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Sample records for cortical deactivation induced

  1. Self-related processing and deactivation of cortical midline regions in disorders of consciousness

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    Julia Sophia eCrone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Self-related stimuli activate anterior parts of cortical midline regions, which normally show task-induced deactivation. Deactivation in medial posterior and frontal regions is associated with the ability to focus attention on the demands of the task, and therefore, with consciousness. Studies investigating patients with impaired consciousness, that is, patients in minimally conscious state and patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (formerly vegetative state, demonstrate that these patients show responses to self-related content in the anterior cingulate cortex. However, it remains unclear if these responses are an indication for conscious processing of stimuli or are due to automatic processing. To shed further light on this issue, we investigated responses of cortical midline regions to the own and another name in 27 patients with a disorder of consciousness and compared them to task-induced deactivation. While almost all of the control subjects responding to the own name demonstrated higher activation due to the self-related content in anterior midline regions and additional deactivation, none of the responding patients did so. Differences between groups showed a similar pattern of findings. Despite the relation between behavioral responsiveness in patients and activation in response to the own name, the findings of this study do not provide evidence for a direct association of activation in anterior midline regions and conscious processing. The deficits in processing of self-referential content in anterior midline regions may rather be due to general impairments in cognitive processing and not particularly linked to impaired consciousness.

  2. Age association of language task induced deactivation induced in a pediatric population.

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    Sun, Binjian; Berl, Madison M; Burns, Thomas G; Gaillard, William D; Hayes, Laura; Adjouadi, Malek; Jones, Richard A

    2013-01-15

    Task-induced deactivation (TID) potentially reflects the interactions between the default mode and task specific networks, which are assumed to be age dependent. The study of the age association of such interactions provides insight about the maturation of neural networks, and lays out the groundwork for evaluating abnormal development of neural networks in neurological disorders. The current study analyzed the deactivations induced by language tasks in 45 right-handed normal controls aging from 6 to 22 years of age. Converging results from GLM, dual regression and ROI analyses showed a gradual reduction in both the spatial extent and the strength of the TID in the DMN cortices as the brain matured from kindergarten to early adulthood in the absence of any significant change in task performance. The results may be ascribed to maturation leading to either improved multi-tasking (i.e. reduced deactivation) or reduced cognitive demands due to greater experience (affects both control and active tasks but leads to reduced overall difference). However, other effects, such as changes in the DMN connectivity that were not included in this study may also have influenced the results. In light of this, researchers should be cautious when investigating the maturation of DMN using TID. With a GLM analysis using the concatenated fMRI data from several paradigms, this study additionally identified an age associated increase of TID in the STG (bilateral), possibly reflecting the role of this area in speech perception and phonological processing.

  3. Combined structural and functional imaging reveals cortical deactivations in grapheme-colour synaesthesia

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    Erik eO'Hanlon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaesthesia is a heritable condition in which particular stimuli generate specific and consistent sensory percepts or associations in another modality or processing stream. Functional neuroimaging studies have identified potential correlates of these experiences, including, in some but not all cases, the hyperactivation of visuotemporal areas and of parietal areas thought to be involved in perceptual binding. Structural studies have identified a similarly variable spectrum of differences between synaesthetes and controls. However, it remains unclear the extent to which these neural correlates reflect the synaesthetic experience itself or additional phenotypes associated with the condition. Here, we acquired both structural and functional neuroimaging data comparing thirteen grapheme-colour synaesthetes with eleven non-synaesthetes. Using voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging, we identify a number of clusters of increased volume of grey matter, of white matter or of increased fractional anisotropy in synaesthetes versus controls. To assess the possible involvement of these areas in the synaesthetic experience, we used nine areas of increased grey matter volume as regions of interest in an fMRI experiment that characterised the contrast in response to stimuli which induced synaesthesia (i.e. letters versus those which did not (non-meaningful symbols. Two of these areas, in left lateral occipital cortex and in postcentral gyrus, showed sensitivity to this contrast in synaesthetes but not controls. Unexpectedly, in both regions, the letter stimuli produced a strong negative BOLD signal in synaesthetes. An additional whole-brain fMRI analysis identified fourteen areas, three of which were driven mainly by a negative BOLD response to letters in synaesthetes. Our findings suggest that cortical deactivations may be involved in the conscious experience of internally generated synaesthetic percepts

  4. Mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases

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    Jaeger Karl E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipases represent the most important class of biocatalysts used for a wealth of applications in organic synthesis. An often applied reaction is the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and alcohols resulting in the formation of acetaldehyde which is known to deactivate microbial lipases, presumably by structural changes caused by initial Schiff-base formation at solvent accessible lysine residues. Previous studies showed that several lipases were sensitive toward acetaldehyde deactivation whereas others were insensitive; however, a general explanation of the acetaldehyde-induced inactivation mechanism is missing. Results Based on five microbial lipases from Candida rugosa, Rhizopus oryzae, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis we demonstrate that the protonation state of lysine ε-amino groups is decisive for their sensitivity toward acetaldehyde. Analysis of the diverse modification products of Bacillus subtilis lipases in the presence of acetaldehyde revealed several stable products such as α,β-unsaturated polyenals, which result from base and/or amino acid catalyzed aldol condensation of acetaldehyde. Our studies indicate that these products induce the formation of stable Michael-adducts at solvent-accessible amino acids and thus lead to enzyme deactivation. Further, our results indicate Schiff-base formation with acetaldehyde to be involved in crosslinking of lipase molecules. Conclusions Differences in stability observed with various commercially available microbial lipases most probably result from different purification procedures carried out by the respective manufacturers. We observed that the pH of the buffer used prior to lyophilization of the enzyme sample is of utmost importance. The mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases involves the generation of α,β-unsaturated polyenals from acetaldehyde which subsequently form stable Michael-adducts with the

  5. Nonlinear analysis and modeling of cortical activation and deactivation patterns in the immature fetal electrocorticogram

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    Schwab, Karin; Groh, Tobias; Schwab, Matthias; Witte, Herbert

    2009-03-01

    An approach combining time-continuous nonlinear stability analysis and a parametric bispectral method was introduced to better describe cortical activation and deactivation patterns in the immature fetal electroencephalogram (EEG). Signal models and data-driven investigations were performed to find optimal parameters of the nonlinear methods and to confirm the occurrence of nonlinear sections in the fetal EEG. The resulting measures were applied to the in utero electrocorticogram (ECoG) of fetal sheep at 0.7 gestation when organized sleep states were not developed and compared to previous results at 0.9 gestation. Cycling of the nonlinear stability of the fetal ECoG occurred already at this early gestational age, suggesting the presence of premature sleep states. This was accompanied by cycling of the time-variant biamplitude which reflected ECoG synchronization effects during premature sleep states associated with nonrapid eye movement sleep later in gestation. Thus, the combined nonlinear and time-variant approach was able to provide important insights into the properties of the immature fetal ECoG.

  6. Implementation of a Peltier-based cooling device for localized deep cortical deactivation during in vivo object recognition testing

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    Marra, Kyle; Graham, Brett; Carouso, Samantha; Cox, David

    2012-02-01

    While the application of local cortical cooling has recently become a focus of neurological research, extended localized deactivation deep within brain structures is still unexplored. Using a wirelessly controlled thermoelectric (Peltier) device and water-based heat sink, we have achieved inactivating temperatures (8 mm) than previously reported. After implanting the device into Long Evans rats' basolateral amygdala (BLA), an inhibitory brain center that controls anxiety and fear, we ran an open field test during which anxiety-driven behavioral tendencies were observed to decrease during cooling, thus confirming the device's effect on behavior. Our device will next be implanted in the rats' temporal association cortex (TeA) and recordings from our signal-tracing multichannel microelectrodes will measure and compare activated and deactivated neuronal activity so as to isolate and study the TeA signals responsible for object recognition. Having already achieved a top performing computational face-recognition system, the lab will utilize this TeA activity data to generalize its computational efforts of face recognition to achieve general object recognition.

  7. Mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger Karl E; Eggert Thorsten; Franken Benjamin; Pohl Martina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Microbial lipases represent the most important class of biocatalysts used for a wealth of applications in organic synthesis. An often applied reaction is the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and alcohols resulting in the formation of acetaldehyde which is known to deactivate microbial lipases, presumably by structural changes caused by initial Schiff-base formation at solvent accessible lysine residues. Previous studies showed that several lipases were ...

  8. Porphyrin Induced Laser Deactivation of Trypsinogen-Trypsin Conversion

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    Perido, Joanna; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatitis is caused by the inflammation of the pancreas, where the digestive enzyme trypsin is activated from the precursor enzyme trypsinogen while still in the pancreas. The presence of trypsin in the pancreas causes auto-activation of trypsinogen, resulting in greater inflammation and auto-digestion of the pancreas. In severe cases, this cascade effect can lead to organ failure, diabetes, and pancreatic cancer. Our hypothesis is that if trypsinogen is prevented from auto-activating into trypsin, then this cascade can be stopped. We propose to do this by inducing conformational changes in trypsinogen when bound to a photoactive porphyrin dye. Porphyrins are comprised of four linked heterocyclic groups forming a flat ring, and bind well with proteins such as trypsinogen. In this study we used spectroscopic techniques to probe the binding of meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatephenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) to trypsinogen in vitro, as a preliminary step to then prompt and characterize conformational changes of trypsinogen through irradiation. If conformational changes are detected the trypsinogen will be tested for trypsin inactivation. This investigation may provide promising initial results to the possible use of porphyrins as an inhibitor of the self-activation of trypsinogen into trypsin, and a potential inhibitor of pancreatitis. MARC*U-STAR.

  9. Attention-induced deactivations in very low frequency EEG oscillations: differential localisation according to ADHD symptom status.

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    Samantha J Broyd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The default-mode network (DMN is characterised by coherent very low frequency (VLF brain oscillations. The cognitive significance of this VLF profile remains unclear, partly because of the temporally constrained nature of the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD signal. Previously we have identified a VLF EEG network of scalp locations that shares many features of the DMN. Here we explore the intracranial sources of VLF EEG and examine their overlap with the DMN in adults with high and low ADHD ratings. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DC-EEG was recorded using an equidistant 66 channel electrode montage in 25 adult participants with high- and 25 participants with low-ratings of ADHD symptoms during a rest condition and an attention demanding Eriksen task. VLF EEG power was calculated in the VLF band (0.02 to 0.2 Hz for the rest and task condition and compared for high and low ADHD participants. sLORETA was used to identify brain sources associated with the attention-induced deactivation of VLF EEG power, and to examine these sources in relation to ADHD symptoms. There was significant deactivation of VLF EEG power between the rest and task condition for the whole sample. Using s-LORETA the sources of this deactivation were localised to medial prefrontal regions, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and temporal regions. However, deactivation sources were different for high and low ADHD groups: In the low ADHD group attention-induced VLF EEG deactivation was most significant in medial prefrontal regions while for the high ADHD group this deactivation was predominantly localised to the temporal lobes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Attention-induced VLF EEG deactivations have intracranial sources that appear to overlap with those of the DMN. Furthermore, these seem to be related to ADHD symptom status, with high ADHD adults failing to significantly deactivate medial prefrontal regions while at the same time showing significant attenuation of

  10. Photon hormesis deactivates alpha-particle induced bystander effects between zebrafish embryos

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    Ng, C. Y. P.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, we studied the effects of low-dose X-ray photons on the alpha-particle induced bystander effects between embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The effects on the naive whole embryos were studied through quantification of apoptotic signals (amounts of cells undergoing apoptosis) at 24 h post fertilization (hpf) using vital dye acridine orange staining, followed by counting the stained cells under a fluorescent microscope. We report data showing that embryos at 5 hpf subjected to a 4.4 mGy alpha-particle irradiation could release a stress signal into the medium, which could induce bystander effect in partnered naive embryos sharing the same medium. We also report that the bystander effect was deactivated when the irradiated embryos were subjected to a concomitant irradiation of 10 or 14 mGy of X-rays, but no such deactivation was achieved if the concomitant X-ray dose dropped to 2.5 or 5 mGy. In the present study, the significant drop in the amount of apoptotic signals on the embryos having received 4.4 mGy alpha particles together X-rays irradiation from 2.5 or 5 mGy to 10 or 14 mGy, together with the deactivation of RIBE with concomitant irradiation of 10 or 14 mGy of X-rays supported the participation of photon hormesis with an onset dose between 5 and 10 mGy, which might lead to removal of aberrant cells through early apoptosis or induction of high-fidelity DNA repair. As we found that photons and alpha particles could have opposite biological effects when these were simultaneously irradiated onto living organisms, these ionizing radiations could be viewed as two different environmental stressors, and the resultant effects could be regarded as multiple stressor effects. The present work presented the first study on a multiple stressor effect which occurred on bystander organisms. In other words, this was a non-targeted multiple stressor effect. The photon hormesis could also explain some failed attempts to observe neutron-induced bystander

  11. Functional MRI Assessment of Task-Induced Deactivation of the Default Mode Network in Alzheimer’s Disease and At-Risk Older Individuals

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    Maija Pihlajamäki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of dementia in old age, and is characterized by prominent impairment of episodic memory. Recent functional imaging studies in AD have demonstrated alterations in a distributed network of brain regions supporting memory function, including regions of the default mode network. Previous positron emission tomography studies of older individuals at risk for AD have revealed hypometabolism of association cortical regions similar to the metabolic abnormalities seen in AD patients. In recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies of AD, corresponding brain default mode regions have also been found to demonstrate an abnormal fMRI task-induced deactivation response pattern. That is, the relative decreases in fMRI signal normally observed in the default mode regions in healthy subjects performing a cognitive task are not seen in AD patients, or may even be reversed to a paradoxical activation response. Our recent studies have revealed alterations in the pattern of deactivation also in elderly individuals at risk for AD by virtue of their APOE e4 genotype, or evidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI. In agreement with recent reports from other groups, these studies demonstrate that the pattern of fMRI task-induced deactivation is progressively disrupted along the continuum from normal aging to MCI and to clinical AD and more impaired in e4 carriers compared to non-carriers. These findings will be discussed in the context of current literature regarding functional imaging of the default network in AD and at-risk populations.

  12. Enhanced sympathetic arousal in response to FMRI scanning correlates with task induced activations and deactivations.

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    Markus Muehlhan

    Full Text Available It has been repeatedly shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI triggers distress and neuroendocrine response systems. Prior studies have revealed that sympathetic arousal increases, particularly at the beginning of the examination. Against this background it appears likely that those stress reactions during the scanning procedure may influence task performance and neural correlates. However, the question how sympathetic arousal elicited by the scanning procedure itself may act as a potential confounder of fMRI data remains unresolved today. Thirty-seven scanner naive healthy subjects performed a simple cued target detection task. Levels of salivary alpha amylase (sAA, as a biomarker for sympathetic activity, were assessed in samples obtained at several time points during the lab visit. SAA increased two times, immediately prior to scanning and at the end of the scanning procedure. Neural activation related to motor preparation and timing as well as task performance was positively correlated with the first increase. Furthermore, the first sAA increase was associated with task induced deactivation (TID in frontal and parietal regions. However, these effects were restricted to the first part of the experiment. Consequently, this bias of scanner related sympathetic activation should be considered in future fMRI investigations. It is of particular importance for pharmacological investigations studying adrenergic agents and the comparison of groups with different stress vulnerabilities like patients and controls or adolescents and adults.

  13. Cyclitols protect glutamine synthetase and malate dehydrogenase against heat induced deactivation and thermal denaturation.

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    Jaindl, Martina; Popp, Marianne

    2006-06-30

    The accumulation of cyclitols in plants is a widespread response that provides protection against various environmental stresses. The capacity of myo-Inositol, pinitol, quercitol, and other compatible solutes (i.e., sorbitol, proline, and glycinebetaine) to protect proteins against thermally induced denaturation and deactivation was examined. Enzymatic activity measurements of L-glutamine synthetase from Escherichia coli and Hordeum vulgare showed that the presence of cyclitols during heat treatment resulted in a significantly higher percentage of residual activity. CD spectroscopy experiments were used to study thermal stabilities of protein secondary structures upon the addition of myo-Inositol, pinitol, and glucose. 0.4 M myo-Inositol was observed to raise the melting temperature (Tm) of GS from E. coli by 3.9 degrees C and MDH from pig heart by 3.4 degrees C, respectively. Pinitol showed an increase in Tm of MDH by 3.8 degrees C, whereas glucose was not effective. Our results show a great potential of stabilizing proteins by the addition of cyclitols.

  14. White matter microstructure contributes to age-related declines in task-induced deactivation of the default mode network

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    Christopher A Brown

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Task-induced deactivations within the brain’s default mode network (DMN are thought to reflect suppression of endogenous thought processes to support exogenous goal-directed task processes. Older adults are known to show reductions in deactivation of the DMN compared to younger adults. However, little is understood about the mechanisms contributing to functional dysregulation of the DMN in aging. Here, we explored the relationships between functional modulation of the DMN and age, task performance and white matter (WM microstructure. Participants were 117 adults ranging from 25 to 83 years old who completed an fMRI task switching paradigm, including easy (single and difficult (mixed conditions, and underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. The fMRI results revealed an age by condition interaction (β = -.13, t = 3.16, p = .002 such that increasing age affected deactivation magnitude during the mixed condition (β = -.29, t = -3.24 p = .002 but not the single condition (p = .58. Additionally, there was a white matter by condition interaction (β = .10, t = 2.33, p = .02 such that decreasing white matter microstructure affected deactivation magnitude during the mixed condition (β = .30, t = 3.42 p = .001 but not the single condition (p = .17. Critically, mediation analyses indicated that age-related reductions in WM microstructure accounted for the relationship between age and DMN deactivation in the more difficult mixed condition. These findings suggest that age-related declines in anatomical connectivity between DMN regions contribute to functional dysregulation within the DMN in older adults.

  15. Acetaminophen induces apoptosis in rat cortical neurons.

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    Inmaculada Posadas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen (AAP is widely prescribed for treatment of mild pain and fever in western countries. It is generally considered a safe drug and the most frequently reported adverse effect associated with acetaminophen is hepatotoxicity, which generally occurs after acute overdose. During AAP overdose, encephalopathy might develop and contribute to morbidity and mortality. Our hypothesis is that AAP causes direct neuronal toxicity contributing to the general AAP toxicity syndrome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report that AAP causes direct toxicity on rat cortical neurons both in vitro and in vivo as measured by LDH release. We have found that AAP causes concentration-dependent neuronal death in vitro at concentrations (1 and 2 mM that are reached in human plasma during AAP overdose, and that are also reached in the cerebrospinal fluid of rats for 3 hours following i.p injection of AAP doses (250 and 500 mg/kg that are below those required to induce acute hepatic failure in rats. AAP also increases both neuronal cytochrome P450 isoform CYP2E1 enzymatic activity and protein levels as determined by Western blot, leading to neuronal death through mitochondrial-mediated mechanisms that involve cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation. In addition, in vivo experiments show that i.p. AAP (250 and 500 mg/kg injection induces neuronal death in the rat cortex as measured by TUNEL, validating the in vitro data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data presented here establish, for the first time, a direct neurotoxic action by AAP both in vivo and in vitro in rats at doses below those required to produce hepatotoxicity and suggest that this neurotoxicity might be involved in the general toxic syndrome observed during patient APP overdose and, possibly, also when AAP doses in the upper dosing schedule are used, especially if other risk factors (moderate drinking, fasting, nutritional impairment are present.

  16. Contrast-induced transient cortical blindness.

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    Shah, Parth R; Yohendran, Jayshan; Parker, Geoffrey D; McCluskey, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    We present a case of transient cortical blindness secondary to contrast medium toxicity. A 58-year-old man had successful endovascular coiling of a right posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm but became confused and unable to see after the procedure. His visual acuity was no light perception bilaterally. Clinically, there was no new intra-ocular pathology. An urgent non-contrast computed tomography scan of the brain showed cortical hyperdensity in both parieto-occipital cortices, consistent with contrast medium leakage through the blood-brain barrier from the coiling procedure. The man remained completely blind for 72 hours, after which his visual acuity improved gradually back to his baseline level.

  17. Cortical deactivation induced by visual stimulation in human slow-wave sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Law, Ian; Lund, Torben E

    2002-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that sleeping and sedated young children respond with a paradoxical decrease in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal in the rostro-medial occipital visual cortex during visual stimulation....... It is unresolved whether this negative BOLD response pattern is of developmental neurobiological origin particular to a given age or to a general effect of sleep or sedative drugs. To further elucidate this issue, we used fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) to study the brain activation pattern during...... visual stimulation in spontaneously sleeping adult volunteers. In five sleeping volunteers fMRI studies confirmed a robust signal decrease during stimulation in the rostro-medial occipital cortex. A similar relative decrease at the same location was found during visual stimulation...

  18. Cortical deactivation induced by visual stimulation in human slow-wave sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Law, Ian; Lund, Torben E

    2002-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that sleeping and sedated young children respond with a paradoxical decrease in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal in the rostro-medial occipital visual cortex during visual stimulation...... visual stimulation in spontaneously sleeping adult volunteers. In five sleeping volunteers fMRI studies confirmed a robust signal decrease during stimulation in the rostro-medial occipital cortex. A similar relative decrease at the same location was found during visual stimulation...... that this decrease was secondary to a relative rCBF decrease. Possible mechanisms for the paradoxical response pattern during sleep include an active inhibition of the visual cortex or a disruption of an energy-consuming process....

  19. Cortical deactivation induced by visual stimulation in human slow-wave sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Law, Ian; Lund, Torben E

    2002-01-01

    . It is unresolved whether this negative BOLD response pattern is of developmental neurobiological origin particular to a given age or to a general effect of sleep or sedative drugs. To further elucidate this issue, we used fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) to study the brain activation pattern during......It has previously been demonstrated that sleeping and sedated young children respond with a paradoxical decrease in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal in the rostro-medial occipital visual cortex during visual stimulation...... visual stimulation in spontaneously sleeping adult volunteers. In five sleeping volunteers fMRI studies confirmed a robust signal decrease during stimulation in the rostro-medial occipital cortex. A similar relative decrease at the same location was found during visual stimulation...

  20. Jealousy increased by induced relative left frontal cortical activity.

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    Kelley, Nicholas J; Eastwick, Paul W; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Schmeichel, Brandon J

    2015-10-01

    Asymmetric frontal cortical activity may be one key to the process linking social exclusion to jealous feelings. The current research examined the causal role of asymmetric frontal brain activity in modulating jealousy in response to social exclusion. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex to manipulate asymmetric frontal cortical activity was combined with a modified version of the Cyberball paradigm designed to induce jealousy. After receiving 15 min of tDCS, participants were excluded by a desired partner and reported how jealous they felt. Among individuals who were excluded, tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity caused greater levels of self-reported jealousy compared to tDCS to increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham stimulation. Limitations concerning the specificity of this effect and implications for the role of the asymmetric prefrontal cortical activity in motivated behaviors are discussed.

  1. Reversible-Deactivation Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate Induced by Photochemical Reduction of Various Copper Catalysts

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    Jaroslav Mosnáček

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Photochemically mediated reversible-deactivation radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate was successfully performed using 50–400 ppm of various copper compounds such as CuSO4·5H2O, copper acetate, copper triflate and copper acetylacetonate as catalysts. The copper catalysts were reduced in situ by irradiation at wavelengths of 366–546 nm, without using any additional reducing agent. Bromopropionitrile was used as an initiator. The effects of various solvents and the concentration and structure of ligands were investigated. Well-defined polymers were obtained when at least 100 or 200 ppm of any catalyst complexed with excess tris(2-pyridylmethylamine as a ligand was used in dimethyl sulfoxide as a solvent.

  2. Photoluminescence study of time- and spatial-dependent light induced trap de-activation in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films.

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    Fu, Xiao; Jacobs, Daniel A; Beck, Fiona J; Duong, The; Shen, Heping; Catchpole, Kylie R; White, Thomas P

    2016-08-10

    Organometal halide perovskite-based solar cells have rapidly achieved high efficiency in recent years. However, many fundamental recombination mechanisms underlying the excellent performance are still not well understood. Here we apply confocal photoluminescence microscopy to investigate the time and spatial characteristics of light-induced trap de-activation in CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite films. Trap de-activation is characterized by a dramatic increase in PL emission during continuous laser illumination accompanied by a lateral expansion of the PL enhancement far beyond the laser spot. These observations are attributed to an oxygen-assisted trap de-activation process associated with carrier diffusion. To model this effect, we add a trap de-activation term to the standard semiconductor carrier recombination and diffusion models. With this approach we are able to reproduce the observed temporal and spatial dependence of laser induced PL enhancement using realistic physical parameters. Furthermore, we experimentally investigate the role of trap diffusion in this process, and demonstrate that the trap de-activation is not permanent, with the traps appearing again once the illumination is turned off. This study provides new insights into recombination and trap dynamics in perovskite films that could offer a better understanding of perovskite solar cell performance.

  3. Transdermal absorption of (-)-linalool induces autonomic deactivation but has no impact on ratings of well-being in humans.

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    Heuberger, Eva; Redhammer, Sandra; Buchbauer, Gerhard

    2004-10-01

    Essential lavender oil has a long tradition as a mild sedative in herbal medicine. Relaxing effects after inhalation have also been demonstrated for one of its main constituents, (-)-linalool. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the effects of this monoterpenoid alcohol on human physiological parameters (blood oxygen saturation, breathing rate, eye-blink rate, pulse rate, skin conductance, skin temperature, surface electromyogram as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure) and assessments of subjective well-being. (-)-Linalool was applied to 14 healthy subjects by percutaneous administration. Inhalation of the fragrance was prevented by means of breathing masks. (-)-Linalool induced deactivation with respect to physiology, that is, a decrease of systolic blood pressure and a smaller decrease of skin temperature, compared to a corresponding control group receiving a placebo, but had no effects on subjective evaluation of well-being.

  4. Cortical spreading depression-induced preconditioning in the brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping-ping Shen; Shuai Hou; Di Ma; Ming-ming Zhao; Ming-qin Zhu; Jing-dian Zhang; Liang-shu Feng; Li Cui; Jia-chun Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression is a technique used to depolarize neurons. During focal or global ischemia, cortical spreading depression-induced preconditioning can enhance tolerance of further injury. Howev-er, the underlying mechanism for this phenomenon remains relatively unclear. To date, numerous issues exist regarding the experimental model used to precondition the brain with cortical spreading depression, such as the administration route, concentration of potassium chloride, induction time, duration of the protection provided by the treatment, the regional distribution of the protective effect, and the types of neurons responsible for the greater tolerance. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying cor-tical spreading depression-induced tolerance in the brain, considering excitatory neurotransmission and metabolism, nitric oxide, genomic reprogramming, inlfammation, neurotropic factors, and cellular stress response. Speciifcally, we clarify the procedures and detailed information regarding cortical spreading de-pression-induced preconditioning and build a foundation for more comprehensive investigations in the ifeld of neural regeneration and clinical application in the future.

  5. Physics and modeling of ion implantation induced transient deactivation and diffusion processes in boron doped silicon

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    Chakravarthi, Srinivasan

    The economics of silicon processing requires predictive modeling capabilities for the continued rapid advancement of semiconductor technology. This is because it has become prohibitively expensive to develop a new process by running a large series of test lots through multi-billion dollar fabrication facilities. Effective process modeling requires an accurate physical understanding of the various interacting processes. The complexity of this problem is compounded by highly non-equilibrium phenomena associated with IC fabrication processes such as implantation annealing. Point defect supersaturations of many orders of magnitude are introduced following ion implantation, which is used to introduce the dopants into silicon. Such supersaturations dramatically alter the diffusion of dopants and reduce the electrical activation during the initial phase of the anneal. Boron is the primary p-type dopant used in silicon and thus understanding and modeling its deactivation/activation and diffusion is critical to predictive process simulation. Since boron is smaller than silicon, boron agglomerates with interstitials becoming electrically inactive. Modeling of boron clusters is complicated, as there is a huge array of potential boron-interstitial cluster compositions. A physical model for boron clustering is derived by identifying dominant clusters and rate limiting steps via atomistic calculations performed at Lawrence Livermore National Labs. The model is then used successfully to match a wide variety of chemical and electrical data. We further apply this model to understand and successfully predict ultra shallow junction formation. We find it is possible to explain some intriguing phenomenon observed during the formation of ultra shallow junctions, like saturation in junction depth despite increasing ramp-up rates. Researchers are exploring novel experimental processing steps like high energy Si pre-implants to produce highly active and shallow B junctions. To understand

  6. Enhanced Sympathetic Arousal in Response to fMRI Scanning Correlates with Task Induced Activations and Deactivations

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    Muehlhan, Markus; Lueken, Ulrike; Siegert, Jens; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Smolka, Michael N.; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) triggers distress and neuroendocrine response systems. Prior studies have revealed that sympathetic arousal increases, particularly at the beginning of the examination. Against this background it appears likely that those stress reactions during the scanning procedure may influence task performance and neural correlates. However, the question how sympathetic arousal elicited by the scanning procedure itself may act as a potential confounder of fMRI data remains unresolved today. Thirty-seven scanner naive healthy subjects performed a simple cued target detection task. Levels of salivary alpha amylase (sAA), as a biomarker for sympathetic activity, were assessed in samples obtained at several time points during the lab visit. SAA increased two times, immediately prior to scanning and at the end of the scanning procedure. Neural activation related to motor preparation and timing as well as task performance was positively correlated with the first increase. Furthermore, the first sAA increase was associated with task induced deactivation (TID) in frontal and parietal regions. However, these effects were restricted to the first part of the experiment. Consequently, this bias of scanner related sympathetic activation should be considered in future fMRI investigations. It is of particular importance for pharmacological investigations studying adrenergic agents and the comparison of groups with different stress vulnerabilities like patients and controls or adolescents and adults. PMID:23967320

  7. 足三里等下肢穴位刺激引发脑运动皮质去激活效应的fMRI研究%Using fMRI to Explore Deactivation in Motor Cortices after Zusanli,Yinlingquan,Fenglong,Sanyinjiao Acupoint Stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏鹏绪; 鲍瑞雪; 张通; 李坤成; 卢洁; 赵澄

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the deactivation responses of individual areas in the human left primary motor cortices, premotor areas and supplementary motor areas to stimulating acupoints Zusanli, Yinlingquan, Fenglong, Sanyinjiao of right body - side. Methods: Ten male healthy subjects received functional MRI examination in a 3T Siemens MAGNETOM Trio system with a block - designed method. BOLD weighted functional images were acquired in the axial plane.Data were analyzed with SPM5 software package to acquire magnitudes of BOLD signal changes with 1st level Bayesian inference. Results: Deactivated signals were found in left primary motor cortices, premotor areas and supplementary motor areas when stimulating each acupoint for every subjets. For Zusanli stimulation, activated signals were found within left primary motor cortices from eight people out of the ten subjects, and within left premotor areas and supplementary motor areas from nine people out of the ten subjects. For Yinlingquan stimulation, activated signals were found within left primary motor cortices and within left premotor areas and supplementary motor areas from all ten subjects. For Fenglong stimulation, activated signals were found within left primary motor cortices from nine people out of the ten subjects, and within left premotor areas and supplementary motor areas from nine people out of the ten subjects. For Sanyinjiao stimulation, activated signals were found within left primary motor cortices from nine people out of the ten subjects, and within left premotor areas and supplementary motor areas from all ten subjects. Conclusion: Znsanli, Yinlingquan, Fenglong or Sanyinjiao stimulation can activate contralateral primary motor cortices, premotor areas and supplementary motor areas for most subjects. However, deactivation can be seen in every condition from each subject. This phenomenon suggests that the effects of acupoint stimulation on central nervous system involve not only activation but

  8. (-) deprenyl attenuates aluminium induced neurotoxicity in primary cortical cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirathinam, S; Lakshmana, M K; Raju, T R

    1996-06-01

    The role of (-) deprenyl in offering neuroprotection to cortical neurons exposed to Aluminium chloride (AlCl3) was examined. Primary cortical cultures derived from newborn rats were exposed to AlCl3 on 6th day in vitro, at 100,200,400,600,800 and 1000 microM concentrations of AlCl3. After 48 h of AlCl3 exposure, many nerve cell bodies were swollen; a beading of neurites and a disruption of the neuritic network were also observed suggesting neurodegeneration. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) efflux increased in a dose-dependent manner (59-120%). (-) Deprenyl co-exposure at concentrations of 10(-7), 10(-8) and 10(-9) M significantly attenuated both the morphological alterations and the LDH efflux induced by AlCl3. This in vitro study has demonstrated that (-) deprenyl can protect neurons from aluminium induced neurotoxicity.

  9. Probiotics protect mice from ovariectomy-induced cortical bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Claes; Engdahl, Cecilia; Fåk, Frida; Andersson, Annica; Windahl, Sara H; Farman, Helen H; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Islander, Ulrika; Sjögren, Klara

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota (GM) modulates the hosts metabolism and immune system. Probiotic bacteria are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host and can alter the composition of the GM. Germ-free mice have increased bone mass associated with reduced bone resorption indicating that the GM also regulates bone mass. Ovariectomy (ovx) results in bone loss associated with altered immune status. The purpose of this study was to determine if probiotic treatment protects mice from ovx-induced bone loss. Mice were treated with either a single Lactobacillus (L) strain, L. paracasei DSM13434 (L. para) or a mixture of three strains, L. paracasei DSM13434, L. plantarum DSM 15312 and DSM 15313 (L. mix) given in the drinking water during 6 weeks, starting two weeks before ovx. Both the L. para and the L. mix treatment protected mice from ovx-induced cortical bone loss and bone resorption. Cortical bone mineral content was higher in both L. para and L. mix treated ovx mice compared to vehicle (veh) treated ovx mice. Serum levels of the resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides and the urinary fractional excretion of calcium were increased by ovx in the veh treated but not in the L. para or the L. mix treated mice. Probiotic treatment reduced the expression of the two inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β, and increased the expression of OPG, a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, in cortical bone of ovx mice. In addition, ovx decreased the frequency of regulatory T cells in bone marrow of veh treated but not probiotic treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with L. para or the L. mix prevents ovx-induced cortical bone loss. Our findings indicate that these probiotic treatments alter the immune status in bone resulting in attenuated bone resorption in ovx mice.

  10. Probiotics protect mice from ovariectomy-induced cortical bone loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Ohlsson

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota (GM modulates the hosts metabolism and immune system. Probiotic bacteria are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host and can alter the composition of the GM. Germ-free mice have increased bone mass associated with reduced bone resorption indicating that the GM also regulates bone mass. Ovariectomy (ovx results in bone loss associated with altered immune status. The purpose of this study was to determine if probiotic treatment protects mice from ovx-induced bone loss. Mice were treated with either a single Lactobacillus (L strain, L. paracasei DSM13434 (L. para or a mixture of three strains, L. paracasei DSM13434, L. plantarum DSM 15312 and DSM 15313 (L. mix given in the drinking water during 6 weeks, starting two weeks before ovx. Both the L. para and the L. mix treatment protected mice from ovx-induced cortical bone loss and bone resorption. Cortical bone mineral content was higher in both L. para and L. mix treated ovx mice compared to vehicle (veh treated ovx mice. Serum levels of the resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides and the urinary fractional excretion of calcium were increased by ovx in the veh treated but not in the L. para or the L. mix treated mice. Probiotic treatment reduced the expression of the two inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β, and increased the expression of OPG, a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, in cortical bone of ovx mice. In addition, ovx decreased the frequency of regulatory T cells in bone marrow of veh treated but not probiotic treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with L. para or the L. mix prevents ovx-induced cortical bone loss. Our findings indicate that these probiotic treatments alter the immune status in bone resulting in attenuated bone resorption in ovx mice.

  11. Training induced cortical plasticity compared between three tongue training paradigms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Jim

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different training types and secondary to test gender differences on the training-related cortical plasticity induced by three different tongue training paradigms: 1. Therapeutic tongue exercises (TTE), 2. Playing computer games......) (control) were established using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at three time-points: (1) before tongue training, (2) immediately after training, (3) 1 h after training. Subject-based reports of motivation, fun, pain and fatigue were evaluated on 0-10 numerical rating scales (NRS) after training......-points. No significant effect of tongue training on FDI MEPs was observed (P>0.335). The tongue cortical motor map areas were not significantly increased by training (P>0.142). Training with TDS was most motivating and fun (Plevel was not different between groups...

  12. Development of deactivation of the default-mode network during episodic memory formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xiaoqian J.; Ofen, Noa; Gabrieli, John D. E.; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Task-induced deactivation of the default-mode network (DMN) has been associated in adults with successful episodic memory formation, possibly as a mechanism to focus allocation of mental resources for successful encoding of external stimuli. We investigated developmental changes of deactivation of the DMN (posterior cingulate, medial prefrontal, and bilateral lateral parietal cortices) during episodic memory formation in children, adolescents, and young adults (ages 8–24), who studied scenes during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Recognition memory improved with age. We defined DMN regions of interest from a different sample of participants with the same age range, using resting-state fMRI. In adults, there was greater deactivation of the DMN for scenes that were later remembered than scenes that were later forgotten. In children, deactivation of the default-network did not differ reliably between scenes that were later remembered or forgotten. Adolescents exhibited a pattern of activation intermediate to that of children and adults. The hippocampal region, often considered part of the DMN, showed a functional dissociation with the rest of the DMN by exhibiting increased activation for later remembered than later forgotten scene that was similar across age groups. These findings suggest that development of memory ability from childhood through adulthood may involve increased deactivation of the neocortical DMN during learning. PMID:24064072

  13. Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating arachidonic acid metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Yuzhong [Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Zheng, Hao; Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Jing [Animal Experimental Center of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Falck, John R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390,USA (United States); Guo, Austin M. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Pharmacology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States); Yue, Jiang; Peng, Renxiu [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu2013@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and its downstream pathways have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in growth control of breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid phytoestrogen from licorice, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating multiple key enzymes in AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. Isoliquiritigenin diminished cell viability, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and clonogenic ability in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, and induced apoptosis as evidenced by an analysis of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and hoechst staining. Furthermore, isoliquiritigenin inhibited mRNA expression of multiple forms of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, and decreased secretion of their products, including prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), without affecting COX-1, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), and leukotriene B{sub 4} (LTB{sub 4}). In addition, it downregulated the levels of phospho-PI3K, phospho-PDK (Ser{sup 241}), phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}), phospho-Bad (Ser{sup 136}), and Bcl-x{sub L} expression, thereby activating caspase cascades and eventually cleaving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conversely, the addition of exogenous eicosanoids, including PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} and a 20-HETE analog (WIT003), and caspase inhibitors, or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. Notably, isoliquiritigenin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice, together with decreased intratumoral levels of eicosanoids and phospho-Akt (Thr{sup 308}). Collectively, these data suggest that isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating AA metabolic

  14. Auditory Cortical Deactivation during Speech Production and following Speech Perception: An EEG investigation of the temporal dynamics of the auditory alpha rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Jenson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor integration within the dorsal stream enables online monitoring of speech. Jenson et al. (2014 used independent component analysis (ICA and event related spectral perturbation (ERSP analysis of EEG data to describe anterior sensorimotor (e.g., premotor cortex; PMC activity during speech perception and production. The purpose of the current study was to identify and temporally map neural activity from posterior (i.e., auditory regions of the dorsal stream in the same tasks. Perception tasks required ‘active’ discrimination of syllable pairs (/ba/ and /da/ in quiet and noisy conditions. Production conditions required overt production of syllable pairs and nouns. ICA performed on concatenated raw 68 channel EEG data from all tasks identified bilateral ‘auditory’ alpha (α components in 15 of 29 participants localized to pSTG (left and pMTG (right. ERSP analyses were performed to reveal fluctuations in the spectral power of the α rhythm clusters across time. Production conditions were characterized by significant α event related synchronization (ERS; pFDR < .05 concurrent with EMG activity from speech production, consistent with speech-induced auditory inhibition. Discrimination conditions were also characterized by α ERS following stimulus offset. Auditory α ERS in all conditions also temporally aligned with PMC activity reported in Jenson et al. (2014. These findings are indicative of speech-induced suppression of auditory regions, possibly via efference copy. The presence of the same pattern following stimulus offset in discrimination conditions suggests that sensorimotor contributions following speech perception reflect covert replay, and that covert replay provides one source of the motor activity previously observed in some speech perception tasks. To our knowledge, this is the first time that inhibition of auditory regions by speech has been observed in real-time with the ICA/ERSP technique.

  15. Localization of Cortical Oscillations Induced by SCS Using Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sovka

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a method based on coherence analysis and scalp mapping of coherence suitable for more accurate localization of cortical oscillations induced by electric stimulation of the dorsal spinal cord (SCS, which were previously detected using spectral analysis. While power spectral density shows the increase of power during SCS only at small number of electrodes, coherence extends this area and sharpens its boundary simultaneously. Parameters of the method were experimentally optimized to maximize its reliability. SCS is applied to suppress chronic, intractable pain by patients, whom pharmacotherapy does not relieve. In our study, the pain developed in lower back and lower extremity as the result of unsuccessful vertebral discotomy, which is called failed-back surgery syndrome (FBSS. Our method replicated the results of previous analysis using PSD and extended them with more accurate localization of the area influenced by SCS.

  16. Neuroprotection and acidosis induced by cortical spreading depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwong KK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth K Kwong, Suk-tak Chan Department of Radiology, MGH/MIT/HMS Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA We read with interest the article “Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5” published in Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat by Viggiano et al.1 The authors showed that cerebral spreading depression (CSD triggered uncoupling protein-5 (UCP-5,1 which had been reported to exert a long-term effect upon neuron protection.2 The result is another piece in CSD literature on modifying gene expressions to provide neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes.3,4 Authors' replyGiovanni Messina1,2Emanuela Viggiano1,3Vincenzo Monda1Antonietta Messina1Fiorenzo Moscatelli2Anna Valenzano2Domenico Tafuri4Vincenzo De Luca5Giuseppe Cibelli2Marcellino Monda1 1Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetic and Sport Medicine, Department of Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Caserta, 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, 3Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, 4Department of Motor Sciences and Wellness, University of Naples “Parthenope,” Napoli, Italy; 5Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Thank you for the attention paid to our article entitled: “Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5”.1 We do agree that cerebral spreading depression (CSD-induced acidosis is an intriguing aspect of the neuroprotection puzzle. It is well known that CSD is involved in the pathophysiology of migraine, cerebral ischemia, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury.2–7 View the original paper by Viggiano and colleagues. 

  17. Comparative proteomics of rat brain in the BCNU-induced model of cortical dysplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭谊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To screen the differential proteins in the brain(neocortex and hippocampus)between the rats with cortical dysplasia(CD)and control ones,and investigate the role of their alteration in the development of epilepsy in CD.Methods Cortical dysplasia was induced in rat pups via in utero delivery of BCNU.A two-dimensional electrophoresis

  18. Mission analysis report - deactivation facilities at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, D.P.

    1996-09-27

    This document examines the portion of the Hanford Site Cleanup Mission that deals with facility deactivation. How facilities get identified for deactivation, how they enter EM-60 for deactivation, programmatic alternatives to perform facility deactivation, the deactivation process itself, key requirements and objectives associated with the deactivation process, and deactivation planning are discussed.

  19. Effects of Parecoxib and Fentanyl on nociception-induced cortical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ying-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analgesics, including opioids and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs reduce postoperative pain. However, little is known about the quantitative effects of these drugs on cortical activity induced by nociceptive stimulation. The aim of the present study was to determine the neural activity in response to a nociceptive stimulus and to investigate the effects of fentanyl (an opioid agonist and parecoxib (a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor on this nociception-induced cortical activity evoked by tail pinch. Extracellular recordings (electroencephalogram and multi-unit signals were performed in the area of the anterior cingulate cortex while intracellular recordings were made in the primary somatosensory cortex. The effects of parecoxib and fentanyl on induced cortical activity were compared. Results Peripheral nociceptive stimulation in anesthetized rats produced an immediate electroencephalogram (EEG desynchronization resembling the cortical arousal (low-amplitude, fast-wave activity, while the membrane potential switched into a persistent depolarization state. The induced cortical activity was abolished by fentanyl, and the fentanyl's effect was reversed by the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. Parecoxib, on the other hand, did not significantly affect the neural activity. Conclusion Cortical activity was modulated by nociceptive stimulation in anesthetized rats. Fentanyl showed a strong inhibitory effect on the nociceptive-stimulus induced cortical activity while parecoxib had no significant effect.

  20. Protective effects of berberine against amyloid beta-induced toxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Yanjun Zhang; Shuai Du; Mixia Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Berberine, a major constituent of Coptidis rhizoma, exhibits neural protective effects. The present study analyzed the potential protective effect of berberine against amyloid G-induced cytotoxicity in rat cerebral cortical neurons. Alzheimer's disease cell models were treated with 0.5 and 2 μmol/Lberberine for 36 hours to inhibit amyloid G-induced toxicity. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining results showed that berberine significantly increased cell viability and reduced cell apoptosis in primary cultured rat cortical neurons. In addition, western blot analysis revealed a protective effect of berberine against amyloid β-induced toxicity in cultured cortical neurons, which coincided with significantly decreased abnormal up-regulation of activated caspase-3. These results showed that berberine exhibited a protective effect against amyloid 13-induced cytotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons.

  1. Deactivation of Oxidation Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Levenspiel (Reference 10) have proposed an equivalent general expression of the form dS _KST (4) dtk to account for deactivation due to catalyst pore...Voorhies, A., IEC, 1954, vol. 37, p. 318. 10. Szepe, S., and 0. Levenspiel , Proc. 4th Europ. Symp. Chem. React. Eng., Pergamon Press, p. 265. 11. U.S

  2. PFP deactivation project management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, D.M.

    1997-07-28

    This document identifies the overall approach for deactivation of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex, excluding the vaults, and includes a draft set of End Point Criteria for all buildings being deactivated.

  3. Cortical Folding Pattern and its Consistency Induced by Biological Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalil Razavi, Mir; Zhang, Tuo; Liu, Tianming; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-09-01

    Cortical folding, characterized by convex gyri and concave sulci, has an intrinsic relationship to the brain’s functional organization. Understanding the mechanism of the brain’s convoluted patterns can provide useful clues into normal and pathological brain function. In this paper, the cortical folding phenomenon is interpreted both analytically and computationally, and, in some cases, the findings are validated with experimental observations. The living human brain is modeled as a soft structure with a growing outer cortex and inner core to investigate its developmental mechanism. Analytical interpretations of differential growth of the brain model provide preliminary insight into critical growth ratios for instability and crease formation of the developing brain. Since the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution of cortical complex convolution after instability, non-linear finite element models are employed to study the crease formation and secondary morphological folds of the developing brain. Results demonstrate that the growth ratio of the cortex to core of the brain, the initial thickness, and material properties of both cortex and core have great impacts on the morphological patterns of the developing brain. Lastly, we discuss why cortical folding is highly correlated and consistent by presenting an intriguing gyri-sulci formation comparison.

  4. Short-term cortical plasticity induced by conditioning pain modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Buchgreitz, Line; Wang, Li

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of homotopic and heterotopic conditioning pain modulation (CPM) on short-term cortical plasticity. Glutamate (tonic pain) or isotonic saline (sham) was injected in the upper trapezius (homotopic) and in the thenar (heterotopic) muscles. Intramuscular electrical stimulat......To investigate the effects of homotopic and heterotopic conditioning pain modulation (CPM) on short-term cortical plasticity. Glutamate (tonic pain) or isotonic saline (sham) was injected in the upper trapezius (homotopic) and in the thenar (heterotopic) muscles. Intramuscular electrical......, and after homotopic and heterotopic CPM versus control. Peak latencies at N100, P200, and P300 were extracted and the location/strength of corresponding dipole current sources and multiple dipoles were estimated. Homotopic CPM caused hypoalgesia (P = 0.032, 30.6% compared to baseline) to electrical...... stimulation. No cortical changes were found for homotopic CPM. A positive correlation at P200 between electrical pain threshold after tonic pain and the z coordinate after tonic pain (P = 0.032) was found for homotopic CPM. For heterotopic CPM, no significant hypoalgesia was found and a dipole shift of the P...

  5. High-frequency and brief-pulse stimulation pulses terminate cortical electrical stimulation-induced afterdischarges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhi-Wei; Li, Yong-Jie; Yu, Tao; Ni, Duan-Yu; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Du, Wei; Piao, Yuan-Yuan; Zhou, Xiao-Xia

    2017-06-01

    Brief-pulse stimulation at 50 Hz has been shown to terminate afterdischarges observed in epilepsy patients. However, the optimal pulse stimulation parameters for terminating cortical electrical stimulation-induced afterdischarges remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of different brief-pulse stimulation frequencies (5, 50 and 100 Hz) on cortical electrical stimulation-induced afterdischarges in 10 patients with refractory epilepsy. Results demonstrated that brief-pulse stimulation could terminate cortical electrical stimulation-induced afterdischarges in refractory epilepsy patients. In conclusion, (1) a brief-pulse stimulation was more effective when the afterdischarge did not extend to the surrounding brain area. (2) A higher brief-pulse stimulation frequency (especially 100 Hz) was more likely to terminate an afterdischarge. (3) A low current intensity of brief-pulse stimulation was more likely to terminate an afterdischarge.

  6. Focal cortical lesions induce bidirectional changes in the excitability of fast spiking and non fast spiking cortical interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrosci, Barbara; Neitz, Angela; Mittmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A physiological brain function requires neuronal networks to operate within a well-defined range of activity. Indeed, alterations in neuronal excitability have been associated with several pathological conditions, ranging from epilepsy to neuropsychiatric disorders. Changes in inhibitory transmission are known to play a key role in the development of hyperexcitability. However it is largely unknown whether specific interneuronal subpopulations contribute differentially to such pathological condition. In the present study we investigated functional alterations of inhibitory interneurons embedded in a hyperexcitable cortical circuit at the border of chronically induced focal lesions in mouse visual cortex. Interestingly, we found opposite alterations in the excitability of non fast-spiking (Non Fs) and fast-spiking (Fs) interneurons in acute cortical slices from injured animals. Non Fs interneurons displayed a depolarized membrane potential and a higher frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). In contrast, Fs interneurons showed a reduced sEPSCs amplitude. The observed downscaling of excitatory synapses targeting Fs interneurons may prevent the recruitment of this specific population of interneurons to the hyperexcitable network. This mechanism is likely to seriously affect neuronal network function and to exacerbate hyperexcitability but it may be important to protect this particular vulnerable population of GABAegic neurons from excitotoxicity.

  7. Luteolin decreases invasiveness, deactivates STAT3 signaling, and reverses interleukin-6 induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition and matrix metalloproteinase secretion of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang XC

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Xince Huang,1 Shengjie Dai,1 Juji Dai,1 Yuwu Xiao,1 Yongyu Bai,1 Bicheng Chen,1,2 Mengtao Zhou1 1Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Zhejiang Provincial Top Key Discipline in Surgery, Wenzhou Key Laboratory of Surgery, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Luteolin, a flavone, has been shown to exhibit anticancer properties. Here, we investigated whether luteolin affects epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cell lines and their underlying mechanism. Pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and SW1990 were used in our study, and their EMT characters, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression level, invasiveness, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 activity were determined after luteolin treatment. We also treated pancreatic cancer cells with interleukin-6 (IL-6 to see whether IL-6-induced activation of STAT3, EMT, and MMP secretion was affected by luteolin. We found that luteolin inhibits EMT and MMP2, MMP7, and MMP9 expression in a dose-dependent manner, similar to STAT3 signaling. Through Transwell assay, we found that invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells was inhibited by luteolin. EMT characters and MMP secretion increase with STAT3 activity after IL-6 treatment and these effects, caused by IL-6, were inhibited by luteolin. We concluded that luteolin inhibits invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells, and we speculated that luteolin inhibits EMT and MMP secretion likely through deactivation of STAT3 signaling. Luteolin has potential antitumor effects and merits further investigation. Keywords: epithelial–mesenchymal transition, matrix metalloproteinase, luteolin, STAT3

  8. Deactivations during the numerical processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG HongBo; ZHANG Ye; TANG YiYuan; JIN Jing; DONG Feng; FENG ShiGang; ZHANG WuTian

    2007-01-01

    Deactivation has been encountered frequently in functional brain imaging researches. However,the deactivations during the numerical processing have not been reported yet. In this study,the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was employed to investigate the pattern of the deactivation in the brain of 15 healthy subjects during the numerical addition task. Analyses revealed significant deactivations in several brain regions,including the posterior cingulate,precuneus,anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex. Especially,we found notable deactivation in bilateral insula. Accounting for the cognitive functions of these regions participating in a combinated way,we discuss their contributions in sustaining the brain activity during conscious resting state,and indicate that the insula is an important area of gathering auditory information from the external world.

  9. OPTICAL DENSITY OF CORTICAL BONE MATRIX IS DIMINISHED IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED OSTEOPOROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Janić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD and abnormalities in bone structural and material properties, with unexplained low trauma fractures. The aim of the present study was to quantify the optical density of cortical bone matrix in rats with experimentally induced osteoporosis by ovariectomy. The experimental group was divided in two equal subgroups, the first sacrificed in the third month after ovariectomy and second sacrificed in the fifth month after ovariectomy. After decalcification, on routinely stained histopathologic sections optical density (OD, standard deviation of OD, mode OD, minimal and maximal OD of cortical bone matrix were estimated. Mean optical density and mode optical density of cortical bone were statistically higher in the control than in the experimental group (p<0.05. Maximal optical density of cortical bone was significantly lower in rats three months after ovariectomy than in other groups. Obtained results indicate that in experimentally induced osteoporosis the optical density of cortical bone matrix is diminished, similarly to low bone mineral density.

  10. Ischemia-Induced Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Pia Mater Following Cortical Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakagomi, Takayuki; Molnar, Zoltan; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Taguchi, Akihiko; Saino, Orie; Kubo, Shuji; Clausen, Martijn; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Nakagomi, Nami; Matsuyama, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that neural stem/ progenitor cells (NSPCs) can be activated in the nonconventional neurogenic zones such as the cortex following ischemic stroke. However, the precise origin, identity, and subtypes of the ischemia-induced NSPCs (iNSPCs), which can contribute to cortical

  11. Regulation of Masticatory Force During Cortically Induced Rhythmic Jaw Movements in the Anesthetized Rabbit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hidaka, O; Morimoto, T; Masuda, Y; Kato, T; Matsuo, R; Inoue, T; Kobayashi, M; Takada, K

    1997-01-01

    ... Japan Hidaka, O., T. Morimoto, Y. Masuda, T. Kato, R. Matsuo, T. Inoue, M. Kobayashi, and K. Takada. Regulation of masticatory force during cortically induced rhythmic jaw movements in the anesthetized rabbit...

  12. Ischemia-Induced Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Pia Mater Following Cortical Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakagomi, Takayuki; Molnar, Zoltan; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Taguchi, Akihiko; Saino, Orie; Kubo, Shuji; Clausen, Martijn; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Nakagomi, Nami; Matsuyama, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that neural stem/ progenitor cells (NSPCs) can be activated in the nonconventional neurogenic zones such as the cortex following ischemic stroke. However, the precise origin, identity, and subtypes of the ischemia-induced NSPCs (iNSPCs), which can contribute to cortical neu

  13. Subclinical cognitive decline in middle-age is associated with reduced task-induced deactivation of the brain's default mode network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Naja Liv; Lauritzen, Martin; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2014-01-01

    range of neurodegenerative diseases involving cognitive symptoms, in conditions with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, and even in advanced but healthy aging. Here, we investigated brain activation and deactivation during a visual-motor task in 185 clinically healthy males from a Danish birth...

  14. Acidosis-Induced Dysfunction of Cortical GABAergic Neurons through Astrocyte-Related Excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Zhao, Shidi; Lu, Wei; Guan, Sudong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis impairs cognitions and behaviors presumably by acidification-induced changes in neuronal metabolism. Cortical GABAergic neurons are vulnerable to pathological factors and their injury leads to brain dysfunction. How acidosis induces GABAergic neuron injury remains elusive. As the glia cells and neurons interact each other, we intend to examine the role of the astrocytes in acidosis-induced GABAergic neuron injury. Experiments were done at GABAergic cells and astrocytes in mouse cortical slices. To identify astrocytic involvement in acidosis-induced impairment, we induced the acidification in single GABAergic neuron by infusing proton intracellularly or in both neurons and astrocytes by using proton extracellularly. Compared the effects of intracellular acidification and extracellular acidification on GABAergic neurons, we found that their active intrinsic properties and synaptic outputs appeared more severely impaired in extracellular acidosis than intracellular acidosis. Meanwhile, extracellular acidosis deteriorated glutamate transporter currents on the astrocytes and upregulated excitatory synaptic transmission on the GABAergic neurons. Moreover, the antagonists of glutamate NMDA-/AMPA-receptors partially reverse extracellular acidosis-induced injury in the GABAergic neurons. Our studies suggest that acidosis leads to the dysfunction of cortical GABAergic neurons by astrocyte-mediated excitotoxicity, in addition to their metabolic changes as indicated previously.

  15. Isoquercetin protects cortical neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-reperfusion induced injury via suppression of TLR4-NF-кB signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai-Ping; Li, Jian-Long; Zhang, Lu-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Chuan; Yu, Shu; Liang, Xin-Miao; Ding, Fei; Wang, Zhi-Wei

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reperfusion (OGD/R), an in vitro model of ischemia, was used to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of isoquercetin in primary culture of rat cortical neuronal cells. It was found that isoquercetin administered prior to the insult could prevent OGD/R-induced intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) increase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and cell viability decrease. For the first time, isoquercetin is described as a neuroprotective agent that potentially explains the alleviation and prevention from OGD/R-induced injury in neurons. Mechanistic studies showed that the neuroprotective effect of isoquercetin was carried out by anti-inflammatory signaling pathway of inhibiting protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-6, accompanied by the anti-apoptotic signaling pathway of deactivation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), Jun kinase (JNK) and p38, and inhibition of activity of caspase-3. Therefore, these studies highlighted the confirmation of isoquercetin, a flavonoid compound, as an anti-inflammation and anti-apoptosis factor which might be used as a therapeutic strategy for the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) brain injury and related diseases.

  16. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gefei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i. but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  17. [Cortical blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokron, S

    2014-02-01

    Cortical blindness refers to a visual loss induced by a bilateral occipital lesion. The very strong cooperation between psychophysics, cognitive psychology, neurophysiology and neuropsychology these latter twenty years as well as recent progress in cerebral imagery have led to a better understanding of neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness. It thus becomes possible now to propose an earlier diagnosis of cortical blindness as well as new perspectives for rehabilitation in children as well as in adults. On the other hand, studying complex neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness is a way to infer normal functioning of the visual system.

  18. Radiation-induced abnormal cortical thickness in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabao Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional MRI studies showed that radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC in years after radiotherapy (RT could involve brain gray matter (GM and impair brain function. However, it is still unclear the radiation-induced brain morphological changes in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM in the early period after RT. In this study, we acquired high-resolution brain structural MRI data from three groups of patients, 22 before radiotherapy (pre-RT NPC patients with newly diagnosed but not yet medically treated, 22 NPC patients in the early-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-ED, and 20 NPC patients in the late-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-LD, and then analyzed the radiation-induced cortical thickness alteration in NPC patients after RT. Using a vertex-wise surface-based morphometry (SBM approach, we detected significantly decreased cortical thickness in the precentral gyrus (PreCG in the post-RT-ED group compared to the pre-RT group. And the post-RT-LD group showed significantly increased cortical thickness in widespread brain regions, including the bilateral inferior parietal, left isthmus of the cingulate, left bank of the superior temporal sulcus and left lateral occipital regions, compared to the pre-RT group, and in the bilateral PreCG compared to the post-RT-ED group. Similar analysis with ROI-wise SBM method also found the consistent results. These results indicated that radiation-induced brain injury mainly occurred in the post-RT-LD group and the cortical thickness alterations after RT were dynamic in different periods. Our findings may reflect the pathogenesis of radiation-induced brain injury in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM and an early intervention is necessary for protecting GM during RT.

  19. Disruption of cortical integration during midazolam-induced light sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peipeng; Zhang, Han; Xu, Yachao; Jia, Wenbin; Zang, Yufeng; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-11-01

    This work examines the effect of midazolam-induced light sedation on intrinsic functional connectivity of human brain, using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, within-subject design. Fourteen healthy young subjects were enrolled and midazolam (0.03 mg/kg of the participant's body mass, to a maximum of 2.5 mg) or saline were administrated with an interval of one week. Resting-state fMRI was conducted before and after administration for each subject. We focus on two types of networks: sensory related lower-level functional networks and higher-order functions related ones. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify these resting-state functional networks. We hypothesize that the sensory (visual, auditory, and sensorimotor) related networks will be intact under midazolam-induced light sedation while the higher-order (default mode, executive control, salience networks, etc.) networks will be functionally disconnected. It was found that the functional integrity of the lower-level networks was maintained, while that of the higher-level networks was significantly disrupted by light sedation. The within-network connectivity of the two types of networks was differently affected in terms of direction and extent. These findings provide direct evidence that higher-order cognitive functions including memory, attention, executive function, and language were impaired prior to lower-level sensory responses during sedation. Our result also lends support to the information integration model of consciousness.

  20. Salidroside protects cortical neurons against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wei-Yong; Ye, Qiang; Huang, Huan-Jie; Xia, Nian-Ge; Chen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Yi; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glutamate-induced cytotoxicity contributes to autophagic neuron death and is partially mediated by increased oxidative stress. Salidroside has been demonstrated to have neuroprotective effects in glutamate-induced neuronal damage. The precise mechanism of its regulatory role in neuronal autophagy is, however, poorly understood. This study aimed to probe the effects and mechanisms of salidroside in glutamate-induced autophagy activation in cultured rat cortical neurons. Cell viability assay, Western blotting, coimmunoprecipitation, and small interfering RNA were performed to analyze autophagy activities during glutamate-evoked oxidative injury. We found that salidroside protected neonatal neurons from glutamate-induced apoptotic cell death. Salidroside significantly attenuated the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio and expression of Beclin-1, but increased (SQSTM1)/p62 expression under glutamate exposure. Pretreatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an autophagy inhibitor, decreased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, attenuated glutamate-induced cell injury, and mimicked some of the protective effects of salidroside against glutamate-induced cell injury. Molecular analysis demonstrated that salidroside inhibited cortical neuron autophagy in response to glutamate exposure through p53 signaling by increasing the accumulation of cytoplasmic p53. Salidroside inhibited the glutamate-induced dissociation of the Bcl-2-Beclin-1 complex with minor affects on the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. These data demonstrate that the inhibition of autophagy could be responsible for the neuroprotective effects of salidroside on glutamate-induced neuronal injury.

  1. Subcortical substrates of TMS induced modulation of the cortico-cortical connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groppa, Sergiu; Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Otto, Birte

    2013-01-01

    of oscillatory interaction between corresponding central regions of both hemispheres in the alpha band. The contralateral thalamus, transcallosal fibres and the contralateral thalamocortical pathways may constitute critical brain structures mediating the TMS induced change in oscillatory coupling.......BACKGROUND: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can modulate transiently the physiological brain oscillations, e.g. the alpha rhythm. It has been hypothesized that this effect is not limited to the stimulated region but involves subcortical and distant cortical areas. METHODS: We applied single...

