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Sample records for cortical deactivation induced

  1. Radiation induced deactivation, post deactivation of horse radish peroxidase, glucose oxidase and the protective effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Min; Zhong Qun; Chen Yiqing; Ha Hongfei

    1993-01-01

    In order to check the fact if the radiation induced post deactivation are possessed by all the enzymes, the radiation effects of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOD) were investigated. It was found that in dilute aqueous solution the irradiated HRP has the post deactivation also. The effects of absorbed dose, initial HRP concentration in solution, atmosphere, temperature and additives (three kinds of complex agents: EDTA, CDTA and D) on the post deactivation of HRP were investigated. The regularity of post deactivation of HRP is similar with the catalase. Oxygen in enzyme samples is necessary for the post deactivation. 5 x 10 -3 mol/l of the three additives could control the phenomenon efficiently. Of course, the radiation deactivation of HRP was given as well. In the case of GOD the post deactivation was not found, although it's radiation deactivation is serious. It means that the radiation induced post deactivation is not a common phenomenon for all enzymes

  2. Combined structural and functional imaging reveals cortical deactivations in grapheme-colour synaesthesia

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    Erik eO'Hanlon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaesthesia is a heritable condition in which particular stimuli generate specific and consistent sensory percepts or associations in another modality or processing stream. Functional neuroimaging studies have identified potential correlates of these experiences, including, in some but not all cases, the hyperactivation of visuotemporal areas and of parietal areas thought to be involved in perceptual binding. Structural studies have identified a similarly variable spectrum of differences between synaesthetes and controls. However, it remains unclear the extent to which these neural correlates reflect the synaesthetic experience itself or additional phenotypes associated with the condition. Here, we acquired both structural and functional neuroimaging data comparing thirteen grapheme-colour synaesthetes with eleven non-synaesthetes. Using voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging, we identify a number of clusters of increased volume of grey matter, of white matter or of increased fractional anisotropy in synaesthetes versus controls. To assess the possible involvement of these areas in the synaesthetic experience, we used nine areas of increased grey matter volume as regions of interest in an fMRI experiment that characterised the contrast in response to stimuli which induced synaesthesia (i.e. letters versus those which did not (non-meaningful symbols. Two of these areas, in left lateral occipital cortex and in postcentral gyrus, showed sensitivity to this contrast in synaesthetes but not controls. Unexpectedly, in both regions, the letter stimuli produced a strong negative BOLD signal in synaesthetes. An additional whole-brain fMRI analysis identified fourteen areas, three of which were driven mainly by a negative BOLD response to letters in synaesthetes. Our findings suggest that cortical deactivations may be involved in the conscious experience of internally generated synaesthetic percepts

  3. Mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases

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    Jaeger Karl E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial lipases represent the most important class of biocatalysts used for a wealth of applications in organic synthesis. An often applied reaction is the lipase-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and alcohols resulting in the formation of acetaldehyde which is known to deactivate microbial lipases, presumably by structural changes caused by initial Schiff-base formation at solvent accessible lysine residues. Previous studies showed that several lipases were sensitive toward acetaldehyde deactivation whereas others were insensitive; however, a general explanation of the acetaldehyde-induced inactivation mechanism is missing. Results Based on five microbial lipases from Candida rugosa, Rhizopus oryzae, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis we demonstrate that the protonation state of lysine ε-amino groups is decisive for their sensitivity toward acetaldehyde. Analysis of the diverse modification products of Bacillus subtilis lipases in the presence of acetaldehyde revealed several stable products such as α,β-unsaturated polyenals, which result from base and/or amino acid catalyzed aldol condensation of acetaldehyde. Our studies indicate that these products induce the formation of stable Michael-adducts at solvent-accessible amino acids and thus lead to enzyme deactivation. Further, our results indicate Schiff-base formation with acetaldehyde to be involved in crosslinking of lipase molecules. Conclusions Differences in stability observed with various commercially available microbial lipases most probably result from different purification procedures carried out by the respective manufacturers. We observed that the pH of the buffer used prior to lyophilization of the enzyme sample is of utmost importance. The mechanism of acetaldehyde-induced deactivation of microbial lipases involves the generation of α,β-unsaturated polyenals from acetaldehyde which subsequently form stable Michael-adducts with the

  4. Study on radiation-induced deactivation and post-deactivation of some oxidoreductases in dilute aqueous solution and protective effect: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yiqing; Ha Hongfei

    1993-01-01

    In this work the radiation-induced deactivation of catalase in dilute aqueous solution was reported. The effects of irradiation atmosphere, temperature and original concentration of catalase in dilute aqueous solutions on the deactivation of catalase were investigated. The protective effect by some additives (CH 3 CH 2 OH, HCOONa and EDTA) to radiation deactivation in dilute aqueous solutions was also studied. Remarkable protective effect by those additives was observed. The mechanism of radiation deactivation and protective effect have been discussed

  5. Epidemic Spread in Networks Induced by Deactivation Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiaoling; Wu Xiao; Zhang Duanming; Li Zhihao; Liang Fang; Wang Xiaoyu

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the topology and epidemic spreading behaviors on the networks in which deactivation mechanism and long-rang connection are coexisted. By means of numerical simulation, we find that the clustering coefficient C and the Pearson correlation coefficient r decrease with increasing long-range connection μ and the topological state of the network changes into that of BA model at the end (when μ = 1). For the Susceptible-Infect-Susceptible model of epidemics, the epidemic threshold can reach maximum value at μ = 0.4 and presents two different variable states around μ = 0.4

  6. Quenching-induced deactivation of photosensitizer by nanoencapsulation to improve phototherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisser-Labouèbe, Magali; Mattiuzzo, Marc; Lange, Norbert; Gurny, Robert; Delie, Florence

    2009-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy has emerged as a promising alternative to current cancer treatment. However, conventional photosensitizers have several limitations due to their unsuitable pharmaceutical formulations and lack of selectivity. Our strategy was to exploit the advantages of nanoparticles and the quenching-induced deactivation of the model photosensitizer hypericin to produce "activatable" drug delivery systems. Efficient fluorescence and activity quenching were achieved by increasing the drug-loading rate of nanoparticles. In vitro assays confirmed the reversibility of hypericin deactivation, as the hypericin fluorescence and photodynamic activity were recovered upon cell internalization.

  7. Specialization in the default mode: Task-induced brain deactivations dissociate between visual working memory and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jutta S; Roebroeck, Alard; Maurer, Konrad; Linden, David E J

    2010-01-01

    The idea of an organized mode of brain function that is present as default state and suspended during goal-directed behaviors has recently gained much interest in the study of human brain function. The default mode hypothesis is based on the repeated observation that certain brain areas show task-induced deactivations across a wide range of cognitive tasks. In this event-related functional resonance imaging study we tested the default mode hypothesis by comparing common and selective patterns of BOLD deactivation in response to the demands on visual attention and working memory (WM) that were independently modulated within one task. The results revealed task-induced deactivations within regions of the default mode network (DMN) with a segregation of areas that were additively deactivated by an increase in the demands on both attention and WM, and areas that were selectively deactivated by either high attentional demand or WM load. Attention-selective deactivations appeared in the left ventrolateral and medial prefrontal cortex and the left lateral temporal cortex. Conversely, WM-selective deactivations were found predominantly in the right hemisphere including the medial-parietal, the lateral temporo-parietal, and the medial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, during WM encoding deactivated regions showed task-specific functional connectivity. These findings demonstrate that task-induced deactivations within parts of the DMN depend on the specific characteristics of the attention and WM components of the task. The DMN can thus be subdivided into a set of brain regions that deactivate indiscriminately in response to cognitive demand ("the core DMN") and a part whose deactivation depends on the specific task. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Photon hormesis deactivates alpha-particle induced bystander effects between zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.Y.P.; Cheng, S.H.; Yu, K.N.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the effects of low-dose X-ray photons on the alpha-particle induced bystander effects between embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio. The effects on the naive whole embryos were studied through quantification of apoptotic signals (amounts of cells undergoing apoptosis) at 24 h post fertilization (hpf) using vital dye acridine orange staining, followed by counting the stained cells under a fluorescent microscope. We report data showing that embryos at 5 hpf subjected to a 4.4 mGy alpha-particle irradiation could release a stress signal into the medium, which could induce bystander effect in partnered naive embryos sharing the same medium. We also report that the bystander effect was deactivated when the irradiated embryos were subjected to a concomitant irradiation of 10 or 14 mGy of X-rays, but no such deactivation was achieved if the concomitant X-ray dose dropped to 2.5 or 5 mGy. In the present study, the significant drop in the amount of apoptotic signals on the embryos having received 4.4 mGy alpha particles together X-rays irradiation from 2.5 or 5 mGy to 10 or 14 mGy, together with the deactivation of RIBE with concomitant irradiation of 10 or 14 mGy of X-rays supported the participation of photon hormesis with an onset dose between 5 and 10 mGy, which might lead to removal of aberrant cells through early apoptosis or induction of high-fidelity DNA repair. As we found that photons and alpha particles could have opposite biological effects when these were simultaneously irradiated onto living organisms, these ionizing radiations could be viewed as two different environmental stressors, and the resultant effects could be regarded as multiple stressor effects. The present work presented the first study on a multiple stressor effect which occurred on bystander organisms. In other words, this was a non-targeted multiple stressor effect. The photon hormesis could also explain some failed attempts to observe neutron-induced bystander

  9. Attention-induced deactivations in very low frequency EEG oscillations: differential localisation according to ADHD symptom status.

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    Samantha J Broyd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The default-mode network (DMN is characterised by coherent very low frequency (VLF brain oscillations. The cognitive significance of this VLF profile remains unclear, partly because of the temporally constrained nature of the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD signal. Previously we have identified a VLF EEG network of scalp locations that shares many features of the DMN. Here we explore the intracranial sources of VLF EEG and examine their overlap with the DMN in adults with high and low ADHD ratings. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DC-EEG was recorded using an equidistant 66 channel electrode montage in 25 adult participants with high- and 25 participants with low-ratings of ADHD symptoms during a rest condition and an attention demanding Eriksen task. VLF EEG power was calculated in the VLF band (0.02 to 0.2 Hz for the rest and task condition and compared for high and low ADHD participants. sLORETA was used to identify brain sources associated with the attention-induced deactivation of VLF EEG power, and to examine these sources in relation to ADHD symptoms. There was significant deactivation of VLF EEG power between the rest and task condition for the whole sample. Using s-LORETA the sources of this deactivation were localised to medial prefrontal regions, posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus and temporal regions. However, deactivation sources were different for high and low ADHD groups: In the low ADHD group attention-induced VLF EEG deactivation was most significant in medial prefrontal regions while for the high ADHD group this deactivation was predominantly localised to the temporal lobes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Attention-induced VLF EEG deactivations have intracranial sources that appear to overlap with those of the DMN. Furthermore, these seem to be related to ADHD symptom status, with high ADHD adults failing to significantly deactivate medial prefrontal regions while at the same time showing significant attenuation of

  10. Study on radiation-induced deactivation and post-deactivation of some oxide-reductase in dilute aqueous solutions and protective effects: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha Hongfei; Chen Yiqing

    1993-01-01

    The post-deactivation of irradiated catalase in dilute aqueous solution was found and investigated. Post-deactivation of irradiated catalase means that the catalase in dilute aqueous solution could not only be deactivated during γ-irradiation, but it has also been deactivated continuously for some time after the irradiated samples were taken out of the radiation field. No reports about this phenomenon in literature were searched up to now. The effects of absorbed dose, initial catalase concentration in solutions, atmosphere, temperature and additive on post-deactivation of catalase were investigated. H 2 O 2 produced by water radiolysis may attend the post-deactivation reaction in some way. Oxygen in enzyme samples in necessitous for the post-deactivation. 1 x 10 -4 to 5 x 10 -3 mol/L of CH 3 CH 2 OH, HCOONa and EDTA could control the post-deactivation efficiently

  11. Functional MRI Assessment of Task-Induced Deactivation of the Default Mode Network in Alzheimer’s Disease and At-Risk Older Individuals

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    Maija Pihlajamäki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of dementia in old age, and is characterized by prominent impairment of episodic memory. Recent functional imaging studies in AD have demonstrated alterations in a distributed network of brain regions supporting memory function, including regions of the default mode network. Previous positron emission tomography studies of older individuals at risk for AD have revealed hypometabolism of association cortical regions similar to the metabolic abnormalities seen in AD patients. In recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies of AD, corresponding brain default mode regions have also been found to demonstrate an abnormal fMRI task-induced deactivation response pattern. That is, the relative decreases in fMRI signal normally observed in the default mode regions in healthy subjects performing a cognitive task are not seen in AD patients, or may even be reversed to a paradoxical activation response. Our recent studies have revealed alterations in the pattern of deactivation also in elderly individuals at risk for AD by virtue of their APOE e4 genotype, or evidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI. In agreement with recent reports from other groups, these studies demonstrate that the pattern of fMRI task-induced deactivation is progressively disrupted along the continuum from normal aging to MCI and to clinical AD and more impaired in e4 carriers compared to non-carriers. These findings will be discussed in the context of current literature regarding functional imaging of the default network in AD and at-risk populations.

  12. Accelerating deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISHBACK, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, the focus of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has shifted from defense production to facility stabilization, decommissioning, and environmental restoration. This shift from production to cleanup requires a parallel shift from operations-focused management to project-focused management for an efficient facility deactivation. In the operation-focused management organization, activities are planned and executed based on production goals and are typically repetitive and cyclic. In the project-focused management environment, activities are based on a defined scope/end objective, start date, and completion date. Since the workforce used to perform production operations is also usually relied onto perform facility deactivation, it is important to shift from an operations management approach to a project management approach. It is best if the transition is accomplished quickly so the project can move forward and workers don't spend a lot of energy anticipating change. Therefore, it is essential that managers, planners, and other workers understand the key elements associated with planning a deactivation project. This paper describes a planning approach that has been used successfully to plan deactivation projects consistent with the requirements provided in DOE Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management and the companion Deactivation Implementation Guide, G430. 1A-3, while exceeding schedule expectations and reducing costs. Although the planning of a deactivation project closely mirrors the classic project planning for construction projects, there are unique variations associated with facility deactivation. The key elements of planning a deactivation project are discussed relative to scope, schedule, and cost. Management tools such as project metrics and histograms are discussed as desired outputs from the planning process. In addition, lessons learned from planning deactivation projects across the DOE complex are discussed relative to making the

  13. Enhanced sympathetic arousal in response to FMRI scanning correlates with task induced activations and deactivations.

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    Markus Muehlhan

    Full Text Available It has been repeatedly shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI triggers distress and neuroendocrine response systems. Prior studies have revealed that sympathetic arousal increases, particularly at the beginning of the examination. Against this background it appears likely that those stress reactions during the scanning procedure may influence task performance and neural correlates. However, the question how sympathetic arousal elicited by the scanning procedure itself may act as a potential confounder of fMRI data remains unresolved today. Thirty-seven scanner naive healthy subjects performed a simple cued target detection task. Levels of salivary alpha amylase (sAA, as a biomarker for sympathetic activity, were assessed in samples obtained at several time points during the lab visit. SAA increased two times, immediately prior to scanning and at the end of the scanning procedure. Neural activation related to motor preparation and timing as well as task performance was positively correlated with the first increase. Furthermore, the first sAA increase was associated with task induced deactivation (TID in frontal and parietal regions. However, these effects were restricted to the first part of the experiment. Consequently, this bias of scanner related sympathetic activation should be considered in future fMRI investigations. It is of particular importance for pharmacological investigations studying adrenergic agents and the comparison of groups with different stress vulnerabilities like patients and controls or adolescents and adults.

  14. Cortical deactivation induced by visual stimulation in human slow-wave sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Law, Ian; Lund, Torben E

    2002-01-01

    . It is unresolved whether this negative BOLD response pattern is of developmental neurobiological origin particular to a given age or to a general effect of sleep or sedative drugs. To further elucidate this issue, we used fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) to study the brain activation pattern during......It has previously been demonstrated that sleeping and sedated young children respond with a paradoxical decrease in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal in the rostro-medial occipital visual cortex during visual stimulation...... visual stimulation in spontaneously sleeping adult volunteers. In five sleeping volunteers fMRI studies confirmed a robust signal decrease during stimulation in the rostro-medial occipital cortex. A similar relative decrease at the same location was found during visual stimulation...

  15. Cortical deactivation induced by visual stimulation in human slow-wave sleep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Law, Ian; Lund, Torben E

    2002-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that sleeping and sedated young children respond with a paradoxical decrease in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal in the rostro-medial occipital visual cortex during visual stimulation. It is unreso...... that this decrease was secondary to a relative rCBF decrease. Possible mechanisms for the paradoxical response pattern during sleep include an active inhibition of the visual cortex or a disruption of an energy-consuming process...

  16. Jealousy increased by induced relative left frontal cortical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Nicholas J; Eastwick, Paul W; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Schmeichel, Brandon J

    2015-10-01

    Asymmetric frontal cortical activity may be one key to the process linking social exclusion to jealous feelings. The current research examined the causal role of asymmetric frontal brain activity in modulating jealousy in response to social exclusion. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) over the frontal cortex to manipulate asymmetric frontal cortical activity was combined with a modified version of the Cyberball paradigm designed to induce jealousy. After receiving 15 min of tDCS, participants were excluded by a desired partner and reported how jealous they felt. Among individuals who were excluded, tDCS to increase relative left frontal cortical activity caused greater levels of self-reported jealousy compared to tDCS to increase relative right frontal cortical activity or sham stimulation. Limitations concerning the specificity of this effect and implications for the role of the asymmetric prefrontal cortical activity in motivated behaviors are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Reversible-Deactivation Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate Induced by Photochemical Reduction of Various Copper Catalysts

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    Jaroslav Mosnáček

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Photochemically mediated reversible-deactivation radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate was successfully performed using 50–400 ppm of various copper compounds such as CuSO4·5H2O, copper acetate, copper triflate and copper acetylacetonate as catalysts. The copper catalysts were reduced in situ by irradiation at wavelengths of 366–546 nm, without using any additional reducing agent. Bromopropionitrile was used as an initiator. The effects of various solvents and the concentration and structure of ligands were investigated. Well-defined polymers were obtained when at least 100 or 200 ppm of any catalyst complexed with excess tris(2-pyridylmethylamine as a ligand was used in dimethyl sulfoxide as a solvent.

  18. Ultrasonically-induced electrical potentials in demineralized bovine cortical bone

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    Mori, Shunki; Makino, Taiki; Koyama, Daisuke; Takayanagi, Shinji; Yanagitani, Takahiko; Matsukawa, Mami

    2018-04-01

    While the low-intensity pulsed ultrasound technique has proved useful for healing of bone fractures, the ultrasound healing mechanism is not yet understood. To understand the initial physical effects of the ultrasound irradiation process on bone, we have studied the anisotropic piezoelectric properties of bone in the MHz range. Bone is known to be composed of collagen and hydroxyapatite (HAp) and shows strong elastic anisotropy. In this study, the effects of HAp on the piezoelectricity were investigated experimentally. To remove the HAp crystallites from the bovine cortical bone, demineralization was performed using ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) solutions. To investigate the piezoelectricity, we have fabricated ultrasound transducers using the cortical bone or demineralized cortical bone. The induced electrical potentials due to the piezoelectricity were observed as the output of these transducers under pulsed ultrasound irradiation in the MHz range. The cortical bone transducer (before mineralization) showed anisotropic piezoelectric behavior. When the ultrasound irradiation was applied normal to the transducer surface, the observed induced electrical potentials had minimum values. The potential increased under off-axis ultrasound irradiation with changes in polarization. In the demineralized bone transducer case, however, the anisotropic behavior was not observed in the induced electrical potentials. These results therefore indicate that the HAp crystallites affect the piezoelectric characteristics of bone.

  19. Understanding age-induced cortical porosity in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Christina Møller; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; van der Eerden, Bram C J

    2018-01-01

    of a histomorphometric analysis of sections of iliac bone specimens from 35 women (age 16-78 years). Firstly, the study shows that the aging-induced cortical porosity reflects an increased pore size rather than an increased pore density. Secondly, it establishes a novel histomorphometric classification of the pores...... initiation of the subsequent bone formation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  20. Probiotics protect mice from ovariectomy-induced cortical bone loss.

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    Ohlsson, Claes; Engdahl, Cecilia; Fåk, Frida; Andersson, Annica; Windahl, Sara H; Farman, Helen H; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Islander, Ulrika; Sjögren, Klara

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota (GM) modulates the hosts metabolism and immune system. Probiotic bacteria are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host and can alter the composition of the GM. Germ-free mice have increased bone mass associated with reduced bone resorption indicating that the GM also regulates bone mass. Ovariectomy (ovx) results in bone loss associated with altered immune status. The purpose of this study was to determine if probiotic treatment protects mice from ovx-induced bone loss. Mice were treated with either a single Lactobacillus (L) strain, L. paracasei DSM13434 (L. para) or a mixture of three strains, L. paracasei DSM13434, L. plantarum DSM 15312 and DSM 15313 (L. mix) given in the drinking water during 6 weeks, starting two weeks before ovx. Both the L. para and the L. mix treatment protected mice from ovx-induced cortical bone loss and bone resorption. Cortical bone mineral content was higher in both L. para and L. mix treated ovx mice compared to vehicle (veh) treated ovx mice. Serum levels of the resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides and the urinary fractional excretion of calcium were increased by ovx in the veh treated but not in the L. para or the L. mix treated mice. Probiotic treatment reduced the expression of the two inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β, and increased the expression of OPG, a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, in cortical bone of ovx mice. In addition, ovx decreased the frequency of regulatory T cells in bone marrow of veh treated but not probiotic treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with L. para or the L. mix prevents ovx-induced cortical bone loss. Our findings indicate that these probiotic treatments alter the immune status in bone resulting in attenuated bone resorption in ovx mice.

  1. Probiotics protect mice from ovariectomy-induced cortical bone loss.

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    Claes Ohlsson

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota (GM modulates the hosts metabolism and immune system. Probiotic bacteria are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host and can alter the composition of the GM. Germ-free mice have increased bone mass associated with reduced bone resorption indicating that the GM also regulates bone mass. Ovariectomy (ovx results in bone loss associated with altered immune status. The purpose of this study was to determine if probiotic treatment protects mice from ovx-induced bone loss. Mice were treated with either a single Lactobacillus (L strain, L. paracasei DSM13434 (L. para or a mixture of three strains, L. paracasei DSM13434, L. plantarum DSM 15312 and DSM 15313 (L. mix given in the drinking water during 6 weeks, starting two weeks before ovx. Both the L. para and the L. mix treatment protected mice from ovx-induced cortical bone loss and bone resorption. Cortical bone mineral content was higher in both L. para and L. mix treated ovx mice compared to vehicle (veh treated ovx mice. Serum levels of the resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides and the urinary fractional excretion of calcium were increased by ovx in the veh treated but not in the L. para or the L. mix treated mice. Probiotic treatment reduced the expression of the two inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β, and increased the expression of OPG, a potent inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, in cortical bone of ovx mice. In addition, ovx decreased the frequency of regulatory T cells in bone marrow of veh treated but not probiotic treated mice. In conclusion, treatment with L. para or the L. mix prevents ovx-induced cortical bone loss. Our findings indicate that these probiotic treatments alter the immune status in bone resulting in attenuated bone resorption in ovx mice.

  2. Ketamine-induced apoptosis in cultured rat cortical neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takadera, Tsuneo; Ishida, Akira; Ohyashiki, Takao

    2006-01-01

    Recent data suggest that anesthetic drugs cause neurodegeneration during development. Ketamine is frequently used in infants and toddlers for elective surgeries. The purpose of this study is to determine whether glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is involved in ketamine-induced apoptosis. Ketamine increased apoptotic cell death with morphological changes which were characterized by cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation or fragmentation. In addition, insulin growth factor-1 completely blocked the ketamine-induced apoptotic cell death. Ketamine decreased Akt phosphorylation. GSK-3 is known as a downstream target of Akt. The selective inhibitors of GSK-3 prevented the ketamine-induced apoptosis. Moreover, caspase-3 activation was accompanied by the ketamine-induced cell death and inhibited by the GSK-3 inhibitors. These results suggest that activation of GSK-3 is involved in ketamine-induced apoptosis in rat cortical neurons

  3. Rapid localized deactivation of self-assembled monolayers by propagation-controlled laser-induced plasma and its application to self-patterning of electronics and biosensors

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    Kim, Jongsu; Kwon, Seung-Gab; Back, Seunghyun; Kang, Bongchul

    2018-03-01

    We present a novel laser-induced surface treatment process to rapidly control the spatial wettabilities of various functional solutions with submicron to micron resolutions. Ultrathin hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) that little absorb typical laser lights due to short penetration depth were selectively deactivated by instantaneous interaction with laser-induced metallic plasmas. The spatial region of the deactivated SAM, which corresponds to process resolution, is adjustable by controlling the spatial propagation of the plasma. This method leads to the parallel formation of hydrophilic functional solutions on glass substrates with a minimum resolution on the submicron scale. To show its feasibility in device engineering fields, this method was applied to the cost-effective fabrication of electronics and biosensors. Rapid self-patterning of electronic and biological functional solutions (silver nanoparticle solution and streptavidin protein solution) was successfully realized by selective deactivation of two different SAMs (tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyltrichlorosilane (FOTS) for electronics and the hetero-hybrid SAM (octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)/2-[methoxy(polyethyleneoxy)propyl] trichlorosilane (PEG)) for biosensors). As a result, this method can be exploited for the rapid and low-cost fabrication of various thin film devices such as electronics, biosensors, energy, displays, and photonics.

  4. Subclinical cognitive decline in middle-age is associated with reduced task-induced deactivation of the brain's default mode network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Naja Liv; Lauritzen, Martin; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2014-01-01

    range of neurodegenerative diseases involving cognitive symptoms, in conditions with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease, and even in advanced but healthy aging. Here, we investigated brain activation and deactivation during a visual-motor task in 185 clinically healthy males from a Danish birth......Cognitive abilities decline with age, but with considerable individual variation. The neurobiological correlate of this variation is not well described. Functional brain imaging studies have demonstrated reduced task-induced deactivation (TID) of the brain's default mode network (DMN) in a wide...... cohort, whose cognitive function was assessed in youth and midlife. Using each individual as his own control, we defined a group with a large degree of cognitive decline, and a control group. When correcting for effects of total cerebral blood flow and hemoglobin level, we found reduced TID...

  5. Brain activation and deactivation during location and color working memory tasks in 11-13-year-old children.

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    Vuontela, Virve; Steenari, Maija-Riikka; Aronen, Eeva T; Korvenoja, Antti; Aronen, Hannu J; Carlson, Synnöve

    2009-02-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and n-back tasks we investigated whether, in 11-13-year-old children, spatial (location) and nonspatial (color) information is differentially processed during visual attention (0-back) and working memory (WM) (2-back) tasks and whether such cognitive task performance, compared to a resting state, results in regional deactivation. The location 0-back task, compared to the color 0-back task, activated segregated areas in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortices whereas no differentially activated voxels were obtained when location and color 2-back tasks were directly contrasted. Several midline cortical areas were less active during 0- and 2-back task performance than resting state. The task-induced deactivation increased with task difficulty as demonstrated by larger deactivation during 2-back than 0-back tasks. The results suggest that, in 11-13-year-old children, the visual attentional network is differently recruited by spatial and nonspatial information processing, but the functional organization of cortical activation in WM in this age group is not based on the type of information processed. Furthermore, 11-13-year-old children exhibited a similar pattern of cortical deactivation that has been reported in adults during cognitive task performance compared to a resting state.

  6. Training induced cortical plasticity compared between three tongue training paradigms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Jim

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different training types and secondary to test gender differences on the training-related cortical plasticity induced by three different tongue training paradigms: 1. Therapeutic tongue exercises (TTE), 2. Playing computer games......) (control) were established using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at three time-points: (1) before tongue training, (2) immediately after training, (3) 1 h after training. Subject-based reports of motivation, fun, pain and fatigue were evaluated on 0-10 numerical rating scales (NRS) after training....... The resting motor thresholds of tongue MEPs were lowered by training with TDS and TPT (Ptraining with TDS and TPT (P

  7. Localization of Cortical Oscillations Induced by SCS Using Coherence

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    P. Sovka

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a method based on coherence analysis and scalp mapping of coherence suitable for more accurate localization of cortical oscillations induced by electric stimulation of the dorsal spinal cord (SCS, which were previously detected using spectral analysis. While power spectral density shows the increase of power during SCS only at small number of electrodes, coherence extends this area and sharpens its boundary simultaneously. Parameters of the method were experimentally optimized to maximize its reliability. SCS is applied to suppress chronic, intractable pain by patients, whom pharmacotherapy does not relieve. In our study, the pain developed in lower back and lower extremity as the result of unsuccessful vertebral discotomy, which is called failed-back surgery syndrome (FBSS. Our method replicated the results of previous analysis using PSD and extended them with more accurate localization of the area influenced by SCS.

  8. Increased phencyclidine-induced hyperactivity following cortical cholinergic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Anna; Lindqvist, Eva; Ogren, Sven Ove; Olson, Lars

    2005-11-07

    Altered cholinergic function is considered as a potential contributing factor in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. We hypothesize that cortical cholinergic denervation may result in changes in glutamatergic activity. Therefore, we lesioned the cholinergic corticopetal projections by local infusion of 192 IgG-saporin into the nucleus basalis magnocellularis of rats. Possible effects of this lesion on glutamatergic systems were examined by phencyclidine-induced locomotor activity, and also by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor binding. We find that cholinergic lesioning of neocortex leads to enhanced sensitivity to phencyclidine in the form of a dramatic increase in horizontal activity. Further, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor binding is unaffected in denervated rats. These results suggest that aberrations in cholinergic function might lead to glutamatergic dysfunctions, which might be of relevance for the pathophysiology for schizophrenia.

  9. Isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating arachidonic acid metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Wang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Hao; Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Zhang, Jing; Falck, John R.; Guo, Austin M.; Yue, Jiang; Peng, Renxiu; Yang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived eicosanoids and its downstream pathways have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in growth control of breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid phytoestrogen from licorice, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating multiple key enzymes in AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in human breast cancer. Isoliquiritigenin diminished cell viability, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and clonogenic ability in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells, and induced apoptosis as evidenced by an analysis of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry and hoechst staining. Furthermore, isoliquiritigenin inhibited mRNA expression of multiple forms of AA-metabolizing enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenases (COX)-2 and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A, and decreased secretion of their products, including prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), without affecting COX-1, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP), and leukotriene B 4 (LTB 4 ). In addition, it downregulated the levels of phospho-PI3K, phospho-PDK (Ser 241 ), phospho-Akt (Thr 308 ), phospho-Bad (Ser 136 ), and Bcl-x L expression, thereby activating caspase cascades and eventually cleaving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conversely, the addition of exogenous eicosanoids, including PGE 2 , LTB 4 and a 20-HETE analog (WIT003), and caspase inhibitors, or overexpression of constitutively active Akt reversed isoliquiritigenin-induced apoptosis. Notably, isoliquiritigenin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice, together with decreased intratumoral levels of eicosanoids and phospho-Akt (Thr 308 ). Collectively, these data suggest that isoliquiritigenin induces growth inhibition and apoptosis through downregulating AA metabolic network and the deactivation of PI3K/Akt in

  10. LMR deactivation information exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1998-01-01

    This report contains vugraphs of presentations given at the meeting. The topics covered include the following: FFTF Deactivation Strategy; Sodium Drain and Disposition; Sodium Processing; and Fuel Storage and Disposition

  11. Cigarette smoke induces molecular responses in respiratory tissues of ApoE−/− mice that are progressively deactivated upon cessation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boué, Stéphanie; De León, Héctor; Schlage, Walter K.; Peck, Michael J.; Weiler, Horst; Berges, An; Vuillaume, Grégory; Martin, Florian; Friedrichs, Baerbel; Lebrun, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the primary etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a risk factor for both lung and cardiovascular (CV) diseases, which are rarely investigated concomitantly. Although smoking cessation shows clear CV risk benefit, lung-related disease risk remains higher in former smokers than in never smokers. We sought to determine the differential molecular responses of murine respiratory tissues to better understand the toxicity pathways involved in smoking-related disease risk and those related to the benefits of smoking cessation. ApoE −/− mice were exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke (CS) or a smoking cessation-mimicking protocol for up to 6 months and transcriptomics analysis of nasal epithelium and lung parenchyma performed. We supported our gene expression profiling approach with standard lung histopathology and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) analysis. Many BALF analytes involved in functions ranging from inflammation to cell proliferation and tissue remodeling were found elevated in BALF. Gene expression levels of these molecules were also increased in lung tissue, suggesting that the inflammatory response was the result of local tissue activation and the contribution of recruited inflammatory cells. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of expression data from murine lungs and nasal epithelium showed distinct activation patterns of inflammation, complement, and xenobiotic metabolism pathways during CS exposure that were deactivated upon smoking cessation. Pathways involved in cell proliferation and tissue remodeling were activated by CS and progressively deactivated upon smoke exposure cessation. Differential CS-mediated responses of pulmonary and nasal tissues reflect common mechanisms but also the varying degrees of epithelial functional specialization and exposure along the respiratory tract

  12. Effects of Parecoxib and Fentanyl on nociception-induced cortical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ying-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analgesics, including opioids and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs reduce postoperative pain. However, little is known about the quantitative effects of these drugs on cortical activity induced by nociceptive stimulation. The aim of the present study was to determine the neural activity in response to a nociceptive stimulus and to investigate the effects of fentanyl (an opioid agonist and parecoxib (a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor on this nociception-induced cortical activity evoked by tail pinch. Extracellular recordings (electroencephalogram and multi-unit signals were performed in the area of the anterior cingulate cortex while intracellular recordings were made in the primary somatosensory cortex. The effects of parecoxib and fentanyl on induced cortical activity were compared. Results Peripheral nociceptive stimulation in anesthetized rats produced an immediate electroencephalogram (EEG desynchronization resembling the cortical arousal (low-amplitude, fast-wave activity, while the membrane potential switched into a persistent depolarization state. The induced cortical activity was abolished by fentanyl, and the fentanyl's effect was reversed by the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. Parecoxib, on the other hand, did not significantly affect the neural activity. Conclusion Cortical activity was modulated by nociceptive stimulation in anesthetized rats. Fentanyl showed a strong inhibitory effect on the nociceptive-stimulus induced cortical activity while parecoxib had no significant effect.

  13. Deactivation of Building 7602

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yook, H.R.; Barnett, J.R.; Collins, T.L.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored research and development programs in Building 7602 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1984. This work focused on development of advanced technology for processing nuclear fuels. Building 7602 was used for engineering-scale tests using depleted and natural uranium to simulate the nuclear fuel. In April 1994 the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sent supplemental FY 1994 guidance to ORNL stating that in FY 1995 and beyond, Building 7602 is considered surplus to NE programs and missions and shall be shut down (deactivated) and maintained in a radiologically and industrially safe condition with minimal surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M). DOE-NE subsequently provided FY 1995 funding to support the deactivation activities. Deactivation of Building 7602 was initiated on October 1, 1994. The principal activity during the first quarter of FY 1995 was removal of process materials (chemicals and uranium) from the systems. The process systems were operated to achieve chemical solution concentrations needed for reuse or disposal of the solutions prior to removal of the materials from the systems. During this phase of deactivation the process materials processed and removed were: (1) Uranyl nitrate solution 30,178 L containing 4490 kg of uranium; (2) Nitric acid (neutralized) 9850 L containing less than 0.013 kg of uranium; (3) Organic solution 3346 L containing 265 kg of uranium; (4) Uranium oxide powder 95 kg; and (5) Miscellaneous chemicals. At the end of December 1994, the process systems and control systems were shut down and deactivated. Disposition of the process materials removed from the process systems in Building 7602 proved to be the most difficult part of the deactivation. An operational stand down and funding reductions at Y-12 prevented planned conversion of the uranyl nitrate solution to depleted uranium oxide powder. This led to disposal of the uranyl nitrate solution as waste

  14. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade by telmisartan prevents stress-induced impairment of memory via HPA axis deactivation and up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincewicz, D; Juchniewicz, A; Waszkiewicz, N; Braszko, J J

    2016-09-01

    Physical and psychological aspects of chronic stress continue to be a persistent clinical problem for which new pharmacological treatment strategies are aggressively sought. By the results of our previous work it has been demonstrated that telmisartan (TLM), an angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1) blocker (ARB) and partial agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), alleviates stress-induced cognitive decline. Understanding of mechanistic background of this phenomenon is hampered by both dual binding sites of TLM and limited data on the consequences of central AT1 blockade and PPARγ activation. Therefore, a critical need exists for progress in the characterization of this target for pro-cognitive drug discovery. An unusual ability of novel ARBs to exert various PPARγ binding activities is commonly being viewed as predominant over angiotensin blockade in terms of neuroprotection. Here we aimed to verify this hypothesis using an animal model of chronic psychological stress (Wistar rats restrained 2.5h daily for 21days) with simultaneous oral administration of TLM (1mg/kg), GW9662 - PPARγ receptor antagonist (0.5mg/kg), or both in combination, followed by a battery of behavioral tests (open field, elevated plus maze, inhibitory avoidance - IA, object recognition - OR), quantitative determination of serum corticosterone (CORT) and evaluation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HIP). Stressed animals displayed decreased recall of the IA behavior (pBDNF in the mPFC (paxis deactivation associated with changes in primarily cortical gene expression. This study confirms the dual activities of TLM that controls hypertension and cognition through AT1 blockade. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Visualization of migration of human cortical neurons generated from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Yohei; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Yamasaki, Mami

    2017-09-01

    Neuronal migration is considered a key process in human brain development. However, direct observation of migrating human cortical neurons in the fetal brain is accompanied by ethical concerns and is a major obstacle in investigating human cortical neuronal migration. We established a novel system that enables direct visualization of migrating cortical neurons generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We observed the migration of cortical neurons generated from hiPSCs derived from a control and from a patient with lissencephaly. Our system needs no viable brain tissue, which is usually used in slice culture. Migratory behavior of human cortical neuron can be observed more easily and more vividly by its fluorescence and glial scaffold than that by earlier methods. Our in vitro experimental system provides a new platform for investigating development of the human central nervous system and brain malformation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. PFP deactivation project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogen, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    This document identifies the overall approach for deactivation of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex, excluding the vaults, and includes a draft set of End Point Criteria for all buildings being deactivated

  17. Sensory experience regulates cortical inhibition by inducing IGF1 in VIP neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardinly, A R; Spiegel, I; Patrizi, A; Centofante, E; Bazinet, J E; Tzeng, C P; Mandel-Brehm, C; Harmin, D A; Adesnik, H; Fagiolini, M; Greenberg, M E

    2016-03-17

    Inhibitory neurons regulate the adaptation of neural circuits to sensory experience, but the molecular mechanisms by which experience controls the connectivity between different types of inhibitory neuron to regulate cortical plasticity are largely unknown. Here we show that exposure of dark-housed mice to light induces a gene program in cortical vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons that is markedly distinct from that induced in excitatory neurons and other subtypes of inhibitory neuron. We identify Igf1 as one of several activity-regulated genes that are specific to VIP neurons, and demonstrate that IGF1 functions cell-autonomously in VIP neurons to increase inhibitory synaptic input onto these neurons. Our findings further suggest that in cortical VIP neurons, experience-dependent gene transcription regulates visual acuity by activating the expression of IGF1, thus promoting the inhibition of disinhibitory neurons and affecting inhibition onto cortical pyramidal neurons.

