability was comparable between FL and other ALS phenotypes, defined by site of disease onset. In addition, the CSP duration correlated with biomarkers of peripheral neurodegeneration in FL. In conclusion, cortical hyperexcitability is a feature of the flail leg syndrome, being comparable to other ALS phenotypes. Importantly, cortical hyperexcitability correlates with neurodegeneration, and as such may contribute to the underlying pathophysiology in FL.

  2. Cortical spreading depression in migraine-time to reconsider?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J McComas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available New evidence concerning the pathophysiology of migraine has come from the results of therapeutic transcranial magnetic stimulation (tTMS. The instantaneous responses to single pulses applied during the aura or headache phase, together with a number of other observations, make it unlikely that cortical spreading depression is involved in migraine. tTMS is considered to act by abolishing abnormal impulse activity in cortical pyramidal neurons and a suggestion is made as to how this activity could arise.

  3. Peptides Regulate Cortical Thymocytes Differentiation, Proliferation, and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kh. Khavinson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis were studied in a cell culture of human cortical thymocytes under the influence of short peptides T-32 (Glu-Asp-Ala and T-38 (Lys-Glu-Asp. Peptides T-32 and T-38 amplified cortical thymocytes differentiation towards regulatory T cells, increased their proliferative activity, and decreased the level of apoptosis. Moreover, peptides under study stimulated proliferative and antiapoptotic activity of the mature regulatory T cells.

  4. Vessel Activity Record

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Activity Record is a bi-weekly spreadsheet that shows the status of fishing vessels. It records whether fishing vessels are fishing without an observer...

  5. Climate Record Books

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climate Record Books contain daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual averages, extremes, or occurrences. Most data are sequential by period of record 1871-1910,...

  6. Iraq Radiosonde Launch Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Iraqi upper air records loaned to NCDC from the Air Force 14th Weather Squadron. Scanned notebooks containing upper air radiosonde launch records and data. Launches...

  7. Daily Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These daily weather records were compiled from a subset of stations in the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN)-Daily dataset. A weather record is...

  8. Transient Voltage Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Simpson, Howard J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A voltage transient recorder can detect lightning induced transient voltages. The recorder detects a lightning induced transient voltage and adjusts input amplifiers to accurately record transient voltage magnitudes. The recorder stores voltage data from numerous monitored channels, or devices. The data is time stamped and can be output in real time, or stored for later retrieval. The transient recorder, in one embodiment, includes an analog-to-digital converter and a voltage threshold detector. When an input voltage exceeds a pre-determined voltage threshold, the recorder stores the incoming voltage magnitude and time of arrival. The recorder also determines if its input amplifier circuits clip the incoming signal or if the incoming signal is too low. If the input data is clipped or too low, the recorder adjusts the gain of the amplifier circuits to accurately acquire subsequent components of the lightning induced transients.

  9. Asymmetric frontal cortical activity and negative affective responses to ostracism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carly K; Gravens, Laura C; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2011-06-01

    Ostracism arouses negative affect. However, little is known about variables that influence the intensity of these negative affective responses. Two studies fill this void by incorporating work on approach- and withdrawal-related emotional states and their associated cortical activations. Study 1 found that following ostracism anger related directly to relative left frontal cortical activation. Study 2 used unilateral hand contractions to manipulate frontal cortical activity prior to an ostracizing event. Right-hand contractions, compared to left-hand contractions, caused greater relative left frontal cortical activation during the hand contractions as well as ostracism. Also, right-hand contractions caused more self-reported anger in response to being ostracized. Within-condition correlations revealed patterns of associations between ostracism-induced frontal asymmetry and emotive responses to ostracism consistent with Study 1. Taken together, these results suggest that asymmetrical frontal cortical activity is related to angry responses to ostracism, with greater relative left frontal cortical activity being associated with increased anger.

  10. [Cortical spreading depolarization: a new pathophysiological mechanism in neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Santos, Edgar

    2014-05-20

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a wave of almost complete depolarization of the neuronal and glial cells that occurs in different neurological diseases such as migraine with aura, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, head trauma and stroke. These depolarization waves are characterized by a change in the negative potential with an amplitude between -10 and -30mV, duration of ∼1min and changes in the ion homeostasis between the intra- and extracellular space. This results in neuronal edema and dendritic distortion. Under pathologic states of hypoperfusion, cortical spreading depolarization can produce oxidative stress, worsen hypoxia and induce neuronal death. This is due to intense arterial vasoconstriction produced by an inverse response called spreading ischemia. Only in the last years there has been an electrophysiological confirmation of cortical spreading depolarization in human brains. Occurrence of cortical spreading depolarization has been associated with worse outcome in patients. Currently, increased knowledge regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms supports the hypothetical correlation of cortical spreading depolarization with brain damage in humans. There are diverse therapeutic alternatives that promise inhibition of cortical spreading depolarization and subsequent better outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Somatostatin-expressing inhibitory interneurons in cortical circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Yavorska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical layers. Through these disinhibitory circuits, SOM cells help encode the behavioral relevance of sensory stimuli by regulating the activity of cortical neurons based on subcortical and intracortical modulatory input. Associative learning leads to long-term changes in the strength of connectivity of SOM cells with other neurons, often influencing the strength of inhibitory input they receive. Thus despite their heterogeneity and variability across cortical areas, current evidence shows that SOM neurons perform unique neural computations, forming not only distinct molecular but also functional subclasses of cortical inhibitory interneurons.

  12. Interpreting land records

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    Base retracement on solid research and historically accurate interpretation Interpreting Land Records is the industry's most complete guide to researching and understanding the historical records germane to land surveying. Coverage includes boundary retracement and the primary considerations during new boundary establishment, as well as an introduction to historical records and guidance on effective research and interpretation. This new edition includes a new chapter titled "Researching Land Records," and advice on overcoming common research problems and insight into alternative resources wh

  13. The Cortical Signature of Central Poststroke Pain: Gray Matter Decreases in Somatosensory, Insular, and Prefrontal Cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, T; Asseyer, S; Taskin, B; Flöel, A; Witte, A V; Mueller, K; Fiebach, J B; Villringer, K; Villringer, A; Jungehulsing, G J

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that cortical structural plasticity plays a crucial role in the emergence and maintenance of chronic pain. Various distinct pain syndromes have accordingly been linked to specific patterns of decreases in regional gray matter volume (GMV). However, it is not known whether central poststroke pain (CPSP) is also associated with cortical structural plasticity. To determine this, we employed T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T and voxel-based morphometry in 45 patients suffering from chronic subcortical sensory stroke with (n = 23) and without CPSP (n = 22), and healthy matched controls (n = 31). CPSP patients showed decreases in GMV in comparison to healthy controls, involving secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), anterior as well as posterior insular cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex, temporal cortex, and nucleus accumbens. Comparing CPSP patients to nonpain patients revealed a similar but more restricted pattern of atrophy comprising S2, ventrolateral prefrontal and temporal cortex. Additionally, GMV in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex negatively correlated to pain intensity ratings. This shows for the first time that CPSP is accompanied by a unique pattern of widespread structural plasticity, which involves the sensory-discriminative areas of insular/somatosensory cortex, but also expands into prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum, where emotional aspects of pain are processed.

  14. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Seo

    Full Text Available Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling stu