  2. Measuring Brain Stimulation Induced Changes in Cortical Properties Using TMS-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sung Wook; Rogasch, Nigel C; Hoy, Kate E; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulatory brain stimulation can induce plastic reorganization of cortical circuits that persist beyond the period of stimulation. Most of our current knowledge about the physiological properties has been derived from the motor cortex. The integration of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) is a valuable method for directly probing excitability, connectivity and oscillatory dynamics of regions throughout the brain. Offering in depth measurement of cortical reactivity, TMS-EEG allows the evaluation of TMS-evoked components that may act as a marker for cortical excitation and inhibition. A growing body of research is using concurrent TMS and EEG (TMS-EEG) to explore the effects of different neuromodulatory techniques such as repetitive TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation on cortical function, particularly in non-motor regions. In this review, we outline studies examining TMS-evoked potentials and oscillations before and after, or during a single session of brain stimulation. Investigating these studies will aid in our understanding of mechanisms involved in the modulation of excitability and inhibition by neuroplasticity following different stimulation paradigms.

  3. Motor cortical plasticity induced by motor learning through mental practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAvanzino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several investigations suggest that actual and mental actions trigger similar neural substrates. Motor learning via physical practice results in long-term potentiation (LTP-like plasticity processes, namely potentiation of M1 and a temporary occlusion of additional LTP-like plasticity. However, whether this neuroplasticity process contributes to improve motor performance through mental practice remains to be determined. Here, we tested skill learning-dependent changes in primary motor cortex (M1 excitability and plasticity by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation in subjects trained to physically execute or mentally perform a sequence of finger opposition movements. Before and after physical practice and motor-imagery practice, M1 excitability was evaluated by measuring the input-output (IO curve of motor evoked potentials. M1 long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD-like plasticity was assessed with paired-associative stimulation (PAS of the median nerve and motor cortex using an interstimulus interval of 25 ms (PAS25 or 10 ms (PAS10, respectively. We found that even if after both practice sessions subjects significantly improved their movement speed, M1 excitability and plasticity were differentially influenced by the two practice sessions. First, we observed an increase in the slope of IO curve after physical but not after motor-imagery practice. Second, there was a reversal of the PAS25 effect from LTP-like plasticity to LTD-like plasticity following physical and motor-imagery practice. Third, LTD-like plasticity (PAS10 protocol increased after physical practice, whilst it was occluded after motor-imagery practice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that motor-imagery practice lead to the development of neuroplasticity, as it affected the PAS25- and PAS10- induced plasticity in M1. These results, expanding the current knowledge on how motor-imagery training shapes M1 plasticity, might have a potential impact in

  4. Abnormal dopaminergic modulation of striato-cortical networks underlies levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N; Christensen, Mark S; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Rowe, James B; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2015-06-01

    Dopaminergic signalling in the striatum contributes to reinforcement of actions and motivational enhancement of motor vigour. Parkinson's disease leads to progressive dopaminergic denervation of the striatum, impairing the function of cortico-basal ganglia networks. While levodopa therapy alleviates basal ganglia dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, it often elicits involuntary movements, referred to as levodopa-induced peak-of-dose dyskinesias. Here, we used a novel pharmacodynamic neuroimaging approach to identify the changes in cortico-basal ganglia connectivity that herald the emergence of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease (age range: 51-84 years; 11 females) received a single dose of levodopa and then performed a task in which they had to produce or suppress a movement in response to visual cues. Task-related activity was continuously mapped with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic causal modelling was applied to assess levodopa-induced modulation of effective connectivity between the pre-supplementary motor area, primary motor cortex and putamen when patients suppressed a motor response. Bayesian model selection revealed that patients who later developed levodopa-induced dyskinesias, but not patients without dyskinesias, showed a linear increase in connectivity between the putamen and primary motor cortex after levodopa intake during movement suppression. Individual dyskinesia severity was predicted by levodopa-induced modulation of striato-cortical feedback connections from putamen to the pre-supplementary motor area (Pcorrected = 0.020) and primary motor cortex (Pcorrected = 0.044), but not feed-forward connections from the cortex to the putamen. Our results identify for the first time, aberrant dopaminergic modulation of striatal-cortical connectivity as a neural signature of levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans. We argue that excessive striato-cortical connectivity in response to levodopa produces an

  5. Involvement of MEK/ERK pathway in cephaloridine-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Yuka; Hiramatsu, Jun; Gemba, Munekazu

    2003-07-20

    We have previously reported that free radical-mediated injury induced by cephaloridine (CER) is enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, in rat renal cortical slices. We have also shown that PKC activation in mitochondria is involved in CER-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. We investigated the role of a downstream PKC pathway, a MEK/ERK pathway, in free radical-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices exposed to CER. Immediately after preparing slices from rat renal cortex, the slices were incubated in the medium containing MEK inhibitors. ERK1/2 activation was determined by Western blot analysis for phosphorylated ERK (pERK) 1/2 protein in nucleus fraction prepared from the slices exposed to CER. Prominently, CER caused not only increases in lipid peroxidation as an index of free radical generation and in LDH leakage as that of cell injury in the slices, but also marked activation of ERK1/2 in nucleus fraction. PD98059 and U0126, MEK1/2 inhibitors, significantly attenuated CER-induced increases in lipid peroxidation and LDH leakage in the slices. PD98059 also suppressed ERK1/2 activation in nucleus fraction prepared from the slices treated with CER. Inhibition of other MAP kinase pathways, p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) had no effect on CER-induced increases in lipid peroxidation level and LDH leakage in the slices. The present results suggest that a MEK/ERK pathway down stream of a PKC pathway is probably involved in free radical-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices exposed to CER.

  6. Schisandrin B protects rat cortical neurons against Abeta1-42-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Xue-Mei

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of schisandrin B on amyloid-beta1-42-induced toxicity and its potential mechanisms in rat cortical neuron cells. Amyloid beta1-42 significantly reduced cell viability and increased apoptosis. Pretreatment with schisandrin B prior to amyloid-beta1-42 exposure significantly elevated cell viability and reduced apoptosis. The anti-apoptotic effect of schisandrin B in rat cortical neurons was mediated by up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and down-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax. Schisandrin B also reduced the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytosol and decreased caspase-9 and caspase-3 activities. Furthermore, schisandrin B increased activities of anti-oxidant reduced glutathione and decreased production of oxidative glutathione. Taken together, these results suggest that schisandrin B protected primary cultures of rat cortical cells against amyloid-beta1-42-induced neurotoxicity through anti-apoptosis involved in a mitochondria-mediated pathway and anti-oxidant action. Schisandrin B may represent a potential treatment strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Cadmium induces reactive oxygen species generation and lipid peroxidation in cortical neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, E; Arce, C; Oset-Gasque, M J; Cañadas, S; González, M P

    2006-03-15

    Cadmium is a toxic agent that it is also an environmental contaminant. Cadmium exposure may be implicated in some humans disorders related to hyperactivity and increased aggressiveness. This study presents data indicating that cadmium induces cellular death in cortical neurons in culture. This death could be mediated by an apoptotic and a necrotic mechanism. The apoptotic death may be mediated by oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation which could be induced by mitochondrial membrane dysfunction since this cation produces: (a) depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential and (b) diminution of ATP levels with ATP release. Necrotic death could be mediated by lipid peroxidation induced by cadmium through an indirect mechanism (ROS formation). On the other hand, 40% of the cells survive cadmium action. This survival seems to be mediated by the ability of these cells to activate antioxidant defense systems, since cadmium reduced the intracellular glutathione levels and induced catalase and SOD activation in these cells.

  8. Electronically induced contrast enhancement in whisker S1 cortical response fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kraus, Lee M; Francis, Joseph T

    2014-01-01

    The ability of an organism to specifically attend to relevant sensory information during learning and subsequent performance of a task is highly dependent on the release of the neurotransmitter Acetylcholine (ACh). Electrophysiological studies have shown that pairing endogenous ACh with specific visual or auditory stimuli induces long lasting enhancements of subsequent cortical responses to the previously paired stimulus. In this study we present data suggesting that similar effects can be elicited in the rat whisker sensory system. Specifically, we show that pairing whisker deflection with electrical stimulation of the magnocellular basal nucleus (BN: a natural source of cortical ACh) causes an increase in the center-surround contrast of the treated whisker's cortical response field (CRF). Meanwhile, deflections of whiskers distant from the treated whisker show overall increased response magnitudes, but non-significant changes in contrast between principle vs. surround barrel responses. Control trials, in which BN stimulation was not paired with whisker deflection, showed similar lack of contrast enhancement. These results indicate that BN stimulation, paired with incoming whisker information, selectively increases the paired whisker's CRF center-surround contrast, while unpaired BN stimulation causes a more general increases in S1 responsiveness, without contrast modulation. Enhanced control over whisker sensory pathway attentional mechanisms has the potential to facilitate a more effective transfer of desired information to the animal's neural processing circuitry, thereby allowing experimental evaluation of more complex behavior and cognition than was previously possible.

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 contributes to VX-induced cell death in cultured cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenn, Catherine C; Weiss, M Tracy; Beaup, Claire; Peinnequin, Andre; Wang, Yushan; Dorandeu, Frederic

    2012-04-05

    The link between cell death and increased cyclooxygenases-2 (COX-2) activity has not been clearly established. In this study, we examined whether COX-2 activation contributed to the mechanism of neurotoxicity produced by an organophosphorous nerve agent in cultured rat cortical neurons. Exposure of neuronal cells to the nerve agent, VX resulted in an increase in COX enzyme activity in the culture media. A concentration dependent increase in the activity levels of COX-2 enzyme was observed while there was little to no effect on COX-1. In addition, COX-2 mRNA and protein levels increased several hours post-VX exposure. Pre-treatment of the cortical cells with the COX-2 selective inhibitor, NS 398 resulted in a decrease in both the enzyme activity and prostaglandin (PGE(2) and PGF(2α)) release, as well as in a reduction in cell death. These findings indicate that the increase in COX-2 activity may contribute to the mechanism of VX-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neuron.

  10. Baicalein reverts L-valine-induced persistent sodium current up-modulation in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caioli, Silvia; Candelotti, Elena; Pedersen, Jens Z; Saba, Luana; Antonini, Alessia; Incerpi, Sandra; Zona, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    L-valine is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) largely used as dietary integrator by athletes and involved in some inherited rare diseases such as maple syrup urine disease. This pathology is caused by an altered BCAA metabolism with the accumulation of toxic keto acids in tissues and body fluids with consequent severe neurological symptoms. In animal models of BCAA accumulation, increased oxidative stress levels and lipid peroxidation have been reported. The aim of this study was to analyze both whether high BCAA concentrations in neurons induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and whether, by performing electrophysiological recordings, the neuronal functional properties are modified. Our results demonstrate that in primary cortical cultures, a high dose of valine increases ROS production and provokes neuronal hyperexcitability because the action potential frequencies and the persistent sodium current amplitudes increase significantly compared to non-treated neurons. Since Baicalein, a flavone obtained from the Scutellaria root, has been shown to act as a strong antioxidant with neuroprotective effects, we evaluated its possible antioxidant activity in primary cortical neurons chronically exposed to L-valine. The preincubation of cortical neurons with Baicalein prevents the ROS production and is able to revert both the neuronal hyperexcitability and the increase of the persistent sodium current, indicating a direct correlation between the ROS production and the altered physiological parameters. In conclusion, our data show that the electrophysiological alterations of cortical neurons elicited by high valine concentration are due to the increase in ROS production, suggesting much caution in the intake of BCAA dietary integrators.

  11. Cortical plasticity induced by transplantation of embryonic somatostatin or parvalbumin interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunshuo; Stryker, Michael P; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Espinosa, Juan Sebastian

    2014-12-23

    GABAergic inhibition has been shown to play an important role in the opening of critical periods of brain plasticity. We recently have shown that transplantation of GABAergic precursors from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), the source of neocortical parvalbumin- (PV(+)) and somatostatin-expressing (SST(+)) interneurons, can induce a new period of ocular dominance plasticity (ODP) after the endogenous period has closed. Among the diverse subtypes of GABAergic interneurons PV(+) cells have been thought to play the crucial role in ODP. Here we have used MGE transplantation carrying a conditional allele of diphtheria toxin alpha subunit and cell-specific expression of Cre recombinase to deplete PV(+) or SST(+) interneurons selectively and to investigate the contributions of each of these types of interneurons to ODP. As expected, robust plasticity was observed in transplants containing PV(+) cells but in which the majority of SST(+) interneurons were depleted. Surprisingly, transplants in which the majority of PV(+) cells were depleted induced plasticity as effectively as those containing PV(+) cells. In contrast, depleting both cell types blocked induction of plasticity. These findings reveal that PV(+) cells do not play an exclusive role in ODP; SST(+) interneurons also can drive cortical plasticity and contribute to the reshaping of neural networks. The ability of both PV(+) and SST(+) interneurons to induce de novo cortical plasticity could help develop new therapeutic approaches for brain repair.

  12. Selective inhibition of deactivated mitochondrial complex I by biguanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi; Humphries, Kenneth M

    2015-03-24

    Biguanides are widely used antihyperglycemic agents for diabetes mellitus and prediabetes treatment. Complex I is the rate-limiting step of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), a major source of mitochondrial free radical production, and a known target of biguanides. Complex I has two reversible conformational states, active and de-active. The deactivated state is promoted in the absence of substrates but is rapidly and fully reversed to the active state in the presence of NADH. The objective of this study was to determine the relative sensitivity of active/de-active complex I to biguanide-mediated inhibition and resulting superoxide radical (O₂(•⁻)) production. Using isolated rat heart mitochondria, we show that deactivation of complex I sensitizes it to metformin and phenformin (4- and 3-fold, respectively), but not to other known complex I inhibitors, such as rotenone. Mitochondrial O₂(•⁻) production by deactivated complex I was measured fluorescently by NADH-dependent 2-hydroxyethidium formation at alkaline pH to impede reactivation. Superoxide production was 260.4% higher than in active complex I at pH 9.4. However, phenformin treatment of de-active complex I decreased O₂(•⁻) production by 14.9%, while rotenone increased production by 42.9%. Mitochondria isolated from rat hearts subjected to cardiac ischemia, a condition known to induce complex I deactivation, were sensitized to phenformin-mediated complex I inhibition. This supports the idea that the effects of biguanides are likely to be influenced by the complex I state in vivo. These results demonstrate that the complex I active and de-active states are a determinant in biguanide-mediated inhibition.

  13. Protective effects of isoatriplicolide tiglate from Paulownia coreana against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat cortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Kim, Eun-Hye; Jeon, Hyun-Seok; Moon, Hyung-In

    2010-06-01

    To examine the neuroprotective effects of Paulownia coreana, we tested its protection against the glutamate-induced neurotoxicity to primary cultured cortical neurons. An aqueous extract of the plants exhibited significant protection against glutamate-induced toxicity in primary cultured rat cortical cells. In order to clarify the neuroprotective mechanism(s) of this observed effect, isolation was performed to seek and identify active fractions and components. By such fractionation, one bioactive sesquiterpene lactone, isoatriplicolide tiglate, was isolated, which exhibited significant neuroprotective activities against glutamate-induced toxicity, exhibiting cell viability of about 50%, at concentrations ranging from 0.1 microM to 10 microM.

  14. Dissociation of motor task-induced cortical excitability and pain perception changes in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena S Volz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is evidence that interventions aiming at modulation of the motor cortex activity lead to pain reduction. In order to understand further the role of the motor cortex on pain modulation, we aimed to compare the behavioral (pressure pain threshold and neurophysiological effects (transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS induced cortical excitability across three different motor tasks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifteen healthy male subjects were enrolled in this randomized, controlled, blinded, cross-over designed study. Three different tasks were tested including motor learning with and without visual feedback, and simple hand movements. Cortical excitability was assessed using single and paired-pulse TMS measures such as resting motor threshold (RMT, motor-evoked potential (MEP, intracortical facilitation (ICF, short intracortical inhibition (SICI, and cortical silent period (CSP. All tasks showed significant reduction in pain perception represented by an increase in pressure pain threshold compared to the control condition (untrained hand. ANOVA indicated a difference among the three tasks regarding motor cortex excitability change. There was a significant increase in motor cortex excitability (as indexed by MEP increase and CSP shortening for the simple hand movements. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although different motor tasks involving motor learning with and without visual feedback and simple hand movements appear to change pain perception similarly, it is likely that the neural mechanisms might not be the same as evidenced by differential effects in motor cortex excitability induced by these tasks. In addition, TMS-indexed motor excitability measures are not likely good markers to index the effects of motor-based tasks on pain perception in healthy subjects as other neural networks besides primary motor cortex might be involved with pain modulation during motor training.

  15. UPREGULATION OF BNIP3 AND TRANSLOCATION TO MITOCHONDRIA MEDIATES CYANIDE-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN CORTICAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, K.; Li, L.; Zhang, L.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2008-01-01

    BNIP3, a BH3 domain only Bcl-2 protein, has been identified as a mitochrondrial mediator of hypoxia-induced cell death. Since cyanide produces histotoxic anoxia (chemical hypoxia), the present study was undertaken in primary cortical cells to determine involvement of the BNIP3 signaling pathway in cyanide-induced death. Over a 20 h exposure KCN increased BNIP3 expression, followed by a concentration-related apoptotic death. To determine if BNIP3 plays a role in the cell death, expression was either overexpressed with BNIP3 cDNA (BNIP3+) or knocked down with small interfering RNA (RNAi). In BNIP3+ cells, cyanide-induced apoptotic death was markedly enhanced and preceded by reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and elevated caspase 3 and 7 activity. Pretreatment with the pan caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk suppressed BNIP3+-mediated cell death, thus confirming a caspase-dependent apoptosis. On the other hand, BNIP3 knock down by RNAi or antagonism of BNIP3 by a transmembrane-deleted dominant-negative mutant (BNIP3ΔTM) markedly reduced cell death. Immunohistochemical imaging showed that cyanide stimulated translocation of BNIP3 from cytosol to mitochondria and displacement studies with BNIP3ΔTM showed that integration of BNIP3 into the mitochondrial outer membrane was necessary for the cell death. In BNIP3+ cells, cyclosporin-A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial pore transition, blocked the cyanide-induced reduction of Δψm and decreased the apoptotic death. These results demonstrate in cortical cells that cyanide induces a rapid upregulation of BNIP3 expression, followed by translocation to the mitochondrial outer membrane to reduceΔψm This was followed by mitochondrial release of cytochrome c to execute a caspase-dependent cell death. PMID:17980495

  16. Tissue-type plasminogen activator induces synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cerebral cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, M; Wu, F; Torre, E; Cuellar-Giraldo, D; Jia, D; Cheng, L

    2016-04-05

    The release of the serine proteinase tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from the presynaptic terminal of cerebral cortical neurons plays a central role in the development of synaptic plasticity, adaptation to metabolic stress and neuronal survival. Our earlier studies indicate that by inducing the recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein βII-spectrin and voltage-gated calcium channels to the active zone, tPA promotes Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of synaptic vesicles (SVs) to the synaptic release site where they release their load of neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments to investigate whether this effect leads to depletion of SVs in the presynaptic terminal. Our data indicate that tPA promotes SV endocytosis via a mechanism that does not require the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. Instead, we show that tPA induces calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation, which is followed by dynamin I-induced recruitment of the actin-binding protein profilin II to the presynaptic membrane, and profilin II-induced F-actin formation. We report that this tPA-induced sequence of events leads to the association of newly formed SVs with F-actin clusters in the endocytic zone. In summary, the data presented here indicate that following the exocytotic release of neurotransmitters tPA activates the mechanism whereby SVs are retrieved from the presynaptic membrane and endocytosed to replenish the pool of vesicles available for a new cycle of exocytosis. Together, these results indicate that in murine cerebral cortical neurons tPA plays a central role coupling SVs exocytosis and endocytosis.

  17. Cortical regulation of dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in striatal medium spiny neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, M D; Schmidt, D E; Deutch, A Y

    2007-10-26

    The proximate cause of Parkinson's disease is striatal dopamine depletion. Although no overt toxicity to striatal neurons has been reported in Parkinson's disease, one of the consequences of striatal dopamine loss is a decrease in the number of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Dendrites of these neurons receive cortical glutamatergic inputs onto the dendritic spine head and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra onto the spine neck. This synaptic arrangement suggests that dopamine gates corticostriatal glutamatergic drive onto spines. Using triple organotypic slice cultures composed of ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and cortex of the neonatal rat, we examined the role of the cortex in dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in MSNs. The striatal dopamine innervation was lesioned by treatment of the cultures with the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) or by removing the mesencephalon. Both MPP+ and mesencephalic ablation decreased MSN dendritic spine density. Analysis of spine morphology revealed that thin spines were preferentially lost after dopamine depletion. Removal of the cortex completely prevented dopamine depletion-induced spine loss. These data indicate that the dendritic remodeling of MSNs seen in parkinsonism occurs secondary to increases in corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, and suggest that modulation of cortical activity may be a useful therapeutic strategy in Parkinson's disease.

  18. Controlled-deactivation cannabinergic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rishi; Nikas, Spyros P; Paronis, Carol A; Wood, Jodianne T; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Guo, Jason Jianxin; Thakur, Ganesh A; Kulkarni, Shashank; Benchama, Othman; Raghav, Jimit Girish; Gifford, Roger S; Järbe, Torbjörn U C; Bergman, Jack; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-12-27

    We report an approach for obtaining novel cannabinoid analogues with controllable deactivation and improved druggability. Our design involves the incorporation of a metabolically labile ester group at the 2'-position on a series of (-)-Δ(8)-THC analogues. We have sought to introduce benzylic substituents α to the ester group which affect the half-lives of deactivation through enzymatic activity while enhancing the affinities and efficacies of individual ligands for the CB1 and CB2 receptors. The 1'-(S)-methyl, 1'-gem-dimethyl, and 1'-cyclobutyl analogues exhibit remarkably high affinities for both CB receptors. The novel ligands are susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis by plasma esterases in a controllable manner, while their metabolites are inactive at the CB receptors. In further in vitro and in vivo experiments key analogues were shown to be potent CB1 receptor agonists and to exhibit CB1-mediated hypothermic and analgesic effects.

  19. Pharmacological Mechanisms of Cortical Enhancement Induced by the Repetitive Pairing of Visual/Cholinergic Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Il Kang

    Full Text Available Repetitive visual training paired with electrical activation of cholinergic projections to the primary visual cortex (V1 induces long-term enhancement of cortical processing in response to the visual training stimulus. To better determine the receptor subtypes mediating this effect the selective pharmacological blockade of V1 nicotinic (nAChR, M1 and M2 muscarinic (mAChR or GABAergic A (GABAAR receptors was performed during the training session and visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded before and after training. The training session consisted of the exposure of awake, adult rats to an orientation-specific 0.12 CPD grating paired with an electrical stimulation of the basal forebrain for a duration of 1 week for 10 minutes per day. Pharmacological agents were infused intracortically during this period. The post-training VEP amplitude was significantly increased compared to the pre-training values for the trained spatial frequency and to adjacent spatial frequencies up to 0.3 CPD, suggesting a long-term increase of V1 sensitivity. This increase was totally blocked by the nAChR antagonist as well as by an M2 mAChR subtype and GABAAR antagonist. Moreover, administration of the M2 mAChR antagonist also significantly decreased the amplitude of the control VEPs, suggesting a suppressive effect on cortical responsiveness. However, the M1 mAChR antagonist blocked the increase of the VEP amplitude only for the high spatial frequency (0.3 CPD, suggesting that M1 role was limited to the spread of the enhancement effect to a higher spatial frequency. More generally, all the drugs used did block the VEP increase at 0.3 CPD. Further, use of each of the aforementioned receptor antagonists blocked training-induced changes in gamma and beta band oscillations. These findings demonstrate that visual training coupled with cholinergic stimulation improved perceptual sensitivity by enhancing cortical responsiveness in V1. This enhancement is mainly mediated by n

  20. Chronic ciguatoxin treatment induces synaptic scaling through voltage gated sodium channels in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Rubiolo, Juan A; Roel, Maria; Hirama, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shuji; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2015-06-15

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channels activators that cause ciguatera, one of the most widespread nonbacterial forms of food poisoning, which presents with long-term neurological alterations. In central neurons, chronic perturbations in activity induce homeostatic synaptic mechanisms that adjust the strength of excitatory synapses and modulate glutamate receptor expression in order to stabilize the overall activity. Immediate early genes, such as Arc and Egr1, are induced in response to activity changes and underlie the trafficking of glutamate receptors during neuronal homeostasis. To better understand the long lasting neurological consequences of ciguatera, it is important to establish the role that chronic changes in activity produced by ciguatoxins represent to central neurons. Here, the effect of a 30 min exposure of 10-13 days in vitro (DIV) cortical neurons to the synthetic ciguatoxin CTX 3C on Arc and Egr1 expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Since the toxin increased the mRNA levels of both Arc and Egr1, the effect of CTX 3C in NaV channels, membrane potential, firing activity, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and glutamate receptors expression in cortical neurons after a 24 h exposure was evaluated using electrophysiological and western blot approaches. The data presented here show that CTX 3C induced an upregulation of Arc and Egr1 that was prevented by previous coincubation of the neurons with the NaV channel blocker tetrodotoxin. In addition, chronic CTX 3C caused a concentration-dependent shift in the activation voltage of NaV channels to more negative potentials and produced membrane potential depolarization. Moreover, 24 h treatment of cortical neurons with 5 nM CTX 3C decreased neuronal firing and induced synaptic scaling mechanisms, as evidenced by a decrease in the amplitude of mEPSCs and downregulation in the protein level of glutamate receptors that was also prevented by tetrodotoxin

  1. Effects of parietal TMS on visual and auditory processing at the primary cortical level -- a concurrent TMS-fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Werner, Sebastian; Pohmann, Rolf; Noppeney, Uta

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that multisensory interactions emerge already at the primary cortical level. Specifically, auditory inputs were shown to suppress activations in visual cortices when presented alone but amplify the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses to concurrent visual inputs (and vice versa). This concurrent transcranial magnetic stimulation-functional magnetic resonance imaging (TMS-fMRI) study applied repetitive TMS trains at no, low, and high intensity over right intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and vertex to investigate top-down influences on visual and auditory cortices under 3 sensory contexts: visual, auditory, and no stimulation. IPS-TMS increased activations in auditory cortices irrespective of sensory context as a result of direct and nonspecific auditory TMS side effects. In contrast, IPS-TMS modulated activations in the visual cortex in a state-dependent fashion: it deactivated the visual cortex under no and auditory stimulation but amplified the BOLD response to visual stimulation. However, only the response amplification to visual stimulation was selective for IPS-TMS, while the deactivations observed for IPS- and Vertex-TMS resulted from crossmodal deactivations induced by auditory activity to TMS sounds. TMS to IPS may increase the responses in visual (or auditory) cortices to visual (or auditory) stimulation via a gain control mechanism or crossmodal interactions. Collectively, our results demonstrate that understanding TMS effects on (uni)sensory processing requires a multisensory perspective.

  2. Lycopene Prevents Amyloid [Beta]-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress and Dysfunctions in Cultured Rat Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mingyue; Jiang, Zheng; Liao, Yuanxiang; Song, Zhenyao; Nan, Xinzhong

    2016-06-01

    Brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) show a large spectrum of mitochondrial alterations at both morphological and genetic level. The causal link between β-amyloid (Aβ) and mitochondrial dysfunction has been established in cellular models of AD. We observed previously that lycopene, a member of the carotenoid family of phytochemicals, could counteract neuronal apoptosis and cell damage induced by Aβ and other neurotoxic substances, and that this neuroprotective action somehow involved the mitochondria. The present study aims to investigate the effects of lycopene on mitochondria in cultured rat cortical neurons exposed to Aβ. It was found that lycopene attenuated Aβ-induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by the decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondria-derived superoxide production. Additionally, lycopene ameliorated Aβ-induced mitochondrial morphological alteration, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pores and the consequent cytochrome c release. Lycopene also improved mitochondrial complex activities and restored ATP levels in Aβ-treated neuron. Furthermore, lycopene prevented mitochondrial DNA damages and improved the protein level of mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria. Those results indicate that lycopene protects mitochondria against Aβ-induced damages, at least in part by inhibiting mitochondrial oxidative stress and improving mitochondrial function. These beneficial effects of lycopene may account for its protection against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity.

  3. Subthalamic and Cortical Local Field Potentials Associated with Pilocarpine-Induced Oral Tremor in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lauren L; Podurgiel, Samantha J; Haque, Aileen F; Errante, Emily L; Chrobak, James J; Salamone, John D

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) are rapid vertical deflections of the lower jaw that resemble chewing but are not directed at any particular stimulus. In rodents, TJMs are induced by neurochemical conditions that parallel those seen in human Parkinsonism, including neurotoxic or pharmacological depletion of striatal dopamine (DA), DA antagonism, and cholinomimetic administration. Moreover, TJMs in rodents can be attenuated by antiparkinsonian agents, including levodopa (L-DOPA), DA agonists, muscarinic antagonists, and adenosine A2A antagonists. In human Parkinsonian patients, exaggerated physiological synchrony is seen in the beta frequency band in various parts of the cortical/basal ganglia/thalamic circuitry, and activity in the tremor frequency range (3-7 Hz) also has been recorded. The present studies were undertaken to determine if tremor-related local field potential (LFP) activity could be recorded from motor cortex (M1) or subthalamic nucleus (STN) during the TJMs induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, which is a well-known tremorogenic agent. Pilocarpine induced a robust TJM response that was marked by rhythmic electromyographic (EMG) activity in the temporalis muscle. Compared to periods with no tremor activity, TJM epochs were characterized by increased LFP activity in the tremor frequency range in both neocortex and STN. Tremor activity was not associated with increased synchrony in the beta frequency band. These studies identified tremor-related LFP activity in parts of the cortical/basal ganglia circuitry that are involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism. This research may ultimately lead to identification of the oscillatory neural mechanisms involved in the generation of tremulous activity, and promote development of novel treatments for tremor disorders.

  4. Adaptation to Cortical Noise Induced by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Occipital Lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Heslip

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is increasingly used as a method to modify and study functional brain activity. However, results from various studies have produced conflicting theories on how TMS of cortical tissue influences ongoing visual processing. To investigate this issue, single pulse TMS was applied over left V1 in five healthy subjects during an orientation discrimination task (vertical vs. horizontal using a Gabor patch (2 c/deg, presented 6° in the right visual field. Stimulus contrast was set to each individual's threshold, measured in the absence of TMS. When TMS was applied over V1 performance decreased in all observers (by 1.2–8.7% compared to accuracy levels obtained during stimulation of a control site (Cz. Crucially, accuracy levels during V1 stimulation gradually improved across blocks of 200 trials in some subjects, whereas performance remained stable during control site stimulation. In contrast, this pattern of recovery was not found in an analogous backward masking paradigm, using a brief visual noise mask instead of a TMS pulse. These results show that that the magnitude of TMS disruption can dissipate with repeated stimulation. This suggests that future studies using this technique should minimise the length of TMS exposure within each session to maximise its effectiveness. Our results show that the visual system can adapt dynamically to increased internal noise levels, minimising the impact of TMS induced cortical activity on sensory judgments.

  5. STIM1 and Orai1 mediate thrombin-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Claudia; Sampieri, Alicia; Vivas, Oscar; Peña-Segura, Claudia; Vaca, Luis

    2012-12-01

    In astrocytes, thrombin leads to cytoplasmic Ca(2+) elevations modulating a variety of cytoprotective and cytotoxic responses. Astrocytes respond to thrombin stimulation with a biphasic Ca(2+) increase generated by an interplay between ER-Ca(2+) release and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). In many cell types, STIM1 and Orai1 have been demonstrated to be central components of SOCE. STIM1 senses the ER-Ca(2+) depletion and binds Orai1 to activate Ca(2+) influx. Here we used immunocytochemistry, overexpression and siRNA assays to investigate the role of STIM1 and Orai1 in the thrombin-induced Ca(2+) response in primary cultures of rat cortical astrocytes. We found that STIM1 and Orai1 are endogenously expressed in cortical astrocytes and distribute accordingly with other mammalian cells. Importantly, native and overexpressed STIM1 reorganized in puncta under thrombin stimulation and this reorganization was reversible. In addition, the overexpression of STIM1 and Orai1 increased by twofold the Ca(2+) influx evoked by thrombin, while knockdown of endogenous STIM1 and Orai1 significantly decreased this Ca(2+) influx. These results indicate that STIM1 and Orai1 underlie an important fraction of the Ca(2+) response that astrocytes exhibit in the presence of thrombin. Thrombin stimulation in astrocytes leads to ER-Ca(2+) release which causes STIM1 reorganization allowing the activation of Orai1 and the subsequent Ca(2+) influx. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypergravity induces reorientation of cortical microtubules and modifies growth anisotropy in azuki bean epicotyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro; Hoson, Takayuki

    2006-11-01

    We examined the changes in the orientation of cortical microtubules during the hypergravity-induced modification of growth anisotropy (inhibition of elongation growth and promotion of lateral growth) in azuki bean (Vigna angularis Ohwi et Ohashi) epicotyls. The percentage of cells with transverse microtubules was decreased, while that with longitudinal microtubules was increased, in proportion to the logarithm of the magnitude of gravity. The percentage of cells with longitudinal microtubules showed an increase within 0.5 h of transfer of the 1g-grown seedlings to a 300g-hypergravity condition. Lanthanum and gadolinium, blockers of calcium channels, nullified the modification of growth anisotropy and reorientation of microtubules by hypergravity. Horizontal and acropetal hypergravity modified growth anisotropy and reorientation of microtubules, as did basipetal hypergravity, and these changes were not seen in the presence of lanthanum or gadolinium. These results suggest that hypergravity changes activities of lanthanum- and gadolinium-sensitive calcium channels independently of its direction, which may lead to reorientation of cortical microtubules and modification of growth anisotropy in azuki bean epicotyls.

  7. A rare CYP 21 mutation (p.E431K) induced deactivation of CYP 21A2 and resulted in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Yuki; Usui, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Masanobu; Miyahara, Naoki; Nishimura, Rei; Hanaki, Keiichi; Kanzaki, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is caused by mutations in the CYP21A2 gene. The residual enzyme activity is strongly associated with the phenotype. We describe a rare case of CAH with a rare CYP21A2 mutation. The patient was a one-year-old Japanese boy. At 16 days old, he was referred to our hospital because of elevated serum 17-OH-progesterone (17-OHP) levels in neonatal screening. The compound heterozygous mutations (IVS2-13 A/C>G, and p.E431K) in CYP21A2 were identified at 2 months old, and we diagnosed non-classical CAH, since he did not have significant physical signs (pigmentation and salt-wasting). However, his body weight decreased, and his serum 17-OHP level (99.5 ng/mL) was elevated at 3 months old. Steroid replacement therapy was started at 3 months old. Our patient's clinical course resembled simple virilizing (SV) CAH, but classification was difficult because the patient showed increased renin activity indicating an aldosterone deficiency, and late onset of symptoms. While the IVS 2-13 A/C>G mutation is common in the classical form of CAH, p.E431K is a rare point mutation. Functional analysis revealed that the residual enzyme activity of p.E431L was 5.08±2.55% for 17-OHP and 4.12±2.37% for progesterone, which is consistent with SV CAH. p.E431 is localized in the L-helix near the heme-binding site. The mutation might interfere with heme binding, leading to deactivation of CYP21A2. This report showed that CYP21A2 p.E431 has an important effect on enzyme activity.

  8. Serum inducible kinase is a positive regulator of cortical dendrite development and is required for BDNF-promoted dendritic arborization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-Ling Guo; Guo-He Tan; Shuai Li; Xue-Wen Cheng; Ya Zhou; Yun-Fang Jia; Hui Xiong; Jiong Tao; Zhi-Qi Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Serum inducible kinase (SNK),also known as (p)olo-(l)ike (k)inase 2 (PLK2),is a known regulator of mitosis,synaptogenesis and synaptic homeostasis.However,its role in early cortical development is unknown.Herein,we show that snk is expressed in the cortical plate from embryonic day 14,but not in the ventricular/subventricular zones (VZ/SVZ),and SNK protein localizes to the soma and dendrites of cultured immature cortical neurons.Loss of SNK impaired dendritic but not axonal arborization in a dose-dependent manner and overexpression had opposite effects,both in vitro and in vivo.Overexpression of SNK also caused abnormal branching of the leading process of migrating cortical neurons in electroporated cortices.The kinase activity was necessary for these effects.Extracellular signalregulated kinase (ERK) pathway activity downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulation led to increases in SNK protein expression via transcriptional regulation,and this upregulation was necessary for the growth-promoting effect of BDNF on dendritic arborization.Taken together,our results indicate that SNK is essential for dendrite morphogenesis in cortical neurons.

  9. Activity Changes Induced by Spatio-Temporally Correlated Stimuli in Cultured Cortical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Yuzo; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    Activity-dependent plasticity probably plays a key role in learning and memory in biological information processing systems. Though long-term potentiation and depression have been extensively studied in the filed of neuroscience, little is known on the mechanisms for integrating these modifications on network-wide activity changes. In this report, we studied effects of spatio-temporally correlated stimuli on the neuronal network activity. Rat cortical neurons were cultured on substrates with 64 embedded micro-electrodes and the evoked responses were extracellularly recorded and analyzed. We compared spatio-temporal patterns of the responses between before and after repetitive application of correlated stimuli. After the correlated stimuli, the networks showed significantly different responses from those in the initial states. The modified activity reflected structures of the repeatedly applied correlated stimuli. The results suggested that spatiotemporally correlated inputs systematically induced modification of synaptic strengths in neuronal networks, which could serve as an underlying mechanism of associative memory.

  10. CD44 deficiency inhibits unloading-induced cortical bone loss through downregulation of osteoclast activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuheng; Zhong, Guohui; Sun, Weijia; Zhao, Chengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Song, Jinping; Zhao, Dingsheng; Jin, Xiaoyan; Li, Qi; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    The CD44 is cellular surface adhesion molecule that is involved in physiological processes such as hematopoiesis, lymphocyte homing and limb development. It plays an important role in a variety of cellular functions including adhesion, migration, invasion and survival. In bone tissue, CD44 is widely expressed in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes. However, the mechanisms underlying its role in bone metabolism remain unclear. We found that CD44 expression was upregulated during osteoclastogenesis. CD44 deficiency in vitro significantly inhibited osteoclast activity and function by regulating the NF-κB/NFATc1-mediated pathway. In vivo, CD44 mRNA levels were significantly upregulated in osteoclasts isolated from the hindlimb of tail-suspended mice. CD44 deficiency can reduce osteoclast activity and counteract cortical bone loss in the hindlimb of unloaded mice. These results suggest that therapeutic inhibition of CD44 may protect from unloading induced bone loss by inhibiting osteoclast activity.

  11. EFFECT OF MELATONIN AGAINST GLUTAMATE-INDUCED EXCITOTOXICITY ON CULTURED CEREBRAL CORTICAL NEURONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To research the effect of melatonin against glutamate excitotoxicity. Methods The model of glutamate-induced excitotoxic damage was built up in rat cerebral cortical cell culture. The effect of mela- tonin against excitotoxic injury was observed by determining the leakage rate of lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) from neurons. Results The leakage rate of LDH wasn't decreased markedly when cultures were exposed to melatonin be- fore, during or 6 h after glutamate treatment. The leakage rate of LDH was decreased significantly when melatonin was administered 0 h, 2 h or 4 h after the cultures were exposed to glutamate. The inhibitory function of melatonin on LDH leakage was most effective at 2 h and 4 h. Conclusion Melatonin has protective effects on neurons damaged by glutamate in a certain time limit.

  12. Heterogeneous Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris D. Argyle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Deactivation of heterogeneous catalysts is a ubiquitous problem that causes loss of catalytic rate with time. This review on deactivation and regeneration of heterogeneous catalysts classifies deactivation by type (chemical, thermal, and mechanical and by mechanism (poisoning, fouling, thermal degradation, vapor formation, vapor-solid and solid-solid reactions, and attrition/crushing. The key features and considerations for each of these deactivation types is reviewed in detail with reference to the latest literature reports in these areas. Two case studies on the deactivation mechanisms of catalysts used for cobalt Fischer-Tropsch and selective catalytic reduction are considered to provide additional depth in the topics of sintering, coking, poisoning, and fouling. Regeneration considerations and options are also briefly discussed for each deactivation mechanism.

  13. Aluminum—induced apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons and its effects on SAPK/JNK signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FuHJ; DongSZ

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) exposure and apoptotic cell death have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases.the mechanisms by which Al interacts with the nervous system are only partly understood.In this study,we used cultured cortical neurons to investigate the ability of Al to induce the apoptosis of neurons and to explore the role of SAPK/JNK signal transduction pathway on the apoptosis induced by Al.It was found that Al-induced degeneration of cortical neurons involved the DNA fragmentation characteristic of apoptosis.The rate of apoptosis increased significantly,which was measured by TdT-mediated dUTKP nick end labeling.Westerm blot analysis showed that SAPK/JNK activities of cortical neurons varied when the dose and exposure time of AlCl3 were different.Our study demonstrates that Al can induce the apoptosis of cortical neurons and SAPK/JNK signal transduction pathway may play a great role in the apoptosis.

  14. Cortical plasticity induced by rapid Hebbian learning of novel tonal word-forms : Evidence from mismatch negativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, Jinxing; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Alter, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Although several experiments reported rapid cortical plasticity induced by passive exposure to novel segmental patterns, few studies have devoted attention to the neural dynamics during the rapid learning of novel tonal word-forms in tonal languages, such as Chinese. In the current study, native

  15. Potential protection of green tea polyphenols against 1800 MHz electromagnetic radiation-induced injury on rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Li; Wen, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2011-10-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) are harmful to public health, but the certain anti-irradiation mechanism is not clear yet. The present study was performed to investigate the possible protective effects of green tea polyphenols against electromagnetic radiation-induced injury in the cultured rat cortical neurons. In this study, green tea polyphenols were used in the cultured cortical neurons exposed to 1800 MHz EMFs by the mobile phone. We found that the mobile phone irradiation for 24 h induced marked neuronal cell death in the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) and TUNEL (TdT mediated biotin-dUTP nicked-end labeling) assay, and protective effects of green tea polyphenols on the injured cortical neurons were demonstrated by testing the content of Bcl-2 Assaciated X protein (Bax) in the immunoprecipitation assay and Western blot assay. In our study results, the mobile phone irradiation-induced increases in the content of active Bax were inhibited significantly by green tea polyphenols, while the contents of total Bax had no marked changes after the treatment of green tea polyphenols. Our results suggested a neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols against the mobile phone irradiation-induced injury on the cultured rat cortical neurons.

  16. Abscisic acid induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through cortical microtubule reorganization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Shogo; Hirayama, Takashi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Takahashi, Taku; Motose, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates seed maturation, germination and various stress responses in plants. The roles of ABA in cellular growth and morphogenesis, however, remain to be explored. Here, we report that ABA induces the ectopic outgrowth of epidermal cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. Seedlings of A. thaliana germinated and grown in the presence of ABA developed ectopic protrusions in the epidermal cells of hypocotyls, petioles and cotyledons. One protrusion was formed in the middle of each epidermal cell. In the hypocotyl epidermis, two types of cell files are arranged alternately into non-stoma cell files and stoma cell files, ectopic protrusions being restricted to the non-stoma cell files. This suggests the presence of a difference in the degree of sensitivity to ABA or in the capacity of cells to form protrusions between the two cell files. The ectopic outgrowth was suppressed in ABA insensitive mutants, whereas it was enhanced in ABA hypersensitive mutants. Interestingly, ABA-induced ectopic outgrowth was also suppressed in mutants in which microtubule organization was compromised. Furthermore, cortical microtubules were disorganized and depolymerized by the ABA treatment. These results suggest that ABA signaling induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through microtubule reorganization. PMID:26068445

  17. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zheng, Ruimao, E-mail: rmzheng@pku.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shigong, E-mail: sgzhu@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  18. Learning strategy trumps motivational level in determining learning-induced auditory cortical plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieszczad, Kasia M; Weinberger, Norman M

    2010-02-01

    Associative memory for auditory-cued events involves specific plasticity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) that facilitates responses to tones which gain behavioral significance, by modifying representational parameters of sensory coding. Learning strategy, rather than the amount or content of learning, can determine this learning-induced cortical (high order) associative representational plasticity (HARP). Thus, tone-contingent learning with signaled errors can be accomplished either by (1) responding only during tone duration ("tone-duration" strategy, T-Dur), or (2) responding from tone onset until receiving an error signal for responses made immediately after tone offset ("tone-onset-to-error", TOTE). While rats using both strategies achieve the same high level of performance, only those using the TOTE strategy develop HARP, viz., frequency-specific decreased threshold (increased sensitivity) and decreased bandwidth (increased selectivity) (Berlau & Weinberger, 2008). The present study challenged the generality of learning strategy by determining if high motivation dominates in the formation of HARP. Two groups of adult male rats were trained to bar-press during a 5.0kHz (10s, 70dB) tone for a water reward under either high (HiMot) or moderate (ModMot) levels of motivation. The HiMot group achieved a higher level of correct performance. However, terminal mapping of A1 showed that only the ModMot group developed HARP, i.e., increased sensitivity and selectivity in the signal-frequency band. Behavioral analysis revealed that the ModMot group used the TOTE strategy while HiMot subjects used the T-Dur strategy. Thus, type of learning strategy, not level of learning or motivation, is dominant for the formation of cortical plasticity.

  19. Retinal lesions induce fast intrinsic cortical plasticity in adult mouse visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, Katrien; Vreysen, Samme; Laramée, Marie-Eve; Cuyvers, Annemie; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Van Brussel, Leen; Eysel, Ulf T; Nys, Julie; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-09-01

    Neuronal activity plays an important role in the development and structural-functional maintenance of the brain as well as in its life-long plastic response to changes in sensory stimulation. We characterized the impact of unilateral 15° laser lesions in the temporal lower visual field of the retina, on visually driven neuronal activity in the afferent visual pathway of adult mice using in situ hybridization for the activity reporter gene zif268. In the first days post-lesion, we detected a discrete zone of reduced zif268 expression in the contralateral hemisphere, spanning the border between the monocular segment of the primary visual cortex (V1) with extrastriate visual area V2M. We could not detect a clear lesion projection zone (LPZ) in areas lateral to V1 whereas medial to V2M, agranular and granular retrosplenial cortex showed decreased zif268 levels over their full extent. All affected areas displayed a return to normal zif268 levels, and this was faster in higher order visual areas than in V1. The lesion did, however, induce a permanent LPZ in the retinorecipient layers of the superior colliculus. We identified a retinotopy-based intrinsic capacity of adult mouse visual cortex to recover from restricted vision loss, with recovery speed reflecting the areal cortical magnification factor. Our observations predict incomplete visual field representations for areas lateral to V1 vs. lack of retinotopic organization for areas medial to V2M. The validation of this mouse model paves the way for future interrogations of cortical region- and cell-type-specific contributions to functional recovery, up to microcircuit level.

  20. Playing and listening to tailor-made notched music: cortical plasticity induced by unimodal and multimodal training in tinnitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Janna; Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Bruchmann, Maximilian; Wollbrink, Andreas; Rudack, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The generation and maintenance of tinnitus are assumed to be based on maladaptive functional cortical reorganization. Listening to modified music, which contains no energy in the range of the individual tinnitus frequency, can inhibit the corresponding neuronal activity in the auditory cortex. Music making has been shown to be a powerful stimulator for brain plasticity, inducing changes in multiple sensory systems. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and behavioral measurements we evaluated the cortical plasticity effects of two months of (a) active listening to (unisensory) versus (b) learning to play (multisensory) tailor-made notched music in nonmusician tinnitus patients. Taking into account the fact that uni- and multisensory trainings induce different patterns of cortical plasticity we hypothesized that these two protocols will have different affects. RESULTS. Only the active listening (unisensory) group showed significant reduction of tinnitus related activity of the middle temporal cortex and an increase in the activity of a tinnitus-coping related posterior parietal area. CONCLUSIONS. These findings indicate that active listening to tailor-made notched music induces greater neuroplastic changes in the maladaptively reorganized cortical network of tinnitus patients while additional integration of other sensory modalities during training reduces these neuroplastic effects.

  1. Playing and Listening to Tailor-Made Notched Music: Cortical Plasticity Induced by Unimodal and Multimodal Training in Tinnitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Pape

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The generation and maintenance of tinnitus are assumed to be based on maladaptive functional cortical reorganization. Listening to modified music, which contains no energy in the range of the individual tinnitus frequency, can inhibit the corresponding neuronal activity in the auditory cortex. Music making has been shown to be a powerful stimulator for brain plasticity, inducing changes in multiple sensory systems. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG and behavioral measurements we evaluated the cortical plasticity effects of two months of (a active listening to (unisensory versus (b learning to play (multisensory tailor-made notched music in nonmusician tinnitus patients. Taking into account the fact that uni- and multisensory trainings induce different patterns of cortical plasticity we hypothesized that these two protocols will have different affects. Results. Only the active listening (unisensory group showed significant reduction of tinnitus related activity of the middle temporal cortex and an increase in the activity of a tinnitus-coping related posterior parietal area. Conclusions. These findings indicate that active listening to tailor-made notched music induces greater neuroplastic changes in the maladaptively reorganized cortical network of tinnitus patients while additional integration of other sensory modalities during training reduces these neuroplastic effects.

  2. Plasticity Induced by Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Bilateral Motor Cortices Is Not Altered in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickins, Daina S E; Sale, Martin V; Kamke, Marc R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that plasticity induced in the motor cortex by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is attenuated in older adults. Those investigations, however, have focused solely on the stimulated hemisphere. Compared to young adults, older adults exhibit more widespread activity across bilateral motor cortices during the performance of unilateral motor tasks, suggesting that the manifestation of plasticity might also be altered. To address this question, twenty young (65 years) underwent intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) whilst attending to the hand targeted by the plasticity-inducing procedure. The amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by single pulse TMS was used to quantify cortical excitability before and after iTBS. Individual responses to iTBS were highly variable, with half the participants showing an unexpected decrease in cortical excitability. Contrary to predictions, however, there were no age-related differences in the magnitude or manifestation of plasticity across bilateral motor cortices. The findings suggest that advancing age does not influence the capacity for, or manifestation of, plasticity induced by iTBS.

  3. Plasticity Induced by Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Bilateral Motor Cortices Is Not Altered in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daina S. E. Dickins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported that plasticity induced in the motor cortex by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is attenuated in older adults. Those investigations, however, have focused solely on the stimulated hemisphere. Compared to young adults, older adults exhibit more widespread activity across bilateral motor cortices during the performance of unilateral motor tasks, suggesting that the manifestation of plasticity might also be altered. To address this question, twenty young (65 years underwent intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS whilst attending to the hand targeted by the plasticity-inducing procedure. The amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by single pulse TMS was used to quantify cortical excitability before and after iTBS. Individual responses to iTBS were highly variable, with half the participants showing an unexpected decrease in cortical excitability. Contrary to predictions, however, there were no age-related differences in the magnitude or manifestation of plasticity across bilateral motor cortices. The findings suggest that advancing age does not influence the capacity for, or manifestation of, plasticity induced by iTBS.

  4. Clinacanthus nutans Protects Cortical Neurons Against Hypoxia-Induced Toxicity by Downregulating HDAC1/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Da; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Kao, Mei-Han; Chen, Jin-Jer; Sun, Grace Y; Ong, Wei-Yi; Lin, Teng-Nan

    2016-09-01

    Many population-based epidemiological studies have unveiled an inverse correlation between intake of herbal plants and incidence of stroke. C. nutans is a traditional herbal medicine widely used for snake bite, viral infection and cancer in Asian countries. However, its role in protecting stroke damage remains to be studied. Despite of growing evidence to support epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis and recovery of stroke, a clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still lacking. In the present study, primary cortical neurons were subjected to in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-reoxygenation and hypoxic neuronal death was used to investigate the interaction between C. nutans and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Using pharmacological agents (HDAC inhibitor/activator), loss-of-function (HDAC siRNA) and gain-of-function (HDAC plasmid) approaches, we demonstrated an early induction of HDAC1/2/3/8 and HDAC6 in neurons after OGD insult. C. nutans extract selectively inhibited HDAC1 and HDAC6 expression and attenuated neuronal death. Results of reporter analysis further revealed that C. nutans suppressed HDAC1 and HDAC6 transcription. Besides ameliorating neuronal death, C. nutans also protected astrocytes and endothelial cells from hypoxic-induced cell death. In summary, results support ability for C. nutans to suppress post-hypoxic HDACs activation and mitigate against OGD-induced neuronal death. This study further opens a new avenue for the use of herbal medicines to regulate epigenetic control of brain injury.

  5. TMS-induced cortical potentiation during wakefulness locally increases slow wave activity during sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Huber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep slow wave activity (SWA is thought to reflect sleep need, increasing in proportion to the length of prior wakefulness and decreasing during sleep. However, the process responsible for SWA regulation is not known. We showed recently that SWA increases locally after a learning task involving a circumscribed brain region, suggesting that SWA may reflect plastic changes triggered by learning. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis directly, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS in conjunction with high-density EEG in humans. We show that 5-Hz TMS applied to motor cortex induces a localized potentiation of TMS-evoked cortical EEG responses. We then show that, in the sleep episode following 5-Hz TMS, SWA increases markedly (+39.1+/-17.4%, p<0.01, n = 10. Electrode coregistration with magnetic resonance images localized the increase in SWA to the same premotor site as the maximum TMS-induced potentiation during wakefulness. Moreover, the magnitude of potentiation during wakefulness predicts the local increase in SWA during sleep. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide direct evidence for a link between plastic changes and the local regulation of sleep need.

  6. Neuroprotection with metformin and thymoquinone against ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in prenatal rat cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullah Ikram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to ethanol during early development triggers severe neuronal death by activating multiple stress pathways and causes neurological disorders, such as fetal alcohol effects or fetal alcohol syndrome. This study investigated the effect of ethanol on intracellular events that predispose developing neurons for apoptosis via calcium-mediated signaling. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms of ethanol neurotoxicity are not completely determined, mitochondrial dysfunction, altered calcium homeostasis and apoptosis-related proteins have been implicated in ethanol neurotoxicity. The present study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective mechanisms of metformin (Met and thymoquinone (TQ during ethanol toxicity in rat prenatal cortical neurons at gestational day (GD 17.5. Results We found that Met and TQ, separately and synergistically, increased cell viability after ethanol (100 mM exposure for 12 hours and attenuated the elevation of cytosolic free calcium [Ca2+]c. Furthermore, Met and TQ maintained normal physiological mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔψM, which is typically lowered by ethanol exposure. Increased cytosolic free [Ca2+]c and lowered mitochondrial transmembrane potential after ethanol exposure significantly decreased the expression of a key anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, increased expression of Bax, and stimulated the release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria. Met and TQ treatment inhibited the apoptotic cascade by increasing Bcl-2 expression. These compounds also repressed the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and reduced the cleavage of PARP-1. Morphological conformation of cell death was assessed by TUNEL, Fluoro-Jade-B, and PI staining. These staining methods demonstrated more cell death after ethanol treatment, while Met, TQ or Met plus TQ prevented ethanol-induced apoptotic cell death. Conclusion These findings suggested that Met and TQ are strong protective agents against ethanol-induced

  7. Cerebellar and Motor Cortical Transcranial Stimulation Decrease Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesias in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Cortese, Francesca; Bianchi, Marta; Pittera, Dario; Turrone, Rosanna; Bocci, Tommaso; Borroni, Barbara; Vergari, Maurizio; Cogiamanian, Filippo; Ardolino, Gianluca; Di Fonzo, Alessio; Padovani, Alessandro; Priori, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive technique for inducing prolonged functional changes in the human cerebral cortex. This simple and safe neurostimulation technique for modulating motor functions in Parkinson's disease could extend treatment option for patients with movement disorders. We assessed whether tDCS applied daily over the cerebellum (cerebellar tDCS) and motor cortex (M1-tDCS) improves motor and cognitive symptoms and levodopa-induced dyskinesias in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nine patients (aged 60-85 years; four women; Hoehn & Yahr scale score 2-3) diagnosed as having idiopathic PD were recruited. To evaluate how tDCS (cerebellar tDCS or M1-tDCS) affects motor and cognitive function in PD, we delivered bilateral anodal (2 mA, 20 min, five consecutive days) and sham tDCS, in random order, in three separate experimental sessions held at least 1 month apart. In each session, as outcome variables, patients underwent the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III and IV) and cognitive testing before treatment (baseline), when treatment ended on day 5 (T1), 1 week later (T2), and then 4 weeks later (T3), at the same time each day. After patients received anodal cerebellar tDCS and M1-tDCS for five days, the UPDRS IV (dyskinesias section) improved (p  0.05). Despite the small sample size, our preliminary results show that anodal tDCS applied for five consecutive days over the motor cortical areas and cerebellum improves parkinsonian patients' levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

  8. Acute phencyclidine administration induces c-Fos-immunoreactivity in interneurons in cortical and subcortical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervig, Mona E.; Thomsen, Morten S; Kalló, Imre;

    2016-01-01

    ) field of hippocampus and mediodorsal thalamus (MD); (2) PV-IR cells in the ventrolateral orbitofrontal and retrosplenial cortices and CA1 field of hippocampus; and (3) CB-IR cells in the motor cortex. Overall, our data indicate that PCP activates a wide range of cortical and subcortical brain regions...

  9. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P bone length (6%), middiaphyseal cross-sectional area (20%), and the amount of newly accreted bone collagen (28%) in the total pool of middiaphyseal bone collagen. Cortical bone density, mean hydroxyapatite crystal size, and the calcium and collagen contents (microgram/mm3) were significantly smaller in the GH group (P bone collagen maturation, and mean hydroxyapatite crystal size may be independently regulated during rapid growth.

  10. Cannabinoid receptors activation and glucocorticoid receptors deactivation in the amygdala prevent the stress-induced enhancement of a negative learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramot, Assaf; Akirav, Irit

    2012-05-01

    The enhancement of emotional memory is clearly important as emotional stimuli are generally more significant than neutral stimuli for surviving and reproduction purposes. Yet, the enhancement of a negative emotional memory following exposure to stress may result in dysfunctional or intrusive memory that underlies several psychiatric disorders. Here we examined the effects of stress exposure on a negative emotional learning experience as measured by a decrease in the magnitude of the expected quantity of reinforcements in an alley maze. In contrast to other fear-related negative experiences, reward reduction is more associated with frustration and is assessed by measuring the latency to run the length of the alley to consume the reduced quantity of reward. We also examined whether the cannabinoid receptors agonist WIN55,212-2 (5 μg/side) and the glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) antagonist RU-486 (10 ng/side) administered into the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) could prevent the stress-induced enhancement. We found that intra-BLA RU-486 or WIN55,212 before stress exposure prevented the stress-induced enhancement of memory consolidation for reduction in reward magnitude. These findings suggest that cannabinoid receptors and GRs in the BLA are important modulators of stress-induced enhancement of emotional memory.

  11. [Olpadronate prevents cortical and trabecular bone loss induced by supraphysiological dosis of thyroxine in ovariectomized rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeni, S N; Gómez Acotto, C; Di Gregorio, S

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present report was to clarify the effect of excess T4 on axial and peripheral bone mineral density (BMD) in estrogen-depleted rats. The protective effect of olpadronate (Olpa) on axial and peripheral bone mass in thyroxine-treated rats was also investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used: SHAM, OVX + Vh, OVX + Olpa (0.3 mg/kg/week), OVX + T4 (250 micrograms/kg/day) and OVX + T4 + Olpa rats. OVX + Vh group presented a BMD lower than SHAM in the tibia (p < 0.01) but not in femur or lumbar spine; the middle tibia BMD did not change but it was lower at the distal (pns.) and proximal levels (p < 0.003) in OVX + Vh. OVX + T4 rats presented a BMD significantly lower than OVX + Vh rats in total tibia (p < 0.02), femur (p < 0.006) and lumbar spine (p < 0.006). Moreover the BMD was lower in all studied areas of the tibia, but it was statistically significant only at the middle level (p < 0.004). OVX + Olpa rats had a BMD higher than OVX + Vh rats in femur (p < 0.002), lumbar spine (p < 0.0001), total (p < 0.001) and proximal tibia (p < 0.001). Surprisingly, total and proximal tibia BMD values in OVX + Olpa rats presented a BMD significantly higher than OVX + T4 rats in femur (p < 0.001), lumbar spine (p < 0.001), tibia (p < 0.001) and proximal tibia (p < 0.0001). It is important to point out that OVX + T4 + Olpa BMD was significantly higher than in SHAM rats at the lumbar spine, total and proximal tibia (p < 0.01). The present study suggests that although supraphysiological thyroid hormone affected both cortical and trabecular bone, under estrogen-depleted conditions, the cortical bone appears to be more sensitive than the trabecular bone to T4 treatment. We also found that Olpa could prevent the peripheral and axial bone loss induced by thyroid hormone excess.

  12. Cortical plasticity induced by short-term multimodal musical rhythm training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lappe

    Full Text Available Performing music is a multimodal experience involving the visual, auditory, and somatosensory modalities as well as the motor system. Therefore, musical training is an excellent model to study multimodal brain plasticity. Indeed, we have previously shown that short-term piano practice increase the magnetoencephalographic (MEG response to melodic material in novice players. Here we investigate the impact of piano training using a rhythmic-focused exercise on responses to rhythmic musical material. Musical training with non musicians was conducted over a period of two weeks. One group (sensorimotor-auditory, SA learned to play a piano sequence with a distinct musical rhythm, another group (auditory, A listened to, and evaluated the rhythmic accuracy of the performances of the SA-group. Training-induced cortical plasticity was evaluated using MEG, comparing the mismatch negativity (MMN in response to occasional rhythmic deviants in a repeating rhythm pattern before and after training. The SA-group showed a significantly greater enlargement of MMN and P2 to deviants after training compared to the A- group. The training-induced increase of the rhythm MMN was bilaterally expressed in contrast to our previous finding where the MMN for deviants in the pitch domain showed a larger right than left increase. The results indicate that when auditory experience is strictly controlled during training, involvement of the sensorimotor system and perhaps increased attentional recources that are needed in producing rhythms lead to more robust plastic changes in the auditory cortex compared to when rhythms are simply attended to in the auditory domain in the absence of motor production.