  18. Short-term cortical plasticity induced by conditioning pain modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Line Lindhardt; Buchgreitz, Line; Wang, Li

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of homotopic and heterotopic conditioning pain modulation (CPM) on short-term cortical plasticity. Glutamate (tonic pain) or isotonic saline (sham) was injected in the upper trapezius (homotopic) and in the thenar (heterotopic) muscles. Intramuscular electrical stimulat......To investigate the effects of homotopic and heterotopic conditioning pain modulation (CPM) on short-term cortical plasticity. Glutamate (tonic pain) or isotonic saline (sham) was injected in the upper trapezius (homotopic) and in the thenar (heterotopic) muscles. Intramuscular electrical......, and after homotopic and heterotopic CPM versus control. Peak latencies at N100, P200, and P300 were extracted and the location/strength of corresponding dipole current sources and multiple dipoles were estimated. Homotopic CPM caused hypoalgesia (P = 0.032, 30.6% compared to baseline) to electrical...... stimulation. No cortical changes were found for homotopic CPM. A positive correlation at P200 between electrical pain threshold after tonic pain and the z coordinate after tonic pain (P = 0.032) was found for homotopic CPM. For heterotopic CPM, no significant hypoalgesia was found and a dipole shift of the P...

  19. Visual-induced expectations modulate auditory cortical responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie evan Wassenhove

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Active sensing has important consequences on multisensory processing (Schroeder et al. 2010. Here, we asked whether in the absence of saccades, the position of the eyes and the timing of transient colour changes of visual stimuli could selectively affect the excitability of auditory cortex by predicting the where and the when of a sound, respectively. Human participants were recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG while maintaining the position of their eyes on the left, right, or centre of the screen. Participants counted colour changes of the fixation cross while neglecting sounds which could be presented to the left, right or both ears. First, clear alpha power increases were observed in auditory cortices, consistent with participants’ attention directed to visual inputs. Second, colour changes elicited robust modulations of auditory cortex responses (when prediction seen as ramping activity, early alpha phase-locked responses, and enhanced high-gamma band responses in the contralateral side of sound presentation. Third, no modulations of auditory evoked or oscillatory activity were found to be specific to eye position. Altogether, our results suggest that visual transience can automatically elicit a prediction of when a sound will occur by changing the excitability of auditory cortices irrespective of the attended modality, eye position or spatial congruency of auditory and visual events. To the contrary, auditory cortical responses were not significantly affected by eye position suggesting that where predictions may require active sensing or saccadic reset to modulate auditory cortex responses, notably in the absence of spatial orientation to sounds.

  20. Acute Cocaine Induces Fast Activation of D1 Receptor and Progressive Deactivation of D2 Receptor Strial Neurons: In Vivo Optical Microprobe [Ca2+]i Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, C.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Heintz, N.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine induces fast dopamine increases in brain striatal regions, which are recognized to underlie its rewarding effects. Both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are involved in cocaine's reward but the dynamic downstream consequences of cocaine effects in striatum are not fully understood. Here we used transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of either the D1 receptor (D1R) or the D2 receptor (D2R) gene and microprobe optical imaging to assess the dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ) responses (used as marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in vivo separately for D1R- versus D2R-expressing neurons in striatum. Acute cocaine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) rapidly increased [Ca 2+ ] i in D1R-expressing neurons (10.6 ± 3.2%) in striatum within 8.3 ± 2.3 min after cocaine administration after which the increases plateaued; these fast [Ca 2+ ] i increases were blocked by pretreatment with a D1R antagonist (SCH23390). In contrast, cocaine induced progressive decreases in [Ca 2+ ] i in D2R-expressing neurons (10.4 ± 5.8%) continuously throughout the 30 min that followed cocaine administration; these slower [Ca 2+ ] i decreases were blocked by pretreatment with a D2R antagonist (raclopride). Since activation of striatal D1R-expressing neurons (direct-pathway) enhances cocaine reward, whereas activation of D2R expressing neurons suppresses it (indirect-pathway) (Lobo et al., 2010), this suggests that cocaine's rewarding effects entail both its fast stimulation ofD1R (resulting in abrupt activation of direct-pathway neurons) and a slower stimulation of D2R (resulting in longer-lasting deactivation of indirect-pathway neurons). We also provide direct in vivo evidence of D2R and D1R interactions in the striatal responses to acute cocaine administration.

  1. Luteolin decreases invasiveness, deactivates STAT3 signaling, and reverses interleukin-6 induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition and matrix metalloproteinase secretion of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang XC

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Xince Huang,1 Shengjie Dai,1 Juji Dai,1 Yuwu Xiao,1 Yongyu Bai,1 Bicheng Chen,1,2 Mengtao Zhou1 1Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Zhejiang Provincial Top Key Discipline in Surgery, Wenzhou Key Laboratory of Surgery, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Luteolin, a flavone, has been shown to exhibit anticancer properties. Here, we investigated whether luteolin affects epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cell lines and their underlying mechanism. Pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and SW1990 were used in our study, and their EMT characters, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression level, invasiveness, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 activity were determined after luteolin treatment. We also treated pancreatic cancer cells with interleukin-6 (IL-6 to see whether IL-6-induced activation of STAT3, EMT, and MMP secretion was affected by luteolin. We found that luteolin inhibits EMT and MMP2, MMP7, and MMP9 expression in a dose-dependent manner, similar to STAT3 signaling. Through Transwell assay, we found that invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells was inhibited by luteolin. EMT characters and MMP secretion increase with STAT3 activity after IL-6 treatment and these effects, caused by IL-6, were inhibited by luteolin. We concluded that luteolin inhibits invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells, and we speculated that luteolin inhibits EMT and MMP secretion likely through deactivation of STAT3 signaling. Luteolin has potential antitumor effects and merits further investigation. Keywords: epithelial–mesenchymal transition, matrix metalloproteinase, luteolin, STAT3

  2. Somatosensory cortices are required for the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference.

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    Zhiqiang Meng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sensory system information is thought to play an important role in drug addiction related responses. However, how somatic sensory information participates in the drug related behaviors is still unclear. Many studies demonstrated that drug addiction represents a pathological usurpation of neural mechanisms of learning and memory that normally relate to the pursuit of rewards. Thus, elucidate the role of somatic sensory in drug related learning and memory is of particular importance to understand the neurobiological mechanisms of drug addiction. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we investigated the role of somatosensory system in reward-related associative learning using the conditioned place preference model. Lesions were made in somatosensory cortices either before or after conditioning training. We found that lesion of somatosensory cortices before, rather than after morphine conditioning impaired the acquisition of place preference. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that somatosensory cortices are necessary for the acquisition but not retention of morphine induced place preference.

  3. Subcortical substrates of TMS induced modulation of the cortico-cortical connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groppa, Sergiu; Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Otto, Birte

    2013-01-01

    pulse TMS to the primary motor cortex (M1) of healthy subjects to interfere the cortical oscillatory activity recorded by simultaneous EEG and calculated the cortico-cortical coherence and power in the alpha and beta band. To study the structural substrate of the functional connectivity we performed...... diffusion tensor imaging and fractional anisotropy analysis (FA). To capture the pathways involved we applied probabilistic tractography to reconstruct the entire network. RESULTS: Suprathreshold TMS of M1 induced a consistent enhancement of interhemispheric cortico-cortical alpha band coherence that lasted...... ca. 175 ms. after the pulse has been applied. The changes were confined to the interhemispheric central EEG electrodes (i.e. C3-C4). There were no consistent changes in the beta band. Power analysis revealed a longer lasting increase in the beta band after TMS pulses. A cluster in the contralateral...

  4. Acute phencyclidine administration induces c-Fos-immunoreactivity in interneurons in cortical and subcortical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervig, Mona E; Thomsen, Morten S; Kalló, Imre

    2016-01-01

    and thalamus of rats. A single dose of PCP (10mg/kg, s.c.) significantly increased total number of c-Fos-IR in: (1) the prelimbic, infralimbic, anterior cingulate, ventrolateral orbital, motor, somatosensory and retrosplenial cortices as well as the nucleus accumbens (NAc), field CA1 of the hippocampus (CA1......) field of hippocampus and mediodorsal thalamus (MD); (2) PV-IR cells in the ventrolateral orbitofrontal and retrosplenial cortices and CA1 field of hippocampus; and (3) CB-IR cells in the motor cortex. Overall, our data indicate that PCP activates a wide range of cortical and subcortical brain regions...... and subcortical areas, but whether such induction occurs in specific populations of GABAergic interneuron subtypes still remains to be established. We performed an immunohistochemical analysis of the PCP-induced c-Fos-immunoreactivity (IR) in parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin (CB) interneuron subtypes in the cortex...

  5. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gefei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i. but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  6. Beneficial effects of minocycline on cuprizone induced cortical demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripuletz, Thomas; Miller, Elvira; Moharregh-Khiabani, Darius; Blank, Alexander; Pul, Refik; Gudi, Viktoria; Trebst, Corinna; Stangel, Martin

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential of minocycline to influence cuprizone induced demyelination in the grey and white matter. To induce demyelination C57BL/6 mice were fed with cuprizone for up to 6 weeks and were analysed at different timepoints (week 0, 4, 5, 6). Mice treated with minocycline had less demyelination of the cortex and corpus callosum compared with sham treated animals. In the cortex decreased numbers of activated and proliferating microglia were found after 6 weeks of cuprizone feeding, while there were no significant effects for microglial infiltration of the corpus callosum. In addition to the beneficial effects on demyelination, minocycline prevented from motor coordination disturbance as shown in the beam walking test. For astrogliosis and the numbers of OPC and oligodendrocytes no treatment effects were found. In summary, minocycline treatment diminished the course of demyelination in the grey and white matter and prevented disturbances in motor coordination.

  7. Role of IGF-1 in cortical plasticity and functional deficit induced by sensorimotor restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysoet, Julien; Dupont, Erwan; Bastide, Bruno; Canu, Marie-Hélène

    2015-09-01

    In the adult rat, sensorimotor restriction by hindlimb unloading (HU) is known to induce impairments in motor behavior as well as a disorganization of somatosensory cortex (shrinkage of the cortical representation of the hindpaw, enlargement of the cutaneous receptive fields, decreased cutaneous sensibility threshold). Recently, our team has demonstrated that IGF-1 level was decreased in the somatosensory cortex of rats submitted to a 14-day period of HU. To determine whether IGF-1 is involved in these plastic mechanisms, a chronic cortical infusion of this substance was performed by means of osmotic minipump. When administered in control rats, IGF-1 affects the size of receptive fields and the cutaneous threshold, but has no effect on the somatotopic map. In addition, when injected during the whole HU period, IGF-1 is interestingly implied in cortical changes due to hypoactivity: the shrinkage of somatotopic representation of hindlimb is prevented, whereas the enlargement of receptive fields is reduced. IGF-1 has no effect on the increase in neuronal response to peripheral stimulation. We also explored the functional consequences of IGF-1 level restoration on tactile sensory discrimination. In HU rats, the percentage of paw withdrawal after a light tactile stimulation was decreased, whereas it was similar to control level in HU-IGF-1 rats. Taken together, the data clearly indicate that IGF-1 plays a key-role in cortical plastic mechanisms and in behavioral alterations induced by a decrease in sensorimotor activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation-induced abnormal cortical thickness in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabao Lin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional MRI studies showed that radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC in years after radiotherapy (RT could involve brain gray matter (GM and impair brain function. However, it is still unclear the radiation-induced brain morphological changes in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM in the early period after RT. In this study, we acquired high-resolution brain structural MRI data from three groups of patients, 22 before radiotherapy (pre-RT NPC patients with newly diagnosed but not yet medically treated, 22 NPC patients in the early-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-ED, and 20 NPC patients in the late-delayed stage after radiotherapy (post-RT-LD, and then analyzed the radiation-induced cortical thickness alteration in NPC patients after RT. Using a vertex-wise surface-based morphometry (SBM approach, we detected significantly decreased cortical thickness in the precentral gyrus (PreCG in the post-RT-ED group compared to the pre-RT group. And the post-RT-LD group showed significantly increased cortical thickness in widespread brain regions, including the bilateral inferior parietal, left isthmus of the cingulate, left bank of the superior temporal sulcus and left lateral occipital regions, compared to the pre-RT group, and in the bilateral PreCG compared to the post-RT-ED group. Similar analysis with ROI-wise SBM method also found the consistent results. These results indicated that radiation-induced brain injury mainly occurred in the post-RT-LD group and the cortical thickness alterations after RT were dynamic in different periods. Our findings may reflect the pathogenesis of radiation-induced brain injury in NPC patients with normal-appearing GM and an early intervention is necessary for protecting GM during RT.

  9. Thalamic deactivation at sleep onset precedes that of the cerebral cortex in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnin, Michel; Rey, Marc; Bastuji, Hélène; Guillemant, Philippe; Mauguière, François; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Thalamic and cortical activities are assumed to be time-locked throughout all vigilance states. Using simultaneous intracortical and intrathalamic recordings, we demonstrate here that the thalamic deactivation occurring at sleep onset most often precedes that of the cortex by several minutes, whereas reactivation of both structures during awakening is synchronized. Delays between thalamus and cortex deactivations can vary from one subject to another when a similar cortical region is considered. In addition, heterogeneity in activity levels throughout the cortical mantle is larger than previously thought during the descent into sleep. Thus, asynchronous thalamo-cortical deactivation while falling asleep probably explains the production of hypnagogic hallucinations by a still-activated cortex and the common self-overestimation of the time needed to fall asleep. PMID:20142493

  10. Disruption of cortical integration during midazolam-induced light sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peipeng; Zhang, Han; Xu, Yachao; Jia, Wenbin; Zang, Yufeng; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-11-01

    This work examines the effect of midazolam-induced light sedation on intrinsic functional connectivity of human brain, using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, within-subject design. Fourteen healthy young subjects were enrolled and midazolam (0.03 mg/kg of the participant's body mass, to a maximum of 2.5 mg) or saline were administrated with an interval of one week. Resting-state fMRI was conducted before and after administration for each subject. We focus on two types of networks: sensory related lower-level functional networks and higher-order functions related ones. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify these resting-state functional networks. We hypothesize that the sensory (visual, auditory, and sensorimotor) related networks will be intact under midazolam-induced light sedation while the higher-order (default mode, executive control, salience networks, etc.) networks will be functionally disconnected. It was found that the functional integrity of the lower-level networks was maintained, while that of the higher-level networks was significantly disrupted by light sedation. The within-network connectivity of the two types of networks was differently affected in terms of direction and extent. These findings provide direct evidence that higher-order cognitive functions including memory, attention, executive function, and language were impaired prior to lower-level sensory responses during sedation. Our result also lends support to the information integration model of consciousness. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. GDNF/GFRα1 Complex Abrogates Self-Renewing Activity of Cortical Neural Precursors Inducing Their Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonela Bonafina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The balance between factors leading to proliferation and differentiation of cortical neural precursors (CNPs determines the correct cortical development. In this work, we show that GDNF and its receptor GFRα1 are expressed in the neocortex during the period of cortical neurogenesis. We show that the GDNF/GFRα1 complex inhibits the self-renewal capacity of mouse CNP cells induced by fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2, promoting neuronal differentiation. While GDNF leads to decreased proliferation of cultured cortical precursor cells, ablation of GFRα1 in glutamatergic cortical precursors enhances its proliferation. We show that GDNF treatment of CNPs promoted morphological differentiation even in the presence of the self-renewal-promoting factor, FGF2. Analysis of GFRα1-deficient mice shows an increase in the number of cycling cells during cortical development and a reduction in dendrite development of cortical GFRα1-expressing neurons. Together, these results indicate that GDNF/GFRα1 signaling plays an essential role in regulating the proliferative condition and the differentiation of cortical progenitors. : In this article, Ledda and colleagues show that GDNF acting through its receptor GFRα1 plays a critical role in the maturation of cortical progenitors by counteracting FGF2 self-renewal activity on neural stem cells and promoting neuronal differentiation. Keywords: GDNF, GFRα1, cortical precursors, proliferation, postmitotic neurons, neuronal differentiation

  12. Effects of fatigue induced damage on the longitudinal fracture resistance of cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Lloyd; Codrington, John; Parkinson, Ian

    2014-07-01

    As a composite material, cortical bone accumulates fatigue microdamage through the repetitive loading of everyday activity (e.g. walking). The accumulation of fatigue microdamage is thought to contribute to the occurrence of fragility fractures in older people. Therefore it is beneficial to understand the relationship between microcrack accumulation and the fracture resistance of cortical bone. Twenty longitudinally orientated compact tension fracture specimens were machined from a single bovine femur, ten specimens were assigned to both the control and fatigue damaged groups. The damaged group underwent a fatigue loading protocol to induce microdamage which was assessed via fluorescent microscopy. Following fatigue loading, non-linear fracture resistance tests were undertaken on both the control and damaged groups using the J-integral method. The interaction of the crack path with the fatigue induced damage and inherent toughening mechanisms were then observed using fluorescent microscopy. The results of this study show that fatigue induced damage reduces the initiation toughness of cortical bone and the growth toughness within the damage zone by three distinct mechanisms of fatigue-fracture interaction. Further analysis of the J-integral fracture resistance showed both the elastic and plastic component were reduced in the damaged group. For the elastic component this was attributed to a decreased number of ligament bridges in the crack wake while for the plastic component this was attributed to the presence of pre-existing fatigue microcracks preventing energy absorption by the formation of new microcracks.

  13. mGluR5 ablation in cortical glutamatergic neurons increases novelty-induced locomotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris P Jew

    Full Text Available The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 has been implicated in the pathology of various neurological disorders including schizophrenia, ADHD, and autism. mGluR5-dependent synaptic plasticity has been described at a variety of neural connections and its signaling has been implicated in several behaviors. These behaviors include locomotor reactivity to novel environment, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, and cognition. mGluR5 is expressed in glutamatergic neurons, inhibitory neurons, and glia in various brain regions. In this study, we show that deleting mGluR5 expression only in principal cortical neurons leads to defective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R dependent synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex. These cortical glutamatergic mGluR5 knockout mice exhibit increased novelty-induced locomotion, and their locomotion can be further enhanced by treatment with the psychostimulant methylphenidate. Despite a modest reduction in repetitive behaviors, cortical glutamatergic mGluR5 knockout mice are normal in sensorimotor gating, anxiety, motor balance/learning and fear conditioning behaviors. These results show that mGluR5 signaling in cortical glutamatergic neurons is required for precisely modulating locomotor reactivity to a novel environment but not for sensorimotor gating, anxiety, motor coordination, several forms of learning or social interactions.

  14. Pharmacological modulation of cortical excitability shifts induced by transcranial direct current stimulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, M A; Fricke, K; Henschke, U; Schlitterlau, A; Liebetanz, D; Lang, N; Henning, S; Tergau, F; Paulus, W

    2003-11-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the human motor cortex results in polarity-specific shifts of cortical excitability during and after stimulation. Anodal tDCS enhances and cathodal stimulation reduces excitability. Animal experiments have demonstrated that the effect of anodal tDCS is caused by neuronal depolarisation, while cathodal tDCS hyperpolarises cortical neurones. However, not much is known about the ion channels and receptors involved in these effects. Thus, the impact of the sodium channel blocker carbamazepine, the calcium channel blocker flunarizine and the NMDA receptor antagonist dextromethorphane on tDCS-elicited motor cortical excitability changes of healthy human subjects were tested. tDCS-protocols inducing excitability alterations (1) only during tDCS and (2) eliciting long-lasting after-effects were applied after drug administration. Carbamazepine selectively eliminated the excitability enhancement induced by anodal stimulation during and after tDCS. Flunarizine resulted in similar changes. Antagonising NMDA receptors did not alter current-generated excitability changes during a short stimulation, which elicits no after-effects, but prevented the induction of long-lasting after-effects independent of their direction. These results suggest that, like in other animals, cortical excitability shifts induced during tDCS in humans also depend on membrane polarisation, thus modulating the conductance of sodium and calcium channels. Moreover, they suggest that the after-effects may be NMDA receptor dependent. Since NMDA receptors are involved in neuroplastic changes, the results suggest a possible application of tDCS in the modulation or induction of these processes in a clinical setting. The selective elimination of tDCS-driven excitability enhancements by carbamazepine proposes a role for this drug in focussing the effects of cathodal tDCS, which may have important future clinical applications.

  15. Enhancement of synaptic transmission induced by BDNF in cultured cortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Li, Yanling; Luo, Qingming

    2005-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), like other neurotrophins, has long-term effects on neuronal survival and differentiation; furthermore, BDNF has been reported to exert an acute potentiation of synaptic activity and are critically involved in long-term potentiation (LTP). We found that BDNF rapidly induced potentiation of synaptic activity and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in cultured cortical neurons. Within minutes of BDNF application to cultured cortical neurons, spontaneous firing rate was dramatically increased as were the frequency and amplitude of excitatory spontaneous postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Fura-2 recordings showed that BDNF acutely elicited an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]c). This effect was partially dependent on [Ca2+]o; The BDNF-induced increase in [Ca2+]c can not be completely blocked by Ca2+-free solution. It was completely blocked by K252a and partially blocked by Cd2+ and TTX. The results demonstrate that BDNF can enhances synaptic transmission and that this effect is accompanied by a rise in [Ca2+]c that requires two route: the release of Ca2+ from intracellular calcium stores and influx of extracellular Ca2+ through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in cultured cortical neurons.

  16. Piriform cortical glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons express coordinated plasticity for whisker-induced odor recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahui; Gao, Zilong; Chen, Changfeng; Wen, Bo; Huang, Li; Ge, Rongjing; Zhao, Shidi; Fan, Ruichen; Feng, Jing; Lu, Wei; Wang, Liping; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2017-11-10

    Neural plasticity occurs in learning and memory. Coordinated plasticity at glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons during memory formation remains elusive, which we investigate in a mouse model of associative learning by cellular imaging and electrophysiology. Paired odor and whisker stimulations lead to whisker-induced olfaction response. In mice that express this cross-modal memory, the neurons in the piriform cortex are recruited to encode newly acquired whisker signal alongside innate odor signal, and their response patterns to these associated signals are different. There are emerged synaptic innervations from barrel cortical neurons to piriform cortical neurons from these mice. These results indicate the recruitment of associative memory cells in the piriform cortex after associative memory. In terms of the structural and functional plasticity at these associative memory cells in the piriform cortex, glutamatergic neurons and synapses are upregulated, GABAergic neurons and synapses are downregulated as well as their mutual innervations are refined in the coordinated manner. Therefore, the associated activations of sensory cortices triggered by their input signals induce the formation of their mutual synapse innervations, the recruitment of associative memory cells and the coordinated plasticity between the GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, which work for associative memory cells to encode cross-modal associated signals in their integration, associative storage and distinguishable retrieval.

  17. Cortical cholinergic deficiency enhances amphetamine-induced dopamine release in the accumbens but not striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Anna; Olson, Lars; Svensson, Torgny H; Schilström, Björn

    2007-11-01

    Cholinergic dysfunction has been implicated as a putative contributing factor in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Recently, we showed that cholinergic denervation of the neocortex in adult rats leads to a marked increase in the behavioral response to amphetamine. The main objective of this study was to investigate if the enhanced locomotor response to amphetamine seen after cortical cholinergic denervation was paralleled by an increased amphetamine-induced release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and/or striatum. The corticopetal cholinergic projections were lesioned by intraparenchymal infusion of 192 IgG-saporin into the nucleus basalis magnocellularis of adult rats. Amphetamine-induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens or striatum was monitored by in vivo microdialysis 2 to 3 weeks after lesioning. We found that cholinergic denervation of the rat neocortex leads to a significantly increased amphetamine-induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Interestingly, the cholinergic lesion did not affect amphetamine-induced release of dopamine in the striatum. The enhanced amphetamine-induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens in the cholinergically denervated rats could be reversed by administration of the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine, but not nicotine, prior to the amphetamine challenge, suggesting that loss of muscarinic receptor stimulation is likely to have caused the observed effect. The results suggest that abnormal responsiveness of dopamine neurons can be secondary to cortical cholinergic deficiency. This, in turn, might be of relevance for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and provides a possible link between cholinergic disturbances and alteration of dopamine transmission.

  18. Cytokines effects on radio-induced apoptosis in cortical and hippocampal rat cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffigny, H.; Briot, D.; Le Nin, I.

    2000-01-01

    In the central nervous system in development the radio-induced cell death occurs mainly by apoptosis. The effects of modulating factors like cytokines were studied on this kind of death. To handle more easily parameters implicated in nerve cell apoptosis, we studied the effects of radiation with a in vitro system. Cells were isolated from rat foetal cortex and hippocampus, two of the major structures implicated in human mental retardation observed after exposition in utero at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Cortical or hippocampal cells were isolated from 17 day-old rat foetuses by enzymatic and mechanical treatments and irradiated with 0.50 or 1 Gy. The cells from both structures were cultured 1 or 3 days in serum free medium. Cytokines like βNGF, NT3, EGF, βTGF, α and βFGF, IGF I and II, interleukines like Il 1β, Il 2 and IL 6 were added to the medium. In 3 days cortical cell culture, only βFGF increased cell survival with as little as 10 ng/ml. This effect was dose dependent. In hippocampal cell culture, no significant increase of cell survival occurred with 10 ng/ml of any cytokines. In the same system culture with 1 Gy irradiation, the positive or negative effect of the association of βFGF with another cytokine was tested on cell survival. Only the association with EGF induced higher cell survival in cortical cell culture. In hippocampal cell culture where βFGF alone had no effect, the cell survival was not modified by the association. In the same system, the triple association of βFGF-EGF with another cytokine was tested on hippocampal and cortical cell cultures. No significant effect was observed in both cultures but cell survival trented to decrease with βTGF. In order to avoid the mitotic effect of cytokines in the 3 day-old culture, experiments were carried out on 20 hours cell culture, before the end of the first round of the cell cycle, with the selected cytokines (βFGF or βFGF-EGF). Without irradiation, the percentage of cortical cell survival

  19. Methamphetamine induces heme oxygenase-1 expression in cortical neurons and glia to prevent its toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.-N.; Wu, C.-H.; Lin, T.-C.; Wang, J.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    The impairment of cognitive and motor functions in humans and animals caused by methamphetamine (METH) administration underscores the importance of METH toxicity in cortical neurons. The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts a cytoprotective effect against various neuronal injures; however, it remains unclear whether HO-1 is involved in METH-induced toxicity. We used primary cortical neuron/glia cocultures to explore the role of HO-1 in METH-induced toxicity. Exposure of cultured cells to various concentrations of METH (0.1, 0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 10 mM) led to cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. A METH concentration of 5 mM, which caused 50% of neuronal death and glial activation, was chosen for subsequent experiments. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that METH significantly induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, both preceded cell death. Double and triple immunofluorescence staining further identified HO-1-positive cells as activated astrocytes, microglia, and viable neurons, but not dying neurons. Inhibition of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway significantly blocked HO-1 induction by METH and aggravated METH neurotoxicity. Inhibition of HO activity using tin protoporphyrine IX significantly reduced HO activity and exacerbated METH neurotoxicity. However, prior induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrine IX partially protected neurons from METH toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest that induction of HO-1 by METH via the p38 signaling pathway may be protective, albeit insufficient to completely protect cortical neurons from METH toxicity.

  20. A New Rat Model of Epileptic Spasms Based on Methylazoxymethanol-Induced Malformations of Cortical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hee Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Malformations of cortical development (MCDs can cause medically intractable epilepsies and cognitive disabilities in children. We developed a new model of MCD-associated epileptic spasms by treating rats prenatally with methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM to induce cortical malformations and postnatally with N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA to induce spasms. To produce cortical malformations to infant rats, two dosages of MAM (15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally were injected to pregnant rats at gestational day 15. In prenatally MAM-exposed rats and the controls, spasms were triggered by single (6 mg/kg on postnatal day 12 (P12 or 10 mg/kg on P13 or 15 mg/kg on P15 or multiple doses (P12, P13, and P15 of NMDA. In prenatally MAM-exposed rats with single NMDA-provoked spasms at P15, we obtain the intracranial electroencephalography and examine the pretreatment response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH or vigabatrin. Rat pups prenatally exposed to MAM exhibited a significantly greater number of spasms in response to single and multiple postnatal NMDA doses than vehicle-exposed controls. Vigabatrin treatment prior to a single NMDA dose on P15 significantly suppressed spasms in MAM group rats (p < 0.05, while ACTH did not. The MAM group also showed significantly higher fast oscillation (25–100 Hz power during NMDA-induced spasms than controls (p = 0.047. This new model of MCD-based epileptic spasms with corresponding features of human spasms will be valuable for future research of the developmental epilepsy.

  1. N Reactor Deactivation Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    This N Reactor Deactivation Program Plan is structured to provide the basic methodology required to place N Reactor and supporting facilities · in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition such that they can be decommissioned at a later date. Deactivation will be in accordance with facility transfer criteria specified in Department of Energy (DOE) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) guidance. Transition activities primarily involve shutdown and isolation of operational systems and buildings, radiological/hazardous waste cleanup, N Fuel Basin stabilization and environmental stabilization of the facilities. The N Reactor Deactivation Program covers the period FY 1992 through FY 1997. The directive to cease N Reactor preservation and prepare for decommissioning was issued by DOE to WHC on September 20, 1991. The work year and budget data supporting the Work Breakdown Structure in this document are found in the Activity Data Sheets (ADS) and the Environmental Restoration Program Baseline, that are prepared annually

  2. Implementing RCRA during facility deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebaron, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    RCRA regulations require closure of permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations, and this may essentially necessitate decommissioning to complete closure. A more cost effective way to handle the facility would be to significantly reduce the risk to human health and the environment by taking it from its operational status to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to decommissioning. This paper presents an innovative approach to the cost effective deactivation of a large, complex chemical processing facility permitted under RCRA. The approach takes into account risks to the environment posed by this facility in comparison to risks posed by neighboring facilities at the site. The paper addresses the manner in which: 1) stakeholders and regulators were involved; 2) identifies a process by which the project proceeds and regulators and stakeholders were involved; 3) end points were developed so completion of deactivation was clearly identified at the beginning of the project, and 4) innovative practices were used to deactivate more quickly and cost effectively

  3. Pharmacological Mechanisms of Cortical Enhancement Induced by the Repetitive Pairing of Visual/Cholinergic Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Il Kang

    Full Text Available Repetitive visual training paired with electrical activation of cholinergic projections to the primary visual cortex (V1 induces long-term enhancement of cortical processing in response to the visual training stimulus. To better determine the receptor subtypes mediating this effect the selective pharmacological blockade of V1 nicotinic (nAChR, M1 and M2 muscarinic (mAChR or GABAergic A (GABAAR receptors was performed during the training session and visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded before and after training. The training session consisted of the exposure of awake, adult rats to an orientation-specific 0.12 CPD grating paired with an electrical stimulation of the basal forebrain for a duration of 1 week for 10 minutes per day. Pharmacological agents were infused intracortically during this period. The post-training VEP amplitude was significantly increased compared to the pre-training values for the trained spatial frequency and to adjacent spatial frequencies up to 0.3 CPD, suggesting a long-term increase of V1 sensitivity. This increase was totally blocked by the nAChR antagonist as well as by an M2 mAChR subtype and GABAAR antagonist. Moreover, administration of the M2 mAChR antagonist also significantly decreased the amplitude of the control VEPs, suggesting a suppressive effect on cortical responsiveness. However, the M1 mAChR antagonist blocked the increase of the VEP amplitude only for the high spatial frequency (0.3 CPD, suggesting that M1 role was limited to the spread of the enhancement effect to a higher spatial frequency. More generally, all the drugs used did block the VEP increase at 0.3 CPD. Further, use of each of the aforementioned receptor antagonists blocked training-induced changes in gamma and beta band oscillations. These findings demonstrate that visual training coupled with cholinergic stimulation improved perceptual sensitivity by enhancing cortical responsiveness in V1. This enhancement is mainly mediated by n

  4. Deactivation of silica surfaces with a silanol-terminated polysiloxane; Structural characterization by inverse gas chromatography and solid-state NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, A.B.; Haan, de J.W.; Janssen, J.G.M.; Ven, van de L.J.M.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Retention gape deactivated with Silicone OV-1701-OH show good chromatographic performance and remarkable stability against water induced stationary phase degradrdation. In an attempt to better understand the findamentals off the deactivation process using silanol terminated polysiloxanes, a fumed

  5. Chronic ciguatoxin treatment induces synaptic scaling through voltage gated sodium channels in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Rubiolo, Juan A; Roel, Maria; Hirama, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shuji; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2015-06-15

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channels activators that cause ciguatera, one of the most widespread nonbacterial forms of food poisoning, which presents with long-term neurological alterations. In central neurons, chronic perturbations in activity induce homeostatic synaptic mechanisms that adjust the strength of excitatory synapses and modulate glutamate receptor expression in order to stabilize the overall activity. Immediate early genes, such as Arc and Egr1, are induced in response to activity changes and underlie the trafficking of glutamate receptors during neuronal homeostasis. To better understand the long lasting neurological consequences of ciguatera, it is important to establish the role that chronic changes in activity produced by ciguatoxins represent to central neurons. Here, the effect of a 30 min exposure of 10-13 days in vitro (DIV) cortical neurons to the synthetic ciguatoxin CTX 3C on Arc and Egr1 expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Since the toxin increased the mRNA levels of both Arc and Egr1, the effect of CTX 3C in NaV channels, membrane potential, firing activity, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and glutamate receptors expression in cortical neurons after a 24 h exposure was evaluated using electrophysiological and western blot approaches. The data presented here show that CTX 3C induced an upregulation of Arc and Egr1 that was prevented by previous coincubation of the neurons with the NaV channel blocker tetrodotoxin. In addition, chronic CTX 3C caused a concentration-dependent shift in the activation voltage of NaV channels to more negative potentials and produced membrane potential depolarization. Moreover, 24 h treatment of cortical neurons with 5 nM CTX 3C decreased neuronal firing and induced synaptic scaling mechanisms, as evidenced by a decrease in the amplitude of mEPSCs and downregulation in the protein level of glutamate receptors that was also prevented by tetrodotoxin

  6. Cortical plasticity induced by spike-triggered microstimulation in primate somatosensory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Song

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation of the nervous system for therapeutic purposes, such as deep brain stimulation in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, has been used for decades. Recently, increased attention has focused on using microstimulation to restore functions as diverse as somatosensation and memory. However, how microstimulation changes the neural substrate is still not fully understood. Microstimulation may cause cortical changes that could either compete with or complement natural neural processes, and could result in neuroplastic changes rendering the region dysfunctional or even epileptic. As part of our efforts to produce neuroprosthetic devices and to further study the effects of microstimulation on the cortex, we stimulated and recorded from microelectrode arrays in the hand area of the primary somatosensory cortex (area 1 in two awake macaque monkeys. We applied a simple neuroprosthetic microstimulation protocol to a pair of electrodes in the area 1 array, using either random pulses or pulses time-locked to the recorded spiking activity of a reference neuron. This setup was replicated using a computer model of the thalamocortical system, which consisted of 1980 spiking neurons distributed among six cortical layers and two thalamic nuclei. Experimentally, we found that spike-triggered microstimulation induced cortical plasticity, as shown by increased unit-pair mutual information, while random microstimulation did not. In addition, there was an increased response to touch following spike-triggered microstimulation, along with decreased neural variability. The computer model successfully reproduced both qualitative and quantitative aspects of the experimental findings. The physiological findings of this study suggest that even simple microstimulation protocols can be used to increase somatosensory information flow.

  7. Lycopene Prevents Amyloid [Beta]-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress and Dysfunctions in Cultured Rat Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mingyue; Jiang, Zheng; Liao, Yuanxiang; Song, Zhenyao; Nan, Xinzhong

    2016-06-01

    Brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) show a large spectrum of mitochondrial alterations at both morphological and genetic level. The causal link between β-amyloid (Aβ) and mitochondrial dysfunction has been established in cellular models of AD. We observed previously that lycopene, a member of the carotenoid family of phytochemicals, could counteract neuronal apoptosis and cell damage induced by Aβ and other neurotoxic substances, and that this neuroprotective action somehow involved the mitochondria. The present study aims to investigate the effects of lycopene on mitochondria in cultured rat cortical neurons exposed to Aβ. It was found that lycopene attenuated Aβ-induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by the decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondria-derived superoxide production. Additionally, lycopene ameliorated Aβ-induced mitochondrial morphological alteration, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pores and the consequent cytochrome c release. Lycopene also improved mitochondrial complex activities and restored ATP levels in Aβ-treated neuron. Furthermore, lycopene prevented mitochondrial DNA damages and improved the protein level of mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria. Those results indicate that lycopene protects mitochondria against Aβ-induced damages, at least in part by inhibiting mitochondrial oxidative stress and improving mitochondrial function. These beneficial effects of lycopene may account for its protection against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Functional MRI Assessment of Task-Induced Deactivation of the Default Mode Network in Alzheimer?s Disease and At-Risk Older Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Pihlajam?ki, Maija; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in old age, and is characterized by prominent impairment of episodic memory. Recent functional imaging studies in AD have demonstrated alterations in a distributed network of brain regions supporting memory function, including regions of the default mode network. Previous positron emission tomography studies of older individuals at risk for AD have revealed hypometabolism of association cortical regions similar to the metabolic abno...