  13. Neuroprotective effect of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on aluminium-induced temporal cortical degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekong, Moses B; Ekpo, Mfon M; Akpanyung, Edet O; Nwaokonko, Dennis U

    2017-04-11

    Aluminium (Al), one of the metals implicated in neurodegeneration easily gain access to the nervous system through its presence in many manufactured foods, medicines and drinking water, and causes neurotoxicity utilizing the reactive oxygen specie pathway. The need to curtail these effects on the nervous system motivated the use of the plant Moringa oleifera (MO). This study thus, investigated the neuroprotective effects of MO leaf extract on aluminium-induced temporal cortical degeneration in rats. 24 male albino Wistar rats were grouped (n = 6) into control (1 ml/kg distilled water), l00 mg/kg aluminium chloride (AlCl3), 300 mg/kg MO, and 100 mg/kg AlCl3 and 300 mg/kg MO groups. The administration lasted for 28 days and the rats were sacrificed on day 29 by perfusion-fixation after blood was obtained for serum Al estimation. The brain tissues were then routinely processed for some histological and immunnolabelling studies. There was no significant difference in serum Al in the test groups. Histological results showed atrophied and karyorrhetic cells with loss of Nissl substance in the temporal cortex of the AlCl3 group, while no adverse effect was observed in the cytoarchitecture of the temporal cortex and Nissl substance of the MO group. However, groups which were administered AlCl3 simultaneously with MO extract showed less degenerative features in the cyto-architecture of the temporal cortex with normal Nissl substance staining. There was increased neuron specific enolase (NSE) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expressions in the AlCl3 group, while the MO group also showed increased NSE but decreased GFAP expression. However, the group which were administered AlCl3 simultaneously with MO extract showed less expression of NSE and GFAP. In conclusion, MO protects against Al-induced neurotoxicity of the temporal cortex of rats.

  14. Cortical plasticity induced by short-term multimodal musical rhythm training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, Claudia; Trainor, Laurel J; Herholz, Sibylle C; Pantev, Christo

    2011-01-01

    Performing music is a multimodal experience involving the visual, auditory, and somatosensory modalities as well as the motor system. Therefore, musical training is an excellent model to study multimodal brain plasticity. Indeed, we have previously shown that short-term piano practice increase the magnetoencephalographic (MEG) response to melodic material in novice players. Here we investigate the impact of piano training using a rhythmic-focused exercise on responses to rhythmic musical material. Musical training with non musicians was conducted over a period of two weeks. One group (sensorimotor-auditory, SA) learned to play a piano sequence with a distinct musical rhythm, another group (auditory, A) listened to, and evaluated the rhythmic accuracy of the performances of the SA-group. Training-induced cortical plasticity was evaluated using MEG, comparing the mismatch negativity (MMN) in response to occasional rhythmic deviants in a repeating rhythm pattern before and after training. The SA-group showed a significantly greater enlargement of MMN and P2 to deviants after training compared to the A- group. The training-induced increase of the rhythm MMN was bilaterally expressed in contrast to our previous finding where the MMN for deviants in the pitch domain showed a larger right than left increase. The results indicate that when auditory experience is strictly controlled during training, involvement of the sensorimotor system and perhaps increased attentional recources that are needed in producing rhythms lead to more robust plastic changes in the auditory cortex compared to when rhythms are simply attended to in the auditory domain in the absence of motor production.

  15. Caudal Ganglionic Eminence Precursor Transplants Disperse and Integrate as Lineage-Specific Interneurons but Do Not Induce Cortical Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Larimer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The maturation of inhibitory GABAergic cortical circuits regulates experience-dependent plasticity. We recently showed that the heterochronic transplantation of parvalbumin (PV or somatostatin (SST interneurons from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE reactivates ocular dominance plasticity (ODP in the postnatal mouse visual cortex. Might other types of interneurons similarly induce cortical plasticity? Here, we establish that caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE-derived interneurons, when transplanted into the visual cortex of neonatal mice, migrate extensively in the host brain and acquire laminar distribution, marker expression, electrophysiological properties, and visual response properties like those of host CGE interneurons. Although transplants from the anatomical CGE do induce ODP, we found that this plasticity reactivation is mediated by a small fraction of MGE-derived cells contained in the transplant. These findings demonstrate that transplanted CGE cells can successfully engraft into the postnatal mouse brain and confirm the unique role of MGE lineage neurons in the induction of ODP.

  16. Releasing the Cortical Brake by Non-Invasive Electromagnetic Stimulation? rTMS Induces LTD of GABAergic Neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Maximilian; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique which modulates cortical excitability beyond the stimulation period. However, despite its clinical use rTMS-based therapies which prevent or reduce disabilities in a functionally significant and sustained manner are scarce. It remains unclear how rTMS-mediated changes in cortical excitability, which are not task- or input-specific, exert beneficial effects in some healthy subjects and patients. While experimental evidence exists that repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) is linked to the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory neurotransmission, less attention has been dedicated to rTMS-induced structural, functional and molecular adaptations at inhibitory synapses. In this review article we provide a concise overview on basic neuroscience research, which reveals an important role of local disinhibitory networks in promoting associative learning and memory. These studies suggest that a reduction in inhibitory neurotransmission facilitates the expression of associative plasticity in cortical networks under physiological conditions. Hence, it is interesting to speculate that rTMS may act by decreasing GABAergic neurotransmission onto cortical principal neurons. Indeed, evidence has been provided that rTMS is capable of modulating inhibitory networks. Consistent with this suggestion recent basic science work discloses that a 10 Hz rTMS protocol reduces GABAergic synaptic strength on principal neurons. These findings support a model in which rTMS-induced long-term depression (LTD) of GABAergic synaptic strength mediates changes in excitation/inhibition-balance of cortical networks, which may in turn facilitate (or restore) the ability of stimulated networks to express input- and task-specific associative synaptic plasticity.

  17. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons integrate in stroke-injured cortex and improve functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero, Daniel; Wattananit, Somsak; Grønning Madsen, Marita; Koch, Philipp; Wood, James; Tatarishvili, Jemal; Mine, Yutaka; Ge, Ruimin; Monni, Emanuela; Devaraju, Karthikeyan; Hevner, Robert F; Brüstle, Oliver; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2013-12-01

    Stem cell-based approaches to restore function after stroke through replacement of dead neurons require the generation of specific neuronal subtypes. Loss of neurons in the cerebral cortex is a major cause of stroke-induced neurological deficits in adult humans. Reprogramming of adult human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells is a novel approach to produce patient-specific cells for autologous transplantation. Whether such cells can be converted to functional cortical neurons that survive and give rise to behavioural recovery after transplantation in the stroke-injured cerebral cortex is not known. We have generated progenitors in vitro, expressing specific cortical markers and giving rise to functional neurons, from long-term self-renewing neuroepithelial-like stem cells, produced from adult human fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. At 2 months after transplantation into the stroke-damaged rat cortex, the cortically fated cells showed less proliferation and more efficient conversion to mature neurons with morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a cortical phenotype and higher axonal projection density as compared with non-fated cells. Pyramidal morphology and localization of the cells expressing the cortex-specific marker TBR1 in a certain layered pattern provided further evidence supporting the cortical phenotype of the fated, grafted cells, and electrophysiological recordings demonstrated their functionality. Both fated and non-fated cell-transplanted groups showed bilateral recovery of the impaired function in the stepping test compared with vehicle-injected animals. The behavioural improvement at this early time point was most likely not due to neuronal replacement and reconstruction of circuitry. At 5 months after stroke in immunocompromised rats, there was no tumour formation and the grafted cells exhibited electrophysiological properties of mature neurons with evidence of integration in host circuitry. Our

  18. PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, E.N. III

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of PUREX at the Hanford Site, and to preserve that configuration for a 10-year horizon. The 10-year horizon is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents they typical time duration expended to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. This document was prepared to increase attention to worker safety issues during the deactivation project and, as such, identifies the documentation and programs associated with PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety.

  19. Restoration of Progranulin Expression Rescues Cortical Neuron Generation in an Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of Frontotemporal Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Raitano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand how haploinsufficiency of progranulin (PGRN causes frontotemporal dementia (FTD, we created induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients carrying the GRNIVS1+5G > C mutation (FTD-iPSCs. FTD-iPSCs were fated to cortical neurons, the cells most affected in FTD. Although generation of neuroprogenitors was unaffected, their further differentiation into CTIP2-, FOXP2-, or TBR1-TUJ1 double-positive cortical neurons, but not motorneurons, was significantly decreased in FTD-neural progeny. Zinc finger nuclease-mediated introduction of GRN cDNA into the AAVS1 locus corrected defects in cortical neurogenesis, demonstrating that PGRN haploinsufficiency causes inefficient cortical neuron generation. RNA sequencing analysis confirmed reversal of the altered gene expression profile following genetic correction. We identified the Wnt signaling pathway as one of the top defective pathways in FTD-iPSC-derived neurons, which was reversed following genetic correction. Differentiation of FTD-iPSCs in the presence of a WNT inhibitor mitigated defective corticogenesis. Therefore, we demonstrate that PGRN haploinsufficiency hampers corticogenesis in vitro.

  20. The Fas/Fas ligand death receptor pathway contributes to phenylalanine-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Huang

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU, an autosomal recessive disorder of amino acid metabolism caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH gene, leads to childhood mental retardation by exposing neurons to cytotoxic levels of phenylalanine (Phe. A recent study showed that the mitochondria-mediated (intrinsic apoptotic pathway is involved in Phe-induced apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons, but it is not known if the death receptor (extrinsic apoptotic pathway and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-associated apoptosis also contribute to neurodegeneration in PKU. To answer this question, we used specific inhibitors to block each apoptotic pathway in cortical neurons under neurotoxic levels of Phe. The caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-FMK strongly attenuated apoptosis in Phe-treated neurons (0.9 mM, 18 h, suggesting involvement of the Fas receptor (FasR-mediated cell death receptor pathway in Phe toxicity. In addition, Phe significantly increased cell surface Fas expression and formation of the Fas/FasL complex. Blocking Fas/FasL signaling using an anti-Fas antibody markedly inhibited apoptosis caused by Phe. In contrast, blocking the ER stress-induced cell death pathway with salubrinal had no effect on apoptosis in Phe-treated cortical neurons. These experiments demonstrate that the Fas death receptor pathway contributes to Phe-induced apoptosis and suggest that inhibition of the death receptor pathway may be a novel target for neuroprotection in PKU patients.

  1. Stronger activation and deactivation in archery experts for differential cognitive strategy in visuospatial working memory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeehye; Kim, Yang-Tae; Song, Hui-Jin; Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Jongmin; Jung, Tae-Du; Lee, Gunyoung; Kwon, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Gu; Chang, Yongmin

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that elite athletes have higher performance in perception, planning, and execution in sports activities relative to novices. It remains controversial, however, whether any differences in basic cognitive functions between experts and novices exist. Furthermore, few studies have directly used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural activation and deactivation differences between experts and novices while performing visuospatial working memory (WM) tasks. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in neural activation and deactivation associated with working memory components in processing visuospatial information between archery experts and novices. To this end, we employed a judgment of line orientation (JLO) task, which has a strong WM component. With regard to brain activation, archery experts displayed higher activation in cortical areas associated with visuospatial attention and working memory, including the middle frontal cortex, supplemental motor area, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex than that of the novices during the performance of the JLO task. With regard to brain deactivation, archery experts exhibited stronger task-related deactivation in cortical areas, such as the paracentral cortex/precuneus and the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex related to the default network, than that of the novices. These results suggest that the archery experts have a strategy that demands greater use of neural correlates associated with visuospatial working memory and attention in addition to greater use of DMN in visuospatial working memory task not directly tied to their domain of expertise.

  2. Anti-HSV Activity of Kuwanon X from Mulberry Leaves with Genes Expression Inhibitory and HSV-1 Induced NF-κB Deactivated Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Shen, Wenwei; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Li, Manmei; Wang, Yifei; Zou, Yuxiao; Li, Yaolan; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Six stilbene derivatives isolated from Mulberry leaves including Kuwanon X, Mulberrofuran C, Mulberrofuran G, Moracin C, Moracin M 3'-O-b-glucopyranoside and Moracin M were found to have antiviral effects against herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) at different potencies except for Mulberrofuran G. Kuwanon X exhibited the greatest activity against HSV-1 15577 and clinical strains and HSV-2 strain 333 with IC50 values of 2.2, 1.5 and 2.5 µg/mL, respectively. Further study revealed that Kuwanon X did not inactivate cell-free HSV-1 particles, but inhibited cellular adsorption and penetration of HSV-1 viral particles. Following viral penetration, Kuwanon X reduced the expression of HSV-1 IE and L genes, and decreased the synthesis of HSV-1 DNA. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that Kuwanon X inhibited the HSV-1-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation through blocking the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB. These results suggest that Kuwanon X exerts anti-HSV activity through multiple modes and could be a potential candidate for the therapy of HSV infection.

  3. Modulation by cyclic AMP and phorbol myristate acetate of cephaloridine-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Y; Gemba, M

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and protein kinase C (PKC) have been suggested to modulate the generation of free radicals. We investigated the effects of cAMP and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, on cephaloridine (CER)-induced renal cell injury, which has been reported to be due to the generation of free radicals. Incubation of rat renal cortical slices with CER resulted in increases in lipid peroxidation and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and in decreases in gluconeogenesis and p-aminohippurate (PAH) accumulation in rat renal cortical slices, suggesting free radical-induced injury in slices exposed to CER. A derivative of cAMP ameliorated not only the increase in lipid peroxidation but also the renal cell damage induced by CER. This amelioration by a cAMP derivative of lipid peroxidation and renal cell damage caused by CER was blocked by KT 5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Lipid peroxidation and the indices of cell injury were increased by PMA. PMA also enhanced CER-induced lipid peroxidation and cell damage in the slices. This enhancement by PMA of CER-induced injury was blocked by H-7, a PKC inhibitor. These results indicated that intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and PKC modulate free radical-mediated nephrotoxicity induced by CER.

  4. Photo-controlled deactivation of immobilised lipase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poloni, Claudia; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L.

    2014-01-01

    Lipase from Candida rugosa was immobilised on a quartz surface using an azobenzene-containing, bifunctional linker, which allows deactivation of the immobilised enzyme by irradiation with visible light.

  5. Changes in cortical beta activity related to a biceps brachii movement task while experiencing exercise induced muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Kristina; Lambert, Michael I; Tam, Nicholas; Lamberts, Robert P; Baumeister, Jochen

    2014-01-17

    Exercise-induced-muscle-damage (EIMD) is a well-described phenomenon which leads to decreased force output and altered neuromuscular function. How these symptoms of EIMD affect brain function, in particular cortical activity has not been described. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the symptoms of EIMD and cortical beta (β) activity during a submaximal biceps brachii movement. Half of the subjects participated in an EIMD protocol. Control and EIMD groups were monitored for 132h thereafter. Muscle pain scores in the EIMD group peaked after 36h with the lowest muscle torque reported at 12h. Beta-1 and -2 activity was increased in the frontal and parietal area in the experimental group at 12h. This suggests an impact of EIMD induced neuromuscular changes on the cortical proprioceptive and motor perceptive networks. Beta-2 activity decreased in the control group over time suggesting a loss in focused attention and greater familiarization with the protocol as the study progressed. These data suggest that a change in β-1 and -2 activity is associated with integrating movement perception and proprioception post-EIMD.

  6. Protection of cortical cells by equine estrogens against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity is mediated through a calcium independent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrella Joel

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High concentrations of glutamate can accumulate in the brain and may be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. This form of neurotoxicity involves changes in the regulation of cellular calcium (Ca2+ and generation of free radicals such as peroxynitrite (ONOO-. Estrogen may protect against glutamate-induced cell death by reducing the excitotoxic Ca2+ influx associated with glutamate excitotoxicity. In this study, the inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor and nitric oxide synthase (NOS along with the effect of 17β-estradiol (17β-E2 and a more potent antioxidant Δ8, 17β-estradiol (Δ8, 17β-E2 on cell viability and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i, following treatment of rat cortical cells with glutamate, was investigated. Results Primary rat cortical cells were cultured for 7–12 days in Neurobasal medium containing B27 supplements. Addition of glutamate (200 μM decreased cell viability to 51.3 ± 0.7% compared to control. Treatment with the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist, MK-801, and the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, completely prevented cell death. Pretreatment (24 hrs with 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2 (0.01 to 10 μM significantly reduced cell death. 17β-E2 was more potent than Δ8, 17β-E2. Glutamate caused a rapid 2.5 fold increase in [Ca2+]i. Treatment with 0.001 to 10 μM MK-801 reduced the initial Ca2+ influx by 14–41% and increased cell viability significantly. Pretreatment with 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2 had no effect on Ca2+ influx but protected the cortical cells against glutamate-induced cell death. Conclusion Glutamate-induced cell death in cortical cultures can occur through NMDAR and NOS-linked mechanisms by increasing nitric oxide and ONOO-. Equine estrogens: 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2, significantly protected cortical cells against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by a mechanism that appears to be independent of Ca2+ influx. To our knowledge, this is a first

  7. Ovariectomy-induced changes in aged beagles : histomorphometry of rib cortical bone.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, A. K.; Bhattacharyya, M. H.; Miller, S.; Sacco-Gibson, N.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Utah; Procter & Gamble Pharmaceuticals

    1998-03-01

    Bone loss associated with estrogen depletion is well documented in cancellous bone but less well characterized in cortical bone. The effects of ovariectomy on the aged beagle skeleton were studied by histomorphometric analysis of the cortical bone in sequential rib biopsies. Biopsies were taken from each ovariectomized or sham-operated dog at the time of surgery and at 1, 4, and 8.5 months after surgery. Just prior to each postoperative biopsy, tetracycline, calcein, and xylenol orange, respectively, were administered by a fluorochrome labeling procedure (2d-10d-2d) to provide markers of bone formation. Analysis of sequential rib biopsies provided a means to follow the ovariectomy response over time and to compare each animal against its own baseline. Though ovariectomy did not influence histomorphometric indices at 1 month after surgery, a transient increase in cortical bone formation occurred thereafter, with a sixfold increase over that of sham-operated dogs at 4 months (P < 0.001) and a return to near control levels at 8.5 months. Cortical porosity increased by the fourth month after ovariectomy and remained high at 8.5 months. These data demonstrate for the first time that rib cortical bone is a responsive site for the effects of ovariectomy in aged female dogs.

  8. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans from Schisandra chinensis protect primary cultures of rat cortical cells from glutamate-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Ra; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Koo, Kyung Ah; Kim, Seung Hyun; Sung, Sang Hyun; Lee, Na Gyong; Markelonis, George J; Oh, Tae H; Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Young Choong

    2004-05-01

    A methanolic extract of dried Schisandra fruit (Schisandra chinensis Baill.; Schisandraceae) significantly attenuated the neurotoxicity induced by L-glutamate in primary cultures of rat cortical cells. Five dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans (deoxyschisandrin, gomisin N, gomisin A, schisandrin, and wuweizisu C) were isolated from the methanolic extract; their protective effects against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity were then evaluated. Among the five lignans, deoxyschisandrin, gomisin N, and wuweizisu C significantly attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity as measured by 1). an inhibition in the increase of intracellular [Ca(2+)]; 2). an improvement in the glutathione defense system, the level of glutathione, and the activity of glutathione peroxidase; and 3). an inhibition in the formation of cellular peroxide. These results suggest that dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans from Schisandra chinensis may possess therapeutic potential against oxidative neuronal damage induced by excitotoxin.

  9. Activation and involvement of JNK1 / 2 in hydrogen peroxide- induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei WANG; Can GAO; Xiao-yu HOU; Yong LIU; Yan-yan ZONG; Guang-yi ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase 1 and 2 (JNK1/2) and the main signal pathway for its activation in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced apoptotic-like cortical cell death. METHODS: Using the model of oxidative stress induced by H2O2, the expression and diphosphorylation of JNK1/2 was examined by immunoblotting analysis, and neuronal apoptotic like cell death was determined by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining.RESULTS: The elevation in diphosphorylation level of JNK1/2 (4.40-/5.61-fold vs sham control) was associated with the concentration of H2O2 (0-100 μmol/L) and the development of apoptotic-like cell death (11.04 %-81.01%).There was no alteration of JNK1/2 protein expression following H2O2 treatment and recovery at different time points. Administration with JNK1/2 antisense oligonucleotides not only significantly decreased JNK1/2 protein expression and activation level, but also significantly reduced cortical cell death induced by H2O2 exposure.Furthermore, both JNK1/2 diphosphorylation and apoptotic-like cell death were largely prevented by pretreatment with (5S, l0R)-(-)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801)or omission of Ca2+ in incubation medium with ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). CONCLUSION: JNK1/2 is activated and participates in H2O2-induced apoptotic-like death in cultured rat cortical neurons mainly via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated influx of extracellular Ca2+.

  10. Acute Cocaine Induces Fast Activation of D1 Receptor and Progressive Deactivation of D2 Receptor Strial Neurons: In Vivo Optical Microprobe [Ca(superscript)2+]subscript)i Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, C.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Heintz, N.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2011-09-14

    Cocaine induces fast dopamine increases in brain striatal regions, which are recognized to underlie its rewarding effects. Both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are involved in cocaine's reward but the dynamic downstream consequences of cocaine effects in striatum are not fully understood. Here we used transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of either the D1 receptor (D1R) or the D2 receptor (D2R) gene and microprobe optical imaging to assess the dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} ) responses (used as marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in vivo separately for D1R- versus D2R-expressing neurons in striatum. Acute cocaine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) rapidly increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D1R-expressing neurons (10.6 {+-} 3.2%) in striatum within 8.3 {+-} 2.3 min after cocaine administration after which the increases plateaued; these fast [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases were blocked by pretreatment with a D1R antagonist (SCH23390). In contrast, cocaine induced progressive decreases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D2R-expressing neurons (10.4 {+-} 5.8%) continuously throughout the 30 min that followed cocaine administration; these slower [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} decreases were blocked by pretreatment with a D2R antagonist (raclopride). Since activation of striatal D1R-expressing neurons (direct-pathway) enhances cocaine reward, whereas activation of D2R expressing neurons suppresses it (indirect-pathway) (Lobo et al., 2010), this suggests that cocaine's rewarding effects entail both its fast stimulation ofD1R (resulting in abrupt activation of direct-pathway neurons) and a slower stimulation of D2R (resulting in longer-lasting deactivation of indirect-pathway neurons). We also provide direct in vivo evidence of D2R and D1R interactions in the striatal responses to acute cocaine administration.

  11. Sulforhodamine 101, a widely used astrocyte marker, can induce cortical seizure-like activity at concentrations commonly used

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Nedergaard, Maiken; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar

    2016-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a preferential astrocyte marker widely used in 2-photon microscopy experiments. Here we show, that topical loading of two commonly used SR101 concentrations, 100 μM and 250 μM when incubated for 10 min, can induce seizure-like local field potential (LFP) activity in both anaesthetized and awake mouse sensori-motor cortex. This cortical seizure-like activity develops in less than ten minutes following topical loading, and when applied longer, these neuronal discharges reliably evoke contra-lateral hindlimb muscle contractions. Short duration (<1 min) incubation of 100 μM and 250 μM SR101 or application of lower concentrations 25 μM and 50 μM of SR101, incubated for 30 and 20 min, respectively, did not induce abnormal LFP activity in sensori-motor cortex, but did label astrocytes, and may thus be considered more appropriate concentrations for in vivo astrocyte labeling. In addition to label astrocytes SR101 may, at 100 μM and 250 μM, induce abnormal neuronal activity and interfere with cortical circuit activity. SR101 concentration of 50 μM or lower did not induce abnormal neuronal activity. We advocate that, to label astrocytes with SR101, concentrations no higher than 50 μM should be used for in vivo experiments. PMID:27457281

  12. Cortical overexpression of neuronal calcium sensor-1 induces functional plasticity in spinal cord following unilateral pyramidal tract injury in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping K Yip

    Full Text Available Following trauma of the adult brain or spinal cord the injured axons of central neurons fail to regenerate or if intact display only limited anatomical plasticity through sprouting. Adult cortical neurons forming the corticospinal tract (CST normally have low levels of the neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS1 protein. In primary cultured adult cortical neurons, the lentivector-induced overexpression of NCS1 induces neurite sprouting associated with increased phospho-Akt levels. When the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway was pharmacologically inhibited the NCS1-induced neurite sprouting was abolished. The overexpression of NCS1 in uninjured corticospinal neurons exhibited axonal sprouting across the midline into the CST-denervated side of the spinal cord following unilateral pyramidotomy. Improved forelimb function was demonstrated behaviourally and electrophysiologically. In injured corticospinal neurons, overexpression of NCS1 induced axonal sprouting and regeneration and also neuroprotection. These findings demonstrate that increasing the levels of intracellular NCS1 in injured and uninjured central neurons enhances their intrinsic anatomical plasticity within the injured adult central nervous system.

  13. Prognostic value of cortically induced motor evoked activity by TMS in chronic stroke: Caveats from a revealing single clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amengual Julià L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report the case of a chronic stroke patient (62 months after injury showing total absence of motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS of spared regions of the left motor cortex, but near-to-complete recovery of motor abilities in the affected hand. Case presentation Multimodal investigations included detailed TMS based motor mapping, motor evoked potentials (MEP, and Cortical Silent period (CSP as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI of motor activity, MRI based lesion analysis and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI Tractography of corticospinal tract (CST. Anatomical analysis revealed a left hemisphere subinsular lesion interrupting the descending left CST at the level of the internal capsule. The absence of MEPs after intense TMS pulses to the ipsilesional M1, and the reversible suppression of ongoing electromyographic (EMG activity (indexed by CSP demonstrate a weak modulation of subcortical systems by the ipsilesional left frontal cortex, but an inability to induce efficient descending volleys from those cortical locations to right hand and forearm muscles. Functional MRI recordings under grasping and finger tapping patterns involving the affected hand showed slight signs of subcortical recruitment, as compared to the unaffected hand and hemisphere, as well as the expected cortical activations. Conclusions The potential sources of motor voluntary activity for the affected hand in absence of MEPs are discussed. We conclude that multimodal analysis may contribute to a more accurate prognosis of stroke patients.

  14. Prognostic Value of Cortically Induced Motor Evoked Activity by TMS in Chronic Stroke: Caveats from a Revealing Single Clinical Case

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amengual, Julià L

    2012-06-08

    AbstractBackgroundWe report the case of a chronic stroke patient (62 months after injury) showing total absence of motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of spared regions of the left motor cortex, but near-to-complete recovery of motor abilities in the affected hand.Case presentationMultimodal investigations included detailed TMS based motor mapping, motor evoked potentials (MEP), and Cortical Silent period (CSP) as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of motor activity, MRI based lesion analysis and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Tractography of corticospinal tract (CST). Anatomical analysis revealed a left hemisphere subinsular lesion interrupting the descending left CST at the level of the internal capsule. The absence of MEPs after intense TMS pulses to the ipsilesional M1, and the reversible suppression of ongoing electromyographic (EMG) activity (indexed by CSP) demonstrate a weak modulation of subcortical systems by the ipsilesional left frontal cortex, but an inability to induce efficient descending volleys from those cortical locations to right hand and forearm muscles. Functional MRI recordings under grasping and finger tapping patterns involving the affected hand showed slight signs of subcortical recruitment, as compared to the unaffected hand and hemisphere, as well as the expected cortical activations.ConclusionsThe potential sources of motor voluntary activity for the affected hand in absence of MEPs are discussed. We conclude that multimodal analysis may contribute to a more accurate prognosis of stroke patients.

  15. Dynamics of vocalization-induced modulation of auditory cortical activity at mid-utterance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaocong Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent research has addressed the suppression of cortical sensory responses to altered auditory feedback that occurs at utterance onset regarding speech. However, there is reason to assume that the mechanisms underlying sensorimotor processing at mid-utterance are different than those involved in sensorimotor control at utterance onset. The present study attempted to examine the dynamics of event-related potentials (ERPs to different acoustic versions of auditory feedback at mid-utterance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects produced a vowel sound while hearing their pitch-shifted voice (100 cents, a sum of their vocalization and pure tones, or a sum of their vocalization and white noise at mid-utterance via headphones. Subjects also passively listened to playback of what they heard during active vocalization. Cortical ERPs were recorded in response to different acoustic versions of feedback changes during both active vocalization and passive listening. The results showed that, relative to passive listening, active vocalization yielded enhanced P2 responses to the 100 cents pitch shifts, whereas suppression effects of P2 responses were observed when voice auditory feedback was distorted by pure tones or white noise. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The present findings, for the first time, demonstrate a dynamic modulation of cortical activity as a function of the quality of acoustic feedback at mid-utterance, suggesting that auditory cortical responses can be enhanced or suppressed to distinguish self-produced speech from externally-produced sounds.

  16. Collisional deactivation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie A.; Barker, John R.

    1996-07-01

    The collisional deactivation of vibrationally excited pyrazine (C4N2H4) in the electronic ground state by 19 collider gases was studied using the time-resolved infrared fluorescence (IRF) technique. The pyrazine was photoexcited with a 308 nm laser and its vibrational deactivation was monitored following rapid radiationless transitions to produce vibrationally excited molecules in the electronic ground state. The IRF data were analyzed by a simple approximate inversion method, as well as with full collisional master equation simulations. The average energies transferred in deactivating collisions (d) exhibit a near-linear dependence on vibrational energy at lower energies and less dependence at higher energies. The deactivation of ground state pyrazine was found to be similar to that of ground state benzene [J. R. Barker and B. M. Toselli, Int. Rev. Phys. Chem. 12, 305 (1990)], but it is strikingly different from the deactivation of triplet state pyrazine [T. J. Bevilacqua and R. B. Weisman, J. Chem. Phys. 98, 6316 (1993)].

  17. Acute hepatic ischemic-reperfusion injury induces a renal cortical "stress response," renal "cytoresistance," and an endotoxin hyperresponsive state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Frostad, Kirsten B

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic ischemic-reperfusion injury (HIRI) is considered a risk factor for clinical acute kidney injury (AKI). However, HIRI's impact on renal tubular cell homeostasis and subsequent injury responses remain ill-defined. To explore this issue, 30-45 min of partial HIRI was induced in CD-1 mice. Sham-operated or normal mice served as controls. Renal changes and superimposed injury responses (glycerol-induced AKI; endotoxemia) were assessed 2-18 h later. HIRI induced mild azotemia (blood urea nitrogen ∼45 mg/dl) in the absence of renal histologic injury or proteinuria, implying a "prerenal" state. However, marked renal cortical, and isolated proximal tubule, cytoprotective "stress protein" gene induction (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, heme oxygenase-1, hemopexin, hepcidin), and increased Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression resulted (protein/mRNA levels). Ischemia caused release of hepatic heme-based proteins (e.g., cytochrome c) into the circulation. This corresponded with renal cortical oxidant stress (malondialdehyde increases). That hepatic derived factors can evoke redox-sensitive "stress protein" induction was implied by the following: peritoneal dialysate from HIRI mice, soluble hepatic extract, or exogenous cytochrome c each induced the above stress protein(s) either in vivo or in cultured tubule cells. Functional significance of HIRI-induced renal "preconditioning" was indicated by the following: 1) HIRI conferred virtually complete morphologic protection against glycerol-induced AKI (in the absence of hyperbilirubinemia) and 2) HIRI-induced TLR4 upregulation led to a renal endotoxin hyperresponsive state (excess TNF-α/MCP-1 gene induction). In conclusion, HIRI can evoke "renal preconditioning," likely due, in part, to hepatic release of pro-oxidant factors (e.g., cytochrome c) into the systemic circulation. The resulting renal changes can impact subsequent AKI susceptibility and TLR4 pathway-mediated stress.

  18. Dopamine D3 receptor antagonism contributes to blonanserin-induced cortical dopamine and acetylcholine efflux and cognitive improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei; Kwon, Sunoh; Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Miyauchi, Masanori; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2015-11-01

    Blonanserin is a novel atypical antipsychotic drug (APD), which, unlike most atypical APDs, has a slightly higher affinity for dopamine (DA) D2 than serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors, and is an antagonist at both, as well as at D3 receptors. The effects of atypical APDs to enhance rodent cortical, hippocampal, limbic, and dorsal striatal (dSTR) DA and acetylcholine (ACh) release, contribute to their ability to improve novel object recognition (NOR) in rodents treated with sub-chronic (sc) phencyclidine (PCP) and cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS). Here we determined the ability of blonanserin, the D3 antagonist NGB 2904, and the typical APD, haloperidol, a D2 antagonist, to enhance neurotransmitter efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dSTR of mice, and to ameliorate the scPCP-induced deficit in NOR in rats. Blonanserin, 10mg/kg, i.p., increased DA, norepinephrine (NE), and ACh efflux in mPFC and dSTR. NGB 2904, 3mg/kg, increased DA and ACh, but not NE, efflux in mPFC, and DA, but not ACh, efflux in dSTR. Haloperidol increased DA and NE efflux in dSTR only. The selective D3 agonist PD 128907 partially blocked the blonanserin-induced cortical ACh, DA, NE and striatal DA efflux. NGB 2904, 3mg/kg, like blonanserin, 1mg/kg, and the combination of sub-effective doses of NGB 2904 and blonanserin (both 0.3mg/kg), ameliorated the scPCP-induced NOR deficit in rats. These results suggest that D3 receptor blockade may contribute to the ability of blonanserin to increase cortical DA and ACh efflux, as well as to restore NOR and improve CIAS.

  19. Catalyst Deactivation: Control Relevance of Model Assumptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernt Lie

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Two principles for describing catalyst deactivation are discussed, one based on the deactivation mechanism, the other based on the activity and catalyst age distribution. When the model is based upon activity decay, it is common to use a mean activity developed from the steady-state residence time distribution. We compare control-relevant properties of such an approach with those of a model based upon the deactivation mechanism. Using a continuous stirred tank reactor as an example, we show that the mechanistic approach and the population balance approach lead to identical models. However, common additional assumptions used for activity-based models lead to model properties that may deviate considerably from the correct one.

  20. On the CCN [de]activation nonlinearities

    CERN Document Server

    Arabas, Sylwester

    2016-01-01

    We take into consideration the evolution of particle size in a monodisperse aerosol population during activation and deactivation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The phase portrait of the system derived through a weakly-nonlinear analysis reveals a saddle-node bifurcation and a cusp catastrophe. An analytical estimate of the activation timescale is derived through estimation of the time spent in the saddle-node bifurcation bottleneck. Numerical integration of the system portrays two types of activation/deactivation hystereses: one associated with the kinetic limitations on droplet growth when the system is far from equilibrium, and one occurring close to equilibrium and associated with the cusp catastrophe. The hysteretic behaviour close to equilibrium imposes stringent time-resolution constraints on numerical integration, particularly during deactivation.

  1. Deactivation of the default mode network as a marker of impaired consciousness: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Sophia Crone

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of patients with a disorder of consciousness is very challenging. Previous studies investigating resting state networks demonstrate that 2 main features of the so-called default mode network (DMN, metabolism and functional connectivity, are impaired in patients with a disorder of consciousness. However, task-induced deactivation--a third main feature of the DMN--has not been explored in a group of patients. Deactivation of the DMN is supposed to reflect interruptions of introspective processes. Seventeen patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS, former vegetative state, 8 patients in minimally conscious state (MCS, and 25 healthy controls were investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging during a passive sentence listening task. Results show that deactivation in medial regions is reduced in MCS and absent in UWS patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, behavioral scores assessing the level of consciousness correlate with deactivation in patients. On single-subject level, all control subjects but only 2 patients in MCS and 6 with UWS exposed deactivation. Interestingly, all patients who deactivated during speech processing (except for one showed activation in left frontal regions which are associated with conscious processing. Our results indicate that deactivation of the DMN can be associated with the level of consciousness by selecting those who are able to interrupt ongoing introspective processes. In consequence, deactivation of the DMN may function as a marker of consciousness.

  2. Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David Shane; Webber, Frank Laverne

    2001-07-01

    This report is a compilation of summary descriptions of Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Surveillance and Maintenance projects planned for inactive facilities and sites at the INEEL from FY-2002 through FY-2010. Deactivations of contaminated facilities will produce safe and stable facilities requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance pending further decontamination and decommissioning. Decontamination and decommissioning actions remove contaminated facilities, thus eliminating long-term surveillance and maintenance. The projects are prioritized based on risk to DOE-ID, the public, and the environment, and the reduction of DOE-ID mortgage costs and liability at the INEEL.

  3. Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David Shane; Webber, Frank Laverne

    2001-07-01

    This report is a compilation of summary descriptions of Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Surveillance and Maintenance projects planned for inactive facilities and sites at the INEEL from FY-2002 through FY-2010. Deactivations of contaminated facilities will produce safe and stable facilities requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance pending further decontamination and decommissioning. Decontamination and decommissioning actions remove contaminated facilities, thus eliminating long-term surveillance and maintenance. The projects are prioritized based on risk to DOE-ID, the public, and the environment, and the reduction of DOE-ID mortgage costs and liability at the INEEL.

  4. Crambescidin 816 induces calcium influx though glutamate receptors in primary cultures of cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Martín Vázquez

    2014-06-01

    In summary, our data suggest that the cytotoxic effect of 10 μM Cramb816 in cortical neurons may be related to an increase in the cytosolic calcium concentration elicited by the toxin, which is shown to be mediated by glutamate receptor activation. Further studies analyzing the effect of glutamate receptor blockers on the cytotoxic effect of Cramb816 are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  5. Cortical activation changes underlying stimulation-induced behavioural gains in chronic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Stagg, Charlotte Jane; Bachtiar, Velicia; O'Shea, Jacinta; Allman, Claire; Bosnell, Rosemary Ann; Kischka, Udo; Matthews, Paul McMahan; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation, a form of non-invasive brain stimulation, is showing increasing promise as an adjunct therapy in rehabilitation following stroke. However, although significant behavioural improvements have been reported in proof-of-principle studies, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The rationale for transcranial direct current stimulation as therapy for stroke is that therapeutic stimulation paradigms increase activity in ipsilesional motor cortical a...

  6. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  7. Monitoring transcranial direct current stimulation induced changes in cortical excitability during the serial reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrus, Géza Gergely; Chaieb, Leila; Stilling, Roman; Rothkegel, Holger; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2016-03-11

    The measurement of the motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a common method to observe changes in motor cortical excitability. The level of cortical excitability has been shown to change during motor learning. Conversely, motor learning can be improved by using anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In the present study, we aimed to monitor cortical excitability changes during an implicit motor learning paradigm, a version of the serial reaction time task (SRTT). Responses from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and forearm flexor (FLEX) muscles were recorded before, during and after the performance of the SRTT. Online measurements were combined with anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS for the duration of the SRTT. Negative correlations between the amplitude of online FDI MEPs and SRTT reaction times (RTs) were observed across the learning blocks in the cathodal condition (higher average MEP amplitudes associated with lower RTs) but no significant differences in the anodal and sham conditions. tDCS did not have an impact on SRTT performance, as would be predicted based on previous studies. The offline before-after SRTT MEP amplitudes showed an increase after anodal and a tendency to decrease after cathodal stimulation, but these changes were not significant. The combination of different interventions during tDCS might result in reduced efficacy of the stimulation that in future studies need further attention.

  8. Cortical Up states induce the selective weakening of subthreshold synaptic inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Julian; Kahn, Martin C; Tuohy, Simon; Paulsen, Ole; Wilson, Tony; Mann, Edward O

    2017-09-22

    Slow-wave sleep is thought to be important for retuning cortical synapses, but the cellular mechanisms remain unresolved. During slow-wave activity, cortical neurons display synchronized transitions between depolarized Up states and hyperpolarized Down states. Here, using recordings from LIII pyramidal neurons from acute slices of mouse medial entorhinal cortex, we find that subthreshold inputs arriving during the Up state undergo synaptic weakening. This does not reflect a process of global synaptic downscaling, as it is dependent on presynaptic spiking, with network state encoded in the synaptically evoked spine Ca(2+) responses. Our data indicate that the induction of synaptic weakening is under postsynaptic control, as it can be prevented by correlated postsynaptic spiking activity, and depends on postsynaptic NMDA receptors and GSK3β activity. This provides a mechanism by which slow-wave activity might bias synapses towards weakening, while preserving the synaptic connections within active neuronal assemblies.Slow oscillations between cortical Up and Down states are a defining feature of deep sleep, but their function is not well understood. Here the authors study Up/Down states in acute slices of entorhinal cortex, and find that Up states promote the weakening of subthreshold synaptic inputs, while suprathreshold inputs are preserved or strengthened.

  9. Deactivation of platinum catalysts by oxygen 2. Nature of the catalyst deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, P.J.M.; Duisters, H.A.M.; Kuster, B.F.M.; van der Wiele, K. (Univ. of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands))

    1988-08-01

    The effect of different start-up procedures on the deactivation of a 5% Pt/C catalyst used for the oxidation of D-gluconate has been investigated. Results have been obtained both in a stirred tank reactor for batch experiments and in an apparatus for continuous oxidation processes. The deactivation of the catalyst is not explicable by formation of platinum oxides. A model is proposed for the deactivation of platinum catalysts by oxygen, based on penetration of oxygen atoms into the platinum lattice.

  10. Associations of unilateral whisker and olfactory signals induce synapse formation and memory cell recruitment in bilateral barrel cortices: cellular mechanism for unilateral training toward bilateral memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilong Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveals the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory.

  11. Associations of Unilateral Whisker and Olfactory Signals Induce Synapse Formation and Memory Cell Recruitment in Bilateral Barrel Cortices: Cellular Mechanism for Unilateral Training Toward Bilateral Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zilong; Chen, Lei; Fan, Ruicheng; Lu, Wei; Wang, Dangui; Cui, Shan; Huang, Li; Zhao, Shidi; Guan, Sudong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex (CBC) were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveal the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory. PMID:28018178

  12. The Approach of Emotional Deactivation of Prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jean-Nil

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the approach of emotional deactivation is to help students reduce the prejudice they may feel towards diverse social groups. Be those groups homosexuals, people living with a disability or immigrants, the victims of prejudice are invited to come into classrooms and to confront the preconceptions that students have in their respect.…

  13. Kinetic Analysis of Char Thermal Deactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zolin, Alfredo; Jensen, Anker; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2001-01-01

    data for all chars obtained from the TGA, kinetic parameters in an annealing model reported in the literature were determined. A shifted Gamma distribution taking into account a positive activation energy at the beginning of deactivation, as well as a lower bound of char reactivity corresponding...

  14. Kinetic Analysis of Char Thermal Deactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zolin, Alfredo; Jensen, Anker; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2001-01-01

    The thermal deactivation of several fuels was investigated by measuring the reactivity, of chars prepared in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) apparatus at well-defined conditions in the temperature range 973-1673 K. Four coals, Blair Athol from Australia, Cerrejon from Colombia. Illinois no. 6...

  15. The effects of caffeine ingestion on cortical areas: functional imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-A; Kang, Chang-Ki; Son, Young-Don; Choi, Eun-Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Oh, Seung-Taek; Kim, Young-Bo; Park, Chan-Woong; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2014-05-01

    The effect of caffeine as a cognitive enhancer is well known; however, caffeine-induced changes in the cortical regions are still not very clear. Therefore, in this study, we conducted an investigation of the activation and deactivation with blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and of metabolic activity change with positron emission tomography (PET) in the human brain. Fourteen healthy subjects performed a visuomotor task inducing attention with 3T MRI, and PET imaging was also carried out in seven subjects to determine the cerebral glucose metabolic changes of caffeine at rest. The result by fMRI showed increased BOLD activation in the left cerebellum, putamen, insula, thalamus and the right primary motor cortex, and decreased BOLD deactivation in the posterior medial and the left posterior lateral cortex. Also, the resting state PET data showed reduced metabolic activity in the putamen, caudate nucleus, insula, pallidum and posterior medial cortex. The common cortical regions between fMRI and PET, such as putamen, insula and posterior medial cortex, where significant changes occurred after caffeine ingestion, are well known to play an important role in cognitive function like attention. This result suggests that the effect of caffeine as a cognitive enhancer is derived by modulating the attentional areas.

  16. Cortical activation changes underlying stimulation-induced behavioural gains in chronic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtiar, Velicia; O'Shea, Jacinta; Allman, Claire; Bosnell, Rosemary Ann; Kischka, Udo; Matthews, Paul McMahan; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation, a form of non-invasive brain stimulation, is showing increasing promise as an adjunct therapy in rehabilitation following stroke. However, although significant behavioural improvements have been reported in proof-of-principle studies, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The rationale for transcranial direct current stimulation as therapy for stroke is that therapeutic stimulation paradigms increase activity in ipsilesional motor cortical areas, but this has not previously been directly tested for conventional electrode placements. This study was performed to test directly whether increases in ipsilesional cortical activation with transcranial direct current stimulation are associated with behavioural improvements in chronic stroke patients. Patients at least 6 months post-first stroke participated in a behavioural experiment (n = 13) or a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment (n = 11), each investigating the effects of three stimulation conditions in separate sessions: anodal stimulation to the ipsilesional hemisphere; cathodal stimulation to the contralesional hemisphere; and sham stimulation. Anodal (facilitatory) stimulation to the ipsilesional hemisphere led to significant improvements (5–10%) in response times with the affected hand in both experiments. This improvement was associated with an increase in movement-related cortical activity in the stimulated primary motor cortex and functionally interconnected regions. Cathodal (inhibitory) stimulation to the contralesional hemisphere led to a functional improvement only when compared with sham stimulation. We show for the first time that the significant behavioural improvements produced by anodal stimulation to the ipsilesional hemisphere are associated with a functionally relevant increase in activity within the ipsilesional primary motor cortex in patients with a wide range of disabilities following stroke. PMID:22155982

  17. Cortical activation changes underlying stimulation-induced behavioural gains in chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Charlotte Jane; Bachtiar, Velicia; O'Shea, Jacinta; Allman, Claire; Bosnell, Rosemary Ann; Kischka, Udo; Matthews, Paul McMahan; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation, a form of non-invasive brain stimulation, is showing increasing promise as an adjunct therapy in rehabilitation following stroke. However, although significant behavioural improvements have been reported in proof-of-principle studies, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The rationale for transcranial direct current stimulation as therapy for stroke is that therapeutic stimulation paradigms increase activity in ipsilesional motor cortical areas, but this has not previously been directly tested for conventional electrode placements. This study was performed to test directly whether increases in ipsilesional cortical activation with transcranial direct current stimulation are associated with behavioural improvements in chronic stroke patients. Patients at least 6 months post-first stroke participated in a behavioural experiment (n = 13) or a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment (n = 11), each investigating the effects of three stimulation conditions in separate sessions: anodal stimulation to the ipsilesional hemisphere; cathodal stimulation to the contralesional hemisphere; and sham stimulation. Anodal (facilitatory) stimulation to the ipsilesional hemisphere led to significant improvements (5-10%) in response times with the affected hand in both experiments. This improvement was associated with an increase in movement-related cortical activity in the stimulated primary motor cortex and functionally interconnected regions. Cathodal (inhibitory) stimulation to the contralesional hemisphere led to a functional improvement only when compared with sham stimulation. We show for the first time that the significant behavioural improvements produced by anodal stimulation to the ipsilesional hemisphere are associated with a functionally relevant increase in activity within the ipsilesional primary motor cortex in patients with a wide range of disabilities following stroke.

  18. Visual discrimination training improves Humphrey perimetry in chronic cortically induced blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Matthew R; Huxlin, Krystel R

    2017-05-09

    To assess if visual discrimination training improves performance on visual perimetry tests in chronic stroke patients with visual cortex involvement. 24-2 and 10-2 Humphrey visual fields were analyzed for 17 chronic cortically blind stroke patients prior to and following visual discrimination training, as well as in 5 untrained, cortically blind controls. Trained patients practiced direction discrimination, orientation discrimination, or both, at nonoverlapping, blind field locations. All pretraining and posttraining discrimination performance and Humphrey fields were collected with online eye tracking, ensuring gaze-contingent stimulus presentation. Trained patients recovered ∼108 degrees(2) of vision on average, while untrained patients spontaneously improved over an area of ∼16 degrees(2). Improvement was not affected by patient age, time since lesion, size of initial deficit, or training type, but was proportional to the amount of training performed. Untrained patients counterbalanced their improvements with worsening of sensitivity over ∼9 degrees(2) of their visual field. Worsening was minimal in trained patients. Finally, although discrimination performance improved at all trained locations, changes in Humphrey sensitivity occurred both within trained regions and beyond, extending over a larger area along the blind field border. In adults with chronic cortical visual impairment, the blind field border appears to have enhanced plastic potential, which can be recruited by gaze-controlled visual discrimination training to expand the visible field. Our findings underscore a critical need for future studies to measure the effects of vision restoration approaches on perimetry in larger cohorts of patients. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Investigation of the mechanisms mediating MDMA "Ecstasy"-induced increases in cerebro-cortical perfusion determined by btASL MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouine, J; Kelly, M E; Jennings-Murphy, C; Duffy, P; Gorman, I; Gormley, S; Kerskens, C M; Harkin, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Acute administration of the recreational drug of abuse 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) has previously been shown to increase cerebro-cortical perfusion as determined by bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling (btASL) MRI. The purpose of the current study was to assess the mechanisms mediating these changes following systemic administration of MDMA to rats. Pharmacological manipulation of serotonergic, dopaminergic and nitrergic transmission was carried out to determine the mechanism of action of MDMA-induced increases in cortical perfusion using btASL MRI. Fenfluramine (10 mg/kg), like MDMA (20 mg/kg), increased cortical perfusion. Increased cortical perfusion was not obtained with the 5-HT2 receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI) (1 mg/kg). Depletion of central 5-HT following systemic administration of the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) produced effects similar to those observed with MDMA. Pre-treatment with the 5-HT receptor antagonist metergoline (4 mg/kg) or with the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram (30 mg/kg), however, failed to produce any effect alone or influence the response to MDMA. Pre-treatment with the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (1 mg/kg) failed to influence the changes in cortical perfusion obtained with MDMA. Treatment with the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg) provoked no change in cerebral perfusion alone yet attenuated the MDMA-related increase in cortical perfusion. Cortical 5-HT depletion is associated with increases in perfusion although this mechanism alone does not account for MDMA-related changes. A role for NO, a key regulator of cerebrovascular perfusion, is implicated in MDMA-induced increases in cortical perfusion.

  20. Catalyst deactivation. Is it predictable? What to do?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulijn, J.A.; Van Diepen, A.E.; Kapteijn, F. [Department of Chemical Process Technology, Section of Industrial Catalysis, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft (Netherlands)

    2001-04-30

    Catalyst deactivation is usually inevitable, although the rate at which it occurs varies greatly. This article discusses the causes of deactivation and the influence on reaction rate. Methods for minimising catalyst deactivation, by tailoring catalyst properties and/or process operations, are presented, as well as reactor configurations suitable for the regeneration of deactivated catalysts. Alkane dehydrogenation is used as an example to demonstrate the variety of engineering solutions possible.

  1. Volume reductions in frontopolar and left perisylvian cortices in methamphetamine induced psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yuta; Orikabe, Lina; Takayanagi, Yoichiro; Yahata, Noriaki; Mozue, Yuriko; Sudo, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Tatsuji; Itokawa, Masanari; Suzuki, Michio; Kurachi, Masayoshi; Okazaki, Yuji; Kasai, Kiyoto; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2013-07-01

    Consumption of methamphetamine disturbs dopaminergic transmission and sometimes provokes schizophrenia-like-psychosis, named methamphetamine-associated psychosis (MAP). While previous studies have repeatedly reported regional volume reductions in the frontal and temporal areas as neuroanatomical substrates for psychotic symptoms, no study has examined whether such neuroanatomical substrates exist or not in patients with MAP. Magnetic resonance images obtained from twenty patients with MAP and 20 demographically-matched healthy controls (HC) were processed for voxel-based morphometry (VBM) using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration using Exponentiated Lie Algebra. An analysis of covariance model was adopted to identify volume differences between subjects with MAP and HC, treating intracranial volume as a confounding covariate. The VBM analyses showed significant gray matter volume reductions in the left perisylvian structures, such as the posterior inferior frontal gyrus and the anterior superior temporal gyrus, and the frontopolar cortices, including its dorsomedial, ventromedial, dorsolateral, and ventrolateral portions, and white matter volume reduction in the orbitofrontal area in the patients with MAP compared with the HC subjects. The smaller regional gray matter volume in the medial portion of the frontopolar cortex was significantly correlated with the severe positive symptoms in the individuals with MAP. The volume reductions in the left perisylvian structure suggest that patients with MAP have a similar pathophysiology to schizophrenia, whereas those in the frontopolar cortices and orbitofrontal area suggest an association with antisocial traits or vulnerability to substance dependence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Calorie restriction aggravated cortical and trabecular bone architecture in ovariectomy-induced estrogen-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyejin; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han Sung; Choue, Ryowon

    2014-08-01

    We hypothesized that calorie restriction (CR) and estrogen deficiency (ovariectomy [OVX]) would aggravate bone biomarkers and structural parameters in rats. Seven-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to sham-operated groups and fed either an ad libitum diet (SHAM-AL) or a CR diet (SHAM-CR); ovariectomy-operated groups were fed an ad libitum diet (OVX-AL) or a CR diet (OVX-CR). For 8 weeks, the OVX-AL and SHAM-AL groups were fed the same diet, whereas CR groups were fed a diet containing 50% fewer calories. Bone-related biomarkers and structural parameters (OC; deoxypyridinoline [DPD]; N-terminal telopeptide, NTx; architecture and mineralization; and microcomputed tomography images) were analyzed at the end of the experiment. The serum OC levels of calorie-restricted groups (SHAM-CR and OVX-CR) were significantly lower than those of the AL groups (SHAM-AL and OVX-AL) (P bone, the calorie-restricted and ovariectomized groups had lower values of bone volume to total volume, trabecular number, and bone mineral density, but higher values of trabecular separation than those of their counterparts (P bone, the calorie-restricted groups had reduced values of bone volume, mean polar moment of inertia, and cortical thickness compared to the AL groups (P bone; CR has detrimental effects on trabecular and cortical bone; and estrogen deficiency only had an effect on trabecular bone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Drosophila Mon2 couples Oskar-induced endocytosis with actin remodeling for cortical anchorage of the germ plasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tsubasa; Kato, Yasuko; Matsuda, Kazuki; Hanyu-Nakamura, Kazuko; Nakamura, Akira

    2011-06-01

    Drosophila pole (germ) plasm contains germline and abdominal determinants. Its assembly begins with the localization and translation of oskar (osk) RNA at the oocyte posterior, to which the pole plasm must be restricted for proper embryonic development. Osk stimulates endocytosis, which in turn promotes actin remodeling to form long F-actin projections at the oocyte posterior pole. Although the endocytosis-coupled actin remodeling appears to be crucial for the pole plasm anchoring, the mechanism linking Osk-induced endocytic activity and actin remodeling is unknown. Here, we report that a Golgi-endosomal protein, Mon2, acts downstream of Osk to remodel cortical actin and to anchor the pole plasm. Mon2 interacts with two actin nucleators known to be involved in osk RNA localization in the oocyte, Cappuccino (Capu) and Spire (Spir), and promotes the accumulation of the small GTPase Rho1 at the oocyte posterior. We also found that these actin regulators are required for Osk-dependent formation of long F-actin projections and cortical anchoring of pole plasm components. We propose that, in response to the Osk-mediated endocytic activation, vesicle-localized Mon2 acts as a scaffold that instructs the actin-remodeling complex to form long F-actin projections. This Mon2-mediated coupling event is crucial to restrict the pole plasm to the oocyte posterior cortex.

  4. Deafferentation-Induced Plasticity of Visual Callosal Connections: Predicting Critical Periods and Analyzing Cortical Abnormalities Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime F. Olavarria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Callosal connections form elaborate patterns that bear close association with striate and extrastriate visual areas. Although it is known that retinal input is required for normal callosal development, there is little information regarding the period during which the retina is critically needed and whether this period correlates with the same developmental stage across species. Here we review the timing of this critical period, identified in rodents and ferrets by the effects that timed enucleations have on mature callosal connections, and compare it to other developmental milestones in these species. Subsequently, we compare these events to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI measurements of water diffusion anisotropy within developing cerebral cortex. We observed that the relationship between the timing of the critical period and the DTI-characterized developmental trajectory is strikingly similar in rodents and ferrets, which opens the possibility of using cortical DTI trajectories for predicting the critical period in species, such as humans, in which this period likely occurs prenatally. Last, we discuss the potential of utilizing DTI to distinguish normal from abnormal cerebral cortical development, both within the context of aberrant connectivity induced by early retinal deafferentation, and more generally as a potential tool for detecting abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  5. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Da-min [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Lu, Pei-Hua, E-mail: lphty1_1@163.com [Department of Medical Oncology, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Sun, Min [Department of General Surgery, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Chen, Guo-Qian [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Wang, Qiong, E-mail: WangQiongprof1@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China)

    2015-02-13

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • Pre-treatment of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) protects murine cortical neurons from OGD/R. • AS-IV activates Nrf2-ARE signaling in murine cortical neurons. • Nrf2 is required for AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. • AS-IV stimulates HB-EGF release to trans-activate EGFR in murine cortical neurons. • EGFR mediates AS-IV-induced Nrf2 activation and neuroprotection against OGD/R.

  6. Does the presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at CT have any prognostic value in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Hugo J.A.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de [Meander Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Fijnheer, Rob [Meander Medical Center, Department of Hematology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Heggelman, Ben G.F. [Meander Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Dubois, Stefan V. [Meander Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    To determine the prognostic value of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at computed tomography (CT) in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This retrospective study included 105 patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL who had undergone CT and bone marrow biopsy (BMB) before R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin, and prednisolone) chemo-immunotherapy. Cox regression analyses were used to determine the associations of cortical bone status at CT (absence vs. presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction), BMB findings (negative vs. positive for lymphomatous involvement), and dichotomized National Comprehensive Cancer Network International Prognostic Index (NCCN-IPI) strata (low risk vs. high risk) with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Univariate Cox regression analysis indicated that cortical bone status at CT was no significant predictor of either PFS or OS (p = 0.358 and p = 0.560, respectively), whereas BMB findings (p = 0.002 and p = 0.013, respectively) and dichotomized NCCN-IPI risk strata (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively) were significant predictors of both PFS and OS. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, only the dichotomized NCCN-IPI score was an independent predictive factor of PFS and OS (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). The presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at CT was not found to have any prognostic implications in newly diagnosed DLBCL. (orig.)

  7. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: From activation to deactivation?

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    Varin Audrey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1 induced in particular by IFN-γ display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2 induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM. Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  8. The macrophage in HIV-1 infection: from activation to deactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbein, Georges; Varin, Audrey

    2010-04-09

    Macrophages play a crucial role in innate and adaptative immunity in response to microorganisms and are an important cellular target during HIV-1 infection. Recently, the heterogeneity of the macrophage population has been highlighted. Classically activated or type 1 macrophages (M1) induced in particular by IFN-gamma display a pro-inflammatory profile. The alternatively activated or type 2 macrophages (M2) induced by Th-2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13 express anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties. Finally IL-10 has been described as the prototypic cytokine involved in the deactivation of macrophages (dM). Since the capacity of macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is known to be modulated by cytokines, this review shows how modulation of macrophage activation by cytokines impacts the capacity to support productive HIV-1 infection. Based on the activation status of macrophages we propose a model starting with M1 classically activated macrophages with accelerated formation of viral reservoirs in a context of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Then IL-4/IL-13 alternatively activated M2 macrophages will enter into the game that will stop the expansion of the HIV-1 reservoir. Finally IL-10 deactivation of macrophages will lead to immune failure observed at the very late stages of the HIV-1 disease.

  9. Schizandrin Protects Primary Rat Cortical Cell Cultures from Glutamate-Induced Apoptosis by Inhibiting Activation of the MAPK Family and the Mitochondria Dependent Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Huang Peng; Ming-Tsuen Hsieh; Fan-Shiu Tsai; Li-Wei Lin; Jiin-Cherng Yen; Jung Chao; Meng-Shiou Lee; Hao-Yuan Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity has been implicated in a variety of neuronal degenerative disorders. In the present study, we investigated the possible neuroprotective effects of schizandrin against apoptosis of primary cultured rat cortical cells induced by glutamate. Glutamate (10 μM) administered for 24 h decreased the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL protein, whereas increased the expression of Bax, Bak, apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), endonuclease G (Nodo G) and endoplasmic reti...

  10. Olanzapine Prevents the PCP-induced Reduction in the Neurite Outgrowth of Prefrontal Cortical Neurons via NRG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingsheng; Yu, Yinghua; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-19

    Accumulating evidence suggests that reducing neurite outgrowth and synaptic plasticity plays a critical role in the pathology of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) can induce symptoms of schizophrenia as well as reduce dendritic spine density and neurite growth. The antipsychotic drug olanzapine may improve these deficits. This study aimed to investigate: (1) if olanzapine prevents PCP-induced suppression of neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression; (2) if olanzapine affects the Akt-GSK3 signaling pathway; and (3) the role of neuregulin 1 (NRG1) in this process. Immunofluorescence revealed that PCP treatment for 24 hours reduces both neurite length (28.5%) and the number of neurite branches (35.6%) in primary prefrontal cortical neuron cultures. PCP reduced protein and mRNA expressions of synaptophysin (24.9% and 23.2%, respectively) and PSD95 (31.5% and 21.4%, respectively), and the protein expression of p-Akt (26.7%) and p-GSK3β (35.2%). Olanzapine co-treatment prevented these PCP-induced effects in normal neurons but not in neurons from NRG1-knockout mice. These results indicate that NRG1 mediates the preventive effects of olanzapine on the PCP-induced impairment of neurite outgrowth and synaptic protein expression. This study provides potential targets for interventions on improving the efficacy of olanzapine on preventing cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  11. Impact of Non-Invasively Induced Motor Deficits on Tibial Cortical Properties in Mutant Lurcher Mice.

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    Alena Jindrová

    Full Text Available It has been shown that Lurcher mutant mice have significantly altered motor abilities, regarding their motor coordination and muscular strength because of olivorecebellar degeneration. We assessed the response of the cross-sectional geometry and lacuno-canalicular network properties of the tibial mid-diaphyseal cortical bone to motor differences between Lurcher and wild-type (WT male mice from the B6CBA strain. The first data set used in the cross-sectional geometry analysis consists of 16 mice of 4 months of age and 32 mice of 9 months of age. The second data set used in the lacunar-canalicular network analysis consists of 10 mice of 4 months of age. We compared two cross-sectional geometry and four lacunar-canalicular properties by I-region using the maximum and minimum second moment of area and anatomical orientation as well as H-regions using histological differences within a cross section. We identified inconsistent differences in the studied cross-sectional geometry properties between Lurcher and WT mice. The biggest significant difference between Lurcher and WT mice is found in the number of canaliculi, whereas in the other studied properties are only limited. Lurcher mice exhibit an increased number of canaliculi (p < 0.01 in all studied regions compared with the WT controls. The number of canaliculi is also negatively correlated with the distance from the centroid in the Lurcher and positively correlated in the WT mice. When the Lurcher and WT sample is pooled, the number of canaliculi and lacunar volume is increased in the posterior Imax region, and in addition, midcortical H-region exhibit lower number of canaliculi, lacuna to lacuna distance and increased lacunar volume. Our results indicate, that the importance of precise sample selection within cross sections in future studies is highlighted because of the histological heterogeneity of lacunar-canalicular network properties within the I-region and H-region in the mouse cortical

  12. Can chronic remote cortical hypoperfusion induced by thalamic infarction cause damage of tracts passing through those hypoperfused regions?

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    Eloi eMagnin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a woman presenting with changes on cerebral imaging a year and a half after a bi-thalamic (predominantly left-sided infarction including lateral and medial thalamic nuclei. Lateral geniculate body and pulvinar were not damaged. Hypoperfusion was observed in left cortical and basal structures. White matter FLAIR hyperintense lesions occurred in the left hemisphere and the occipital region one year and half after stroke. Medial and lateral thalamic nuclei are not highly connected to the occipital cortex. Therefore, in addition to Wallerian degeneration after thalamic stroke, we hypothesize that the chronic left temporal hypoperfusion induced by diaschisis can lead to a lateralized chronic hypoxic damage of the occipital fiber tract (optic radiation that passes through the temporal lobe.

  13. Temperature (de)activated patchy colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Las Heras, Daniel; da Gama, Margarida M Telo

    2016-06-22

    We present a new model of patchy particles in which the interaction sites can be activated or deactivated by varying the temperature of the system. We study the thermodynamics of the system by means of Wertheim's first order perturbation theory, and use Flory-Stockmayer theory of polymerization to analyse the percolation threshold. We find a very rich phase behaviour including lower critical points and reentrant percolation.

  14. Beyond catalyst deactivation: cross-metathesis involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaye, Kevin; Bosset, Cyril; Nicolas, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Alkenes containing N-heteroaromatics are known to be poor partners in cross-metathesis reactions, probably due to catalyst deactivation caused by the presence of a nitrogen atom. However, some examples of ring-closing and cross-metathesis involving alkenes that incorporate N-heteroaromatics can be found in the literature. In addition, recent mechanistic studies have focused on the rationalization of nitrogen-induced catalysts deactivation. The purpose of this mini-review is to give a brief overview of successful metathesis reactions involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics in order to delineate some guidelines for the use of these challenging substrates in metathesis reactions. PMID:26664645

  15. Beyond catalyst deactivation: cross-metathesis involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaye, Kevin; Bosset, Cyril; Nicolas, Lionel; Guérinot, Amandine; Cossy, Janine

    2015-01-01

    Alkenes containing N-heteroaromatics are known to be poor partners in cross-metathesis reactions, probably due to catalyst deactivation caused by the presence of a nitrogen atom. However, some examples of ring-closing and cross-metathesis involving alkenes that incorporate N-heteroaromatics can be found in the literature. In addition, recent mechanistic studies have focused on the rationalization of nitrogen-induced catalysts deactivation. The purpose of this mini-review is to give a brief overview of successful metathesis reactions involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics in order to delineate some guidelines for the use of these challenging substrates in metathesis reactions.

  16. Beyond catalyst deactivation: cross-metathesis involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Lafaye

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alkenes containing N-heteroaromatics are known to be poor partners in cross-metathesis reactions, probably due to catalyst deactivation caused by the presence of a nitrogen atom. However, some examples of ring-closing and cross-metathesis involving alkenes that incorporate N-heteroaromatics can be found in the literature. In addition, recent mechanistic studies have focused on the rationalization of nitrogen-induced catalysts deactivation. The purpose of this mini-review is to give a brief overview of successful metathesis reactions involving olefins containing N-heteroaromatics in order to delineate some guidelines for the use of these challenging substrates in metathesis reactions.

  17. The task dependent interaction of the deactivation regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ye; FENG ShiGang; FENG HongBo; DONG Feng; TANG YiYuan

    2008-01-01

    Although deactivation has been found frequently in former functional brain imaging researches, only recently has it become a focus of systematic study because of its not well understood physiological mechanism. However, most of the researches concentrated on the brain areas that would present de-activation, and, to our knowledge, the deactivation connectivity between these brain areas during the cognitive tasks has rarely been reported in literature. In this work, using the functional connectivity method WlCA (within-condition interregional covariance analysis), we analyzed the deactivations in two different cognitive tasks-symbol orientation and number comparison. The results revealed de-activations in the posterior cingulate, precuneus, anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex in both tasks. However, the interaction between the deactivated regions shows many differences. Our result further indicates that the potential implication of special deactivation connectivity may be related to the dif-ferent task or attention resource. Further research is needed to clarify the exact reason.

  18. Deactivation and poisoning of fuel cell catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P. N., Jr.

    1985-06-01

    The deactivation and poisoning phenomena reviewed are: the poisoning of anode (fuel electrode) catalyst by carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide; the deactivation of the cathode (air electrode) catalyst by sintering; and the deactivation of the cathode by corrosion of the support. The anode catalyst is Pt supported on a conductive, high area carbon black, usually at a loading of 10 w/o. This catalyst is tolerant to some level of carbon monoxide or hydrogen sulfide or both in combination, the level depending on temperature and pressure. Much less is known about hydrogen sulfide poisoning. Typical tolerance levels are 2% CO, and 10 ppM H2S. The cathode catalyst is typically Pt supported on a raphitic carbon black, usually a furnace black heat-treated to 2700 C. The Pt loading is typically 10 w/o, and the dispersion (or percent exposed) as-prepared is typically 30%. The loss of dispersion in use depends on the operational parameters, most especially the cathode potential history, i.e., higher potentials cause more rapid decrease in dispersion. The mechanism of loss of dispersion is not well known. The graphitic carbon support corrodes at a finite rate that is also potential dependent. Support corrosion causes thickening of the electrolyte film between the gas pores and the catalyst particles, which in turn causes increased diffusional resistance and performance loss.

  19. Autophagy activation is involved in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy'--induced neurotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons.

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    I-Hsun Li

    Full Text Available Autophagic (type II cell death, characterized by the massive accumulation of autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of cells, has been suggested to play pathogenetic roles in cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, and neurodegenerative disorders. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy is an illicit drug causing long-term neurotoxicity in the brain. Apoptotic (type I and necrotic (type III cell death have been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, while the role of autophagy in MDMA-elicited neurotoxicity has not been investigated. The present study aimed to evaluate the occurrence and contribution of autophagy to neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons challenged with MDMA. Autophagy activation was monitored by expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3; an autophagic marker using immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Here, we demonstrate that MDMA exposure induced monodansylcadaverine (MDC- and LC3B-densely stained autophagosome formation and increased conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II, coinciding with the neurodegenerative phase of MDMA challenge. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA pretreatment significantly attenuated MDMA-induced autophagosome accumulation, LC3B-II expression, and ameliorated MDMA-triggered neurite damage and neuronal death. In contrast, enhanced autophagy flux by rapamycin or impaired autophagosome clearance by bafilomycin A1 led to more autophagosome accumulation in neurons and aggravated neurite degeneration, indicating that excessive autophagosome accumulation contributes to MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, MDMA induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and its downstream unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1, suggesting the AMPK/ULK1 signaling pathway might be involved in MDMA-induced autophagy activation.

  20. Role of hippocampal and prefrontal cortical signaling pathways in dextromethorphan effect on morphine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2016-02-01

    Evidence suggests that dextromethorphan (DM), an NMDA receptor antagonist, induces memory impairment. Considering that DM is widely used in cough-treating medications, and the co-abuse of DM with morphine has recently been reported, the aims of the present study was (1) to investigate whether there is a functional interaction between morphine and DM in passive avoidance learning and (2) to assess the possible role of the hippocampal and prefrontal cortical (PFC) signaling pathways in the effects of the drugs on memory formation. Our findings indicated that post-training or pre-test administration of morphine (2 and 6 mg/kg) or DM (10-30 mg/kg) impaired memory consolidation and retrieval which was associated with the attenuation of the levels of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (p-CAMKII) and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the targeted sites. Moreover, the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of morphine was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of morphine or DM (30 mg/kg), indicating state-dependent learning (SDL) and a cross-SDL between the drugs. It is important to note that the levels of p-CAMKII/CAMKII and p-CREB/CREB in the hippocampus and the PFC increased in drugs-induced SDL. In addition, DM administration potentiated morphine-induced SDL which was related to the enhanced levels of hippocampal and PFC CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways. It can be concluded that there is a relationship between the hippocampus and the PFC in the effect of DM and/or morphine on memory retrieval. Moreover, a cross SDL can be induced between the co-administration of DM and morphine. Interestingly, CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways also mediate the drugs-induced SDL.

  1. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization is involved in oxidative stress-induced apoptotic cell death in LAMP2-deficient iPSCs-derived cerebral cortical neurons

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    Cheuk-Yiu Law

    2016-03-01

    Our results from cellular fractionation and inhibitor blockade experiments further revealed that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in the LAMP2-deficient cortical neurons was caused by increased abundance of cytosolic cathepsin L. These results suggest the involvement of lysosomal membrane permeabilization in the LAMP2 deficiency associated neural injury.

  2. Geniposide Protects Primary Cortical Neurons against Oligomeric Aβ1-42-Induced Neurotoxicity through a Mitochondrial Pathway.

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    Chunhui Zhao

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The accumulation of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in the brains of AD patients is thought to be closely related to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Therefore, protecting mitochondria from Aβ-induced neurotoxicity is an effective strategy for AD therapeutics. In a previous study, we found that geniposide, a pharmacologically active compound purified from gardenia fruit, has protective effects on oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in AD transgenic mouse models. However, whether geniposide has a protective effect on Aβ-induced neuronal dysfunction remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that geniposide protects cultured primary cortical neurons from Aβ-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction by recovering ATP generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO and caspase 3/9 activity; by reducing ROS production and cytochrome c leakage; as well as by inhibiting apoptosis. These findings suggest that geniposide may attenuate Aβ-induced neuronal injury by inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of triterpene glycosides from glycine max against glutamate induced toxicity in primary cultured rat cortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyung-In; Lee, Jai-Heon

    2012-01-01

    To examine the neuroprotective effects of Glycine max, we tested its protection against the glutamate-induced toxicity in primary cortical cultured neurons. In order to clarify the neuroprotective mechanism(s) of this observed effect, isolation was performed to seek and identify active fractions and components. From such fractionation, two triterpene glycosides, 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl(1-2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl(1-2)-β-d-glucuronopyranosyl]olean-12-en-3β,22β,24-triol (1) and 3-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl(1-2)-β-d-galactopyranosyl(1-2)-β-d-glucuronopyranosyl]olean-12-en-3β,22β,24-triol (2) were isolated with the methanol extracts with of air-dried Glycine max. Among these compounds, compound 2 exhibited significant neuroprotective activities against glutamate-induced toxicity, exhibiting cell viability of about 50% at concentrations ranging from 0.1 μM to 10 μM. Therefore, the neuroprotective effect of Glycine max might be due to the inhibition of glutamate-induced toxicity by triterpene glycosides.

  4. Elevated Mechanical Loading When Young Provides Lifelong Benefits to Cortical Bone Properties in Female Rats Independent of a Surgically Induced Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galley, Matthew R.; Hurd, Andrea L.; Wallace, Joseph M.; Gallant, Maxime A.; Richard, Jeffrey S.; George, Lydia A.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise that mechanically loads the skeleton is advocated when young to enhance lifelong bone health. Whether the skeletal benefits of elevated loading when young persist into adulthood and after menopause are important questions. This study investigated the influence of a surgically induced menopause in female Sprague-Dawley rats on the lifelong maintenance of the cortical bone benefits of skeletal loading when young. Animals had their right forearm extrinsically loaded 3 d/wk between 4 and 10 weeks of age using the forearm axial compression loading model. Left forearms were internal controls and not loaded. Animals were subsequently detrained (restricted to cage activities) for 94 weeks (until age 2 years), with ovariectomy (OVX) or sham-OVX surgery being performed at 24 weeks of age. Loading enhanced midshaft ulna cortical bone mass, structure, and estimated strength. These benefits persisted lifelong and contributed to loaded ulnas having greater strength after detraining. Loading also had effects on cortical bone quality. The benefits of loading when young were not influenced by a surgically induced menopause because there were no interactions between loading and surgery. However, OVX had independent effects on cortical bone mass, structure, and estimated strength at early postsurgery time points (up to age 58 weeks) and bone quality measures. These data indicate skeletal loading when young had lifelong benefits on cortical bone properties that persisted independent of a surgically induced menopause. This suggests that skeletal loading associated with exercise when young may provide lifelong antifracture benefits by priming the skeleton to offset the cortical bone changes associated with aging and menopause. PMID:23782938

  5. Humanin rescues cultured rat cortical neurons from NMDA-induced toxicity through the alleviation of mitochondrial dysfunction

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    Cui A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ai-Ling Cui,1 Ying-Hua Zhang,2 Jian-Zhong Li,3 Tianbin Song,4 Xue-Min Liu,1 Hui Wang,2 Ce Zhang,5 Guo-Lin Ma,6 Hui Zhang,7 Kefeng Li8 1Anatomy Department, Changzhi Medical College, Changzhi, Shanxi, 2Key Laboratory of Tissue Regeneration of Henan Province, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan, 3Clinical Laboratory of Heji Hospital Affiliated to Changzhi Medical College, Changzhi, Shanxi, 4Department of Nuclear Medicine, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 5Department of Physiology, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 6Department of Radiology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, 7Department of Radiology, First Clinical Medical College, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People’s Republic of China; 8School of Medicine, University of California – San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NDMA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity has been implicated in a variety of pathological situations such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease. However, no effective treatments for the same have been developed so far. Humanin (HN is a 24-amino acid peptide originally cloned from the brain of patients with AD and it prevents stress-induced cell death in many cells/tissues. In our previous study, HN was found to effectively rescue rat cortical neurons. It is still not clear whether HN protects the neurons through the attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, excitatory toxicity was induced by NMDA, which binds the NMDA receptor in primarily cultured rat cortical neurons. We found that NMDA (100 µmol/L dramatically induced the decrease of cell viability and caused mitochondrial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the neurons with HN (1 µmol/L led to significant increases of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity and membrane potential. In addition, HN pretreatment significantly reduced the excessive production of both reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric

  6. Axonal shearing in mature cortical neurons induces attempted regeneration and the reestablishment of neurite polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blizzard, Catherine A; King, Anna E; Haas, Matilda A; O'Toole, David A; Vickers, James C; Dickson, Tracey C

    2009-12-01

    While functional recovery after injury is limited, it has become evident that the mature central nervous system does retain some ability to regenerate. This study investigated the intrinsic capacity of relatively mature cortical neurons (21 days in vitro) to respond to axonal loss. Neurons, growing as clusters on poly-L-lysine, were completely sheared of axons through chemical and mechanical disruption and transferred to either an intact astrocyte monolayer or a substrate of poly-L-lysine. Injured neurons exhibited a regenerative sprouting response that was independent of neuronal cell division or neural progenitors, as demonstrated by negative bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and the neuronal precursor intermediate filament nestin, labeling. At 24 h after injury, neurons had extended appropriately polarized neurites, demonstrated by compartmentalized microtubule-associated proteins MAP2 and tau immunolabeling. Newly sprouting axons were tipped by growth cones; however, growth cones on the tips of sprouting axons (mean area, 26.32 +/- 2.20 microm) were significantly (pregenerating neurons exhibited distinct axonal dynamics, with a significant (pneuronal structural plasticity and defining the role of astrocyte reactivity in the response to trauma.

  7. Glutamate receptor δ1 induces preferentially inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of cortical neurons by interacting with neurexins through cerebellin precursor protein subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumura, Misato; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Lee, Sung-Jin; Uemura, Takeshi; Joo, Jae-Yeol; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2012-06-01

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) δ1 is widely expressed in the developing forebrain, whereas GluRδ2 is selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Recently, we found that trans-synaptic interaction of postsynaptic GluRδ2 and pre-synaptic neurexins (NRXNs) through cerebellin precursor protein (Cbln) 1 mediates excitatory synapse formation in the cerebellum. Thus, a question arises whether GluRδ1 regulates synapse formation in the forebrain. In this study, we showed that the N-terminal domain of GluRδ1 induced inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of some populations of cultured cortical neurons. When Cbln1 or Cbln2 was added to cultures, GluRδ1 expressed in HEK293T cells induced preferentially inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of cultured cortical neurons. The synaptogenic activity of GluRδ1 was suppressed by the addition of the extracellular domain of NRXN1α or NRXN1β containing splice segment 4. Cbln subtypes directly bound to the N-terminal domain of GluRδ1. The synaptogenic activity of GluRδ1 in the presence of Cbln subtypes correlated well with their binding affinities. When transfected to cortical neurons, GluRδ1 stimulated inhibitory synapse formation in the presence of Cbln1 or Cbln2. These results together with differential interactions of Cbln subtypes with NRXN variants suggest that GluRδ1 induces preferentially inhibitory presynaptic differentiation of cortical neurons by interacting with NRXNs containing splice segment 4 through Cbln subtypes.

  8. Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury induces ventriculomegaly and cortical thinning in juvenile rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddeyne, Corey; Nichols, Joshua; Wu, Chen; Anderson, Trent

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) most frequently occurs in pediatric patients and remains a leading cause of childhood death and disability. Mild TBI (mTBI) accounts for nearly 75% of all TBI cases, yet its neuropathophysiology is still poorly understood. While even a single mTBI injury can lead to persistent deficits, repeat injuries increase the severity and duration of both acute symptoms and long-term deficits. In this study, to model pediatric repetitive mTBI (rmTBI) we subjected unrestrained juvenile animals (postnatal day 20) to repeat weight-drop impacts. Animals were anesthetized and subjected to sham injury or rmTBI once per day for 5 days. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 14 days after injury revealed marked cortical atrophy and ventriculomegaly in rmTBI animals. Specifically, beneath the impact zone the thickness of the cortex was reduced by up to 46% and the area of the ventricles increased by up to 970%. Immunostaining with the neuron-specific marker NeuN revealed an overall loss of neurons within the motor cortex but no change in neuronal density. Examination of intrinsic and synaptic properties of layer II/III pyramidal neurons revealed no significant difference between sham-injured and rmTBI animals at rest or under convulsant challenge with the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine. Overall, our findings indicate that the neuropathological changes reported after pediatric rmTBI can be effectively modeled by repeat weight drop in juvenile animals. Developing a better understanding of how rmTBI alters the pediatric brain may help improve patient care and direct "return to game" decision making in adolescents.

  9. Role of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in APP Hyperphosphorylation Induced by NMDA Stimulation in Cortical Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanthi Antoniou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The phosphorylation of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP at Thr668 plays a key role in APP metabolism that is highly relevant to AD. The c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 can all be responsible for this phosphorylation. These kinases are activated by excitotoxic stimuli fundamental hallmarks of AD. The exposure of cortical neurons to a high dose of NMDA (100 μM for 30’-45’ led to an increase of P-APP Thr668. During NMDA stimulation APP hyperphosphorylation has to be assigned to GSK-3β activity, since addition of L803-mts, a substrate competitive inhibitor of GSK-3β reduced APP phosphorylation induced by NMDA. On the contrary, inhibition of JNK and Cdk5 with D-JNKI1 and Roscovitine respectively did not prevent NMDA-induced P-APP increase. These data show a tight connection, in excitotoxic conditions, between APP metabolism and the GSK-3β signaling pathway.

  10. Abnormal dopaminergic modulation of striato-cortical networks underlies levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Christensen, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic signalling in the striatum contributes to reinforcement of actions and motivational enhancement of motor vigour. Parkinson's disease leads to progressive dopaminergic denervation of the striatum, impairing the function of cortico-basal ganglia networks. While levodopa therapy...... of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease (age range: 51–84 years; 11 females) received a single dose of levodopa and then performed a task in which they had to produce or suppress a movement in response to visual cues. Task-related activity was continuously mapped...... later developed levodopa-induced dyskinesias, but not patients without dyskinesias, showed a linear increase in connectivity between the putamen and primary motor cortex after levodopa intake during movement suppression. Individual dyskinesia severity was predicted by levodopa-induced modulation...

  11. Silica deactivation of bead VOC catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libanati, C.; Pereira, C.J. [Research Division, W. R. Grace and Co., Columbia, MD (United States); Ullenius, D.A. [Grace TEC Systems, De Pere, WI (United States)

    1998-01-15

    Catalytic oxidation is a key technology for controlling the emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from industrial plants. The present paper examines the deactivation by silica of bead VOC catalysts in a flexographic printing application. Post mortem analyses of field-aged catalysts suggest that organosilicon compounds contained in the printing ink diffuse into the catalyst and deposit as silica particles in the micropores. Laboratory activity evaluation of aged catalysts suggests that silica deposition is non-selective and that silica masks the noble metal active site

  12. 3-Hydroxybutyrate regulates energy metabolism and induces BDNF expression in cerebral cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marosi, Krisztina; Kim, Sang Woo; Moehl, Keelin

    2016-01-01

    . The mechanism by which 3OHB induces Bdnf gene expression involves generation of reactive oxygen species, activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, and activity of the histone acetyltransferase p300/EP300. Because BDNF plays important roles in synaptic plasticity and neuronal stress resistance, our findings...

  13. Protective effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonism on VX-induced neuronal cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yushan; Weiss, M Tracy; Yin, Junfei; Tenn, Catherine C; Nelson, Peggy D; Mikler, John R

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of the central nervous system to organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents induces seizures and neuronal cell death. Here we report that the OP nerve agent, VX, induces apoptotic-like cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. The VX effects on neurons were concentration-dependent, with an IC(50) of approximately 30 microM. Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) with 50 microM. D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) diminished 30 microM VX-induced total cell death, as assessed by alamarBlue assay and Hoechst staining. In contrast, neither antagonists of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) nor metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) had any effect on VX-induced neurotoxicity. VX-induced neuronal cell death could not be solely attributed to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, since neither the reversible pharmacological cholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, nor the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine, affected VX-induced cell death. Importantly, APV was found to be therapeutically effective against VX-induced cell death up to 2 h post VX exposure. These results suggest that NMDARs, but not AMPARs or mGluRs, play important roles in VX-induced cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. Based on their therapeutic effects, NMDAR antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of VX-induced neurotoxicities.

  14. The response of cortical alpha activity to pain and neuromuscular changes caused by exercise-induced muscle damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, K; Lambert, M I; Tam, N; Baumeister, J

    2014-02-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is characterized by pain, swelling, and shortening of the muscle; increased serum creatine kinase; decreased force output; and altered neuromuscular function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of EIMD to determine the relationship between the peripheral symptoms, neuromuscular changes, and delayed pain sensation during a submaximal movement of the biceps brachii on cortical alpha (α) activity. In contrast to the control (n = 12) group, the experimental (n = 16) group participated in an EIMD protocol, and both groups were monitored for 132 h post-EIMD protocol. At 12 h, neuromuscular functioning was already disturbed while the sensation of pain was perceived, but not fully developed. Muscle pain scores in the experimental group peaked after 36 h with the lowest torque reported at 12 h. α-1 activity increased significantly in the motor and somatosensory area 12 h post-EIMD while α-2 activity increased in the contralateral fronto-central area. At 36 h, pain had further increased and neuromuscular function improved while α-1 and α-2 activities had decreased. We hypothesize that α-1 activity over the motor and somatosensory cortex of the experimental group displays a compensatory increase in response to the changes in neuromuscular function during movement, while an increase in α-2 activity is related to the suppression of pain experienced within the first 12 h.

  15. Modulation of Cortical Interhemispheric Interactions by Motor Facilitation or Restraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Vidal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical interhemispheric interactions in motor control are still poorly understood and it is important to clarify how these depend on inhibitory/facilitatory limb movements and motor expertise, as reflected by limb dominance. Here we addressed this problem using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and a task involving dominant/nondominant limb mobilization in the presence/absence of contralateral limb restraint. In this way we could modulate excitation/deactivation of the contralateral hemisphere. Blocks of arm elevation were alternated with absent/present restraint of the contralateral limb in 17 participants. We found the expected activation of contralateral sensorimotor cortex and ipsilateral cerebellum during arm elevation. In addition, only the dominant arm elevation (hold period was accompanied by deactivation of ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex, irrespective of presence/absence of contralateral restraint, although the latter increased deactivation. In contrast, the nondominant limb yielded absent deactivation and reduced area of contralateral activation upon restriction. Our results provide evidence for a difference in cortical communication during motor control (action facilitation/inhibition, depending on the “expertise” of the hemisphere that controls action (dominant versus nondominant. These results have relevant implications for the development of facilitation/inhibition strategies in neurorehabilitation, namely, in stroke, given that fMRI deactivations have recently been shown to reflect decreases in neural responses.

  16. Pulsed DC Electric Field-Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Fang Chang

    Full Text Available We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz. The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders.

  17. Pulsed DC Electric Field–Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Lee, Ying-Shan; Tang, Tang K.; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2016-01-01

    We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC) pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs) could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz). The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders. PMID:27352251

  18. Directed cortical information flow during human object recognition: analyzing induced EEG gamma-band responses in brain's source space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot G Supp

    Full Text Available The increase of induced gamma-band responses (iGBRs; oscillations >30 Hz elicited by familiar (meaningful objects is well established in electroencephalogram (EEG research. This frequency-specific change at distinct locations is thought to indicate the dynamic formation of local neuronal assemblies during the activation of cortical object representations. As analytically power increase is just a property of a single location, phase-synchrony was introduced to investigate the formation of large-scale networks between spatially distant brain sites. However, classical phase-synchrony reveals symmetric, pair-wise correlations and is not suited to uncover the directionality of interactions. Here, we investigated the neural mechanism of visual object processing by means of directional coupling analysis going beyond recording sites, but rather assessing the directionality of oscillatory interactions between brain areas directly. This study is the first to identify the directionality of oscillatory brain interactions in source space during human object recognition and suggests that familiar, but not unfamiliar, objects engage widespread reciprocal information flow. Directionality of cortical information-flow was calculated based upon an established Granger-Causality coupling-measure (partial-directed coherence; PDC using autoregressive modeling. To enable comparison with previous coupling studies lacking directional information, phase-locking analysis was applied, using wavelet-based signal decompositions. Both, autoregressive modeling and wavelet analysis, revealed an augmentation of iGBRs during the presentation of familiar objects relative to unfamiliar controls, which was localized to inferior-temporal, superior-parietal and frontal brain areas by means of distributed source reconstruction. The multivariate analysis of PDC evaluated each possible direction of brain interaction and revealed widespread reciprocal information-transfer during familiar

  19. Mechanical strain, induced noninvasively in the high-frequency domain, is anabolic to cancellous bone, but not cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, C; Turner, A S; Mallinckrodt, C; Jerome, C; McLeod, K; Bain, S

    2002-03-01

    Departing from the premise that it is the large-amplitude signals inherent to intense functional activity that define bone morphology, we propose that it is the far lower magnitude, high-frequency mechanical signals that continually barrage the skeleton during longer term activities such as standing, which regulate skeletal architecture. To examine this hypothesis, we proposed that brief exposure to slight elevations in these endogenous mechanical signals would suffice to increase bone mass in those bones subject to the stimulus. This was tested by exposing the hind limbs of adult female sheep (n = 9) to 20 min/day of low-level (0.3g), high-frequency (30 Hz) mechanical signals, sufficient to induce a peak of approximately 5 microstrain (micro epsilon) in the tibia. Following euthanasia, peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to segregate the cortical shell from the trabecular envelope of the proximal femur, revealing a 34.2% increase in bone density in the experimental animals as compared with controls (p = 0.01). Histomorphometric examination of the femur supported these density measurements, with bone volume per total volume increasing by 32% (p = 0.04). This density increase was achieved by two separate strategies: trabecular spacing decreased by 36.1% (p = 0.02), whereas trabecular number increased by 45.6% (p = 0.01), indicating the formation of cancellous bone de novo. There were no significant differences in the radii of animals subject to the stimulus, indicating that the adaptive response was local rather than systemic. The anabolic potential of the signal was evident only in trabecular bone, and there were no differences, as measured by any assay, in the cortical bone. These data suggest that subtle mechanical signals generated during predominant activities such as posture may be potent determinants of skeletal morphology. Given that these strain levels are three orders of magnitude below strains that can damage bone tissue, we

  20. Activation of cortical 5-HT3 receptor-expressing interneurons induces NO mediated vasodilatations and NPY mediated vasoconstrictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin ePerrenoud

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic interneurons are local integrators of cortical activity that have been reported to be involved in the control of cerebral blood flow through their ability to produce vasoactive molecules and their rich innervation of neighboring blood vessels. They form a highly diverse population among which the serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine 3A receptor (5-HT3A-expressing interneurons share a common developmental origin, in addition to the responsiveness to serotonergic ascending pathway. We have recently shown that these neurons regroup two distinct subpopulations within the somatosensory cortex: Neuropeptide Y (NPY-expressing interneurons, displaying morphological properties similar to those of neurogliaform cells, and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP-expressing bipolar/bitufted interneurons. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of these neuronal populations in the control of vascular tone by monitoring blood vessels diameter changes, using infrared videomicroscopy in mouse neocortical slices. Bath applications of 1-(3-Chlorophenylbiguanide hydrochloride (mCPBG, a 5-HT3R agonist, induced both constrictions (30% and dilations (70% of penetrating arterioles within supragranular layers. All vasoconstrictions were abolished in the presence of the NPY receptor antagonist (BIBP 3226, suggesting that they were elicited by NPY release. Vasodilations persisted in the presence of the VIP receptor antagonist VPAC1 (PG-97-269, whereas they were blocked in the presence of the neuronal Nitric Oxide (NO Synthase (nNOS inhibitor, L-NNA. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that activation of neocortical 5-HT3A-expressing interneurons by serotoninergic input could induces NO mediated vasodilatations and NPY mediated vasoconstrictions.

  1. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P growth.

  2. Spindle-like activity appearing during paradoxical sleep in rats with iron-induced cortical focus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uezu,Eiko

    1982-06-01

    Full Text Available Under barbiturate anesthesia, male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were injected with 2.5 microliters of 0.2 M FeCl3 solution into the left sensori-motor cortex to induce an epileptic focus with minimal abnormal activities. Polygraphy started 1 week after the surgery, showed a spindle-like hypersynchronous activity that appeared not only in the slow wave sleep period but also during paradoxical sleep (PS. This activity had a frequency of 8-14 Hz. The amplitude was more than 200 mu v in the right (non-injected side cortex but very small in the left cortex (injected side. Isolated spike discharges were observed in an ECoG of slow wave sleep. Apart from this activity there was nothing resembling the usual sleep spindles.

  3. Detection of Cortical Oscillations Induced by SCS Using Power Spectral Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sovka

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic, intractable pain of lower back and lower extremity might develop as the result of unsuccessful surgery of back. This state called failed-back surgery syndrome (FBSS cannot be effectively treated by pharmacotherapy. Electric stimulation of the dorsal spinal cord is applied to relieve the pain. According to the medical hypothesis, oscillatory activity, which might be related to the analgesic effects, may occur in the cortex during the stimulation. To confirm the presence of the SCS induced oscillations, a new method of detection was designed for this purpose. The analysis of EEG data was performed using power spectral density, confidence intervals, visualization and group statistic for its verification. Parameters of the method were experimentally optimized to maximize its reliability. During ongoing SCS, statistically significant changes were detected and localized at the stimulation frequency and/or its subharmonic or upper harmonic over central midline electrodes in eight patients.

  4. Pyruvate administration reduces recurrent/moderate hypoglycemia-induced cortical neuron death in diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Young Choi

    Full Text Available Recurrent/moderate (R/M hypoglycemia is common in type 1 diabetes patients. Moderate hypoglycemia is not life-threatening, but if experienced recurrently it may present several clinical complications. Activated PARP-1 consumes cytosolic NAD, and because NAD is required for glycolysis, hypoglycemia-induced PARP-1 activation may render cells unable to use glucose even when glucose availability is restored. Pyruvate, however, can be metabolized in the absence of cytosolic NAD. We therefore hypothesized that pyruvate may be able to improve the outcome in diabetic rats subjected to insulin-induced R/M hypoglycemia by terminating hypoglycemia with glucose plus pyruvate, as compared with delivering just glucose alone. In an effort to mimic juvenile type 1 diabetes the experiments were conducted in one-month-old young rats that were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin (STZ, 50mg/kg, i.p. injection. One week after STZ injection, rats were subjected to moderate hypoglycemia by insulin injection (10 U/kg, i.p. without anesthesia for five consecutive days. Pyruvate (500 mg/kg was given by intraperitoneal injection after each R/M hypoglycemia. Three hours after last R/M hypoglycemia, zinc accumulation was evaluated. Three days after R/M hypoglycemia, neuronal death, oxidative stress, microglial activation and GSH concentrations in the cerebral cortex were analyzed. Sparse neuronal death was observed in the cortex. Zinc accumulation, oxidative injury, microglial activation and GSH loss in the cortex after R/M hypoglycemia were all reduced by pyruvate injection. These findings suggest that when delivered alongside glucose, pyruvate may significantly improve the outcome after R/M hypoglycemia by circumventing a sustained impairment in neuronal glucose utilization resulting from PARP-1 activation.

  5. Multimodal responses induced by cortical stimulation of the parietal lobe: a stereo-electroencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Francione, Stefano; Mai, Roberto; Castana, Laura; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Marino, Daniela; Provinciali, Leandro; Cardinale, Francesco; Tassi, Laura

    2015-09-01

    The functional complexity of the parietal lobe still represents a challenge for neurophysiological and functional neuroimaging studies. While the somatosensory functions of the anterior parietal cortex are well established, the posterior parietal cortex has a relevant role in processing the sensory information, including visuo-spatial perception, visual attention, visuo-motor transformations and other complex and not completely understood functions. We retrospectively analysed all the clinical manifestations induced by intracerebral bipolar electrical stimulation in 172 patients suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsy (mean age 25.6, standard deviation 11.6; 44% females and 56% males) with at least one electrode stereotactically implanted in the parietal cortex. A total of 1186 electrical stimulations were included in the analysis, of which 88 were subsequently excluded because of eliciting pathological electric activity or inducing ictal symptomatology. In the dominant parietal lobe, clinical responses were observed for 56 (25%) of the low-frequency stimulations and for 76 (50%) of the high-frequency stimulations. In the non-dominant parietal lobe, 111 (27%) low-frequency and 176 (55%) high-frequency stimulations were associated with a clinical response. Body scheme alteration was the only clinical effect showing a lateralization, as they were evoked only in the non-dominant hemisphere. The occurrence of somatosensory sensations, motor symptoms, dysarthria and multimodal responses were significantly associated with stimulation of the postcentral gyrus (odds ratio: 5.83, P parietal cortex with the aim to evaluate the neurophysiology of this relevant brain region. Our analysis offers a general overview of the multiple roles of the parietal cortex and supports its crucial involvement in different networks related to complex integrative functions.media-1vid110.1093/brain/awv187_video_abstractawv187_video_abstract. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford

  6. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces microglial nitric oxide production and subsequent rat primary cortical neuron apoptosis through p38/JNK MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanye; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Jianya; Nie, Xiaoke; Wan, Chunhua; Liu, Jiao; Duan, Zhiqing; Xu, Guangfei

    2013-10-04

    It has been widely accepted that microglia, which are the innate immune cells in the brain, upon activation can cause neuronal damage. In the present study, we investigated the role of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in regulating microglial nitric oxide production and its role in causing neuronal damage. The study revealed that TCDD stimulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as well as the production of nitric oxide (NO) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further, a rapid activation of p38 and JNK MAPKs was found in HAPI microglia following TCDD treatment. Blockage of p38 and JNK kinases with their specific inhibitors, SB202190 and SP600125, significantly reduced TCDD-induced iNOS expression and NO production. In addition, it was demonstrated through treating rat primary cortical neurons with media conditioned with TCDD treated microglia that microglial iNOS activation mediates neuronal apoptosis. Lastly, it was also found that p38 and JNK MAPK inhibitors could attenuate the apoptosis of rat cortical neurons upon exposure to medium conditioned by TCDD-treated HAPI microglial cells. Based on these observations, we highlight that the p38/JNK MAPK pathways play an important role in TCDD-induced iNOS activation in rat HAPI microglia and in the subsequent induction of apoptosis in primary cortical neurons.

  7. Dopaminergic neurotransmission dysfunction induced by amyloid-β transforms cortical long-term potentiation into long-term depression and produces memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Castilla, Perla; Rodriguez-Duran, Luis F; Guzman-Ramos, Kioko; Barcenas-Femat, Alejandro; Escobar, Martha L; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition manifested by synaptic dysfunction and memory loss, but the mechanisms underlying synaptic failure are not entirely understood. Although dopamine is a key modulator of synaptic plasticity, dopaminergic neurotransmission dysfunction in AD has mostly been associated to noncognitive symptoms. Thus, we aimed to study the relationship between dopaminergic neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in AD models. We used a transgenic model of AD (triple-transgenic mouse model of AD) and the administration of exogenous amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers into wild type mice. We found that Aβ decreased cortical dopamine levels and converted in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP) into long-term depression (LTD) after high-frequency stimulation delivered at basolateral amygdaloid nucleus-insular cortex projection, which led to impaired recognition memory. Remarkably, increasing cortical dopamine and norepinephrine levels rescued both high-frequency stimulation -induced LTP and memory, whereas depletion of catecholaminergic levels mimicked the Aβ-induced shift from LTP to LTD. Our results suggest that Aβ-induced dopamine depletion is a core mechanism underlying the early synaptopathy and memory alterations observed in AD models and acts by modifying the threshold for the induction of cortical LTP and/or LTD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PUREX/UO{sub 3} deactivation project management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washenfelder, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    From 1955 through 1990, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) provided the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site with nuclear fuel reprocessing capability. It operated in sequence with the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant, which converted the PUREX liquid uranium nitrate product to solid UO{sub 3} powder. Final UO{sub 3} Plant operation ended in 1993. In December 1992, planning was initiated for the deactivation of PUREX and UO{sub 3} Plant. The objective of deactivation planning was to identify the activities needed to establish a passively safe, environmentally secure configuration at both plants, and ensure that the configuration could be retained during the post-deactivation period. The PUREX/UO{sub 3} Deactivation Project management plan represents completion of the planning efforts. It presents the deactivation approach to be used for the two plants, and the supporting technical, cost, and schedule baselines. Deactivation activities concentrate on removal, reduction, and stabilization of the radioactive and chemical materials remaining at the plants, and the shutdown of the utilities and effluents. When deactivation is completed, the two plants will be left unoccupied and locked, pending eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Deactivation is expected to cost $233.8 million, require 5 years to complete, and yield $36 million in annual surveillance and maintenance cost savings.

  9. Venlafaxine treatment after endothelin-1-induced cortical stroke modulates growth factor expression and reduces tissue damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda, Rodrigo; Contreras, Valentina; Pissani, Claudia; Stack, Katherine; Vargas, Macarena; Owen, Gareth I; Lazo, Oscar M; Bronfman, Francisca C

    2016-08-01

    Neuromodulators, such as antidepressants, may contribute to neuroprotection by modulating growth factor expression to exert anti-inflammatory effects and to support neuronal plasticity after stroke. Our objective was to study whether early treatment with venlafaxine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, modulates growth factor expression and positively contributes to reducing the volume of infarcted brain tissue resulting in increased functional recovery. We studied the expression of BDNF, FGF2 and TGF-β1 by examining their mRNA and protein levels and cellular distribution using quantitative confocal microscopy at 5 days after venlafaxine treatment in control and infarcted brains. Venlafaxine treatment did not change the expression of these growth factors in sham rats. In infarcted rats, BDNF mRNA and protein levels were reduced, while the mRNA and protein levels of FGF2 and TGF-β1 were increased. Venlafaxine treatment potentiated all of the changes that were induced by cortical stroke alone. In particular, increased levels of FGF2 and TGF-β1 were observed in astrocytes at 5 days after stroke induction, and these increases were correlated with decreased astrogliosis (measured by GFAP) and increased synaptophysin immunostaining at twenty-one days after stroke in venlafaxine-treated rats. Finally, we show that venlafaxine reduced infarct volume after stroke resulting in increased functional recovery, which was measured using ladder rung motor tests, at 21 days after stroke. Our results indicate that the early oral administration of venlafaxine positively contributes to neuroprotection during the acute and late events that follow stroke.

  10. Phospho-Rb mediating cell cycle reentry induces early apoptosis following oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Ren, Qing-Guo; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Ke; Yu, Zhi-Yuan; Luo, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cell cycle reentry and apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We found that the percentage of neurons with BrdU uptake, TUNEL staining, and colocalized BrdU uptake and TUNEL staining was increased relative to control 6, 12 and 24 h after 1 h of OGD. The number of neurons with colocalized BrdU and TUNEL staining was decreased relative to the number of TUNEL-positive neurons at 24 h. The expression of phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (phospho-Rb) was significantly increased 6, 12 and 24 h after OGD, parallel with the changes in BrdU uptake. Phospho-Rb and TUNEL staining were colocalized in neurons 6 and 12 h after OGD. This colocalization was strikingly decreased 24 h after OGD. Treatment with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine (100 μM) decreased the expression of phospho-Rb and reduced neuronal apoptosis in vitro. These results demonstrated that attempted cell cycle reentry with phosphorylation of Rb induce early apoptosis in neurons after OGD and there must be other mechanisms involved in the later stages of neuronal apoptosis besides cell cycle reentry. Phosphoralated Rb may be an important factor which closely associates aberrant cell cycle reentry with the early stages of neuronal apoptosis following ischemia/hypoxia in vitro, and pharmacological interventions for neuroprotection may be useful directed at this keypoint.

  11. Potentiation of N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced currents by the nootropic drug nefiracetam in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Marszalec, William; Zhao, Xilong; Yeh, Jay Z; Narahashi, Toshio

    2003-10-01

    Nefiracetam is a new pyrrolidone nootropic drug being developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's type and post-stroke vascular-type dementia. In the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients, down-regulation of both cholinergic and glutamatergic systems has been found and is thought to play an important role in impairment of cognition, learning and memory. We have previously shown that the activity of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is potently augmented by nefiracetam. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of action of nefiracetam on glutamatergic receptors. Currents were recorded from rat cortical neurons in long-term primary culture using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique at a holding potential of -70 mV in Mg2+-free solutions. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked currents were greatly and reversibly potentiated by bath application of nefiracetam resulting in a bell-shaped dose-response curve. The minimum effective nefiracetam concentration was 1 nM, and the maximum potentiation to 170% of the control was produced at 10 nM. Nefiracetam potentiation occurred at high NMDA concentrations that evoked the saturated response, and in a manner independent of NMDA concentrations ranging from 3 to 1,000 microM. Glycine at 3 microM potentiated NMDA currents but this effect was attenuated with an increasing concentration of nefiracetam from 1 to 10,000 nM. 7-Chlorokynurenic acid at 1 microM prevented nefiracetam from potentiating NMDA currents. Nefiracetam at 10 nM shifted the dose-response relationship for the 7-chlorokynurenic acid inhibition of NMDA currents in the direction of higher concentrations. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid- and kainate-induced currents were not significantly affected by application of 10 nM nefiracetam. It was concluded that nefiracetam potentiated NMDA currents through interactions with the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptor.

  12. Music-induced cortical plasticity and lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex as foundations for tonal tinnitus treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo ePantev

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15 years, we have studied plasticity in the human auditory cortex by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. Two main topics nurtured our curiosity: the effects of musical training on plasticity in the auditory system, and the effects of lateral inhibition. One of our plasticity studies found that listening to notched music for three hours inhibited the neuronal activity in the auditory cortex that corresponded to the center-frequency of the notch, suggesting suppression of neural activity by lateral inhibition. Crucially, the overall effects of lateral inhibition on human auditory cortical activity were stronger than the habituation effects. Based on these results we developed a novel treatment strategy for tonal tinnitus - tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT. By notching the music energy spectrum around the individual tinnitus frequency, we intended to attract lateral inhibition to auditory neurons involved in tinnitus perception. So far, the training strategy has been evaluated in two studies. The results of the initial long-term controlled study (12 months supported the validity of the treatment concept: subjective tinnitus loudness and annoyance were significantly reduced after TMNMT but not when notching spared the tinnitus frequencies. Correspondingly, tinnitus-related auditory evoked fields (AEFs were significantly reduced after training. The subsequent short-term (5 days training study indicated that training was more effective in the case of tinnitus frequencies ≤ 8 kHz compared to tinnitus frequencies > 8 kHz, and that training should be employed over a long-term in order to induce more persistent effects. Further development and evaluation of TMNMT therapy are planned. A goal is to transfer this novel, completely non-invasive, and low-cost treatment approach for tonal tinnitus into routine clinical practice.

  13. Opiate sensitization induces FosB/ΔFosB expression in prefrontal cortical, striatal and amygdala brain regions.

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    Gary B Kaplan

    Full Text Available Sensitization to the effects of drugs of abuse and associated stimuli contributes to drug craving, compulsive drug use, and relapse in addiction. Repeated opiate exposure produces behavioral sensitization that is hypothesized to result from neural plasticity in specific limbic, striatal and cortical systems. ΔFosB and FosB are members of the Fos family of transcription factors that are implicated in neural plasticity in addiction. This study examined the effects of intermittent morphine treatment, associated with motor sensitization, on FosB/ΔFosB levels using quantitative immunohistochemistry. Motor sensitization was tested in C57BL/6 mice that received six intermittent pre-treatments (on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12 with either subcutaneous morphine (10 mg/kg or saline followed by a challenge injection of morphine or saline on day 16. Mice receiving repeated morphine injections demonstrated significant increases in locomotor activity on days 8, 10, and 12 of treatment (vs. day 1, consistent with development of locomotor sensitization. A morphine challenge on day 16 significantly increased locomotor activity of saline pre-treated mice and produced even larger increases in motor activity in the morphine pre-treated mice, consistent with the expression of opiate sensitization. Intermittent morphine pre-treatment on these six pre-treatment days produced a significant induction of FosB/ΔFosB, measured on day 16, in multiple brain regions including prelimbic (PL and infralimbic (IL cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAc core, dorsomedial caudate-putamen (CPU, basolateral amygdala (BLA and central nucleus of the amygdala (CNA but not in a motor cortex control region. Opiate induced sensitization may develop via Fos/ΔFosB plasticity in motivational pathways (NAc, motor outputs (CPU, and associative learning (PL, IL, BLA and stress pathways (CNA.

  14. Slowed N-Type Calcium Channel (CaV2.2) Deactivation by the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Roscovitine

    OpenAIRE

    Buraei, Zafir; Anghelescu, Mircea; Elmslie, Keith S.

    2005-01-01

    The lack of a calcium channel agonist (e.g., BayK8644) for CaV2 channels has impeded their investigation. Roscovitine, a potent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 1, 2, and 5, has recently been reported to slow the deactivation of P/Q-type calcium channels (CaV2.1). We show that roscovitine also slows deactivation (EC50 ∼53 μM) of N-type calcium channels (CaV2.2) and investigate gating alterations induced by roscovitine. The onset of slowed deactivation was rapid (∼2 s), which contrasts wi...

  15. Potassium Aspartate Attenuates Brain Injury Induced by Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats Through Increasing Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Levels, Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Reducing Brain Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yi; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yumei; Su, Yujin; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2016-12-13

    BACKGROUND Potassium aspartate (PA), as an electrolyte supplement, is widely used in clinical practice. In our previous study, we found PA had neuroprotective effects against apoptosis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rats. In this study, we examine whether PA has protective effects on traumatic brain injury (TBI). MATERIAL AND METHODS TBI was induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) in rats. Vehicle treatment (control) or PA treatment was administered intraperitoneally at 30 minutes after CCI. The modified neurological severity score (mNSS) and cortical lesion volume were examined. Brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity were measured, as well as brain ATP contents, lactic acid levels, and Na+/K+-ATPase activities. RESULTS We found that CCI induced cortical injury in rats. Acute PA treatment at the dose of 62.5 mg/kg and 125 mg/kg significantly improved neurological deficits (pATP (pATP levels, Na+/K+-ATPase activity, and reducing brain edema. It provides experimental evidence for the clinical application of PA.

  16. Music-induced cortical plasticity and lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex as foundations for tonal tinnitus treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantev, Christo; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Teismann, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, we have studied plasticity in the human auditory cortex by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). Two main topics nurtured our curiosity: the effects of musical training on plasticity in the auditory system, and the effects of lateral inhibition. One of our plasticity studies found that listening to notched music for 3 h inhibited the neuronal activity in the auditory cortex that corresponded to the center-frequency of the notch, suggesting suppression of neural activity by lateral inhibition. Subsequent research on this topic found that suppression was notably dependent upon the notch width employed, that the lower notch-edge induced stronger attenuation of neural activity than the higher notch-edge, and that auditory focused attention strengthened the inhibitory networks. Crucially, the overall effects of lateral inhibition on human auditory cortical activity were stronger than the habituation effects. Based on these results we developed a novel treatment strategy for tonal tinnitus—tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT). By notching the music energy spectrum around the individual tinnitus frequency, we intended to attract lateral inhibition to auditory neurons involved in tinnitus perception. So far, the training strategy has been evaluated in two studies. The results of the initial long-term controlled study (12 months) supported the validity of the treatment concept: subjective tinnitus loudness and annoyance were significantly reduced after TMNMT but not when notching spared the tinnitus frequencies. Correspondingly, tinnitus-related auditory evoked fields (AEFs) were significantly reduced after training. The subsequent short-term (5 days) training study indicated that training was more effective in the case of tinnitus frequencies ≤ 8 kHz compared to tinnitus frequencies >8 kHz, and that training should be employed over a long-term in order to induce more persistent effects. Further development and evaluation of TMNMT therapy

  17. The blink reflex and the corneal reflex are followed by cortical activity resembling the nociceptive potentials induced by trigeminal laser stimulation in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, M; Libro, G; Guido, M; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2001-09-07

    Laser stimulation of the supraorbital regions evokes brain potentials (LEPs) related to trigeminal nociception. The aim of this study was to record the R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex in 20 normal subjects, comparing the scalp activity following these reflexes with the nociceptive potentials evoked by CO2 laser stimulation of supraorbital regions. Cortical and muscular reflexes evoked by stimulation of the first trigeminal branch were recorded simultaneously. The R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex were followed by two cortical peaks, which resembled morphologically N-P waves of LEPs. The two peaks demonstrated a difference in latency of approximately 40 ms, which is consistent with activation time of nociception. This finding suggests that these reflexes are induced by activation of small pain-related fibers.

  18. Renal cortical hexokinase and pentose phosphate pathway activation through the EGFR/Akt signaling pathway in endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua A; Stallons, L Jay; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2014-08-15

    While disruption of energy production is an important contributor to renal injury, metabolic alterations in sepsis-induced AKI remain understudied. We assessed changes in renal cortical glycolytic metabolism in a mouse model of sepsis-induced AKI. A specific and rapid increase in hexokinase (HK) activity (∼2-fold) was observed 3 h after LPS exposure and maintained up to 18 h, in association with a decline in renal function as measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN). LPS-induced HK activation occurred independently of HK isoform expression or mitochondrial localization. No other changes in glycolytic enzymes were observed. LPS-mediated HK activation was not sufficient to increase glycolytic flux as indicated by reduced or unchanged pyruvate and lactate levels in the renal cortex. LPS-induced HK activation was associated with increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity but not glycogen production. Mechanistically, LPS-induced HK activation was attenuated by pharmacological inhibitors of the EGF receptor (EGFR) and Akt, indicating that EGFR/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling is responsible. Our findings reveal LPS rapidly increases renal cortical HK activity in an EGFR- and Akt-dependent manner and that HK activation is linked to increased pentose phosphate pathway activity.

  19. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in primary cortical neurons is inhibited by equine estrogens via down-regulation of caspase-3 and prevention of mitochondrial cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YueMei

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a key role in cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases marked by a progressive loss of neurons as seen in Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact cause of apoptosis is not known, a number of factors such as free radicals, insufficient levels of nerve growth factors and excessive levels of glutamate have been implicated. We and others, have previously reported that in a stable HT22 neuronal cell line, glutamate induces apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation and up- and down-regulation of Bax (pro-apoptotic, and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic genes respectively. Furthermore, these changes were reversed/inhibited by estrogens. Several lines of evidence also indicate that a family of cysteine proteases (caspases appear to play a critical role in neuronal apoptosis. The purpose of the present study is to determine in primary cultures of cortical cells, if glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis and its inhibition by estrogens involve changes in caspase-3 protease and whether this process is mediated by Fas receptor and/or mitochondrial signal transduction pathways involving release of cytochrome c. Results In primary cultures of rat cortical cells, glutamate induced apoptosis that was associated with enhanced DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and up-regulation of pro-caspase-3. Exposure of cortical cells to glutamate resulted in a time-dependent cell death and an increase in caspase-3 protein levels. Although the increase in caspase-3 levels was evident after 3 h, cell death was only significantly increased after 6 h. Treatment of cells for 6 h with 1 to 20 mM glutamate resulted in a 35 to 45% cell death that was associated with a 45 to 65% increase in the expression of caspase-3 protein. Pretreatment with caspase-3-protease inhibitor z-DEVD or pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD significantly decreased glutamate-induced cell death of cortical cells. Exposure of cells to glutamate for 6 h in the presence or

  20. Neuroprotective effects of a sesquiterpene lactone and flavanones from Paulownia tomentosa Steud. against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat cortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Ki; Cho, Sang-Buem; Moon, Hyung-In

    2010-12-01

    The neuroprotective effects of Paulownia tomentosa against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity were studied in primary cultured rat cortical cells. It was found that the aqueous extract of this medicinal plant significantly attenuated glutamate-induced toxicity. In order to clarify the mechanism(s) underlying this neuroprotective effect, the active fractions and components were isolated and identified. Five compounds were isolated as the methanol extracts from air-dried flowers of P. tomentosa. Isoatriplicolide tiglate exhibited significant neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced toxicity at concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 10 μM, and exhibited cell viability of approximately 43-78%. Therefore, the neuroprotective effect of P. tomentosa might be due to the inhibition of glutamate-induced toxicity by the sesquiterpene lactone derivative it contains.

  1. Brain deactivation in the outperformance in bimodal tasks: an FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Ching Chiang

    Full Text Available While it is known that some individuals can effectively perform two tasks simultaneously, other individuals cannot. How the brain deals with performing simultaneous tasks remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to assess which brain areas corresponded to various phenomena in task performance. Nineteen subjects were requested to sequentially perform three blocks of tasks, including two unimodal tasks and one bimodal task. The unimodal tasks measured either visual feature binding or auditory pitch comparison, while the bimodal task required performance of the two tasks simultaneously. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI results are compatible with previous studies showing that distinct brain areas, such as the visual cortices, frontal eye field (FEF, lateral parietal lobe (BA7, and medial and inferior frontal lobe, are involved in processing of visual unimodal tasks. In addition, the temporal lobes and Brodmann area 43 (BA43 were involved in processing of auditory unimodal tasks. These results lend support to concepts of modality-specific attention. Compared to the unimodal tasks, bimodal tasks required activation of additional brain areas. Furthermore, while deactivated brain areas were related to good performance in the bimodal task, these areas were not deactivated where the subject performed well in only one of the two simultaneous tasks. These results indicate that efficient information processing does not require some brain areas to be overly active; rather, the specific brain areas need to be relatively deactivated to remain alert and perform well on two tasks simultaneously. Meanwhile, it can also offer a neural basis for biofeedback in training courses, such as courses in how to perform multiple tasks simultaneously.

  2. Reversible and rapid transfer-RNA deactivation as a mechanism of translational repression in stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Andreas; Wende, Sandra; Mörl, Mario; Pan, Tao; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-08-01

    Stress-induced changes of gene expression are crucial for survival of eukaryotic cells. Regulation at the level of translation provides the necessary plasticity for immediate changes of cellular activities and protein levels. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure to oxidative stress results in a quick repression of translation by deactivation of the aminoacyl-ends of all transfer-RNA (tRNA). An oxidative-stress activated nuclease, angiogenin, cleaves first within the conserved single-stranded 3'-CCA termini of all tRNAs, thereby blocking their use in translation. This CCA deactivation is reversible and quickly repairable by the CCA-adding enzyme [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferase]. Through this mechanism the eukaryotic cell dynamically represses and reactivates translation at low metabolic costs.

  3. Reversible and rapid transfer-RNA deactivation as a mechanism of translational repression in stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Czech

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced changes of gene expression are crucial for survival of eukaryotic cells. Regulation at the level of translation provides the necessary plasticity for immediate changes of cellular activities and protein levels. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure to oxidative stress results in a quick repression of translation by deactivation of the aminoacyl-ends of all transfer-RNA (tRNA. An oxidative-stress activated nuclease, angiogenin, cleaves first within the conserved single-stranded 3'-CCA termini of all tRNAs, thereby blocking their use in translation. This CCA deactivation is reversible and quickly repairable by the CCA-adding enzyme [ATP(CTP:tRNA nucleotidyltransferase]. Through this mechanism the eukaryotic cell dynamically represses and reactivates translation at low metabolic costs.

  4. Depletion effect of polycrystalline-silicon gate electrode by phosphorus deactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Woojin; Ahn, Ji-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    A study of the polycrystalline silicon depletion effect generated from the subsequent thermal process is undertaken. Although phosphorus out-diffusion, which causes the polycrystalline silicon depletion effect, is increased with an increase in the thermal process temperature, the polysilicon depletion effect is stronger when inducing rapid thermal annealing in lower temperatures of 600-800 °C than in 900 °C. This indicates that the major reason for the polysilicon depletion effect is not the out-diffusion of phosphorus but the electrical deactivation of phosphorus, which is segregated at the grain boundary. Therefore, by increasing the size of polycrystalline silicon grain, we can efficiently reduce the polysilicon depletion effect and enhance the tolerance to deactivation.

  5. 1997 project of the year, PUREX deactivation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, R.W.

    1998-02-13

    At the end of 1992, the PUREX and UO{sub 3} plants were deemed no longer necessary for the defense needs of the United States. Although no longer necessary, they were very costly to maintain in their post-operation state. The DOE embarked on a deactivation strategy for these plants to reduce the costs of providing continuous surveillance of the facilities and their hazards. Deactivation of the PUREX and UO{sub 3} plants was estimated to take 5 years and cost $222.5 million and result in an annual surveillance and maintenance cost of $2 million. Deactivation of the PUREX/UO{sub 3} plants officially began on October 1, 1993. The deactivation was 15 months ahead of the original schedule and $75 million under the original cost estimate. The annual cost of surveillance and maintenance of the plants was reduced to less than $1 million.

  6. Selective Inhibition of Deactivated Mitochondrial Complex I by Biguanides †

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Biguanides are widely used antihyperglycemic agents for diabetes mellitus and prediabetes treatment. Complex I is the rate limiting step of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), a major source of mitochondrial free radical production, and a known target of biguanides. Complex I has two reversible conformational states, active and de-active. The deactivated state is promoted in the absence of substrates, but is rapidly and fully reversed to the active state in the presence of NADH....

  7. Active components from Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) for protection of amyloid β(25-35)-induced neuritic atrophy in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanjing; Tohda, Chihiro; Zhu, Shu; Hattori, Masao; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2011-07-01

    Not only neuronal death but also neuritic atrophy and synaptic loss underlie the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease as direct causes of the memory deficit. Extracts of Siberian ginseng (the rhizome of Eleutherococcus senticosus) were shown to have protective effects on the regeneration of neurites and the reconstruction of synapses in rat cultured cortical neurons damaged by amyloid β (Aβ)(25-35), and eleutheroside B was one of the active constituents. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of constituents was conducted to explore active components from Siberian ginseng which can protect against neuritic atrophy induced by Aβ(25-35) in cultured rat cortical neurons. The ethyl acetate, n-butanol and water fractions from the methanol extract of Siberian ginseng showed protective effects against Aβ-induced neuritic atrophy. Twelve compounds were isolated from the active fractions and identified. Among them, eleutheroside B, eleutheroside E and isofraxidin showed obvious protective effects against Aβ(25-35)-induced atrophies of axons and dendrites at 1 and 10 μM.

  8. Piracetam ameliorated oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced injury in rat cortical neurons via inhibition of oxidative stress, excitatory amino acids release and P53/Bax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi; Hu, Min; Zha, Yun-hong; Li, Zi-cheng; Zhao, Bo; Yu, Ling-ling; Yu, Min; Qian, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that piracetam inhibited the decrease in amino acid content induced by chronic hypoperfusion, ameliorated the dysfunction of learning and memory in a hypoperfusion rat model, down-regulated P53, and BAX protein, facilitated the synaptic plasticity, and may be helpful in the treatment of vascular dementia. To explore the precise mechanism, the present study further evaluated effects of piracetam on Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal damage in rat primary cortical cells. The addition of piracetam to the cultured cells 12 h before OGD for 4 h significantly reduced neuronal damage as determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and lactate dehydrogenase release experiments. Piracetam also lowered the levels of malondialdehyde, nitrogen monoxidum, and xanthine oxidase which was increased in the OGD cells, and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, which were decreased in the OGD cells. We also demonstrated that piracetam could decrease glutamate and aspartate release when cortical cells were subjected to OGD. Furthermore, Western blot study demonstrated that piracetam attenuated the increased expression of P53 and BAX protein in OGD cells. These observations demonstrated that piracetam reduced OGD-induced neuronal damage by inhibiting the oxidative stress and decreasing excitatory amino acids release and lowering P53/Bax protein expression in OGD cells.

  9. ESP-102, a combined extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis and Schizandra chinensis, protects against glutamate-induced toxicity in primary cultures of rat cortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Choong Je; Kim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Ki Yong; Oh, Taehwan; Kim, Sun Yeou; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Choong

    2009-11-01

    It was reported previously that ESP-102, a combined extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis and Schizandra chinensis, significantly improved scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice and protected primary cultured rat cortical cells against glutamate-induced toxicity. To corroborate this effect, the action patterns of ESP-102 were elucidated using the same in vitro system. ESP-102 decreased the cellular calcium concentration increased by glutamate, and inhibited the subsequent overproduction of cellular nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species to the level of control cells. It also preserved cellular activities of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase reduced in the glutamate-injured neuronal cells. While a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was observed in glutamate treated cells, the mitochondrial membrane potential was maintained by ESP-102. These results support that the actual mechanism of neuroprotective activity of ESP-102 against glutamate-induced oxidative stress might be its antioxidative activity.

  10. Dopamine D2 antagonist-induced striatal Nur77 expression requires activation of mGlu5 receptors by cortical afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eMaheux

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine D2 receptor antagonists modulate gene transcription in the striatum. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this effect remains elusive. Here we used the expression of Nur77, a transcription factor of the orphan nuclear receptor family, as readout to explore the role of dopamine, glutamate and adenosine receptors in the effect of a dopamine D2 antagonist in the striatum. First, we investigated D2 antagonist-induced Nur77 mRNA in D2L receptor knockout mice. Surprisingly, deletion of the D2L receptor isoform did not reduce eticlopride-induced upregulation of Nur77 mRNA levels in the striatum. Next, we tested if an ibotenic acid-induced cortical lesion could block the effect of eticlopride on Nur77 expression. Cortical lesions strongly reduced eticlopride-induced striatal upregulation of Nur77 mRNA. Then, we investigated if glutamatergic neurotransmission could modulate eticlopride-induced Nur77 expression. A combination of a metabotropic glutamate type 5 (mGlu5 and adenosine A2A receptor antagonists abolished eticlopride-induced upregulation of Nur77 mRNA levels in the striatum. Direct modulation of Nur77 expression by striatal glutamate and adenosine receptors was confirmed using corticostriatal organotypic cultures. Taken together, these results indicate that blockade of postsynaptic D2 receptors is not sufficient to trigger striatal transcriptional activity and that interaction with corticostriatal presynaptic D2 receptors and subsequent activation of postsynaptic glutamate and adenosine receptors in the striatum is required. Thus, these results uncover an unappreciated role of presynaptic D2 heteroreceptors and support a prominent role of glutamate in the effect of D2 antagonists.