  9. Adaptation to Cortical Noise Induced by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Occipital Lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Heslip

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is increasingly used as a method to modify and study functional brain activity. However, results from various studies have produced conflicting theories on how TMS of cortical tissue influences ongoing visual processing. To investigate this issue, single pulse TMS was applied over left V1 in five healthy subjects during an orientation discrimination task (vertical vs. horizontal using a Gabor patch (2 c/deg, presented 6° in the right visual field. Stimulus contrast was set to each individual's threshold, measured in the absence of TMS. When TMS was applied over V1 performance decreased in all observers (by 1.2–8.7% compared to accuracy levels obtained during stimulation of a control site (Cz. Crucially, accuracy levels during V1 stimulation gradually improved across blocks of 200 trials in some subjects, whereas performance remained stable during control site stimulation. In contrast, this pattern of recovery was not found in an analogous backward masking paradigm, using a brief visual noise mask instead of a TMS pulse. These results show that that the magnitude of TMS disruption can dissipate with repeated stimulation. This suggests that future studies using this technique should minimise the length of TMS exposure within each session to maximise its effectiveness. Our results show that the visual system can adapt dynamically to increased internal noise levels, minimising the impact of TMS induced cortical activity on sensory judgments.

  10. Huperzine A prophylaxis against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rats is associated with increased cortical inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersner, R; Ekstein, D; Dhamne, S C; Schachter, S C; Rotenberg, A

    2015-11-01

    Huperzine A (HupA) is a naturally occurring compound found in the firmoss Huperzia serrata. While HupA is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, its full pharmacologic profile is incompletely described. Since previous works suggested a capacity for HupA to prophylax against seizures, we tested the HupA antiepileptic potential in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) rat epilepsy model and explored its mechanism of action by spectral EEG analysis and by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS), a measure of GABA-mediated intracortical inhibition. We tested whether HupA suppresses seizures in the rat PTZ acute seizure model, and quantified latency to first myoclonus and to generalized tonic-clonic seizure, and spike frequency on EEG. Additionally, we measured power in the EEG gamma frequency band which is associated with GABAergic cortical interneuron activation. Then, as a step toward further examining the HupA antiepileptic mechanism of action, we tested long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) using ppTMS coupled with electromyography to assess whether HupA augments GABA-mediated paired-pulse inhibition of the motor evoked potential. We also tested whether the HupA effect on paired-pulse inhibition was central or peripheral by comparison of outcomes following administration of HupA or the peripheral acetylcholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine. We also tested whether the HupA effect was dependent on central muscarinic or GABAA receptors by co-administration of HupA and atropine or PTZ, respectively. In tests of antiepileptic potential, HupA suppressed seizures and epileptic spikes on EEG. Spectral EEG analysis also revealed enhanced gamma frequency band power with HupA treatment. By ppTMS we found that HupA increases intracortical inhibition and blocks PTZ-induced cortical excitation. Atropine co-administration with HupA did not alter HupA-induced intracortical inhibition suggesting independent of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors mechanism in this model

  11. Structure of the Deactive State of Mammalian Respiratory Complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaza, James N; Vinothkumar, Kutti R; Hirst, Judy

    2018-02-06

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is central to energy metabolism in mammalian mitochondria. It couples NADH oxidation by ubiquinone to proton transport across the energy-conserving inner membrane, catalyzing respiration and driving ATP synthesis. In the absence of substrates, active complex I gradually enters a pronounced resting or deactive state. The active-deactive transition occurs during ischemia and is crucial for controlling how respiration recovers upon reperfusion. Here, we set a highly active preparation of Bos taurus complex I into the biochemically defined deactive state, and used single-particle electron cryomicroscopy to determine its structure to 4.1 Å resolution. We show that the deactive state arises when critical structural elements that form the ubiquinone-binding site become disordered, and we propose reactivation is induced when substrate binding to the NADH-reduced enzyme templates their reordering. Our structure both rationalizes biochemical data on the deactive state and offers new insights into its physiological and cellular roles. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of functional near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor cortical plasticity induced by transcranial direct current stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Bilal; Hervey, Nathan; Stowe, Ann; Hodics, Timea; Alexandrakis, George

    2013-03-01

    Electrical stimulation of the human cortex in conjunction with physical rehabilitation has been a valuable approach in facilitating the plasticity of the injured brain. One such method is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) which is a non-invasive method to elicit neural stimulation by delivering current through electrodes placed on the scalp. In order to better understand the effects tDCS has on cortical plasticity, neuroimaging techniques have been used pre and post tDCS stimulation. Recently, neuroimaging methods have discovered changes in resting state cortical hemodynamics after the application of tDCS on human subjects. However, analysis of the cortical hemodynamic activity for a physical task during and post tDCS stimulation has not been studied to our knowledge. A viable and sensitive neuroimaging method to map changes in cortical hemodynamics during activation is functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). In this study, the cortical activity during an event-related, left wrist curl task was mapped with fNIRS before, during, and after tDCS stimulation on eight healthy adults. Along with the fNIRS optodes, two electrodes were placed over the sensorimotor hand areas of both brain hemispheres to apply tDCS. Changes were found in both resting state cortical connectivity and cortical activation patterns that occurred during and after tDCS. Additionally, changes to surface electromyography (sEMG) measurements of the wrist flexor and extensor of both arms during the wrist curl movement, acquired concurrently with fNIRS, were analyzed and related to the transient cortical plastic changes induced by tDCS.

  13. Potential protection of green tea polyphenols against 1800 MHz electromagnetic radiation-induced injury on rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Li; Wen, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2011-10-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) are harmful to public health, but the certain anti-irradiation mechanism is not clear yet. The present study was performed to investigate the possible protective effects of green tea polyphenols against electromagnetic radiation-induced injury in the cultured rat cortical neurons. In this study, green tea polyphenols were used in the cultured cortical neurons exposed to 1800 MHz EMFs by the mobile phone. We found that the mobile phone irradiation for 24 h induced marked neuronal cell death in the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) and TUNEL (TdT mediated biotin-dUTP nicked-end labeling) assay, and protective effects of green tea polyphenols on the injured cortical neurons were demonstrated by testing the content of Bcl-2 Assaciated X protein (Bax) in the immunoprecipitation assay and Western blot assay. In our study results, the mobile phone irradiation-induced increases in the content of active Bax were inhibited significantly by green tea polyphenols, while the contents of total Bax had no marked changes after the treatment of green tea polyphenols. Our results suggested a neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols against the mobile phone irradiation-induced injury on the cultured rat cortical neurons.

  14. Frontal brain deactivation during a non-verbal cognitive judgement bias test in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldimann, Kathrin; Vögeli, Sabine; Wolf, Martin; Wechsler, Beat; Gygax, Lorenz

    2015-02-01

    Animal welfare concerns have raised an interest in animal affective states. These states also play an important role in the proximate control of behaviour. Due to their potential to modulate short-term emotional reactions, one specific focus is on long-term affective states, that is, mood. These states can be assessed by using non-verbal cognitive judgement bias paradigms. Here, we conducted a spatial variant of such a test on 24 focal animals that were kept under either unpredictable, stimulus-poor or predictable, stimulus-rich housing conditions to induce differential mood states. Based on functional near-infrared spectroscopy, we measured haemodynamic frontal brain reactions during 10 s in which the sheep could observe the configuration of the cognitive judgement bias trial before indicating their assessment based on the go/no-go reaction. We used (generalised) mixed-effects models to evaluate the data. Sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor housing conditions took longer and were less likely to reach the learning criterion and reacted slightly more optimistically in the cognitive judgement bias test than sheep from the predictable, stimulus-rich housing conditions. A frontal cortical increase in deoxy-haemoglobin [HHb] and a decrease in oxy-haemoglobin [O2Hb] were observed during the visual assessment of the test situation by the sheep, indicating a frontal cortical brain deactivation. This deactivation was more pronounced with the negativity of the test situation, which was reflected by the provenance of the sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor housing conditions, the proximity of the cue to the negatively reinforced cue location, or the absence of a go reaction in the trial. It seems that (1) sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor in comparison to sheep from the predictable, stimulus-rich housing conditions dealt less easily with the test conditions rich in stimuli, that (2) long-term housing conditions seemingly did not influence mood

  15. Variability and Reliability of Paired-Pulse Depression and Cortical Oscillation Induced by Median Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Hideaki; Otsuru, Naofumi; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Saito, Kei; Inukai, Yasuto; Yamashiro, Koya; Sato, Daisuke; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2018-05-08

    Paired-pulse depression (PPD) has been widely used to investigate the functional profiles of somatosensory cortical inhibition. However, PPD induced by somatosensory stimulation is variable, and the reasons for between- and within-subject PPD variability remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to clarify the factors influencing PPD variability induced by somatosensory stimulation. The study participants were 19 healthy volunteers. First, we investigated the relationship between the PPD ratio of each component (N20m, P35m, and P60m) of the somatosensory magnetic field, and the alpha, beta, and gamma band changes in power [event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS)] induced by median nerve stimulation. Second, because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene polymorphisms reportedly influence the PPD ratio, we assessed whether BDNF genotype influences PPD ratio variability. Finally, we evaluated the test-retest reliability of PPD and the alpha, beta, and gamma ERD/ERS induced by somatosensory stimulation. Significant positive correlations were observed between the P60m_PPD ratio and beta power change, and the P60m_PPD ratio was significantly smaller for the beta ERD group than for the beta ERS group. P35m_PPD was found to be robust and highly reproducible; however, P60m_PPD reproducibility was poor. In addition, the ICC values for alpha, beta, and gamma ERD/ERS were 0.680, 0.760, and 0.552 respectively. These results suggest that the variability of PPD for the P60m deflection may be influenced by the ERD/ERS magnitude, which is induced by median nerve stimulation.

  16. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1

  17. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zheng, Ruimao, E-mail: rmzheng@pku.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shigong, E-mail: sgzhu@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  18. Plasticity Induced by Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Bilateral Motor Cortices Is Not Altered in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daina S. E. Dickins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported that plasticity induced in the motor cortex by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is attenuated in older adults. Those investigations, however, have focused solely on the stimulated hemisphere. Compared to young adults, older adults exhibit more widespread activity across bilateral motor cortices during the performance of unilateral motor tasks, suggesting that the manifestation of plasticity might also be altered. To address this question, twenty young (65 years underwent intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS whilst attending to the hand targeted by the plasticity-inducing procedure. The amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by single pulse TMS was used to quantify cortical excitability before and after iTBS. Individual responses to iTBS were highly variable, with half the participants showing an unexpected decrease in cortical excitability. Contrary to predictions, however, there were no age-related differences in the magnitude or manifestation of plasticity across bilateral motor cortices. The findings suggest that advancing age does not influence the capacity for, or manifestation of, plasticity induced by iTBS.

  19. Plasticity Induced by Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation in Bilateral Motor Cortices Is Not Altered in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickins, Daina S. E.; Sale, Martin V.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that plasticity induced in the motor cortex by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is attenuated in older adults. Those investigations, however, have focused solely on the stimulated hemisphere. Compared to young adults, older adults exhibit more widespread activity across bilateral motor cortices during the performance of unilateral motor tasks, suggesting that the manifestation of plasticity might also be altered. To address this question, twenty young (65 years) underwent intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) whilst attending to the hand targeted by the plasticity-inducing procedure. The amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by single pulse TMS was used to quantify cortical excitability before and after iTBS. Individual responses to iTBS were highly variable, with half the participants showing an unexpected decrease in cortical excitability. Contrary to predictions, however, there were no age-related differences in the magnitude or manifestation of plasticity across bilateral motor cortices. The findings suggest that advancing age does not influence the capacity for, or manifestation of, plasticity induced by iTBS. PMID:26064691

  20. Playing and Listening to Tailor-Made Notched Music: Cortical Plasticity Induced by Unimodal and Multimodal Training in Tinnitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Pape

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The generation and maintenance of tinnitus are assumed to be based on maladaptive functional cortical reorganization. Listening to modified music, which contains no energy in the range of the individual tinnitus frequency, can inhibit the corresponding neuronal activity in the auditory cortex. Music making has been shown to be a powerful stimulator for brain plasticity, inducing changes in multiple sensory systems. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG and behavioral measurements we evaluated the cortical plasticity effects of two months of (a active listening to (unisensory versus (b learning to play (multisensory tailor-made notched music in nonmusician tinnitus patients. Taking into account the fact that uni- and multisensory trainings induce different patterns of cortical plasticity we hypothesized that these two protocols will have different affects. Results. Only the active listening (unisensory group showed significant reduction of tinnitus related activity of the middle temporal cortex and an increase in the activity of a tinnitus-coping related posterior parietal area. Conclusions. These findings indicate that active listening to tailor-made notched music induces greater neuroplastic changes in the maladaptively reorganized cortical network of tinnitus patients while additional integration of other sensory modalities during training reduces these neuroplastic effects.

  1. Playing and listening to tailor-made notched music: cortical plasticity induced by unimodal and multimodal training in tinnitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Janna; Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Bruchmann, Maximilian; Wollbrink, Andreas; Rudack, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The generation and maintenance of tinnitus are assumed to be based on maladaptive functional cortical reorganization. Listening to modified music, which contains no energy in the range of the individual tinnitus frequency, can inhibit the corresponding neuronal activity in the auditory cortex. Music making has been shown to be a powerful stimulator for brain plasticity, inducing changes in multiple sensory systems. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and behavioral measurements we evaluated the cortical plasticity effects of two months of (a) active listening to (unisensory) versus (b) learning to play (multisensory) tailor-made notched music in nonmusician tinnitus patients. Taking into account the fact that uni- and multisensory trainings induce different patterns of cortical plasticity we hypothesized that these two protocols will have different affects. RESULTS. Only the active listening (unisensory) group showed significant reduction of tinnitus related activity of the middle temporal cortex and an increase in the activity of a tinnitus-coping related posterior parietal area. CONCLUSIONS. These findings indicate that active listening to tailor-made notched music induces greater neuroplastic changes in the maladaptively reorganized cortical network of tinnitus patients while additional integration of other sensory modalities during training reduces these neuroplastic effects.

  2. In vitro deposition of hydroxyapatite on cortical bone collagen stimulated by deformation-induced piezoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noris-Suárez, Karem; Lira-Olivares, Joaquin; Ferreira, Ana Marina; Feijoo, José Luis; Suárez, Nery; Hernández, Maria C; Barrios, Esteban

    2007-03-01

    In the present work, we have studied the effect of the piezoelectricity of elastically deformed cortical bone collagen on surface using a biomimetic approach. The mineralization process induced as a consequence of the piezoelectricity effect was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SEM micrographs showed that mineralization occurred predominantly over the compressed side of bone collagen, due to the effect of piezoelectricity, when the sample was immersed in the simulated body fluid (SBF) in a cell-free system. The TSDC method was used to examine the complex collagen dielectric response. The dielectric spectra of deformed and undeformed collagen samples with different hydration levels were compared and correlated with the mineralization process followed by SEM. The dielectric measurements showed that the mineralization induced significant changes in the dielectric spectra of the deformed sample. DSC and TSDC results demonstrated a reduction of the collagen glass transition as the mineralization process advanced. The combined use of SEM, TSDC, and DSC showed that, even without osteoblasts present, the piezoelectric dipoles produced by deformed collagen can produce the precipitation of hydroxyapatite by electrochemical means, without a catalytic converter as occurs in classical biomimetic deposition.

  3. TMS-induced cortical potentiation during wakefulness locally increases slow wave activity during sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Huber

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Sleep slow wave activity (SWA is thought to reflect sleep need, increasing in proportion to the length of prior wakefulness and decreasing during sleep. However, the process responsible for SWA regulation is not known. We showed recently that SWA increases locally after a learning task involving a circumscribed brain region, suggesting that SWA may reflect plastic changes triggered by learning.To test this hypothesis directly, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS in conjunction with high-density EEG in humans. We show that 5-Hz TMS applied to motor cortex induces a localized potentiation of TMS-evoked cortical EEG responses. We then show that, in the sleep episode following 5-Hz TMS, SWA increases markedly (+39.1+/-17.4%, p<0.01, n = 10. Electrode coregistration with magnetic resonance images localized the increase in SWA to the same premotor site as the maximum TMS-induced potentiation during wakefulness. Moreover, the magnitude of potentiation during wakefulness predicts the local increase in SWA during sleep.These results provide direct evidence for a link between plastic changes and the local regulation of sleep need.

  4. Effects of parietal TMS on visual and auditory processing at the primary cortical level -- a concurrent TMS-fMRI study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitão, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Werner, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    cortices under 3 sensory contexts: visual, auditory, and no stimulation. IPS-TMS increased activations in auditory cortices irrespective of sensory context as a result of direct and nonspecific auditory TMS side effects. In contrast, IPS-TMS modulated activations in the visual cortex in a state...... deactivations induced by auditory activity to TMS sounds. TMS to IPS may increase the responses in visual (or auditory) cortices to visual (or auditory) stimulation via a gain control mechanism or crossmodal interactions. Collectively, our results demonstrate that understanding TMS effects on (uni......Accumulating evidence suggests that multisensory interactions emerge already at the primary cortical level. Specifically, auditory inputs were shown to suppress activations in visual cortices when presented alone but amplify the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses to concurrent visual...

  5. Kinetic Analysis of Char Thermal Deactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zolin, Alfredo; Jensen, Anker; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2001-01-01

    and demineralized Dietz from USA, and two alternative fuels, Danish leached straw and petroleum coke, were used in the experiments. The coal chars from demineralized Dietz, Illinois no. 6, and Cerrejon deactivate readily, whereas petroleum coke and Blair Athol show a relative high resistance to deactivation....... Leached straw deactivates significantly, but maintains at any heat-treatment temperature a higher reactivity than the other chars. The inertinite-rich coal Blair Athol is more resistant to deactivation than two vitrinite-rich coals of the same ASTM rank, Cerrejon and Illinois no. 6. Cerrejon and Illinois...

  6. Neuroprotection with metformin and thymoquinone against ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in prenatal rat cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullah Ikram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to ethanol during early development triggers severe neuronal death by activating multiple stress pathways and causes neurological disorders, such as fetal alcohol effects or fetal alcohol syndrome. This study investigated the effect of ethanol on intracellular events that predispose developing neurons for apoptosis via calcium-mediated signaling. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms of ethanol neurotoxicity are not completely determined, mitochondrial dysfunction, altered calcium homeostasis and apoptosis-related proteins have been implicated in ethanol neurotoxicity. The present study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective mechanisms of metformin (Met and thymoquinone (TQ during ethanol toxicity in rat prenatal cortical neurons at gestational day (GD 17.5. Results We found that Met and TQ, separately and synergistically, increased cell viability after ethanol (100 mM exposure for 12 hours and attenuated the elevation of cytosolic free calcium [Ca2+]c. Furthermore, Met and TQ maintained normal physiological mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔψM, which is typically lowered by ethanol exposure. Increased cytosolic free [Ca2+]c and lowered mitochondrial transmembrane potential after ethanol exposure significantly decreased the expression of a key anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, increased expression of Bax, and stimulated the release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria. Met and TQ treatment inhibited the apoptotic cascade by increasing Bcl-2 expression. These compounds also repressed the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and reduced the cleavage of PARP-1. Morphological conformation of cell death was assessed by TUNEL, Fluoro-Jade-B, and PI staining. These staining methods demonstrated more cell death after ethanol treatment, while Met, TQ or Met plus TQ prevented ethanol-induced apoptotic cell death. Conclusion These findings suggested that Met and TQ are strong protective agents against ethanol-induced

  7. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P < 0.05) in longitudinal bone length (6%), middiaphyseal cross-sectional area (20%), and the amount of newly accreted bone collagen (28%) in the total pool of middiaphyseal bone collagen. Cortical bone density, mean hydroxyapatite crystal size, and the calcium and collagen contents (microgram/mm3) were significantly smaller in the GH group (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that the processes regulating new collagen accretion, bone collagen maturation, and mean hydroxyapatite crystal size may be independently regulated during rapid growth.

  8. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells with high efficiency from human embryonic renal cortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ling; Chen, Ruifang; Wang, Pu; Zhang, Qi; Tang, Hailiang; Sun, Huaping

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) emerges as a prospective therapeutic angle in regenerative medicine and a tool for drug screening. Although increasing numbers of iPSCs from different sources have been generated, there has been limited progress in yield of iPSC. Here, we show that four Yamanaka factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can convert human embryonic renal cortical cells (hERCCs) to pluripotent stem cells with a roughly 40-fold higher reprogramming efficiency compared with that of adult human dermal fibroblasts. These iPSCs show pluripotency in vitro and in vivo, as evidenced by expression of pluripotency associated genes, differentiation into three embryonic germ layers by teratoma tests, as well as neuronal fate specification by embryoid body formation. Moreover, the four exogenous genes are effectively silenced in these iPSCs. This study highlights the use of hERCCs to generate highly functional human iPSCs which may aid the study of genetic kidney diseases and accelerate the development of cell-based regenerative therapy.

  9. Murine model of acute myocarditis and cerebral cortical neuron edema induced by coxsackievirus B4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Peng Dong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, coxsackievirus B4 (CV-B4 has been continuously isolated and evidence suggests an association with the development of pancreatitis and type I diabetes. In addition, CV-B4 is also associated with myocarditis and severe central nervous system (CNS complications, which remain poorly studied and understood. In the present study, we established an ICR mouse model of CV-B4 infection and examined whether CV-B4 infection resulted in a predisposition to myocarditis and CNS infection. We found high survival in both the treatment and control group, with no significant differences in clinical outcomes observed. However, pathological lesions were evident in both brain and heart tissue of the CV-B4-infected mice. In addition, high viral loads were found in the neural and cardiac tissues as early as 2 d postinfection. Expressions of IFN-γ and IL-6 in sera were significantly higher in CV-B4-infected mice compared to uninfected negative controls, suggesting the involvement of these cytokines in the development of histopathological lesions. Our murine model successfully reproduced the acute myocarditis and cerebral cortical neuron edema induced by CV-B4, and may be useful for the evaluation of vaccine candidates and potential antivirals against CV-B4 infection.

  10. Acupuncture analgesia involves modulation of pain-induced gamma oscillations and cortical network connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Michael; Schröder, Sven; Meyer-Hamme, Gesa; Lorenz, Jürgen; Friedrichs, Sunja; Nolte, Guido; Gerloff, Christian; Engel, Andreas K

    2017-11-24

    Recent studies support the view that cortical sensory, limbic and executive networks and the autonomic nervous system might interact in distinct manners under the influence of acupuncture to modulate pain. We performed a double-blind crossover design study to investigate subjective ratings, EEG and ECG following experimental laser pain under the influence of sham and verum acupuncture in 26 healthy volunteers. We analyzed neuronal oscillations and inter-regional coherence in the gamma band of 128-channel-EEG recordings as well as heart rate variability (HRV) on two experimental days. Pain ratings and pain-induced gamma oscillations together with vagally-mediated power in the high-frequency bandwidth (vmHF) of HRV decreased significantly stronger during verum than sham acupuncture. Gamma oscillations were localized in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), mid-cingulate cortex (MCC), primary somatosensory cortex and insula. Reductions of pain ratings and vmHF-power were significantly correlated with increase of connectivity between the insula and MCC. In contrast, connectivity between left and right PFC and between PFC and insula correlated positively with vmHF-power without a relationship to acupuncture analgesia. Overall, these findings highlight the influence of the insula in integrating activity in limbic-saliency networks with vagally mediated homeostatic control to mediate antinociception under the influence of acupuncture.

  11. Cortical bone growth and maturational changes in dwarf rats induced by recombinant human growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D. A.; Orth, M. W.; Carr, K. E.; Vanderby, R. Jr; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-deficient dwarf rat was used to investigate recombinant human (rh) GH-induced bone formation and to determine whether rhGH facilitates simultaneous increases in bone formation and bone maturation during rapid growth. Twenty dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to dwarf plus rhGH (GH; n = 10) and dwarf plus vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt two times daily for 14 days. Biochemical, morphological, and X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on the femur middiaphysis. rhGH stimulated new bone growth in the GH group, as demonstrated by significant increases (P bone length (6%), middiaphyseal cross-sectional area (20%), and the amount of newly accreted bone collagen (28%) in the total pool of middiaphyseal bone collagen. Cortical bone density, mean hydroxyapatite crystal size, and the calcium and collagen contents (microgram/mm3) were significantly smaller in the GH group (P bone collagen maturation, and mean hydroxyapatite crystal size may be independently regulated during rapid growth.

  12. 3-Hydroxybutyrate regulates energy metabolism and induces BDNF expression in cerebral cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marosi, Krisztina; Kim, Sang Woo; Moehl, Keelin; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Cheng, Aiwu; Cutler, Roy; Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P

    2016-12-01

    During fasting and vigorous exercise, a shift of brain cell energy substrate utilization from glucose to the ketone 3-hydroxybutyrate (3OHB) occurs. Studies have shown that 3OHB can protect neurons against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Neurons maintained in the presence of 3OHB exhibited increased oxygen consumption and ATP production, and an elevated NAD + /NADH ratio. We found that 3OHB metabolism increases mitochondrial respiration which drives changes in expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in cultured cerebral cortical neurons. The mechanism by which 3OHB induces Bdnf gene expression involves generation of reactive oxygen species, activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, and activity of the histone acetyltransferase p300/EP300. Because BDNF plays important roles in synaptic plasticity and neuronal stress resistance, our findings suggest cellular signaling mechanisms by which 3OHB may mediate adaptive responses of neurons to fasting, exercise, and ketogenic diets. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Cortical plasticity induced by short-term multimodal musical rhythm training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lappe

    Full Text Available Performing music is a multimodal experience involving the visual, auditory, and somatosensory modalities as well as the motor system. Therefore, musical training is an excellent model to study multimodal brain plasticity. Indeed, we have previously shown that short-term piano practice increase the magnetoencephalographic (MEG response to melodic material in novice players. Here we investigate the impact of piano training using a rhythmic-focused exercise on responses to rhythmic musical material. Musical training with non musicians was conducted over a period of two weeks. One group (sensorimotor-auditory, SA learned to play a piano sequence with a distinct musical rhythm, another group (auditory, A listened to, and evaluated the rhythmic accuracy of the performances of the SA-group. Training-induced cortical plasticity was evaluated using MEG, comparing the mismatch negativity (MMN in response to occasional rhythmic deviants in a repeating rhythm pattern before and after training. The SA-group showed a significantly greater enlargement of MMN and P2 to deviants after training compared to the A- group. The training-induced increase of the rhythm MMN was bilaterally expressed in contrast to our previous finding where the MMN for deviants in the pitch domain showed a larger right than left increase. The results indicate that when auditory experience is strictly controlled during training, involvement of the sensorimotor system and perhaps increased attentional recources that are needed in producing rhythms lead to more robust plastic changes in the auditory cortex compared to when rhythms are simply attended to in the auditory domain in the absence of motor production.

  14. Caudal Ganglionic Eminence Precursor Transplants Disperse and Integrate as Lineage-Specific Interneurons but Do Not Induce Cortical Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Larimer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The maturation of inhibitory GABAergic cortical circuits regulates experience-dependent plasticity. We recently showed that the heterochronic transplantation of parvalbumin (PV or somatostatin (SST interneurons from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE reactivates ocular dominance plasticity (ODP in the postnatal mouse visual cortex. Might other types of interneurons similarly induce cortical plasticity? Here, we establish that caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE-derived interneurons, when transplanted into the visual cortex of neonatal mice, migrate extensively in the host brain and acquire laminar distribution, marker expression, electrophysiological properties, and visual response properties like those of host CGE interneurons. Although transplants from the anatomical CGE do induce ODP, we found that this plasticity reactivation is mediated by a small fraction of MGE-derived cells contained in the transplant. These findings demonstrate that transplanted CGE cells can successfully engraft into the postnatal mouse brain and confirm the unique role of MGE lineage neurons in the induction of ODP.

  15. Information Subsystem of Shadow Economy Deactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Tatyana V.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents information subsystem of shadow economy deactivation aimed at minimizing negative effects caused by its reproduction. In Russia, as well as in other countries, efficient implementation of the suggested system of shadow economy deactivation can be ensured by the developed information subsystem.

  16. Data quality objectives for PUREX deactivation flushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    This Data Quality Objection (DQO) defines the sampling and analysis requirements necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated by WAC 173-303. Specifically, sampling and analysis requirements are identified for the flushing operations that are a major element of PUREX deactivation

  17. PUREX Plant deactivation mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project mission analysis is to define the problem to be addressed by the PUREX mission, and to lay the ground work for further system definition. The mission analysis is an important first step in the System Engineering (SE) process. This report presents the results of the PUREX Deactivation Project mission analysis. The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to prepare PUREX for Decontamination and Decommissioning within a five year time frame. This will be accomplished by establishing a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of the PUREX Plant, that can be preserved for a 10-year horizon. During deactivation, appropriate portions of the safety envelop will be maintained to ensure deactivation takes place in a safe and regulatory compliant manner

  18. Cannabinoid receptors activation and glucocorticoid receptors deactivation in the amygdala prevent the stress-induced enhancement of a negative learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramot, Assaf; Akirav, Irit

    2012-05-01

    The enhancement of emotional memory is clearly important as emotional stimuli are generally more significant than neutral stimuli for surviving and reproduction purposes. Yet, the enhancement of a negative emotional memory following exposure to stress may result in dysfunctional or intrusive memory that underlies several psychiatric disorders. Here we examined the effects of stress exposure on a negative emotional learning experience as measured by a decrease in the magnitude of the expected quantity of reinforcements in an alley maze. In contrast to other fear-related negative experiences, reward reduction is more associated with frustration and is assessed by measuring the latency to run the length of the alley to consume the reduced quantity of reward. We also examined whether the cannabinoid receptors agonist WIN55,212-2 (5 μg/side) and the glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) antagonist RU-486 (10 ng/side) administered into the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) could prevent the stress-induced enhancement. We found that intra-BLA RU-486 or WIN55,212 before stress exposure prevented the stress-induced enhancement of memory consolidation for reduction in reward magnitude. These findings suggest that cannabinoid receptors and GRs in the BLA are important modulators of stress-induced enhancement of emotional memory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuroglobin overexpression inhibits oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Ning; Li, Yadan; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Xiaoying

    2013-08-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is an endogenous neuroprotective molecule against hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely undefined. Our recent study revealed that Ngb can bind to voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), a regulator of mitochondria permeability transition (MPT). In this study we examined the role of Ngb in MPT pore (mPTP) opening following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) and immunocytochemistry showed that the binding between Ngb and VDAC was increased after OGD compared to normoxia, indicating the OGD-enhanced Ngb-VDAC interaction. Ngb overexpression protected primary mouse cortical neurons from OGD-induced neuronal death, to an extent comparable to mPTP opening inhibitor, cyclosporine A (CsA) pretreatment. We further measured the role of Ngb in OGD-induced mPTP opening using Ngb overexpression and knockdown approaches in primary cultured neurons, and recombinant Ngb exposure to isolated mitochondria. Same as CsA pretreatment, Ngb overexpression significantly reduced OGD-induced mPTP opening markers including mitochondria swelling, mitochondrial NAD(+) release, and cytochrome c (Cyt c) release in primary cultured neurons. Recombinant Ngb incubation significantly reduced OGD-induced NAD(+) release and Cyt c release from isolated mitochondria. In contrast, Ngb knockdown significantly increased OGD-induced neuron death, and increased OGD-induced mitochondrial NAD(+) release and Cyt c release as well, and these outcomes could be rescued by CsA pretreatment. In summary, our results demonstrated that Ngb overexpression can inhibit OGD-induced mPTP opening in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons, which may be one of the molecular mechanisms of Ngb's neuroprotection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Fas/Fas ligand death receptor pathway contributes to phenylalanine-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Huang

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU, an autosomal recessive disorder of amino acid metabolism caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH gene, leads to childhood mental retardation by exposing neurons to cytotoxic levels of phenylalanine (Phe. A recent study showed that the mitochondria-mediated (intrinsic apoptotic pathway is involved in Phe-induced apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons, but it is not known if the death receptor (extrinsic apoptotic pathway and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-associated apoptosis also contribute to neurodegeneration in PKU. To answer this question, we used specific inhibitors to block each apoptotic pathway in cortical neurons under neurotoxic levels of Phe. The caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-FMK strongly attenuated apoptosis in Phe-treated neurons (0.9 mM, 18 h, suggesting involvement of the Fas receptor (FasR-mediated cell death receptor pathway in Phe toxicity. In addition, Phe significantly increased cell surface Fas expression and formation of the Fas/FasL complex. Blocking Fas/FasL signaling using an anti-Fas antibody markedly inhibited apoptosis caused by Phe. In contrast, blocking the ER stress-induced cell death pathway with salubrinal had no effect on apoptosis in Phe-treated cortical neurons. These experiments demonstrate that the Fas death receptor pathway contributes to Phe-induced apoptosis and suggest that inhibition of the death receptor pathway may be a novel target for neuroprotection in PKU patients.

  1. Restoration of Progranulin Expression Rescues Cortical Neuron Generation in an Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of Frontotemporal Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Raitano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand how haploinsufficiency of progranulin (PGRN causes frontotemporal dementia (FTD, we created induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients carrying the GRNIVS1+5G > C mutation (FTD-iPSCs. FTD-iPSCs were fated to cortical neurons, the cells most affected in FTD. Although generation of neuroprogenitors was unaffected, their further differentiation into CTIP2-, FOXP2-, or TBR1-TUJ1 double-positive cortical neurons, but not motorneurons, was significantly decreased in FTD-neural progeny. Zinc finger nuclease-mediated introduction of GRN cDNA into the AAVS1 locus corrected defects in cortical neurogenesis, demonstrating that PGRN haploinsufficiency causes inefficient cortical neuron generation. RNA sequencing analysis confirmed reversal of the altered gene expression profile following genetic correction. We identified the Wnt signaling pathway as one of the top defective pathways in FTD-iPSC-derived neurons, which was reversed following genetic correction. Differentiation of FTD-iPSCs in the presence of a WNT inhibitor mitigated defective corticogenesis. Therefore, we demonstrate that PGRN haploinsufficiency hampers corticogenesis in vitro.

  2. Charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon capacitors in the presence of hydrogen deactivated dopants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witczak, Steven C.; Winokur, Peter S.; Lacoe, Ronald C.; Mayer, Donald C.

    2000-01-01

    An improved charge separation technique for metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitors is presented which accounts for the deactivation of substrate dopants by hydrogen at elevated irradiation temperatures or small irradiation biases. Using high-frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements, radiation-induced inversion voltage shifts are separated into components due to oxide trapped charge, interface traps and deactivated dopants, where the latter is computed from a reduction in Si capacitance. In the limit of no radiation-induced dopant deactivation, this approach reduces to the standard midgap charge separation technique used widely for the analysis of room-temperature irradiations. The technique is demonstrated on a p-type MOS capacitor irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays at 100 C and zero bias, where the dopant deactivation is significant

  3. Protection of cortical cells by equine estrogens against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity is mediated through a calcium independent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrella Joel

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High concentrations of glutamate can accumulate in the brain and may be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. This form of neurotoxicity involves changes in the regulation of cellular calcium (Ca2+ and generation of free radicals such as peroxynitrite (ONOO-. Estrogen may protect against glutamate-induced cell death by reducing the excitotoxic Ca2+ influx associated with glutamate excitotoxicity. In this study, the inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor and nitric oxide synthase (NOS along with the effect of 17β-estradiol (17β-E2 and a more potent antioxidant Δ8, 17β-estradiol (Δ8, 17β-E2 on cell viability and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i, following treatment of rat cortical cells with glutamate, was investigated. Results Primary rat cortical cells were cultured for 7–12 days in Neurobasal medium containing B27 supplements. Addition of glutamate (200 μM decreased cell viability to 51.3 ± 0.7% compared to control. Treatment with the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist, MK-801, and the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, completely prevented cell death. Pretreatment (24 hrs with 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2 (0.01 to 10 μM significantly reduced cell death. 17β-E2 was more potent than Δ8, 17β-E2. Glutamate caused a rapid 2.5 fold increase in [Ca2+]i. Treatment with 0.001 to 10 μM MK-801 reduced the initial Ca2+ influx by 14–41% and increased cell viability significantly. Pretreatment with 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2 had no effect on Ca2+ influx but protected the cortical cells against glutamate-induced cell death. Conclusion Glutamate-induced cell death in cortical cultures can occur through NMDAR and NOS-linked mechanisms by increasing nitric oxide and ONOO-. Equine estrogens: 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2, significantly protected cortical cells against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by a mechanism that appears to be independent of Ca2+ influx. To our knowledge, this is a first

  4. PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, E.N. III.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of PUREX at the Hanford Site, and to preserve that configuration for a 10-year horizon. The 10-year horizon is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents they typical time duration expended to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) activities. This document was prepared to increase attention to worker safety issues during the deactivation project and, as such, identifies the documentation and programs associated with PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety

  5. PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, E.N. III

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of PUREX at the Hanford Site, and to preserve that configuration for a 10-year horizon. The 10-year horizon is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents they typical time duration expended to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. This document was prepared to increase attention to worker safety issues during the deactivation project and, as such, identifies the documentation and programs associated with PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety.