  11. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Administration Induces Amnesia in Male Sprague Dawley Rats and Exacerbates Recovery from Functional Deficits Induced by a Controlled Cortical Impact Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Rastafa I.; Hayashi, Kentaro; Bongers, Quinn; Wehber, Marlyse; Anderson, Icelle M.; Jansen, Alex D.; Nier, Chase; Fares, Emily; Farquhar, Gabrielle; Kapoor, Amita; Ziegler, Toni E.; VadakkadathMeethal, Sivan; Bird, Ian M.

    2017-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids like conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are required for normal neural development and cognitive function and have been ascribed various beneficial functions. Recently, oral CLA also has been shown to increase testosterone (T) biosynthesis, which is known to diminish traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced neuropathology and reduce deficits induced by stroke in adult rats. To test the impact of CLA on cognitive recovery following a TBI, 5–6 month old male Sprague Dawley rats received a focal injury (craniectomy + controlled cortical impact (CCI; n = 17)) or Sham injury (craniectomy alone; n = 12) and were injected with 25 mg/kg body weight of Clarinol® G-80 (80% CLA in safflower oil; n = 16) or saline (n = 13) every 48 h for 4 weeks. Sham surgery decreased baseline plasma progesterone (P4) by 64.2% (from 9.5 ± 3.4 ng/mL to 3.4 ± 0.5 ng/mL; p = 0.068), T by 74.6% (from 5.9 ± 1.2 ng/mL to 1.5 ± 0.3 ng/mL; p CLA treatment did not reverse hypogonadism in Sham (P4: 2.5 ± 1.0 ng/mL; T: 0.9 ± 0.2 ng/mL) or CCI-injured (P4: 2.2 ± 0.9 ng/mL; T: 1.0 ± 0.2 ng/mL, p > 0.05) animals by post-injury day 29, but rapidly reversed by post-injury day 1 the hypoadrenalism in Sham (11-DOC: 372.6 ± 36.6 ng/mL; corticosterone: 202.6 ± 15.6 ng/mL) and CCI-injured (11-DOC: 384.2 ± 101.3 ng/mL; corticosterone: 234.6 ± 43.8 ng/mL) animals. In Sham surgery animals, CLA did not alter body weight, but did markedly increase latency to find the hidden Morris Water Maze platform (40.3 ± 13.0 s) compared to saline treated Sham animals (8.8 ± 1.7 s). In CCI injured animals, CLA did not alter CCI-induced body weight loss, CCI-induced cystic infarct size, or deficits in rotarod performance. However, like Sham animals, CLA injections exacerbated the latency of CCI-injured rats to find the hidden MWM platform (66.8 ± 10.6 s) compared to CCI-injured rats treated with saline (30.7 ± 5.5 s, p CLA at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight in adult male rats over 1

  12. Reduced cortical renal GLUT1 expression induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Souza

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes in spontaneously hypertensive rats is associated with cortical renal GLUT1 and GLUT2 overexpression. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme blockade on cortical renal GLUT1 and GLUT2 expression, urinary albumin and urinary TGF-β1. Streptozotocin, 50 mg/kg, or citrate buffer (N = 16 was administered as a single injection into the tail vein in adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (~260 g. Thirty days later, these diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rats received ramipril by gavage: 0.01 mg·kg-1·day-1 (D0.01, N = 14, 1 mg·kg-1·day-1 (D1, N = 9 or water (D, N = 11 for 15 days. Albumin and TGF-β1 (24-h urine, direct arterial pressure, renal tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme activity (fluorometric assay, and GLUT1 and GLUT2 protein levels (Western blot, renal cortex were determined. Glycemia and glycosuria were higher (P < 0.05 in the diabetic rats compared with controls, but similar between the diabetic groups. Diabetes in spontaneously hypertensive rats lowered renal tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme activity (40%, which was reduced further when higher ramipril doses were used. Diabetes associated with hypertension raised GLUT1 by 28% (P < 0.0001 and GLUT2 by 76% (P = 0.01, and both doses of ramipril equally reduced cortical GLUT1 (D vs D1 and vs D0.01, P ≤ 0.001. GLUT2 levels were reduced in D0.01 (P < 0.05 vs D. Diabetes increased urinary albumin and TGF-β1 urinary excretion, but the 15-day ramipril treatment (with either dose did not reduce them. In conclusion, ramipril is effective in lowering renal tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, as well as blocking cortical GLUT1 overexpression, which may be beneficial in arresting the development of diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Pial iontophoresis of ferric chloride versus cortical ferric chloride injection in establishing iron-induced posttraumatic epilepsy animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinlan Jin; Hanping Zhuang; Shaoming Liu; Junqiang Si; Ying Chen; Jiamei Yao

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to study the pathogenesis of iron-induced posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE), foreign scholars have established several kinds of PTE animal models, among which, the iron- induced PTE animal models proposed by Willmore is the most famous. The iron-induced PTE animal models can be established by two methods: one is cortical ferric chloride injection (CFCI) and the other one is pial iontophoresis of ferric chloride (PIFC). Because Willmore did not give out the elaboration of the behaviors and electroencephalograms (EEGs) of the iron induced PTE animal models established by these two methods, so we have known little about these animal models.OBJECTIVE: To observe the behaviors and EEGs of the iron-induced PTE animal models established by PIFC and CFCI, in order to compare the differences and the study value of these two methods.DESIGN: Qualitative controlled observation trial.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, Urumqi General Hospital, Lanzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Forty healthy adult male SD rats, weighing 200 to 250 g, were involved in this experiment.pany, USA), the wireless blue tooth electroencephlograms recording system (Nuocheng electric Co. Ltd,Shanghai), a set of air turbine dental drill unit, dental base acrylic resin powder, microinjector (50 μL), amperemeter (1 mA), a pair of batteries, electric resistance (200 kΩ) , variable resistance (100 kΩ), tubule with endo-meridians of 2 mm (used as import tube), several silver wire segments and several acupuncture needles were employed in this study.METHODS: This study was carried out in the Experimental Animal Center of the Urumqi General Hospital,Lanzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between November 2004 and April 2005. Establishing the PET animal models by CFCI method: Twenty SD rats were taken, intraperitoneally anesthetized with 50 mg/kg barbanylum and fixed on stereotaxic apparatus. A cranial burr hole with the diameter of 2 mm was drilled 3mm behind the

  14. Expertise-related deactivation of the right temporoparietal junction during musical improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Aaron L; Ansari, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Musical training has been associated with structural changes in the brain as well as functional differences in brain activity when musicians are compared to nonmusicians on both perceptual and motor tasks. Previous neuroimaging comparisons of musicians and nonmusicians in the motor domain have used tasks involving prelearned motor sequences or synchronization with an auditorily presented sequence during the experiment. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine expertise-related differences in brain activity between musicians and nonmusicians during improvisation--the generation of novel musical-motor sequences--using a paradigm that we previously used in musicians alone. Despite behaviorally matched performance, the two groups showed significant differences in functional brain activity during improvisation. Specifically, musicians deactivated the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) during melodic improvisation, while nonmusicians showed no change in activity in this region. The rTPJ is thought to be part of a ventral attentional network for bottom-up stimulus-driven processing, and it has been postulated that deactivation of this region occurs in order to inhibit attentional shifts toward task-irrelevant stimuli during top-down, goal-driven behavior. We propose that the musicians' deactivation of the rTPJ during melodic improvisation may represent a training-induced shift toward inhibition of stimulus-driven attention, allowing for a more goal-directed performance state that aids in creative thought.

  15. Effect of vitamin E on cerebral cortical oxidative stress and brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression induced by hypoxia and exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, H F; Abbas, A M; El Samanoudy, A Z

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in the proliferation of neurons, and its expression increases significantly with exercise. We aimed to investigate the effects of chronic exercise (swimming) and sustained hypoxia on cortical BDNF expression in both the presence and absence of vitamin E. Sixty four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two equal groups; a normoxic group and a hypoxic group. Both groups were equally subdivided into four subgroups: sedentary, sedentary with vitamin E, chronic exercise either with or without vitamin E supplementation. Arterial PO(2), and the levels of cortical malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidants (reduced glutathione GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and vitamin E) and BDNF gene expression were investigated. Hypoxia significantly increased MDA production and BDNF gene expression and decreased the antioxidants compared to control rats. Chronic exercise in hypoxic and normoxic rats increased MDA level and BDNF gene expression and decreased the antioxidants. Providing vitamin E supplementation to the hypoxic and normoxic rats significantly reduced MDA and BDNF gene expression and increased antioxidants. We conclude that sustained hypoxia and chronic exercise increased BDNF gene expression and induced oxidative stress. Moreover, vitamin E attenuated the oxidative stress and decreased BDNF gene expression in sustained hypoxia and chronic exercise which confirms the oxidative stress-induced stimulation of BDNF gene expression.

  16. Prognostic value of posteromedial cortex deactivation in mild cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Petrella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal subjects deactivate specific brain regions, notably the posteromedial cortex (PMC, during many tasks. Recent cross-sectional functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data suggests that deactivation during memory tasks is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD. The goal of this study was to prospectively determine the prognostic significance of PMC deactivation in mild cognitive impairment (MCI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 75 subjects (34 MCI, 13 AD subjects and 28 controls underwent baseline fMRI scanning during encoding of novel and familiar face-name pairs. MCI subjects were followed longitudinally to determine conversion to AD. Regression and analysis of covariance models were used to assess the effect of PMC activation/deactivation on conversion to dementia as well as in the longitudinal change in dementia measures. At longitudinal follow up of up to 3.5 years (mean 2.5+/-0.79 years, 11 MCI subjects converted to AD. The proportion of deactivators was significantly different across all groups: controls (79%, MCI-Nonconverters (73%, MCI-converters (45%, and AD (23% (p<0.05. Mean PMC activation magnitude parameter estimates, at baseline, were negative in the control (-0.57+/-0.12 and MCI-Nonconverter (-0.33+/-0.14 groups, and positive in the MCI-Converter (0.37+/-0.40 and AD (0.92+/-0.30 groups. The effect of diagnosis on PMC deactivation remained significant after adjusting for age, education and baseline Mini-Mental State Exam (p<0.05. Baseline PMC activation magnitude was correlated with change in dementia ratings from baseline. CONCLUSION: Loss of physiological functional deactivation in the PMC may have prognostic value in preclinical AD, and could aid in profiling subgroups of MCI subjects at greatest risk for progressive cognitive decline.

  17. Cerebral Angiography combined Coronary Angiography Induced Cortical Blindness%脑血管造影联合冠脉造影术后致皮质盲

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方晓霞; 王云甫; 刘光健

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the etiology,clinical manifestations and treatments of cortical blindness after cerebral angiography combined coronary angiography. Methods The clinical manifestation, treatment and prognosis of one patient with cortical blindness induced by cerebral angiography were reported,the related literatures were retrospectively analyzed. Results The clinical characteristics of cortical blindness were abrupt onset and hazardous, and its possible etiology in most studies was that the toxicity of contrast media which may destruct the blood-brain barrier transiently, then specifically entered into visual cortex and induced cortex cells injury. The principles of treatment were dilating blood vessels, alleviating cerebral edema,glucocorticoids,nerve nutrition. Conclusion Cortical blindness is a rare clinical complication of cerebral angiography, which should be diagnosed and treated as soon as possible,and take some preventive measures.%目的:探讨心脑血管造影术后皮质盲的病因、临床表现及处理方法.方法:报道1例心脑血管造影术后皮质盲的临床表现、治疗过程及治疗结果,并结合文献讨论.结果:脑血管造影术后皮质盲具有发病突然、凶险的临床特点,一般认为是术中造影剂的毒性作用,使血脑屏障一过性破坏,造影剂特异性进入视皮质,导致皮质细胞毒性损害.治疗原则为舒张血管、抗脑水肿、皮质激素、神经营养治疗.结论:心脑血管造影术后的皮质盲是一临床少见并发症,必须尽快确诊及治疗,并采取一定的预防措施防治.

  18. Plastic Changes in Human Motor Cortical Output Induced by Random but not Closed-Loop Peripheral Stimulation: the Curse of Causality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth I Brown

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous work showed that repetitive peripheral nerve stimulation can induce plastic changes in motor cortical output. Triggering electrical stimulation of central structures from natural activity can also generate plasticity. In this study, we tested whether triggering peripheral nerve stimulation from muscle activity would likewise induce changes in motor output. We developed a wearable electronic device capable of recording electromyogram (EMG and delivering electrical stimulation under closed-loop control. This allowed paired stimuli to be delivered over longer periods than standard laboratory-based protocols.We tested this device in healthy human volunteers. Motor cortical output in relaxed thenar muscles was first assessed via the recruitment curve of responses to contralateral transcranial magnetic stimulation. The wearable device was then configured to record thenar EMG and stimulate the median nerve at the wrist (intensity around motor threshold, rate ~0.66 Hz. Subjects carried out normal daily activities for 4-7 hours, before returning to the laboratory for repeated recruitment curve assessment. Four stimulation protocols were tested (9-14 subjects each: No Stim, no stimuli delivered; Activity, stimuli triggered by EMG activity above threshold; Saved, stimuli timed according to a previous Activity session in the same subject; Rest, stimuli given when EMG was silent. As expected, No Stim did not modify the recruitment curve. Activity and Rest conditions produced no significant effects across subjects, although there were changes in some individuals. Saved produced a significant and substantial increase, with average responses 2.14 times larger at 30% stimulator intensity above threshold.We argue that unavoidable delays in the closed loop feedback, due mainly to central and peripheral conduction times, mean that stimuli in the Activity paradigm arrived too late after cortical activation to generate consistent plastic changes. By contrast

  19. Effect of pycnogenol and spirulina on vancomycin-induced renal cortical oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagy in adult male albino rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayomy, Naglaa A; Abdelaziz, Eman Z; Said, Mona A; Badawi, Marwa S; El-Bakary, Reda H

    2016-08-01

    Vancomycin-induced nephrotoxicity has been reported to occur in 5%-25% of patients who were administered with it. Several natural antioxidants were found to be effective against drug-induced toxicity. We evaluated the possible protective effects of spirulina and pycnogenol alone or in combination on vancomycin-induced renal cortical oxidative stress. Forty-nine rats were randomly divided into 7 groups: group I, control; group II, received spirulina 1000 mg/kg per day; group III, received pycnogenol 200 mg/kg per day; group IV, received vancomycin 200 mg/kg per day every 12 h; group V, (spirulina + vancomycin); group VI, (pycnogenol + vancomycin); and group VII, (pycnogenol + spirulina + vancomycin). At the end of the experiment, kidney functions were estimated and then the kidneys were removed, weighed, and sampled for histopathological, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical studies. Administration of spirulina and pycnogenol alone or in combination decreased elevated serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, renal malondialdehyde, and immunoexpression of the proapoptotic protein (Bax), autophagic marker protein (LC3/B), and inducible nitric oxide synthase induced by vancomycin. They increased reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and immunoexpression of the antiapoptotic protein (Bcl2). They also ameliorated the morphological changes induced by vancomycin. The combination therapy of spirulina and pycnogenol showed better protective effects than the corresponding monotherapy.

  20. Involvement of Raf-1/MEK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway in zinc-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Yuka; Matsunaga, Yoshiko; Shiota, Ryugo; Satoh, Tomohiko; Kishi, Yuko; Kawai, Yoshiko; Gemba, Munekazu

    2006-08-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient that can also be toxic. We have previously reported that zinc-related renal toxicity is due, in part, to free radical generation in the renal epithelial cell line, LLC-PK(1) cells. We have also shown that an MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, markedly inhibits zinc-induced renal cell injury. In this study, we investigated the role of an upstream MEK/ERK pathway, Raf-1 kinase pathway, and the transcription factor and ERK substrate Elk-1, in rat renal cortical slices exposed to zinc. Immediately after preparing slices from rat renal cortex, the slices were incubated in medium containing Raf-1 and MEK inhibitors. ERK1/2 and Elk-1 activation were determined by Western blot analysis for phosphorylated ERK (pERK) 1/2 and phosphorylated Elk-1 (pElk-1) in nuclear fractions prepared from slices exposed to zinc. Zinc caused not only increases in 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) modified protein and lipid peroxidation, as an index of oxidant stress, and decreases in PAH accumulation, as that of renal cell injury in the slices. Zinc also induced a rapid increase in ERK/Elk-1 activity accompanied by increased expressions of pERK and pElk-1 in the nuclear fraction. A Raf-1 kinase inhibitor and an MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 significantly attenuated zinc-induced decreases PAH accumulation in the slices. The Raf-1 kinase inhibitor and U0126 also suppressed ERK1/2 activation in nuclear fractions prepared from slices treated with zinc. The present results suggest that a Raf-1/MEK/ERK1/2 pathway and the ERK substrate Elk-1 are involved in free radical-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices exposed to zinc.

  1. Intention retrieval and deactivation following an acute psychosocial stressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Walser

    Full Text Available We often form intentions but have to postpone them until the appropriate situation for retrieval and execution has come, an ability also referred to as event-based prospective memory. After intention completion, our cognitive system has to deactivate no-more-relevant intention representations from memory to avoid interference with subsequent tasks. In everyday life, we frequently rely on these abilities also in stressful situations. Surprisingly, little is known about potential stress effects on these functions. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the reliability of event-based prospective memory and of intention deactivation in conditions of acute psychosocial stress. To this aim, eighty-two participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test, a standardized stress protocol, or a standardized control situation. Following this treatment, participants performed a computerized event-based prospective memory task with non-salient and focal prospective memory cues in order to assess prospective memory performance and deactivation of completed intentions. Although the stress group showed elevated levels of salivary cortisol as marker of a stress-related increase in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity throughout the cognitive testing period compared to the no-stress group, prospective memory performance and deactivation of completed intentions did not differ between groups. Findings indicate that cognitive control processes subserving intention retrieval and deactivation after completion may be mostly preserved even under conditions of acute stress.

  2. Deactivation of diesel oxidation catalysts. Vehicle- and synthetic aging correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jonas; Skoglundh, Magnus [Competence Centre for Catalysis, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Antonsson, Matilda [Volvo Car Corporation, Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment Diesel, SE-405 31 Goeteborg (Sweden); Eurenius, Lisa; Olsson, Eva [Microscopy and Microanalysis, Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2007-03-08

    Deactivation characteristics of a diesel oxidation catalyst subjected to controlled lab aging were compared to field-aged catalysts after 0, 80,000, and 160,000 km driving in order to establish the (dis)similarities between the two types of aging, and determine to what extent vehicle aging can be replaced by rapid synthetic aging. Emission tests confirmed the increasing deactivation of the field-aged catalysts and measurements of CO oxidation, Pt dispersion and hydrocarbon storage capacity were used together with XPS, TEM, and SEM-EDS to compare the performance with lab-aged catalysts. The synthetic aging was designed to account for a combination of thermal and chemical deactivation. A similar degree of Pt sintering was observed for both real and synthetic aging conditions, whereas differences arose from various contributions to the chemical deactivation. XPS showed that pre-oxidation and pre-reduction at 700 C was not sufficient to remove typical compounds of oil-derived catalyst poisons (P, Zn, Ca), which furthermore accumulated with mileage, on the vehicle-aged catalysts. The degree of sulfur poisoning of the lab-aged catalysts increased with the duration of low-temperature sulfur exposure and could not be recovered in atmospheres typical for normal driving conditions. The results show that synthetic aging can be used to simulate thermal aging and a general effect of irreversible chemical deactivation, and thereby accelerate durability test procedures of various catalysts where loss of catalytic activity by time of operation is of concern. (author)

  3. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C H

    1991-02-14

    Progress is reported for a four-year fundamental investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which were to (1) determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation and (2) model the global rates of deactivation at the surface of the catalyst for the same catalysts. A computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was designed, constructed and tested. Kinetic data for CO hydrogenation on unsupported, unpromoted iron, 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K-promoted 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were obtained as functions of temperature, reactant particle pressures and time. The activity/selectivity and kinetic data are consistent with those previously reported for supported, unpromoted and promoted iron. Two kinds of deactivation were observed during FT synthesis on these samples: (1) loss of surface area after reduction of unsupported, unpromoted iron at 400{degree}C and (2) loss of activity with time due to carbon deposition, especially in the case of K-promoted 99% Fe/1% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Deactivation rate data were obtained for CO hydrogenation on promoted Fe as a function of time, temperature, and H{sub 2}/CO ratio. 50 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1991-01-10

    Although promoted cobalt and iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis of gasoline feedstock were first developed more than three decades ago, a major technical problem still limiting the commercial use of these catalysts today is carbon deactivation. This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which are to: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; and model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. To accomplish the above objectives, the project is divided into the following tasks: (1) determine the kinetics of reaction and of carbon deactivation during CO hydrogenation on Fe and Fe/K catalysts coated on monolith bodies. (2) Determine the reactivities and types of carbon deposited during reaction on the same catalysts from temperature-programmed-surface-reaction spectroscopy (TPSR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Determine the types of iron carbides formed at various temperatures and H{sub 2}/CO ratios using x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (3) Develop mathematical deactivation models which include heat and mass transport contributions for FT synthesis is packed-bed reactors. Progress to date is described. 48 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Experimentally altered navigational demands induce changes in the cortical forebrain of free-ranging northern pacific rattlesnakes (Crotalus o. oreganus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holding, Matthew L; Frazier, Julius A; Taylor, Emily N; Strand, Christine R

    2012-01-01

    The hippocampus of birds and mammals plays a crucial role in spatial memory and navigation. The hippocampus exhibits plasticity in adulthood in response to diverse environmental factors associated with spatial demands placed on an animal. The medial and dorsal cortices of the telencephalon of squamate reptiles have been implicated as functional homologues to the hippocampus. This study sought to experimentally manipulate the navigational demands placed on free-ranging northern Pacific rattlesnakes (Crotalus o. oreganus) to provide direct evidence of the relationship between spatial demands and neuroplasticity in the cortical telencephalon of the squamate brain. Adult male rattlesnakes were radio-tracked for 2 months, during which time 1 of 3 treatments was imposed weekly, namely 225-meter translocation in a random direction, 225-meter walk and release at that day's capture site (handling control) or undisturbed (control). Snakes were then sacrificed and the brains were removed and processed for histological analysis of cortical features. The activity range was larger in the translocated (Tr) group compared to the handled (Hd) and undisturbed control (Cn) groups when measured via 95% minimum convex polygon (MCP). At the 100% MCP level, Tr snakes had larger activity ranges than the Cn snakes only. The volume of the medial cortex (MC) was larger in the Tr group compared to the Cn group. The MC of Hd snakes was not significantly different from that of either of the other groups. No differences in dorsal cortex (DC) or lateral cortex volumes were detected among the groups. Numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells in the MC and DC 3 weeks after BrdU injection were not affected by treatment. This study establishes a causal relationship between navigational demands and greater MC volume in a free-ranging reptile.

  6. Nerve growth factor affects focal cerebral cortical neuronal Bcl-2 and Bax expression in a mouse model of oxyhemoglobin-induced subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianfeng Jiang; Wei Shi; Jin Liang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) can induce brain cell apoptosis in vivo.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) on cerebral cortical neuronal Bcl-2 and Bax expression in mice with OxyHb-induced subarachnoid hemorrhage.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A completely randomized grouping, controlled animal experiment was performed at the Experimental Center for Biomedicine, College of Medicine, Xi'an Jiaotong University between February and April 2005.MATERIALS: Fifty-four healthy, male, adult, ICR mice were included in this study. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced by a subarachnoid injection of OxyHb in 48 mice. Mouse NGF was obtained from Xiamcn Beidazhilu Bioengineering Co., Ltd., China.METHODS: All 54 mice were randomly divided into three groups: control (n = 6), injury (n = 24), and NGF (n = 24). The NGF group received a subarachnoidal administration of OxyHb, immediately followed by a caudal vein injection of NGF (1 μg). The injury group was injected with OxyHb, and subsequently with physiological saline. Thc control group only received intravenous physiological saline.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At 1, 6, 24, and 48 hours following subarachnoid hemorrhage induction,expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax were detected by immunohistochemistry in the cerebral cortex 3 mm anterior and posterior to the injection site.RESULTS: At all time points following OxyHb injection, cerebral cortical Bax levels were significantly higher in the injured group than in the control and NGF groups (P < 0.01). During the first 24 hours following OxyHb injection, cerebral cortical Bcl-2 levels were significantly lower in the injury group compared to the control group (P < 0.05 0.01). Between 1 and 48 hours, Bcl-2 levels were significantly higher in the NGF group than in the injury group (P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Exogenous NGF can inhibit increased neuronal Bax expression and decreased Bcl-2expression in the cerebral cortex of mice with Oxy

  7. Protein kinase D stabilizes aldosterone-induced ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in M1 renal cortical collecting duct cells to promote cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEneaney, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone elicits transcriptional responses in target tissues and also rapidly stimulates the activation of protein kinase signalling cascades independently of de novo protein synthesis. Here we investigated aldosterone-induced cell proliferation and extra-cellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1\\/2) mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling in the M1 cortical collecting duct cell line (M1-CCD). Aldosterone promoted the proliferative growth of M1-CCD cells, an effect that was protein kinase D1 (PKD1), PKCdelta and ERK1\\/2-dependent. Aldosterone induced the rapid activation of ERK1\\/2 with peaks of activation at 2 and 10 to 30 min after hormone treatment followed by sustained activation lasting beyond 120 min. M1-CCD cells suppressed in PKD1 expression exhibited only the early, transient peaks in ERK1\\/2 activation without the sustained phase. Aldosterone stimulated the physical association of PKD1 with ERK1\\/2 within 2 min of treatment. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist RU28318 inhibited the early and late phases of aldosterone-induced ERK1\\/2 activation, and also aldosterone-induced proliferative cell growth. Aldosterone induced the sub-cellular redistribution of ERK1\\/2 to the nuclei at 2 min and to cytoplasmic sites, proximal to the nuclei after 30 min. This sub-cellular distribution of ERK1\\/2 was inhibited in cells suppressed in the expression of PKD1.

  8. Ethanol-induced disruption of Golgi apparatus morphology, primary neurite number and cellular orientation in developing cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powrozek, Teresa A; Olson, Eric C

    2012-11-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure disrupts cortical neurite initiation and outgrowth, but prior studies have reported both ethanol-dependent growth promotion and inhibition. To resolve this ambiguity and better approximate in vivo conditions, we quantitatively analyzed neuronal morphology using a new, whole hemisphere explant model. In this model, Layer 6 (L6) cortical neurons migrate, laminate and extend neurites in an organotypic fashion. To selectively label L6 neurons, we performed ex utero electroporation of a GFP expression construct at embryonic day 13 and allowed the explants to develop for 2 days in vitro. Explants were exposed to (400 mg/dL) ethanol for either 4 or 24 h prior to fixation. Complete 3-D reconstructions were made of >80 GFP-positive neurons in each experimental condition. Acute responses to ethanol exposure included compaction of the Golgi apparatus accompanied by elaboration of supernumerary primary apical neurites, as well as a modest (∼15%) increase in higher order apical neurite length. With longer exposure time, ethanol exposure leads to a consistent, significant disorientation of the cell (cell body, primary apical neurite, and Golgi) with respect to the pial surface. The effects on cellular orientation were accompanied by decreased expression of cytoskeletal elements, microtubule-associated protein 2 and F-actin. These findings indicate that upon exposure to ethanol, developing L6 neurons manifest disruptions in Golgi apparatus and cytoskeletal elements which may in turn trigger selective and significant perturbations to primary neurite formation and neuronal polarity.

  9. Self-deactivation of water vapor - Role of the dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    A phenomenological multiple-relaxation theory of the deactivation rate constant for the nu-2 (1 - 0) bending mode of water vapor is presented which incorporates the role not only of the excited monomer but also of the bound molecular complex, in particular the dimer. The deactivation takes place by means of three parallel processes: (1) collisional deexcitation of the excited monomer, (2) a two-step reaction involving association and spontaneous redissociation of an H2O collision complex, and (3) spontaneous dissociation of the stably bound H2O dimer. Oxygen, but not nitrogen or argon, serves as an effective chaperon for the formation of the activated complex. This observation explains the impurity dependence of the self-deactivation rate constant of water vapor. Analysis of an ultrasonic absorption peak based on the third process yields values for the standard entropy and enthalpy of dissociation of the stably bound H2O dimer.

  10. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G.; Marin, A.; Wyss, C.; Mueller, S.; Newson, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  11. [Gibberellins--structure, biosynthesis and deactivation in plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Katarzyna; Kesy, Jacek; Tretyn, Andrzej; Kopcewicz, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Gibberellins (GA), as one of the most important phytohormones, control different aspect of plant growth and development such as seed germination, stem elongation and floral induction. Although identified more than a hundred and thirty GA, only a small number of them are biological active. Many non-bioactive GA are present in plant tissues as precursors or deactivated metabolites. Biochemical and genetic approaches have led to the recognition most of the genes that encode GA biosynthesis and deactivation enzymes, and conducted investigation has helped us to better understand GA functions in plants. Many enzymes involved in GA metabolism are multifunctional and therefore fewer enzymes than might be expected are required to created the various gibberellins structures. In this review, we summarized current knowledge on the GA biosynthesis and deactivation pathways in plants and showed precise characteristic of genes and encoding protein which are involved in gibberellins metabolism.

  12. Deactivation of SCR catalysts in biomass fired power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Kjærgaard

    In order to meet national and European targets regarding reduction of the emission of greenhouse gases, fossil fuels are gradually being substituted with biomass, such as straw, wood chips and wood pellets, in Danish combined heat and power plants. The release of inorganic elements, present...... particle size distribution, from an aerodynamic diameter of 0.12 to 2.6 μm, showed no effect on the catalyst deactivation rate. This may be attributed to a continued presence of a significant number of ultrafine KCl particles in the flue gas. The K2SO4 aerosols caused a slower rate of deactivation compared...... to the KCl aerosols. This indicates that potassium bound in K2SO4 deposits, on the catalyst surface, is less mobile than that bound KCl. However, an effect of particle size on the catalyst deactivation cannot be excluded, as the obtained K2SO4 aerosols generally were shifted towards larger particles (mass...

  13. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-29

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the fourteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made towards testing of the system hardware and software. 47 refs.

  14. Differential Molecular Targets for Neuroprotective Effect of Chlorogenic Acid and its Related Compounds Against Glutamate Induced Excitotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebai, Olfa; Belkhir, Manel; Sanchez-Gomez, María Victoria; Matute, Carlos; Fattouch, Sami; Amri, Mohamed

    2017-09-25

    The present study has been designed to explore the molecular mechanism and signaling pathway targets of chlorogenic acid (CGA) and its main hydrolysates, caffeic (CA) and quinic acid in the protective effect against glutamate-excitotoxicity. For this purpose 8-DIV cortical neurons in primary culture were exposed to 50 μM L-glutamic acid plus 10 µM glycine, with or without 10-100 μM tested compounds. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid via their antioxidant properties inhibited cell death induced by glutamate in dose depended manner. However, quinic acid slightly protects neurons at a higher dose. DCF, JC-1 and Ca(2+)sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2, were used to measure intracellular ROS accumulation, mitochondrial membrane potential integration and intracellular calcium concentration [Ca(2+)] i . Results indicate that similarly, CGA acts as a protective agent against glutamate-induced cortical neurons injury by suppressing the accumulation of endogenous ROS and restore the mitochondrial membrane potential, activate the enzymatic antioxidant system by the increase levels of SOD activity and modulate the rise of intracellular calcium levels by increasing the rise of intracellular concentrations of Ca(2+)caused by glutamate overstimulation. PKC signaling cascade appear to be engaged in this protective mechanism. Interseling, CGA and CA also exhibit antiapoptotic properties against glutamate-induced cleaved activation of pro-caspases; caspase 1,8 and 9 and calpain (PD 150606,Calpeptin and MDL 28170).These data suggest that neuroprotective activity of CGA ester may occurs throught its hydrolysate,the caffeic acid and its interaction with intracellular molecules suggesting that CGA exert its neuroprotection via its caffeoly acid group that might potentially be used as a therapeutic agent in neurodegeneratives disorders associated with glutamate excitotoxicity.

  15. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased visual ...

  16. Characterization of Deactivated Bio-oil Hydrotreating Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huamin; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-06

    Deactivation of bio-oil hydrotreating catalysts remains a significant challenge because of the poor quality of pyrolysis bio-oil input for hydrotreating and understanding their deactivation mode is critical to developing improved catalysts and processes. In this research, we developed an understanding of the deactivation of two-step bio-oil hydrotreating catalysts (sulfided Ru/C and sulfided CoMo/C) through detailed characterization of the catalysts using various complimentary analytical techniques. Severe fouling of both catalysts by carbonaceous species was the major form of deactivation, which is consistent with the significant loss of surface area and pore volume of both deactivated catalysts and the significant increase of the bulk density. Further analysis of the carbonaceous species by thermogravimetric analysis and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the carbonaceous species was formed by condensation reaction of active species such as sugars and sugar derivatives (aldehydes and ketones) in bio-oil feedstock during bio-oil hydrotreating under the conditions and catalysts used. Microscopy results did not show metal sintering of the Ru/C catalyst. However, X-ray diffraction indicated a probable transformation of the highly-active CoMoS phase in the sulfided CoMo/C catalyst to Co8S9 and MoS2 phase with low activity. Loss of the active site by transport of inorganic elements from the bio-oil and the reactor construction material onto the catalyst surface also might be a cause of deactivation as indicated by elemental analysis of spent catalysts.

  17. Behavioral Resilience and Sensitivity to Locally Restricted Cortical Migration Deficits Induced by In Utero Knockdown of Disabled-1 in the Adult Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomund, Sandra; de Souza Silva, M Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Korth, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    Irregular neuronal migration plays a causal role in mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and autism, but the very nature of the migration deficits necessary to evoke adult behavioral changes is unknown. Here, we used in utero electroporation (IUE) in rats to induce a locally restricted, cortical migration deficit by knockdown of disabled-1 (Dab1), an intracellular converging point of the reelin pathway. After birth, selection of successfully electroporated rats by detection of in vivo bioluminescence of a simultaneously electroporated luciferase gene correlated to and was thus predictive to the number of electroporated neurons in postmortem histochemistry at 6 months of age. Rat neurons silenced for Dab1 did not migrate properly and their number surprisingly decreased after E22. Behavioral tests at adult ages (P180) revealed increased sensitivity to amphetamine as well as decreased habituation, but no deficits in memory tasks or motor functions. The data suggest that even subtle migration deficits involving only ten-thousands of cortical neurons during neurodevelopment can lead to lasting behavioral and neuronal changes into adulthood in some very specific behavioral domains. On the other hand, the lack of effects on various memory-related tasks may indicate resilience and plasticity of cognitive functions critical for survival under these specific conditions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned: History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-11-25

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status.

  19. Simvastatin-induced breast cancer cell death and deactivation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signalling are reversed by metabolic products of the mevalonate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Seah, Serena; Loh, Xinyi; Chan, Ching-Wan; Hartman, Mikael; Goh, Boon-Cher; Lee, Soo-Chin

    2016-01-19

    Statins purportedly exert anti-tumoral effects on breast cancer. However, the biologic mechanisms for these actions are not fully elucidated. The aims of this study were 1) to explore the effects of simvastatin on apoptosis, proliferation as well as PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/ERK pathway in a window-of-opportunity breast cancer trial; 2) to further confirm findings from the clinical trial by functional studies; 3) to explore the regulatory role of mevalonate pathway on the anti-tumoral effects of simvastatin. In clinical samples, simvastatin led to increase in cleaved caspase-3 (p = 0.002) and decreased trend for Ki67 (p = 0.245). Simvastatin markedly suppressed PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling by activating PTEN (p = 0.005) and by dephosphorylating Akt (p = 0.002) and S6RP (p = 0.033); it also inhibited MAPK/ERK pathway by dephosphorylating c-Raf (p = 0.018) and ERK1/2 (p = 0.002). In ER-positive (MCF-7, T47D) and ER-negative (MDA-MB-231, BT-549) breast cancer cells, simvastatin treatment consistently induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation by deregulating caspase cascades and cell cycle proteins in a dose dependent manner. Concordantly, simvastatin strongly suppressed PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway by enhancing PTEN expression and by further sequentially dephosphorylating downstream cascades including Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, S6RP and 4E-BP1. Furthermore, simvastatin significantly inhibited MAPK/ERK pathway by dephosphorylating sequential cascades such as c-Raf, MEK1/2 and ERK1/2. These simvastatin anti-tumoral effects were reversed by metabolic products of the mevalonate pathway, including mevalonate, farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. These findings shed light on the biological and potential anti-tumoral effects of simvastatin in breast cancer.

  20. Force depression and relaxation kinetics after active shortening and deactivation in mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noten, P; Van Leemputte, M

    2013-03-15

    After active shortening, isometric force production capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD). The mechanism is incompletely understood but increasing cross-bridge detachment and/or decreasing attachment rate might be involved. Therefore we aimed to investigate the relation between work delivered during shortening (W), and change in half-relaxation time (Δ0.5RT) and change in the slow phase of muscle relaxation (Δkslow), considered as a marker for cross-bridge detachment rate, after shortening and after a short (0.7s) interruption of activation (deactivation). We hypothesized that shortening induces an accelerated relaxation related to W which is, similar to FD, largely abolished by a short deactivation. In 10 incubated supra-maximally stimulated mouse soleus muscles, we varied the amount of FD at L0 by varying shortening amplitude (0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm). We found that W not only induces FD (R(2)=0.92) but also a dose dependent accelerated relaxation (R(2)=0.88 and R(2)=0.77 for respectively Δkslow and Δ0.5RT). In cyclic movements this is of functional significance, because the loss in force generating capacity might be (partially) compensated by faster relaxation. After a short deactivation, both FD and Δkslow were largely abolished but Δ0.5RT remained largely present. Under the assumption that Δkslow reflects a change in cross-bridge detachment rate, these results support the idea that FD is an intrinsic sarcomeric property originating from a work induced reduction of the number of force generating cross-bridges, however not via decreased attachment but via increased detachment rate. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  2. Effect of polygonatum polysaccharide on the hypoxia-induced apoptosis and necrosis in in vitro cultured cerebral cortical neurons from neonatal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guozhu Hu; Jin Zhang; Ning Tang; Zhu Wen; Rongqing Nie

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiocerebrovascular diseases induced cerebral circulation insufficiency and senile vascular dementia can result in ischemic/hypoxic apoptosis of central neurons, which we should pay more attention to and prevent and treat as early as possible. Traditional Chinese medicine possesses the unique advantage in this field. Polygonatum, a Chinese herb for invigorating qi, may play a role against the hypoxic apoptosis of brain neurons.OBJECTIVE: To observe the protective effect of polygonatum polysaccharide on hypoxia-induced apoptosis and necrosis in cerebral cortical neurons cultured in vitro.DESIGN: A comparative experiment.SETTING: Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Jiangxi Provincial Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine.MATERIALS: The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Jiangxi Provincial Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine from November 2003 to April 2005.Totally 218 Wistar rats (male or female) of clean degree within 24 hours after birth were purchased from the animal center of Jiangxi Medical College (certification number was 021-97-03).METHODS: ① Preparation of cerebral cortical neurons of rats: The cerebral cortical tissues were isolated from the Wistar rats within 24 hours after birth, and prepared to single cell suspension, and the cerebral cortical neurons of neonatal rats were in vitro cultured in serum free medium with Neurobasal plus B27Supplement. ② Observation on the non-toxic dosage of polygonatum polysaccharide on neurons: After the neurons were cultured for 4 days, polygonatum polysaccharide of different dosages (1-20 g/L) was added for continuous culture for 48 hours, the toxicity and non-toxic dosage of polygonatum polysaccharide on neurons were observed and detected with trypan blue staining. ③ Grouping: After hypoxia/reoxygenation,the cultured neurons were divided into normal control group, positive apoptotic group and polygonatum

  3. Neuroprotection afforded by diazepam against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced injury in rat cortical brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Lorenzo; Valoti, Massimo; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Frosini, Maria

    2007-04-30

    The aim of the present investigation was to assess neuroprotection exerted by diazepam (0.1-25 microM) in rat cortical brain slices subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation. Neuronal injury and neuroprotection were assessed by measuring the release of glutamate and lactate dehydrogenase and tissue water content. Results demonstrate that diazepam exerted neuroprotective effects according to a "U-shaped", hormetic-like, concentration-response curve, with an efficacy window of 0.5-5 microM concentration. Flumazenil (20 microM) fully antagonised neuroprotection afforded by 5 microM diazepam. In conclusion, the hormetic response of diazepam should be taken into consideration when designing experiments aimed at assessing diazepam neuroprotection against ischemia/reoxygenation injury.

  4. Cannabidiol induces rapid-acting antidepressant-like effects and enhances cortical 5-HT/glutamate neurotransmission: role of 5-HT1A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linge, Raquel; Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Campa, Leticia; Pilar-Cuéllar, Fuencisla; Vidal, Rebeca; Pazos, Angel; Adell, Albert; Díaz, Álvaro

    2016-04-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), the main non-psychotomimetic component of marihuana, exhibits anxiolytic-like properties in many behavioural tests, although its potential for treating major depression has been poorly explored. Moreover, the mechanism of action of CBD remains unclear. Herein, we have evaluated the effects of CBD following acute and chronic administration in the olfactory bulbectomy mouse model of depression (OBX), and investigated the underlying mechanism. For this purpose, we conducted behavioural (open field and sucrose preference tests) and neurochemical (microdialysis and autoradiography of 5-HT1A receptor functionality) studies following treatment with CBD. We also assayed the pharmacological antagonism of the effects of CBD to dissect out the mechanism of action. Our results demonstrate that CBD exerts fast and maintained antidepressant-like effects as evidenced by the reversal of the OBX-induced hyperactivity and anhedonia. In vivo microdialysis revealed that the administration of CBD significantly enhanced serotonin and glutamate levels in vmPFCx in a different manner depending on the emotional state and the duration of the treatment. The potentiating effect upon neurotransmitters levels occurring immediately after the first injection of CBD might underlie the fast antidepressant-like actions in OBX mice. Both antidepressant-like effect and enhanced cortical 5-HT/glutamate neurotransmission induced by CBD were prevented by 5-HT1A receptor blockade. Moreover, adaptive changes in pre- and post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptor functionality were also found after chronic CBD. In conclusion, our findings indicate that CBD could represent a novel fast antidepressant drug, via enhancing both serotonergic and glutamate cortical signalling through a 5-HT1A receptor-dependent mechanism.

  5. Development of post-traumatic epilepsy after controlled cortical impact and lateral fluid-percussion-induced brain injury in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkvadze, Tamuna; Pitkänen, Asla

    2012-03-20

    The present study investigated the development of hyperexcitability and epilepsy in mice with traumatic brain injury (TBI) induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) or lateral fluid-percussion injury (FPI), which are the two most commonly used experimental models of human TBI in rodents. TBI was induced with CCI to 50 (14 controls) and with lateral FPI to 45 (15 controls) C57BL/6S adult male mice. The animals were followed-up for 9 months, including three 2-week periods of continuous video-electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring, and a seizure susceptibility test with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). In the end, the animals were perfusion-fixed for histology. The experiment included two independent cohorts of animals. Late post-traumatic spontaneous electrographic seizures were detected in 9% of mice after CCI and 3% after lateral FPI. Eighty-two percent of mice after CCI and 71% after lateral FPI had spontaneous epileptiform spiking on EEG. In addition, 58% of mice with lateral FPI showed spontaneous epileptiform discharges. A PTZ test demonstrated increased seizure susceptibility in the majority of mice in both models, compared to control mice. There was no further progression in the occurrence of epilepsy or epileptiform spiking when follow-up was extended from 6 to 9 months. The severity of cortical or hippocampal damage did not differentiate mice with or without epileptiform activity in either model. Finally, two independent series of experiments in both injury models provided comparable data demonstrating reproducibility of the modeling. These data show that different types of impact can trigger epileptogenesis in mice. Even though the frequency of spontaneous seizures in C57BL/6S mice is low, a large majority of animals develop hyperexcitability.

  6. Patterns of Default Mode Network Deactivation in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Soares, José Miguel; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Ganho-Ávila, Ana; Fernandes-Gonçalves, Ana; Pocinho, Fernando; Carracedo, Angel; Sampaio, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to research the patterns of Default Mode Network (DMN) deactivation in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) in the transition between a resting and a non-rest emotional condition. Twenty-seven participants, 15 diagnosed with OCD and 12 healthy controls (HC), underwent a functional neuroimaging paradigm in which DMN brain activation in a resting condition was contrasted with activity during a non-rest condition consisting in the presentation of emotionally pleasant and unpleasant images. Results showed that HC, when compared with OCD, had a significant deactivation in two anterior nodes of the DMN (medial frontal and superior frontal) in the non-rest pleasant stimuli condition. Additional analysis for the whole brain, contrasting the resting condition with all the non-rest conditions grouped together, showed that, compared with OCD, HC had a significantly deactivation of a widespread brain network (superior frontal, insula, middle and superior temporal, putamen, lingual, cuneus, and cerebellum). Concluding, the present study found that OCD patients had difficulties with the deactivation of DMN even when the non-rest condition includes the presentation of emotional provoking stimuli, particularly evident for images with pleasant content. PMID:28287615

  7. Effect of catalyst deactivation on vacuum residue hydrocracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda S. Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated deactivation tests of the pre-sulfided Mo–W/SiO2–Al2O3 commercial catalyst were performed using heavy vacuum petroleum feedstock. High reaction temperature employed in the accelerated catalyst aging resulted in large amounts of carbonaceous deposition with high aromaticity, which was found to be the principal deactivation cause. The effect of catalyst deactivation on hydrocracking of vacuum residue was studied. Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at 60 bar, feed to catalyst ratio 10:1 and temperature 425 °C. The duration time for a cycle-run was 4 h. On increasing the interval duration times from 4 to 20 h (i.e. five cycles, the quality of the hydrocracked products was decreased. In each cycle-run, a fresh feedstock was used with the same sulfide catalyst. The quality of distillate products, such as hydrodesulfurization (HDS was decreased from 61.50% to 39.52%, while asphaltene contents of the total liquid product were increased from 2.7% to 5.2% and their boiling ranges were increased during these duration times due to the successive catalyst deactivation during the 5 cycle-runs, caused by successive adsorption of coke formation.

  8. Compassionate deactivation of ventricular assist devices in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Seth A; Axelrod, David M; Bernstein, Daniel; Cohen, Harvey J; Sourkes, Barbara; Reddy, Sushma; Magnus, David; Rosenthal, David N; Kaufman, Beth D

    2016-05-01

    Despite greatly improved survival in pediatric patients with end-stage heart failure through the use of ventricular assist devices (VADs), heart failure ultimately remains a life-threatening disease with a significant symptom burden. With increased demand for donor organs, liberalizing the boundaries of case complexity, and the introduction of destination therapy in children, more children can be expected to die while on mechanical support. Despite this trend, guidelines on the ethical and pragmatic issues of compassionate deactivation of VAD support in children are strikingly absent. As VAD support for pediatric patients increases in frequency, the pediatric heart failure and palliative care communities must work toward establishing guidelines to clarify the complex issues surrounding compassionate deactivation. Patient, family and clinician attitudes must be ascertained and education regarding the psychological, legal and ethical issues should be provided. Furthermore, pediatric-specific planning documents for use before VAD implantation as well as deactivation checklists should be developed to assist with decision-making at critical points during the illness trajectory. Herein we review the relevant literature regarding compassionate deactivation with a specific focus on issues related to children.

  9. Combustion kinetics of the coke on deactivated dehydrogenation catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Sha; He, Songbo; Li, XianRu; Li, Jingqiu; Bi, Wenjun; Sun, Chenglin

    2015-01-01

    The coke combustion kinetics on the deactivated catalysts for long chain paraffin dehydrogenation was studied by the thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG–DTG) technique. The amount and H/C mole ratio of the coke were determined by the TG and elemental analysis. And the comprehensiv

  10. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14609719 Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: role...ivation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. Pub...medID 14609719 Title Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: role

  11. Interleukin-18 directly protects cortical neurons by activating PI3K/AKT/NF-κB/CREB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia; Ping, Feng-feng; Lv, Wen-ting; Feng, Jun-yi; Shang, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18), a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, was initially identified as an interferon (IFN)-γ-inducing factor. IL-18 is expressed in both immune and non-immune cells and participates in the adjustment of multitude cellular functions. Nonetheless, the effects of IL-18 on cortical neurons have not been explored. The present study was conducted to investigate the influence of IL-18 on rat primary cortical neurons and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We proved that rrIL-18 increased the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in a time-dependent manner. Treatment with rrIL-18 (50 ng/ml) deactivated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) by facilitating its phosphorylation, enhanced the expression of Phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase (PI3K) and p-Akt, standing for the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. As its pivotal downstream pathways, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB)/Bcl-2 and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were examined in further steps. Our data revealed that rrIL-18 stimulated NF-κB activation, improved p-CREB and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression levels. But rrIL-18 had little or no effect on GSK-3β pathway. Besides, rrIL-18 increased levels of BDNF and Bcl-2/Bax ratio and decreased cleaved caspase-3 expression to protect cortical neurons from damage induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). These results in vitro showed the protection of IL-18 on cortical neurons. And this direct neuroprotective effect of IL-18 is crippled by PI3K inhibitor wortmannin.

  12. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor KN-93 protects rat cerebral cortical neurons from N-methyl-D-aspartic acid-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuewen Liu; Cui Ma; Ruixian Xing; Weiwei Zhang; Buxian Tian; Xidong Li; Qiushi Li; Yanhui Zhang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, primary cultured cerebral cortical neurons of Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats were treated with 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 μM calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor KN-93 after 50 μM N-methyl-D-aspartic acid-induced injury. Results showed that, compared with N-methyl-Daspartic acid-induced injury neurons, the activity of cells markedly increased, apoptosis was significantly reduced, leakage of lactate dehydrogenase decreased, and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in neurons reduced after KN-93 treatment. The expression of caspase-3, phosphorylated calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and total calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II protein decreased after KN-93 treatment. And the effect was apparent at a dose of 1.0 μM KN-93. Experimental findings suggest that KN-93 can induce a dose-dependent neuroprotective effect, and that the underlying mechanism may be related to the down-regulation of caspase-3 and calmodulin- dependent protein kinase II expression.

  13. β-Secretase inhibitor increases amyloid-β precursor protein level in rat brain cortical primary neurons induced by okadaic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Chun-Jiang; WANG Wei-zhi; LIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    Background Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) represent two of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The plaques are primarily composed of aggregated amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. The processing of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) in okadaic acid (OA)-induced tau phosphorylation primary neurons was studied.Methods Primary cultures of rat brain cortical neurons were treated with OA and β-secretase inhibitor. Neurons' viability was measured. AβPP processing was examined by immunocytochemistry and Western blotting with specific antibodies against the AβPP-N-terminus (NT) and AβPP-C-terminus (CT).Results Ten nrnol/L OA had a time-dependent suppression effect on primary neurons' viability. The suppression effect was alleviated markedly by pretreatment with β-secretase inhibitor. After OA treatment, both AβPP and β-C-terminal fragment (βCTF) were significantly increased in neurons. AβPP level was increased further in neurons pretreated with β-secretase inhibitor.Conclusions In OA-induced tau phosphorylation cell model, inhibition of β-secretase may protect neurons from death induced by OA. Because of increased accumulation of AβPP in neurons after OA treatment, more AβPP turns to be cleaved by β-secretase, producing neurotoxic βCTF. As a potential effective therapeutic target, β-secretase is worth investigating further.

  14. Downregulation of postsynaptic density-95-interacting regulator of spine morphogenesis reduces glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by differentially regulating glutamate receptors in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng; Yang, Yuefan; Liu, Wei; Rao, Wei; Bian, Huan; Li, Xin; Chen, Tao; Liu, Mengdong; Zhao, Yongbo; Dai, Shuhui; Yan, Xu; Fei, Zhou

    2013-12-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity is involved in many neurological diseases. Preso, a novel postsynaptic scaffold protein, mediates excitatory synaptic transmission and various synaptic functions. In this study, we investigated the role of Preso in the regulation of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in rat cortical neurons. Knockdown of Preso with small interfering RNA improved neuronal viability and attenuated the elevation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Preso also inhibited an increase in the BAX/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Although the expression and distribution of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1/5, NR1, NR2A and NR2B were not changed by knockdown of Preso, downregulation of Preso protected neurons from glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by inhibiting mGluR and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function. However, downregulation of Preso neither affected the expression of GluR1 and GluR2 nor influenced the function of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptor after glutamate treatment. Furthermore, intracellular Ca(2+) was an important downstream effector of Preso in the regulation of excitotoxicity. These results suggest that expression of Preso promotes the induction of excitotoxicity by facilitating different glutamate receptor signaling pathways. Therefore, Preso might be a potential pharmacological target for preventing and treating neurological diseases.

  15. Green tide deactivation with layered-structure cuboids of Ag/CaTiO{sub 3} under UV light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo-Wohn [Global Research Laboratory, Sun Moon University, Galsan-Ri, Tangjung-Myon, Asan Chungnam 336-708 (Korea, Republic of); Lozano-Sánchez, L.M. [División de Materiales Avanzados, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa San José 2055 Col. Lomas 4a sección, C.P. 78216 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Rodríguez-González, V., E-mail: vicente.rdz@ipicyt.edu.mx [División de Materiales Avanzados, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa San José 2055 Col. Lomas 4a sección, C.P. 78216 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Synergic reasons such as mass transfer, morphology, biocide properties, UV-A photoresponse, and electron trapping that reduce recombination on Ag/CaTiO{sub 3} nanocomposites, have the potential for the generation of reactive radicals that promote the fatal irreversible deactivation of Tetraselmis suecica algae in 12 min under UV-A irradiation. -- Highlights: • An alternative to deactivate harmful green tide is proposed by employing Ag/CaTiO{sub 3}. • Particles of perovskite-like have rectangular prisms morphology with AgNPs ∼13 nm. • The cuboids achieve complete inactivation of Tetraselmis suecica algae in 12 min. • AgNPs functionalization induce fatal irreversible damages on the algae surface. -- Abstract: In this work, an alternative to deactivate noxious green tide Tetraselmis suecica in the short-term is proposed by employing Perovskite-like cube-shaped, crystalline CaTiO{sub 3} semiconductors functionalized with atomic silver nanoparticles. CaTiO{sub 3} was prepared by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method and then Ag{sup 0}NPs (1 wt% of CaTiO{sub 3}), were added by the photoreduction method. The XRD results show that crystalline CaTiO{sub 3} has an orthorhombic unit cell with a Perovskite-like structure. Images obtained by FESEM and HRTEM microscopies show well-faceted CaTiO{sub 3} rectangular prismatic morphology functionalizated with silver nanoparticles ∼13.5 nm. XPS and EDS-FESEM has confirmed the composition of CaTiO{sub 3} and silver occurring mainly as reduced metal. The UV inactivation of noxious T. suecica with Ag/CaTiO{sub 3} nanocomposites formed on bare materials results in complete deactivation of the algae in 12 min. The direct contact between harmful algae and Ag/CaTiO{sub 3} nanocomposite is necessary to deactivate the algae and inhibits algae viability.

  16. Impairments in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced glutamate release in cultured cortical neurons derived from rats with intrauterine growth retardation: possible involvement of suppression of TrkB/phospholipase C-γ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numakawa, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Chiba, Shuichi; Furuta, Miyako; Izumi, Aiko; Ninomiya-Baba, Midori; Odaka, Haruki; Hashido, Kazuo; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Low birth weight due to intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is suggested to be a risk factor for various psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. It has been reported that developmental cortical dysfunction and neurocognitive deficits are observed in individuals with IUGR, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB are associated with schizophrenia and play a role in cortical development. We previously demonstrated that BDNF induced glutamate release through activation of the TrkB/phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) pathway in developing cultured cortical neurons, and that, using a rat model for IUGR caused by maternal administration of thromboxane A2, cortical levels of TrkB were significantly reduced in IUGR rats at birth. These studies prompted us to hypothesize that TrkB reduction in IUGR cortex led to impairment of BDNF-dependent glutamatergic neurotransmission. In the present study, we found that BDNF-induced glutamate release was strongly impaired in cultured IUGR cortical neurons where TrkB reduction was maintained. Impairment of BDNF-induced glutamate release in IUGR neurons was ameliorated by transfection of human TrkB (hTrkB). Although BDNF-stimulated phosphorylation of TrkB and of PLC-γ was decreased in IUGR neurons, the hTrkB transfection recovered the deficits in their phosphorylation. These results suggest that TrkB reduction causes impairment of BDNF-stimulated glutamatergic function via suppression of TrkB/PLC-γ activation in IUGR cortical neurons. Our findings provide molecular insights into how IUGR links to downregulation of BDNF function in the cortex, which might be involved in the development of IUGR-related diseases such as schizophrenia.

  17. Test-retest assessment of cortical activation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with brain atlas-guided optical topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fenghua; Kozel, F. Andrew; Yennu, Amarnath; Croarkin, Paul E.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Mapes, Kimberly S.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Liu, Hanli

    2012-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a technology that stimulates neurons with rapidly changing magnetic pulses with demonstrated therapeutic applications for various neuropsychiatric disorders. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a suitable tool to assess rTMS-evoked brain responses without interference from the magnetic or electric fields generated by the TMS coil. We have previously reported a channel-wise study of combined rTMS/fNIRS on the motor and prefrontal cortices, showing a robust decrease of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) at the sites of 1-Hz rTMS and the contralateral brain regions. However, the reliability of this putative clinical tool is unknown. In this study, we develop a rapid optical topography approach to spatially characterize the rTMS-evoked hemodynamic responses on a standard brain atlas. A hemispherical approximation of the brain is employed to convert the three-dimensional topography on the complex brain surface to a two-dimensional topography in the spherical coordinate system. The test-retest reliability of the combined rTMS/fNIRS is assessed using repeated measurements performed two to three days apart. The results demonstrate that the Δ[HbO2] amplitudes have moderate-to-high reliability at the group level; and the spatial patterns of the topographic images have high reproducibility in size and a moderate degree of overlap at the individual level.

  18. Characterization of energy and neurotransmitter metabolism in cortical glutamatergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells: A novel approach to study metabolism in human neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, Blanca I; Zhang, Yu; Lihme, Maria Fog; Bak, Lasse K; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Holst, Bjørn; Hyttel, Poul; Freude, Kristine K; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-02-24

    Alterations in the cellular metabolic machinery of the brain are associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Novel human cellular disease models are essential in order to study underlying disease mechanisms. In the present study, we characterized major metabolic pathways in neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). With this aim, cultures of hiPSC-derived neurons were incubated with [U-(13)C]glucose, [U-(13)C]glutamate or [U-(13)C]glutamine. Isotopic labeling in metabolites was determined using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and cellular amino acid content was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Additionally, we evaluated mitochondrial function using real-time assessment of oxygen consumption via the Seahorse XF(e)96 Analyzer. Moreover, in order to validate the hiPSC-derived neurons as a model system, a metabolic profiling was performed in parallel in primary neuronal cultures of mouse cerebral cortex and cerebellum. These serve as well-established models of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively. The hiPSC-derived neurons were previously characterized as being forebrain-specific cortical glutamatergic neurons. However, a comparable preparation of predominantly mouse cortical glutamatergic neurons is not available. We found a higher glycolytic capacity in hiPSC-derived neurons compared to mouse neurons and a substantial oxidative metabolism through the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. This finding is supported by the extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates measured in the cultured human neurons. [U-(13)C]Glutamate and [U-(13)C]glutamine were found to be efficient energy substrates for the neuronal cultures originating from both mice and humans. Interestingly, isotopic labeling in metabolites from [U-(13)C]glutamate was higher than that from [U-(13)C]glutamine. Although the metabolic profile of hiPSC-derived neurons in vitro was

  19. Aromatization of light naphtha fractions on zeolites: 2. Model of catalyst deactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostrovski Nikolaj M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of catalyst deactivation in the "Zeoforming" process was developed. The deactivation rate constants and activation energies were estimated. The role of adsorbed oligomers in the reaction and the deactivation kinetics were examined. The model is intended for further modeling and optimization of the process.

  20. 卡莫司汀致皮质发育障碍的模型研究%Animal models of cortical dysplasia induced by carmustine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙莉莉; 肖波; 宋延民; 王康; 李国良

    2008-01-01

    Objective To establish the animal model of diffuse cortical dysplasia in Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods Pregnant rats were given intraperitoneal injections of BCNU on embryonic day 17 (E17). Cresyl-violet staining was applied to observe the histological changes in the cortex, hippocampus and neurons of the resulted pups at P60. EEG recordings were detected, and daily activities were observed. Hot water bath was used to induce seizures, the latency to seizure onset and duration of SE (epileptic status) were compared. Learning and memory abilities were estimated with Y maze at different time points. Results The mean wet brain weights in the BCNU-exposed pups were lower than those of controls on P0 (P<0.01). Cresyl-violet staining revealed disruption of cortical lamination and heterotopic cell clusters within the hippocampus. Daily activities were poor in BCNU-exposed pups. No obvious epilepsia discharges were detected. After being induced seizures, adult rats with cortical dysplasia had shorter latency to seizures(P<0.01). The frequency of attempting learning and memory of rats in model group was increased than that in normal group (P<0.05). Conclusions Intraperitoneal injections of BCNU on embryonic day 17 (E 17) can establish the animal model of diffuse cortical dysplasia, and this model has increased seizure susceptibilities and cognitive functional impairments.%目的 建立SD大鼠广泛型皮质发育障碍的动物模型.方法 在SD大鼠孕17 d腹腔注入BCNU(1,3-二氯乙烯一亚硝基脲,卡莫司汀)制作皮质发育障碍模型;病理检查P60仔鼠皮层和海马结构及神经元变化;行为学观察和脑电图检测;热水浴诱导痫性发作,观察两组大鼠的致痫潜伏期和癫痫持续时间;Y迷宫法测试不同时间点仔鼠学习记忆能力.结果 PO仔鼠脑组织湿重实验组比对照组显著减轻(P<0.01);Nissl染色显示皮质层次紊乱、海马区域异位细胞异常聚集,可出现结节状灰质团块;模型鼠

  1. Regulation of Extrasynaptic GABAA α4 Receptors by Ethanol-Induced Protein Kinase A, but Not Protein Kinase C Activation in Cultured Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Stephen L; Bohnsack, J Peyton; Patel, Vraj; Morrow, A Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol produces changes in GABAA receptor trafficking and function that contribute to ethanol dependence symptomatology. Extrasynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors (GABAA-R) mediate inhibitory tonic current and are of particular interest because they are potentiated by physiologically relevant doses of ethanol. Here, we isolate GABAA α4δ receptors by western blotting in subsynaptic fractions to investigate protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) modulation of ethanol-induced receptor trafficking, while extrasynaptic receptor function is determined by measurement of tonic inhibition and responses evoked by 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP). Rat cerebral cortical neurons were grown for 18 days in vitro and exposed to ethanol and/or PKA/PKC modulators. Ethanol exposure (1 hour) did not alter GABAA α4 receptor abundance, but it increased tonic current amplitude, an effect that was prevented by inhibiting PKA, but not PKC. Direct activation of PKA, but not PKC, increased the abundance and tonic current of extrasynaptic α4δ receptors. In contrast, prolonged ethanol exposure (4 hours) reduced α4δ receptor abundance as well as tonic current, and this effect was also PKA dependent. Finally, PKC activation by ethanol or phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PdBu) had no effect on extrasynaptic α4δ subunit abundance or activity. We conclude that ethanol alters extrasynaptic α4δ receptor function and expression in cortical neurons in a PKA-dependent manner, but ethanol activation of PKC does not influence these receptors. These results could have clinical relevance for therapeutic strategies to restore normal GABAergic functioning for the treatment of alcohol use disorders.

  2. Prebiotic administration normalizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced anxiety and cortical 5-HT2A receptor and IL1-β levels in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savignac, Helene M; Couch, Yvonne; Stratford, Michael; Bannerman, David M; Tzortzis, George; Anthony, Daniel C; Burnet, Philip W J

    2016-02-01

    The manipulation of the enteric microbiota with specific prebiotics and probiotics, has been shown to reduce the host's inflammatory response, alter brain chemistry, and modulate anxiety behaviour in both rodents and humans. However, the neuro-immune and behavioural effects of prebiotics on sickness behaviour have not been explored. Here, adult male CD1 mice were fed with a specific mix of non-digestible galacto-oligosaccharides (Bimuno®, BGOS) for 3 weeks, before receiving a single injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which induces sickness behaviour and anxiety. Locomotor and marble burying activities were assessed 4h after LPS injection, and after 24h, anxiety in the light-dark box was assessed. Cytokine expression, and key components of the serotonergic (5-Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and glutamatergic system were evaluated in the frontal cortex to determine the impact of BGOS administration at a molecular level. BGOS-fed mice were less anxious in the light-dark box compared to controls 24h after the LPS injection. Elevated cortical IL-1β concentrations in control mice 28 h after LPS were not observed in BGOS-fed animals. This significant BGOS×LPS interaction was also observed for 5HT2A receptors, but not for 5HT1A receptors, 5HT, 5HIAA, NMDA receptor subunits, or other cytokines. The intake of BGOS did not influence LPS-mediated reductions in marble burying behaviour, and its effect on locomotor activity was equivocal. Together, our data show that the prebiotic BGOS has an anxiolytic effect, which may be related to the modulation of cortical IL-1β and 5-HT2A receptor expression. Our data suggest a potential role for prebiotics in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders where anxiety and neuroinflammation are prominent clinical features.

  3. Long term deactivation test of high dust SCR catalysts by straw co-firing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigang Lin; Degn Jensen, A.; Bjerkvig, J.

    2009-12-15

    The consequences of carbon dioxide induced global warming cause major concern worldwide. The consumption of energy produced with fossil fuels is the major factor that contributes to the global warming. Biomass is a renewable energy resource and has a nature of CO{sub 2} neutrality. Co-combustion of biomass in existing coal fired power plants can maintain high efficiency and reduce the emission of CO{sub 2} at same time. However, one of the problems faced by co-firing is deactivation of the SCR catalysts. Understanding of the mechanisms of deactivation of the catalyst elements at co-firing conditions is crucial for long term runs of the power plants. Twenty six SCR catalyst elements were exposed at two units (SSV3 and SSV4) in the Studstrup Power Plant for a long period. Both units co-fire coal and straw with a typical fraction of 8-10% straw on an energy basis during co-firing. SSV4 unit operated in co-firing mode most of the time; SSV3 unit co-fired straw half of the operating time. The main objective of this PSO-project is to gain knowledge of a long term influence on catalyst activity when co-firing straw in coal-fired power plants, thus, to improve the basis for operating the SCR-plants for NO{sub x}-reduction. The exposure time of the applied catalyst elements (HTAS and BASF) varied from approximately 5000 to 19000 hours in the power plant by exchanging the element two times. The activity of all elements was measured before and after exposure in a bench scale test rig at the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark. The results show that the activity, estimated by exclusion of channel clogging of the elements, decreases gradually with the total exposure time. It appears that the exposure time under co-firing condition has little effect on the deactivation of the catalyst elements and no sharp decrease of the activity was observed. The average deactivation rate of the catalyst elements is 1.6 %/1000 hours. SEM

  4. The encoding/retrieval flip: interactions between memory performance and memory stage and relationship to intrinsic cortical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijbers, Willem; Schultz, Aaron P; Vannini, Patrizia; McLaren, Donald G; Wigman, Sarah E; Ward, Andrew M; Hedden, Trey; Sperling, Reisa A

    2013-07-01

    fMRI studies have linked the posteromedial cortex to episodic learning (encoding) and remembering (retrieval) processes. The posteromedial cortex is considered part of the default network and tends to deactivate during encoding but activate during retrieval, a pattern known as the encoding/retrieval flip. Yet, the exact relationship between the neural correlates of memory performance (hit/miss) and memory stage (encoding/retrieval) and the extent of overlap with intrinsic cortical networks remains to be elucidated. Using task-based fMRI, we isolated the pattern of activity associated with memory performance, memory stage, and the interaction between both. Using resting-state fMRI, we identified which intrinsic large-scale functional networks overlapped with regions showing task-induced effects. Our results demonstrated an effect of successful memory performance in regions associated with the control network and an effect of unsuccessful memory performance in the ventral attention network. We found an effect of memory retrieval in brain regions that span the default and control networks. Finally, we found an interaction between memory performance and memory stage in brain regions associated with the default network, including the posteromedial cortex, posterior parietal cortex, and parahippocampal cortex. We discuss these findings in relation to the encoding/retrieval flip. In general, the findings demonstrate that task-induced effects cut across intrinsic cortical networks. Furthermore, regions within the default network display functional dissociations, and this may have implications for the neural underpinnings of age-related memory disorders.

  5. A nicardipine-sensitive Ca2+ entry contributes to the hypotonicity-induced increase in [Ca2+]i of principal cells in rat cortical collecting duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komagiri, You; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Kubokawa, Manabu

    2011-01-01

    We examined the mechanisms involved in the [Ca(2+)](i) response to the extracellular hypotonicity in the principal cells of freshly isolated rat cortical collecting duct (CCD), using Fura-2/AM fluorescence imaging. Reduction of extracellular osmolality from 305 (control) to 195 mosmol/kgH(2)O (hypotonic) evoked transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i) of principal cells of rat CCDs. The [Ca(2+)](i) increase was markedly attenuated by the removal of extracellular Ca(2+)(.) The application of a P(2) purinoceptor antagonist, suramin failed to inhibit the hypotonicity-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase. The [Ca(2+)](i) increase in response to extracellular hypotonicity was not influenced by application of Gd(3+) and ruthenium red. On the other hand, a voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, nicardipine, significantly reduced the peak amplitude of [Ca(2+)](i) increase in the principal cells. In order to assess Ca(2+) entry during the hypotonic stimulation, we measured the quenching of Fura-2 fluorescence intensity by Mn(2+). The hypotonic stimulation enhanced quenching of Fura-2 fluorescence by Mn(2+), indicating that a Ca(2+)-permeable pathway was activated by the hypotonicity. The hypotonicity-mediated enhancement of Mn(2+) quenching was significantly inhibited by nicardipine. These results strongly suggested that a nicardipine-sensitive Ca(2+) entry pathway would contribute to the mechanisms underlying the hypotonicity-induced [Ca(2+)](i) elevation of principal cells in rat CCD.

  6. The Ketone Body, β-Hydroxybutyrate Stimulates the Autophagic Flux and Prevents Neuronal Death Induced by Glucose Deprivation in Cortical Cultured Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camberos-Luna, Lucy; Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Montiel, Teresa; Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Massieu, Lourdes

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is the major energy substrate in brain, however, during ketogenesis induced by starvation or prolonged hypoglycemia, the ketone bodies (KB), acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) can substitute for glucose. KB improve neuronal survival in diverse injury models, but the mechanisms by which KB prevent neuronal damage are still not well understood. In the present study we have investigated whether protection by the D isomer of BHB (D-BHB) against neuronal death induced by glucose deprivation (GD), is related to autophagy. Autophagy is a lysosomal-dependent degradation process activated during nutritional stress, which leads to the digestion of damaged proteins and organelles providing energy for cell survival. Results show that autophagy is activated in cortical cultured neurons during GD, as indicated by the increase in the levels of the lipidated form of the microtubule associated protein light chain 3 (LC3-II), and the number of autophagic vesicles. At early phases of glucose reintroduction (GR), the levels of p62 declined suggesting that the degradation of the autophagolysosomal content takes place at this time. In cultures exposed to GD and GR in the presence of D-BHB, the levels of LC3-II and p62 rapidly declined and remained low during GR, suggesting that the KB stimulates the autophagic flux preventing autophagosome accumulation and improving neuronal survival.

  7. Cortical plasticity and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moucha, Raluca; Kilgard, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    The brain is constantly adapting to environmental and endogenous changes (including injury) that occur at every stage of life. The mechanisms that regulate neural plasticity have been refined over millions of years. Motivation and sensory experience directly shape the rewiring that makes learning and neurological recovery possible. Guiding neural reorganization in a manner that facilitates recovery of function is a primary goal of neurological rehabilitation. As the rules that govern neural plasticity become better understood, it will be possible to manipulate the sensory and motor experience of patients to induce specific forms of plasticity. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding factors that regulate cortical plasticity, illustrates specific forms of reorganization induced by control of each factor, and suggests how to exploit these factors for clinical benefit.

  8. A study on the mechanisms by which minocycline protects against MDMA ('ecstasy')-induced neurotoxicity of 5-HT cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, Laura; Llopis, Noemi; Torres, Elisa; Izco, Maria; O'Shea, Esther; Colado, M Isabel

    2010-08-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') is a selective 5-HT neurotoxin in rat brain which has been shown to produce acute neuroinflammation characterized by activation of microglia and release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). We aimed to determine whether or not minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic capable of inhibiting microglial activation, could prevent the inflammatory response and reduce the toxicity induced by MDMA. Adult male Dark Agouti rats were given minocycline twice a day for 2 days (45 mg/kg on the first day and 90 mg/kg on the second day; 12-h apart, i.p.). MDMA (12.5 mg/kg; i.p.) was given after the third minocycline injection and animals were killed either 1 h later for the determination of NFkappaB binding activity, 3 h later for the determination of IL-1beta, 24 h later for the determination of microglial activation or 7 days later for the determination of [(3)H]-paroxetine binding as a measure of 5-HT neurotoxicity. MDMA increased NFkappaB activation, IL-1beta release and microglial activation both in the frontal cortex and in the hypothalamus and 7 days later produced a reduction in the density of 5-HT uptake sites in both these brain areas. Minocycline prevented the MDMA-induced increase in NFkappaB activation, IL-1beta release and microglial activation in the frontal cortex and prevented the 5-HT neurotoxicity 7 days later. However, in the hypothalamus, in spite of preventing MDMA-induced microglial activation, minocycline failed to prevent MDMA-induced NFkappaB activation, IL-1beta release and neurotoxicity. This suggests that the protective mechanism of minocycline against MDMA-induced neurotoxicity in frontal cortex involves inhibition of MDMA-induced NFkappaB activation possibly through a reduction in IL-1beta signalling.

  9. Does weight gain induce cortical and trabecular bone regain in anorexia nervosa? A two-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Gabriella; Spindler, Anja; Rüegsegger, Peter; Hasler, Gregor; Schnyder, Ulrich; Laib, Andres; Gallo, Luigi M; Uebelhart, Daniel; Häuselmann, Hansjörg

    2007-11-01

    This prospective study examines bone density and structure over a two-year time period in women with anorexia nervosa (AN) under weight gain treatment. Twenty-four women with AN were examined at baseline and at two annual follow-up examinations. In 9 AN patients BMI increased whereas in 15 it remained unchanged or decreased. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed on the lumbar spine, the femoral neck and the whole hip and three-dimensional peripheral quantitative computer tomography (3D-pQCT) was performed on the ultradistal radius. ANOVAs for repeated measures were used to examine change over time in BMI and bone parameters. At baseline, patients with increased BMI had significantly higher bone density of femoral neck and total hip, and higher levels in all 3D-pQCT parameters of the ultradistal radius, compared to the group with unchanged or decreased BMI. The two groups did not differ at baseline in bone density of the spine. ANOVAs showed that bone density of the total hip increased significantly and that overall bone density (D100), the density of the trabecular area (D.Trab.) and the cortical thickness (C.Th.) in the ultradistal radius decreased significantly. Group x time interactions showed that changes over time were different in the two groups with regard to spine density and in the parameters D100, D.Trab. and C.Th. of the ultradistal radius. In the group with increased BMI the spine density dropped at the first follow-up whereas at the second follow-up it rose again to baseline. Patients with unchanged or decreased BMI showed a small but steady increase in spine density. The group changes of D100, D.Trab. and C.Th. of the ultradistal radius all followed the same pattern. Bone mineral density at all locations measured with both technologies (DXA and 3D-pQCT) did not vary according to BMI changes. The course of bone density and structure at different locations was different, and, despite weight increase, bone regain appeared to need different

  10. Intracortical injection of endothelin-1 induces cortical infarcts in mice: effect of neuronal expression of an adenosine transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soylu Hanifi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of adenosine A1 receptors has neuroprotective effects in animal stroke models. Adenosine levels are regulated by nucleoside transporters. In vitro studies showed that neuron-specific expression of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1 decreases extracellular adenosine levels and adenosine A1 receptor activity. In this study, we tested the effect of hENT1 expression on cortical infarct size following intracerebral injection of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1 or saline. Methods Mice underwent stereotaxic intracortical injection of ET-1 (1 μl; 400 pmol or saline (1 μl. Some mice received the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (25 mg/kg, intraperitoneal 30 minutes prior to ET-1. Perfusion and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF and subsequent infarct size, respectively. Results ET-1 reduced CBF at the injection site to 7.3 ± 1.3% (n = 12 in hENT1 transgenic (Tg and 12.5 ± 2.0% (n = 13 in wild type (Wt mice. At 48 hours following ET-1 injection, CBF was partially restored to 35.8 ± 4.5% in Tg and to 45.2 ± 6.3% in Wt mice; infarct sizes were significantly greater in Tg (9 ± 1.1 mm3 than Wt (5.4 ± 0.8 mm3 mice. Saline-treated Tg and Wt mice had modest decreases in CBF and infarcts were less than 1 mm3. For mice treated with caffeine, CBF values and infarct sizes were not significantly different between Tg and Wt mice. Conclusions ET-1 produced greater ischemic injury in hENT1 Tg than in Wt mice. This genotype difference was not observed in mice that had received caffeine. These data indicate that hENT1 Tg mice have reduced ischemia-evoked increases in adenosine receptor activity compared to Wt mice.

  11. Boosting functionality of synthetic DNA circuits with tailored deactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Kevin; Gines, Guillaume; Fujii, Teruo; Rondelez, Yannick

    2016-11-15

    Molecular programming takes advantage of synthetic nucleic acid biochemistry to assemble networks of reactions, in vitro, with the double goal of better understanding cellular regulation and providing information-processing capabilities to man-made chemical systems. The function of molecular circuits is deeply related to their topological structure, but dynamical features (rate laws) also play a critical role. Here we introduce a mechanism to tune the nonlinearities associated with individual nodes of a synthetic network. This mechanism is based on programming deactivation laws using dedicated saturable pathways. We demonstrate this approach through the conversion of a single-node homoeostatic network into a bistable and reversible switch. Furthermore, we prove its generality by adding new functions to the library of reported man-made molecular devices: a system with three addressable bits of memory, and the first DNA-encoded excitable circuit. Specific saturable deactivation pathways thus greatly enrich the functional capability of a given circuit topology.

  12. Rank-based deactivation model for networks with age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xue-Wen; Yang Guo-Hong; Li Xiao-Lin; Xu Xin-Jian

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of age on network evolution which couples addition of new nodes and deactivation of old ones.During evolution,each node experiences two stages:active and inactive.The transition from the active state to the inactive one is based on the rank of the node.In this paper,we adopt age as a criterion of ranking,and propose two deactivation models that generalize previous research.In model A,the older active node possesses the higher rank,whereas in model B,the younger active node takes the higher rank.We make a comparative study between the two models through the node-degree distribution.

  13. Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, G.; Walton, T.

    2003-02-25

    Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. These technologies offer improved methods for accessing difficult-to-reach spaces and performing tasks such as visual inspection, radiological characterization, decontamination, waste handling, and size reduction. This paper is focused on the application of remote systems in support of deactivation work being performed in several legacy facilities at Hanford (i.e., the 324 and 327 Buildings). These facilities were previously used for fuel fabrication, materials examination, and the development of waste treatment processes. The technologies described in this paper represent significant improvements to Hanford's baseline methods, and may offer benefits to other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites and commercial operations.

  14. Insights into the Deactivation of 5-Bromouracil after UV Excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Peccati, Francesca; González, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    5-Bromouracil is a nucleobase analogue that can replace thymine in DNA strands and acts as a strong radiosensitizer, with potential applications in molecular biology and cancer therapy. Here, the deactivation of 5-bromouracil after UV irradiation is investigated in the singlet and triplet manifold by accurate quantum chemistry calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations. It is found that after irradiation to the bright 1pipi* state, three main relaxation pathways are in principle possible: relaxation back to the ground state, intersystem crossing, and C-Br photodissociation. Based on accurate MS-CASPT2 optimizations, we propose that ground state relaxation should be the predominant deactivation pathway in gas phase. We then employ different electronic structure methods to assess their suitability to carry out excited-state dynamics simulations. MRCIS was used in surface hopping simulations to compute the ultrafast intersystem crossing dynamics, which mostly involves the 1nOpi* and 3pipi* states.

  15. Role of GluR2 expression in AMPA-induced toxicity in cultured murine cerebral cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Timmermann, D B;

    2001-01-01

    of the Mg(2+) block of the NMDA receptor on AMPA-R stimulation. The involvement of Ca(2+) influx through AMPA-R was also examined. The number of neurons possessing Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA-R increased during culture development, concurrently with an increasing susceptibility for AMPA-induced toxicity during...

  16. Spreading depression induces expression of calcium-independent protein kinase C subspecies in ischaemia-sensitive cortical layers: regulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, S; Keinänen, R; Roivainen, R; Hirvonen, T; Närhi, M; Chan, P H; Koistinaho, J

    1999-01-01

    Spreading depression is a wave of sustained depolarization challenging the energy metabolism of the cells without causing irreversible damage. In the ischaemic brain, sreading depression-like depolarization contributes to the evolution of ischaemia to infarction. The depolarization is propagated by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but changes in signal transduction downstream of the receptors are not known. Because protein phosphorylation is a general mechanism whereby most cellular processes are regulated, and inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors or protein kinase C is neuroprotective, the expression of protein kinase C subspecies in spreading depression was examined. Cortical treatment with KCl induced an upregulation of protein kinase Cdelta and zeta messenger RNA at 4 and 8 h, whereas protein kinase Calpha, beta, gamma and epsilon did not show significant changes. The gene induction was the strongest in layers 2 and 3, and was followed by an increased number of protein kinase Cdelta-immunoreactive neurons. Protein kinase Cdelta and zeta inductions were inhibited by pretreatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, dizocilpine maleate, which also blocked spreading depression propagation, and with dexamethasone, which acted without blocking the propagation. Quinacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor, reduced only protein kinase C5 induction. In addition, N(G)(-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, did not influence protein kinase Cdelta or zeta induction, whereas 6-nitro-7-sulphamoylbenzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione, an alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate/kainate receptor antagonist, and the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and diclophenac tended to increase gene expression. The data show that cortical spreading depression induces Ca2(+)-independent protein kinase C subspecies delta and zeta, but not Ca(2+)-dependent subspecies, through activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and

  17. Gamification of Learning Deactivates the Default Mode Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Jones, Paul A; Jay, Tim; Mason, Alice; Jones, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that embedding educational learning in a game would improve learning outcomes, with increased engagement and recruitment of cognitive resources evidenced by increased activation of working memory network (WMN) and deactivation of default mode network (DMN) regions. In an fMRI study, we compared activity during periods of learning in three conditions that were increasingly game-like: Study-only (when periods of learning were followed by an exemplar question together with its correct answer), Self-quizzing (when periods of learning were followed by a multiple choice question in return for a fixed number of points) and Game-based (when, following each period of learning, participants competed with a peer to answer the question for escalating, uncertain rewards). DMN hubs deactivated as conditions became more game-like, alongside greater self-reported engagement and, in the Game-based condition, higher learning scores. These changes did not occur with any detectable increase in WMN activity. Additionally, ventral striatal activation was associated with responding to questions and receiving positive question feedback. Results support the significance of DMN deactivation for educational learning, and are aligned with recent evidence suggesting DMN and WMN activity may not always be anti-correlated.

  18. Default network deactivations are correlated with psychopathic personality traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Sheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The posteromedial cortex (PMC and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC are part of a network of brain regions that has been found to exhibit decreased activity during goal-oriented tasks. This network is thought to support a baseline of brain activity, and is commonly referred to as the "default network". Although recent reports suggest that the PMC and mPFC are associated with affective, social, and self-referential processes, the relationship between these default network components and personality traits, especially those pertaining to social context, is poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current investigation, we assessed the relationship between PMC and mPFC deactivations and psychopathic personality traits using fMRI and a self-report measure. We found that PMC deactivations predicted traits related to egocentricity and mPFC deactivations predicted traits related to decision-making. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that the PMC and mPFC are associated with processes involving self-relevancy and affective decision-making, consistent with previous reports. More generally, these findings suggest a link between default network activity and personality traits.

  19. Gamification of learning deactivates the Default Mode Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Alexander Howard-Jones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesised that embedding educational learning in a game would improve learning outcomes, with increased engagement and recruitment of cognitive resources evidenced by increased activation of working memory network (WMN and deactivation of Default Mode Network (DMN regions. In an fMRI study, we compared activity during periods of learning in three conditions that were increasingly game-like: Study-only (when periods of learning were followed by an exemplar question together with its correct answer, Self-quizzing (when periods of learning were followed by a multiple choice question in return for a fixed number of points and Game-based (when, following each period of learning, participants competed with a peer to answer the question for escalating, uncertain rewards. DMN hubs deactivated as conditions became more game-like, alongside greater self-reported engagement and, in the Game-based condition, higher learning scores. These changes did not occur with any detectable increase in WMN activity. Additionally, ventral striatal activation was associated with responding to questions and receiving positive question feedback. Results support the significance of DMN deactivation for educational learning, and are aligned with recent evidence suggesting DMN and WMN activity may not always be anti-correlated.

  20. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-11

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the thirteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made on the testing of the system hardware and software. H{sub 2} chemisorption capacities and activity selectivity data were also measured for three iron catalysts promoted with 1% alumina. 47 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Neuronal deletion of caspase 8 protects against brain injury in mouse models of controlled cortical impact and kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryla Krajewska

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is an important health problem. Given the critical position of caspase 8 at the crossroads of cell death pathways, we generated a new viable mouse line (Ncasp8(-/-, in which the gene encoding caspase 8 was selectively deleted in neurons by cre-lox system.Caspase 8 deletion reduced rates of neuronal cell death in primary neuronal cultures and in whole brain organotypic coronal slice cultures prepared from 4 and 8 month old mice and cultivated up to 14 days in vitro. Treatments of cultures with recombinant murine TNFα (100 ng/ml or TRAIL (250 ng/mL plus cyclohexamide significantly protected neurons against cell death induced by these apoptosis-inducing ligands. A protective role of caspase 8 deletion in vivo was also demonstrated using a controlled cortical impact (CCI model of traumatic brain injury (TBI and seizure-induced brain injury caused by kainic acid (KA. Morphometric analyses were performed using digital imaging in conjunction with image analysis algorithms. By employing virtual images of hundreds of brain sections, we were able to perform quantitative morphometry of histological and immunohistochemical staining data in an unbiased manner. In the TBI model, homozygous deletion of caspase 8 resulted in reduced lesion volumes, improved post-injury motor performance, superior learning and memory retention, decreased apoptosis, diminished proteolytic processing of caspases and caspase substrates, and less neuronal degeneration, compared to wild type, homozygous cre, and caspase 8-floxed control mice. In the KA model, Ncasp8(-/- mice demonstrated superior survival, reduced seizure severity, less apoptosis, and reduced caspase 3 processing. Uninjured aged knockout mice showed improved learning and memory, implicating a possible role for caspase 8 in cognitive decline with aging.Neuron-specific deletion of caspase 8 reduces brain damage and improves post-traumatic functional outcomes, suggesting an important role for this

  2. FNIRS-based evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-03-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2 ± 2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger tapping task were quantified before, immediately after, and six months after CIMT. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8 ± 1.3 years old) were also imaged at the same time points to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. In children with CP the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted six months later. In contrast to this longer term improvement in localized activation response, the laterality index that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed six months later.

  3. Sulforhodamine 101, a widely used astrocyte marker, can induce cortical seizure-like activity at concentrations commonly used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Nedergaard, Maiken; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar

    2016-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a preferential astrocyte marker widely used in 2-photon microscopy experiments. Here we show, that topical loading of two commonly used SR101 concentrations, 100 μM and 250 μM when incubated for 10 min, can induce seizure-like local field potential (LFP) activity...... of 100 μM and 250 μM SR101 or application of lower concentrations 25 μM and 50 μM of SR101, incubated for 30 and 20 min, respectively, did not induce abnormal LFP activity in sensori-motor cortex, but did label astrocytes, and may thus be considered more appropriate concentrations for in vivo astrocyte...

  4. Protein kinase D1 modulates aldosterone-induced ENaC activity in a renal cortical collecting duct cell line.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEneaney, Victoria

    2010-08-30

    Aldosterone treatment of M1-CCD cells stimulated an increase in epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) alpha-subunit expression that was mainly localized to the apical membrane. PKD1-suppressed cells constitutively expressed ENaCalpha at low abundance, with no increase after aldosterone treatment. In the PKD1-suppressed cells, ENaCalpha was mainly localized proximal to the basolateral surface of the epithelium both before and after aldosterone treatment. Apical membrane insertion of ENaCbeta in response to aldosterone treatment was also sensitive to PKD1 suppression as was the aldosterone-induced rise in the amiloride-sensitive, trans-epithelial current (I(TE)). The interaction of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) with specific elements in the promoters of aldosterone responsive genes is stabilized by ligand interaction and phosphorylation. PKD1 suppression inhibited aldosterone-induced SGK-1 expression. The nuclear localization of MR was also blocked by PKD1 suppression and MEK antagonism implicating both these kinases in MR nuclear stabilization. PKD1 thus modulates aldosterone-induced ENaC activity through the modulation of sub-cellular trafficking and the stabilization of MR nuclear localization.

  5. Mechanically-induced osteogenesis in the cortical bone of pre- to peripubertal stage and peri- to postpubertal stage mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plochocki Jeffrey H

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise during postnatal development plays a key role in determining adult bone mass and reducing the risk of fracture and osteoporosis later in life. However, the relationship between mechanically-induced osteogenesis and age is unclear. Elevated levels of estrogen during puberty may inhibit periosteal bone formation. Thus, magnitudes of mechanically-induced osteogenesis may be vary with pubertal state. Methods The present study uses a murine model to examine age-related changes in bone formation at the femoral midshaft with voluntary exercise. Pre- to peripubertal mice aged 3 weeks and peri- to postpubertal mice aged 7 weeks were randomly divided into sedentary and exercised groups and subjected to histomorphometric comparison after 4 weeks of treatment. Results Results of the experiment indicate that exercise significantly increased osteogenesis on the periosteal and endocortical surface of the mice in the older age group (P P Conclusion These findings suggest that the amount and location of mechanically-induced osteogenesis differs by age during skeletal development. Late adolescence may be the optimal time to accrue bone mass and maximize bone strength.

  6. Insight into deactivation of commercial SCR catalyst by arsenic: an experiment and DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Si, Wenzhe; Luo, Jinming; Dai, Qizhou; Luo, Xubiao; Liu, Xin; Hao, Jiming

    2014-12-01

    Fresh and arsenic-poisoned V2O5–WO3/TiO2 catalysts are investigated by experiments and DFT calculations for SCR activity and the deactivation mechanism. Poisoned catalyst (1.40% of arsenic) presents lower NO conversion and more N2O formation than fresh. Stream (5%) could further decrease the activity of poisoned catalyst above 350 °C. The deactivation is not attributed to the loss of surface area or phase transformation of TiO2 at a certain arsenic content, but due to the coverage of the V2O5 cluster and the decrease in the surface acidity: the number of Lewis acid sites and the stability of Brønsted acid sites. Large amounts of surface hydroxyl induced by H2O molecules provide more unreactive As–OH groups and give rise to a further decrease in the SCR activity. N2O is mainly from NH3 unselective oxidation at high temperatures since the reducibility of catalysts and the number of surface-active oxygens are improved by As2O5. Finally, the reaction pathway seems unchanged after poisoning: NH3 adsorbed on both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites is reactive.

  7. Long-term exposure to 835 MHz RF-EMF induces hyperactivity, autophagy and demyelination in the cortical neurons of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Hwan; Yu, Da-Hyeon; Huh, Yang Hoon; Lee, Eun Ho; Kim, Hyung-Gun; Kim, Hak Rim

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) is used globally in conjunction with mobile communications. There are public concerns of the perceived deleterious biological consequences of RF-EMF exposure. This study assessed neuronal effects of RF-EMF on the cerebral cortex of the mouse brain as a proxy for cranial exposure during mobile phone use. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 835 MHz RF-EMF at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 4.0 W/kg for 5 hours/day during 12 weeks. The aim was to examine activation of autophagy pathway in the cerebral cortex, a brain region that is located relatively externally. Induction of autophagy genes and production of proteins including LC3B-II and Beclin1 were increased and accumulation of autolysosome was observed in neuronal cell bodies. However, proapoptotic factor Bax was down-regulted in the cerebral cortex. Importantly, we found that RF-EMF exposure led to myelin sheath damage and mice displayed hyperactivity-like behaviour. The data suggest that autophagy may act as a protective pathway for the neuronal cell bodies in the cerebral cortex during radiofrequency exposure. The observations that neuronal cell bodies remained structurally stable but demyelination was induced in cortical neurons following prolonged RF-EMF suggests a potential cause of neurological or neurobehavioural disorders. PMID:28106136

  8. SIRT3 Expression Decreases with Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Rat Cortical Neurons during Early Brain Injury Induced by Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Huang, Yong; Huang, Ren-qiang; Gu, Jin-mao; Dong, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) is an important protein deacetylase which predominantly presents in mitochondria and exhibits broad bioactivities including regulating energy metabolism and counteracting inflammatory effect. Since inflammatory cascade was proved to be critical for pathological damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), we investigated the overall expression and cell-specific distribution of SIRT3 in the cerebral cortex of Sprague-Dawley rats with experimental SAH induced by internal carotid perforation. Results suggested that SIRT3 was expressed abundantly in neurons and endothelia but rarely in gliocytes in normal cerebral cortex. After experimental SAH, mRNA and protein expressions of SIRT3 decreased significantly as early as 8 hours and dropped to the minimum value at 24 h after SAH. By contrast, SOD2 expression increased slowly as early as 12 hours after experimental SAH, rose up sharply at the following 12 hours, and then was maintained at a higher level. In conclusion, attenuated SIRT3 expression in cortical neurons was associated closely with enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and cellular apoptosis, implying that SIRT3 might play an important neuroprotective role during early brain injury following SAH. PMID:28053989

  9. Ketamine alters cortical integration of GABAergic interneurons and induces long-term sex-dependent impairments in transgenic Gad67-GFP mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aligny, C; Roux, C; Dourmap, N; Ramdani, Y; Do-Rego, J-C; Jégou, S; Leroux, P; Leroux-Nicollet, I; Marret, S; Gonzalez, B J

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, widely used as an anesthetic in neonatal pediatrics, is also an illicit drug named Super K or KitKat consumed by teens and young adults. In the immature brain, despite several studies indicating that NMDA antagonists are neuroprotective against excitotoxic injuries, there is more and more evidence indicating that these molecules exert a deleterious effect by suppressing a trophic function of glutamate. In the present study, we show using Gad67-GFP mice that prenatal exposure to ketamine during a time-window in which GABAergic precursors are migrating results in (i) strong apoptotic death in the ganglionic eminences and along the migratory routes of GABAergic interneurons; (ii) long-term deficits in interneuron density, dendrite numbers and spine morphology; (iii) a sex-dependent deregulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels and GABA transporter expression; (iv) sex-dependent changes in the response to glutamate-induced calcium mobilization; and (v) the long-term sex-dependent behavioral impairment of locomotor activity. In conclusion, using a preclinical approach, the present study shows that ketamine exposure during cortical maturation durably affects the integration of GABAergic interneurons by reducing their survival and differentiation. The resulting molecular, morphological and functional modifications are associated with sex-specific behavioral deficits in adults. In light of the present data, it appears that in humans, ketamine could be deleterious for the development of the brain of preterm neonates and fetuses of addicted pregnant women. PMID:24991763

  10. Overexpressed neuroglobin raises threshold for nitric oxide-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiratory activities and stress signaling in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpee; Zhuo, Ming; Gorgun, Falih M; Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    Surges of nitric oxide compromise mitochondrial respiration primarily by competitive inhibition of oxygen binding to cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and are particularly injurious in neurons, which rely on oxidative phosphorylation for all their energy needs. Here, we show that transgenic overexpression of the neuronal globin protein, neuroglobin, helps diminish protein nitration, preserve mitochondrial function and sustain ATP content of primary cortical neurons challenged by extended nitric oxide exposure. Specifically, in transgenic neurons, elevated neuroglobin curtailed nitric oxide-induced alterations in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, including baseline oxygen consumption, consumption coupled with ATP synthesis, proton leak and spare respiratory capacity. Concomitantly, activation of genes involved in sensing and responding to oxidative/nitrosative stress, including the early-immediate c-Fos gene and the phase II antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1, was diminished in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons. Taken together, these differences reflect a lesser insult produced by similar concentrations of nitric oxide in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons, suggesting that abundant neuroglobin buffers nitric oxide and raises the threshold of nitric oxide-mediated injury in neurons.

  11. Characterization of energy and neurotransmitter metabolism in cortical glutamatergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana, Blanca I; Zhang, Yu; Lihme, Maria Fog

    2017-01-01

    pathways in neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). With this aim, cultures of hiPSC-derived neurons were incubated with [U-(13)C]glucose, [U-(13)C]glutamate or [U-(13)C]glutamine. Isotopic labeling in metabolites was determined using gas chromatography coupled to mass...... acid (TCA) cycle. This finding is supported by the extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates measured in the cultured human neurons. [U-(13)C]Glutamate and [U-(13)C]glutamine were found to be efficient energy substrates for the neuronal cultures originating from both mice and humans...

  12. Small-molecule inhibitors at the PSD-95/nNOS interface protect against glutamate-induced neuronal atrophy in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, M V; O'Toole, E; Connor, T; Harkin, A

    2015-08-20

    Glutamate and nitric oxide (NO) are important regulators of dendrite and axon development in the central nervous system. Excess glutamatergic stimulation is a feature of many pathological conditions and manifests in neuronal atrophy and shrinkage with eventual neurodegeneration and cell death. Here we demonstrate that treatment of cultured primary cortical rat neurons for 24h with glutamate (500μM) or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) (100-500μM) combined with glycine suppresses neurite outgrowth. A similar reduction of neurite outgrowth was observed with the NO precursor l-arginine and NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (100 and 300μM). The NMDA-receptor (NMDA-R) antagonists ketamine and MK-801 (10nM) counteracted the NMDA/glycine-induced reduction in neurite outgrowth and the neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) inhibitor 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] imidazole (TRIM) (100nM) counteracted both the NMDA/glycine and l-arginine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, targeting soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a downstream target of NO, with the sGC inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (10μM) also protected against l-arginine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. Since the NMDA-R is functionally coupled to nNOS via the postsynaptic protein 95kDa (PSD-95), inhibitors of the PSD-95/nNOS interaction were tested for their ability to protect against glutamate-induced suppression in neurite outgrowth. Treatment with the small-molecule inhibitors of the PSD-95/nNOS interface 2-((1H-benzo[d] [1,2,3]triazol-5-ylamino) methyl)-4,6-dichlorophenol (IC87201) (10 and 100nM) and 4-(3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxy-benzylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (ZL-006) (10 and 100nM) attenuated NMDA/glycine-induced decreases in neurite outgrowth. These data support the hypothesis that targeting the NMDA-R/PSD-95/nNOS interaction downstream of NMDA-R promotes neurotrophic effects by preventing neurite shrinkage in response to excess glutamatergic stimulation. The PSD-95/n

  13. Beat-induced fluctuations in auditory cortical beta-band activity: Using EEG to measure age-related changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K Cirelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available People readily extract regularity in rhythmic auditory patterns, enabling prediction of the onset of the next beat. Recent magnetoencephalography (MEG research suggests that such prediction is reflected by the entrainment of oscillatory networks in the brain to the tempo of the sequence. In particular, induced beta-band oscillatory activity from auditory cortex decreases after each beat onset and rebounds prior to the onset of the next beat across tempi in a predictive manner. The objective of the present study was to examine the development of such oscillatory activity by comparing electroencephalography (EEG measures of beta-band fluctuations in 7-year-old children to adults. EEG was recorded while participants listened passively to isochronous tone sequences at three tempi (390, 585, and 780ms for onset-to-onset interval. In adults, induced power in the high beta-band (20-25 Hz decreased after each tone onset and rebounded prior to the onset of the next tone across tempo conditions, consistent with MEG findings. In children, a similar pattern was measured in the two slower tempo conditions, but was weaker in the fastest condition. The results indicate that the beta-band timing network works similarly in children, although there are age-related changes in consistency and the tempo range over which it operates.

  14. Orchidectomy-induced alterations in volumetric bone density, cortical porosity and strength of femur are attenuated by dietary conjugated linoleic acid in aged guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGuire, Jason R; Mak, Ivy L; Lavery, Paula; Agellon, Sherry; Wykes, Linda J; Weiler, Hope A

    2015-04-01

    Age-related osteoporosis and sarcopenia are ascribed in part to reductions in anabolic hormones. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) improves lean and bone mass, but its impact during androgen deficiency is not known. This study tested if CLA would attenuate the effects of orchidectomy (ORX)-induced losses of bone and lean tissue. Male guinea pigs (n=40; 70-72 weeks), were randomized into four groups: (1) SHAM+Control diet, (2) SHAM+CLA diet, (3) ORX+Control diet, (4) ORX+CLA diet. Baseline blood sampling and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans were conducted, followed by surgery 4 days later with the test diets started 7 days after baseline sampling. Serial blood sampling and DXA scans were repeated 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks on the test diets. Body composition and areal BMD (aBMD) of whole body, lumbar spine, femur and tibia were measured using DXA. At week 16, muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR), volumetric BMD (vBMD), microarchitecture and bone strength were assessed. Body weight declined after SHAM and ORX surgery, with slower recovery in the ORX group. Dietary CLA did not affect weight or lean mass, but attenuated gains in fat mass. Lean mass was stable in SHAM and reduced in ORX by 2 weeks with whole body and femur bone mineral content (BMC) reduced by 4 weeks; CLA did not alter BMC. By week 16 ORX groups had lower free testosterone and myofibrillar FSR, yet higher cortisol, osteocalcin and ionized calcium with no alterations due to CLA. ORX+Control had higher prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and total alkaline phosphatase compared to SHAM+Control whereas ORX+CLA were not different from SHAM groups. Femur metaphyseal vBMD was reduced in ORX+CTRL with the reduction attenuated by CLA. Femur cortical thickness (Ct.Th.) and biomechanical strength were reduced and cortical porosity (Ct.Po.) elevated by ORX and attenuated by CLA. This androgen deficient model with a sarcopenic-osteoporotic phenotype similar to aging men responded to dietary CLA with

  15. Role of GluR2 expression in AMPA-induced toxicity in cultured murine cerebral cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jette Bisgaard; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Timmermann, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPA-R)-mediated neurotoxicity was studied in relation to subunit expression and the presence of Ca(2+)-permeable receptor channels. AMPA-mediated toxicity had two components: 1) a direct AMPA-R-mediated component, which was not due...... of the Mg(2+) block of the NMDA receptor on AMPA-R stimulation. The involvement of Ca(2+) influx through AMPA-R was also examined. The number of neurons possessing Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA-R increased during culture development, concurrently with an increasing susceptibility for AMPA-induced toxicity during...... development. GluR2(R) levels also increased during development, and channel blockers of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA-R lacking the GluR2(R) subunit (spermine and philanthotoxin) failed to prevent neurotoxicity or increases in [Ca(2+)](i). Thus, the direct AMPA-R-mediated toxicity may be explained by initiation...

  16. Role of the NR2A/2B subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in glutamate-induced glutamic acid decarboxylase alteration in cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerie, H; Hsu, F-C; Coulter, D A; Le Roux, P D

    2010-12-29

    The vulnerability of brain neuronal cell subpopulations to neurologic insults varies greatly. Among cells that survive a pathological insult, for example ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that may compromise brain function. The present study is a follow-up of our previous studies that investigated the effect of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67)'s expression in surviving DIV 11 cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro [Monnerie and Le Roux, (2007) Exp Neurol 205:367-382, (2008) Exp Neurol 213:145-153]. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated decrease in GAD expression was found following glutamate exposure. Here we examined which NMDAR subtype(s) mediated the glutamate-induced change in GAD protein levels. Western blotting techniques on cortical neuron cultures showed that glutamate's effect on GAD proteins was not altered by NR2B-containing diheteromeric (NR1/NR2B) receptor blockade. By contrast, blockade of triheteromeric (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) receptors fully protected against a decrease in GAD protein levels following glutamate exposure. When receptor location on the postsynaptic membrane was examined, extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was observed to be sufficient to decrease GAD protein levels similar to that observed after glutamate bath application. Blocking diheteromeric receptors prevented glutamate's effect on GAD proteins after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation. Finally, NR2B subunit examination with site-specific antibodies demonstrated a glutamate-induced, calpain-mediated alteration in NR2B expression. These results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic NMDAR stimulation in cultured GABAergic cortical neurons depends upon subunit composition and receptor location (synaptic vs. extrasynaptic) on the neuronal membrane. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered

  17. Cortical kindling induces elevated levels of AMPA and GABA receptor subunit mRNA within the amygdala/piriform region and is associated with behavioral changes in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amy K; Galic, Michael A; Teskey, G Campbell

    2009-11-01

    Cortical kindling causes alterations within the motor cortex and results in long-standing motor deficits. Less attention has been directed to other regions that also participate in the epileptiform activity. We examined if cortical kindling could induce changes in excitatory and inhibitory receptor subunit mRNA in the amygdala/piriform regions and if such changes are associated with behavioral deficits. After cortical kindling, amygdala/piriform regions were dissected to analyze mRNA levels of NMDA, AMPA, and GABA receptor subunits using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, or rats were subjected to a series of behavioral tests. Kindled rats had significantly greater amounts of GluR1 and GluR2 AMPA receptor mRNA, and alpha1 and alpha2 GABA receptor subunit mRNA, compared with sham controls, which was associated with greater anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus maze and reduced freezing behaviors in the fear conditioning task. In summary, cortical kindling produces dynamic receptor subunit changes in regions in addition to the seizure focus.

  18. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotaro Michinaga

    Full Text Available Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice. Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist, IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist, or FR139317 (ETA antagonist prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  19. Selective deactivation of gibberellins below the shoot apex is critical to flowering but not to stem elongation of Lolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Rod W; Mander, Lewis N; Asp, Torben; MacMillan, Colleen P; Blundell, Cheryl A; Evans, Lloyd T

    2008-03-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) cause dramatic increases in plant height and a genetic block in the synthesis of GA(1) explains the dwarfing of Mendel's pea. For flowering, it is GA(5) which is important in the long-day (LD) responsive grass, Lolium. As we show here, GA(1) and GA(4) are restricted in their effectiveness for flowering because they are deactivated by C-2 hydroxylation below the shoot apex. In contrast, GA(5) is effective because of its structural protection at C-2. Excised vegetative shoot tips rapidly degrade [14C]GA(1), [14C]GA(4), and [14C]GA(20) (>80% in 6 h), but not [14C]GA(5). Coincidentally, genes encoding two 2beta-oxidases and a putative 16-17-epoxidase were most expressed just below the shoot apex (4 mm), expression of these GA deactivation genes is reduced, so allowing GA(1) and GA(4) to promote sub-apical stem elongation. Subsequently, GA degradation declines in florally induced shoot tips and these GAs can become active for floral development. Structural changes which stabilize GA(4) confirm the link between florigenicity and restricted GA 2beta-hydroxylation (e.g. 2alpha-hydroxylation and C-2 di-methylation). Additionally, a 2-oxidase inhibitor (Trinexapac Ethyl) enhanced the activity of applied GA(4), as did limiting C-16,17 epoxidation in 16,17-dihydro GAs or after C-13 hydroxylation. Overall, deactivation of GA(1) and GA(4) just below the shoot apex effectively restricts their florigenicity in Lolium and, conversely, with GA(5), C-2 and C-13 protection against deactivation allows its high florigenicity. Speculatively, such differences in GA access to the shoot apex of grasses may be important for separating floral induction from inflorescence emergence and thus could influence their survival under conditions of herbivore predation.

  20. Selective Deactivation of Gibberellins below the Shoot Apex is Critical to Flowering but Not to Stem Elongation of Lolium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rod W.King; Lewis N.Mander; Torben Asp; Colleen P. MacMillan; Cheryl A.Blundell; Lloyd T.Evans

    2008-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) cause dramatic increases in plant height and a genetic block in the synthesis of GA1 explains the dwarfing of Mendel's pea.For flowering,it is GAs which is important in the long-day (LD) responsive grass,Lolium.As we show here,GA1 and GA4 are restricted in their effectiveness for flowering because they are deactivated by C-2 hydroxylation below the shoot apex.In contrast,GAs is effective because of its structural protection at C-2.Excised vegetative shoot tips rapidly degrade [14C]GA1,[14C]GA4,and [14C]GA20 (>80% in 6 h),but not [14C]GA5.Coincidentally,genes encoding two 2β-oxidases and a putative 16-17-epoxidase were most expressed just below the shoot apex (4 mm),expression of these GA deactivation genes is reduced,so allowing GA1 and GA4 to promote sub-apical stem elongation.Subsequently,GA degradation declines in florally induced shoot tips and these GAs can become active for floral development.Structural changes which stabilize GA4 confirm the link between florigenicity and restricted GA 2β-hydroxylation (e.g.2α-hydroxylation and C-2 di-methylation).Additionally,a 2-oxidase inhibitor (Trinexapac Ethyl) enhanced the activity of applied GA4,as did limiting C-16,17 epoxidation in 16,17-dihydro GAs or after C-13 hydroxylation.Overall,deactivation of GA1 and GA4 just below the shoot apex effectively restricts their florigenicity in Lolium and,conversely,with GAs,C-2 and C-13 protection against deactivation allows its high florigenicity.Speculatively,such differences in GA access to the shoot apex of grasses may be important for separating floral induction from inflorescence emergence and thus could influence their survival under conditions of herbivore predation.

  1. Adaptation to alkalosis induces cell cycle delay and apoptosis in cortical collecting duct cells: role of Aquaporin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivarola, Valeria; Flamenco, Pilar; Melamud, Luciana; Galizia, Luciano; Ford, Paula; Capurro, Claudia

    2010-08-01

    Collecting ducts (CD) not only constitute the final site for regulating urine concentration by increasing apical membrane Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression, but are also essential for the control of acid-base status. The aim of this work was to examine, in renal cells, the effects of chronic alkalosis on cell growth/death as well as to define whether AQP2 expression plays any role during this adaptation. Two CD cell lines were used: WT- (not expressing AQPs) and AQP2-RCCD(1) (expressing apical AQP2). Our results showed that AQP2 expression per se accelerates cell proliferation by an increase in cell cycle progression. Chronic alkalosis induced, in both cells lines, a time-dependent reduction in cell growth. Even more, cell cycle movement, assessed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase and propidium iodide analyses, revealed a G2/M phase cell accumulation associated with longer S- and G2/M-transit times. This G2/M arrest is paralleled with changes consistent with apoptosis. All these effects appeared 24 h before and were always more pronounced in cells expressing AQP2. Moreover, in AQP2-expressing cells, part of the observed alkalosis cell growth decrease is explained by AQP2 protein down-regulation. We conclude that in CD cells alkalosis causes a reduction in cell growth by cell cycle delay that triggers apoptosis as an adaptive reaction to this environment stress. Since cell volume changes are prerequisite for the initiation of cell proliferation or apoptosis, we propose that AQP2 expression facilitates cell swelling or shrinkage leading to the activation of channels necessary to the control of these processes.

  2. Perturbations in reward-related decision-making induced by reduced prefrontal cortical GABA transmission: Relevance for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantadosi, Patrick T; Khayambashi, Shahin; Schluter, Magdalen G; Kutarna, Agnes; Floresco, Stan B

    2016-02-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critical for higher-order cognitive functions, including decision-making. In psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, prefrontal dysfunction co-occurs with pronounced alterations in decision-making ability. These alterations include a diminished ability to utilize probabilistic reinforcement in guiding future choice, and a reduced willingness to expend effort to receive reward. Among the neurochemical abnormalities observed in the PFC of individuals with schizophrenia are alterations in the production and function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To probe how PFC GABA hypofunction may contribute to alterations in cost/benefit decision-making, we assessed the effects GABAA-receptor antagonist bicuculline (BIC; 50 ng in 0.5 μl saline/hemisphere) infusion in the medial PFC of rats during performance on a series of well-validated cost/benefit decision-making tasks. Intra-PFC BIC reduced risky choice and reward sensitivity during probabilistic discounting and decreased the preference for larger rewards associated with a greater effort cost, similar to the behavioral sequelae observed in schizophrenia. Additional experiments revealed that these treatments did not alter instrumental responding on a progressive ratio schedule, nor did they impair the ability to discriminate between reward and no reward. However, BIC induced a subtle but consistent impairment in preference for larger vs. smaller rewards of equal cost. BIC infusion also increased decision latencies and impaired the ability to "stay on task" as indexed by reduced rates of instrumental responding. Collectively, these results implicate prefrontal GABAergic dysfunction as a key contributing factor to abnormal decision-making observed in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions with similar neurobiological and behavioral alterations.

  3. Effects of affective pictures on pain sensitivity and cortical responses induced by laser stimuli in healthy subjects and migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Calabrese, Rita; Vecchio, Eleonora; De Vito Francesco, Vito; Lancioni, Giulio; Livrea, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    Visually induced analgesia has been correlated with the affective content of pleasant, neutral or unpleasant pictures. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of affective images vision on laser evoked potentials and pain perception, in a cohort of healthy subjects and migraine patients. Twenty-two healthy subjects and 24 migraine without aura patients (recorded during the inter-critical phase) participated in the study. Eighty-four colour slides, arranged in two blocks, each consisting of 14 pleasant, 14 unpleasant and 14 neutral images, in random presentation, were chosen from the International Affective Picture System. The CO(2) laser stimuli were delivered on the dorsum of the right hand and supra-orbital zone at 7.5-watt intensity and 25-ms duration, in basal condition and during the viewing of affective pictures. Migraine patients expressed higher scores of valence and arousal for pleasant and unpleasant pictures, compared to controls. In both groups, a late positive potential in the 400-700 ms time range was clear for pleasant and unpleasant pictures, but its amplitude was significantly reduced in migraine patients. The pain rating and the N2 component were reduced in both groups during the visual task compared to basal condition. In migraineurs and controls the P2 wave was reduced during the vision of pleasant pictures, compared to basal condition. This indicates that stimulation by images with different affective content reduces subjective pain for a cognitive mechanism of attentive engagement, while a special inhibition of later LEPs is produced by a positive emotional impact. In migraine, affective images are able to modulate pain perception and LEPs, differently from other modalities of distraction, suggesting a possible emotive elaboration of painful stimuli.

  4. Rupture loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.

  5. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Tongjun; Zhang, Guifeng; Li, Ganlong; Lu, Na; Lai, Xinsheng; Lu, Yangjia; Chen, Jiarong

    2012-01-01

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state, as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture. Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint. Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling, true needling activated Brodmann areas 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 20, 21, 37, 39, 40, 43, and 47, the head of the caudate nucleus, the parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus and red nucleus. True needling also deactivated Brodmann areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 18, 24, 31, 40 and 46. PMID:25538761

  6. PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-09-19

    Disconnecting the criticality alarm permanently in June 1996 signified that the hazards in the PUREX (plutonium-uranium extraction) plant had been so removed and reduced that criticality was no longer a credible event. Turning off the PUREX criticality alarm also marked a salient point in a historic deactivation project, 1 year before its anticipated conclusion. The PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project began in October 1993 as a 5-year, $222.5- million project. As a result of innovations implemented during 1994 and 1995, the project schedule was shortened by over a year, with concomitant savings. In 1994, the innovations included arranging to send contaminated nitric acid from the PUREX Plant to British Nuclear Fuels, Limited (BNFL) for reuse and sending metal solutions containing plutonium and uranium from PUREX to the Hanford Site tank farms. These two steps saved the project $36.9- million. In 1995, reductions in overhead rate, work scope, and budget, along with curtailed capital equipment expenditures, reduced the cost another $25.6 million. These savings were achieved by using activity-based cost estimating and applying technical schedule enhancements. In 1996, a series of changes brought about under the general concept of ``reengineering`` reduced the cost approximately another $15 million, and moved the completion date to May 1997. With the total savings projected at about $75 million, or 33.7 percent of the originally projected cost, understanding how the changes came about, what decisions were made, and why they were made becomes important. At the same time sweeping changes in the cultural of the Hanford Site were taking place. These changes included shifting employee relations and work structures, introducing new philosophies and methods in maintaining safety and complying with regulations, using electronic technology to manage information, and, adopting new methods and bases for evaluating progress. Because these changes helped generate cost savings and were

  7. Reversible cortical blindness after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knower, Mark T; Pethke, Scott D; Valentine, Vincent G

    2003-06-01

    Cyclosporine (CYA) is a calcineurin inhibitor widely used in immunosuppressive regimens after organ transplantation. Several neurologic side effects are frequently associated with CYA use; however, reversible cortical blindness is a rare manifestation of CYA toxicity traditionally seen after liver and bone marrow transplantation. This report presents a case of reversible cortical blindness after lung transplantation, then details the risk factors and clinical course of 28 previously well-documented cases of CYA-induced cortical blindness after transplantation. Identification of known risk factors, clinical clues, and typical radiographic findings may aid in the diagnosis of CYA-induced cortical blindness, since reduction in CYA dose or cessation of CYA therapy usually permits resolution of the neurologic effects.

  8. Nrdp1 Increases Ischemia Induced Primary Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons and Pheochromocytoma Cells Apoptosis Via Downregulation of HIF-1α Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin receptor degradation protein-1 (Nrdp1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets proteins for degradation and regulates cell growth, apoptosis and oxidative stress in various cell types. We have previously shown that Nrdp1 is implicated in ischemic cardiomyocyte death. In this study, we investigated the change of Nrdp1 expression in ischemic neurons and its role in ischemic neuronal injury. Primary rat cerebral cortical neurons and pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells were infected with adenoviral constructs expressing Nrdp1 gene or its siRNA before exposing to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD treatment. Our data showed that Nrdp1 was upregulated in ischemic brain tissue 3 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and in OGD-treated neurons. Of note, Nrdp1 overexpression by Ad-Nrdp1 enhanced OGD-induced neuron apoptosis, while knockdown of Nrdp1 with siRNA attenuated this effect, implicating a role of Nrdp1 in ischemic neuron injury. Moreover, Nrdp1 upregulation is accompanied by increased protein ubiquitylation and decreased protein levels of ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8 in OGD-treated neurons, which led to a suppressed interaction between USP8 and HIF-1α and subsequently a reduction in HIF-1α protein accumulation in neurons under OGD conditions. In conclusion, our data support an important role of Nrdp1 upregulation in ischemic neuronal death, and suppressing the interaction between USP8 and HIF-1α and consequently the hypoxic adaptive response of neurons may account for this detrimental effect.

  9. Cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortical gray matter in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong-Kha Truong

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625 × 0.625 × 3 mm and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo.

  10. Cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortical gray matter in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Guidon, Arnaud; Song, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625 × 0.625 × 3 mm) and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i) a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii) a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo.

  11. Insights into the deactivation of 5-bromouracil after ultraviolet excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccati, Francesca; Mai, Sebastian; González, Leticia

    2017-03-01

    5-Bromouracil is a nucleobase analogue that can replace thymine in DNA strands and acts as a strong radiosensitizer, with potential applications in molecular biology and cancer therapy. Here, the deactivation of 5-bromouracil after ultraviolet irradiation is investigated in the singlet and triplet manifold by accurate quantum chemistry calculations and non-adiabatic dynamics simulations. It is found that, after irradiation to the bright ππ* state, three main relaxation pathways are, in principle, possible: relaxation back to the ground state, intersystem crossing (ISC) and C-Br photodissociation. Based on accurate MS-CASPT2 optimizations, we propose that ground-state relaxation should be the predominant deactivation pathway in the gas phase. We then employ different electronic structure methods to assess their suitability to carry out excited-state dynamics simulations. MRCIS (multi-reference configuration interaction including single excitations) was used in surface hopping simulations to compute the ultrafast ISC dynamics, which mostly involves the 1nOπ* and 3ππ* states. This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'.

  12. Universal and reusable virus deactivation system for respiratory protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Rubino, Ilaria; Lee, Su-Hwa; Koch, Brendan; Choi, Hyo-Jick

    2017-01-01

    Aerosolized pathogens are a leading cause of respiratory infection and transmission. Currently used protective measures pose potential risk of primary/secondary infection and transmission. Here, we report the development of a universal, reusable virus deactivation system by functionalization of the main fibrous filtration unit of surgical mask with sodium chloride salt. The salt coating on the fiber surface dissolves upon exposure to virus aerosols and recrystallizes during drying, destroying the pathogens. When tested with tightly sealed sides, salt-coated filters showed remarkably higher filtration efficiency than conventional mask filtration layer, and 100% survival rate was observed in mice infected with virus penetrated through salt-coated filters. Viruses captured on salt-coated filters exhibited rapid infectivity loss compared to gradual decrease on bare filters. Salt-coated filters proved highly effective in deactivating influenza viruses regardless of subtypes and following storage in harsh environmental conditions. Our results can be applied in obtaining a broad-spectrum, airborne pathogen prevention device in preparation for epidemic and pandemic of respiratory diseases.

  13. Routes for deactivation of different autothermal reforming catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasel, Joachim; Wohlrab, Sebastian; Kreft, Stefanie; Rotov, Mikhail; Löhken, Katrin; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    Fuel cell systems with integrated autothermal reforming units require active and robust catalysts for H2 production. In pursuit of this, an experimental screening of catalysts utilized in the autothermal reforming of commercial diesel fuels is performed. The catalysts incorporate a monolithic cordierite substrate, an oxide support (γ-Al2O3, La-Al2O3, CeO2, Gd-CeO2, ZrO2, Y-ZrO2) and Rh as the active phase. Experiments are run by widely varying the O2/C and H2O/C molar ratios at different gas hourly space velocities. In most cases, this provokes accelerated catalyst deactivation and permits an informative comparison of the catalysts. Fresh and aged catalysts are characterized by temperature-programmed methods, thermogravimetry and transmission electron microscopy to find correlations with catalytic activity and stability. Using this approach, routes for catalyst deactivation are identified, together with causes of different catalytic activities. Suitable reaction conditions can be derived from our results for the operation of reactors for autothermal reforming at steady-state and under transient reaction conditions, which helps improve the efficiency and the stability of fuel cell systems.

  14. Model dependences of the deactivation of phytoplankton pigment excitation energy on environmental conditions in the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Ostrowska

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical, physical models have been derived of the quantum yield ofthe deactivation processes (fluorescence, photosynthesis and heat productionof excited states in phytoplankton pigment molecules. Besides some alreadyknown models (photosynthesis and fluorescence, this novel approachincorporates the dependence of the dissipation yield of the excitation energyin phytoplankton pigment molecules on heat. The quantitative dependences ofthe quantum yields of these three processes on three fundamental parameters ofthe marine environment are defined: the chlorophyll concentration in the surface water layer Ca(0 (the basin trophicity,the irradiance PAR(z and the temperature temp(z at the study site.The model is complemented with two other relevant models describing thequantum yield of photosynthesis and of natural Sun-Induced Chlorophyll a Fluorescence (SICF in the sea, derived earlier by the author or with herparticipation on the basis of statistical analyses of a vast amount ofempirical material. The model described in the present paper enables theestimation of the quantum yields of phytoplankton pigment heat production forany region and season, in waters of any trophicity at different depths fromthe surface to depths of ca 60 m. The model can therefore be used to estimatethe yields of these deactivation processes in more than half the thickness ofthe euphotic zone in oligotrophic waters and in the whole thickness (anddeeper of this zone in mesotrophic and eutrophic waters. In particular theserelationships may be useful for a component analysis of the budget of lightenergy absorbed by phytoplankton pigments, namely, its utilization influorescence, photochemical quenching and nonphotochemical radiationlessdissipation - i.e. direct heat production.

  15. Respiration phase-locks to fast stimulus presentations: Implications for the interpretation of posterior midline "deactivations"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbers, W.; Pennartz, C.M.A.; Beldzik, E.; Domagalik, A.; Vinck, M.A.; Hofman, W.; Cabeza, R.; Daselaar, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior midline region (PMR)-considered a core of the default mode network-is deactivated during successful performance in different cognitive tasks. The extent of PMR-deactivations is correlated with task-demands and associated with successful performance in various cognitive domains. In the

  16. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING PLANNING AND ANALYSIS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, J; William Austin, W; Larry Koffman, L

    2007-09-17

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dispositioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dispositioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities.

  17. Synthesis of Glycopolymer Architectures by Reversible-Deactivation Radical Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghadban

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the state of the art in the synthesis of well-defined glycopolymers by Reversible-Deactivation Radical Polymerization (RDRP from its inception in 1998 until August 2012. Glycopolymers architectures have been successfully synthesized with four major RDRP techniques: Nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization (NMP, cyanoxyl-mediated radical polymerization (CMRP, atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization. Over 140 publications were analyzed and their results summarized according to the technique used and the type of monomer(s and carbohydrates involved. Particular emphasis was placed on the experimental conditions used, the structure obtained (comonomer distribution, topology, the degree of control achieved and the (potential applications sought. A list of representative examples for each polymerization process can be found in tables placed at the beginning of each section covering a particular RDRP technique.

  18. Revealing Deactivation Pathways Hidden in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-10-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is commonly employed with the intention to monitor electronic excited-state dynamics occurring in a neutral molecule. With the help of theory, we show that when excited-state processes occur on similar time scales the different relaxation pathways are completely obscured in the total photoionization signal recorded in the experiment. Using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and Dyson norms, we calculate the photoionization signal of cytosine and disentangle the transient contributions originating from the different deactivation pathways of its tautomers. In the simulations, the total signal from the relevant keto and enol tautomers can be decomposed into contributions either from the neutral electronic state populations or from the distinct mechanistic pathways across the multiple potential surfaces. The lifetimes corresponding to these contributions cannot be extracted from the experiment, thereby illustrating that new experimental setups are necessary to unravel the intricate non-adiabatic pathways occurring in polyatomic molecules after irradiation by light.