  6. Role of glutathione in determining the differential sensitivity between the cortical and cerebellar regions towards mercury-induced oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Aschner, Michael; Syversen, Tore

    2007-01-01

    Certain discrete areas of the CNS exhibit enhanced sensitivity towards MeHg. To determine whether GSH is responsible for this particular sensitivity, we investigated its role in MeHg-induced oxidative insult in primary neuronal and astroglial cell cultures of both cerebellar and cortical origins. For this purpose, ROS and GSH were measured with the fluorescent indicators, CMH 2 DCFDA and MCB. Cell associated-MeHg was measured with 14 C-radiolabeled MeHg. The intracellular GSH content was modified by pretreatment with NAC or DEM. For each of the dependent variables (ROS, GSH, and MTT), there was an overall significant effect of cellular origin, MeHg and pretreatment in all the cell cultures. A trend towards significant interaction between origin x MeHg x pretreatment was observed only for the dependent variable, ROS (astrocytes p = 0.056; neurons p = 0.000). For GSH, a significant interaction between origin x MeHg was observed only in astrocytes (p = 0.030). The cerebellar cell cultures were more vulnerable (astrocytes mean = 223.77; neurons mean = 138.06) to ROS than the cortical cell cultures (astrocytes mean = 125.18; neurons mean 107.91) for each of the tested treatments. The cell associated-MeHg increased when treated with DEM, and the cerebellar cultures varied significantly from the cortical cultures. Non-significant interactions between origin x MeHg x pretreatment for GSH did not explain the significant interactions responsible for the increased amount of ROS produced in these cultures. In summary, although GSH modulation influences MeHg-induced toxicity, the difference in the content of GSH in cortical and cerebellar cultures fails to account for the increased ROS production in cerebellar cultures. Hence, different approaches for the future studies regarding the mechanisms behind selectivity of MeHg have been discussed

  7. Inducible nitric oxide inhibitors block NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behaviors and medial prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadley C Bergstrom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays a critical role in the motoric and glutamate releasing action of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-antagonist stimulants. Earlier studies utilized neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (nNOS for studying the neurobehavioral effects of noncompetitive NMDA-antagonist stimulants such as dizocilpine (MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP. This study explores the role of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (iNOS aminoguanidine (AG and (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG in NMDA-antagonist induced motoric behavior and prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. Adult male rats were administered a dose range of AG, EGCG or vehicle prior to receiving NMDA antagonists MK-801, PCP or a conventional psychostimulant (cocaine and tested for motoric behavior in an open arena. Glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex was measured using in vivo microdialysis after a combination of AG or EGCG prior to MK-801. Acute administration of AG or EGCG dose-dependently attenuated the locomotor and ataxic properties of MK-801 and PCP. Both AG and EGCG were unable to block the motoric effects of cocaine, indicating the acute pharmacologic action of AG and EGCG is specific to NMDA antagonism and not generalizable to all stimulant class drugs. AG and EGCG normalized MK-801-stimulated medial prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. These data demonstrate that AG and EGCG attenuates NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behavior and cortical glutamate efflux. Our results suggest that EGCG-like polyphenol nutraceuticals (contained in green tea and chocolate may be clinically useful in protecting against the adverse behavioral dissociative and cortical glutamate stimulating effects of NMDA antagonists. Medications that interfere with NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and PCP have been proposed as treatments for schizophrenia.

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction precedes depression of AMPK/AKT signaling in insulin resistance induced by high glucose in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yunhua; Liu, Jing; Shi, Le; Tang, Ying; Gao, Dan; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated brain insulin signaling impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia arising from diabetes have been linked to neuronal insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia induces peripheral sensory neuronal impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, how brain glucose at diabetic conditions elicits cortical neuronal insulin signaling impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction remains unknown. In the present study, we cultured primary cortical neurons with high glucose levels and investigated the neuronal mitochondrial function and insulin response. We found that mitochondrial function was declined in presence of 10 mmol/L glucose, prior to the depression of AKT signaling in primary cortical neurons. We further demonstrated that the cerebral cortex of db/db mice exhibited both insulin resistance and loss of mitochondrial complex components. Moreover, we found that adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inactivation is involved in high glucose-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in primary cortical neurons and neuroblastoma cells, as well as in cerebral cortex of db/db mice, and all these impairments can be rescued by mitochondrial activator, resveratrol. Taken together, our results extend the finding that high glucose (≥10 mmol/L) comparable to diabetic brain extracellular glucose level leads to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and resultant insulin resistance, and targeting mitochondria-AMPK signaling might be a promising strategy to protect against diabetes-related neuronal impairment in central nerves system. We found that high glucose (≥10 mmol/L), comparable to diabetic brain extracellular glucose level, leads to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and resultant insulin resistance in an AMPK-dependent manner, and targeting mitochondria-AMPK signaling might be a promising strategy to protect against diabetes-related neuronal impairment in central

  9. 308 Building deactivation function analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and a function hierarchy chart that describes what needs to be performed to deactivate the 308 Building

  10. PUREX Plant deactivation function analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and a function hierarchy chart that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate PUREX

  11. 309 Building deactivation function analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and a function hierarchy chart that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate the 309 Building

  12. N Area Post-Deactivation ALARA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides information about a wide range of radiological work activities at the N Area Deactivation Project. The report is divided into sections that are based on specific N Area scopes of work. Each section contains specific information that was of significant radiological importance in completing N Area Deactivation work. The information presented in this report may be applicable and beneficial to similar projects throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, and in commercial industry

  13. Prognostic Value of Cortically Induced Motor Evoked Activity by TMS in Chronic Stroke: Caveats from a Revealing Single Clinical Case

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amengual, Julià L

    2012-06-08

    AbstractBackgroundWe report the case of a chronic stroke patient (62 months after injury) showing total absence of motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of spared regions of the left motor cortex, but near-to-complete recovery of motor abilities in the affected hand.Case presentationMultimodal investigations included detailed TMS based motor mapping, motor evoked potentials (MEP), and Cortical Silent period (CSP) as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of motor activity, MRI based lesion analysis and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Tractography of corticospinal tract (CST). Anatomical analysis revealed a left hemisphere subinsular lesion interrupting the descending left CST at the level of the internal capsule. The absence of MEPs after intense TMS pulses to the ipsilesional M1, and the reversible suppression of ongoing electromyographic (EMG) activity (indexed by CSP) demonstrate a weak modulation of subcortical systems by the ipsilesional left frontal cortex, but an inability to induce efficient descending volleys from those cortical locations to right hand and forearm muscles. Functional MRI recordings under grasping and finger tapping patterns involving the affected hand showed slight signs of subcortical recruitment, as compared to the unaffected hand and hemisphere, as well as the expected cortical activations.ConclusionsThe potential sources of motor voluntary activity for the affected hand in absence of MEPs are discussed. We conclude that multimodal analysis may contribute to a more accurate prognosis of stroke patients.

  14. Prognostic value of cortically induced motor evoked activity by TMS in chronic stroke: Caveats from a revealing single clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amengual Julià L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report the case of a chronic stroke patient (62 months after injury showing total absence of motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS of spared regions of the left motor cortex, but near-to-complete recovery of motor abilities in the affected hand. Case presentation Multimodal investigations included detailed TMS based motor mapping, motor evoked potentials (MEP, and Cortical Silent period (CSP as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI of motor activity, MRI based lesion analysis and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI Tractography of corticospinal tract (CST. Anatomical analysis revealed a left hemisphere subinsular lesion interrupting the descending left CST at the level of the internal capsule. The absence of MEPs after intense TMS pulses to the ipsilesional M1, and the reversible suppression of ongoing electromyographic (EMG activity (indexed by CSP demonstrate a weak modulation of subcortical systems by the ipsilesional left frontal cortex, but an inability to induce efficient descending volleys from those cortical locations to right hand and forearm muscles. Functional MRI recordings under grasping and finger tapping patterns involving the affected hand showed slight signs of subcortical recruitment, as compared to the unaffected hand and hemisphere, as well as the expected cortical activations. Conclusions The potential sources of motor voluntary activity for the affected hand in absence of MEPs are discussed. We conclude that multimodal analysis may contribute to a more accurate prognosis of stroke patients.

  15. The Marine Guanidine Alkaloid Crambescidin 816 Induces Calcium Influx and Cytotoxicity in Primary Cultures of Cortical Neurons through Glutamate Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Aida G; Juncal, Andrea Boente; Silva, Siguara B L; Thomas, Olivier P; Martín Vázquez, Víctor; Alfonso, Amparo; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Vale, Carmen; Botana, Luís M

    2017-07-19

    Crambescidin 816 is a guanidine alkaloid produced by the sponge Crambe crambe with known antitumoral activity. While the information describing the effects of this alkaloid in central neurons is scarce, Cramb816 is known to block voltage dependent calcium channels being selective for L-type channels. Moreover, Cramb816 reduced neuronal viability through an unknown mechanism. Here, we aimed to describe the toxic activity of Cramb816 in cortical neurons. Since calcium influx is considered the main mechanism responsible for neuronal cell death, the effects of Cramb816 in the cytosolic calcium concentration of cortical neurons were studied. The alkaloid decreased neuronal viability and induced a dose-dependent increase in cytosolic calcium that was also related to the presence of calcium in the extracellular media. The increase in calcium influx was age dependent, being higher in younger neurons. Moreover, this effect was prevented by glutamate receptor antagonists, which did not fully block the cytotoxic effect of Cramb816 after 24 h of treatment but completely prevented Cramb816 cytotoxicity after 10 min exposure. Therefore, the findings presented herein provide new insights into the cytotoxic effect of Cramb816 in cortical neurons.

  16. Neuropeptide Y as a possible homeostatic element for changes in cortical excitability induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazmati, Danny; Neubacher, Ute; Funke, Klaus

    2018-02-24

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is able to modify cortical excitability. Rat rTMS studies revealed a modulation of inhibitory systems, in particular that of the parvalbumin-expressing (PV+) interneurons, when using intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS). The potential disinhibitory action of iTBS raises the questions of how neocortical circuits stabilize excitatory-inhibitory balance within a physiological range. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) appears to be one candidate. Analysis of cortical expression of PV, NPY and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1 (vGluT1) by immunohistochemical means at the level of cell counts, mean neuropil expression and single cell pre-/postsynaptic expression, with and without intraventricular NPY-injection. Our results show that iTBS not only reduced the number of neurons with high-PV expression in a dose-dependent fashion, but also increased the cortical expression of NPY, discussed to reduce glutamatergic transmission, and this was further associated with a reduced vGluT1 expression, an indicator of glutamateric presynaptic activity. Interneurons showing a low-PV expression exhibit less presynaptic vGluT1 expression compared to those with a high-PV expression. Intraventricular application of NPY prior to iTBS prevented the iTBS-induced reduction in the number of high-PV neurons, the reduction in tissue vGluT1 level and that presynaptic to high-PV cells. We conclude that NPY, possibly via a global but also slow homeostatic control of glutamatergic transmission, modulates the strength and direction of the iTBS effects, likely preventing pathological imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory cortical activity but still allowing enough disinhibition beneficial for plastic changes as during learning. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute Cocaine Induces Fast Activation of D1 Receptor and Progressive Deactivation of D2 Receptor Strial Neurons: In Vivo Optical Microprobe [Ca(superscript)2+]subscript)i Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, C.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Heintz, N.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2011-09-14

    Cocaine induces fast dopamine increases in brain striatal regions, which are recognized to underlie its rewarding effects. Both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are involved in cocaine's reward but the dynamic downstream consequences of cocaine effects in striatum are not fully understood. Here we used transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of either the D1 receptor (D1R) or the D2 receptor (D2R) gene and microprobe optical imaging to assess the dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} ) responses (used as marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in vivo separately for D1R- versus D2R-expressing neurons in striatum. Acute cocaine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) rapidly increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D1R-expressing neurons (10.6 {+-} 3.2%) in striatum within 8.3 {+-} 2.3 min after cocaine administration after which the increases plateaued; these fast [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases were blocked by pretreatment with a D1R antagonist (SCH23390). In contrast, cocaine induced progressive decreases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D2R-expressing neurons (10.4 {+-} 5.8%) continuously throughout the 30 min that followed cocaine administration; these slower [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} decreases were blocked by pretreatment with a D2R antagonist (raclopride). Since activation of striatal D1R-expressing neurons (direct-pathway) enhances cocaine reward, whereas activation of D2R expressing neurons suppresses it (indirect-pathway) (Lobo et al., 2010), this suggests that cocaine's rewarding effects entail both its fast stimulation ofD1R (resulting in abrupt activation of direct-pathway neurons) and a slower stimulation of D2R (resulting in longer-lasting deactivation of indirect-pathway neurons). We also provide direct in vivo evidence of D2R and D1R interactions in the striatal responses to acute cocaine administration.

  18. Slow-oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation can induce bidirectional shifts in motor cortical excitability in awake humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groppa, S; Bergmann, T O; Siems, C

    2010-01-01

    Constant transcranial direct stimulation (c-tDCS) of the primary motor hand area (M1(HAND)) can induce bidirectional shifts in motor cortical excitability depending on the polarity of tDCS. Recently, anodal slow oscillation stimulation at a frequency of 0.75 Hz has been shown to augment intrinsic...... slow oscillations during sleep and theta oscillations during wakefulness. To embed this new type of stimulation into the existing tDCS literature, we aimed to characterize the after effects of slowly oscillating stimulation (so-tDCS) on M1(HAND) excitability and to compare them to those of c-tDCS. Here...

  19. UO3 deactivation end point criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanski, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    The UO 3 Deactivation End Point Criteria are necessary to facilitate the transfer of the UO 3 Facility from the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) to the office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). The criteria were derived from a logical process for determining end points for the systems and spaces at the UO 3 , Facility based on the objectives, tasks, and expected future uses pertinent to that system or space. Furthermore, the established criteria meets the intent and supports the draft guidance for acceptance criteria prepared by EM-40, open-quotes U.S. Department of Energy office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) Decontamination and Decommissioning Guidance Document (Draft).close quotes For the UO 3 Facility, the overall objective of deactivation is to achieve a safe, stable and environmentally sound condition, suitable for an extended period, as quickly and economically as possible. Once deactivated, the facility is kept in its stable condition by means of a methodical surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) program, pending ultimate decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). Deactivation work involves a range of tasks, such as removal of hazardous material, elimination or shielding of radiation fields, partial decontamination to permit access for inspection, installation of monitors and alarms, etc. it is important that the end point of each of these tasks be established clearly and in advance, for the following reasons: (1) End points must be such that the central element of the deactivation objective - to achieve stability - is unquestionably achieved. (2) Much of the deactivation work involves worker exposure to radiation or dangerous materials. This can be minimized by avoiding unnecessary work. (3) Each task is, in effect, competing for resources with other deactivation tasks and other facilities. By assuring that each task is appropriately bounded, DOE's overall resources can be used most fully and effectively

  20. Nanofibrillar scaffolds induce preferential activation of Rho GTPases in cerebral cortical astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiryaki, Volkan Mujdat; Ayres, Virginia M; Khan, Adeel A; Ahmed, Ijaz; Shreiber, David I; Meiners, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral cortical astrocyte responses to polyamide nanofibrillar scaffolds versus poly-L-lysine (PLL)-functionalized planar glass, unfunctionalized planar Aclar coverslips, and PLL-functionalized planar Aclar surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy and immunocytochemistry. The physical properties of the cell culture environments were evaluated using contact angle and surface roughness measurements and compared. Astrocyte morphological responses, including filopodia, lamellipodia, and stress fiber formation, and stellation were imaged using atomic force microscopy and phalloidin staining for F-actin. Activation of the corresponding Rho GTPase regulators was investigated using immunolabeling with Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA. Astrocytes cultured on the nanofibrillar scaffolds showed a unique response that included stellation, cell–cell interactions by stellate processes, and evidence of depression of RhoA. The results support the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger preferential activation of members of the Rho GTPase family, with demonstrable morphological consequences for cerebral cortical astrocytes. PMID:22915841

  1. 'Visual' cortical activation induced by acupuncture at vision-related acupoint: A fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, B.; Shan, B.C.; Zhi, L.H.; Li, K.; Lu, N.; Li, L.; Liu, H.

    2005-01-01

    BA 7, 20 and 21. However, bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and BA 10, the ipsilateral anterior cingulate, BA 17, 18 and 42, and the contralateral supramarginal gyrus were deactivated. Stimulation at Liv3 activates the visual cortex bilaterally BA 19, and deactivates ipsilateral BA 17 and 18. The present finding supports the view that the therapeutic effects of acupuncture may depend on specific response patterns in the CNS.

  2. 'Visual' cortical activation induced by acupuncture at vision-related acupoint: a fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, B.; Shan, B.C.; Zhi, L.H.; Li, K.; Lu, N.; Li, L.; Liu, H.

    2005-01-01

    BA 7, 20 and 21. However, bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and BA 10, the ipsilateral anterior cingulate, BA 17, 18 and 42, and the contralateral supramarginal gyrus were deactivated. Stimulation at Liv3 activates the visual cortex bilaterally BA 19, and deactivates ipsilateral BA 17 and 18. The present finding supports the view that the therapeutic effects of acupuncture may depend on specific response patterns in the CNS.

  3. Does status epilepticus induced at early postnatal period change excitability after cortical epileptic afterdischarges?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 8 (2016), E183-E186 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11015; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-16605S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : status epilepticus * cortical stimulation * epileptic afterdischarges * ontogeny * rat Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  4. Crambescidin 816 induces calcium influx though glutamate receptors in primary cultures of cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Martín Vázquez

    2014-06-01

    In summary, our data suggest that the cytotoxic effect of 10 μM Cramb816 in cortical neurons may be related to an increase in the cytosolic calcium concentration elicited by the toxin, which is shown to be mediated by glutamate receptor activation. Further studies analyzing the effect of glutamate receptor blockers on the cytotoxic effect of Cramb816 are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  5. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring transcranial direct current stimulation induced changes in cortical excitability during the serial reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrus, Géza Gergely; Chaieb, Leila; Stilling, Roman; Rothkegel, Holger; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2016-03-11

    The measurement of the motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a common method to observe changes in motor cortical excitability. The level of cortical excitability has been shown to change during motor learning. Conversely, motor learning can be improved by using anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In the present study, we aimed to monitor cortical excitability changes during an implicit motor learning paradigm, a version of the serial reaction time task (SRTT). Responses from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and forearm flexor (FLEX) muscles were recorded before, during and after the performance of the SRTT. Online measurements were combined with anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS for the duration of the SRTT. Negative correlations between the amplitude of online FDI MEPs and SRTT reaction times (RTs) were observed across the learning blocks in the cathodal condition (higher average MEP amplitudes associated with lower RTs) but no significant differences in the anodal and sham conditions. tDCS did not have an impact on SRTT performance, as would be predicted based on previous studies. The offline before-after SRTT MEP amplitudes showed an increase after anodal and a tendency to decrease after cathodal stimulation, but these changes were not significant. The combination of different interventions during tDCS might result in reduced efficacy of the stimulation that in future studies need further attention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. SEP-induced activity and its thermographic cortical representation in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Ruff, Roman; Kirsch, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    This article is a methodical report on the generation of reproducible changes in brain activity in a murine model. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) are used to generate synchronized cortical activity. After electrical stimulation of mice forelimbs, the potentials were recorded with a flexible thin-film polyimide electrode structure directly from the cortex. Every registration included a simultaneous recording from both hemispheres that repeated four times to reproduce and compare the results. The SEPs in the murine model were shown to generate a very stable signal. The latency of the second positive wave (P2 wave) ranged between 16 and 19 ms, and the N1-P2 amplitude ranged between 39 and 48 µV. In addition, the temperature distribution of the cortex was acquired using infrared thermography. Surface cortical temperature changed during electrical stimulation without a clear hemispheric correlation. These initial results could be a step toward a better understanding of the different synchronized cortical activities and basic methods of evaluation of various mathematical algorithms to detect them.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of Quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract on intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced oxidative stress in cortical tissue of rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hajizadeh Moghaddam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between free radicals and the antioxidant system of the body. Increased oxidative stress in brain causes dysfunction of brain activities, destruction of neurons, and disease such as Alzheimer. Antioxidants, for example vitamins, phenolic compounds and flavonoids have been extensively investigated as potential therapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo for prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present experimental study, the neuro-protective effect of quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract (QLHE on intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (icv-STZ-induced oxidative stress in cortical tissue of rat brain was examined. Methods: In the present experimental research, forty-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, sham, icv-STZ and icv-STZ treated with QLHE groups. The ICV-STZ group rats were injected unilaterally with ICV-STZ (3 mg/kg using a stereotactic device and QLHE (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg/day were administered for 6 weeks starting from 3 weeks before of ICV-STZ injection. The rats were killed at the end of the study and their brain cortical tissue superoxide dismutase and catalase activity were measured. The assay of catalase and superoxide dismutase was performed by following the Genet method. The amount of protein was determined according to the Bradford method.The statistical analysis was performed using one way ANOVA. Data were expressed as mean±SD and  P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The present study indicated that in the ICV-STZ group showed significant decrease (P<0.001 in enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase and catalase in the cortical tissue of the brain. Treatment of different doses of QLHE significantly increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activity compared to icv-STZ group (P<0.001 in cortical tissue of the brain. Conclusion: The study demonstrated the effectiveness of quince leaf hydroalcoholic extract as a powerful antioxidant

  9. Sulfur deactivation of fatty ester hydrogenolysis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brands, D.S.; U-A-Sai, G.; Poels, E.K.; Bliek, A. [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-08-15

    Trace organosulfur compounds present as natural impurities in oleochemical feedstocks may lead to activation of copper-containing catalysts applied for hydrogenolysis of esters toward fatty alcohols. In this paper, the sulfur deactivation of Cu/SiO{sub 2} and Cu/ZnO/SiO{sub 2} catalysts was studied in the liquid-phase hydrogenolysis of methyl palmitate. The rate of deactivation is fast and increases as a function of the sulfur-containing compound present: octadecanethiol {approx} dihexadecyl disulfide < benzyl isothiocyanate < methyl p-toluene sulfonate < dihexadecyl sulfide < dibenzothiophene. The rapid deactivation is caused by the fact that sulfur is quantitatively removed from the reaction mixture and because mainly surface sulfides are formed under hydrogenolysis conditions. The life time of a zinc-promoted catalyst is up to two times higher than that of the Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalyst, most likely due to zinc surface sulfide formation. The maximum sulfur coverage obtained after full catalyst deactivation with dibenzothiophene and dihexadecyl sulfide--the sulfur compounds that cause the fastest deactivation--may be as low as 0.07. This is due to the fact that decomposition of these compounds as well as the hydrogenolysis reaction itself proceeds on ensembles of copper atoms. Catalyst regeneration studies reveal that activity cannot be regained by reduction or combined oxidation/reduction treatments. XRD, TPR, and TPO results confirm that no distinct bulk copper or zinc sulfide or sulfate phases are present.

  10. Deactivating a major nuclear fuels reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBaron, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes three key processes used in deactivating the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, a large, complex nuclear reprocessing facility, 15 months ahead of schedule and $77 million under budget. The organization was reengineered to refine its business processes and more effectively organize around the deactivation work scope. Multi-disciplined work teams were formed to be self-sufficient and empowered to make decisions and perform work. A number of benefits were realized by reengineering. A comprehensive process to develop end points which clearly identified specific results and the post-project facility configuration was developed so all areas of a facility were addressed. Clear and specific end points allowed teams to focus on completing deactivation activities and helped ensure there were no unfulfilled end-of-project expectations. The RCRA regulations require closure of permitted facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations which may essentially necessitate decommissioning. A more cost effective approach was adopted which significantly reduced risk to human health and the environment by taking the facility to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to disposition. PUREX thus became the first large reprocessing facility with active TSD [treatment, storage, and disposal] units to be deactivated under the RCRA regulations

  11. Associations of unilateral whisker and olfactory signals induce synapse formation and memory cell recruitment in bilateral barrel cortices: cellular mechanism for unilateral training toward bilateral memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilong Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveals the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory.

  12. Crossmodal plasticity in auditory, visual and multisensory cortical areas following noise-induced hearing loss in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schormans, Ashley L; Typlt, Marei; Allman, Brian L

    2017-01-01

    Complete or partial hearing loss results in an increased responsiveness of neurons in the core auditory cortex of numerous species to visual and/or tactile stimuli (i.e., crossmodal plasticity). At present, however, it remains uncertain how adult-onset partial hearing loss affects higher-order cortical areas that normally integrate audiovisual information. To that end, extracellular electrophysiological recordings were performed under anesthesia in noise-exposed rats two weeks post-exposure (0.8-20 kHz at 120 dB SPL for 2 h) and age-matched controls to characterize the nature and extent of crossmodal plasticity in the dorsal auditory cortex (AuD), an area outside of the auditory core, as well as in the neighboring lateral extrastriate visual cortex (V2L), an area known to contribute to audiovisual processing. Computer-generated auditory (noise burst), visual (light flash) and combined audiovisual stimuli were delivered, and the associated spiking activity was used to determine the response profile of each neuron sampled (i.e., unisensory, subthreshold multisensory or bimodal). In both the AuD cortex and the multisensory zone of the V2L cortex, the maximum firing rates were unchanged following noise exposure, and there was a relative increase in the proportion of neurons responsive to visual stimuli, with a concomitant decrease in the number of neurons that were solely responsive to auditory stimuli despite adjusting the sound intensity to account for each rat's hearing threshold. These neighboring cortical areas differed, however, in how noise-induced hearing loss affected audiovisual processing; the total proportion of multisensory neurons significantly decreased in the V2L cortex (control 38.8 ± 3.3% vs. noise-exposed 27.1 ± 3.4%), and dramatically increased in the AuD cortex (control 23.9 ± 3.3% vs. noise-exposed 49.8 ± 6.1%). Thus, following noise exposure, the cortical area showing the greatest relative degree of multisensory convergence

  13. Serotonin depletion can enhance the cerebrovascular responses induced by cortical spreading depression via the nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengjaroentham, Chonlawan; Supornsilpchai, Weera; Ji-Au, Wilawan; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan; Maneesri-le Grand, Supang

    2015-02-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter involved in the control of neural and vascular responses. 5-HT depletion can induce several neurological disorders, including migraines. Studies on a cortical spreading depression (CSD) migraine animal model showed that the cortical neurons sensitivity, vascular responses, and nitric oxide (NO) production were significantly increased in 5-HT depletion. However, the involvement of NO in the cerebrovascular responses in 5-HT depletion remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of NO in the CSD-induced alterations of cerebral microvessels in 5-HT depletion. Rats were divided into four groups: control, control with L-NAME treatment, 5-HT depleted, and 5-HT depleted with L-NAME treatment. 5-HT depletion was induced by intraperitoneal injection with para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) 3 days before the experiment. The CSD was triggered by KCl application. After the second wave of CSD, N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or saline was intravenously injected into the rats with or without L-NAME treatment groups, respectively. The intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (ICAM-1), cell adhesion molecules-1 (VCAM-1), and the ultrastructural changes of the cerebral microvessels were examined. The results showed that 5-HT depletion significantly increased ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions in the cerebral cortex. The number of endothelial pinocytic vesicles and microvilli was higher in the 5-HT depleted group when compared to the control. Interestingly, L-NAME treatment significantly reduced the abnormalities observed in the 5-HT depleted group. The results of this study demonstrated that an increase of NO production is one of the mechanisms involved in the CSD-induced alterations of the cerebrovascular responses in 5-HT depletion.

  14. Visual discrimination training improves Humphrey perimetry in chronic cortically induced blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Matthew R; Huxlin, Krystel R

    2017-05-09

    To assess if visual discrimination training improves performance on visual perimetry tests in chronic stroke patients with visual cortex involvement. 24-2 and 10-2 Humphrey visual fields were analyzed for 17 chronic cortically blind stroke patients prior to and following visual discrimination training, as well as in 5 untrained, cortically blind controls. Trained patients practiced direction discrimination, orientation discrimination, or both, at nonoverlapping, blind field locations. All pretraining and posttraining discrimination performance and Humphrey fields were collected with online eye tracking, ensuring gaze-contingent stimulus presentation. Trained patients recovered ∼108 degrees 2 of vision on average, while untrained patients spontaneously improved over an area of ∼16 degrees 2 . Improvement was not affected by patient age, time since lesion, size of initial deficit, or training type, but was proportional to the amount of training performed. Untrained patients counterbalanced their improvements with worsening of sensitivity over ∼9 degrees 2 of their visual field. Worsening was minimal in trained patients. Finally, although discrimination performance improved at all trained locations, changes in Humphrey sensitivity occurred both within trained regions and beyond, extending over a larger area along the blind field border. In adults with chronic cortical visual impairment, the blind field border appears to have enhanced plastic potential, which can be recruited by gaze-controlled visual discrimination training to expand the visible field. Our findings underscore a critical need for future studies to measure the effects of vision restoration approaches on perimetry in larger cohorts of patients. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Radiation-induced focal cortical necrosis of the femur presenting as a lytic lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Schils, Jean [Cleveland Clinic, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Joyce, Michael [Cleveland Clinic, Orthopedic Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shah, Chirag [Cleveland Clinic, Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zhang, Yaxia [Cleveland Clinic, Pathology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Management of soft tissue sarcomas is often complicated, requiring radiation before and in some cases after limb-sparing surgery. Radiation necrosis is a severe complication after radiation treatment and is typically dose related and involves medullary bone. We report on two cases of hitherto unreported focal circumscribed intra-cortical lytic lesions within the radiation portal, which appeared 19 months and 31 months, respectively, after the conclusion of radiation treatment. Both patients had a history of soft tissue sarcoma treated with radiation (66 Gy) and surgical resection. Biopsy of these lesions showed necrotic bone attributed to radiation. (orig.)

  16. Reboxetine Enhances the Olanzapine-Induced Antipsychotic-Like Effect, Cortical Dopamine Outflow and NMDA Receptor-Mediated Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Monica M; Jardemark, Kent; Malmerfelt, Anna; Björkholm, Carl; Svensson, Torgny H

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data have shown that addition of the selective norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor reboxetine increases the antipsychotic-like effect of the D2/3 antagonist raclopride and, in parallel, enhances cortical dopamine output. Subsequent clinical results suggested that adding reboxetine to stable treatments with various antipsychotic drugs (APDs) may improve positive, negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated in rats the effects of adding reboxetine to the second-generation APD olanzapine on: (i) antipsychotic efficacy, using the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) test, (ii) extrapyramidal side effect (EPS) liability, using a catalepsy test, (iii) dopamine efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving animals and (iv) cortical N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated transmission, using intracellular electrophysiological recording in vitro. Reboxetine (6 mg/kg) enhanced the suppression of CAR induced by a suboptimal dose (1.25 mg/kg), but not an optimal (2.5 mg/kg) dose of olanzapine without any concomitant catalepsy. Addition of reboxetine to the low dose of olanzapine also markedly increased cortical dopamine outflow and facilitated prefrontal NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. Our data suggest that adjunctive treatment with a NET inhibitor may enhance the therapeutic effect of low-dose olanzapine in schizophrenia without increasing EPS liability and add an antidepressant action, thus in principle allowing for a dose reduction of olanzapine with a concomitant reduction of dose-related side effects, such as EPS and weight gain. PMID:20463659

  17. Metal-deactivating additives for liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boneva, M.I. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Sofia (Bulgaria); Ivanov, S.K.; Kalitchin, Z.D. [SciBulCom, Ltd., Sofia (Bulgaria); Tanielyan, S.K. [Seton Hall Univ., South Orange, NJ (United States); Terebenina, A.; Todorova, O.I. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-05-01

    The metal-deactivating and the antioxidant properties of 1-phenyl-3-methylpyrazolone-5 derivatives have been investigated both in the model reaction of low temperature oxidation of ethylbenzene and in gasoline oxidation. The study of the ability of these derivatives to reduce the catalytic effect of copper naphthenate demonstrates that they are promising as metal deactivating additives for light fuels. Some of the pyrazolone compounds appear to be of special interest for the long-term storage of liquid fuels due to their action as multifunctional inhibitors.

  18. Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David Shane; Webber, Frank Laverne

    2001-07-01

    This report is a compilation of summary descriptions of Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Surveillance and Maintenance projects planned for inactive facilities and sites at the INEEL from FY-2002 through FY-2010. Deactivations of contaminated facilities will produce safe and stable facilities requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance pending further decontamination and decommissioning. Decontamination and decommissioning actions remove contaminated facilities, thus eliminating long-term surveillance and maintenance. The projects are prioritized based on risk to DOE-ID, the public, and the environment, and the reduction of DOE-ID mortgage costs and liability at the INEEL.

  19. Investigation of the mechanisms mediating MDMA "Ecstasy"-induced increases in cerebro-cortical perfusion determined by btASL MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouine, J; Kelly, M E; Jennings-Murphy, C; Duffy, P; Gorman, I; Gormley, S; Kerskens, C M; Harkin, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Acute administration of the recreational drug of abuse 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) has previously been shown to increase cerebro-cortical perfusion as determined by bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling (btASL) MRI. The purpose of the current study was to assess the mechanisms mediating these changes following systemic administration of MDMA to rats. Pharmacological manipulation of serotonergic, dopaminergic and nitrergic transmission was carried out to determine the mechanism of action of MDMA-induced increases in cortical perfusion using btASL MRI. Fenfluramine (10 mg/kg), like MDMA (20 mg/kg), increased cortical perfusion. Increased cortical perfusion was not obtained with the 5-HT2 receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI) (1 mg/kg). Depletion of central 5-HT following systemic administration of the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) produced effects similar to those observed with MDMA. Pre-treatment with the 5-HT receptor antagonist metergoline (4 mg/kg) or with the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram (30 mg/kg), however, failed to produce any effect alone or influence the response to MDMA. Pre-treatment with the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (1 mg/kg) failed to influence the changes in cortical perfusion obtained with MDMA. Treatment with the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg) provoked no change in cerebral perfusion alone yet attenuated the MDMA-related increase in cortical perfusion. Cortical 5-HT depletion is associated with increases in perfusion although this mechanism alone does not account for MDMA-related changes. A role for NO, a key regulator of cerebrovascular perfusion, is implicated in MDMA-induced increases in cortical perfusion.

  20. The effects of caffeine ingestion on cortical areas: functional imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-A; Kang, Chang-Ki; Son, Young-Don; Choi, Eun-Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Oh, Seung-Taek; Kim, Young-Bo; Park, Chan-Woong; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2014-05-01

    The effect of caffeine as a cognitive enhancer is well known; however, caffeine-induced changes in the cortical regions are still not very clear. Therefore, in this study, we conducted an investigation of the activation and deactivation with blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and of metabolic activity change with positron emission tomography (PET) in the human brain. Fourteen healthy subjects performed a visuomotor task inducing attention with 3T MRI, and PET imaging was also carried out in seven subjects to determine the cerebral glucose metabolic changes of caffeine at rest. The result by fMRI showed increased BOLD activation in the left cerebellum, putamen, insula, thalamus and the right primary motor cortex, and decreased BOLD deactivation in the posterior medial and the left posterior lateral cortex. Also, the resting state PET data showed reduced metabolic activity in the putamen, caudate nucleus, insula, pallidum and posterior medial cortex. The common cortical regions between fMRI and PET, such as putamen, insula and posterior medial cortex, where significant changes occurred after caffeine ingestion, are well known to play an important role in cognitive function like attention. This result suggests that the effect of caffeine as a cognitive enhancer is derived by modulating the attentional areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Deafferentation-Induced Plasticity of Visual Callosal Connections: Predicting Critical Periods and Analyzing Cortical Abnormalities Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime F. Olavarria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Callosal connections form elaborate patterns that bear close association with striate and extrastriate visual areas. Although it is known that retinal input is required for normal callosal development, there is little information regarding the period during which the retina is critically needed and whether this period correlates with the same developmental stage across species. Here we review the timing of this critical period, identified in rodents and ferrets by the effects that timed enucleations have on mature callosal connections, and compare it to other developmental milestones in these species. Subsequently, we compare these events to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI measurements of water diffusion anisotropy within developing cerebral cortex. We observed that the relationship between the timing of the critical period and the DTI-characterized developmental trajectory is strikingly similar in rodents and ferrets, which opens the possibility of using cortical DTI trajectories for predicting the critical period in species, such as humans, in which this period likely occurs prenatally. Last, we discuss the potential of utilizing DTI to distinguish normal from abnormal cerebral cortical development, both within the context of aberrant connectivity induced by early retinal deafferentation, and more generally as a potential tool for detecting abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  2. Effect of glucose on fatigue-induced changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties of demineralized bovine cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trębacz, Hanna; Zdunek, Artur; Wlizło-Dyś, Ewa; Cybulska, Justyna; Pieczywek, Piotr

    2015-10-16

    The aim of this study was to test a hypothesis that fatigue-induced weakening of cortical bone was intensified in bone incubated in glucose and that this weakening is revealed in the microstructure and mechanical competence of the bone matrix. Cubic specimens of bovine femoral shaft were incubated in glucose solution (G) or in buffer (NG). One half of G samples and one half of NG were axially loaded in 300 cycles (30 mm/min) at constant deformation (F); the other half was a control (C). Samples from each group (GF, NGF, GC, NGC) were completely demineralized. Slices from demineralized samples were used for microscopic image analysis. A combined effect of glycation and fatigue on demineralized bone was tested in compression (10 mm/min). Damage of samples during the test was examined in terms of acoustic emission analysis (AE). During the fatigue procedure, resistance to loading in glycated samples decreased by 14.5% but only by 8.1% in nonglycated samples. In glycated samples fatigue resulted in increased porosity with pores significantly larger than in the other groups. Under compression, strain at failure in demineralized bone was significantly affected by glucose and fatigue. AE from demineralized bone matrix was considerably related to the largest pores in the tissue. The results confirm the hypothesis that the effect of fatigue on cortical bone tissue was intensified after incubation in glucose, both in the terms of the mechanical competence of bone tissue and the structural changes in the collagenous matrix of bone.

  3. Intermittent theta-burst stimulation induces correlated changes in cortical and corticospinal excitability in healthy older subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedankien, Tamara; Fried, Peter J; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Shafi, Mouhsin M

    2017-12-01

    We studied the correlation between motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and early TMS-evoked EEG potentials (TEPs) from single-pulse TMS before and after intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation (iTBS) to the left primary motor cortex (M1) in 17 healthy older participants. TMS was targeted to the hand region of M1 using a MRI-guided navigated brain stimulation system and a figure-of-eight biphasic coil. MEPs were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous muscle using surface EMG. TEPs were extracted from a 61-channel EEG recording. Participants received 90 single TMS pulses at 120% of resting motor threshold before and after iTBS. Across all participants, the change in N15-P30 TEP and MEP amplitudes were significantly correlated (r=0.69; piTBS, whereas MEP amplitudes showed a significant increase. Changes in corticospinal reactivity and cortical reactivity induced by iTBS are related. However, the effect of iTBS on TEPs, unlike MEPs, is not straightforward. Our findings help elucidate the relationship between changes in cortical and corticospinal excitability in healthy older individuals. Going forward, TEPs may be used to evaluate the effects of theta-burst stimulation in non-motor brain regions. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Does the presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at CT have any prognostic value in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Hugo J.A.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de [Meander Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Fijnheer, Rob [Meander Medical Center, Department of Hematology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Heggelman, Ben G.F. [Meander Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Dubois, Stefan V. [Meander Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    To determine the prognostic value of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at computed tomography (CT) in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This retrospective study included 105 patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL who had undergone CT and bone marrow biopsy (BMB) before R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin, and prednisolone) chemo-immunotherapy. Cox regression analyses were used to determine the associations of cortical bone status at CT (absence vs. presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction), BMB findings (negative vs. positive for lymphomatous involvement), and dichotomized National Comprehensive Cancer Network International Prognostic Index (NCCN-IPI) strata (low risk vs. high risk) with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Univariate Cox regression analysis indicated that cortical bone status at CT was no significant predictor of either PFS or OS (p = 0.358 and p = 0.560, respectively), whereas BMB findings (p = 0.002 and p = 0.013, respectively) and dichotomized NCCN-IPI risk strata (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively) were significant predictors of both PFS and OS. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, only the dichotomized NCCN-IPI score was an independent predictive factor of PFS and OS (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). The presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at CT was not found to have any prognostic implications in newly diagnosed DLBCL. (orig.)

  5. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Da-min; Lu, Pei-Hua; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang; Sun, Min; Chen, Guo-Qian; Wang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • Pre-treatment of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) protects murine cortical neurons from OGD/R. • AS-IV activates Nrf2-ARE signaling in murine cortical neurons. • Nrf2 is required for AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. • AS-IV stimulates HB-EGF release to trans-activate EGFR in murine cortical neurons. • EGFR mediates AS-IV-induced Nrf2 activation and neuroprotection against OGD/R

  6. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Da-min [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Lu, Pei-Hua, E-mail: lphty1_1@163.com [Department of Medical Oncology, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Sun, Min [Department of General Surgery, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Chen, Guo-Qian [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Wang, Qiong, E-mail: WangQiongprof1@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China)

    2015-02-13

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • Pre-treatment of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) protects murine cortical neurons from OGD/R. • AS-IV activates Nrf2-ARE signaling in murine cortical neurons. • Nrf2 is required for AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. • AS-IV stimulates HB-EGF release to trans-activate EGFR in murine cortical neurons. • EGFR mediates AS-IV-induced Nrf2 activation and neuroprotection against OGD/R.

  7. Deactivation completed at historic Hanford Fuels Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses deactivation work which was completed as of March 31, 1994 at the 308 Fuels Development Laboratory (FDL) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The decision to deactivate the structure, formerly known as the Plutonium Fabrication Pilot Plant (PFPP), was driven by a 1980s Department of Energy (DOE) decision that plutonium fuels should not be fabricated in areas near the Site`s boundaries, as well as by changing facility structural requirements. Inventory transfer has been followed by the cleanout and stabilization of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and enriched uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) residues and powders in the facility`s equipment and duct work. The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was one of America`s primary arsenals of nuclear defense production for nearly 50 years beginning in World War II. Approximately 53 metric tons of weapons grade plutonium, over half of the national supply and about one quarter of the world`s supply, were produced at Hanford between 1944 and 1989. Today, many Site buildings are undergoing deactivation, a precursor phase to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The primary difference between the two activities is that equipment and structural items are not removed or torn down in deactivation. However, utilities are disconnected, and special nuclear materials (SNM) as well as hazardous and pyrophoric substances are removed from structures undergoing this process.

  8. Deactivation completed at historic Hanford Fuels Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses deactivation work which was completed as of March 31, 1994 at the 308 Fuels Development Laboratory (FDL) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The decision to deactivate the structure, formerly known as the Plutonium Fabrication Pilot Plant (PFPP), was driven by a 1980s Department of Energy (DOE) decision that plutonium fuels should not be fabricated in areas near the Site's boundaries, as well as by changing facility structural requirements. Inventory transfer has been followed by the cleanout and stabilization of plutonium oxide (PuO 2 ) and enriched uranium oxide (UO 2 ) residues and powders in the facility's equipment and duct work. The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was one of America's primary arsenals of nuclear defense production for nearly 50 years beginning in World War II. Approximately 53 metric tons of weapons grade plutonium, over half of the national supply and about one quarter of the world's supply, were produced at Hanford between 1944 and 1989. Today, many Site buildings are undergoing deactivation, a precursor phase to decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). The primary difference between the two activities is that equipment and structural items are not removed or torn down in deactivation. However, utilities are disconnected, and special nuclear materials (SNM) as well as hazardous and pyrophoric substances are removed from structures undergoing this process

  9. Deactivation and regeneration of refinery catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    1979-08-01

    A discussion covers the mechanisms of catalyst aging, poisoning, coke deposition, and metals deposition; feedstock pretreatment to extend catalyst life; the effects of operating conditions; the effects of catalyst composition and structure on its stability; nonchemical deactivation processes; and methods of catalyst regeneration, including coke burn-off and solvent extraction.

  10. 308 Building deactivation mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of the 308 Building (Fuels Development Laboratory) Deactivation Project mission analysis. Hanford systems engineering (SE) procedures call for a mission analysis. The mission analysis is an important first step in the SE process. The functions and requirements to successfully accomplish this mission, the selected alternatives and products will later be defined using the SE process

  11. 309 Building deactivation mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of the 309 Building (Plutonium Fuels Utilization Program) Deactivation Project mission analysis. Hanford systems engineering (SE) procedures call for a mission analysis. The mission analysis is an important first step in the SE process. The functions and requirements to successfully accomplish this mission, the selected alternatives and products will later be defined using the SE process

  12. The Approach of Emotional Deactivation of Prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jean-Nil

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the approach of emotional deactivation is to help students reduce the prejudice they may feel towards diverse social groups. Be those groups homosexuals, people living with a disability or immigrants, the victims of prejudice are invited to come into classrooms and to confront the preconceptions that students have in their respect.…

  13. Impact of Non-Invasively Induced Motor Deficits on Tibial Cortical Properties in Mutant Lurcher Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Jindrová

    Full Text Available It has been shown that Lurcher mutant mice have significantly altered motor abilities, regarding their motor coordination and muscular strength because of olivorecebellar degeneration. We assessed the response of the cross-sectional geometry and lacuno-canalicular network properties of the tibial mid-diaphyseal cortical bone to motor differences between Lurcher and wild-type (WT male mice from the B6CBA strain. The first data set used in the cross-sectional geometry analysis consists of 16 mice of 4 months of age and 32 mice of 9 months of age. The second data set used in the lacunar-canalicular network analysis consists of 10 mice of 4 months of age. We compared two cross-sectional geometry and four lacunar-canalicular properties by I-region using the maximum and minimum second moment of area and anatomical orientation as well as H-regions using histological differences within a cross section. We identified inconsistent differences in the studied cross-sectional geometry properties between Lurcher and WT mice. The biggest significant difference between Lurcher and WT mice is found in the number of canaliculi, whereas in the other studied properties are only limited. Lurcher mice exhibit an increased number of canaliculi (p < 0.01 in all studied regions compared with the WT controls. The number of canaliculi is also negatively correlated with the distance from the centroid in the Lurcher and positively correlated in the WT mice. When the Lurcher and WT sample is pooled, the number of canaliculi and lacunar volume is increased in the posterior Imax region, and in addition, midcortical H-region exhibit lower number of canaliculi, lacuna to lacuna distance and increased lacunar volume. Our results indicate, that the importance of precise sample selection within cross sections in future studies is highlighted because of the histological heterogeneity of lacunar-canalicular network properties within the I-region and H-region in the mouse cortical

  14. Autophagy activation is involved in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy'--induced neurotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsun Li

    Full Text Available Autophagic (type II cell death, characterized by the massive accumulation of autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of cells, has been suggested to play pathogenetic roles in cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, and neurodegenerative disorders. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy is an illicit drug causing long-term neurotoxicity in the brain. Apoptotic (type I and necrotic (type III cell death have been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, while the role of autophagy in MDMA-elicited neurotoxicity has not been investigated. The present study aimed to evaluate the occurrence and contribution of autophagy to neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons challenged with MDMA. Autophagy activation was monitored by expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3; an autophagic marker using immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Here, we demonstrate that MDMA exposure induced monodansylcadaverine (MDC- and LC3B-densely stained autophagosome formation and increased conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II, coinciding with the neurodegenerative phase of MDMA challenge. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA pretreatment significantly attenuated MDMA-induced autophagosome accumulation, LC3B-II expression, and ameliorated MDMA-triggered neurite damage and neuronal death. In contrast, enhanced autophagy flux by rapamycin or impaired autophagosome clearance by bafilomycin A1 led to more autophagosome accumulation in neurons and aggravated neurite degeneration, indicating that excessive autophagosome accumulation contributes to MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, MDMA induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and its downstream unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1, suggesting the AMPK/ULK1 signaling pathway might be involved in MDMA-induced autophagy activation.

  15. Role of hippocampal and prefrontal cortical signaling pathways in dextromethorphan effect on morphine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2016-02-01

    Evidence suggests that dextromethorphan (DM), an NMDA receptor antagonist, induces memory impairment. Considering that DM is widely used in cough-treating medications, and the co-abuse of DM with morphine has recently been reported, the aims of the present study was (1) to investigate whether there is a functional interaction between morphine and DM in passive avoidance learning and (2) to assess the possible role of the hippocampal and prefrontal cortical (PFC) signaling pathways in the effects of the drugs on memory formation. Our findings indicated that post-training or pre-test administration of morphine (2 and 6 mg/kg) or DM (10-30 mg/kg) impaired memory consolidation and retrieval which was associated with the attenuation of the levels of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (p-CAMKII) and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the targeted sites. Moreover, the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of morphine was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of morphine or DM (30 mg/kg), indicating state-dependent learning (SDL) and a cross-SDL between the drugs. It is important to note that the levels of p-CAMKII/CAMKII and p-CREB/CREB in the hippocampus and the PFC increased in drugs-induced SDL. In addition, DM administration potentiated morphine-induced SDL which was related to the enhanced levels of hippocampal and PFC CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways. It can be concluded that there is a relationship between the hippocampus and the PFC in the effect of DM and/or morphine on memory retrieval. Moreover, a cross SDL can be induced between the co-administration of DM and morphine. Interestingly, CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways also mediate the drugs-induced SDL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Attention, emotion, and deactivation of default activity in inferior medial prefrontal cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geday, Jacob; Gjedde, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Attention deactivates the inferior medial prefrontal cortex (IMPC), but it is uncertain if emotions can attenuate this deactivation. To test the extent to which common emotions interfere with attention, we measured changes of a blood flow index of brain activity in key areas of the IMPC...... with positron emission tomography (PET) of labeled water (H(15)2O) uptake in brain of 14 healthy subjects. The subjects performed either a less demanding or a more demanding task of attention while they watched neutral and emotive images of people in realistic indoor or outdoor situations. In the less demanding...... cortices, revealed significant activation in the fusiform gyrus, independently of the task. In contrast, we found no effect of emotional content in the IMPC, where emotions failed to override the effect of the task. The results are consistent with a role of the IMPC in the selection among competitive...

  17. The Nitric Oxide Donor SNAP-Induced Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Release in Cortical Neurons. Effects of Blockers of Voltage-Dependent Sodium and Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Findings The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Conclusions Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons. PMID:24598811

  18. The nitric oxide donor SNAP-induced amino acid neurotransmitter release in cortical neurons. Effects of blockers of voltage-dependent sodium and calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons.

  19. The nitric oxide donor SNAP-induced amino acid neurotransmitter release in cortical neurons. Effects of blockers of voltage-dependent sodium and calcium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Joaquín Merino

    Full Text Available The discovery that nitric oxide (NO functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated.The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated.Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons.

  20. [Role of immune-related GTPase M1 in cortical neurons autophagy of mice with sepsis-induced brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qun; Chen, Bin; Li, Yafei; Li, Xihong

    2017-12-28

    To investigate the role of immune-related GTPase M1 (IRGM1) in cortical neurons autophagy in mice with sepsis induced brain injury (SIBI).
 Methods: Sixty wild-type C57BL/6 mice and sixty IRGM1 gene knockout C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: a sham-operated wild-type (SWT) group, a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model wild-type (MWT) group, a sham-operated knockout (SKO) group, and a CLP model knockout (MKO) group. Models of mice with sepsis were established by CLP. Six hours of after CLP, the neurobehavioral scores for mice were recorded. The mice were diagnosed with SIBI and enrolled for the studies in next step if the neurobehavioral score was less than 6 in the MWT and MKO groups. The sham operation group only opened the abdominal cavity without CLP. Pathological changes in mouse cerebral cortex were observed by HE staining. Electron microscope was used to observe the ultrastructure of autophagy in cortical neurons. The expression of IRGM1 and INF-γ mRNA in the cerebral cortex of mice were detected by Real time quantitative PCR. The protein expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II, LC3-I, sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1) and IRGM1 were measured by Western blot. Immunofluorescence staining was used to examine the expression of IRGM1 in mouse cortical neurons.
 Results: In the MWT group, the cortical neurons showed dilated endoplasmic reticulum, swelling mitochondria, and increased number of autophagosomes after 6 or 24 h of CLP in contrast to the SWT group. At 6 h after CLP, the expression of LC3-II in the cerebral cortex began to up-regulate, and the up-regulation was maintained till 96 h after CLP; on the contrary, SQSTM1 began to decline after 6 h of CLP. Compared with SWT group, IRGM1 was strongly up-regulated in the cerebral cortex of mice at both mRNA and protein levels in the MWT group after 12 h of CLP, and the mRNA expression of IFN-γ was also increased significantly (PSIBI was 90% (27/30) in the MWT group

  1. Humanin rescues cultured rat cortical neurons from NMDA-induced toxicity through the alleviation of mitochondrial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ai-Ling Cui,1 Ying-Hua Zhang,2 Jian-Zhong Li,3 Tianbin Song,4 Xue-Min Liu,1 Hui Wang,2 Ce Zhang,5 Guo-Lin Ma,6 Hui Zhang,7 Kefeng Li8 1Anatomy Department, Changzhi Medical College, Changzhi, Shanxi, 2Key Laboratory of Tissue Regeneration of Henan Province, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan, 3Clinical Laboratory of Heji Hospital Affiliated to Changzhi Medical College, Changzhi, Shanxi, 4Department of Nuclear Medicine, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 5Department of Physiology, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 6Department of Radiology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing, 7Department of Radiology, First Clinical Medical College, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People’s Republic of China; 8School of Medicine, University of California – San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NDMA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity has been implicated in a variety of pathological situations such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease. However, no effective treatments for the same have been developed so far. Humanin (HN is a 24-amino acid peptide originally cloned from the brain of patients with AD and it prevents stress-induced cell death in many cells/tissues. In our previous study, HN was found to effectively rescue rat cortical neurons. It is still not clear whether HN protects the neurons through the attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, excitatory toxicity was induced by NMDA, which binds the NMDA receptor in primarily cultured rat cortical neurons. We found that NMDA (100 µmol/L dramatically induced the decrease of cell viability and caused mitochondrial dysfunction. Pretreatment of the neurons with HN (1 µmol/L led to significant increases of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity and membrane potential. In addition, HN pretreatment significantly reduced the excessive production of both reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric

  2. L-Ascorbate Protects Against Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity of Cortical Cells via Inhibiting Oxidative Stress, Autophagy, and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Ni; Yang, Ling-Yu; Wang, Jing-Ya; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Chiu, Chien-Tsai; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH)-induced cell death contributes to the pathogenesis of neurotoxicity; however, the relative roles of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagy remain unclear. L-Ascorbate, also called vitamin (Vit.) C, confers partial protection against METH neurotoxicity via induction of heme oxygenase-1. We further investigated the role of Vit. C in METH-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagy in cortical cells. Exposure to lower concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1 mM) of METH had insignificant effects on ROS production, whereas cells exposed to 5 mM METH exhibited ROS production in a time-dependent manner. We confirmed METH-induced apoptosis (by nuclear morphology revealed by Hoechst 33258 staining and Western blot showing the protein levels of pro-caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 3) and autophagy (by Western blot showing the protein levels of Belin-1 and conversion of microtubule-associated light chain (LC)3-I to LC3-II and autophagosome staining by monodansylcadaverine). The apoptosis as revealed by cleaved caspase-3 expression marked an increase at 18 h after METH exposure while both autophagic markers, Beclin 1 and LC3-II, marked an increase in cells exposed to METH for 6 and 24 h, respectively. Treating cells with Vit. C 30 min before METH exposure time-dependently attenuated the production of ROS. Vitamin C also attenuated METH-induced Beclin 1 and LC3-II expression and METH toxicity. Treatment of cells with Vit. C before METH exposure attenuated the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and reduced the number of METH-induced apoptotic cells. We suggest that the protective effect of Vit. C against METH toxicity might be through attenuation of ROS production, autophagy, and apoptosis.

  3. Application of extended Kalman filter to identification of enzymatic deactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminal, G; Lafuente, J; López-Santín, J; Poch, M; Solà, C

    1987-02-01

    A recursive estimation scheme, the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) technique, was applied to study enzymatic deactivation in the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated cellulose using a model previously developed by the authors. When no deactivation model was assumed, the results showed no variation with time for all the model parameters except for the maximum rate of cellobiose-to-glucose conversion (r'(m)).The r'(m) variation occurred in two zones with a grace period. A new model of enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated cellulose deactivation was proposed and validated showing better behavior than the old deactivation model. This approach allows one to study enzyme deactivation without additional experiments and within operational conditions.

  4. Bone fragility induced by X-ray irradiation in relation to cortical bone-mineral content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyaruba, M.M.; Yamamoto, I.; Morita, R.; Kimura, H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of fractional irradiation on the biomechanical properties of bone in the rat in relation to the cortical bone-mineral content (BMC), and to compare these effects with those brought about by single-dose irradiation. Seventy-five veteran female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Group 1 was the control group. The left tibiae of the remaining rats were exposed to irradiation. Group 2 received one single dose of X-rays at 10-60 Gy. Groups 3 and 4 received fractional irradiation up to different cumulative doses (10-60 Gy): group 3 received 2.5 Gy once a day; group 4 received 1.25 Gy twice a day. Twenty-four weeks after irradiation, the rats were killed and the BMC in each tibial diaphysis was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The bones were then loaded to failure in a three-point bending test. The control group showed no difference (p>0.05) between left and right tibiae, neither in BMC nor in the maximum load at fracture. Single-dose irradiation caused a 16% (p=0.0366) decrease in the maximum load at 40 Gy, and a 19% (p=0.008) decrease at 60 Gy. The once-daily fractional dose of irradiation caused a 10% (p=0.0022) decrease in the maximum load of the irradiated tibiae at 60 Gy when compared to the intact contralateral tibiae. The twice-daily fractional dose of irradiation had no observable effect on the maximum load of the irradiated tibiae. Neither fractional irradiation modality had an effect on BMC. (orig./MG)

  5. Human endothelial progenitor cells rescue cortical neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation induced death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigaluppi, Susanna; Donzelli, Elisabetta; De Cristofaro, Valentina; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; D'Amico, Giovanna; Scuteri, Arianna; Tredici, Giovanni

    2016-09-19

    Cerebral ischemia is characterized by both acute and delayed neuronal injuries. Neuro-protection is a major issue that should be properly addressed from a pharmacological point of view, and cell-based treatment approaches are of interest due to their potential pleiotropic effects. Endothelial progenitor cells have the advantage of being mobilized from the bone marrow into the circulation, but have been less studied than other stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, the comparison between human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) and human mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMSC) in terms of efficacy in rescuing neurons from cell death after transitory ischemia is the aim of the current study, in the effort to address further directions. In vitro model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) on a primary culture of rodent cortical neurons was set up with different durations of exposure: 1, 2 and 3hrs with assessment of neuron survival. The 2hrs OGD was chosen for the subsequent experiments. After 2hrs OGD neurons were either placed in indirect co-culture with hMSC or hEPC or cultured in hMSC or hEPC conditioned medium and cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. At day 2 after 2hrs OGD exposure, mean neuronal survival was 47.9±24.2%. In contrast, after treatment with hEPC and hMSC indirect co-culture was 74.1±27.3%; and 69.4±18.8%, respectively. In contrast, treatment with conditioned medium did not provide any advantage in terms of survival to OGD neurons The study shows the efficacy of hEPC in indirect co-culture to rescue neurons from cell death after OGD, comparable to that of hMSC. hEPC deserve further studies given their potential interest for ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Deep brain stimulation of the amygdala alleviates fear conditioning-induced alterations in synaptic plasticity in the cortical-amygdala pathway and fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Li; Huang, SiJia; Peng, BinBin; Ren, Jie; Tian, FuYing; Wang, Yan

    2014-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the amygdala has been demonstrated to modulate hyperactivity of the amygdala, which is responsible for the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and thus might be used for the treatment of PTSD. However, the underlying mechanism of DBS of the amygdala in the modulation of the amygdala is unclear. The present study investigated the effects of DBS of the amygdala on synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity at cortical inputs to the amygdala, which is critical for the formation and storage of auditory fear memories, and fear memories. The results demonstrated that auditory fear conditioning increased single-pulse-evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the cortical-amygdala pathway. Furthermore, auditory fear conditioning decreased the induction of paired-pulse facilitation and long-term potentiation, two neurophysiological models for studying short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity, respectively, in the cortical-amygdala pathway. In addition, all these auditory fear conditioning-induced changes could be reversed by DBS of the amygdala. DBS of the amygdala also rescued auditory fear conditioning-induced enhancement of long-term retention of fear memory. These findings suggested that DBS of the amygdala alleviating fear conditioning-induced alterations in synaptic plasticity in the cortical-amygdala pathway and fear memory may underlie the neuromodulatory role of DBS of the amygdala in activities of the amygdala.

  7. The nonadiabatic deactivation paths of pyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbatti, Mario; Vazdar, Mario; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Eckert-Maksic, Mirjana; Lischka, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations have been performed for pyrrole with the aim of providing an explanation for the experimentally observed photochemical deactivation processes. Potential energy curves and minima on the crossing seam were determined using the analytic MRCI gradient and nonadiabatic coupling features of the COLUMBUS program system. A new deactivation mechanism based on an out-of-plane ring deformation is presented. This mechanism directly couples the charge transfer 1 ππ* and ground states. It may be responsible for more than 50% of the observed photofragments of ππ*-excited pyrrole. The ring deformation mechanism should act complementary to the previously proposed NH-stretching mechanism, thus offering a more complete interpretation of the pyrrole photodynamics

  8. Repeatability and reliability of muscle relaxation properties induced by motor cortical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Joery P; Voermans, Nicol C; de Jong, Lysanne A; Stegeman, Dick F; Doorduin, Jonne; van Engelen, Baziel G

    2018-03-15

    Impaired muscle relaxation is a feature of many neuromuscular disorders. However, there are few tests available to quantify muscle relaxation. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex can induce muscle relaxation by abruptly inhibiting corticospinal drive. The aim of our study is to investigate if repeatability and reliability of TMS-induced relaxation is greater than voluntary relaxation. Furthermore, effects of sex, cooling and fatigue on muscle relaxation properties were studied. Muscle relaxation of deep finger flexors was assessed in twenty-five healthy subjects (14 M and 11 F, aged 39.1{plus minus}12.7 and 45.3{plus minus}8.7 years old, respectively) using handgrip dynamometry. All outcome measures showed greater repeatability and reliability in TMS-induced relaxation compared to voluntary relaxation. The within-subject coefficient of variability of normalized peak relaxation rate was lower in TMS-induced relaxation than in voluntary relaxation (3.0 vs 19.7% in men, and 6.1 vs 14.3% in women). The repeatability coefficient was lower (1.3 vs 6.1 s -1 in men and 2.3 vs 3.1 s -1 in women), and the intraclass correlation coefficient was higher (0.95 vs 0.53 in men and 0.78 vs 0.69 in women), for TMS-induced relaxation compared to voluntary relaxation. TMS enabled to demonstrate slowing effects of sex, muscle cooling, and muscle fatigue on relaxation properties that voluntary relaxation could not. In conclusion, repeatability and reliability of TMS-induced muscle relaxation was greater compared to voluntary muscle relaxation. TMS-induced muscle relaxation has the potential to be used in clinical practice for diagnostic purposes and therapy effect monitoring in patients with impaired muscle relaxation.

  9. A Functional Role for the Epigenetic Regulator ING1 in Activity-induced Gene Expression in Primary Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Laura J; Zhao, Qiongyi; Li, Xiang; Dai, Chuanyang; Marshall, Paul R; Liu, Sha; Wang, Yi; Zajaczkowski, Esmi L; Khandelwal, Nitin; Kumar, Arvind; Bredy, Timothy W; Wei, Wei

    2018-01-15

    Epigenetic regulation of activity-induced gene expression involves multiple levels of molecular interaction, including histone and DNA modifications, as well as mechanisms of DNA repair. Here we demonstrate that the genome-wide deposition of inhibitor of growth family member 1 (ING1), which is a central epigenetic regulatory protein, is dynamically regulated in response to activity in primary cortical neurons. ING1 knockdown leads to decreased expression of genes related to synaptic plasticity, including the regulatory subunit of calcineurin, Ppp3r1. In addition, ING1 binding at a site upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) of Ppp3r1 depends on yet another group of neuroepigenetic regulatory proteins, the Piwi-like family, which are also involved in DNA repair. These findings provide new insight into a novel mode of activity-induced gene expression, which involves the interaction between different epigenetic regulatory mechanisms traditionally associated with gene repression and DNA repair. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in APP Hyperphosphorylation Induced by NMDA Stimulation in Cortical Neurons

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    Xanthi Antoniou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The phosphorylation of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP at Thr668 plays a key role in APP metabolism that is highly relevant to AD. The c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 can all be responsible for this phosphorylation. These kinases are activated by excitotoxic stimuli fundamental hallmarks of AD. The exposure of cortical neurons to a high dose of NMDA (100 μM for 30’-45’ led to an increase of P-APP Thr668. During NMDA stimulation APP hyperphosphorylation has to be assigned to GSK-3β activity, since addition of L803-mts, a substrate competitive inhibitor of GSK-3β reduced APP phosphorylation induced by NMDA. On the contrary, inhibition of JNK and Cdk5 with D-JNKI1 and Roscovitine respectively did not prevent NMDA-induced P-APP increase. These data show a tight connection, in excitotoxic conditions, between APP metabolism and the GSK-3β signaling pathway.

  11. Abnormal dopaminergic modulation of striato-cortical networks underlies levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Christensen, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease (age range: 51–84 years; 11 females) received a single dose of levodopa and then performed a task in which they had to produce or suppress a movement in response to visual cues. Task-related activity was continuously mapped...... with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic causal modelling was applied to assess levodopa-induced modulation of effective connectivity between the pre-supplementary motor area, primary motor cortex and putamen when patients suppressed a motor response. Bayesian model selection revealed that patients who...

  12. Differential regulation of the Rac1 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) BCR during oxygen/glucose deprivation in hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katharine R; Rajgor, Dipen; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2017-12-08

    Brain ischemia causes oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in neurons, triggering a cascade of events leading to synaptic accumulation of glutamate. Excessive activation of glutamate receptors causes excitotoxicity and delayed cell death in vulnerable neurons. Following global cerebral ischemia, hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are more vulnerable to injury than their cortical counterparts, but the mechanisms that underlie this difference are unclear. Signaling via Rho-family small GTPases, their upstream guanine nucleotide exchange factors, and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) is differentially dysregulated in response to OGD/ischemia in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Increased Rac1 activity caused by OGD/ischemia contributes to neuronal death in hippocampal neurons via diverse effects on NADPH oxidase activity and dendritic spine morphology. The Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1 mediates an OGD-induced increase in Rac1 activity in hippocampal neurons; however, the identity of an antagonistic GAP remains elusive. Here we show that the Rac1 GAP breakpoint cluster region (BCR) associates with NMDA receptors (NMDARs) along with Tiam1 and that this protein complex is more abundant in hippocampal compared with cortical neurons. Although total BCR is similar in the two neuronal types, BCR is more active in hippocampal compared with cortical neurons. OGD causes an NMDAR- and Ca 2+ -permeable AMPAR-dependent deactivation of BCR in hippocampal but not cortical neurons. BCR knockdown occludes OGD-induced Rac1 activation in hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, disrupting the Tiam1-NMDAR interaction with a fragment of Tiam1 blocks OGD-induced Tiam1 activation but has no effect on the deactivation of BCR. This work identifies BCR as a critical player in Rac1 regulation during OGD in hippocampal neurons. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Tributyltin induces distinct effects on cortical and trabecular bone in female C57Bl/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, James; Baker, Amelia H; Meeks, Brett; Pajevic, Paola D; Morgan, Elise F; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Schlezinger, Jennifer J

    2018-09-01

    The retinoid X receptors (RXR), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and liver X receptors (LXR) all have been shown to regulate bone homeostasis. Tributyltin (TBT) is an environmental contaminant that is a dual RXRα/β and PPARγ agonist. TBT induces RXR, PPARγ, and LXR-mediated gene transcription and suppresses osteoblast differentiation in vitro. Bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells derived from female C57BL/6J mice were more sensitive to suppression of osteogenesis by TBT than those derived from male mice. In vivo, oral gavage of 12 week old female, C57Bl/6J mice with 10 mg/kg TBT for 10 weeks resulted in femurs with a smaller cross-sectional area and thinner cortex. Surprisingly, TBT induced significant increases in trabecular thickness, number, and bone volume fraction. TBT treatment did not change the Rankl:Opg RNA ratio in whole bone, and histological analyses showed that osteoclasts in the trabecular space were minimally reduced. In contrast, expression of cardiotrophin-1, an osteoblastogenic cytokine secreted by osteoclasts, increased. In primary bone marrow macrophage cultures, TBT marginally inhibited the number of osteoclasts that differentiated, in spite of significantly suppressing expression of osteoclast markers Nfatc1, Acp5, and Ctsk and resorptive activity. TBT induced expression of RXR- and LXR-dependent genes in whole bone and in vitro osteoclast cultures. However, only an RXR antagonist, but not an LXR antagonist, significantly inhibited TBTs ability to suppress osteoclast differentiation. These results suggest that TBT has distinct effects on cortical versus trabecular bone, likely resulting from independent effects on osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation that are mediated through RXR. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Agonist-induced PIP(2) hydrolysis inhibits cortical actin dynamics: regulation at a global but not at a micrometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rheenen, Jacco; Jalink, Kees

    2002-09-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane has been proposed to locally regulate the actin cytoskeleton. Indeed, recent studies that use GFP-tagged pleckstrin homology domains (GFP-PH) as fluorescent PIP(2) sensors suggest that this lipid is enriched in membrane microdomains. Here we report that this concept needs revision. Using three distinct fluorescent GFP-tagged pleckstrin homology domains, we show that highly mobile GFP-PH patches colocalize perfectly with various lipophilic membrane dyes and, hence, represent increased lipid content rather than PIP(2)-enriched microdomains. We show that bright patches are caused by submicroscopical folds and ruffles in the membrane that can be directly visualized at approximately 15 nm axial resolution with a novel numerically enhanced imaging method. F-actin motility is inhibited significantly by agonist-induced PIP(2) breakdown, and it resumes as soon as PIP(2) levels are back to normal. Thus, our data support a role for PIP(2) in the regulation of cortical actin, but they challenge a model in which spatial differences in PIP(2) regulation of the cytoskeleton exist at a micrometer scale.

  15. Behavior in the open field predicts the number of KCl-induced cortical spreading depressions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Volodymyr Borysovych; Bogdanova, Olena Viktorivna; Koulchitsky, Stanislav Vladimirovich; Chauvel, Virginie; Multon, Sylvie; Makarchuk, Mykola Yukhymovych; Brennan, Kevin Christopher; Renshaw, Perry Franklin; Schoenen, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are known to be comorbid with migraine, and cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the most likely cause of the migraine aura. To search for possible correlations between susceptibility to CSD and anxiety we used the open field test in male Sprague-Dawley rats chronically treated with the preventive anti-migraine drugs valproate or riboflavin. Animals avoiding the central area of the open field chamber and those with less exploratory activity (i.e. rearing) were considered more anxious. After 4 weeks of treatment CSDs were elicited by application of 1M KCl over the occipital cortex and the number of CSDs occurring over a 2h period was compared to the previously assessed open field behavior. Higher anxiety-like behavior was significantly correlated with a higher frequency of KCl-induced CSDs. In saline-treated animals, fewer rearings were found in animals with more frequent CSDs (R=-1.00). The duration of ambulatory episodes in the open field center correlated negatively with number of CSDs in the valproate group (R=-0.83; popen field center in both groups (R=-0.75; p<0.05 and R=-0.58; p<0.1 respectively). These results suggest that anxiety symptoms are associated with susceptibility to CSD and might explain why it can be an aggravating factor in migraine with aura. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulsed DC Electric Field-Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Fang Chang

    Full Text Available We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz. The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders.

  17. Single Silver Nanoparticle Instillation Induced Early and Persisting Moderate Cortical Damage in Rat Kidneys

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    Elisa Roda

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential toxic effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, administered by a single intratracheal instillation (i.t, was assessed in a rat model using commercial physico-chemical characterized nanosilver. Histopathological changes, overall toxic response and oxidative stress (kidney and plasma protein carbonylation, paralleled by ultrastructural observations (TEM, were evaluated to examine renal responses 7 and 28 days after i.t. application of a low AgNP dose (50 µg/rat, compared to an equivalent dose of ionic silver (7 µg AgNO3/rat. The AgNPs caused moderate renal histopathological and ultrastructural alteration, in a region-specific manner, being the cortex the most affected area. Notably, the bulk AgNO3, caused similar adverse effects with a slightly more marked extent, also triggering apoptotic phenomena. Specifically, 7 days after exposure to both AgNPs and AgNO3, dilatation of the intercapillary and peripheral Bowman’s space was observed, together with glomerular shrinkage. At day 28, these effects still persisted after both treatments, accompanied by an additional injury involving the vascular component of the mesangium, with interstitial micro-hemorrhages. Neither AgNPs nor AgNO3 induced oxidative stress effects in kidneys and plasma, at either time point. The AgNP-induced moderate renal effects indicate that, despite their benefits, novel AgNPs employed in consumer products need exhaustive investigation to ensure public health safety.

  18. Pulsed DC Electric Field-Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Lee, Ying-Shan; Tang, Tang K; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2016-01-01

    We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC) pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs) could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz). The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders.

  19. Directed cortical information flow during human object recognition: analyzing induced EEG gamma-band responses in brain's source space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot G Supp

    Full Text Available The increase of induced gamma-band responses (iGBRs; oscillations >30 Hz elicited by familiar (meaningful objects is well established in electroencephalogram (EEG research. This frequency-specific change at distinct locations is thought to indicate the dynamic formation of local neuronal assemblies during the activation of cortical object representations. As analytically power increase is just a property of a single location, phase-synchrony was introduced to investigate the formation of large-scale networks between spatially distant brain sites. However, classical phase-synchrony reveals symmetric, pair-wise correlations and is not suited to uncover the directionality of interactions. Here, we investigated the neural mechanism of visual object processing by means of directional coupling analysis going beyond recording sites, but rather assessing the directionality of oscillatory interactions between brain areas directly. This study is the first to identify the directionality of oscillatory brain interactions in source space during human object recognition and suggests that familiar, but not unfamiliar, objects engage widespread reciprocal information flow. Directionality of cortical information-flow was calculated based upon an established Granger-Causality coupling-measure (partial-directed coherence; PDC using autoregressive modeling. To enable comparison with previous coupling studies lacking directional information, phase-locking analysis was applied, using wavelet-based signal decompositions. Both, autoregressive modeling and wavelet analysis, revealed an augmentation of iGBRs during the presentation of familiar objects relative to unfamiliar controls, which was localized to inferior-temporal, superior-parietal and frontal brain areas by means of distributed source reconstruction. The multivariate analysis of PDC evaluated each possible direction of brain interaction and revealed widespread reciprocal information-transfer during familiar

  20. Music-induced cortical plasticity and lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex as foundations for tonal tinnitus treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantev, Christo; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Teismann, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, we have studied plasticity in the human auditory cortex by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). Two main topics nurtured our curiosity: the effects of musical training on plasticity in the auditory system, and the effects of lateral inhibition. One of our plasticity studies found that listening to notched music for 3 h inhibited the neuronal activity in the auditory cortex that corresponded to the center-frequency of the notch, suggesting suppression of neural activity by lateral inhibition. Subsequent research on this topic found that suppression was notably dependent upon the notch width employed, that the lower notch-edge induced stronger attenuation of neural activity than the higher notch-edge, and that auditory focused attention strengthened the inhibitory networks. Crucially, the overall effects of lateral inhibition on human auditory cortical activity were stronger than the habituation effects. Based on these results we developed a novel treatment strategy for tonal tinnitus-tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT). By notching the music energy spectrum around the individual tinnitus frequency, we intended to attract lateral inhibition to auditory neurons involved in tinnitus perception. So far, the training strategy has been evaluated in two studies. The results of the initial long-term controlled study (12 months) supported the validity of the treatment concept: subjective tinnitus loudness and annoyance were significantly reduced after TMNMT but not when notching spared the tinnitus frequencies. Correspondingly, tinnitus-related auditory evoked fields (AEFs) were significantly reduced after training. The subsequent short-term (5 days) training study indicated that training was more effective in the case of tinnitus frequencies ≤ 8 kHz compared to tinnitus frequencies >8 kHz, and that training should be employed over a long-term in order to induce more persistent effects. Further development and evaluation of TMNMT therapy

  1. Glycine Receptor Activation Impairs ATP-Induced Calcium Transients in Cultured Cortical Astrocytes

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    Tatiana P. Morais

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In central nervous system, glycine receptor (GlyR is mostly expressed in the spinal cord and brainstem, but glycinergic transmission related elements have also been identified in the brain. Astrocytes are active elements at the tripartite synapse, being responsible for the maintenance of brain homeostasis and for the fine-tuning of synaptic activity. These cells communicate, spontaneously or in response to a stimulus, by elevations in their cytosolic calcium (calcium transients, Ca2+T that can be propagated to other cells. How these Ca2+T are negatively modulated is yet poorly understood. In this work, we evaluated GlyR expression and its role on calcium signaling modulation in rat brain astrocytes. We first proved that GlyR, predominantly subunits α2 and β, was expressed in brain astrocytes and its localization was confirmed in the cytoplasm and astrocytic processes by immunohistochemistry assays. Calcium imaging experiments in cultured astrocytes showed that glycine (500 μM, a GlyR agonist, caused a concentration-dependent reduction in ATP-induced Ca2+T, an effect abolished by the GlyR antagonist, strychnine (0.8 μM, as well as by nocodazole (1 μM, known to impair GlyR anchorage to the plasma membrane. This effect was mimicked by activation of GABAAR, another Cl--permeable channel. In summary, we demonstrated that GlyR activation in astrocytes mediates an inhibitory effect upon ATP induced Ca2+T, which most probably involves changes in membrane permeability to Cl- and requires GlyR anchorage at the plasma membrane. GlyR in astrocytes may thus be part of a mechanism to modulate astrocyte-to-neuron communication.