  19. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sype, T.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fischer, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex.

  20. β-Arrestin-dependent deactivation of mouse melanopsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan G Cameron

    Full Text Available In mammals, the expression of the unusual visual pigment, melanopsin, is restricted to a small subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs, whose signaling regulate numerous non-visual functions including sleep, circadian photoentrainment and pupillary constriction. IpRGCs exhibit attenuated electrical responses following sequential and prolonged light exposures indicative of an adaptational response. The molecular mechanisms underlying deactivation and adaptation in ipRGCs however, have yet to be fully elucidated. The role of melanopsin phosphorylation and β-arrestin binding in this adaptive process is suggested by the phosphorylation-dependent reduction of melanopsin signaling in vitro and the ubiquitous expression of β-arrestin in the retina. These observations, along with the conspicuous absence of visual arrestin in ipRGCs, suggest that a β-arrestin terminates melanopsin signaling. Here, we describe a light- and phosphorylation- dependent reduction in melanopsin signaling mediated by both β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2. Using an in vitro calcium imaging assay, we demonstrate that increasing the cellular concentration of β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2 significantly increases the rate of deactivation of light-activated melanopsin in HEK293 cells. Furthermore, we show that this response is dependent on melanopsin carboxyl-tail phosphorylation. Crosslinking and co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirm β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2 bind to melanopsin in a light- and phosphorylation- dependent manner. These data are further supported by proximity ligation assays (PLA, which demonstrate a melanopsin/β-arrestin interaction in HEK293 cells and ipRGCs. Together, these results suggest that melanopsin signaling is terminated in a light- and phosphorylation-dependent manner through the binding of a β-arrestin within the retina.

  1. Deactivation of Escherichia coli by the plasma needle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladek, R E J; Stoffels, E [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2005-06-07

    In this paper we present a parameter study on deactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) by means of a non-thermal plasma (plasma needle). The plasma needle is a small-sized (1 mm) atmospheric glow sustained by radio-frequency excitation. This plasma will be used to disinfect heat-sensitive objects; one of the intended applications is in vivo deactivation of dental bacteria: destruction of plaque and treatment of caries. We use E. coli films plated on agar dishes as a model system to optimize the conditions for bacterial destruction. Plasma power, treatment time and needle-to-sample distance are varied. Plasma treatment of E. coli films results in formation of a bacteria-free void with a size up to 12 mm. 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} colony forming units are already destroyed after 10 s of treatment. Prolongation of treatment time and usage of high powers do not significantly improve the destruction efficiency: short exposure at low plasma power is sufficient. Furthermore, we study the effects of temperature increase on the survival of E. coli and compare it with thermal effects of the plasma. The population of E. coli heated in a warm water bath starts to decrease at temperatures above 40 deg. C. Sample temperature during plasma treatment has been monitored. The temperature can reach up to 60 deg. C at high plasma powers and short needle-to-sample distances. However, thermal effects cannot account for bacterial destruction at low power conditions. For safe and efficient in vivo disinfection, the sample temperature should be kept low. Thus, plasma power and treatment time should not exceed 150 mW and 60 s, respectively.

  2. Synergy by secretory phospholipase A2 and glutamate on inducing cell death and sustained arachidonic acid metabolic changes in primary cortical neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; DeCoster, M A; de Turco, E B

    1996-01-01

    Secretory and cytosolic phospholipases A2 (sPLA2 and cPLA2) may contribute to the release of arachidonic acid and other bioactive lipids, which are modulators of synaptic function. In primary cortical neuron cultures, neurotoxic cell death and [3H]arachidonate metabolism was studied after adding ...

  3. Evolution of cortical neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Mannan, Omar; Cheung, Amanda F P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2008-03-18

    The neurons of the mammalian neocortex are organised into six layers. By contrast, the reptilian and avian dorsal cortices only have three layers which are thought to be equivalent to layers I, V and VI of mammals. Increased repertoire of mammalian higher cognitive functions is likely a result of an expanded cortical surface area. The majority of cortical cell proliferation in mammals occurs in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ), with a small number of scattered divisions outside the germinal zone. Comparative developmental studies suggest that the appearance of SVZ coincides with the laminar expansion of the cortex to six layers, as well as the tangential expansion of the cortical sheet seen within mammals. In spite of great variation and further compartmentalisation in the mitotic compartments, the number of neurons in an arbitrary cortical column appears to be remarkably constant within mammals. The current challenge is to understand how the emergence and elaboration of the SVZ has contributed to increased cortical cell diversity, tangential expansion and gyrus formation of the mammalian neocortex. This review discusses neurogenic processes that are believed to underlie these major changes in cortical dimensions in vertebrates.

  4. DMPD: Toll receptors, CD14, and macrophage activation and deactivation by LPS. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12106783 Toll receptors, CD14, and macrophage activation and deactivation by LPS. D...ceptors, CD14, and macrophage activation and deactivation by LPS. PubmedID 12106783 Title Toll receptors, CD14, and macrophage activa...tion and deactivation by LPS. Authors Dobrovolskaia MA,

  5. Cortical Lewy Body Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. G. Gibb

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In cortical Lewy body dementia the distribution of Lewy bodies in the nervous system follows that of Parkinson's disease, except for their greater profusion in the cerebral cortex. The cortical tangles and plaques of Alzheimer pathology are often present, the likely explanation being that Alzheimer pathology provokes dementia in many patients. Pure cortical Lewy body dementia without Alzheimer pathology is uncommon. The age of onset reflects that of Parkinson's disease, and clinical features, though not diagnostic, include aphasias, apraxias, agnosias, paranoid delusions and visual hallucinations. Parkinsonism may present before or after the dementia, and survival duration is approximately half that seen in Parkinson's disease without dementia.

  6. Development of new deactivation method for simulation of fluid catalytic cracking equilibrium catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Chiranjeevi; D T Gokak; V Ravikumar; P S Viswanathan

    2014-03-01

    Selection of a good catalyst is the easiest way to increase profitability of a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit. During operation, these catalysts get deactivated due to operation at high temperatures, steam and deposition of metals on the catalyst. Developing a proper catalyst deactivation method is crucial for optimization of a good catalyst for FCC. Conventional laboratory deactivation procedures include direct metal impregnation method, cyclic deactivation method (CDM) and cyclic propylene steaming (CPS). Direct metal impregnation method gives higher coke and gas yields. CDM and CPS methods implementation is very difficult and time-consuming and there is a deviation in coke and gas yield. New rapid deactivation method has been developed to simulate plant equilibrium catalyst (E-Cat) by modifying metal impregnation, steaming and oxidation/reduction procedures. The E-Cat generated through a new deactivation method was characterized for physico-chemical properties using X ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and SEM-EDX and activity studies. XRD studies show that metals are dispersed well on catalyst samples. SEMEDX studies reveal that the morphology of simulated E-Cat and plant E-Cat catalyst particles appear to be same. E-Cat obtained by new deactivationmethod gives better coke and gas yields. Two E-Cats were also generated through CDM and direct metal impregnation method for comparing with the one generated through new method. New deactivation method also significantly reduces the evaluation time.

  7. Deactivation and Regeneration of Commercial Type Fischer-Tropsch Co-Catalysts—A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling Rytter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deactivation of commercially relevant cobalt catalysts for Low Temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT synthesis is discussed with a focus on the two main long-term deactivation mechanisms proposed: Carbon deposits covering the catalytic surface and re-oxidation of the cobalt metal. There is a great variety in commercial, demonstration or pilot LTFT operations in terms of reactor systems employed, catalyst formulations and process conditions. Lack of sufficient data makes it difficult to correlate the deactivation mechanism with the actual process and catalyst design. It is well known that long term catalyst deactivation is sensitive to the conditions the actual catalyst experiences in the reactor. Therefore, great care should be taken during start-up, shutdown and upsets to monitor and control process variables such as reactant concentrations, pressure and temperature which greatly affect deactivation mechanism and rate. Nevertheless, evidence so far shows that carbon deposition is the main long-term deactivation mechanism for most LTFT operations. It is intriguing that some reports indicate a low deactivation rate for multi-channel micro-reactors. In situ rejuvenation and regeneration of Co catalysts are economically necessary for extending their life to several years. The review covers information from open sources, but with a particular focus on patent literature.

  8. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Study of Lateral Spreading of Cortical Activity in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex Induced by a Current Impulse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Dávid Fehérvári

    Full Text Available In the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1, lateral spreading of excitatory potentials is believed to be involved in spatial integrative functions, but the underlying cortical mechanism is not well understood. Visually-evoked population-level responses have been shown to propagate beyond the V1 initial activation site in mouse, similar to higher mammals. Visually-evoked responses are, however, affected by neuronal circuits prior to V1 (retina, LGN, making the separate analysis of V1 difficult. Intracortical stimulation eliminates these initial processing steps. We used in vivo RH1691 voltage-sensitive dye (VSD imaging and intracortical microstimulation in adult C57BL/6 mice to elucidate the spatiotemporal properties of population-level signal spreading in V1 cortical circuits. The evoked response was qualitatively similar to that measured in single-cell electrophysiological experiments in rodents: a fast transient fluorescence peak followed by a fast and a slow decrease or hyperpolarization, similar to EPSP and fast and slow IPSPs in single cells. The early cortical response expanded at speeds commensurate with long horizontal projections (at 5% of the peak maximum, 0.08-0.15 m/s however, the bulk of the VSD signal propagated slowly (at half-peak maximum, 0.05-0.08 m/s suggesting an important role of regenerative multisynaptic transmission through short horizontal connections in V1 spatial integrative functions. We also found a tendency for a widespread and fast cortical response suppression in V1, which was eliminated by GABAA-antagonists gabazine and bicuculline methiodide. Our results help understand the neuronal circuitry involved in lateral spreading in V1.

  9. Cortical actin networks induce spatio-temporal confinement of phospholipids in the plasma membrane - a minimally invasive investigation by STED-FCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Débora M.; Clausen, Mathias P.; Keller, Jan; Mueller, Veronika; Wu, Congying; Bear, James E.; Hell, Stefan W.; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Eggeling, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Important discoveries in the last decades have changed our view of the plasma membrane organisation. Specifically, the cortical cytoskeleton has emerged as a key modulator of the lateral diffusion of membrane proteins. Cytoskeleton-dependent compartmentalised lipid diffusion has been proposed, but this concept remains controversial because this phenomenon has thus far only been observed with artefact-prone probes in combination with a single technique: single particle tracking. In this paper, we report the first direct observation of compartmentalised phospholipid diffusion in the plasma membrane of living cells using a minimally invasive, fluorescent dye labelled lipid analogue. These observations were made using optical STED nanoscopy in combination with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (STED-FCS), a technique which allows the study of membrane dynamics on a sub-millisecond time-scale and with a spatial resolution of down to 40 nm. Specifically, we find that compartmentalised phospholipid diffusion depends on the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and that this constrained diffusion is directly dependent on the F-actin branching nucleator Arp2/3. These findings provide solid evidence that the Arp2/3-dependent cortical actin cytoskeleton plays a pivotal role in the dynamic organisation of the plasma membrane, potentially regulating fundamental cellular processes.

  10. Field Dependent Dopant Deactivation in Bipolar Devices at Elevated irradiation Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WITCZAK,STEVEN C.; LACOE,RONALD C.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.; MAYER,DONALD C.; SCHWANK,JAMES R.; WINOKUR,PETER S.

    2000-08-15

    Metal-oxide-silicon capacitors fabricated in a bi-polar process were examined for densities of oxide trapped charge, interface traps and deactivated substrate acceptors following high-dose-rate irradiation at 100 C. Acceptor neutralization near the Si surface occurs most efficiently for small irradiation biases in depletion. The bias dependence is consistent with compensation and passivation mechanisms involving the drift of H{sup +} ions in the oxide and Si layers and the availability of holes in the Si depletion region. Capacitor data from unbiased irradiations were used to simulate the impact of acceptor neutralization on the current gain of an npn bipolar transistor. Neutralized acceptors near the base surface enhance current gain degradation associated with radiation-induced oxide trapped charge and interface traps by increasing base recombination. The additional recombination results from the convergence of carrier concentrations in the base and increased sensitivity of the base to oxide trapped charge. The enhanced gain degradation is moderated by increased electron injection from the emitter. These results suggest that acceptor neutralization may enhance radiation-induced degradation of linear circuits at elevated temperatures.

  11. Focal cortical dysplasia - review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults.Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed - from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized.Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe.Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes.New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life.Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias.THE MOST COMMON FINDINGS ON MRI IMAGING INCLUDE: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also in both types

  12. Thalamic Bursts Down-regulate Cortical Theta and Nociceptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Brian W; Cross, Brent; Smith, Kelsey A; Roach, Catherine; Xia, Jimmy; Chao, Yu-Chieh; Levitt, Joshua; Koyama, Suguru; Moore, Christopher I; Saab, Carl Y

    2017-05-30

    We tested the relation between pain behavior, theta (4-8 Hz) oscillations in somatosensory cortex and burst firing in thalamic neurons in vivo. Optically-induced thalamic bursts attenuated cortical theta and mechanical allodynia. It is proposed that thalamic bursts are an adaptive response to pain that de-synchronizes cortical theta and decreases sensory salience.

  13. Postpartum cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Shakeel Ahmed

    2008-09-01

    A 30-years-old third gravida with previous normal pregnancies and an unremarkable prenatal course had an emergency lower segment caesarean section at a periphery hospital for failure of labour to progress. She developed bilateral cortical blindness immediately after recovery from anesthesia due to cerebral angiopathy shown by CT and MR scan as cortical infarct cerebral angiopathy, which is a rare complication of a normal pregnancy.

  14. Patients' perspective on deactivation of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator near the end of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Chaitsing, Rismy; Szili-Torok, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    (67%) completed the survey. Most patients (68%) were aware that it is possible to turn the ICD off, and 95% believed it is important to inform patients about the possibility. Of the patients completing the survey, 84% indicated a choice for or against deactivation. Psychological morbidity...... was not associated with a response in favor or against deactivation (p >0.05 for all). The wish for a worthy death near the end of life was an independent associate of a favorable attitude toward deactivation (odds ratio 2.14, 95% confidence interval 1.49 to 3.06, p...

  15. Helium POT System for Maintaining Sample Temperature after Cryocooler Deactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haid, B. J.

    2006-04-01

    A system for maintaining a sample at a constant temperature below 10 K after deactivating the cooling source is demonstrated. In this system, the cooling source is a 4 K GM cryocooler that is joined with the sample through an extension that consists of a helium pot and a thermal resistance. Upon stopping the cryocooler, the power applied to a heater located on the sample side of the thermal resistance is decreased gradually to maintain an appropriate temperature rise across the thermal resistance as the helium pot warms. The sample temperature is held constant in this manner without the use of solid or liquid cryogens and without mechanically disconnecting the sample from the cooler. Shutting off the cryocooler significantly reduces sample motion that results from vibration and expansion/contraction of the cold-head housing. The reduction in motion permits certain procedures that are very sensitive to sample position stability, but are performed with limited duration. A proof-of-concept system was built and operated with the helium pot pressurized to the cryocooler's charge pressure. A sample with 200 mW of continuous heat dissipation was maintained at 7 K while the cryocooler operated intermittently with a duty cycle of 9.5 minutes off and 20 minutes on.

  16. A study of paint sludge deactivation by pyrolysis reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniz L.A.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of large quantities of paint sludge is a serious environmental problem. This work evaluates the use of pyrolysis reaction as a process for deactivating paint sludge that generates a combustible gas phase, a solvent liquid phase and an inert solid phase. These wastes were classified into three types: water-based solvent (latex resin and solvents based on their resins (alkyd and polyurethane. An electrically heated stainless steel batch reactor with a capacity of 579 mL and a maximum pressure of 30 atm was used. Following the reactor, a flash separator, which was operated at atmospheric pressure, partially condensed and separated liquid and gas products. Pressure and temperature were monitored on-line by a control and data acquisition system, which adjusted the heating power supplied to the pyrolysis reactor. Reactions followed an experimental design with two factors (reaction time and temperature and three levels (10, 50 and 90 minutes; 450, 550 and 650degreesC. The response variables were liquid and solid masses and net heat of combustion. The optimal operational range for the pyrolysis process was obtained for each response variable. A significant reduction in total mass of solid waste was obtained.

  17. Collective Resistance in Microbial Communities by Intracellular Antibiotic Deactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, Robin A.; Lin, Leo; van Doorn, G. Sander; Sorg, Moritz; Olson, Joshua; Nizet, Victor; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    The structure and composition of bacterial communities can compromise antibiotic efficacy. For example, the secretion of β-lactamase by individual bacteria provides passive resistance for all residents within a polymicrobial environment. Here, we uncover that collective resistance can also develop via intracellular antibiotic deactivation. Real-time luminescence measurements and single-cell analysis demonstrate that the opportunistic human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae grows in medium supplemented with chloramphenicol (Cm) when resistant bacteria expressing Cm acetyltransferase (CAT) are present. We show that CAT processes Cm intracellularly but not extracellularly. In a mouse pneumonia model, more susceptible pneumococci survive Cm treatment when coinfected with a CAT-expressing strain. Mathematical modeling predicts that stable coexistence is only possible when antibiotic resistance comes at a fitness cost. Strikingly, CAT-expressing pneumococci in mouse lungs were outcompeted by susceptible cells even during Cm treatment. Our results highlight the importance of the microbial context during infectious disease as a potential complicating factor to antibiotic therapy. PMID:28027306

  18. Soluble inhibitors/deactivators of cellulase enzymes from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngmi; Ximenes, Eduardo; Mosier, Nathan S; Ladisch, Michael R

    2011-04-01

    Liquid hot water, steam explosion, and dilute acid pretreatments of lignocellulose generate soluble inhibitors which hamper enzymatic hydrolysis as well as fermentation of sugars to ethanol. Toxic and inhibitory compounds will vary with pretreatment and include soluble sugars, furan derivatives (hydroxymethyl fulfural, furfural), organic acids (acetic, formic and, levulinic acid), and phenolic compounds. Their effect is seen when an increase in the concentration of pretreated biomass in a hydrolysis slurry results in decreased cellulose conversion, even though the ratio of enzyme to cellulose is kept constant. We used lignin-free cellulose, Solka Floc, combined with mixtures of soluble components released during pretreatment of wood, to prove that the decrease in the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis is due to a combination of enzyme inhibition and deactivation. The causative agents were extracted from wood pretreatment liquid using PEG surfactant, activated charcoal or ethyl acetate and then desorbed, recovered, and added back to a mixture of enzyme and cellulose. At enzyme loadings of either 1 or 25mg protein/g glucan, the most inhibitory components, later identified as phenolics, decreased the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis by half due to both inhibition and precipitation of the enzymes. Full enzyme activity occurred when the phenols were removed. Hence detoxification of pretreated woods through phenol removal is expected to reduce enzyme loadings, and therefore reduce enzyme costs, for a given level of cellulose conversion.

  19. Integrated Project Management Planning for the Deactivation of the Savannah River Site F-Canyon Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, T.G.

    2000-12-01

    This paper explains the planning process that is being utilized by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company to take the F-Canyon Complex facilities from operations to a deactivated condition awaiting final decommissioning.

  20. Selective deactivation of M13 bacteriophage in E. Coli using femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molukanele, P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Potential for the selective deactivation of viruses while leaving the sensitive material such as the host cell unharmed was studied using a femtosecond laser system, and preliminary results are reported....

  1. Studies on Catalyst Deactivation Rate and Byproducts Yield during Conversion of Methanol to Olefins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Dengchao; Munib Shahda; Weng Huixin

    2006-01-01

    The conversion of methanol to olefins (MTO) over the SAPO-34 catalyst in fixed-bed microreactor was studied. The effect of reaction temperatures for methanol conversion to olefins and byproducts was investigated. A temperature of 425 ℃ appeared to be the optimum one suitable for conversion of methanol to olefins. Since the presence of water could increase the olefins selectivity, the methanol conversion reactions with mixed water/methanol feed were also studied. The effect of weight hourly space velocity on conversion of methanol was also studied. The results indicated that the olefins selectivity was significantly increased as WHSV increased till approximately 7.69 h-1 then it began to level off. Different factors affecting the catalyst deactivation rate was studied, showing that the catalyst deactivation time was dependent on reaction conditions, and temperatures higher and lower than the optimal one made the catalyst deactivation faster.Adding water to methanol could slow down the catalyst deactivation rate.

  2. Pd migration. 1: A possible reason for the deactivation of pyrolysis gasoline partial hydrogenation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, T.B.; Chou, T.C. (National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    The catalyst deactivation of the selective hydrogenation of pyrolysis gasoline of a commercial plant was investigated. Both the fresh and the regenerated catalysts, sampled from the commercial plant, were characterized by the palladium wt %, BET surface area, pore volume, the dispersion of Pd/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], XRD (X-ray diffraction), and EPMA (electron probe microanalyzer). The results indicated that the major factors affecting the catalyst deactivation of the selective hydrogenation of pyrolysis gasoline of a commercial plant are palladium migration and coke deposition, 53.2%, poor palladium dispersion, 37%, and palladium metal loss, 9.8%. However, the pore mouth plugging, loss of surface area, and phase change of support were the minor factors for catalytic deactivation. The first findings of the effect of palladium migration on the catalyst deactivation of the eggshell palladium profile catalyst are meaningful and important for improving the performance of the catalyst with nonuniform active site distribution.

  3. Cortical grey matter demyelination can be induced by elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines in the subarachnoid space of MOG-immunized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Christopher; Magliozzi, Roberta; Durrenberger, Pascal F; Howell, Owain W; Rundle, Jon; Reynolds, Richard

    2013-12-01

    A substantial proportion of cases with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis have extensive inflammation in the leptomeninges that is associated with increased subpial demyelination, neuronal loss and an exacerbated disease course. However, the mechanisms underlying this extensive subpial pathology are poorly understood. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory cytokine production within the meninges may be a key to this process. Post-mortem cerebrospinal fluid and dissected cerebral leptomeningeal tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis were used to study the presence of tumour necrosis factor and interferon gamma protein and messenger RNA levels. A novel model of subpial cortical grey matter demyelination was set up in Dark Agouti rats and analysed using quantitative immunohistochemistry. Increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor and interferon gamma was found in the meninges of cases with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis exhibiting tertiary lymphoid-like structures. Injection of tumour necrosis factor and interferon gamma into the subarachnoid space of female Dark Agouti rats pre-immunized with a subclinical dose of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein mimicked the pathology seen in multiple sclerosis, including infiltration of lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD79+ B cells) into the meninges and extensive subpial demyelination. Extensive microglial/macrophage activation was present in a gradient from the pial surface to deeper cortical layers. Demyelination did not occur in control animals immunized with incomplete Freund's adjuvant and injected with cytokines. These results support the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory molecules produced in the meninges play a major role in cortical demyelination in multiple sclerosis, but also emphasize the involvement of an anti-myelin immune response.

  4. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition prevents myocardial infarction-induced increase in renal cortical cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, François; Charloux, Anne; Piquard, François; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Talha, Samy; Zoll, Joffrey; Lugnier, Claire; Geny, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether myocardial infarction (MI) enhances renal phosphodiesterases (PDE) activities, investigating particularly the relative contribution of PDE1-5 isozymes in total PDE activity involved in both cGMP and cAMP pathways, and whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEi) decreases such renal PDE hyperactivities. We also investigated whether ACEi might thereby improve atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) efficiency. We studied renal cortical PDE1-5 isozyme activities in sham (SH)-operated, MI rats and in MI rats treated with perindopril (ACEi) 1 month after coronary artery ligation. Circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), its second intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cGMP/ANP ratio were also determined. Cortical cGMP-PDE2 (80.3 vs. 65.1 pmol/min/mg) and cGMP-PDE1 (50.7 vs. 30.1 pmol/min/mg), and cAMP-PDE2 (161 vs. 104.1 pmol/min/mg) and cAMP-PDE4 (307.5 vs. 197.2 pmol/min/mg) activities were higher in MI than in SH rats. Despite increased ANP plasma level, ANP efficiency tended to be decreased in MI compared to SH rats. Perindopril restored PDE activities and tended to improve ANP efficiency in MI rats. One month after coronary ligation, perindopril treatment of MI rats prevents the increase in renal cortical PDE activities. This may contribute to increase renal ANP efficiency in MI rats.

  5. Memantine, a Low-Affinity NMDA Receptor Antagonist, Protects against Methylmercury-Induced Cytotoxicity of Rat Primary Cultured Cortical Neurons, Involvement of Ca(2+) Dyshomeostasis Antagonism, and Indirect Antioxidation Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhaofa; Yang, Tianyao; Xu, Bin; Deng, Yu; Feng, Shu

    2017-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an extremely dangerous environmental pollutant that induces severe toxic effects in the central nervous system. Neuronal damage plays critical roles mediating MeHg-induced loss of brain function and neurotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms of MeHg neurotoxicity are incompletely understood. The objective of the study is to explore mechanisms that contribute to MeHg-induced neurocyte injuries focusing on neuronal Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis and alteration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) expression, as well as oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of memantine against MeHg cytotoxicity were also investigated. The cortical neurons were exposed to 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, or 2 μM methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) for 0.5-12 h, or pre-treated with 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 μM memantine for 0.5-6 h, respectively; cell viability and LDH release were then quantified. For further experiments, 2.5, 5, and 10 μM of memantine pre-treatment for 3 h followed by 1 μM MeHgCl for 6 h were performed for evaluation of neuronal injuries, specifically addressing apoptosis; intracellular free Ca(2+) concentrations; ATPase activities; calpain activities; expressions of NMDAR subunits (NR1, NR2A, NR2B); NPSH levels; and ROS formation. Exposure of MeHgCl resulted in toxicity of cortical neurons, which were shown as a loss of cell viability, high levels of LDH release, morphological changes, and cell apoptosis. Moreover, intracellular Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis, ATPase activities inhibition, calpain activities, and NMDARs expression alteration were observed with 1 μM MeHgCl administration. Last but not least, NPSH depletion and reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction showed an obvious oxidative stress in neurons. However, memantine pre-treatment dose-dependently antagonized MeHg-induced neuronal toxic effects, apoptosis, Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis, NMDARs expression alteration, and oxidative stress. In conclusion

  6. Dopamine transporters in striatum correlate with deactivation in the default mode network during visuospatial attention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dardo Tomasi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dopamine and dopamine transporters (DAT, which regulate extracellular dopamine in the brain are implicated in the modulation of attention but their specific roles are not well understood. Here we hypothesized that dopamine modulates attention by facilitation of brain deactivation in the default mode network (DMN. Thus, higher striatal DAT levels, which would result in an enhanced clearance of dopamine and hence weaker dopamine signals, would be associated to lower deactivation in the DMN during an attention task. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For this purpose we assessed the relationship between DAT in striatum (measured with positron emission tomography and [(11C]cocaine used as DAT radiotracer and brain activation and deactivation during a parametric visual attention task (measured with blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy controls. We show that DAT availability in caudate and putamen had a negative correlation with deactivation in ventral parietal regions of the DMN (precuneus, BA 7 and a positive correlation with deactivation in a small region in the ventral anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24/32. With increasing attentional load, DAT in caudate showed a negative correlation with load-related deactivation increases in precuneus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings provide evidence that dopamine transporters modulate neural activity in the DMN and anterior cingulate gyrus during visuospatial attention. Our findings suggest that dopamine modulates attention in part by regulating neuronal activity in posterior parietal cortex including precuneus (region involved in alertness and cingulate gyrus (region deactivated in proportion to emotional interference. These findings suggest that the beneficial effects of stimulant medications (increase dopamine by blocking DAT in inattention reflect in part their ability to facilitate the deactivation of the DMN.

  7. Dopamine Transporters in Striatum Correlated with Deactivation in the Default Mode Network during Visuospatial Attention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasi, D.; Fowler, J.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.L.; Telang, F.; Wang, Chang, L.; Ernst, T.; /Fowler, J.S.

    2009-06-01

    Dopamine and dopamine transporters (DAT, which regulate extracellular dopamine in the brain) are implicated in the modulation of attention but their specific roles are not well understood. Here we hypothesized that dopamine modulates attention by facilitation of brain deactivation in the default mode network (DMN). Thus, higher striatal DAT levels, which would result in an enhanced clearance of dopamine and hence weaker dopamine signals, would be associated to lower deactivation in the DMN during an attention task. For this purpose we assessed the relationship between DAT in striatum (measured with positron emission tomography and [{sup 11}C]cocaine used as DAT radiotracer) and brain activation and deactivation during a parametric visual attention task (measured with blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging) in healthy controls. We show that DAT availability in caudate and putamen had a negative correlation with deactivation in ventral parietal regions of the DMN (precuneus, BA 7) and a positive correlation with deactivation in a small region in the ventral anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24/32). With increasing attentional load, DAT in caudate showed a negative correlation with load-related deactivation increases in precuneus. These findings provide evidence that dopamine transporters modulate neural activity in the DMN and anterior cingulate gyrus during visuospatial attention. Our findings suggest that dopamine modulates attention in part by regulating neuronal activity in posterior parietal cortex including precuneus (region involved in alertness) and cingulate gyrus (region deactivated in proportion to emotional interference). These findings suggest that the beneficial effects of stimulant medications (increase dopamine by blocking DAT) in inattention reflect in part their ability to facilitate the deactivation of the DMN.

  8. Patient perceptions of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane MacIver

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a class I recommendation for implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions to occur between physicians and heart failure patients. Few studies have reported the patient’s perspective on the timing of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions. Aim: To determine patient awareness, preferences and timing of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation discussions. Design: Grounded theory was used to collect and analyze interview data from 25 heart failure patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Setting and participants: Patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, from the Heart Function Clinic at University Health Network (Toronto, Canada. Results: The sample (n = 25 was predominately male (76% with an average age of 62 years. Patients identified three stages where they felt implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation should be discussed: (1 prior to implantation, (2 with any significant deterioration but while they were of sound mind to engage in and communicate their preferences and (3 at end of life, where patients wished further review of their previously established preferences and decisions about implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation. Most patients (n = 17, 68% said they would consider deactivation, six (24% were undecided and two (8% were adamant they would never turn it off. Conclusion: The patient preferences identified in this study support the need to include information on implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation at implant, with change in clinical status and within broader discussions about end-of-life treatment preferences. Using this process to help patients determine and communicate their implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation preferences may reduce the number of patients experiencing distressing implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks at end of life.

  9. Regulation of GIRK channel deactivation by Galpha(q) and Galpha(i/o) pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M D; Ruppersberg, J P; Herlitze, S

    2000-09-01

    G protein regulated inward rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) are activated by G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) via the G protein betagamma subunits. However, little is known about the effects of different GPCRs on the deactivation kinetics of transmitter-mediated GIRK currents. In the present study we investigated the influence of different GPCRs in the presence and absence of RGS proteins on the deactivation kinetics of GIRK channels by coexpressing the recombinant protein subunits in Xenopus oocytes. The stimulation of both G(i/o)- and G(q)-coupled pathways accelerated GIRK deactivation. GIRK currents deactivated faster upon stimulation of G(i/o)- and G(q)-coupled pathways by P(2)Y(2) receptors (P(2)Y(2)Rs) than upon activation of the G(i/o)-coupled pathway alone via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (M(2) mAChRs). This acceleration was found to be dependent on phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) activities and intracellular calcium. With the assumption that RGS2 has a higher affinity for Galpha(q) than Galpha(i/o), we demonstrated that the deactivation kinetics of GIRK channels can be differentially regulated by the relative amount of RGS proteins. These data indicate that transmitter-mediated deactivation of GIRK currents is modulated by crosstalk between G(i/o)- and G(q)-coupled pathways.

  10. Sunlight technologies for photochemical deactivation of organic pollutants in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acher, A.; Fischer, E.; Tornheim, R. [The Volcani Center, Inst. of Soils and Water, Bet Dagan (Israel); Manor, Y. [Sheba Medical Center, Central Virology Lab., Ramat Gan (Israel)

    1997-12-31

    Sensitized-photochemical oxidation methods aimed at use in water treatment technologies for deactivation of biotic (microorganisms) and/or of xenobiotic (pesticides) pollutants in water were developed using global solar radiation or concentrated sunlight (up to 250 suns). The solar global radiation was used either for detoxification of industrial waste water from a pesticide factory to allow their discharge into the urban sewer, or for disinfection of domestric effluents to be used in crop irrigation. The disinfection process was eventually carried out in an experimental pilot-scale plant, capable of disinfection up to 50 m{sup 3}/h of effluent supplied by an activated sludge sewage treatment plant located in Tel-Aviv area. The treated effluents did not show any regrowth of the microorganisms during 7 days. The solar concentrated radiation experiments performed using facilities of the Sun Tower of The Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovot. The concentrated sunlight was provided by different combination of several computer controlled heliostates, up to 8, that track the sun and focus the received sunlight onto the target situated on the roof of the sun-tower. The sunlight intensities measured on the target reached up to 200 kW/m{sup 2}. The experiments were performed either batch- or continuous-wise. The water-samples exposed to disinfection were the above effluent, filtered and supplemented with vaccine strain poliovirus or with different concentrations of an industrial potential pollutant (bromacil), MB 2 mg/L and two concentrations of dissolved oxygen (8.0 or 40.0 mg O{sub 2}/L). An exposure time of 2-3 seconds at 150 kW/m{sup 2} was decreased the microorganisms alive (counts) by five orders of magnitude. A comparison between the two above water treatment technologies is presented. (orig./SR)

  11. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also

  12. Impaired secondary oxidant deactivation capacity and enhanced oxidative stress in serum from alveld affected lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegge, Anne Bee; Mysterud, Ivar; Karlsen, Jan; Skulberg, Olav M; Laane, Carl M M; Schumacher, Trond; Tønnesen, Hanne Hjorth

    2013-09-05

    Alveld is a hepatogenous photosensitivity disorder in lambs. The aim of the study was to investigate if alveld affected lambs had a reduced capacity to handle oxidative stress induced from either endogenous and/or exogenous photosensitizers. Serum samples from alveld lambs (n=33) were compared to serum samples from control lambs (n=31) and exposed to a controlled amount of singlet oxygen ((1)O2). The sera from alveld lambs were found to have an impaired ability to deactivate reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to control sera. A higher degree of initial hemolysis and a higher concentration of the exogenous photosensitizer phytoporphyrin (PP) were detected in alveld sera compared to the controls. The action spectrum for the formation of (1)O2 indicated that PP as well as the endogenous compound protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) may act as in vivo photosensitizers. A relatively high level of iron was detected in pooled serum from alveld lambs that showed a high degree of hemolysis. It was concluded that alveld photosensitivity is likely to be initiated by a photodynamic reaction involving PP and possibly also PP IX followed by a light-independent reaction involving hemoglobin-related products and catalysis by the Fenton reaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sulindac attenuates valproic acid-induced oxidative stress levels in primary cultured cortical neurons and ameliorates repetitive/stereotypic-like movement disorders in Wistar rats prenatally exposed to valproic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinghua; Yang, Cailing; Yuan, Guoyan; Wang, Zhongping; Cui, Weigang; Li, Ruixi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that anti-inflammatory agents and antioxidants have neuroprotective properties and may be beneficial in the treatment of neurodevelopental disorders, such as autism. In the present study, the possible neuroprotective properties of sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), were investigated in vitro using cultured cortical neurons with valproic acid (VPA)-induced neurotoxicity, as well as in vivo through the behavioral analysis of rats prenatally exposed to VPA as a model of autism. VPA induced 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and decreased cell viability in primary cultured cortical neurons established from timed-pregnant (embryonic day 18) Wistar rat pups. However, co-incubation of the neurons with VPA and sulindac reduced oxidative stress and increased cell viability. The rats were administered an intraperitoneal injection with one of the following: VPA, sulindac, VPA and sulindac, or physiological saline, and their offspring were subjected to the open field test. During the test trials, repetitive/stereotypic-like movements for each rat were recorded and analyzed. The results revealed that treatment with both sulindac and VPA reduced the VPA-induced repetitive/stereotypic-like activity and the sulindac and VPA-treated animals responded better in the open field test compared to the VPA-treated animals. The results from the present study demonstrate that the antioxidant properties of sulindac may prove to be beneficial in the treatment of autism, suggesting that the upregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway disrupts oxidative homeostasis and facilitates susceptibility to autism.

  14. Effects of repetitive loading on the growth-induced changes in bone mass and cortical bone geometry: a 12-month study in pre/peri- and postmenarcheal tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducher, Gaele; Bass, Shona L; Saxon, Leanne; Daly, Robin M

    2011-06-01

    Pre- and early puberty may be the most opportune time to strengthen the female skeleton, but there are few longitudinal data to support this claim. Competitive female premenarcheal (pre/peri, n = 13) and postmenarcheal (post, n = 32) tennis players aged 10 to 17 years were followed over 12 months. The osteogenic response to loading was studied by comparing the playing and nonplaying humeri for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) bone mineral content (BMC) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) total bone area (ToA), medullary area (MedA), cortical area (CoA), and muscle area (MCSA) at the humerus. Over 12 months, growth-induced gains (nonplaying arm) in BMC, ToA, and CoA were greater in pre/peri (10% to 19%, p < .001) than in post (3% to 5%, p < .05 to .001) players. At baseline, BMC, ToA, CoA, and MCSA were 8% to 18% greater in the playing versus nonplaying arms in pre/peri and post players (all p < .001); MedA was smaller in the playing versus nonplaying arms in post only players (p < .05). When comparing the annual gains in the playing arm relative to changes in the nonplaying arm, the increases in ToA and CoA were greater in pre/peri than post players (all p < .05). The smaller the side-to-side differences in BMC and CoA at baseline, the larger the exercise benefits at 12 months (r = -0.39 to -0.48, p < .01). The exercise-induced change in MCSA was predictive of the exercise benefits in BMC in pre/peri players only (p < .05). In conclusion, both pre/peri- and postmenarcheal tennis players showed significant exercise-induced skeletal benefits within a year, with greater benefits in cortical bone geometry in pre/perimenarcheal girls.

  15. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Thom, M; Ellison, DW; Wilkins, P; Barnes, D; Thompson, PD; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. Background: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  16. Cortical Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Grey-matter abnormalities at the cortical surface and regional brain size were mapped by high-resolution MRI and surface-based, computational image analytical techniques in a group of 27 children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and 46 controls, matched by age and sex, at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  17. Spread of activation and deactivation in the brain: Does age matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Andrew Gordon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional aging fMRI results are sometimes difficult to interpret, as standard measures of activation and deactivation may confound variations in signal amplitude and spread, which however may be differentially affected by age-related changes in various anatomical and physiological factors. To disentangle these two types of measures, here we propose a novel method to obtain independent estimates of the peak amplitude and spread of the BOLD signal in areas activated (task-positive and deactivated (task-negative by a Sternberg task, in 14 younger and 28 older adults. The peak measures indicated that, compared to younger adults, older adults had increased activation of the task-positive network, but similar levels of deactivation in the task-negative network. Measures of signal spread revealed that older adults had an increased spread of activation in task-positive areas, but a starkly reduced spread of deactivation in task-negative areas. These effects were consistent across regions within each network. Further, there was greater variability in the anatomical localization of peak points in older adults, leading to reduced cross-subject overlap. These results reveal factors that may confound the interpretation of studies of aging. Additionally, spread measures may be linked to local connectivity phenomena and could be particularly useful to analyze age-related deactivation patterns, complementing the results obtained with standard peak and ROI analyses.

  18. Viscous heating effect on deactivation of helminth eggs in ventilated improved pit sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, D; Foutch, G L; Smay, J; Archer, C; Buckley, C A

    2015-01-01

    Viscous heating by extrusion of faecal material obtained from ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrines can be used to deactivate soil-transmitted helminth (STH) eggs by increasing the temperature of faecal sludge uniformly. Viscous heating can deactivate STH eggs present in sludge to make the material safer to transport, dispose of, or use in agricultural applications or as an energy source. The mechanical energy required to generate the shear rate can originate from any source. No other heat source or additive is required. Here we determined a baseline for the deactivation of STH eggs using viscous heating. To characterize equipment performance, three parameters were investigated: (1) minimum temperature required for deactivation; (2) local maximum temperatures for various flow rates and moisture contents (MCs); and (3) thermal efficiency. Excess water is undesirable since low viscosities require extended residence time and increased energy input. The minimum temperature to achieve greater than 90% helminth egg deactivation is 70 °C. For the laboratory-scale equipment tested, the maximum allowable mass flow rate for VIP sludge with 77% MC was found to be 3.6 g/s.

  19. The enemy within: propagation of aberrant corticostriatal learning to cortical function in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff A Beeler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Motor dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease is believed to arise primarily from pathophysiology in the dorsal striatum and its related corticostriatal and thalamostriatal circuits during progressive dopamine denervation. One function of these circuits is to provide a filter that selectively facilitates or inhibits cortical activity to optimize cortical processing, making motor responses rapid and efficient. Corticostriatal synaptic plasticity mediates the learning that underlies this performance-optimizing filter. Under dopamine denervation, corticostriatal plasticity is altered, resulting in aberrant learning that induces inappropriate basal ganglia filtering that impedes rather than optimizes cortical processing. Human imaging suggests that increased cortical activity may compensate for striatal dysfunction in PD patients. In this Perspective article, we consider how aberrant learning at corticostriatal synapses may impair cortical processing and learning and undermine potential cortical compensatory mechanisms. Blocking or remediating aberrant corticostriatal plasticity may protect cortical function and support cortical compensatory mechanisms mitigating the functional decline associated with progressive dopamine denervation.

  20. Topiramate reduces blood-brain barrier disruption and inhibits seizure activity in hyperthermia-induced seizures in rats with cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürses, Candan; Orhan, Nurcan; Ahishali, Bulent; Yilmaz, Canan Ugur; Kemikler, Gonul; Elmas, Imdat; Cevik, Aydin; Kucuk, Mutlu; Arican, Nadir; Kaya, Mehmet

    2013-02-04

    We investigated the effects of topiramate (TPM), a novel broad spectrum anticonvulsant, on seizure severity, survival rate and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity during hyperthermic seizures in rats with cortical dysplasia (CD). Offsprings of irradiated mothers were used in this study. To show the functional and morphological alterations in BBB integrity, quantitative analysis of Evans blue (EB) extravasation, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopic assessment of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) permeability were performed. Rats with CD exposed to hyperthermia exhibited seizures with mean Racine's scores of 3.92 ± 1.2. Among the rats with CD pretreated with TPM, 21 of 24 rats showed no sign of seizure activity upon exposure to hyperthermia (pseizures increased BBB permeability to EB in animals with CD, but TPM pretreatment decreased the penetration of the tracer into the brain in these animals (pseizures, and TPM pretreatment prevented the development of HRP reaction products in these animals. The results of this study suggest that TPM inhibits seizure activity and maintains BBB integrity in the course of febrile seizures in the setting of CD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease.

  2. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Ramalho Romero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma.

  3. Decoupling HZSM-5 catalyst activity from deactivation during upgrading of pyrolysis oil vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shaolong; Waters, Christopher; Stevens, Adam; Gumidyala, Abhishek; Jentoft, Rolf; Lobban, Lance; Resasco, Daniel; Mallinson, Richard; Crossley, Steven

    2015-02-01

    The independent evaluation of catalyst activity and stability during the catalytic pyrolysis of biomass is challenging because of the nature of the reaction system and rapid catalyst deactivation that force the use of excess catalyst. In this contribution we use a modified pyroprobe system in which pulses of pyrolysis vapors are converted over a series of HZSM-5 catalysts in a separate fixed-bed reactor controlled independently. Both the reactor-bed temperature and the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite are varied to evaluate catalyst activity and deactivation rates independently both on a constant surface area and constant acid site basis. Results show that there is an optimum catalyst-bed temperature for the production of aromatics, above which the production of light gases increases and that of aromatics decrease. Zeolites with lower Si/Al ratios give comparable initial rates for aromatics production, but far more rapid catalyst deactivation rates than those with higher Si/Al ratios.

  4. Modeling Deactivation of Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx by KCl Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Kjærgaard; Castellino, Francesco; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2017-01-01

    with the catalyst at the surface of the monolith wall, the transport and accumulation of potassium, bound to Brønsted acid sites, throughout the catalyst wall, and the resulting loss in SCR activity. Using an experimentally measured KCl aerosol size distribution as input, the model can replicate the observed...... if the particle size of the incoming aerosol is increased. The model provides, for the first time, a mechanistic framework for understanding and modeling SCR catalyst deactivation by KCl that may be applicable also for deactivation by other salts and at different operating conditions.......A detailed model for the deactivation of a V2O5–WO3/TiO2-based SCR monolith catalyst by potassium poisoning has been developed and validated. The model accounts for deposition of KCl aerosol particles present in the flue gas on the external catalyst surface, the reaction of the deposited particles...

  5. Application, Deactivation, and Regeneration of Heterogeneous Catalysts in Bio-Oil Upgrading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyun Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The massive consumption of fossil fuels and associated environmental issues are leading to an increased interest in alternative resources such as biofuels. The renewable biofuels can be upgraded from bio-oils that are derived from biomass pyrolysis. Catalytic cracking and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO are two of the most promising bio-oil upgrading processes for biofuel production. Heterogeneous catalysts are essential for upgrading bio-oil into hydrocarbon biofuel. Although advances have been achieved, the deactivation and regeneration of catalysts still remains a challenge. This review focuses on the current progress and challenges of heterogeneous catalyst application, deactivation, and regeneration. The technologies of catalysts deactivation, reduction, and regeneration for improving catalyst activity and stability are discussed. Some suggestions for future research including catalyst mechanism, catalyst development, process integration, and biomass modification for the production of hydrocarbon biofuels are provided.

  6. [Posterior cortical atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyga, Volker Moræus; Western, Elin; Solheim, Hanne; Hassel, Bjørnar; Kerty, Emilia

    2015-06-02

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a neurodegenerative condition with atrophy of posterior parts of the cerebral cortex, including the visual cortex and parts of the parietal and temporal cortices. It presents early, in the 50s or 60s, with nonspecific visual disturbances that are often misinterpreted as ophthalmological, which can delay the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to present current knowledge about symptoms, diagnostics and treatment of this condition. The review is based on a selection of relevant articles in PubMed and on the authors' own experience with the patient group. Posterior cortical atrophy causes gradually increasing impairment in reading, distance judgement, and the ability to perceive complex images. Examination of higher visual functions, neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging contribute to diagnosis. In the early stages, patients do not have problems with memory or insight, but cognitive impairment and dementia can develop. It is unclear whether the condition is a variant of Alzheimer's disease, or whether it is a separate disease entity. There is no established treatment, but practical measures such as the aid of social care workers, telephones with large keypads, computers with voice recognition software and audiobooks can be useful. Currently available treatment has very limited effect on the disease itself. Nevertheless it is important to identify and diagnose the condition in its early stages in order to be able to offer patients practical assistance in their daily lives.

  7. Relearning to See in Cortical Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Michael D; Tadin, Duje; Huxlin, Krystel R

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of cortically induced blindness is increasing as our population ages. The major cause of cortically induced blindness is stroke affecting the primary visual cortex. While the impact of this form of vision loss is devastating to quality of life, the development of principled, effective rehabilitation strategies for this condition lags far behind those used to treat motor stroke victims. Here we summarize recent developments in the still emerging field of visual restitution therapy, and compare the relative effectiveness of different approaches. We also draw insights into the properties of recovered vision, its limitations and likely neural substrates. We hope that these insights will guide future research and bring us closer to the goal of providing much-needed rehabilitation solutions for this patient population.

  8. Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S&M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S&M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the IFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of IFDP facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 1999. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $36M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S&M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year.

  9. Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S and M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S and M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the EFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of EFDP Facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 2000. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $51M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S and M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year.

  10. Up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-target genes in cortical neurons by the novel multifunctional iron chelator anti-Alzheimer drug, M30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramovich-Tirosh, Y; Bar-Am, O; Amit, T; Youdim, M B H; Weinreb, O

    2010-06-01

    Based on a multimodal drug design paradigm, we have synthesized a multifunctional non-toxic, brain permeable iron chelator, M30, possessing the neuroprotective propargylamine moiety of the anti-Parkinsonian drug, rasagiline (Azilect) and antioxidant-iron chelator moiety of an 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative of our iron chelator, VK28. M30 was recently found to confer potential neuroprotective effects in vitro and in various preclinical neurodegenerative models and regulate the levels and processing of the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein and its toxic amyloidogenic derivative, Abeta. Here, we show that M30 activates the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha signaling pathway, thus promoting HIF-1alpha mRNA and protein expression levels, as well as increasing transcription of HIF-1alpha-dependent genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor, erythropoietin, enolase-1, p21 and tyrosine hydroxylase in rat primary cortical cells. In addition, M30 also increased the expression levels of the transcripts of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Regarding aspects of relevance to Alzheimer's disease (AD), western blotting analysis of glycogen synthase kinase- 3beta (GSK-3beta) signaling pathway revealed that M30 enhanced the levels of phospho-AKT (Ser473) and phospho- GSK-3beta (Ser9) and attenuated Tau phosphorylation. M30 was also shown to protect cultured cortical neurons against Abeta(25-35) toxicity. All these multimodal pharmacological activities of M30 might be beneficial for its potent efficacy in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson's disease and AD in which oxidative stress and iron-mediated toxicity are involved.

  11. Intramolecular deactivation processes in complexes of salicylic acid or glycolic acid with Eu(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuke, S; Marmodée, B; Eidner, S; Schilde, U; Kumke, M U

    2010-04-01

    The complexation of Eu(III) by 2-hydroxy benzoic acid (2HB) or glycolic acid (GL) was investigated using steady-state and time-resolved laser spectroscopy. Experiments were carried out in H(2)O as well as in D(2)O in the temperature range of 80Kluminescence spectra and luminescence decay times were evaluated with respect to the temperature dependence of (i) the luminescence decay time tau, (ii) the energy of the D5(0)-->F7(0) transition, (iii) the width of the D5(0)-->F7(0) transition, and (iv) the asymmetry ratio calculated from the luminescence intensities of the D5(0)-->F7(2) and D5(0)-->F7(1) transition, respectively. The differences in ligand-related luminescence quenching are discussed. Based on the temperature dependence of the luminescence decay times an activation energy for the ligand-specific non-radiative deactivation in Eu(III)-2HB or Eu(III)-GL complexes was determined. It is stressed that ligand-specific quenching processes (other than OH quenching induced by water molecules) need to be determined and considered in detail, in order to extract speciation-relevant information from luminescence data (e.g., estimation of the number of water molecules n(H(2)0) in the first coordination sphere of Eu(III)). In case of 2HB, conclusions drawn from the evaluation of the Eu(III) luminescence are compared with results of a X-ray structure analysis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Catalytic Activity and Deactivation of SO2 Oxidation Catalysts in Simulated Power Plant Flue Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masters, Stephen G.; Chrissanthopoulos, Asthanassios; Eriksen, Kim Michael

    1997-01-01

    The catalyst deactivation and the simultaneious formation of compounds in commercial SO2 oxidation catalysts have been studied by combined activity measurements and in situ EPR spectroscopy in the temperature range 350-480 C in wet and dry simulated power plant flue gas.......The catalyst deactivation and the simultaneious formation of compounds in commercial SO2 oxidation catalysts have been studied by combined activity measurements and in situ EPR spectroscopy in the temperature range 350-480 C in wet and dry simulated power plant flue gas....

  13. Cortical control of vertical and horizontal saccades in progressive supranuclear palsy: An exploratory fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, J; Pereira, D; Almendra, L; Rebelo, D; Patrício, M; Castelhano, J; Cunha, G; Januário, C; Cunha, L; Freire, A; Castelo-Branco, M

    2017-02-15

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disorder showing predominant brainstem involvement, characterized by marked slowing of rapid eye movements (saccades), particularly along the vertical plane. While the contribution of the brainstem damage for the saccadic disturbance in PSP has been extensively studied, much less is known about its cortical and subcortical pathomechanisms. We measured reflexive (prosaccades) and voluntary (antisaccades) saccades in the vertical and horizontal plane in PSP patients (n=8) and controls (n=10) in an eye tracking study, followed by the measurement of blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) activation (PSP, n=6; controls, n=10) during similar saccade paradigms. Behaviorally, PSP patients evidenced slower and lower amplitude prosaccades (horizontal and vertical) and lower amplitude antisaccades (vertical) than controls. Functionally, patients showed decreased frontostriatal BOLD activation during prosaccades (horizontal and vertical) and antisaccades (vertical), relative to controls. Additionally, PSP patients showed less default mode network (DMN) deactivation than controls for all types of saccades. Within groups, controls showed no BOLD differences between horizontal and vertical prosaccades while PSP patients demonstrated greater DMN deactivation during vertical prosaccades. Both groups evidenced greater DMN deactivation during vertical antisaccades when compared to their horizontal counterpart and patients further showed relative frontostriatal BOLD hypoactivity during vertical antisaccades. We found fMRI evidence of frontostriatal hypoactivity in PSP patients relative to controls, especially during vertical saccades. These new findings highlight the impact of cortical impairment in saccadic disturbance of PSP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Malformations of cortical development and neocortical focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Kilb, Werner; Clusmann, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Developmental neocortical malformations resulting from abnormal neurogenesis, disturbances in programmed cell death, or neuronal migration disorders may cause a long-term hyperexcitability. Early generated Cajal-Retzius and subplate neurons play important roles in transient cortical circuits, and structural/functional disorders in early cortical development may induce persistent network disturbances and epileptic disorders. In particular, depolarizing GABAergic responses are important for the regulation of neurodevelopmental events, like neurogenesis or migration, while pathophysiological alterations in chloride homeostasis may cause epileptic activity. Although modern imaging techniques may provide an estimate of the structural lesion, the site and extent of the cortical malformation may not correlate with the epileptogenic zone. The neocortical focus may be surrounded by widespread molecular, structural, and functional disturbances, which are difficult to recognize with imaging technologies. However, modern imaging and electrophysiological techniques enable focused hypotheses of the neocortical epileptogenic zone, thus allowing more specific epilepsy surgery. Focal cortical malformation can be successfully removed with minimal rim, close to or even within eloquent cortex with a promising risk-benefit ratio.

  15. Amitriptyline induces brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression through ERK-dependent modulation of multiple BDNF mRNA variants in primary cultured rat cortical astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Kajitani, Naoto; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shigetou, Takahiro; Kasai, Miho; Matsumoto, Chie; Yokoe, Toshiki; Azuma, Honami; Takebayashi, Minoru; Morioka, Norimitsu; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-03-01

    A significant role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been previously implicated in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. To ascertain the contribution of specific cell types in the brain that produce BDNF following antidepressant treatment, the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline on rat primary neuronal, astrocytic and microglial cortical cultures were examined. Amitriptyline increased the expression of BDNF mRNA in astrocytic and microglial cultures but not neuronal cultures. Antidepressants with distinct mechanisms of action, such as clomipramine, duloxetine and fluvoxamine, also increased BDNF mRNA expression in astrocytic and microglial cultures. There are multiple BDNF mRNA variants (exon I, IIA, IV and VI) expressed in astrocytes and microglia and the variant induced by antidepressants has yet to be elaborated. Treatment with antidepressants increased the expression of exon I, IV and VI in astrocyte and microglia. Clomipramine alone significantly upregulated expression of exon IIA. The amitriptyline-induced expression of both total and individual BDNF mRNA variants (exon I, IV and VI) were blocked by MEK inhibitor U0126, indicating MEK/ERK signaling is required in the expression of BDNF. These findings indicate that non-neural cells are a significant target of antidepressants and further support the contention that glial production of BDNF is crucial role in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. The current data suggest that targeting of glial function could lead to the development of antidepressants with a truly novel mechanism of action.

  16. The action of pulse-modulated GSM radiation increases regional changes in brain activity and c-Fos expression in cortical and subcortical areas in a rat model of picrotoxin-induced seizure proneness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martín, E; Bregains, J; Relova-Quinteiro, J L; Cadarso-Suárez, C; Jorge-Barreiro, F J; Ares-Pena, F J

    2009-05-01

    The action of the pulse-modulated GSM radiofrequency of mobile phones has been suggested as a physical phenomenon that might have biological effects on the mammalian central nervous system. In the present study, GSM-exposed picrotoxin-pretreated rats showed differences in clinical and EEG signs, and in c-Fos expression in the brain, with respect to picrotoxin-treated rats exposed to an equivalent dose of unmodulated radiation. Neither radiation treatment caused tissue heating, so thermal effects can be ruled out. The most marked effects of GSM radiation on c-Fos expression in picrotoxin-treated rats were observed in limbic structures, olfactory cortex areas and subcortical areas, the dentate gyrus, and the central lateral nucleus of the thalamic intralaminar nucleus group. Nonpicrotoxin-treated animals exposed to unmodulated radiation showed the highest levels of neuronal c-Fos expression in cortical areas. These results suggest a specific effect of the pulse modulation of GSM radiation on brain activity of a picrotoxin-induced seizure-proneness rat model and indicate that this mobile-phone-type radiation might induce regional changes in previous preexcitability conditions of neuronal activation.

  17. Locus coeruleus stimulation recruits a broad cortical neuronal network and increases cortical perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussay, Xavier; Basu, Kaustuv; Lacoste, Baptiste; Hamel, Edith

    2013-02-20

    The locus coeruleus (LC), the main source of brain noradrenalin (NA), modulates cortical activity, cerebral blood flow (CBF), glucose metabolism, and blood-brain barrier permeability. However, the role of the LC-NA system in the regulation of cortical CBF has remained elusive. This rat study shows that similar proportions (∼20%) of cortical pyramidal cells and GABA interneurons are contacted by LC-NA afferents on their cell soma or proximal dendrites. LC stimulation induced ipsilateral activation (c-Fos upregulation) of pyramidal cells and of a larger proportion (>36%) of interneurons that colocalize parvalbumin, somatostatin, or nitric oxide synthase compared with pyramidal cells expressing cyclooxygenase-2 (22%, p interneurons (16%, p BK, -52%, p < 0.05), and inward-rectifier (Kir, -40%, p < 0.05) K+ channels primarily impaired the hyperemic response. The data demonstrate that LC stimulation recruits a broad network of cortical excitatory and inhibitory neurons resulting in increased cortical activity and that K+ fluxes and EET signaling mediate a large part of the hemodynamic response.

  18. Defects in RGS9 or its anchor protein R9AP in patients with slow photoreceptor deactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishiguchi, KM; Sandberg, MA; Kooijman, AC; Martemyanov, KA; Pott, JWR; Hagstrom, SA; Arshavsky, VY; Berson, EL; Dryja, TP

    2004-01-01

    The RGS proteins are GTPase activating proteins that accelerate the deactivation of G proteins in a variety of signalling pathways in eukaryotes(1-6). RGS9 deactivates the G proteins (transducins) in the rod and cone phototransduction cascades(7,8). It is anchored to photoreceptor membranes by the t

  19. L-ascorbate attenuates the endotoxin-induced production of inflammatory mediators by inhibiting MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation in cortical neurons/glia Cocultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ni Huang

    Full Text Available In response to acute insults to the central nervous system, such as pathogen invasion or neuronal injuries, glial cells become activated and secrete inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines. This neuroinflammation plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Endogenous ascorbate levels are significantly decreased among patients with septic encephalopathy. Using the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS to induce neuroinflammation in primary neuron/glia cocultures, we investigated how L-ascorbate (vitamin C; Vit. C affected neuroinflammation. LPS (100 ng/ml induced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS and the production of NO, interleukin (IL-6, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2/CXCL2 in a time-dependent manner; however, cotreatment with Vit. C (5 or 10 mM attenuated the LPS-induced iNOS expression and production of NO, IL-6, and MIP-2 production. The morphological features revealed after immunocytochemical staining confirmed that Vit. C suppressed LPS-induced astrocytic and microglial activation. Because Vit. C can be transported into neurons and glia via the sodium-dependent Vit. C transporter-2, we examined how Vit. C affected LPS-activated intracellular signaling in neuron/glia cocultures. The results indicated the increased activation (caused by phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, such as p38 at 30 min and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs at 180 min after LPS treatment. The inhibition of p38 and ERK MAPK suppressed the LPS-induced production of inflammatory mediators. Vit. C also inhibited the LPS-induced activation of p38 and ERK. Combined treatments of Vit. C and the inhibitors of p38 and ERK yielded no additional inhibition compared with using the inhibitors alone, suggesting that Vit. C functions through the same signaling pathway (i.e., MAPK as these inhibitors. Vit. C also reduced LPS-induced

  20. Active linear mass absorber technology for the reduction of noise and vibration at a cylinder deactivation vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rottner, T.; Eckel, H.G. [Vibracoustic GmbH und Co. KG (Germany); Kim, J.H. [Hyundai Motor Company (Korea); Klatt, C. [Freudenberg New Technologies, Weinheim (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Cylinder deactivation is a suitable strategy for reducing the fuel consumption of a vehicle. In this particular case, a V6 engine runs under partial load conditions in a restricted engine speed range as an inline three cylinder engine by deactivating an entire bank. As a side effect, noise and vibrations in the deactivated condition deteriorate significantly. For comfort reasons, however, a similar noise and vibration level for both - full and deactivated engine running condition - is desired. To achieve this, active technology is used. In the cylinder deactivation mode, two active linear mass aborbers installed at the engine mounts cancel out the main disturbing engine excitation orders of the engine mount forces. As a result, the noise and vibration in the passenger compartment is significantly reduced. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons and Rat Primary CorticalNeurons as In Vitro Models of Neurite Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput assays that can quantify chemical-induced changes at the cellular and molecular level have been recommended for use in chemical safety assessment. High-throughput, high content imaging assays for the key cellular events of neurodevelopment have been proposed to ra...

  2. Comparison of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons and Rat Primary CorticalNeurons as In Vitro Models of Neurite Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput assays that can quantify chemical-induced changes at the cellular and molecular level have been recommended for use in chemical safety assessment. High-throughput, high content imaging assays for the key cellular events of neurodevelopment have been proposed to ra...

  3. Determination of a Jet Fuel Metal Deactivator by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY Paul C. Hayes, Jr. Fuels Branch...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block number) High Performance Liquid Chromatography absorbance...SYMBOL HPLC High Performance Liquid Chromatography P-4 jet propulsion fuel, wide-boiling range, conforming to MIL-T-5624L MDA metal deactivator,

  4. Chemical deactivation of Cu-SSZ-13 ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lezcano-Gonzalez, I.; Deka, U.; van der Bij, H. E.; Paalanen, P.; Arstad, B.; Weckhuysen, B. M.; Beale, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical deactivation of Cu-SSZ-13 Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction (NH3-SCR) catalysts by Pt, Zn, Ca and P has been systematically investigated using a range of analytical techniques in order to study the influence on both the zeolitic framework and the active Cu2+ ions. The results obtain

  5. On the Deactivation of Cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cats, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) process is an attractive way to obtain synthetic liquid fuel from alternative energy sources such as natural gas, coal or biomass. However, the deactivation of the catalyst, consisting of cobalt nanoparticles supported on TiO2, currently hampers the industrial app

  6. Characterization and Regeneration of Pt-Catalysts Deactivated in Municipal Waste Flue Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Kustov, Arkadii; Due-Hansen, Johannes;

    2006-01-01

    that siloxanes were the most severe catalyst poisons, although acidic sulfur compounds also caused deactivation. Furthermore, a method for on-site regeneration without shutdown of the catalytic flue gas cleaning system has been developed, i.e. an addition of H-2/N-2 gas to the off-gas can completely restore...