  2. Pyruvate administration reduces recurrent/moderate hypoglycemia-induced cortical neuron death in diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Young Choi

    Full Text Available Recurrent/moderate (R/M hypoglycemia is common in type 1 diabetes patients. Moderate hypoglycemia is not life-threatening, but if experienced recurrently it may present several clinical complications. Activated PARP-1 consumes cytosolic NAD, and because NAD is required for glycolysis, hypoglycemia-induced PARP-1 activation may render cells unable to use glucose even when glucose availability is restored. Pyruvate, however, can be metabolized in the absence of cytosolic NAD. We therefore hypothesized that pyruvate may be able to improve the outcome in diabetic rats subjected to insulin-induced R/M hypoglycemia by terminating hypoglycemia with glucose plus pyruvate, as compared with delivering just glucose alone. In an effort to mimic juvenile type 1 diabetes the experiments were conducted in one-month-old young rats that were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin (STZ, 50mg/kg, i.p. injection. One week after STZ injection, rats were subjected to moderate hypoglycemia by insulin injection (10 U/kg, i.p. without anesthesia for five consecutive days. Pyruvate (500 mg/kg was given by intraperitoneal injection after each R/M hypoglycemia. Three hours after last R/M hypoglycemia, zinc accumulation was evaluated. Three days after R/M hypoglycemia, neuronal death, oxidative stress, microglial activation and GSH concentrations in the cerebral cortex were analyzed. Sparse neuronal death was observed in the cortex. Zinc accumulation, oxidative injury, microglial activation and GSH loss in the cortex after R/M hypoglycemia were all reduced by pyruvate injection. These findings suggest that when delivered alongside glucose, pyruvate may significantly improve the outcome after R/M hypoglycemia by circumventing a sustained impairment in neuronal glucose utilization resulting from PARP-1 activation.

  3. Multimodal responses induced by cortical stimulation of the parietal lobe: a stereo-electroencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Francione, Stefano; Mai, Roberto; Castana, Laura; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Marino, Daniela; Provinciali, Leandro; Cardinale, Francesco; Tassi, Laura

    2015-09-01

    The functional complexity of the parietal lobe still represents a challenge for neurophysiological and functional neuroimaging studies. While the somatosensory functions of the anterior parietal cortex are well established, the posterior parietal cortex has a relevant role in processing the sensory information, including visuo-spatial perception, visual attention, visuo-motor transformations and other complex and not completely understood functions. We retrospectively analysed all the clinical manifestations induced by intracerebral bipolar electrical stimulation in 172 patients suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsy (mean age 25.6, standard deviation 11.6; 44% females and 56% males) with at least one electrode stereotactically implanted in the parietal cortex. A total of 1186 electrical stimulations were included in the analysis, of which 88 were subsequently excluded because of eliciting pathological electric activity or inducing ictal symptomatology. In the dominant parietal lobe, clinical responses were observed for 56 (25%) of the low-frequency stimulations and for 76 (50%) of the high-frequency stimulations. In the non-dominant parietal lobe, 111 (27%) low-frequency and 176 (55%) high-frequency stimulations were associated with a clinical response. Body scheme alteration was the only clinical effect showing a lateralization, as they were evoked only in the non-dominant hemisphere. The occurrence of somatosensory sensations, motor symptoms, dysarthria and multimodal responses were significantly associated with stimulation of the postcentral gyrus (odds ratio: 5.83, P < 0.001; odds ratio: 8.77, P < 0.001; odds ratio: 5.44, P = 0.011; odds ratio: 8.33, P = 0.006; respectively). Stimulation of the intraparietal sulcus was associated with the occurrence of sensory illusions or hallucinations (odds ratio: 8.68, P < 0.001) and eyeball/eyelid movements or sensations (odds ratio: 4.35, P = 0.047). To our knowledge, this is the only currently available complete

  4. Reorganization of motor cortex and impairment of motor performance induced by hindlimb unloading are partially reversed by cortical IGF-1 administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysoet, Julien; Canu, Marie-Hélène; Gillet, Christophe; Fourneau, Julie; Garnier, Cyril; Bastide, Bruno; Dupont, Erwan

    2017-01-15

    Immobilization, bed rest, or sedentary lifestyle, are known to induce a profound impairment in sensorimotor performance. These alterations are due to a combination of peripheral and central factors. Previous data conducted on a rat model of disuse (hindlimb unloading, HU) have shown a profound reorganization of motor cortex and an impairment of motor performance. Recently, our interest was turned towards the role of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in cerebral plasticity since this growth factor is considered as the mediator of beneficial effects of exercise on the central nervous system, and its cortical level is decreased after a 14-day period of HU. In the present study, we attempted to determine whether a chronic subdural administration of IGF-1 in HU rats could prevent deleterious effects of HU on the motor cortex and on motor activity. We demonstrated that HU induces a shrinkage of hindlimb cortical representation and an increase in current threshold to elicit a movement. Administration of IGF-1 in HU rats partially reversed these changes. The functional evaluation revealed that IGF-1 prevents the decrease in spontaneous activity found in HU rats and the changes in hip kinematics during overground locomotion, but had no effect of challenged locomotion (ladder rung walking test). Taken together, these data clearly indicate the implication of IGF-1 in cortical plastic mechanisms and in behavioral alteration induced by a decreased in sensorimotor activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Antioxidant Deactivation on Graphenic Nanocarbon Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinyuan [ORNL; Sen, Sujat [Brown University; Liu, Jingyu [Brown University; Kulaots, Indrek [Brown University; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Kane, Agnes [Brown University; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Palmore, G. Tayhas R. [Brown University; Hurt, Robert H. [Brown University

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a direct chemical pathway for antioxidant deactivation on the surfaces of carbon nanomaterials. In the absence of cells, carbon nanotubes are shown to deplete the key physiological antioxidant glutathione (GSH) in a reaction involving dissolved dioxygen that yields the oxidized dimer, GSSG, as the primary product. In both chemical and electrochemical experiments, oxygen is only consumed at a significant steady-state rate in the presence of both nanotubes and GSH. GSH deactivation occurs for single- and multi-walled nanotubes, graphene oxide, nanohorns, and carbon black at varying rates that are characteristic of the material. The GSH depletion rates can be partially unified by surface area normalization, are accelerated by nitrogen doping, and suppressed by defect annealing or addition of proteins or surfactants. It is proposed that dioxygen reacts with active sites on graphenic carbon surfaces to produce surface-bound oxygen intermediates that react heterogeneously with glutathione to restore the carbon surface and complete a catalytic cycle. The direct catalytic reaction between nanomaterial surfaces and antioxidants may contribute to oxidative stress pathways in nanotoxicity, and the dependence on surface area and structural defects suggest strategies for safe material design.

  6. Phospho-Rb mediating cell cycle reentry induces early apoptosis following oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Ren, Qing-Guo; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Ke; Yu, Zhi-Yuan; Luo, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cell cycle reentry and apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We found that the percentage of neurons with BrdU uptake, TUNEL staining, and colocalized BrdU uptake and TUNEL staining was increased relative to control 6, 12 and 24 h after 1 h of OGD. The number of neurons with colocalized BrdU and TUNEL staining was decreased relative to the number of TUNEL-positive neurons at 24 h. The expression of phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (phospho-Rb) was significantly increased 6, 12 and 24 h after OGD, parallel with the changes in BrdU uptake. Phospho-Rb and TUNEL staining were colocalized in neurons 6 and 12 h after OGD. This colocalization was strikingly decreased 24 h after OGD. Treatment with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine (100 μM) decreased the expression of phospho-Rb and reduced neuronal apoptosis in vitro. These results demonstrated that attempted cell cycle reentry with phosphorylation of Rb induce early apoptosis in neurons after OGD and there must be other mechanisms involved in the later stages of neuronal apoptosis besides cell cycle reentry. Phosphoralated Rb may be an important factor which closely associates aberrant cell cycle reentry with the early stages of neuronal apoptosis following ischemia/hypoxia in vitro, and pharmacological interventions for neuroprotection may be useful directed at this keypoint.

  7. Opiate sensitization induces FosB/ΔFosB expression in prefrontal cortical, striatal and amygdala brain regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary B Kaplan

    Full Text Available Sensitization to the effects of drugs of abuse and associated stimuli contributes to drug craving, compulsive drug use, and relapse in addiction. Repeated opiate exposure produces behavioral sensitization that is hypothesized to result from neural plasticity in specific limbic, striatal and cortical systems. ΔFosB and FosB are members of the Fos family of transcription factors that are implicated in neural plasticity in addiction. This study examined the effects of intermittent morphine treatment, associated with motor sensitization, on FosB/ΔFosB levels using quantitative immunohistochemistry. Motor sensitization was tested in C57BL/6 mice that received six intermittent pre-treatments (on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 12 with either subcutaneous morphine (10 mg/kg or saline followed by a challenge injection of morphine or saline on day 16. Mice receiving repeated morphine injections demonstrated significant increases in locomotor activity on days 8, 10, and 12 of treatment (vs. day 1, consistent with development of locomotor sensitization. A morphine challenge on day 16 significantly increased locomotor activity of saline pre-treated mice and produced even larger increases in motor activity in the morphine pre-treated mice, consistent with the expression of opiate sensitization. Intermittent morphine pre-treatment on these six pre-treatment days produced a significant induction of FosB/ΔFosB, measured on day 16, in multiple brain regions including prelimbic (PL and infralimbic (IL cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAc core, dorsomedial caudate-putamen (CPU, basolateral amygdala (BLA and central nucleus of the amygdala (CNA but not in a motor cortex control region. Opiate induced sensitization may develop via Fos/ΔFosB plasticity in motivational pathways (NAc, motor outputs (CPU, and associative learning (PL, IL, BLA and stress pathways (CNA.

  8. Music-induced cortical plasticity and lateral inhibition in the human auditory cortex as foundations for tonal tinnitus treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo ePantev

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15 years, we have studied plasticity in the human auditory cortex by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. Two main topics nurtured our curiosity: the effects of musical training on plasticity in the auditory system, and the effects of lateral inhibition. One of our plasticity studies found that listening to notched music for three hours inhibited the neuronal activity in the auditory cortex that corresponded to the center-frequency of the notch, suggesting suppression of neural activity by lateral inhibition. Crucially, the overall effects of lateral inhibition on human auditory cortical activity were stronger than the habituation effects. Based on these results we developed a novel treatment strategy for tonal tinnitus - tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT. By notching the music energy spectrum around the individual tinnitus frequency, we intended to attract lateral inhibition to auditory neurons involved in tinnitus perception. So far, the training strategy has been evaluated in two studies. The results of the initial long-term controlled study (12 months supported the validity of the treatment concept: subjective tinnitus loudness and annoyance were significantly reduced after TMNMT but not when notching spared the tinnitus frequencies. Correspondingly, tinnitus-related auditory evoked fields (AEFs were significantly reduced after training. The subsequent short-term (5 days training study indicated that training was more effective in the case of tinnitus frequencies ≤ 8 kHz compared to tinnitus frequencies > 8 kHz, and that training should be employed over a long-term in order to induce more persistent effects. Further development and evaluation of TMNMT therapy are planned. A goal is to transfer this novel, completely non-invasive, and low-cost treatment approach for tonal tinnitus into routine clinical practice.

  9. 1,8-Cineole ameliorates oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation-induced ischaemic injury by reducing oxidative stress in rat cortical neuron/glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sangwoo; Park, Hyeon; Seol, Geun Hee; Choi, In-Young

    2014-12-01

    1,8-Cineole, the main monoterpene in many essential oils, has been used as an ingredient in flavourings and medicine. 1,8-Cineole has been shown to possess pharmacological properties, including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive actions. However, to date, no studies have examined the potential of 1,8-cineole to protect against cerebral ischaemic injury. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of 1,8-cineole against cortical neuronal/glial cell injury caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) in an in-vitro model of ischaemia. 1,8-Cineole significantly attenuated OGD/R-induced cortical cell injury, as well as reduced n-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-induced cell injury. However, it did not inhibit NMDA-induced cytosolic calcium overload. Nevertheless, 1,8-cineole significantly reduced the OGD/R- and NMDA-induced overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results indicate that 1,8-cineole exerts neuroprotection through its anti-oxidative rather than its anti-excitotoxic, properties. The decrease in OGD/R-induced intracellular superoxide in 1,8-cineole-treated cortical cells was associated with the upregulation of superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, 1,8-cineole showed direct ROS scavenging activity in an assay of oxygen radical absorbance capacity. Collectively, these results suggest 1,8-cineole as a potentially effective neuroprotective and anti-oxidative candidate for the treatment of patients with ischaemic stroke. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. PUREX/UO3 deactivation project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washenfelder, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    From 1955 through 1990, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) provided the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site with nuclear fuel reprocessing capability. It operated in sequence with the Uranium Trioxide (UO 3 ) Plant, which converted the PUREX liquid uranium nitrate product to solid UO 3 powder. Final UO 3 Plant operation ended in 1993. In December 1992, planning was initiated for the deactivation of PUREX and UO 3 Plant. The objective of deactivation planning was to identify the activities needed to establish a passively safe, environmentally secure configuration at both plants, and ensure that the configuration could be retained during the post-deactivation period. The PUREX/UO 3 Deactivation Project management plan represents completion of the planning efforts. It presents the deactivation approach to be used for the two plants, and the supporting technical, cost, and schedule baselines. Deactivation activities concentrate on removal, reduction, and stabilization of the radioactive and chemical materials remaining at the plants, and the shutdown of the utilities and effluents. When deactivation is completed, the two plants will be left unoccupied and locked, pending eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Deactivation is expected to cost $233.8 million, require 5 years to complete, and yield $36 million in annual surveillance and maintenance cost savings

  11. Deactivation of molybdate catalysts by nitrogen bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.

    1982-10-01

    Nitrogen bases present in petroleum deactivate the surface of molybdate catalysts. The detrimental effect is attributed either to interactions of the bases with Lewis sites via unpaired electrons on nitrogen or to their ability to remove proton from the surface. The later effect results in a decrease of concentration of Bronsted sites known to be active in catalytic reactions. This enhances rate of coke forming reactions. Resistence of molybdate catalysts to coke formation depends on the form and redistribution of active ingredients on the surface. This can be effected by conditions applied during preparation and pretreatment of the catalysts. Processing parameters used during catalytic hydrotreatment are also important; i.e., the coke formation is slow under conditions ensuring high rate of removal of basic nitrogen containing compounds.

  12. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P. [and others

    1997-12-31

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D&D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively {open_quotes}solder{close_quotes} components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible.

  13. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P.

    1997-01-01

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D ampersand D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively open-quotes solderclose quotes components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible

  14. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in primary cortical neurons is inhibited by equine estrogens via down-regulation of caspase-3 and prevention of mitochondrial cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YueMei

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a key role in cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases marked by a progressive loss of neurons as seen in Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact cause of apoptosis is not known, a number of factors such as free radicals, insufficient levels of nerve growth factors and excessive levels of glutamate have been implicated. We and others, have previously reported that in a stable HT22 neuronal cell line, glutamate induces apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation and up- and down-regulation of Bax (pro-apoptotic, and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic genes respectively. Furthermore, these changes were reversed/inhibited by estrogens. Several lines of evidence also indicate that a family of cysteine proteases (caspases appear to play a critical role in neuronal apoptosis. The purpose of the present study is to determine in primary cultures of cortical cells, if glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis and its inhibition by estrogens involve changes in caspase-3 protease and whether this process is mediated by Fas receptor and/or mitochondrial signal transduction pathways involving release of cytochrome c. Results In primary cultures of rat cortical cells, glutamate induced apoptosis that was associated with enhanced DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and up-regulation of pro-caspase-3. Exposure of cortical cells to glutamate resulted in a time-dependent cell death and an increase in caspase-3 protein levels. Although the increase in caspase-3 levels was evident after 3 h, cell death was only significantly increased after 6 h. Treatment of cells for 6 h with 1 to 20 mM glutamate resulted in a 35 to 45% cell death that was associated with a 45 to 65% increase in the expression of caspase-3 protein. Pretreatment with caspase-3-protease inhibitor z-DEVD or pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD significantly decreased glutamate-induced cell death of cortical cells. Exposure of cells to glutamate for 6 h in the presence or

  15. Piracetam ameliorated oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced injury in rat cortical neurons via inhibition of oxidative stress, excitatory amino acids release and P53/Bax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi; Hu, Min; Zha, Yun-hong; Li, Zi-cheng; Zhao, Bo; Yu, Ling-ling; Yu, Min; Qian, Ying

    2014-05-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that piracetam inhibited the decrease in amino acid content induced by chronic hypoperfusion, ameliorated the dysfunction of learning and memory in a hypoperfusion rat model, down-regulated P53, and BAX protein, facilitated the synaptic plasticity, and may be helpful in the treatment of vascular dementia. To explore the precise mechanism, the present study further evaluated effects of piracetam on Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal damage in rat primary cortical cells. The addition of piracetam to the cultured cells 12 h before OGD for 4 h significantly reduced neuronal damage as determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and lactate dehydrogenase release experiments. Piracetam also lowered the levels of malondialdehyde, nitrogen monoxidum, and xanthine oxidase which was increased in the OGD cells, and enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, which were decreased in the OGD cells. We also demonstrated that piracetam could decrease glutamate and aspartate release when cortical cells were subjected to OGD. Furthermore, Western blot study demonstrated that piracetam attenuated the increased expression of P53 and BAX protein in OGD cells. These observations demonstrated that piracetam reduced OGD-induced neuronal damage by inhibiting the oxidative stress and decreasing excitatory amino acids release and lowering P53/Bax protein expression in OGD cells.

  16. ALARA review for the deactivation of 105-N Lift Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    This ALARA review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used to manage personnel exposure and to control contamination levels and airborne radioactivity concentrations, while removing water, sludge, stabilizing surfaces, and all other associated work involved in the deactivation of the 105-N Lift Station. The lift station was used as a sump and received contaminated water from the 105-N Fuel Storage Basin weirs and contaminated drains in the 105-N Building. During operation water from the lift station was pumped to the 1310-N and 1325-N cribs. Deactivation of the lift station is a critical step in completing the deactivation of N-Area

  17. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Administration Induces Amnesia in Male Sprague Dawley Rats and Exacerbates Recovery from Functional Deficits Induced by a Controlled Cortical Impact Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastafa I Geddes

    Full Text Available Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids like conjugated linoleic acids (CLA are required for normal neural development and cognitive function and have been ascribed various beneficial functions. Recently, oral CLA also has been shown to increase testosterone (T biosynthesis, which is known to diminish traumatic brain injury (TBI-induced neuropathology and reduce deficits induced by stroke in adult rats. To test the impact of CLA on cognitive recovery following a TBI, 5-6 month old male Sprague Dawley rats received a focal injury (craniectomy + controlled cortical impact (CCI; n = 17 or Sham injury (craniectomy alone; n = 12 and were injected with 25 mg/kg body weight of Clarinol® G-80 (80% CLA in safflower oil; n = 16 or saline (n = 13 every 48 h for 4 weeks. Sham surgery decreased baseline plasma progesterone (P4 by 64.2% (from 9.5 ± 3.4 ng/mL to 3.4 ± 0.5 ng/mL; p = 0.068, T by 74.6% (from 5.9 ± 1.2 ng/mL to 1.5 ± 0.3 ng/mL; p 0.05 animals by post-injury day 29, but rapidly reversed by post-injury day 1 the hypoadrenalism in Sham (11-DOC: 372.6 ± 36.6 ng/mL; corticosterone: 202.6 ± 15.6 ng/mL and CCI-injured (11-DOC: 384.2 ± 101.3 ng/mL; corticosterone: 234.6 ± 43.8 ng/mL animals. In Sham surgery animals, CLA did not alter body weight, but did markedly increase latency to find the hidden Morris Water Maze platform (40.3 ± 13.0 s compared to saline treated Sham animals (8.8 ± 1.7 s. In CCI injured animals, CLA did not alter CCI-induced body weight loss, CCI-induced cystic infarct size, or deficits in rotarod performance. However, like Sham animals, CLA injections exacerbated the latency of CCI-injured rats to find the hidden MWM platform (66.8 ± 10.6 s compared to CCI-injured rats treated with saline (30.7 ± 5.5 s, p < 0.05. These results indicate that chronic treatment of CLA at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight in adult male rats over 1-month 1 does not reverse craniectomy- and craniectomy + CCI-induced hypogonadism, but does reverse

  18. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P.; Wells, P.B.; Zahn, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D and D plan has necessitated this current action

  19. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelbacher, J A; Earle, O K; Henslee, S P; Wells, P B; Zahn, T P

    1996-01-01

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D and D plan has necessitated this current action.

  20. Fitness-driven deactivation in network evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xin-Jian; Peng, Xiao-Long; Fu, Xin-Chu; Small, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Individual nodes in evolving real-world networks typically experience growth and decay—that is, the popularity and influence of individuals peaks and then fades. In this paper, we study this phenomenon via an intrinsic nodal fitness function and an intuitive ageing mechanism. Each node of the network is endowed with a fitness which represents its activity. All the nodes have two discrete stages: active and inactive. The evolution of the network combines the addition of new active nodes randomly connected to existing active ones and the deactivation of old active nodes with a possibility inversely proportional to their fitnesses. We obtain a structured exponential network when the fitness distribution of the individuals is homogeneous and a structured scale-free network with heterogeneous fitness distributions. Furthermore, we recover two universal scaling laws of the clustering coefficient for both cases, C(k) ∼ k −1 and C ∼ n −1 , where k and n refer to the node degree and the number of active individuals, respectively. These results offer a new simple description of the growth and ageing of networks where intrinsic features of individual nodes drive their popularity, and hence degree

  1. Behaviour in the open field predicts the number of KCl-induced cortical spreading depressions in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanov, Volodymyr Borysovych; Bogdanova, Olena Viktorivna; Koulchitsky, Stanislav Vladimirovich; Chauvel, Virginie; Multon, Sylvie; Makarchuk, Mykola Yukhymovych; Brennan, Kevin Christopher; Renshaw, Perry F.; Schoenen, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are known to be comorbid with migraine, and cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the most likely cause of the migraine aura. To search for possible correlations between susceptibility to CSD and anxiety we used the open field test in male Sprague-Dawley rats chronically treated with the preventive anti-migraine drugs valproate or riboflavin. Animals avoiding the central area of the open field chamber and those with less exploratory activity (i.e. rearing) were considered m...

  2. Modeling neurodevelopment and cortical dysfunction in SPG11-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia using human induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Himanshu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited motor neuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. Mutations in the Spastic Paraplegia Gene11 (SPG11), encoding spatacsin, cause the most frequent form of autosomal recessive HSP. SPG11 patients are clinically distinguishable from most other HSPs, by severe cortical atrophy and presence of a thin corpus callosum (TCC), associated with cognitive deficits. Partly due to l...

  3. Brain deactivation in the outperformance in bimodal tasks: an FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Ching Chiang

    Full Text Available While it is known that some individuals can effectively perform two tasks simultaneously, other individuals cannot. How the brain deals with performing simultaneous tasks remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to assess which brain areas corresponded to various phenomena in task performance. Nineteen subjects were requested to sequentially perform three blocks of tasks, including two unimodal tasks and one bimodal task. The unimodal tasks measured either visual feature binding or auditory pitch comparison, while the bimodal task required performance of the two tasks simultaneously. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI results are compatible with previous studies showing that distinct brain areas, such as the visual cortices, frontal eye field (FEF, lateral parietal lobe (BA7, and medial and inferior frontal lobe, are involved in processing of visual unimodal tasks. In addition, the temporal lobes and Brodmann area 43 (BA43 were involved in processing of auditory unimodal tasks. These results lend support to concepts of modality-specific attention. Compared to the unimodal tasks, bimodal tasks required activation of additional brain areas. Furthermore, while deactivated brain areas were related to good performance in the bimodal task, these areas were not deactivated where the subject performed well in only one of the two simultaneous tasks. These results indicate that efficient information processing does not require some brain areas to be overly active; rather, the specific brain areas need to be relatively deactivated to remain alert and perform well on two tasks simultaneously. Meanwhile, it can also offer a neural basis for biofeedback in training courses, such as courses in how to perform multiple tasks simultaneously.

  4. The Study Of Deactivation And Regeneration Of A Fluid Cracking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Study Of Deactivation And Regeneration Of A Fluid Cracking Zeolite Catalysts. ... The catalytic activities of modified and unmodified sodium Y-Zeolites catalysts ... sample was seen to completely restore the catalytic activity of both samples.

  5. 340 waste handling complex: Deactivation project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stordeur, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides an overview of the strategy for deactivating the 340 Waste Handling Complex within Hanford's 300 Area. The plan covers the period from the pending September 30, 1998 cessation of voluntary radioactive liquid waste (RLW) transfers to the 340 Complex, until such time that those portions of the 340 Complex that remain active beyond September 30, 1998, specifically, the Retention Process Sewer (RPS), can also be shut down and deactivated. Specific activities are detailed and divided into two phases. Phase 1 ends in 2001 after the core RLW systems have been deactivated. Phase 2 covers the subsequent interim surveillance of deactivated and stand-by components during the period of continued RPS operation, through the final transfer of the entire 340 Complex to the Environmental Restoration Contractor. One of several possible scenarios was postulated and developed as a budget and schedule planning case

  6. 1997 project of the year, PUREX deactivation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    At the end of 1992, the PUREX and UO 3 plants were deemed no longer necessary for the defense needs of the United States. Although no longer necessary, they were very costly to maintain in their post-operation state. The DOE embarked on a deactivation strategy for these plants to reduce the costs of providing continuous surveillance of the facilities and their hazards. Deactivation of the PUREX and UO 3 plants was estimated to take 5 years and cost $222.5 million and result in an annual surveillance and maintenance cost of $2 million. Deactivation of the PUREX/UO 3 plants officially began on October 1, 1993. The deactivation was 15 months ahead of the original schedule and $75 million under the original cost estimate. The annual cost of surveillance and maintenance of the plants was reduced to less than $1 million

  7. 300 Area fuel supply facilities deactivation function analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-09-01

    The document contains the functions, function definitions, function interfaces, function interface definitions, Input Computer Automated Manufacturing Definition (IDEFO) diagrams, and a function hierarchy chart that describe what needs to be performed to deactivate the 300 Area Fuel Supply Facilities

  8. Sulforaphane protects cortical neurons against 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine-induced toxicity through the activation of ERK1/2, Nrf-2 and the upregulation of detoxification enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauzour, David; Buonfiglio, Maria; Corona, Giulia; Chirafisi, Joselita; Vafeiadou, Katerina; Angeloni, Cristina; Hrelia, Silvana; Hrelia, Patrizia; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2010-04-01

    The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra has been linked to the formation of the endogenous neurotoxin 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine. Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate derived from the corresponding precursor glucosinolate found in cruciferous vegetables has been observed to exert a range of biological activities in various cell populations. In this study, we show that SFN protects primary cortical neurons against 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine induced neuronal injury. Pre-treatment of cortical neurons with SFN (0.01-1 microM) resulted in protection against 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine-induced neurotoxicity, which peaked at 100 nM. This protection was observed to be mediated by the ability of SFN to modulate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 and the activation of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1/NF-E2-related factor-2 leading to the increased expression and activity of glutathione-S-transferase (M1, M3 and M5), glutathione reductase, thioredoxin reductase and NAD(P)H oxidoreductase 1. These data suggest that SFN stimulates the NF-E2-related factor-2 pathway of antioxidant gene expression in neurons and may protect against neuronal injury relevant to the aetiology of Parkinson's disease.

  9. Deactivation of waste waters in the Czechoslovak Uranium Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priban, V.

    1978-01-01

    Deactivation techniques are described used for the treatment of waste waters from uranium mines and uranium chemical treatment plants. With treatment plant waters this is done either by precipitation of radium with barium sulfate or using multistage evaporating units. Mine waste waters are deactivated by sorption on ion exchangers; strongly basic anion exchangers, mostly Wofatit SBW, Varion AP or Ostion AU are used for uranium, while the strongly acidic Ostion KS is used for radium. (Z.M.)

  10. Neuroprotective effects of orientin on oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion-induced cell injury in primary culture of rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Zeng, Junan; Zhao, Guangyu; Zhao, Wenjing; Gao, Songyi; Liu, Li

    2018-01-01

    Orientin (luteolin-8-C-glucoside) is a phenolic compound found abundantly in millet, juice, and peel of passion fruit and has been shown to have antioxidant properties. In the present study, we explored the effects of orientin on oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/RP)-induced cell injury in primary culture of rat cortical neurons using an in vitro model of neonatal ischemic brain injury. The reduced cell viability and elevated lactate dehydrogenase leakage were observed after OGD/RP exposure, which were then reversed by orientin (10, 20, and 30 µM) pretreatment in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, OGD/RP treatment resulted in significant oxidative stress, accompanied by enhanced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and obvious depletion in the activities of intracellular Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase antioxidases. However, these effects were dose dependently restored by orientin pretreatment. We also found that orientin pretreatment dose dependently suppressed [Ca 2+ ] i increase and mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation caused by OGD/RP in primary culture of rat cortical neurons. Western blot analysis showed that OGD/RP exposure induced a distinct decrease of Bcl-2 protein and a marked elevation of Bax, caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-3 proteins; whereas these effects were dose dependently reversed by orientin incubation. Both the caspase-3 activity and the apoptosis rate were increased under OGD/RP treatment, but was then dose dependently down-regulated by orientin (10, 20, and 30 µM) incubation. Moreover, orientin pretreatment dose dependently inhibited OGD/RP-induced phosphorylation of JNK and ERK1/2. Notably, JNK inhibitor SP600125 and ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 also dramatically attenuated OGD/RP-induced cell viability loss and ROS generation, and further, orientin failed to protect cortical neurons with the interference of JNK activator anisomycin or ERK1/2 activator FGF-2. Taken

  11. Activation and deactivation in heavily boron-doped silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seung-Han; Ro, Jae-Sang

    2003-01-01

    A shallow p + /n junction was formed using a ultra-low-energy (ULE) implanter. Activation by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) exhibited both solid phase epitaxy, in which the sheet resistance dropped rapidly, and reverse annealing, in a manner similar to furnace annealing. The temperature ranges in which these phenomena were observed, however, were higher in the case of RTA processing than they were in the case of furnace annealing due to the low thermal budget associated with the former. Deactivation phenomena were investigated for the shallow source/drain junction based on measurements of the post-annealing time and temperature following the RTA treatments. We found that the deactivation kinetics was divided into two regions. In the first regions, the rate of deactivation increased exponentially with the annealing temperature up to 850 .deg. C. In the second regions, it was found to decrease linearly with the annealing temperature beyond 850 .deg. C. We believe that the first region is kinetically limited while the second is thermodynamically limited. We also observed 'transient enhanced deactivation' an anomalous increase in the sheet resistance during the early stage of annealing at temperatures higher than 800 .deg. C. The activation energy for transient enhanced deactivation was measured to be in the 1.75 ∼ 1.87 eV range while that for normal deactivation was found to be between 3.49 and 3.69 eV.

  12. Decommissioning and deactivation of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anasco, Roberto; Harriague, Santiago; Hey, Alfredo M.; Fabbri, Silvio; Garonis, Omar H.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is responsible for the decommissioning and deactivation of all relevant nuclear facilities in Argentina. A D and D Subprogram was created in 2000, within Technology Branch of the CNEA, in order to fulfill this responsibility. The D and D Subprogram has organized its activities in four fields: Planning; Technology development; Human resources development and training; International cooperation. The paper describes the work already done in those 4 areas, as well as the nuclear facilities existing in the country. Planning is being developed for the decommissioning of research reactors, beginning with RA-1, as well as for the Atucha I nuclear power station. An integral Management System has been developed, compatibilizing requirements from ISO 9001, ISO 14001, the national norm for Safety and Occupational Health (equivalent to BS 8800), and IAEA 50-SG Q series. Technology development is for the time being concentrated on mechanical decontamination and concrete demolition. A review has been made of technologies already developed both by CNEA and Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (the nuclear power utility) in areas of chemical and electrochemical decontamination, cutting techniques and robotics. Human resources development has been based on training abroad in the areas of decontamination, cutting techniques, quality assurance and planning, as well as on specific courses, seminars and workshops. An IAEA regional training course on D and D has been given on April 2002 at CNEA's Constituyentes Atomic Center, with the assistance of 22 university graduates from 13 countries in the Latin American and Caribbean Region, and 11 from Argentina. CNEA has also given fellowships for PhD and Master thesis on the subject. International cooperation has been intense, and based on: - IAEA Technical Cooperation Project and experts missions; - Cooperation agreement with the US Department of Energy; - Cooperation agreement with Germany

  13. m-Trifluoromethyl-diphenyl Diselenide Regulates Prefrontal Cortical MOR and KOR Protein Levels and Abolishes the Phenotype Induced by Repeated Forced Swim Stress in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Suzan Gonçalves; Pesarico, Ana Paula; Martini, Franciele; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2018-04-05

    The present study aimed to investigate the m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide [(m-CF 3 -PhSe) 2 ] effects on prefrontal cortical MOR and KOR protein levels and phenotype induced by repeated forced swim stress (FSS) in mice. Adult Swiss mice were subjected to repeated FSS sessions, and after that, they performed the spontaneous locomotor/exploratory activity, tail suspension, and splash tests. (m-CF 3 -PhSe) 2 (0.1 to 5 mg/kg) was administered to mice 30 min before the first FSS session and 30 min before the subsequent repeated FSS. (m-CF 3 -PhSe) 2 abolished the phenotype induced by repeated FSS in mice. In addition, a single FSS session increased μ but reduced δ-opioid receptor contents, without changing the κ content. Mice subjected to repeated FSS had an increase in the μ content when compared to those of naïve group or subjected to single FSS. Repeated FSS induced an increase of δ-opioid receptor content compared to those mice subjected to single FSS. However, the δ-opioid receptor contents were lower than those found in the naïve group. The mice subjected to repeated FSS showed an increase in the κ-opioid receptor content when compared to that of the naïve mice. (m-CF 3 -PhSe) 2 regulated the protein contents of μ and κ receptors in mice subjected to repeated FSS. These findings demonstrate that (m-CF 3 -PhSe) 2 was effective to abolish the phenotype induced by FSS, which was accompanied by changes in the contents of cortical μ- and κ-opioid receptors.

  14. DREAM mediates cAMP-dependent, Ca2+-induced stimulation of GFAP gene expression and regulates cortical astrogliogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebolla, Beatriz; Fernández-Pérez, Antonio; Perea, Gertrudis; Araque, Alfonso; Vallejo, Mario

    2008-06-25

    In the developing mouse brain, once the generation of neurons is mostly completed during the prenatal period, precisely coordinated signals act on competent neural precursors to direct their differentiation into astrocytes, which occurs mostly after birth. Among these signals, those provided by neurotrophic cytokines and bone morphogenetic proteins appear to have a key role in triggering the neurogenic to gliogenic switch and in regulating astrocyte numbers. In addition, we have reported previously that the neurotrophic peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is able to promote astrocyte differentiation of cortical precursors via activation of a cAMP-dependent pathway. Signals acting on progenitor cells of the developing cortex to generate astrocytes activate glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene expression, but the transcriptional mechanisms that regulate this activation are unclear. Here, we identify the previously known transcriptional repressor downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) as an activator of GFAP gene expression. We found that DREAM occupies specific sites on the GFAP promoter before and after differentiation is initiated by exposure of cortical progenitor cells to PACAP. PACAP raises intracellular calcium concentration via a mechanism that requires cAMP, and DREAM-mediated transactivation of the GFAP gene requires the integrity of calcium-binding domains. Cortical progenitor cells from dream(-/-) mice fail to express GFAP in response to PACAP. Moreover, the neonatal cortex of dream(-/-) mice exhibits a reduced number of astrocytes and increased number of neurons. These results identify the PACAP-cAMP-Ca(2+)-DREAM cascade as a new pathway to activate GFAP gene expression during astrocyte differentiation.

  15. High Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Induces Both Acute and Persistent Changes in Broadband Cortical Synchronization: a Simultaneous tDCS-EEG Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Abhrajeet; Baxter, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop methods for simultaneously acquiring electrophysiological data during high definition transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) using high resolution electroencephalography (EEG). Previous studies have pointed to the after effects of tDCS on both motor and cognitive performance, and there appears to be potential for using tDCS in a variety of clinical applications. However, little is known about the real-time effects of tDCS on rhythmic cortical activity in humans due to the technical challenges of simultaneously obtaining electrophysiological data during ongoing stimulation. Furthermore, the mechanisms of action of tDCS in humans are not well understood. We have conducted a simultaneous tDCS-EEG study in a group of healthy human subjects. Significant acute and persistent changes in spontaneous neural activity and event related synchronization (ERS) were observed during and after the application of high definition tDCS over the left sensorimotor cortex. Both anodal and cathodal stimulation resulted in acute global changes in broadband cortical activity which were significantly different than the changes observed in response to sham stimulation. For the group of 8 subjects studied, broadband individual changes in spontaneous activity during stimulation were apparent both locally and globally. In addition, we found that high definition tDCS of the left sensorimotor cortex can induce significant ipsilateral and contralateral changes in event related desynchronization (ERD) and ERS during motor imagination following the end of the stimulation period. Overall, our results demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring high resolution EEG during high definition tDCS and provide evidence that tDCS in humans directly modulates rhythmic cortical synchronization during and after its administration. PMID:24956615

  16. Protein kinase D stabilizes aldosterone-induced ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in M1 renal cortical collecting duct cells to promote cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEneaney, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone elicits transcriptional responses in target tissues and also rapidly stimulates the activation of protein kinase signalling cascades independently of de novo protein synthesis. Here we investigated aldosterone-induced cell proliferation and extra-cellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1\\/2) mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling in the M1 cortical collecting duct cell line (M1-CCD). Aldosterone promoted the proliferative growth of M1-CCD cells, an effect that was protein kinase D1 (PKD1), PKCdelta and ERK1\\/2-dependent. Aldosterone induced the rapid activation of ERK1\\/2 with peaks of activation at 2 and 10 to 30 min after hormone treatment followed by sustained activation lasting beyond 120 min. M1-CCD cells suppressed in PKD1 expression exhibited only the early, transient peaks in ERK1\\/2 activation without the sustained phase. Aldosterone stimulated the physical association of PKD1 with ERK1\\/2 within 2 min of treatment. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist RU28318 inhibited the early and late phases of aldosterone-induced ERK1\\/2 activation, and also aldosterone-induced proliferative cell growth. Aldosterone induced the sub-cellular redistribution of ERK1\\/2 to the nuclei at 2 min and to cytoplasmic sites, proximal to the nuclei after 30 min. This sub-cellular distribution of ERK1\\/2 was inhibited in cells suppressed in the expression of PKD1.

  17. Expertise-related deactivation of the right temporoparietal junction during musical improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Aaron L; Ansari, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Musical training has been associated with structural changes in the brain as well as functional differences in brain activity when musicians are compared to nonmusicians on both perceptual and motor tasks. Previous neuroimaging comparisons of musicians and nonmusicians in the motor domain have used tasks involving prelearned motor sequences or synchronization with an auditorily presented sequence during the experiment. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine expertise-related differences in brain activity between musicians and nonmusicians during improvisation--the generation of novel musical-motor sequences--using a paradigm that we previously used in musicians alone. Despite behaviorally matched performance, the two groups showed significant differences in functional brain activity during improvisation. Specifically, musicians deactivated the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) during melodic improvisation, while nonmusicians showed no change in activity in this region. The rTPJ is thought to be part of a ventral attentional network for bottom-up stimulus-driven processing, and it has been postulated that deactivation of this region occurs in order to inhibit attentional shifts toward task-irrelevant stimuli during top-down, goal-driven behavior. We propose that the musicians' deactivation of the rTPJ during melodic improvisation may represent a training-induced shift toward inhibition of stimulus-driven attention, allowing for a more goal-directed performance state that aids in creative thought.

  18. Transcriptomic Analysis of Ciguatoxin-Induced Changes in Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Mice Cortical Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Andrés Rubiolo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ciguatoxins are polyether marine toxins that act as sodium channel activators. These toxins cause ciguatera, one of the most widespread nonbacterial forms of food poisoning, which presents several symptoms in humans including long-term neurological alterations. Earlier work has shown that both acute and chronic exposure of primary cortical neurons to synthetic ciguatoxin CTX3C have profound impacts on neuronal function. Thus, the present work aimed to identify relevant neuronal genes and metabolic pathways that could be altered by ciguatoxin exposure. To study the effect of ciguatoxins in primary neurons in culture, we performed a transcriptomic analysis using whole mouse genome microarrays, for primary cortical neurons exposed during 6, 24, or 72 h in culture to CTX3C. Here, we have shown that the effects of the toxin on gene expression differ with the exposure time. The results presented here have identified several relevant genes and pathways related to the effect of ciguatoxins on neurons and may assist in future research or even treatment of ciguatera. Moreover, we demonstrated that the effects of the toxin on gene expression were exclusively consequential of its action as a voltage-gated sodium channel activator, since all the effects of CTX3C were avoided by preincubation of the neurons with the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin.

  19. Ethanol induces cell-cycle activity and reduces stem cell diversity to alter both regenerative capacity and differentiation potential of cerebral cortical neuroepithelial precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingling Joseph D

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fetal cortical neuroepithelium is a mosaic of distinct progenitor populations that elaborate diverse cellular fates. Ethanol induces apoptosis and interferes with the survival of differentiating neurons. However, we know little about ethanol's effects on neuronal progenitors. We therefore exposed neurosphere cultures from fetal rat cerebral cortex, to varying ethanol concentrations, to examine the impact of ethanol on stem cell fate. Results Ethanol promoted cell cycle progression, increased neurosphere number and increased diversity in neurosphere size, without inducing apoptosis. Unlike controls, dissociated cortical progenitors exposed to ethanol exhibited morphological evidence for asymmetric cell division, and cells derived from ethanol pre-treated neurospheres exhibited decreased proliferation capacity. Ethanol significantly reduced the numbers of cells expressing the stem cell markers CD117, CD133, Sca-1 and ABCG2, without decreasing nestin expression. Furthermore, ethanol-induced neurosphere proliferation was not accompanied by a commensurate increase in telomerase activity. Finally, cells derived from ethanol-pretreated neurospheres exhibited decreased differentiation in response to retinoic acid. Conclusion The reduction in stem cell number along with a transient ethanol-driven increase in cell proliferation, suggests that ethanol promotes stem to blast cell maturation, ultimately depleting the reserve proliferation capacity of neuroepithelial cells. However, the lack of a concomitant change in telomerase activity suggests that neuroepithelial maturation is accompanied by an increased potential for genomic instability. Finally, the cellular phenotype that emerges from ethanol pre-treated, stem cell depleted neurospheres is refractory to additional differentiation stimuli, suggesting that ethanol exposure ablates or delays subsequent neuronal differentiation.

  20. Prognostic value of posteromedial cortex deactivation in mild cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Petrella

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal subjects deactivate specific brain regions, notably the posteromedial cortex (PMC, during many tasks. Recent cross-sectional functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data suggests that deactivation during memory tasks is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD. The goal of this study was to prospectively determine the prognostic significance of PMC deactivation in mild cognitive impairment (MCI.75 subjects (34 MCI, 13 AD subjects and 28 controls underwent baseline fMRI scanning during encoding of novel and familiar face-name pairs. MCI subjects were followed longitudinally to determine conversion to AD. Regression and analysis of covariance models were used to assess the effect of PMC activation/deactivation on conversion to dementia as well as in the longitudinal change in dementia measures. At longitudinal follow up of up to 3.5 years (mean 2.5+/-0.79 years, 11 MCI subjects converted to AD. The proportion of deactivators was significantly different across all groups: controls (79%, MCI-Nonconverters (73%, MCI-converters (45%, and AD (23% (p<0.05. Mean PMC activation magnitude parameter estimates, at baseline, were negative in the control (-0.57+/-0.12 and MCI-Nonconverter (-0.33+/-0.14 groups, and positive in the MCI-Converter (0.37+/-0.40 and AD (0.92+/-0.30 groups. The effect of diagnosis on PMC deactivation remained significant after adjusting for age, education and baseline Mini-Mental State Exam (p<0.05. Baseline PMC activation magnitude was correlated with change in dementia ratings from baseline.Loss of physiological functional deactivation in the PMC may have prognostic value in preclinical AD, and could aid in profiling subgroups of MCI subjects at greatest risk for progressive cognitive decline.

  1. Dose rate in a deactivated uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Kelecom, Alphonse G.A.C.; Silva, Ademir X.; Marques, José M.; Carmo, Alessander S. do; Dias, Ayandra O., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com, E-mail: Ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: marqueslopes@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Veiga de Almeida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (COMAP.N/FCN/INB), Resende RJ (Brazil). Fábrica de Combustível Nuclear. Coordenação de Meio Ambiente e Proteção Radiológica Ambiental; Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil). Laboratório de Radiobiologia e Radiometria; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit is a deactivated uranium mine and milling situated in Caldas, MG, BR. Although disabled, there are still areas considered controlled and supervised from the radiological point of view. In these areas, it is necessary to keep an occupational monitoring program to ensure the workers' safety and to prevent the dispersion of radioactive material. For area monitoring, the dose rate, in μSv∙h{sup -1}, was measured with Geiger Müller (GM) area monitors or personal electronic monitors type GM and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), in mSv∙month{sup -1}, along the years 2013 to 2016. For area monitoring, 577 samples were recorded; for personal dosimeters monitoring, 2,656; and for TLD monitoring type, 5,657. The area monitoring showed a mean dose rate of 6.42 μSv∙h{sup -1} associated to a standard deviation of 48 μSv∙h{sup -1} with a maximum recorded value of 685 μSv∙h{sup -1}. 96 % of the samples were below the derived limit per hour for workers (10 μSv∙h{sup -1}). For the personal electronic monitoring, the average of the data sampled was 15.86 μSv∙h{sup -1}, associated to a standard deviation of 61.74 μSv∙h{sup -1}. 80 % of the samples were below the derived limit and the maximum recorded was 1,220 μSv∙h{sup -1}. Finally, the TLD showed a mean of 0.01 mSv∙h{sup -1} (TLD detection limit is 0.2 mSv∙month{sup -1}), associated to a standard deviation of 0.08 mSv∙h{sup -1}. 98% of the registered values were below 0.2 mSv and less than 2 % of the measurements had values above the limit of detection. The samples show areas with low risk of external exposure, as can be seen by the TLD evaluation. Specific areas with greater risk of contamination have already been identified, as well as operations at higher risks. In these cases, the use of the individual electronic dosimeter is justified for a more effective monitoring. Radioprotection identified all risks and was able to extend individual electronic monitoring to all

  2. Dose rate in a deactivated uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Kelecom, Alphonse G.A.C.; Silva, Ademir X.; Marques, José M.; Carmo, Alessander S. do; Dias, Ayandra O.; Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit is a deactivated uranium mine and milling situated in Caldas, MG, BR. Although disabled, there are still areas considered controlled and supervised from the radiological point of view. In these areas, it is necessary to keep an occupational monitoring program to ensure the workers' safety and to prevent the dispersion of radioactive material. For area monitoring, the dose rate, in μSv∙h"-"1, was measured with Geiger Müller (GM) area monitors or personal electronic monitors type GM and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), in mSv∙month"-"1, along the years 2013 to 2016. For area monitoring, 577 samples were recorded; for personal dosimeters monitoring, 2,656; and for TLD monitoring type, 5,657. The area monitoring showed a mean dose rate of 6.42 μSv∙h"-"1 associated to a standard deviation of 48 μSv∙h"-"1 with a maximum recorded value of 685 μSv∙h"-"1. 96 % of the samples were below the derived limit per hour for workers (10 μSv∙h"-"1). For the personal electronic monitoring, the average of the data sampled was 15.86 μSv∙h"-"1, associated to a standard deviation of 61.74 μSv∙h"-"1. 80 % of the samples were below the derived limit and the maximum recorded was 1,220 μSv∙h"-"1. Finally, the TLD showed a mean of 0.01 mSv∙h"-"1 (TLD detection limit is 0.2 mSv∙month"-"1), associated to a standard deviation of 0.08 mSv∙h"-"1. 98% of the registered values were below 0.2 mSv and less than 2 % of the measurements had values above the limit of detection. The samples show areas with low risk of external exposure, as can be seen by the TLD evaluation. Specific areas with greater risk of contamination have already been identified, as well as operations at higher risks. In these cases, the use of the individual electronic dosimeter is justified for a more effective monitoring. Radioprotection identified all risks and was able to extend individual electronic monitoring to all risk operations, even with the use of the TLD

  3. Persistent barrage firing in cortical interneurons can be induced in vivo and may be important for the suppression of epileptiform activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimitsu eSuzuki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits are typically maintained in a state of dynamic equilibrium by balanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. However, brain regions that are particularly susceptible to epilepsy may have evolved additional specialized mechanisms for inhibiting overexcitation. Here we identify one such possible mechanism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. Recently it was reported that some types of GABAergic interneurons can slowly integrate excitatory inputs until eventually they fire persistently in the absence of the original stimulus. This property, called persistent firing or retroaxonal barrage firing, is of unknown physiological importance. We show that two common types of interneurons in cortical regions, neurogliaform cells and fast-spiking multipolar cells, are unique in exhibiting barrage firing in acute slices (~85% and ~23% success rate for induction, respectively. Barrage firing can also be induced in vivo, although the success rate for induction is lower (~60% in neurogliaform cells. In slices, barrage firing could reliably be triggered by trains of excitatory synaptic input, as well as by exposure to proconvulsant bath solutions (elevated extracellular K+, blockade of GABAA receptors. Using pair recordings in slices, we confirmed that barrage-firing neurogliaform cells can produce synaptic inhibition of nearby pyramidal neurons, and that this inhibition outlasts the original excitation. The ubiquity of neurogliaform and fast-spiking cells, together with their ability to fire persistently following excessive excitation, suggests that these interneurons may function as cortical sentinels, imposing an activity-dependent brake on undesirable neuronal hyperexcitability.

  4. Chronic Underactivity of Medial Frontal Cortical β2-Containing Nicotinic Receptors Increases Clozapine-Induced Working Memory Impairment in Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Edward D.; Perkins, Abigail; Brotherton, Terrell; Qazi, Melissa; Berez, Chantal; Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza; Davis, Kasey; Williams, Paul; Christopher, N. Channelle

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic receptor decreases in the frontal cortex and hippocampus are important mediators of cognitive impairment in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Drug treatments for these diseases should take into account the impacts of compromised brain function on drug response. This study investigated the impact of compromised nicotinic receptor activity in the frontal cortex in rats on memory function. Since both Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia can involve psychosis, antipsychotic drugs are often given. The impacts of antipsychotic drugs on cognitive function have been found to be quite variable. It is the hypothesis of this and previous studies that the cognitive effects of antispychotic drugs on cognitive function depend on the integrity of brain systems involved in cognition. Previously in studies of the hippocampus, we found that chronic inhibition of β2-containing nicotinic receptors with dihydro-β-erythrodine (DHβE) impaired working memory and that this effect was attenuated by the antipsychotic drug clozapine. In contrast, chronic hippocampal α7 nicotinic receptor blockade with methyllycaconitine (MLA) potentiated the clozapine-induced memory impairment which is seen in rats without compromised nicotinic receptor activity. The current study determined medial frontal cortical α7 and β2-containing nicotinic receptor involvement in memory and the interactions with antipsychotic drug therapy with clozapine. Chronic DHβE and MLA infusion effects and interactions with systemic clozapine were assessed in female rats tested for memory on the radial-arm maze. Antipsychotic drug interactions with chronic systemic nicotine were investigated because nicotinic procognitive treatment has been proposed. The same local infusion DHβE dose that impaired memory with hippocampal infusion did not impair memory when infused in the medial frontal cortex. Frontal DHβE infusion potentiated clozapine-induced memory impairment, whereas previously the memory

  5. Chronic underactivity of medial frontal cortical beta2-containing nicotinic receptors increases clozapine-induced working memory impairment in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Edward D; Perkins, Abigail; Brotherton, Terrell; Qazi, Melissa; Berez, Chantal; Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza; Davis, Kasey; Williams, Paul; Christopher, N Channelle

    2009-03-17

    Nicotinic receptor decreases in the frontal cortex and hippocampus are important mediators of cognitive impairment in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Drug treatments for these diseases should take into account the impacts of compromised brain function on drug response. This study investigated the impact of compromised nicotinic receptor activity in the frontal cortex in rats on memory function. Since both Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia can involve psychosis, antipsychotic drugs are often given. The impacts of antipsychotic drugs on cognitive function have been found to be quite variable. It is the hypothesis of this and previous studies that the cognitive effects of antispychotic drugs on cognitive function depend on the integrity of brain systems involved in cognition. Previously in studies of the hippocampus, we found that chronic inhibition of beta2-containing nicotinic receptors with dihydro-beta-erythrodine (DHbetaE) impaired working memory and that this effect was attenuated by the antipsychotic drug clozapine. In contrast, chronic hippocampal alpha7 nicotinic receptor blockade with methyllycaconitine (MLA) potentiated the clozapine-induced memory impairment which is seen in rats without compromised nicotinic receptor activity. The current study determined medial frontal cortical alpha7 and beta2-containing nicotinic receptor involvement in memory and the interactions with antipsychotic drug therapy with clozapine. Chronic DHbetaE and MLA infusion effects and interactions with systemic clozapine were assessed in female rats tested for memory on the radial-arm maze. Antipsychotic drug interactions with chronic systemic nicotine were investigated because nicotinic procognitive treatment has been proposed. The same local infusion DHbetaE dose that impaired memory with hippocampal infusion did not impair memory when infused in the medial frontal cortex. Frontal DHbetaE infusion potentiated clozapine-induced memory impairment, whereas previously

  6. Ethanol-induced transcriptional activation of programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4 is mediated by GSK-3β signaling in rat cortical neuroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanjot Kaur Riar

    Full Text Available Ingestion of ethanol (ETOH during pregnancy induces grave abnormalities in developing fetal brain. We have previously reported that ETOH induces programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4, a critical regulator of cell growth, in cultured fetal cerebral cortical neurons (PCNs and in the cerebral cortex in vivo and affect protein synthesis as observed in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD. However, the mechanism which activates PDCD4 in neuronal systems is unclear and understanding this regulation may provide a counteractive strategy to correct the protein synthesis associated developmental changes seen in FASD. The present study investigates the molecular mechanism by which ethanol regulates PDCD4 in cortical neuroblasts, the immediate precursor of neurons. ETOH treatment significantly increased PDCD4 protein and transcript expression in spontaneously immortalized rat brain neuroblasts. Since PDCD4 is regulated at both the post-translational and post-transcriptional level, we assessed ETOH's effect on PDCD4 protein and mRNA stability. Chase experiments demonstrated that ETOH does not significantly impact either PDCD4 protein or mRNA stabilization. PDCD4 promoter-reporter assays confirmed that PDCD4 is transcriptionally regulated by ETOH in neuroblasts. Given a critical role of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β signaling in regulating protein synthesis and neurotoxic mechanisms, we investigated the involvement of GSK-3β and showed that multifunctional GSK-3β was significantly activated in response to ETOH in neuroblasts. In addition, we found that ETOH-induced activation of PDCD4 was inhibited by pharmacologic blockade of GSK-3β using inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl and SB-216763 or siRNA mediated silencing of GSK-3β. These results suggest that ethanol transcriptionally upregulates PDCD4 by enhancing GSK-3β signaling in cortical neuroblasts. Further, we demonstrate that canonical Wnt-3a/GSK-3β signaling is involved in regulating PDCD4 protein

  7. Intention retrieval and deactivation following an acute psychosocial stressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Walser

    Full Text Available We often form intentions but have to postpone them until the appropriate situation for retrieval and execution has come, an ability also referred to as event-based prospective memory. After intention completion, our cognitive system has to deactivate no-more-relevant intention representations from memory to avoid interference with subsequent tasks. In everyday life, we frequently rely on these abilities also in stressful situations. Surprisingly, little is known about potential stress effects on these functions. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the reliability of event-based prospective memory and of intention deactivation in conditions of acute psychosocial stress. To this aim, eighty-two participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test, a standardized stress protocol, or a standardized control situation. Following this treatment, participants performed a computerized event-based prospective memory task with non-salient and focal prospective memory cues in order to assess prospective memory performance and deactivation of completed intentions. Although the stress group showed elevated levels of salivary cortisol as marker of a stress-related increase in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity throughout the cognitive testing period compared to the no-stress group, prospective memory performance and deactivation of completed intentions did not differ between groups. Findings indicate that cognitive control processes subserving intention retrieval and deactivation after completion may be mostly preserved even under conditions of acute stress.

  8. Between-hand difference in ipsilateral deactivation is associated with hand lateralization: fMRI mapping of 284 volunteers balanced for handedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eTzourio-Mazoyer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In right-handers, an increase in the pace of dominant hand movement results in increased ipsilateral deactivation of the primary motor cortex (M1. By contrast, an increase in non-dominant hand movement frequency is associated with reduced ipsilateral deactivation. This pattern suggests that inhibitory processes support right hand dominance in right-handers and raises the issues of whether this phenomenon also supports left hand preference in left-handers, and/or whether it relates to asymmetry of manual ability in either group. Thanks to the BIL&GIN, a database dedicated to the investigation of hemispheric specialization, we studied the variation in M1 activity during right and left finger tapping tasks in a sample of 284 healthy participants balanced for handedness. An M1 fMRI localizer was defined for each participant as an 8 mm diameter sphere centered on the motor activation peak. Right-handers exhibited significantly larger deactivation of the ipsilateral M1 when moving their dominant hand than their non-dominant hand. In contrast, left-handers exhibited comparable ipsilateral M1 deactivation during either hand movement, reflecting a bilateral cortical specialization. This pattern is likely related to left-handers’ good performances with their right hand and consequent lower asymmetry in manual ability compared with right-handers. Finally, inter-individual analyses over the whole sample demonstrated that the larger the difference in manual skill across hands, the larger the difference in ipsilateral deactivation. Overall, we propose that difference in ipsilateral deactivation is a marker of difference in manual ability asymmetry reflecting differences in the strength of transcallosal inhibition when a given hand is moving.

  9. Synergy by secretory phospholipase A2 and glutamate on inducing cell death and sustained arachidonic acid metabolic changes in primary cortical neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; DeCoster, M A; de Turco, E B

    1996-01-01

    glutamate and sPLA2 from bee venom. sPLA2, at concentrations eliciting low neurotoxicity (acid into triacylglycerols. Free [3H]arachidonic acid accumulated at higher enzyme concentrations......, from Taipan snake venom. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 blocked glutamate effects and partially inhibited sPLA2 OS2 but not sPLA2 from bee venom-induced arachidonic acid release. Thus, the synergy with glutamate and very low concentrations of exogenously added sPLA2 suggests a potential role......Secretory and cytosolic phospholipases A2 (sPLA2 and cPLA2) may contribute to the release of arachidonic acid and other bioactive lipids, which are modulators of synaptic function. In primary cortical neuron cultures, neurotoxic cell death and [3H]arachidonate metabolism was studied after adding...

  10. Can short-term oral fine motor training affect precision of task performance and induce cortical plasticity of the jaw muscles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Zhang; Kumar, Abhishek; Kothari, Mohit

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to test the hypothesis that short-term oral sensorimotor training of the jaw muscles would increase the precision of task performance and induce neuroplastic changes in the corticomotor pathways, related to the masseter muscle. Fifteen healthy volunteers performed six series with ten...... trials of an oral sensorimotor task. The task was to manipulate and position a spherical chocolate candy in between the anterior teeth and split it into two equal halves. The precision of the task performance was evaluated by comparing the ratio between the two split halves. A series of "hold......-and-split" tasks was also performed before and after the training. The hold force and split force along with the electromyographic (EMG) activity of jaw muscles were recorded. Motor-evoked potentials and cortical motor maps of the right masseter muscle were evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation...

  11. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  12. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M.; Els, T.

    2001-01-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  13. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrick, D.G.; Gerber, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility`s life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994).

  14. Hydrotreating catalyst deactivation by coke from SRC-II oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Kumata, F.; Massoth, F.E.

    1988-10-01

    Samples of a CoMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst were partially deactivated with SRC-II feed in an autoclave reactor to give coked samples of 5 to 18% C. The coked catalysts were analyzed for surface area, pore volume, coronene adsorption and diffusivity, and their catalytic activity determined for hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and C-N hydrogenolysis (CNH) using model compounds. All of the above measurements decreased with increase in coke content. Property data indicate that some pores are blocked by coke and diffusivity results show narrowing of pore mouths with increasing coke content. Catalyst deactivation versus coke level was identical for HDS and HDO, but less for CNH. A simple model of coke deactivation was developed to relate activity to coke content. Coke is envisioned as forming wedge-like deposits in the catalyst pores. 11 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Regeneration of a deactivated USY alkylation catalyst using supercritical isobutane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Ginosar; David N. Ghompson; Kyle C. Burch

    2005-01-01

    Off-line, in-situ alkylation activity recovery from a completely deactivated solid acid catalyst was examined in a continuous-flow reaction system employing supercritical isobutane. A USY zeolite catalyst was initially deactivated during the liquid phase alkylation of butene with isobutane in a single-pass reactor and then varying amounts of alkylation activity were recovered by passing supercritical isobutane over the catalyst bed at different reactivation conditions. Temperature, pressure and regeneration time were found to play important roles in the supercritical isobutane regeneration process when applied to a completely deactivated USY zeolite alkylation catalyst. Manipulation of the variables that influence solvent strength, diffusivity, surface desorption, hydride transfer rates, and coke aging, strongly influence regeneration effectiveness.

  16. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G; Marin, A; Wyss, C; Mueller, S; Newson, E [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  17. PUREX/UO3 facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamrick, D.G.; Gerber, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO 3 ) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility's life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994)

  18. Robot Work Platform for Large Hot Cell Deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BITTEN, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    The 324 Building, located at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, is being deactivated to meet state and federal cleanup commitments. The facility is currently in its third year of a nine-year project to complete deactivation and closure for long-term surveillance and maintenance. The 324 building contains large hot cells that were used for high-radiation, high-contamination chemical process development and demonstrations. A major obstacle for the 324 deactivation project is the inability to effectively perform deactivation tasks within highly radioactive, contaminated environments. Current strategies use inefficient, resource intensive technologies that significantly impact the cost and schedule for deactivation. To meet mandated cleanup commitments, there is a need to deploy rapid, more efficient remote/robot technologies to minimize worker exposure, accelerate work tasks, and eliminate the need for multiple specialized tool design and procurement efforts. This paper describes the functions and performance requirements for a crane-deployed remote/robot Work Platform possessing full access capabilities. The remote/robot Work Platform will deploy commercially available off-the-shelf tools and end effectors to support Project cleanup goals and reduce overall project risk and cost. The intent of this system is to maximize the use of off-the-shelf technologies that minimize additional new, unproven, or novel designs. This paper further describes procurement strategy, the selection process, the selected technology, and the current status of the procurement and lessons learned. Funding, in part, has been provided by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area

  19. PUREX/UO3 facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status

  20. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned: History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-11-25

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase-independent protective effects of huperzine A against iron overload-induced oxidative damage and aberrant iron metabolism signaling in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ling-Xue; Huang, Xiao-Tian; Chen, Yu-Ting; Tang, Xi-Can; Zhang, Hai-Yan

    2016-11-01

    Iron dyshomeostasis is one of the primary causes of neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Huperzine A (HupA), a natural inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), is a licensed anti-AD drug in China and a nutraceutical in the United Sates. Here, we investigated the protective effects of HupA against iron overload-induced injury in neurons. Rat cortical neurons were treated with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC), and cell viability was assessed with MTT assays. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assays were performed to assess mitochondrial function. The labile iron pool (LIP) level, cytosolic-aconitase (c-aconitase) activity and iron uptake protein expression were measured to determine iron metabolism changes. The modified Ellman's method was used to evaluate AChE activity. HupA significantly attenuated the iron overload-induced decrease in neuronal cell viability. This neuroprotective effect of HupA occurred concurrently with a decrease in ROS and an increase in ATP. Moreover, HupA treatment significantly blocked the upregulation of the LIP level and other aberrant iron metabolism changes induced by iron overload. Additionally, another specific AChE inhibitor, donepezil (Don), at a concentration that caused AChE inhibition equivalent to that of HupA negatively, influenced the aberrant changes in ROS, ATP or LIP that were induced by excessive iron. We provide the first demonstration of the protective effects of HupA against iron overload-induced neuronal damage. This beneficial role of HupA may be attributed to its attenuation of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction and elevation of LIP, and these effects are not associated with its AChE-inhibiting effect.

  2. Test-retest assessment of cortical activation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with brain atlas-guided optical topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fenghua; Kozel, F. Andrew; Yennu, Amarnath; Croarkin, Paul E.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Mapes, Kimberly S.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Liu, Hanli

    2012-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a technology that stimulates neurons with rapidly changing magnetic pulses with demonstrated therapeutic applications for various neuropsychiatric disorders. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a suitable tool to assess rTMS-evoked brain responses without interference from the magnetic or electric fields generated by the TMS coil. We have previously reported a channel-wise study of combined rTMS/fNIRS on the motor and prefrontal cortices, showing a robust decrease of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) at the sites of 1-Hz rTMS and the contralateral brain regions. However, the reliability of this putative clinical tool is unknown. In this study, we develop a rapid optical topography approach to spatially characterize the rTMS-evoked hemodynamic responses on a standard brain atlas. A hemispherical approximation of the brain is employed to convert the three-dimensional topography on the complex brain surface to a two-dimensional topography in the spherical coordinate system. The test-retest reliability of the combined rTMS/fNIRS is assessed using repeated measurements performed two to three days apart. The results demonstrate that the Δ[HbO2] amplitudes have moderate-to-high reliability at the group level; and the spatial patterns of the topographic images have high reproducibility in size and a moderate degree of overlap at the individual level.

  3. Effect of large doses of 131I-19-iodocholesterol on metapyralone-induced adrenal cortical hyperplasia in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.G.; Beierwaltes, W.H.; Nishiyama, R.H.; Ice, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    The potential use of 131 I-19-iodocholesterol to treat ACTH excess Cushing's disease was evaluated in the dog. Three normal female dogs were given LD 50 radiation doses of 131 I-19-iodocholesterol without producing gross or histopathologically demonstrable change of the adrenals at autopsy 3 months later. The adrenal cortices of three dogs were made hyperplastic (to simulate the adrenal cortex in Cushing's disease) with ACTH and three with Metapyralone. In addition these six dogs were given LD 50 doses of 131 I-19-iodocholesterol. Three months after treatment, the adrenal glands of the ACTH-treated dogs were not enlarged, the cortex was thicker than normal, and there were no changes attributable to irradiation. At 3 months, the Metapyralone-treated dogs had enlarged adrenals, widening of the adrenal cortex, and no necrosis or other changes attributable to irradiation. It is concluded that a therapeutic trial of 131 I-19-iodocholesterol in the treatment of Cushing's disease is not indicated. (auth)

  4. Activation of the occipital cortex and deactivation of the default mode network during working memory in the early blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Chun, Ji-Won; Park, Bumhee; Park, Haeil; Kim, Joong Il; Lee, Jong Doo; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2011-05-01

    Although blind people heavily depend on working memory to manage daily life without visual information, it is not clear yet whether their working memory processing involves functional reorganization of the memory-related cortical network. To explore functional reorganization of the cortical network that supports various types of working memory processes in the early blind, we investigated activation differences between 2-back tasks and 0-back tasks using fMRI in 10 congenitally blind subjects and 10 sighted subjects. We used three types of stimulus sequences: words for a verbal task, pitches for a non-verbal task, and sound locations for a spatial task. When compared to the sighted, the blind showed additional activations in the occipital lobe for all types of stimulus sequences for working memory and more significant deactivation in the posterior cingulate cortex of the default mode network. The blind had increased effective connectivity from the default mode network to the left parieto-frontal network and from the occipital cortex to the right parieto-frontal network during the 2-back tasks than the 0-back tasks. These findings suggest not only cortical plasticity of the occipital cortex but also reorganization of the cortical network for the executive control of working memory.

  5. Spatial integration and cortical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, C D; Das, A; Ito, M; Kapadia, M; Westheimer, G

    1996-01-23

    Cells in adult primary visual cortex are capable of integrating information over much larger portions of the visual field than was originally thought. Moreover, their receptive field properties can be altered by the context within which local features are presented and by changes in visual experience. The substrate for both spatial integration and cortical plasticity is likely to be found in a plexus of long-range horizontal connections, formed by cortical pyramidal cells, which link cells within each cortical area over distances of 6-8 mm. The relationship between horizontal connections and cortical functional architecture suggests a role in visual segmentation and spatial integration. The distribution of lateral interactions within striate cortex was visualized with optical recording, and their functional consequences were explored by using comparable stimuli in human psychophysical experiments and in recordings from alert monkeys. They may represent the substrate for perceptual phenomena such as illusory contours, surface fill-in, and contour saliency. The dynamic nature of receptive field properties and cortical architecture has been seen over time scales ranging from seconds to months. One can induce a remapping of the topography of visual cortex by making focal binocular retinal lesions. Shorter-term plasticity of cortical receptive fields was observed following brief periods of visual stimulation. The mechanisms involved entailed, for the short-term changes, altering the effectiveness of existing cortical connections, and for the long-term changes, sprouting of axon collaterals and synaptogenesis. The mutability of cortical function implies a continual process of calibration and normalization of the perception of visual attributes that is dependent on sensory experience throughout adulthood and might further represent the mechanism of perceptual learning.

  6. Characterization of energy and neurotransmitter metabolism in cortical glutamatergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells: A novel approach to study metabolism in human neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, Blanca I; Zhang, Yu; Lihme, Maria Fog; Bak, Lasse K; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Holst, Bjørn; Hyttel, Poul; Freude, Kristine K; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-06-01

    Alterations in the cellular metabolic machinery of the brain are associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Novel human cellular disease models are essential in order to study underlying disease mechanisms. In the present study, we characterized major metabolic pathways in neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). With this aim, cultures of hiPSC-derived neurons were incubated with [U- 13 C]glucose, [U- 13 C]glutamate or [U- 13 C]glutamine. Isotopic labeling in metabolites was determined using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and cellular amino acid content was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Additionally, we evaluated mitochondrial function using real-time assessment of oxygen consumption via the Seahorse XF e 96 Analyzer. Moreover, in order to validate the hiPSC-derived neurons as a model system, a metabolic profiling was performed in parallel in primary neuronal cultures of mouse cerebral cortex and cerebellum. These serve as well-established models of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively. The hiPSC-derived neurons were previously characterized as being forebrain-specific cortical glutamatergic neurons. However, a comparable preparation of predominantly mouse cortical glutamatergic neurons is not available. We found a higher glycolytic capacity in hiPSC-derived neurons compared to mouse neurons and a substantial oxidative metabolism through the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. This finding is supported by the extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates measured in the cultured human neurons. [U- 13 C]Glutamate and [U- 13 C]glutamine were found to be efficient energy substrates for the neuronal cultures originating from both mice and humans. Interestingly, isotopic labeling in metabolites from [U- 13 C]glutamate was higher than that from [U- 13 C]glutamine. Although the metabolic profile of hiPSC-derived neurons in vitro was

  7. Effect of Locomotor Respiratory Coupling Induced by Cortical Oxygenated Hemoglobin Levels During Cycle Ergometer Exercise of Light Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanagi, Keiichi; Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Yasufuku, Yuichi; Takai, Haruna; Kera, Takeshi; Tamaki, Akira; Iwata, Kentaro; Onishi, Hideaki

    This study aimed to clarify the effects of locomotor-respiratory coupling (LRC) induced by light load cycle ergometer exercise on oxygenated hemoglobin (O2Hb) in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), supplementary motor area (SMA), and sensorimotor cortex (SMC). The participants were 15 young healthy adults (9 men and 6 women, mean age: 23.1 ± 1.8 (SEM) years). We conducted a task in both LRC-inducing and LRC-non-inducing conditions for all participants. O2Hb was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. The LRC frequency ratio during induction was 2:1; pedaling rate, 50 rpm; and intensity of load, 30 % peak volume of oxygen uptake. The test protocol included a 3-min rest prior to exercise, steady loading motion for 10 min, and 10-min rest post exercise (a total of 23 min). In the measurement of O2Hb, we focused on the DLPFC, SMA, and SMC. The LRC frequency was significantly higher in the LRC-inducing condition (p < 0.05). O2Hb during exercise was significantly lower in the DLPFC and SMA, under the LRC-inducing condition (p < 0.05). The study revealed that even light load could induce LRC and that O2Hb in the DLPFC and SMA decreases during exercise via LRC induction.

  8. Deactivation of Pacemaker: Ethical Approach or Managerial Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macková Marie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The decision about the deactivation of a pacemaker must be the result of a multicriteria decision-making process where the legal, ethical and effectiveness aspects must be taken into account and delicately balanced, while also considering the risk of managerial failure. Academic as well as professional discussion is necessary because there is a whole range of question marks on this topic and all the aspects mentioned above. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the debate by presenting the views of Czech physicians about the possibility of deactivation of the pacemaker in patients in terminal states. Based on the results of our research, the following steps are recommended to enable the deactivation of pacemakers in the Czech environment. Before the patient’s own indication of pacemaker therapy, treatment should be discussed with the patient in detail, including complications and deactivation options. Czech ethical consultant services should be set up in Czech hospitals. And last but not least, they should take an opinion on this issue as well as the professional society.

  9. Mediation Analysis of Mode Deactivation Therapy (Reanalysis and Interpretation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Christopher K.; Apsche, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    A key component of Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) is the development of self-awareness and regulatory skills by the client with the aim of helping adolescent males with conduct disordered behaviors, including sexually inappropriate behaviors and emotional dysregulation. The goal includes altering specific behaviors to fall within socially…

  10. 300 Area fuel supply facilities deactivation mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of the 300 Area fuel supply facilities (formerly call ''N reactor fuel fabrication facilities'') Deactivation Project mission analysis. Hanford systems engineering (SE) procedures call for a mission analysis. The mission analysis is an important first step in the SE process

  11. Combustion kinetics of the coke on deactivated dehydrogenation catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Sha; He, Songbo; Li, XianRu; Li, Jingqiu; Bi, Wenjun; Sun, Chenglin

    2015-01-01

    The coke combustion kinetics on the deactivated catalysts for long chain paraffin dehydrogenation was studied by the thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG–DTG) technique. The amount and H/C mole ratio of the coke were determined by the TG and elemental analysis. And the

  12. Studies of Deactivation of Methanol to Formaldehyde Selective Oxidation Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Kristian Viegaard; Schumann, Max; Høj, Martin

    This work presents a study of the deactivation behavior of Fe-Mo oxide catalyst during selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde in a period of 5 days. The structural changes in the catalyst have been investigated in situ for the initial 10 h by Raman spectroscopy, and the structure after 5...