  7. Step Changes and Deactivation Behavior in the Continuous Decarboxylation of Stearic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Theilgaard; Rozmysłowicz, Bartosz; Simakova, Irina L.

    2011-01-01

    of pure stearic acid. Deactivation took place in H2-deficient gas atmosphere, probably as a result of the formation of unsaturated products and coking in the pore system. Transient experiments with step changes were performed: 1 h was required for the step change to be visible in liquid sampling, whereas...

  8. Step changes and deactivation behaviour in the continuous decarboxylation of stearic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Theilgaard; Rozmyslowicz, B.; Simakova, I.

    2011-01-01

    % conversion of pure stearic acid. Deactivation took place in H-2-deficient gas atmosphere, probably as a result of the formation of unsaturated products and coking in the pore system. Transient experiments with step changes were performed: 1 h was required for the step change to be visible in liquid sampling...

  9. Attention, emotion, and deactivation of default activity in inferior medial prefrontal cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geday, Jacob; Gjedde, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Attention deactivates the inferior medial prefrontal cortex (IMPC), but it is uncertain if emotions can attenuate this deactivation. To test the extent to which common emotions interfere with attention, we measured changes of a blood flow index of brain activity in key areas of the IMPC with posi......Attention deactivates the inferior medial prefrontal cortex (IMPC), but it is uncertain if emotions can attenuate this deactivation. To test the extent to which common emotions interfere with attention, we measured changes of a blood flow index of brain activity in key areas of the IMPC...... with positron emission tomography (PET) of labeled water (H(15)2O) uptake in brain of 14 healthy subjects. The subjects performed either a less demanding or a more demanding task of attention while they watched neutral and emotive images of people in realistic indoor or outdoor situations. In the less demanding...... task, subjects used the index finger to press any key when a new image appeared. In the more demanding task, subjects chose the index or middle finger to press separate keys for outdoor and indoor scenes. Compared to the less demanding task, in a global search of all gray matter, the more demanding...

  10. Deactivation of vanadia-based commercial SCR catalysts by polyphosphoric acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellino, Francesco; Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Jensen, Anker Degn;

    2008-01-01

    Commercial vanadia-based SCR monoliths have been exposed to flue gases in a pilot-scale Setup into which phosphoric acid has been added and the deactivation has been followed during the exposure time. Separate measurements by SMPS showed that the phosphoric acid formed polyphosphoric acid aerosol...

  11. Coronary artery disease affects cortical circuitry associated with brain-heart integration during volitional exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Katelyn N; Badrov, Mark B; Barron, Carly C; Suskin, Neville; Heinecke, Armin; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2015-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that coronary artery disease (CAD) alters the cortical circuitry associated with exercise. Observations of changes in heart rate (HR) and in cortical blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) images were made in 23 control subjects [control; 8 women; 63 ± 11 yr; mean arterial pressure (MAP): 90 ± 9 mmHg] (mean ± SD) and 17 similarly aged CAD patients (4 women; 59 ± 9 yr; MAP: 87 ± 10 mmHg). Four repeated bouts each of 30%, 40%, and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force (LAB session), and seven repeated bouts of isometric handgrip (IHG) at 40% MVC force (fMRI session), were performed, with each contraction lasting 20 s and separated by 40 s of rest. There was a main effect of group (P = 0.03) on HR responses across all IHG intensities. Compared with control, CAD demonstrated less task-dependent deactivation in the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, and reduced activation in the right anterior insula, bilateral precentral cortex, and occipital lobe (P < 0.05). When correlated with HR, CAD demonstrated reduced activation in the bilateral insula and posterior cingulate cortex, and reduced deactivation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and bilateral precentral cortex (P < 0.05). The increased variability in expected autonomic regions and decrease in total cortical activation in response to the IHG task are associated with a diminished HR response to volitional effort in CAD. Therefore, relative to similarly aged and healthy individuals, CAD impairs the heart rate response and modifies the cortical patterns associated with cardiovascular control during IHG.

  12. Effects of polar cortical cytoskeleton and unbalanced cortical surface tension on intercellular bridge thinning during cytokinesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Mei-Wen An; Xiao-Na Li; Fang Yang; Yang Liu

    2011-01-01

    To probe the contributions of polar cortical cytoskeleton and the surface tension of daughter cells to intercellular bridgethinning dynamics during cytokinesis,we applied cytochalasin D (CD) or colchicine (COLC) in a highly localized manner to polar regions of dividing normal rat kidney (NRK) cells.We observed cellular morphological changes and analyzed the intercellular bridge thinning trajectories of dividing cells with different polar cortical characteristics.Global blebbistatin (BS) application was used to obtain cells losing active contractile force groups.Our results show that locally released CD or colchicine at the polar region caused inhibition of cytokinesis before ingression.Similar treatment at phases after ingression allowed completion of cytokinesis but dramatically influenced the trajectories of intercellular bridge thinning.Disturbing single polar cortical actin induced transformation of the intercellular bridge thinning process,and polar cortical tension controlled deformation time of intercellular bridges.Our study provides a feasible framework to induce and analyze the effects of local changes in mechanical properties of cellular components on single cellular cytokinesis.

  13. Working memory encoding and maintenance deficits in schizophrenia: neural evidence for activation and deactivation abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevic, Alan; Repovs, Grega; Barch, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence implicates working memory (WM) as a core deficit in schizophrenia (SCZ), purportedly due to primary deficits in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex functioning. Recent findings suggest that SCZ is also associated with abnormalities in suppression of certain regions during cognitive engagement--namely the default mode system--that may further contribute to WM pathology. However, no study has systematically examined activation and suppression abnormalities across both encoding and maintenance phases of WM in SCZ. Twenty-eight patients and 24 demographically matched healthy subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while performing a delayed match-to-sample WM task. Groups were accuracy matched to rule out performance effects. Encoding load was identical across subjects to facilitate comparisons across WM phases. We examined activation differences using an assumed model approach at the whole-brain level and within meta-analytically defined WM areas. Despite matched performance, we found regions showing less recruitment during encoding and maintenance for SCZ subjects. Furthermore, we identified 2 areas closely matching the default system, which SCZ subjects failed to deactivate across WM phases. Lastly, activation in prefrontal regions predicted the degree of deactivation for healthy but not SCZ subjects. Current results replicate and extend prefrontal recruitment abnormalities across WM phases in SCZ. Results also indicate deactivation abnormalities across WM phases, possibly due to inefficient prefrontal recruitment. Such regional deactivation may be critical for suppressing sources of interference during WM trace formation. Thus, deactivation deficits may constitute an additional source of impairments, which needs to be further characterized for a complete understanding of WM pathology in SCZ.

  14. Sources of deactivation during glycerol conversion on Ni/γ-Al 2 O 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimentão, R. J.; Miranda, B. C.; Szanyi, J.; Sepulveda, C.; Santos, J. B. O.; Correa, J. V. S.; Llorca, J.; Medina, F.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogenolysis of glycerol was studied using a diluted aqueous solution of glycerol in gas phase and atmospheric pressure on Ni/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. The catalytic transformation of glycerol generates products derived from dehydration, dehydrogenation, hydrogenolysis and condensation reactions. Deep hydrogenolysis route to produce CH4 prevails in the first few hours of reaction. As the reaction time progress, dehydration-dehydrogenation products start to appear. Here, a description of the deactivation sources and its effects on the catalytic performance of Ni catalyst was proposed. The catalyst was characterized before and after the catalytic reaction by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and by employing Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of adsorbed CO. A source of deactivation was due to carbonaceous deposition. FTIR at low CO dosing pressure reveal bands assignments species essentially due to linear and bridge carbonyls, whereas high pressure CO dosing produces a complex spectra due to polycarbonyls. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis was employed to reveal the initial degree of reduction of the fresh catalyst. The oxidation of metallic Ni in the course of reaction may also be considered as a source of deactivation. Ni oxide species promote dehydration routes. Alumina support facilitates nickel species to be more active toward interacting with glycerol. Dehydration, which takes place on the acid sites, is the mainly route related to the generation of carbon deposition and to the observed catalyst deactivation. Another source of deactivation was due to carbiding of Ni to form Ni3C. The regeneration of used Ni catalyst was achieved by oxidation-reduction steps at 723 K.

  15. HIV-1-infected and immune-activated macrophages induce astrocytic differentiation of human cortical neural progenitor cells via the STAT3 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Peng

    Full Text Available Diminished adult neurogenesis is considered a potential mechanism in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD. In HAD, HIV-1-infected and immune-activated brain mononuclear phagocytes (MP; perivascular macrophages and microglia drive central nervous system (CNS inflammation and may alter normal neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated HIV-1-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS activated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM inhibit human neural progenitor cell (NPC neurogenesis, while enhancing astrogliogenesis through the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, in vitro and in vivo. Here we further test the hypothesis that HIV-1-infected/activated MDM promote NPC astrogliogenesis via activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, a critical factor for astrogliogenesis. Our results show that LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS-MCM and HIV-infected/LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS+HIV-MCM induced Janus kinase 1 (Jak1 and STAT3 activation. Induction of the Jak-STAT3 activation correlated with increased glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP expression, demonstrating an induction of astrogliogenesis. Moreover, STAT3-targeting siRNA (siSTAT3 decreased MCM-induced STAT3 activation and NPC astrogliogenesis. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines (including IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α produced by LPS-activated and/or HIV-1-infected MDM may contribute to MCM-induced STAT3 activation and astrocytic differentiation. These observations were confirmed in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice with HIV-1 encephalitis (HIVE. In HIVE mice, siRNA control (without target sequence, sicon pre-transfected NPCs injected with HIV-1-infected MDM showed more astrocytic differentiation and less neuronal differentiation of NPCs as compared to NPC injection alone. siSTAT3 abrogated HIV-1-infected MDM-induced astrogliogenesis of injected NPCs. Collectively, these

  16. Control and amplification of cortical neurodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljenstroem, Hans; Aronsson, P.

    1999-03-01

    We investigate different mechanisms for the control and amplification of cortical neurodynamics, using a neural network model of a three layered cortical structure. We show that different dynamical states can be obtained by changing a control parameter of the input-output relation, or by changing the noise level. Point attractor, limit cycle, and strange attractor dynamics occur at different values of the control parameter. For certain, optimal noise levels, system performance is maximized, analogous to stochastic resonance phenomena. Noise can also be used to induce different dynamical states. A few noisy network units distributed in a network layer can result in global synchronous oscillations, or waves of activity moving across the network. We further demonstrate that fast synchronization of network activity can be obtained by implementing electromagnetic interactions between network units.

  17. Hippocampal and cortical expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein in pentylenetetrazol-induced chronic epileptic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Zeng; Zhong Yang; Xiaodong Long; Chao You

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter plays an important role in gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism, and is highly associated with epilepsy seizures.Pathologically, astrocytes release active substances that alter neuronal excitability, and it has been demonstrated that astrocytes play a role in epileptic seizures.OBJECTIVE: To observe changes in gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex of the temporal lobe in rats with pentylenetetrazol-induced chronic epilepsy.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized, controlled, animal experiment was performed at the Department of Neurobiology, Third Military University of Chinese PLA between January 2006 and December 2007.MATERIALS: Pentylenetetrazol was purchased from Sigma, USA; rabbit anti-rat gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were from Chemicon, USA.METHODS; A total of 40 Sprague Dawley rats were divided into model and control groups. Rat models of chronic epilepsy were created by pentylenetetrazol kindling, and were subdivided into 3-, 7-, and 14-day kindling subgroups.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression, as well as the number of positive cells in the hippocampus and cortex of temporal lobe of rats, were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses.RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the number of gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein -positive cells in the hippocampus and cortex of rats with pentylenetetrazol-induced epilepsy significantly increased, gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression increased after 3 days of kindling, reached a peak on day 7, and remained at elevated levels at day 14 (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Astrocytic activation and gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter 1 overexpression may contribute to pentylenetetrazol-induced

  18. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2013-09-04

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG) thalamocortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1), which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID), the plasticity protocol used, medication, and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g., brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism), emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic, and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  19. Do unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients feel pain? Role of laser-evoked potential-induced gamma-band oscillations in detecting cortical pain processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naro, A; Leo, A; Cannavò, A; Buda, A; Bramanti, P; Calabrò, R S

    2016-03-11

    It has been proposed that a neural signature of aware pain perception could be represented by the modulation of gamma-band oscillation (GBO) power induced by nociceptive repetitive laser stimulation (RLS). The aim of our study was to correlate the RLS-induced GBO modulation with the Nociception Coma Scale-Revised (NCS-R) scores (a validated scale assessing possible aware pain perception in patients with chronic disorders of consciousness), in an attempt to differentiate unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) patients from minimally conscious state (MCS) ones (both of them are awake but exhibit no or limited and fluctuant behavioral signs of awareness and mentation, and low and high NCS-R scores, respectively). In addition, we attempted to identify those among UWS patients who probably experienced pain at covert level (i.e. being aware but unable to show pain-related purposeful behaviors, which are those sustained, reproducible, and voluntary behavioral responses to nociceptive stimuli). Notably, the possibility of clearly differentiating UWS from MCS patients has outmost consequences concerning prognosis (worse in UWS) and adequate pain treatment. RLS consisted in 80 trains of three laser stimuli (delivered at 1Hz), at four different energies, able to evoke Aδ-fiber related laser evoked potentials. After each train, we assessed the NCS-R score. EEG was divided into epochs according to the laser trains, and the obtained epochs were classified in four categories according to the NCS-R score magnitude. We quantified the GBO absolute power for each category. RLS protocol induced a strongly correlated increase in GBO power and NCS-R score (the higher the laser stimulation intensity, the higher the NCS-R, independently of stimulus repetition) in all the MCS patients, thus confirming the presence of aware pain processing. Nonetheless, such findings were present even in five UWS individuals. This could suggest the presence of covert pain processing in such subjects

  20. Evaluating mandibular cortical index quantitatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Fusun; Akgunlu, Faruk

    2008-10-01

    The aim was to assess whether Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity analysis can discriminate patients having different mandibular cortical shape. Panoramic radiographs of 52 patients were evaluated for mandibular cortical index. Weighted Kappa between the observations were varying between 0.718-0.805. These radiographs were scanned and converted to binary images. Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity were calculated from the regions where best represents the cortical morphology. It was found that there were statistically significant difference between the Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 1 and Cl 2 (Fractal Dimension P:0.000; Lacunarity P:0.003); and Cl 1 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:0.008; Lacunarity P:0.001); but there was no statistically significant difference between Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 2 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:1.000; Lacunarity P:0.758). FD and L can differentiate Cl 1 mandibular cortical shape from both Cl 2 and Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape but cannot differentiate Cl 2 from Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape on panoramic radiographs.

  1. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per E Roland

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available IIn principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG, and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review.

  2. Evaluation of cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy undergoing constraint-induced movement therapy based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianwei; Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Tian, Fenghua; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Roberts, Heather; Tulchin-Francis, Kirsten; Shierk, Angela; Shagman, Laura; MacFarlane, Duncan; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-04-01

    Sensorimotor cortex plasticity induced by constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in six children (10.2±2.1 years old) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The activation laterality index and time-to-peak/duration during a finger-tapping task and the resting-state functional connectivity were quantified before, immediately after, and 6 months after CIMT. These fNIRS-based metrics were used to help explain changes in clinical scores of manual performance obtained concurrently with imaging time points. Five age-matched healthy children (9.8±1.3 years old) were also imaged to provide comparative activation metrics for normal controls. Interestingly, the activation time-to-peak/duration for all sensorimotor centers displayed significant normalization immediately after CIMT that persisted 6 months later. In contrast to this improved localized activation response, the laterality index and resting-state connectivity metrics that depended on communication between sensorimotor centers improved immediately after CIMT, but relapsed 6 months later. In addition, for the subjects measured in this work, there was either a trade-off between improving unimanual versus bimanual performance when sensorimotor activation patterns normalized after CIMT, or an improvement occurred in both unimanual and bimanual performance but at the cost of very abnormal plastic changes in sensorimotor activity.

  3. Auditory Stimulation Dishabituates Olfactory Responses via Noradrenergic Cortical Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J. Smith

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dishabituation is a return of a habituated response if context or contingency changes. In the mammalian olfactory system, metabotropic glutamate receptor mediated synaptic depression of cortical afferents underlies short-term habituation to odors. It was hypothesized that a known antagonistic interaction between these receptors and norepinephrine ß-receptors provides a mechanism for dishabituation. The results demonstrate that a 108 dB siren induces a two-fold increase in norepinephrine content in the piriform cortex. The same auditory stimulus induces dishabituation of odor-evoked heart rate orienting bradycardia responses in awake rats. Finally, blockade of piriform cortical norepinephrine ß-receptors with bilateral intracortical infusions of propranolol (100 μM disrupts auditory-induced dishabituation of odor-evoked bradycardia responses. These results provide a cortical mechanism for a return of habituated sensory responses following a cross-modal alerting stimulus.

  4. Repetitive speech elicits widespread deactivation in the human cortex: the “Mantra” effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich-Ohana, Aviva; Wilf, Meytal; Kahana, Roni; Arieli, Amos; Malach, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background Mantra (prolonged repetitive verbal utterance) is one of the most universal mental practices in human culture. However, the underlying neuronal mechanisms that may explain its powerful emotional and cognitive impact are unknown. In order to try to isolate the effect of silent repetitive speech, which is used in most commonly practiced Mantra meditative practices, on brain activity, we studied the neuronal correlates of simple repetitive speech in nonmeditators – that is, silent repetitive speech devoid of the wider context and spiritual orientations of commonly practiced meditation practices. Methods We compared, using blood oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a simple task of covertly repeating a single word to resting state activity, in 23 subjects, none of which practiced meditation before. Results We demonstrate that the repetitive speech was sufficient to induce a widespread reduction in BOLD signal compared to resting baseline. The reduction was centered mainly on the default mode network, associated with intrinsic, self-related processes. Importantly, contrary to most cognitive tasks, where cortical-reduced activation in one set of networks is typically complemented by positive BOLD activity of similar magnitude in other cortical networks, the repetitive speech practice resulted in unidirectional negative activity without significant concomitant positive BOLD. A subsequent behavioral study showed a significant reduction in intrinsic thought processes during the repetitive speech condition compared to rest. Conclusions Our results are compatible with a global gating model that can exert a widespread induction of negative BOLD in the absence of a corresponding positive activation. The triggering of a global inhibition by the minimally demanding repetitive speech may account for the long-established psychological calming effect associated with commonly practiced Mantra-related meditative practices. PMID

  5. Modeling cortical circuits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  6. Cortical and spinal assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, I W; Gram, Mikkel; Hansen, T M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standardized objective methods to assess the analgesic effects of opioids, enable identification of underlying mechanisms of drug actions in the central nervous system. Opioids may exert their effect on both cortical and spinal levels. In this study actions of morphine at both levels...... subjects was included in the data analysis. There was no change in the activity in resting EEG (P>0.05) after morphine administration as compared to placebo. During cold pressor stimulation, morphine significantly lowered the relative activity in the delta (1-4Hz) band (P=0.03) and increased the activity...... morphine administration (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Cold pressor EEG and the nociceptive reflex were more sensitive to morphine analgesia than resting EEG and can be used as standardized objective methods to assess opioid effects. However, no correlation between the analgesic effect of morphine on the spinal...

  7. Hiperostosis cortical infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina; Orelvis Pérez Duerto

    2015-01-01

    La enfermedad de Caffey, o hiperostosis cortical infantil, es una rara enfermedad ósea autolimitada, que aparece de preferencia en lactantes con signos inespecíficos sistémicos; el más relevante es la reacción subperióstica e hiperostosis en varios huesos del cuerpo, con predilección en el 75-80 % de los casos por la mandíbula. Su pronóstico es bueno, la mayoría no deja secuelas. El propósito del presente trabajo es describir las características clínicas, presentes en un lactante de cinco mes...

  8. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  9. Sonic Hedgehog Promotes Neurite Outgrowth of Primary Cortical Neurons Through Up-Regulating BDNF Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weiliang; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Xiangjian; He, Junna; Xie, Yanzhao

    2016-04-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a secreted glycoprotein factor, can activate the Shh pathway, which has been implicated in neuronal polarization involving neurite outgrowth. However, little evidence is available about the effect of Shh on neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons and its potential mechanism. Here, we revealed that Shh increased neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons, while the Shh pathway inhibitor (cyclopamine, CPM) partially suppressed Shh-induced neurite outgrowth. Similar results were found for the expressions of Shh and Patched genes in Shh-induced primary cortical neurons. Moreover, Shh increased the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) not only in lysates and in culture medium but also in the longest neurites of primary cortical neurons, which was partially blocked by CPM. In addition, blocking of BDNF action suppressed Shh-mediated neurite elongation in primary cortical neurons. In conclusion, these findings suggest that Shh promotes neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons at least partially through modulating BDNF expression.

  10. Insights into the mechanisms of ifosfamide encephalopathy: drug metabolites have agonistic effects on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptors and induce cellular acidification in mouse cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, J Y; Idle, J R; Vågbø, C B; Magistretti, P J

    2001-12-01

    Therapeutic value of the alkylating agent ifosfamide has been limited by major side effects including encephalopathy. Although the underlying biochemical processes of the neurotoxic side effects are still unclear, they could be attributed to metabolites rather than to ifosfamide itself. In the present study, the effects of selected ifosfamide metabolites on indices of neuronal activity have been investigated, in particular for S-carboxymethylcysteine (SCMC) and thiodiglycolic acid (TDGA). Because of structural similarities of SCMC with glutamate, the Ca(2+)(i) response of single mouse cortical neurons to SCMC and TDGA was investigated. SCMC, but not TDGA, evoked a robust increase in Ca(2+)(i) concentration that could be abolished by the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), but only partly diminished by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist 10,11-dihydro-5-methyl-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK=801). Cyclothiazide (CYZ), used to prevent AMPA/kainate receptor desensitization, potentiated the response to SCMC. Because activation of AMPA/kainate receptors is known to induce proton influx, the intracellular pH (pH(i)) response to SCMC was investigated. SCMC caused a concentration-dependent acidification that was amplified by CYZ. Since H(+)/monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) activity leads to similar cellular acidification, we tested its potential involvement in the pH(i) response. Application of the lactate transport inhibitor quercetin diminished the pH(i) response to SCMC and TDGA by 43 and 51%, respectively, indicating that these compounds may be substrates of MCTs. Taken together, this study indicates that hitherto apparently inert ifosfamide metabolites, in particular SCMC, activate AMPA/kainate receptors and induce cellular acidification. Both processes could provide the biochemical basis of the observed ifosfamide-associated encephalopathy.

  11. Cortical language mapping using electrical cortical stimulation for Mandarin-speaking patients with epilepsy: a report of six case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Yu, Tao; Sun, Wei; Ni, Duanyu; Li, Yongjie

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this study was to summarize the results of language cortex mapping using electrical cortical stimulation with modified language tasks for Mandarin-speaking patients with epilepsy. Electrical currents were delivered through implanted subdural electrodes to six Mandarin-speaking patients before epilepsy surgery. The current intensities inducing any language disturbance during comprehension, repetition, and speech tasks were recorded, and individual cortical mapping was completed to guide subsequent resection, with the distance between mapped language sites and resected zones kept at a minimum of 0.5 cm. Language function was reassessed and followed up after surgery. Language cortices were successfully identified in three patients, but demonstrated great variability in distribution. There seemed to be no difference in the intensity threshold that induced language interference. None of the six patients exhibited language deficits postsurgery. Electrical cortical stimulation with modified language tasks is valid for identification of cortices underlying Mandarin processing. The great variability in language cortex distribution enhances the necessity of individual language cortical mapping in epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Attempts to deactivate tannins in fodder shrubs with physical and chemical treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salem, H. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)]. E-mail: bensalem.hichem@iresa.agrinet.tn; Saghrouni, L. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Ecole Superieure d' Agriculture de Mateur, Mateur (Tunisia); Nefzaoui, A. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)

    2005-08-19

    Chopping, water sprinkling, storage under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, urea, wood ash, activated charcoal and polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG) treatments were evaluated for their efficiency in deactivating tannins in shrub foliage. In a first trial, fresh leaves of Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. (acacia) were stored after chopping or without chopping and spraying or without spraying with water under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The plant material was stored for 1, 7 and 14 days and analysed thereafter for extractable total phenols (TP), extractable total tannins (TT) and extractable condensed tannins (CT) contents. Chopping and water spraying substantially decreased the levels of TP, TT and CT of acacia. The rate of tannin deactivation increased in acacia stored under anaerobic conditions. Acacia stored for 7 days exhibited lower TP, TT and CT contents than that stored for only 1 day. Compared to the 7-day storage period, there was a further non-significant decrease in the level of these phenolic compounds when the storage duration was extended to 14 days. The highest level of rumen degradation of crude protein (CP) in sheep rumen was obtained with chopped, water sprinkled acacia leaves stored under anaerobic conditions. The second trial investigated the effect of increasing levels of urea (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 g/kg) and treatment duration (7, 14, 21 and 28 days) on CP, TP, TT and CT in acacia leaves. The 20 g/kg urea level was sufficient to totally deactivate tannins in acacia even with the shortest storage period, i.e. 7 days. However, urea treatment increased ash-free neutral detergent fibre content and did not improve in sacco acacia degradation. In the third trial air-dried 1 mm ground samples of acacia and kermes oak (Quercus coccifera L.) leaves were added to water (control), acacia wood ash, activated charcoal or PEG solutions (100 g/kg) at 1:10 (w/v) and shaken for 20 min. All these four treatments decreased TP, TT and CT contents and could be classified

  13. Personality functioning and the cortical midline structures--an exploratory FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Doering

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent neuroscience studies explored the neuronal mechanisms underlying our sense of self. Thereby the cortical midline structures and their anterior and posterior regions have been shown to be central. What remains unclear though is how both, self and cortical midline structures, are related to the identity of the self which is of central importance in especially personality disorders. METHODS: Conducting an exploratory study with a dimensional approach, we here compared subjects with high and low level of personality functioning and identity integration as measured in a standardized way in fMRI during both, emotion- and reward-related tasks. RESULTS: Low levels of personality functioning and identity integration were predicted by significantly decreased degrees of deactivation in the anterior and posterior cortical midline structures. CONCLUSIONS: Though exploratory our results show for the first time direct relationship between cortical midline structures and personality functioning in terms of identity integration. This does not only contribute to our understanding of the neuronal mechanism underlying self and identity but carries also major implications for the treatment of patients with personality disorders.

  14. Altered cortical activation from the hand after facial Botulinum Toxin treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Haenzi, Sara; Stefanics, Gabor; Lanaras, Tatjana; Calcagni, Maurizio; Ghosh, Arko

    2014-01-01

    Plastic interactions between face and hand cortical tactile circuits occur after severe injuries that affect the hand such as in amputation or spinal cord injury. However, whether loss of facial movements alters the cortical circuits involved in processing tactile inputs from the hand remains unknown. In this prospective observational study we used electroencephalography (EEG) to measure cortical activity evoked by tactile stimulation of the hands before and after botulinum toxin-A-induced fa...

  15. Physiological maturation and drug responses of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neuronal networks in long-term culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odawara, A; Katoh, H; Matsuda, N; Suzuki, I

    2016-05-18

    The functional network of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons is a potentially powerful in vitro model for evaluating disease mechanisms and drug responses. However, the culture time required for the full functional maturation of individual neurons and networks is uncertain. We investigated the development of spontaneous electrophysiological activity and pharmacological responses for over 1 year in culture using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). The complete maturation of spontaneous firing, evoked responses, and modulation of activity by glutamatergic and GABAergic receptor antagonists/agonists required 20-30 weeks. At this stage, neural networks also demonstrated epileptiform synchronized burst firing (SBF) in response to pro-convulsants and SBF suppression using clinical anti-epilepsy drugs. Our results reveal the feasibility of long-term MEA measurements from hiPSC-derived neuronal networks in vitro for mechanistic analyses and drug screening. However, developmental changes in electrophysiological and pharmacological properties indicate the necessity for the international standardization of culture and evaluation procedures.

  16. Photocatalytic acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation: scope, mechanism, and conquering deactivation with carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Julis, Jennifer; Grabow, Kathleen; Hannebauer, Bernd; Bentrup, Ursula; Adam, Martin; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Alkane dehydrogenation is of special interest for basic science but also offers interesting opportunities for industry. The existing dehydrogenation methodologies make use of heterogeneous catalysts, which suffer from harsh reaction conditions and a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous methodologies rely mostly on unsolicited waste generation from hydrogen acceptors. Conversely, acceptorless photochemical alkane dehydrogenation in the presence of trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl can be regarded as a more benign and atom efficient alternative. However, this methodology suffers from catalyst deactivation over time. Herein, we provide a detailed investigation of the trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl-photocatalyzed alkane dehydrogenation using spectroscopic and theoretical investigations. These studies inspired us to utilize CO2 to prevent catalyst deactivation, which leads eventually to improved catalyst turnover numbers in the dehydrogenation of alkanes that include liquid organic hydrogen carriers.

  17. Origin of low temperature deactivation of Ni5Ga3 nanoparticles as catalyst for methanol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Sharafutdinov, Irek; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    is subsequently increased, suggesting the presence of carbon containing species blocking the active sites of the alloy nanoparticles (Figure 1). Carbon deposition has furthermore been investigated by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) of a deactivated catalyst in a fixed-bed reactor connected to a mass......-Ga alloys as active catalysts for methanol production from syngas mixtures and Ni-Ga nanoparticles supported on highly porous silica have been prepared using an incipient wetness impregnation technique from a solution of nickel and gallium nitrates [2]. Tests conducted in a fixed-bed reactor showed...... as catalyst for methanol production. Synthesis, followed by deactivation and a series of regeneration steps at increasing temperature in pure H2 has been carried out in a fixed-bed reactor connected to a gas chromatography system. In each regeneration step, CH4 is generated and the activity of the catalyst...

  18. The Deactivation of Nickel Hydroxide to Hypophosphite Electrooxidation on a Nickel Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue ZENG; Min MO; Jian Long YI; Xin Jun TANG; Hui Xian WANG

    2004-01-01

    The deactivation of nickel hydroxide to the electrooxidation of hypophosphite on a nickel electrode was studied by means of in situ UV-Vis subtractive reflectance spectroscopy. The experimental results show that when the potential is lower than -1.0 V (SCE), the surface on nickel electrode is free of nickel hydroxide, on which hypophosphite is active. When the potential moves positively to about-0.75V, two absorbency bands around 300 nm and 550 nm, which were ascribed to the formation of α-nickel hydroxide, were observed, nickel is oxidized to α-nickel hydroxide.Severe deactivation of the surface occurs when the nickel surface is covered with nickel hydroxide,which separates the hypophosphite ion from nickel substrate.

  19. Causes of Activation and Deactivation of Modified Nanogold Catalysts during Prolonged Storage and Redox Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Kolobova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic properties of modified Au/TiO2 catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation are affected by deactivation and reactivation after long-term storage and by redox treatments. The effect of these phenomena on the catalysts was studied by HRTEM, BET, SEM, FTIR CO, XPS and H2 TPR methods. The main cause for the deactivation and reactivation of catalytic properties is the variation in the electronic state of the supported gold, mainly, the proportion of singly charged ions Au+. The most active samples are those with the highest proportion of singly charged gold ions, while catalysts with a high content of trivalent gold ions are inactive at low-temperatures. Active states of gold, resistant to changes caused by the reaction process and storage conditions, can be stabilized by modification of the titanium oxide support with transition metals oxides. The catalyst modified with lanthanum oxide shows the highest stability and activity.

  20. Electron microscopy study of the deactivation of nickel based catalysts for bio oil hydrodeoxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Carvalho, Hudson W. P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is proposed as an efficient way to remove oxygen in bio-oil, improving its quality as a more sustainable alternative to conventional fuels in terms of CO2 neutrality and relative short production cycle [1]. Ni and Ni-MoS2 nanoparticles supported on ZrO2 show potential...... as high-pressure (100 bar) catalysts for purification of bio-oil by HDO. However, the catalysts deactivate in presence of sulfur, chlorine and potassium species, which are all naturally occurring in real bio-oil. The deactivation mechanisms of the Ni/ZrO2 have been investigated through scanning...... transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Catalytic testing has been performed using guaiacol in 1-octanol acting as a model compound for bio-oil. Addition of sulphur (0.3 vol% octanethiol) in the feed...

  1. How Can the Deactivation of the Marine Prowler Community Best Serve the Marine Corps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Electronic Counter Measure Officers ( ECMO ) transitioning to new communities. Before the Prowler community deactivation begins it will undergo some...Prowler squadron consists of 180 Marines. Eight are pilots, twenty are Electronic Counter Measure Officers ( ECMO ), twenty seven are Sta:ffNon-Commissioned...three operational squadrons and an FRS. The FRS activation would be used to facilitate the production of any remaining pilots and ECMOs needed to

  2. A study on the deactivation of USY zeolites with different rare earth contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, C.A.; Santos, J.O.J. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Polato, C.M.S.; Valle, Murta; Aguiar, E.F.S. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica; Monteiro, J.L.F. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Nucleo de Catalise

    1998-06-01

    The deactivation of USY zeolites different rare earth contents due to the coke formed n-heptane at 450 deg C was studied. The results show that the presence of rare earth elements decreases the cracking and coking activities, increasing catalytic stability. However, reaction selectivity was not significantly influenced. The greater the rare earth content, the lower the cocking rates and the coke contents. The TPO/DSC profiles suggested that the catalytic effect of the rare earth elements promoted coke oxidation. (author)

  3. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant phaseout/deactivation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, M.W. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The decision to cease all US Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels was made on April 28, 1992. This study provides insight into and a comparison of the management, technical, compliance, and safety strategies for deactivating the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this study is to ensure that lessons-learned and future plans are coordinated between the two facilities.

  4. Anterior medial prefrontal cortex exhibits activation during task preparation but deactivation during task execution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideya Koshino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC exhibits activation during some cognitive tasks, including episodic memory, reasoning, attention, multitasking, task sets, decision making, mentalizing, and processing of self-referenced information. However, the medial part of anterior PFC is part of the default mode network (DMN, which shows deactivation during various goal-directed cognitive tasks compared to a resting baseline. One possible factor for this pattern is that activity in the anterior medial PFC (MPFC is affected by dynamic allocation of attentional resources depending on task demands. We investigated this possibility using an event related fMRI with a face working memory task. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sixteen students participated in a single fMRI session. They were asked to form a task set to remember the faces (Face memory condition or to ignore them (No face memory condition, then they were given 6 seconds of preparation period before the onset of the face stimuli. During this 6-second period, four single digits were presented one at a time at the center of the display, and participants were asked to add them and to remember the final answer. When participants formed a task set to remember faces, the anterior MPFC exhibited activation during a task preparation period but deactivation during a task execution period within a single trial. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the anterior MPFC plays a role in task set formation but is not involved in execution of the face working memory task. Therefore, when attentional resources are allocated to other brain regions during task execution, the anterior MPFC shows deactivation. The results suggest that activation and deactivation in the anterior MPFC are affected by dynamic allocation of processing resources across different phases of processing.

  5. High-intensity erotic visual stimuli de-activate the primary visual cortex in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hieu K; Beers, Caroline; Willemsen, Antoon; Lont, Erna; Laan, Ellen; Dierckx, Rudi; Jansen, Monique; Sand, Michael; Weijmar Schultz, Willibrord; Holstege, Gert

    2012-06-01

    The primary visual cortex, Brodmann's area (BA 17), plays a vital role in basic survival mechanisms in humans. In most neuro-imaging studies in which the volunteers have to watch pictures or movies, the primary visual cortex is similarly activated independent of the content of the pictures or movies. However, in case the volunteers perform demanding non-visual tasks, the primary visual cortex becomes de-activated, although the amount of incoming visual sensory information is the same. Do low- and high-intensity erotic movies, compared to neutral movies, produce similar de-activation of the primary visual cortex? Brain activation/de-activation was studied by Positron Emission Tomography scanning of the brains of 12 healthy heterosexual premenopausal women, aged 18-47, who watched neutral, low- and high-intensity erotic film segments. We measured differences in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the primary visual cortex during watching neutral, low-intensity erotic, and high-intensity erotic film segments. Watching high-intensity erotic, but not low-intensity erotic movies, compared to neutral movies resulted in strong de-activation of the primary (BA 17) and adjoining parts of the secondary visual cortex. The strong de-activation during watching high-intensity erotic film might represent compensation for the increased blood supply in the brain regions involved in sexual arousal, also because high-intensity erotic movies do not require precise scanning of the visual field, because the impact is clear to the observer. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  6. Integrated project management plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant stabilization and deactivation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-05-03

    This document sets forth the plans, organization, and control systems for managing the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project, and includes the top level cost and schedule baselines. The project includes the stabilization of Pu-bearing materials, storage, packaging, and transport of these and other nuclear materials, surveillance and maintenance of facilities and systems relied upon for storage of the materials, and transition of the facilities in the PFP Complex.

  7. [Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator deactivation at the end of life: ethical, clinical and communication issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanò, Massimo; Piga, Maria Antonella; Bertona, Roberta; Negro, Roberto; Ruggeri, Chiara; Zorzoli, Federica; Villani, Rosvaldo

    2017-02-01

    The number of cardioverter-defibrillator implants is increasing worldwide, with the main indication being primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. During the follow-up, patients may die from progression of their underlying heart disease or from nonarrhythmic causes, such as malignancies, dementia and lung disease, without receiving appropriate shocks until the last few days or weeks of their life. These events occur roughly in 30% of patients, mainly in the last 24 hours before death. In this case, inappropriate and even appropriate shock deliveries can no longer prolong life and may simply lead to pain and reduced quality of life. Therefore, it appears important to discuss early with the patients and their relatives about deactivation of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) at the end of life.The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the ethical, clinical and communication issues of ICD deactivation, with a special focus on patients' wishes. It is outlined that patients are not adequately informed about risks and benefits of ICD and the option of ICD deactivation; the doctors are not used to discuss with the patients the topics of end-of-life decisions. Complete information must be part of current informed consent before ICD implantation and should be updated during the follow-up, with special attention to patients with heart failure in relation to their prognosis and advance directives, as suggested by international guidelines.

  8. Atmospheric pressure low-power microwave microplasma source for deactivation of microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Dors, Mirosław; Jasiński, Mariusz; Hrycak, Bartosz; Czylkowski, Dariusz

    2013-02-01

    This work was aimed at experimental investigations of deactivation of different types of microorganisms by using atmospheric pressure low-temperature microwave microplasma source (MmPS). The MmPS was operated at standard microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz. Its main advantages are simple and cheap construction, portability and possibility of penetrating into small cavities. The microplasma deactivation concerned two types of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis) and one fungus (Aspergillus niger). The quality as well as quantity tests were performed. The influence of the microorganism type, oxygen concentration, absorbed microwave power, microplasma treatment time and MmPS distance from the treated sample on the microorganism deactivation efficiency was investigated. All experiments were performed for Ar microplasma and Ar/O2 microplasma with up to 3% of O2. Absorbed microwave power was up to 50 W. The Ar flow rate was up to 10 L/min. The sample treatment time was up to 10 s. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  9. Thermal deactivation kinetics of Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase entrapped in AOT/isooctane reverse micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Min; Kwon, Chang Woo; Choi, Seung Jun; Son, Young-Hwan; Lim, Seokwon; Yoo, Yoonjung; Chang, Pahn-Shick

    2013-10-02

    Thermostability of the lipase (EC 3.1.1.3) was found to be increased by the enzyme-entrapment in 50 mM AOT/isooctane reverse micelles. The half-life (15.75 h) of Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase entrapped in reverse micelles at 70 °C was 9.72- and 11.41-fold longer than those solubilized in a glycerol pool or in 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 8.0), respectively. The enzyme deactivation model considering a two-step series-type was employed, and deactivation constants for the second step (k₂) at all temperatures were drastically decreased after the lipase was entrapped in reverse micelles. In particular, k₂ (0.0354 h⁻¹) at 70 °C in reverse micelles was 12.33- and 13.14-fold lower than in a glycerol pool or in the phosphate buffer, respectively. The deactivation energies (from k₁, k₂) for the lipase entrapped in the reverse micelles, solubilized in a glycerol pool, or in the aqueous buffer were 7.51, 26.35 kcal/mol, 5.93, 21.08 kcal/mol, and 5.53, 17.57 kcal/mol, respectively.

  10. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda ePletzer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret.Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection. During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval.

  11. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Belinda; Kronbichler, Martin; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN) activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret. Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs) and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs) matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection). During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval.

  12. SMFs-supported Pd nanocatalysts in selective acetylene hydrogenation:Pore structure-dependent deactivation mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elaheh; Esmaeili; Ali; Morad; Rashidi; Yadollah; Mortazavi; Abbas; Ali; Khodadadi; Mehdi; Rashidzadeh

    2013-01-01

    In the present study,CNFs,ZnO and Al2O3 were deposited on the SMFs panels to investigate the deactivation mechanism of Pd-based catalysts in selective acetylene hydrogenation reaction.The examined supports were characterized by SEM,NH3-TPD and N2adsorption-desorption isotherms to indicate their intrinsic characteristics.Furthermore,in order to understand the mechanism of deactivation,the resulted green oil was characterized using FTIR and SIM DIS.FTIR results confirmed the presence of more unsaturated constituents and then,more branched hydrocarbons formed upon the reaction over alumina-supported catalyst in comparison with the ones supported on CNFs and ZnO,which in turn,could block the pores mouths.Besides the limited hydrogen transfer,N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms results supported that the lowest pore diameters of Al2O3/SMFs close to the surface led to fast deactivation,compared with the other catalysts,especially at higher temperatures.

  13. Deactivation mechanism and feasible regeneration approaches for the used commercial NH3-SCR catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanke; Meng, Xiaoran; Chen, Jinsheng; Yin, Liqian; Qiu, Tianxue; He, Chi

    2016-01-01

    The deactivation and regeneration of selective catalytic reduction catalysts which have been used for about 37,000 h in a coal power plant are studied. The formation of Al2(SO4)3, surface deposition of K, Mg and Ca are primary reasons for the deactivation of the studied Selective catalytic reduction catalysts. Other factors such as activated V valence alteration also contribute to the deactivation. Reactivation of used catalysts via environment-friendly and finance-feasibly approaches, that is, dilute acid or alkali solution washing, would be of great interest. Three regeneration pathways were studied in the present work, and dilute nitric acid or sodium hydroxide solution could remove most of the contaminants over the catalyst surface and partly recover the catalytic performance. Notably, the acid-alkali combination washing, namely, catalysts treated by dilute sodium hydroxide and nitric acid solutions orderly, was much more effective than single washing approach in recovering the activity, and NO conversion increased from 23.6% to 89.5% at 380°C. The higher removal efficiency of contaminants, the lower dissolution of activated V, and promoting the formation of polymeric vanadate should be the main reason for recovery of the activity.

  14. Housing conditions influence cortical and behavioural reactions of sheep in response to videos showing social interactions of different valence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögeli, Sabine; Wolf, Martin; Wechsler, Beat; Gygax, Lorenz

    2015-05-01

    Mood, as a long-term affective state, is thought to modulate short-term emotional reactions in animals, but the details of this interplay have hardly been investigated experimentally. Apart from a basic interest in this affective system, mood is likely to have an important impact on animal welfare, as bad mood may taint all emotional experience. In the present study about mood - emotion interaction, 29 sheep were kept under predictable, stimulus-rich or unpredictable, stimulus-poor housing conditions, to induce different mood states. In an experiment, the animals were confronted with video sequences of social interactions of conspecifics showing agonistic interactions, ruminating or tolerantly co-feeding as stimuli of different valences. Emotional reactions were assessed by measuring frontal brain activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy and by recording behavioral reactions. Attentiveness of the sheep decreased from videos showing agonistic interactions to ruminating sheep to those displaying co-feeding sheep. Seeing agonistic interactions was also associated with a deactivation of the frontal cortex, specifically in animals living under predictable, stimulus-rich housing conditions. These sheep generally showed less attentiveness and locomotor activity and they had their ears in a forward position less often and in a backward position more often than the sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor conditions. Housing conditions influenced how the sheep behaved, which can either be thought to be mediated by mood or by the animals' previous experience with stimulus-richness in their housing conditions. Frontal cortical activity may not depend on valence only, but also on the perceptual channel through which the stimuli were perceived.

  15. Asymmetric frontal cortical activity and negative affective responses to ostracism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carly K; Gravens, Laura C; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2011-06-01

    Ostracism arouses negative affect. However, little is known about variables that influence the intensity of these negative affective responses. Two studies fill this void by incorporating work on approach- and withdrawal-related emotional states and their associated cortical activations. Study 1 found that following ostracism anger related directly to relative left frontal cortical activation. Study 2 used unilateral hand contractions to manipulate frontal cortical activity prior to an ostracizing event. Right-hand contractions, compared to left-hand contractions, caused greater relative left frontal cortical activation during the hand contractions as well as ostracism. Also, right-hand contractions caused more self-reported anger in response to being ostracized. Within-condition correlations revealed patterns of associations between ostracism-induced frontal asymmetry and emotive responses to ostracism consistent with Study 1. Taken together, these results suggest that asymmetrical frontal cortical activity is related to angry responses to ostracism, with greater relative left frontal cortical activity being associated with increased anger.

  16. [Cortical spreading depolarization: a new pathophysiological mechanism in neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Santos, Edgar

    2014-05-20

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a wave of almost complete depolarization of the neuronal and glial cells that occurs in different neurological diseases such as migraine with aura, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, head trauma and stroke. These depolarization waves are characterized by a change in the negative potential with an amplitude between -10 and -30mV, duration of ∼1min and changes in the ion homeostasis between the intra- and extracellular space. This results in neuronal edema and dendritic distortion. Under pathologic states of hypoperfusion, cortical spreading depolarization can produce oxidative stress, worsen hypoxia and induce neuronal death. This is due to intense arterial vasoconstriction produced by an inverse response called spreading ischemia. Only in the last years there has been an electrophysiological confirmation of cortical spreading depolarization in human brains. Occurrence of cortical spreading depolarization has been associated with worse outcome in patients. Currently, increased knowledge regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms supports the hypothetical correlation of cortical spreading depolarization with brain damage in humans. There are diverse therapeutic alternatives that promise inhibition of cortical spreading depolarization and subsequent better outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessing cortical network properties using TMS-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogasch, Nigel C; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2013-07-01

    The past decade has seen significant developments in the concurrent use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to directly assess cortical network properties such as excitability and connectivity in humans. New hardware solutions, improved EEG amplifier technology, and advanced data processing techniques have allowed substantial reduction of the TMS-induced artifact, which had previously rendered concurrent TMS-EEG impossible. Various physiological artifacts resulting from TMS have also been identified, and methods are being developed to either minimize or remove these sources of artifact. With these developments, TMS-EEG has unlocked regions of the cortex to researchers that were previously inaccessible to TMS. By recording the TMS-evoked response directly from the cortex, TMS-EEG provides information on the excitability, effective connectivity, and oscillatory tuning of a given cortical area, removing the need to infer such measurements from indirect measures. In the following review, we investigate the different online and offline methods for reducing artifacts in TMS-EEG recordings and the physiological information contained within the TMS-evoked cortical response. We then address the use of TMS-EEG to assess different cortical mechanisms such as cortical inhibition and neural plasticity, before briefly reviewing studies that have utilized TMS-EEG to explore cortical network properties at rest and during different functional brain states.

  18. Tyrosine Residues from the S4-S5 Linker of Kv11.1 Channels Are Critical for Slow Deactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chai-Ann; Gravel, Andrée E; Perry, Matthew D; Arnold, Alexandre A; Marcotte, Isabelle; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2016-08-12

    Slow deactivation of Kv11.1 channels is critical for its function in the heart. The S4-S5 linker, which joins the voltage sensor and pore domains, plays a critical role in this slow deactivation gating. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to identify the membrane-bound surface of the S4S5 linker, and we show that two highly conserved tyrosine residues within the KCNH subfamily of channels are membrane-associated. Site-directed mutagenesis and electrophysiological analysis indicates that Tyr-542 interacts with both the pore domain and voltage sensor residues to stabilize activated conformations of the channel, whereas Tyr-545 contributes to the slow kinetics of deactivation by primarily stabilizing the transition state between the activated and closed states. Thus, the two tyrosine residues in the Kv11.1 S4S5 linker play critical but distinct roles in the slow deactivation phenotype, which is a hallmark of Kv11.1 channels.

  19. Final Deactivation Project report on the Alpha Powder Facility, Building 3028, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the condition of the Alpha Powder Facility (APF), Building 3028, after completion of deactivation activities. Activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) program are outlined. A history and profile of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities are provided. Turnover items, such as the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance (S&M) plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided for in the DOE Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) turnover package are discussed.

  20. Cholinergic Neurons Excite Cortically Projecting Basal Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; McKenna, James T.; Zant, Janneke C.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in the control of cortical activation and attention. Understanding the modulation of BF neuronal activity is a prerequisite to treat disorders of cortical activation involving BF dysfunction, such as Alzheimer's disease. Here we reveal the interaction between cholinergic neurons and cortically projecting BF GABAergic neurons using immunohistochemistry and whole-cell recordings in vitro. In GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, BF cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) neurons were intermingled with GABAergic (GFP+) neurons. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that cholinergic fibers apposed putative cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing parvalbumin (PV). In coronal BF slices from GAD67-GFP knock-in or PV-tdTomato mice, pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors with bath application of carbachol increased the firing rate of large (>20 μm diameter) BF GFP+ and PV (tdTomato+) neurons, which exhibited the intrinsic membrane properties of cortically projecting neurons. The excitatory effect of carbachol was blocked by antagonists of M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors in two subpopulations of BF GABAergic neurons [large hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and small Ih, respectively]. Ion substitution experiments and reversal potential measurements suggested that the carbachol-induced inward current was mediated mainly by sodium-permeable cation channels. Carbachol also increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic neurons/fibers caused a mecamylamine- and atropine-sensitive inward current in putative GABAergic neurons. Thus, cortically projecting, BF GABAergic/PV neurons are excited by neighboring BF and/or brainstem cholinergic neurons. Loss of cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease may impair cortical activation, in part, through disfacilitation of BF cortically

  1. Session 6: Hydro-dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride: Study of the Deactivation and Regeneration of Pt Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garetto, T.F.; Borgna, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica-INCAPE. (UNL-CONICET), Santa Fe (Argentina); Montoya, J.A.; Acosta, D. [Zaragoza Univ., Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Tecnologias del Medio Ambiente. Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Monzon, A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this work is to get more insight on the deactivation-regeneration process of supported metal catalysts during CTC hydro-dechlorination. In this contribution we report a kinetic analysis on the deactivation-regeneration of Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the effect of the regeneration conditions. Particularly, the effectiveness of the regeneration treatment under different atmospheres is analyzed. (authors)

  2. Effects of berberine on cancellous and cortical bone in rats induced by glucocorticoid%小檗碱对糖皮质激素性骨质疏松大鼠松质骨和皮质骨的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许碧莲; 徐道华; 陈文双; 崔燎

    2011-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effects of berberine on cancellous bone of the fifth lumbar vertebrae ( LV5 ) and cortical bone of the tibial shaft ( Tx ) in rats induced by glucocorticoid. Methods Sixty 3-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups: control, prednisone, prednisone plus calcium carbonate with vitamin D3 , prednisone plus different doses of berberine. Rats in control group were given vehicle, rats in other five groups were given prednisone at 3. 5 mg · kg-1 · d-1 first, and then administered with vehicle . calcium carbonate 375 mg · kg -1 · d-1 with vitamin D3 50 U · kg -1 · d-1 , berberine 15 , 30, or 60 mg · kg-1 · d-1 an hour later. All rats were treated by oral gavaged at a volume of 5 ml · kg-1 for 12 weeks. The static and dynamic parameters in cancellous bone of LV5 and cortical bone of Tx were examined with histomorphometrical analyses. The changes of interlabeled width of growth plate of LV5 were observed. Results Compared with control group, trabecula bone volume. trabecular thick ( Tb. Th ), dynamic parameters and the interlabeled width of growth plate of LV5 were significantly decreased, while osteoclast number per mm ( Oc. N ) and percent osteoclast surface perimeter ( Oc. S. Pm ) were increased in prednisone group. Total tissue area ( T. Ar ), cortical area ( Ct. Ar ) and bone formation of Tx in periosteal surfaces were decreased in prednisone group. Compared with prednisone group, trabecula bone volume, Tb.Th, dynamic parameters and the interlabeled width of growth plate of LV5 were increased. Oc. N and Oc. S.Pm were decreased, but there was no significant change in Tx in prednisone plus calciuru carbonate with vitamin D3 and prednisone plus berberine groups.Conclusion Berberine can prevent cancellous bone loss of LV5 in glucocorticoid-treated rats by improving bone formation and inhibiting bone resorption, but has no effect on cortical bone of Tx.%目的 探讨小檗碱对糖皮质激素性骨质疏松大

  3. Uso de corticóide como inibidor da resposta inflamatória sistêmica induzida pela circulação extracorpórea Corticoid as an inhibitor of systemic inflammatory response, induced by cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio BRASIL

    1999-07-01

    diferença estatisticamente significativa entre os dois grupos. CONCLUSÕES: A metilprednisolona inibiu significantemente a liberação de citocinas pró-inflamatórias principalmente o TNFa. Os efeitos sistêmicos adversos decorrentes da reação inflamatória pós-CEC foram atenuados com o uso do corticóide.Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB induces the development of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, with the release of cytokines that are responsible for many clinical manifestations. PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to observe the release of the cytokines - tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa and Interleukine-6 (IL-6, and to verify the clinical alterations produced in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization with CPB, with or without corticoids. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty patients were studied - 15 used corticoid (methylprednisolone, 30 mg/kg -Group I and 15 did not (Group II. Serial blood samples were collected and the TNFa and IL-6 release were analyzed, as well as the leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and glycemia. The blood pressure, cardiac rate, temperature, postoperative bleeding, orotracheal tubing time and inotropic drug requirement were also compared. Statistical significance was assumed when p £ 0.05. RESULTS: In Group I TNFa was not detected and IL-6 was detected in 13 patients, with levels ranging from 8.6 to 101.8 pg/ml. In Group II TNFa was detected in 13 patients, with levels between 5.4 and 231.0 pg/ml. The IL-6 in this group was detected in 15 patients, with higher levels than those in Group I, varying between 5.5 and 2569.0 pg/ml. The Group I patients had higher medium blood pressure (7.9 ± 0.5 vs 7.3 ± 0.4 mmHg and lower inotropic drug requirement (5 vs 11. They evolved with less tachycardia (105.6 ± 5.9 vs 109.3 ± 7.2 bpm, lower temperature (36.5 ± 0.2 vs 37.3 ± 0.2°C, lower postoperative bleeding, (576.6 ± 119.5 vs 810.0 ± 176.2 ml, shorter orotracheal tubing time (11.0 ± 2.0 vs 14.6 ± 2.9 hs and lower

  4. Focal cortical dysplasia – review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults. Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed – from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized. Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe. Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes. New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life. Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias. The most common findings on MRI imaging include: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also

  5. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  6. Plasma Deactivation of Oral Bacteria Seeded on Hydroxyapatite Disks as Tooth Enamel Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumhagen, Adam; Singh, Prashant; Mustapha, Azlin; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the plasma treatment effects on deactivation of oral bacteria seeded on a tooth enamel analogue. Methods A non-thermal atmospheric pressure argon plasma brush was used to treat two different Gram-positive oral bacteria including Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). The bacteria were seeded on hydroxyapatite (HA) disks used as tooth enamel analogue with three initial bacterial seeding concentrations: a low inoculum concentration between 2.1×108 and 2.4×108 cfu/mL, a medium inoculum concentration between 9.8×108 and 2.4×109 cfu/mL, and a high inoculum concentration between 1.7×1010 and 3.5×1010 cfu/mL. The bacterial survivability upon plasma exposure was examined in terms of plasma exposure time and oxygen addition into the plasmas. SEM was performed to examine bacterial morphological changes after plasma exposure. Results The experimental data indicated that 13 second plasma exposure time completely killed all the bacteria when initial bacterial seeding density on HA surfaces were less than 6.9×106 cfu/cm2 for L. acidophilus and 1.7×107 cfu/cm2 for S. mutans, which were resulted from low initial seeding inoculum concentration between 2.1×108 and 2.4×108 cfu/mL. Plasma exposure of the bacteria at higher initial bacterial seeding density obtained with high initial seeding inoculum concentration, however, only resulted in ~ 1.5 to 2 log reduction and ~ 2 to 2.5 log reduction for L. acidophilus and S. mutans, respectively. It was also noted that oxygen addition into the argon plasma brush did not affect the plasma deactivation effectiveness. SEM images showed that plasma deactivation mainly occurred with the top layer bacteria, while shadowing effects from the resulting bacterial debris reduced the plasma deactivation of the underlying bacteria. Clinical Significance The experimental results indicate that, with direct contact, nonthermal atmospheric pressure argon plasmas could rapidly and

  7. Final deactivation report on the radioisotope area services, Building 3034, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Bldg. 3034, after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) Program. This report provides a history and profile of Bldg. 3034 before commencement of deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities. Turnover, items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance & Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, an supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover Package, are discussed. Building 3034 will require access to facilitate required surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3034 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. In addition to the minimal S&M activities, the building will be occupied by the maintenance coordinator and the S&M supervisor for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project. The exterior doors are locked when unoccupied to prevent unauthorized access. All materials have been removed from the building. Piping and alarms have been deactivated.

  8. The designer proline-rich antibacterial peptide A3-APO prevents Bacillus anthracis mortality by deactivating bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otvos, Laszlo; Flick-Smith, Helen; Fox, Marc; Ostorhazi, Eszter; Dawson, Raymond M; Wade, John D

    2014-04-01

    Proline-rich antibacterial peptides protect experimental animals from bacterial challenge even if they are unable to kill the microorganisms in vitro. Their major in vivo modes of action are inhibition of bacterial protein folding and immunostimulation. Here we investigated whether the proline-rich antibacterial peptide dimer A3-APO was able to inhibit Bacillus cereus enterotoxin production in vitro and restrict the proliferation of lethal toxin-induced Bacillus anthracis replication in mouse macrophages. After 24 h incubation, peptide A3-APO and its single chain metabolite reduced the amount of properly folded B. cereus diarrhoeal enterotoxin production in a concentration-dependent manner leading to only 10-25% of the original amount of toxin detectable by a conformation-sensitive immunoassay. Likewise, after 4 h incubation, A3-APO restricted the proliferation of B. anthracis in infected macrophages by 40-45% compared to untreated cells both intracellularly and in the extracellular cell culture milieu. Although the peptide had a minimal inhibitory concentration of >512 mg/L against B. anthracis in vitro, in systemic mouse challenge models it improved survival by 20- 37%, exhibiting statistically significant cumulative efficacy when administered at 3x5 mg/kg intraperitoneally or intramuscularly. We hypothesize that the activity in isolated murine macrophages and in vivo is due to deactivation of bacterial toxins. Bacterial protein folding inhibition in synergy with other types of antimicrobial modes offers a remarkable novel strategy in combating resistant or life-threatening infections.

  9. Hiperostosis cortical infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Caffey, o hiperostosis cortical infantil, es una rara enfermedad ósea autolimitada, que aparece de preferencia en lactantes con signos inespecíficos sistémicos; el más relevante es la reacción subperióstica e hiperostosis en varios huesos del cuerpo, con predilección en el 75-80 % de los casos por la mandíbula. Su pronóstico es bueno, la mayoría no deja secuelas. El propósito del presente trabajo es describir las características clínicas, presentes en un lactante de cinco meses de edad, atendido en el Hospital Pediátrico Provincial “Mártires de Las Tunas” con este diagnóstico, quien ingresó en el servicio de miscelánea B por una celulitis facial. Presentaba aumento de volumen en la región geniana izquierda, febrícola e inapetencia. Se impuso tratamiento con cefazolina y se egresó a los siete días. Acudió nuevamente con tumefacción blanda y difusa de ambas hemicaras, irritabilidad y fiebre. Se interconsultó con cirugía maxilofacial, se indicaron estudios sanguíneos y radiológicos. Se diagnosticó como enfermedad de Caffey, basado en la edad del niño, tumefacción facial sin signos inflamatorios agudos e hiperostosis en ambas corticales mandibulares a la radiografía AP mandíbula; unido a anemia ligera, leucocitosis y eritrosedimentación acelerada. El paciente se trató sintomáticamente y con antinflamatorios no esteroideos. Esta rara entidad se debe tener presente en casos de niños y lactantes con irritabilidad y fiebre inespecífica

  10. 局灶性皮质发育障碍致痫的蛋白质组学研究%Proteomics of epilepsy induced by focal disorder of cortical development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄艳军; 郑帼; 卢孝鹏; 陆海英; 莫绪明

    2010-01-01

    目的 寻找皮质发育障碍致痫的疾病相关差异蛋白,以期寻找抗癫痫治疗的新靶点,同时寻找早期十预脑皮质发育障碍新的手段.方法 利用液氮损伤诱导皮质发育障碍,应用比较蛋白质组学方法研究致痫组和对照组皮质蛋白表达图谱差异,并对发现的差异蛋白质进行分析和鉴定.结果皮质发育障碍致痫组筛选到103个差异表达蛋白质斑点,其中64个在致痫组表达上调,39个在致痈组表达下调.有12个蛋白质最终鉴定确认,分别是lissencephaly-lprotein (LIS-1)、synaptotagmin Ⅳ、胶质纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)、热休克蛋白70(HSP70)、生长相关蛋白-43(GAP-43)、neuronal enolase、tubulin beta chain、谷氨酰胺合成酶、神经元胞浆蛋白、电压依赖性阴离子通道1(VDAC1)、丙酮酸激酶(PK)、neurofilament light polypeptide.结论 12个差异蛋白鉴定有利于进一步研究皮质发育障碍与癫痫关系,该结果也为运用蛋白质组学方法寻找皮质发育障碍致痫治疗新靶点提供了实验数据.%Objective To explore the proteomics of epilepsy induced by focal disorder of cortical development (DCD) in revealing the molecular mechanisms of epilepsy caused by DCD and looking for the candidate targets and new therapeutic approaches in clinical practice. Methods Animal models of DCD were established and induced by liquid nitrogen in healthy Wistar newborn rats. Animal model of DCD were divided into epilepsy group and control group according to Racine classification. The proteomics maps of the frontal cortex were obtained in the epilepsy group and the control group by two-dimensional electrophoresis and both Coomassie brilliant blue G250 and silver dying. The proteomics profiles of frontal cortex were preliminary analyzed with PD Quest 7.3 analysis package. The differentially expressed protein spots were excised from gel and digested with trypsin under optimal conditions. The masses of tryptic-digested peptides

  11. Leading role of thalamic over cortical<