  13. 42 CFR 424.540 - Deactivation of Medicare billing privileges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... change in practice location, a change of any managing employee, and a change in billing services. A... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deactivation of Medicare billing privileges. 424.540 Section 424.540 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  14. 200 Area Deactivation Project Facilities Authorization Envelope Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DODD, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    Project facilities as required by HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The Authorization Agreements (AA's) do not identify the specific set of environmental safety and health requirements that are applicable to the facility. Therefore, the facility Authorization Envelopes are defined here to identify the applicable requirements. This document identifies the authorization envelopes for the 200 Area Deactivation

  15. The Ketone Body, β-Hydroxybutyrate Stimulates the Autophagic Flux and Prevents Neuronal Death Induced by Glucose Deprivation in Cortical Cultured Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camberos-Luna, Lucy; Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Montiel, Teresa; Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Massieu, Lourdes

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is the major energy substrate in brain, however, during ketogenesis induced by starvation or prolonged hypoglycemia, the ketone bodies (KB), acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) can substitute for glucose. KB improve neuronal survival in diverse injury models, but the mechanisms by which KB prevent neuronal damage are still not well understood. In the present study we have investigated whether protection by the D isomer of BHB (D-BHB) against neuronal death induced by glucose deprivation (GD), is related to autophagy. Autophagy is a lysosomal-dependent degradation process activated during nutritional stress, which leads to the digestion of damaged proteins and organelles providing energy for cell survival. Results show that autophagy is activated in cortical cultured neurons during GD, as indicated by the increase in the levels of the lipidated form of the microtubule associated protein light chain 3 (LC3-II), and the number of autophagic vesicles. At early phases of glucose reintroduction (GR), the levels of p62 declined suggesting that the degradation of the autophagolysosomal content takes place at this time. In cultures exposed to GD and GR in the presence of D-BHB, the levels of LC3-II and p62 rapidly declined and remained low during GR, suggesting that the KB stimulates the autophagic flux preventing autophagosome accumulation and improving neuronal survival.

  16. Cortical visual impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Koželj, Urša

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we discuss cortical visual impairment, diagnosis that is in the developed world in first place, since 20 percent of children with blindness or low vision are diagnosed with it. The objectives of the thesis are to define cortical visual impairment and the definition of characters suggestive of the cortical visual impairment as well as to search for causes that affect the growing diagnosis of cortical visual impairment. There are a lot of signs of cortical visual impairment. ...

  17. Green tide deactivation with layered-structure cuboids of Ag/CaTiO3 under UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Wohn; Lozano-Sánchez, L.M.; Rodríguez-González, V.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Synergic reasons such as mass transfer, morphology, biocide properties, UV-A photoresponse, and electron trapping that reduce recombination on Ag/CaTiO 3 nanocomposites, have the potential for the generation of reactive radicals that promote the fatal irreversible deactivation of Tetraselmis suecica algae in 12 min under UV-A irradiation. -- Highlights: • An alternative to deactivate harmful green tide is proposed by employing Ag/CaTiO 3 . • Particles of perovskite-like have rectangular prisms morphology with AgNPs ∼13 nm. • The cuboids achieve complete inactivation of Tetraselmis suecica algae in 12 min. • AgNPs functionalization induce fatal irreversible damages on the algae surface. -- Abstract: In this work, an alternative to deactivate noxious green tide Tetraselmis suecica in the short-term is proposed by employing Perovskite-like cube-shaped, crystalline CaTiO 3 semiconductors functionalized with atomic silver nanoparticles. CaTiO 3 was prepared by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method and then Ag 0 NPs (1 wt% of CaTiO 3 ), were added by the photoreduction method. The XRD results show that crystalline CaTiO 3 has an orthorhombic unit cell with a Perovskite-like structure. Images obtained by FESEM and HRTEM microscopies show well-faceted CaTiO 3 rectangular prismatic morphology functionalizated with silver nanoparticles ∼13.5 nm. XPS and EDS-FESEM has confirmed the composition of CaTiO 3 and silver occurring mainly as reduced metal. The UV inactivation of noxious T. suecica with Ag/CaTiO 3 nanocomposites formed on bare materials results in complete deactivation of the algae in 12 min. The direct contact between harmful algae and Ag/CaTiO 3 nanocomposite is necessary to deactivate the algae and inhibits algae viability

  18. Characterization of energy and neurotransmitter metabolism in cortical glutamatergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana, Blanca I; Zhang, Yu; Lihme, Maria Fog

    2017-01-01

    pathways in neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). With this aim, cultures of hiPSC-derived neurons were incubated with [U-(13)C]glucose, [U-(13)C]glutamate or [U-(13)C]glutamine. Isotopic labeling in metabolites was determined using gas chromatography coupled to mass...

  19. Neuroprotective effect of melatonin on soluble Aβ1-42-induced cortical neurodegeneration via Reelin-Dab1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunli; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Shuman; Ren, Lili; Lv, Yiheng; Yin, Rui; Bi, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Soluble Aβ 1-42 oligomers play a vital role in the development and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Melatonin could delay the progress of AD through multiple mechanisms. Reelin-Dab1 signaling plays an important role in AD, including neuronal function and synaptic plasticity. However, whether melatonin could exert its neuroprotective function against soluble Aβ 1-42 -induced neurotoxicity during AD development through regulating Reelin-Dab1 signaling remains poorly understood. AD rat model was established by soluble Aβ 1-42 repeated intracerebroventricular injection. Using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses, the effect of melatonin on synaptic plasticity, neuritic degeneration, and astrocyte activation was investigated in cerebral cortex. Meanwhile, the expression of Reelin and Dab1 was also examined in cerebral cortex. In our in vitro study, Reelin-Dab1 signaling was inhibited by Reelin antibody, and neuroprotective effect of melatonin against Aβ 1-42 was further determined. Melatonin ameliorated the neurotoxiciy and astrocyte activation induced by Aβ 1-42 in the cerebral cortex. Melatonin also blocked the reduction in Reelin and Dab1 expression induced by Aβ 1-42 . Using in vitro study, Reelin inactivation completely abolished the protective effect of melatonin against Aβ 1-42 -induced neurotoxicity. Melatonin might play its neuroprotective role against Aβ 1-42 through mediating Reelin-Dab1 signaling pathway. Melatonin could be a safe and remarkable therapeutic candidate for AD and other aged-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Role of GluR2 expression in AMPA-induced toxicity in cultured murine cerebral cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jette Bisgaard; Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Timmermann, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    of the Mg(2+) block of the NMDA receptor on AMPA-R stimulation. The involvement of Ca(2+) influx through AMPA-R was also examined. The number of neurons possessing Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA-R increased during culture development, concurrently with an increasing susceptibility for AMPA-induced toxicity during...

  1. Sulforhodamine 101, a widely used astrocyte marker, can induce cortical seizure-like activity at concentrations commonly used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Nedergaard, Maiken; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar

    2016-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a preferential astrocyte marker widely used in 2-photon microscopy experiments. Here we show, that topical loading of two commonly used SR101 concentrations, 100 μM and 250 μM when incubated for 10 min, can induce seizure-like local field potential (LFP) activity in ...

  2. Long term deactivation test of high dust SCR catalysts by straw co-firing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigang Lin; Degn Jensen, A.; Bjerkvig, J.

    2009-12-15

    The consequences of carbon dioxide induced global warming cause major concern worldwide. The consumption of energy produced with fossil fuels is the major factor that contributes to the global warming. Biomass is a renewable energy resource and has a nature of CO{sub 2} neutrality. Co-combustion of biomass in existing coal fired power plants can maintain high efficiency and reduce the emission of CO{sub 2} at same time. However, one of the problems faced by co-firing is deactivation of the SCR catalysts. Understanding of the mechanisms of deactivation of the catalyst elements at co-firing conditions is crucial for long term runs of the power plants. Twenty six SCR catalyst elements were exposed at two units (SSV3 and SSV4) in the Studstrup Power Plant for a long period. Both units co-fire coal and straw with a typical fraction of 8-10% straw on an energy basis during co-firing. SSV4 unit operated in co-firing mode most of the time; SSV3 unit co-fired straw half of the operating time. The main objective of this PSO-project is to gain knowledge of a long term influence on catalyst activity when co-firing straw in coal-fired power plants, thus, to improve the basis for operating the SCR-plants for NO{sub x}-reduction. The exposure time of the applied catalyst elements (HTAS and BASF) varied from approximately 5000 to 19000 hours in the power plant by exchanging the element two times. The activity of all elements was measured before and after exposure in a bench scale test rig at the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark. The results show that the activity, estimated by exclusion of channel clogging of the elements, decreases gradually with the total exposure time. It appears that the exposure time under co-firing condition has little effect on the deactivation of the catalyst elements and no sharp decrease of the activity was observed. The average deactivation rate of the catalyst elements is 1.6 %/1000 hours. SEM

  3. The Role of Biotransformation and Oxidative Stress in 3,5-Dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) Induced Nephrotoxicity in Isolated Renal Cortical Cells from Male Fischer 344 Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Christopher R.; Ferguson, Travis; Preston, Debbie; Ward, Dakota; Ball, John; Anestis, Dianne; Valentovic, Monica; Rankin, Gary O.

    2016-01-01

    Among the mono- and dichloroanilines, 3,5-Dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) is the most potent nephrotoxicant in vivo and in vitro. However, the role of renal biotransformation in 3,5-DCA induced nephrotoxicity is unknown. The current study was designed to determine the in vitro nephrotoxic potential of 3,5-DCA in isolated renal cortical cells (IRCC) obtained from male Fischer 344 rats, and the role of renal bioactivation and oxidative stress in 3,5-DCA nephrotoxicity. IRCC (~4 million cells/ml) from male rats were exposed to 3,5-DCA (0-1.0 mM) for up to 120 min. In IRCC, 3,5-DCA was cytotoxic at 1.0 mM by 60 min as evidenced by the increased release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but 120 min was required for 3,5-DCA 0.5 mM to increase LDH release. In subsequent studies, IRCC were exposed to a pretreatment (antioxidant or enzyme inhibitor) prior to exposure to 3,5-DCA (1.0 mM) for 90 min. Cytotoxicity induced by 3,5-DCA was attenuated by pretreatment with inhibitors of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO; methimazole, N-octylamine), cytochrome P450 (CYP; piperonyl butoxide, metyrapone), or peroxidase (indomethacin, mercaptosuccinate) enzymes. Use of more selective CYP inhibitors suggested that the CYP 2C family contributed to 3,5-DCA bioactivation. Antioxidants (glutathione, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, pyruvate) also attenuated 3,5-DCA nephrotoxicity, but oxidized glutathione levels and the oxidized/reduced glutathione ratios were not increased. These results indicate that 3,5-DCA may be activated via several renal enzyme systems to toxic metabolites, and that free radicals, but not oxidative stress, contribute to 3,5-DCA induced nephrotoxicity in vitro. PMID:26808022

  4. Mechanically-induced osteogenesis in the cortical bone of pre- to peripubertal stage and peri- to postpubertal stage mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plochocki Jeffrey H

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise during postnatal development plays a key role in determining adult bone mass and reducing the risk of fracture and osteoporosis later in life. However, the relationship between mechanically-induced osteogenesis and age is unclear. Elevated levels of estrogen during puberty may inhibit periosteal bone formation. Thus, magnitudes of mechanically-induced osteogenesis may be vary with pubertal state. Methods The present study uses a murine model to examine age-related changes in bone formation at the femoral midshaft with voluntary exercise. Pre- to peripubertal mice aged 3 weeks and peri- to postpubertal mice aged 7 weeks were randomly divided into sedentary and exercised groups and subjected to histomorphometric comparison after 4 weeks of treatment. Results Results of the experiment indicate that exercise significantly increased osteogenesis on the periosteal and endocortical surface of the mice in the older age group (P P Conclusion These findings suggest that the amount and location of mechanically-induced osteogenesis differs by age during skeletal development. Late adolescence may be the optimal time to accrue bone mass and maximize bone strength.

  5. Protein kinase D1 modulates aldosterone-induced ENaC activity in a renal cortical collecting duct cell line.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEneaney, Victoria

    2010-08-30

    Aldosterone treatment of M1-CCD cells stimulated an increase in epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) alpha-subunit expression that was mainly localized to the apical membrane. PKD1-suppressed cells constitutively expressed ENaCalpha at low abundance, with no increase after aldosterone treatment. In the PKD1-suppressed cells, ENaCalpha was mainly localized proximal to the basolateral surface of the epithelium both before and after aldosterone treatment. Apical membrane insertion of ENaCbeta in response to aldosterone treatment was also sensitive to PKD1 suppression as was the aldosterone-induced rise in the amiloride-sensitive, trans-epithelial current (I(TE)). The interaction of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) with specific elements in the promoters of aldosterone responsive genes is stabilized by ligand interaction and phosphorylation. PKD1 suppression inhibited aldosterone-induced SGK-1 expression. The nuclear localization of MR was also blocked by PKD1 suppression and MEK antagonism implicating both these kinases in MR nuclear stabilization. PKD1 thus modulates aldosterone-induced ENaC activity through the modulation of sub-cellular trafficking and the stabilization of MR nuclear localization.

  6. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide induces glycogenolysis in mouse cortical slices: a possible regulatory mechanism for the local control of energy metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Magistretti, P J; Morrison, J H; Shoemaker, W J; Sapin, V; Bloom, F E

    1981-01-01

    Mouse cerebral cortex slices will synthesize [3H]glycogen in vitro. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) stimulates the enzymatic breakdown of this [3H]glycogen. The concentration giving 50% of maximum effectiveness (EC50) is 26 nM. Under the same experimental conditions norepinephrine also induces a concentration-dependent [3H]glycogen hydrolysis with an EC50 of 500 nM. The effect of VIP is not mediated by the release of norepinephrine because it is not blocked by the noradrenergic antago...

  7. Quantitative immuno-electron microscopic analysis of depolarization-induced expression of PGC-1alpha in cultured rat visual cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hui; Liang, Huan Ling; Wong-Riley, Margaret

    2007-10-17

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC- 1alpha) is a coactivator of nuclear receptors and other transcription factors that regulate several metabolic processes, including mitochondrial biogenesis, energy homeostasis, respiration, and gluconeogenesis. PGC-1alpha plays a vital role in stimulating genes that are important to oxidative metabolism and other mitochondrial functions in brown adipose tissue and skeleton muscles, but the significance of PGC-1alpha in the brain remains elusive. The goal of our present study was to determine by means of quantitative immuno-electron microscopy the expression of PGC-1alpha in cultured rat visual cortical neurons under normal conditions as well as after depolarizing stimulation for varying periods of time. Our results showed that: (a) PGC-1alpha was normally located in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. In the nucleus, PGC-1alpha was associated mainly with euchromatin rather than heterochromatin, consistent with active involvement in transcription. In the cytoplasm, it was associated mainly with free ribosomes. (b) Neuronal depolarization by KCl for 0.5 h induced a significant increase in PGC-1alpha labeling density in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm (Pneuronal activity by synthesizing more proteins in the cytoplasm and translocating them to the nucleus for gene activation. PGC-1alpha level in neurons is, therefore, tightly regulated by neuronal activity.

  8. SIRT3 Expression Decreases with Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Rat Cortical Neurons during Early Brain Injury Induced by Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuin3 (SIRT3 is an important protein deacetylase which predominantly presents in mitochondria and exhibits broad bioactivities including regulating energy metabolism and counteracting inflammatory effect. Since inflammatory cascade was proved to be critical for pathological damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, we investigated the overall expression and cell-specific distribution of SIRT3 in the cerebral cortex of Sprague-Dawley rats with experimental SAH induced by internal carotid perforation. Results suggested that SIRT3 was expressed abundantly in neurons and endothelia but rarely in gliocytes in normal cerebral cortex. After experimental SAH, mRNA and protein expressions of SIRT3 decreased significantly as early as 8 hours and dropped to the minimum value at 24 h after SAH. By contrast, SOD2 expression increased slowly as early as 12 hours after experimental SAH, rose up sharply at the following 12 hours, and then was maintained at a higher level. In conclusion, attenuated SIRT3 expression in cortical neurons was associated closely with enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and cellular apoptosis, implying that SIRT3 might play an important neuroprotective role during early brain injury following SAH.

  9. Epidemics in Adaptive Social Networks with Temporary Link Deactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Ilker; Shkarayev, Maxim S.; Shaw, Leah B.

    2013-04-01

    Disease spread in a society depends on the topology of the network of social contacts. Moreover, individuals may respond to the epidemic by adapting their contacts to reduce the risk of infection, thus changing the network structure and affecting future disease spread. We propose an adaptation mechanism where healthy individuals may choose to temporarily deactivate their contacts with sick individuals, allowing reactivation once both individuals are healthy. We develop a mean-field description of this system and find two distinct regimes: slow network dynamics, where the adaptation mechanism simply reduces the effective number of contacts per individual, and fast network dynamics, where more efficient adaptation reduces the spread of disease by targeting dangerous connections. Analysis of the bifurcation structure is supported by numerical simulations of disease spread on an adaptive network. The system displays a single parameter-dependent stable steady state and non-monotonic dependence of connectivity on link deactivation rate.

  10. Criticality safety for deactivation of the Rover dry headend process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Rover dry headend process combusted Rover graphite fuels in preparation for dissolution and solvent extraction for the recovery of 235 U. At the end of the Rover processing campaign, significant quantities of 235 U were left in the dry system. The Rover Dry Headend Process Deactivation Project goal is to remove the remaining uranium bearing material (UBM) from the dry system and then decontaminate the cells. Criticality safety issues associated with the Rover Deactivation Project have been influenced by project design refinement and schedule acceleration initiatives. The uranium ash composition used for calculations must envelope a wide range of material compositions, and yet result in cost effective final packaging and storage. Innovative thinking must be used to provide a timely safety authorization basis while the project design continues to be refined

  11. Is the ipsilateral cortex surrounding the lesion or the non-injured contralateral cortex important for motor recovery in rats with photochemically induced cortical lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Kotaro; Yamauchi, Hideki; Tatsuno, Hisashi; Hashimoto, Keiji; Abo, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether the ipsilateral cortex surrounding the lesion or the non-injured contralateral cortex is important for motor recovery after brain damage in the photochemically initiated thrombosis (PIT) model. We induced PIT in the sensorimotor cortex in rats and examined the recovery of motor function using the beam-walking test. In 24 rats, the right sensorimotor cortex was lesioned after 2 days of training for the beam-walking test (group 1). After 10 days, PIT was induced in the left sensorimotor cortex. Eight additional rats (group 2) received 2 days training in beam walking, then underwent the beam-walking test to evaluate function. After 10 days of testing, the left sensorimotor cortex was lesioned and recovery was monitored by the beam-walking test for 8 days. In group 1 animals, left hindlimb function caused by a right sensorimotor cortex lesion recovered within 10 days after the operation. Right hindlimb function caused by the left-side lesion recovered within 6 days. In group 2, right hindlimb function caused by induction of the left-side lesion after a total of 12 days of beam-walking training and testing recovered within 6 days as with the double PIT model. The training effect may be relevant to reorganization and neuromodulation. Motor recovery patterns did not indicate whether motor recovery was dependent on the ipsilateral cortex surrounding the lesion or the cortex of the contralateral side. The results emphasize the need for selection of appropriate programs tailored to the area of cortical damage in order to enhance motor functional recovery in this model. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Mitochondrial bioenergetics during the initiation of mercuric chloride-induced renal injury. I. Direct effects of in vitro mercuric chloride on renal cortical mitochondrial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, J.M. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI); Harding, P.G.; Humes, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    Increasing data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important early component of nephrotoxin-induced changes in renal cell function and viability. This study was designed to obtain more detailed information about the effects on several basic bioenergetic parameters of the direct interaction of Hg/sup 2 +/ with renal cortical mitochondria in vitro as a necessary prelude to studies of mitochondrial functional changes after treatment with mercuric chloride in vivo. Beginning at a threshhold level of 2 nmol of Hg/sup 2 +//mg of mitochondrial protein Hg/sup 2 +/ induced marked stimulation of State 4 respiration, mild inhibition of State 3 respiration, and 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration, a striking increase in atractyloside-insensitive ADP uptake and stimulation of both basal- and Mg/sup 2 +/-activated oligomycin-sensitive mitochondrial ATPase activity. These effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ could be prevented and reversed by the sulfhydryl reagent dithioerythritol and by albumin but were not affected by Mg/sup 2 +/. Detailed studies on the addition of HgCl/sub 2/ to the preparation at different stages of the mitochondrial isolation procedure demonstrated that the presence of other proteins decreased mitochondrial Hg/sup 2 +/ binding, that the Hg/sup 2 +/ was not readily washed off the mitochondria by nonprotein-containing solutions, and that prolonged exposure of mitochondria to Hg/sup 2 +/ during the isolation procedure did not markedly alter its functional effects on their reversibility as assessed on the final mitochondrial preparation. These data provide an important basis for critically assessing the changes in function of mitochondria isolated after in vivo treatment with mercuric chloride.

  13. The GluN2B subunit represents a major functional determinant of NMDA receptors in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Neagoe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal signaling pathways mediated by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various CNS disorders and have been long considered as promising points of therapeutic intervention. However, few efforts have been previously described concerning evaluation of therapeutic modulators of NMDARs and their downstream pathways in human neurons with endogenous expression of NMDARs. In the present study, we assessed expression, functionality, and subunit composition of endogenous NMDARs in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-derived cortical neurons (iCell Neurons and iCell GlutaNeurons. We initially confirmed the expected pharmacological response of iCell Neurons and iCell GlutaNeurons to NMDA by patch-clamp recordings. Subsequent pharmacological interrogation using GluN2 subunit-selective antagonists revealed the predominance of GluN2B in both iCell Neurons and iCell GlutaNeurons. This observation was also supported by qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses of GluN2 subunit expression as well as pharmacological experiments using positive allosteric modulators with distinct GluN2 subunit selectivity. We conclude that iCell Neurons and iCell GlutaNeurons express functional GluN2B-containing NMDARs and could serve as a valuable system for development and validation of GluN2B-modulating pharmaceutical agents. Keywords: Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons, iCell Neurons, iCell GlutaNeurons, NMDA receptors, GluN2B, Positive allosteric modulators

  14. Smoking cessation induced by deep repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the prefrontal and insular cortices: a prospective, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinur-Klein, Limor; Dannon, Pinhas; Hadar, Aviad; Rosenberg, Oded; Roth, Yiftach; Kotler, Moshe; Zangen, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in developed countries. Our previous studies in animal models and humans suggest that repeated activation of cue-induced craving networks followed by electromagnetic stimulation of the dorsal prefrontal cortex (PFC) can cause lasting reductions in drug craving and consumption. We hypothesized that disruption of these circuitries by deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the PFC and insula bilaterally can induce smoking cessation. Adults (N = 115) who smoke at least 20 cigarettes/day and failed previous treatments were recruited from the general population. Participants were randomized to receive 13 daily sessions of high-frequency, low-frequency or sham stimulation following, or without, presentation of smoking cues. Deep TMS was administered using an H-coil version targeting the lateral PFC and insula bilaterally. Cigarette consumption was evaluated during the treatment by measuring cotinine levels in urine samples and recording participants' self-reports as a primary outcome variable. Dependence and craving were assessed using standardized questionnaires. High (but not low) frequency deep TMS treatment significantly reduced cigarette consumption and nicotine dependence. The combination of this treatment with exposure to smoking cues enhanced reduction in cigarette consumption leading to an abstinence rate of 44% at the end of the treatment and an estimated 33% 6 months following the treatment. This study further implicates the lateral PFC and insula in nicotine addiction and suggests the use of deep high-frequency TMS of these regions following presentation of smoking cues as a promising treatment strategy. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bisphenol A Synthesis - Modeling of Industrial Reactor and Catalyst Deactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokop, Zdeněk; Hanková, Libuše; Jeřábek, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 60, - (2004), s. 77-83 Sp/Iss/ SI ISSN 1381-5148. [Asia-Pacific Congress on Catalysis /3./. Dalian, 12.10.2003-15.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/02/1104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : bisphenol A * catalyst deactivation * ion exchanger catalyst Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.582, year: 2004

  16. Deactivation and Storage Issues Shared by Fossil and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas S. LaGuardia

    1998-01-01

    The deactivation of a power plant, be it nuclear or fossil fueled, requires that the facility be placed in a safe and stable condition to prevent unacceptable exposure of the public or the environment to hazardous materials until the facility can be decommissioned. The conditions at two Texas plants are examined. These plants are fossil fueled, but their conditions might be duplicated at a nuclear plant

  17. Deactivation of nickel hydroxide-gold modified electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Caram, Bruno; Tucceri, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study how the charge-transport process of a nickel hydroxide film electrochemically synthesized on a gold substrate is modified when the electrode is stored for a long time. It was found that nickel hydroxide films are deactivated under storage, that is, films became less conductive than films immediately prepared (nondeactivated). This study was carried out in the context of the rotating disc electrode voltammetry when the modified electrode contacts an ele...

  18. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resolves by one year of life. Is “cortical blindness” the same thing as CVI? Cortical blindness is ... What visual characteristics are associated with CVI? • Distinct color preferences • Variable level of vision loss, often demonstrating ...

  19. Deactivation of SCR catalysts in biomass fired power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Kjærgaard

    composition and operating conditions, is not available. The main objective of the work presented in this thesis has been to conduct an in depth investigation of the deactivation mechanism of vanadia based SCR catalysts, when subjected to potassium rich aerosols. It has furthermore been a goal to suggest...... for up to 600 hours. The activity of fresh and exposed catalysts was measured in the temperature range 250-400 °C in a laboratory-scale reactor. All samples exposed for more than 240 hours proved to have deactivated significantly, however, catalysts exposed at 150 °C showed higher remaining activity......-scale setup at 350 °C for up to 1100 hours, and their activities were followed by in situ measurements. A 3%V2O5-7%WO3/TiO2 reference catalyst deactivated with a rate of 0.91 %/day during 960 hours of exposure, and a subsequent SEM-EDS analysis showed complete potassium penetration of the catalyst wall...

  20. Gamification of learning deactivates the Default Mode Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Alexander Howard-Jones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesised that embedding educational learning in a game would improve learning outcomes, with increased engagement and recruitment of cognitive resources evidenced by increased activation of working memory network (WMN and deactivation of Default Mode Network (DMN regions. In an fMRI study, we compared activity during periods of learning in three conditions that were increasingly game-like: Study-only (when periods of learning were followed by an exemplar question together with its correct answer, Self-quizzing (when periods of learning were followed by a multiple choice question in return for a fixed number of points and Game-based (when, following each period of learning, participants competed with a peer to answer the question for escalating, uncertain rewards. DMN hubs deactivated as conditions became more game-like, alongside greater self-reported engagement and, in the Game-based condition, higher learning scores. These changes did not occur with any detectable increase in WMN activity. Additionally, ventral striatal activation was associated with responding to questions and receiving positive question feedback. Results support the significance of DMN deactivation for educational learning, and are aligned with recent evidence suggesting DMN and WMN activity may not always be anti-correlated.

  1. Gamification of Learning Deactivates the Default Mode Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Jones, Paul A; Jay, Tim; Mason, Alice; Jones, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that embedding educational learning in a game would improve learning outcomes, with increased engagement and recruitment of cognitive resources evidenced by increased activation of working memory network (WMN) and deactivation of default mode network (DMN) regions. In an fMRI study, we compared activity during periods of learning in three conditions that were increasingly game-like: Study-only (when periods of learning were followed by an exemplar question together with its correct answer), Self-quizzing (when periods of learning were followed by a multiple choice question in return for a fixed number of points) and Game-based (when, following each period of learning, participants competed with a peer to answer the question for escalating, uncertain rewards). DMN hubs deactivated as conditions became more game-like, alongside greater self-reported engagement and, in the Game-based condition, higher learning scores. These changes did not occur with any detectable increase in WMN activity. Additionally, ventral striatal activation was associated with responding to questions and receiving positive question feedback. Results support the significance of DMN deactivation for educational learning, and are aligned with recent evidence suggesting DMN and WMN activity may not always be anti-correlated.

  2. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1990-10-11

    This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the thirteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made on the testing of the system hardware and software. H{sub 2} chemisorption capacities and activity selectivity data were also measured for three iron catalysts promoted with 1% alumina. 47 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs) are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice). Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist), IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist), or FR139317 (ETA antagonist) prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  4. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotaro Michinaga

    Full Text Available Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice. Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist, IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist, or FR139317 (ETA antagonist prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  5. Negative BOLD in sensory cortices during verbal memory: a component in generating internal representations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azulay, Haim; Striem, Ella; Amedi, Amir

    2009-05-01

    People tend to close their eyes when trying to retrieve an event or a visual image from memory. However the brain mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Recently, we showed that during visual mental imagery, auditory areas show a much more robust deactivation than during visual perception. Here we ask whether this is a special case of a more general phenomenon involving retrieval of intrinsic, internally stored information, which would result in crossmodal deactivations in other sensory cortices which are irrelevant to the task at hand. To test this hypothesis, a group of 9 sighted individuals were scanned while performing a memory retrieval task for highly abstract words (i.e., with low imaginability scores). We also scanned a group of 10 congenitally blind, which by definition do not have any visual imagery per se. In sighted subjects, both auditory and visual areas were robustly deactivated during memory retrieval, whereas in the blind the auditory cortex was deactivated while visual areas, shown previously to be relevant for this task, presented a positive BOLD signal. These results suggest that deactivation may be most prominent in task-irrelevant sensory cortices whenever there is a need for retrieval or manipulation of internally stored representations. Thus, there is a task-dependent balance of activation and deactivation that might allow maximization of resources and filtering out of non relevant information to enable allocation of attention to the required task. Furthermore, these results suggest that the balance between positive and negative BOLD might be crucial to our understanding of a large variety of intrinsic and extrinsic tasks including high-level cognitive functions, sensory processing and multisensory integration.

  6. Perturbations in reward-related decision-making induced by reduced prefrontal cortical GABA transmission: Relevance for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantadosi, Patrick T; Khayambashi, Shahin; Schluter, Magdalen G; Kutarna, Agnes; Floresco, Stan B

    2016-02-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critical for higher-order cognitive functions, including decision-making. In psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, prefrontal dysfunction co-occurs with pronounced alterations in decision-making ability. These alterations include a diminished ability to utilize probabilistic reinforcement in guiding future choice, and a reduced willingness to expend effort to receive reward. Among the neurochemical abnormalities observed in the PFC of individuals with schizophrenia are alterations in the production and function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To probe how PFC GABA hypofunction may contribute to alterations in cost/benefit decision-making, we assessed the effects GABAA-receptor antagonist bicuculline (BIC; 50 ng in 0.5 μl saline/hemisphere) infusion in the medial PFC of rats during performance on a series of well-validated cost/benefit decision-making tasks. Intra-PFC BIC reduced risky choice and reward sensitivity during probabilistic discounting and decreased the preference for larger rewards associated with a greater effort cost, similar to the behavioral sequelae observed in schizophrenia. Additional experiments revealed that these treatments did not alter instrumental responding on a progressive ratio schedule, nor did they impair the ability to discriminate between reward and no reward. However, BIC induced a subtle but consistent impairment in preference for larger vs. smaller rewards of equal cost. BIC infusion also increased decision latencies and impaired the ability to "stay on task" as indexed by reduced rates of instrumental responding. Collectively, these results implicate prefrontal GABAergic dysfunction as a key contributing factor to abnormal decision-making observed in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions with similar neurobiological and behavioral alterations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nrdp1 Increases Ischemia Induced Primary Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons and Pheochromocytoma Cells Apoptosis Via Downregulation of HIF-1α Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin receptor degradation protein-1 (Nrdp1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets proteins for degradation and regulates cell growth, apoptosis and oxidative stress in various cell types. We have previously shown that Nrdp1 is implicated in ischemic cardiomyocyte death. In this study, we investigated the change of Nrdp1 expression in ischemic neurons and its role in ischemic neuronal injury. Primary rat cerebral cortical neurons and pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells were infected with adenoviral constructs expressing Nrdp1 gene or its siRNA before exposing to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD treatment. Our data showed that Nrdp1 was upregulated in ischemic brain tissue 3 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and in OGD-treated neurons. Of note, Nrdp1 overexpression by Ad-Nrdp1 enhanced OGD-induced neuron apoptosis, while knockdown of Nrdp1 with siRNA attenuated this effect, implicating a role of Nrdp1 in ischemic neuron injury. Moreover, Nrdp1 upregulation is accompanied by increased protein ubiquitylation and decreased protein levels of ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8 in OGD-treated neurons, which led to a suppressed interaction between USP8 and HIF-1α and subsequently a reduction in HIF-1α protein accumulation in neurons under OGD conditions. In conclusion, our data support an important role of Nrdp1 upregulation in ischemic neuronal death, and suppressing the interaction between USP8 and HIF-1α and consequently the hypoxic adaptive response of neurons may account for this detrimental effect.

  8. Engineering Phase 2 and Phase 3 certification programs -- PUREX deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the training programs required to become a Phase 2 and Phase 3 certified engineer at PUREX during deactivation. With the change in mission, the PUREX engineering/certification training program is being revamped as discussed below. The revised program will be administered by PUREX Technical Training using existing courses and training materials. The program will comply with the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) order 5480.20A, ''Personnel Selection, Qualification, Training, and Staffing Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.''

  9. Engineering Phase 2 and Phase 3 certification programs -- PUREX deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walser, R.L.

    1994-12-13

    This document describes the training programs required to become a Phase 2 and Phase 3 certified engineer at PUREX during deactivation. With the change in mission, the PUREX engineering/certification training program is being revamped as discussed below. The revised program will be administered by PUREX Technical Training using existing courses and training materials. The program will comply with the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) order 5480.20A, ``Personnel Selection, Qualification, Training, and Staffing Requirements at DOE Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.``

  10. PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-09-19

    Disconnecting the criticality alarm permanently in June 1996 signified that the hazards in the PUREX (plutonium-uranium extraction) plant had been so removed and reduced that criticality was no longer a credible event. Turning off the PUREX criticality alarm also marked a salient point in a historic deactivation project, 1 year before its anticipated conclusion. The PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project began in October 1993 as a 5-year, $222.5- million project. As a result of innovations implemented during 1994 and 1995, the project schedule was shortened by over a year, with concomitant savings. In 1994, the innovations included arranging to send contaminated nitric acid from the PUREX Plant to British Nuclear Fuels, Limited (BNFL) for reuse and sending metal solutions containing plutonium and uranium from PUREX to the Hanford Site tank farms. These two steps saved the project $36.9- million. In 1995, reductions in overhead rate, work scope, and budget, along with curtailed capital equipment expenditures, reduced the cost another $25.6 million. These savings were achieved by using activity-based cost estimating and applying technical schedule enhancements. In 1996, a series of changes brought about under the general concept of ``reengineering`` reduced the cost approximately another $15 million, and moved the completion date to May 1997. With the total savings projected at about $75 million, or 33.7 percent of the originally projected cost, understanding how the changes came about, what decisions were made, and why they were made becomes important. At the same time sweeping changes in the cultural of the Hanford Site were taking place. These changes included shifting employee relations and work structures, introducing new philosophies and methods in maintaining safety and complying with regulations, using electronic technology to manage information, and, adopting new methods and bases for evaluating progress. Because these changes helped generate cost savings and were

  11. Rupture loop annex ion exchange RLAIX vault deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, J.E.; Harris, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This engineering report documents the deactivation, stabilization and final conditions of the Rupture Loop Annex Ion Exchange (RLAIX) Vault located northwest of the 309 Building`s Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR). Twelve ion exchange columns, piping debris, and column liquid were removed from the vault, packaged and shipped for disposal. The vault walls and floor were decontaminated, and portions of the vault were painted to fix loose contamination. Process piping and drains were plugged, and the cover blocks and rain cover were installed. Upon closure,the vault was empty, stabilized, isolated.

  12. Impaired secondary oxidant deactivation capacity and enhanced oxidative stress in serum from alveld affected lambs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegge, Anne Bee; Mysterud, Ivar; Karlsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Alveld is a hepatogenous photosensitivity disorder in lambs. The aim of the study was to investigate if alveld affected lambs had a reduced capacity to handle oxidative stress induced from either endogenous and/or exogenous photosensitizers. Serum samples from alveld lambs (n=33) were compared...... to serum samples from control lambs (n=31) and exposed to a controlled amount of singlet oxygen ((1)O2). The sera from alveld lambs were found to have an impaired ability to deactivate reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to control sera. A higher degree of initial hemolysis and a higher concentration...... in pooled serum from alveld lambs that showed a high degree of hemolysis. It was concluded that alveld photosensitivity is likely to be initiated by a photodynamic reaction involving PP and possibly also PP IX followed by a light-independent reaction involving hemoglobin-related products and catalysis...

  13. The hominoid-specific gene TBC1D3 promotes generation of basal neural progenitors and induces cortical folding in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiang-Chun; Hou, Qiong-Qiong; Sheng, Ai-Li; Wu, Kong-Yan; Zhou, Yang; Jin, Ying; Wen, Tieqiao; Yang, Zhengang; Wang, Xiaoqun; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2016-01-01

    Cortical expansion and folding are often linked to the evolution of higher intelligence, but molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying cortical folding remain poorly understood. The hominoid-specific gene TBC1D3 undergoes segmental duplications during hominoid evolution, but its role in brain development has not been explored. Here, we found that expression of TBC1D3 in ventricular cortical progenitors of mice via in utero electroporation caused delamination of ventricular radial glia cells (vRGs) and promoted generation of self-renewing basal progenitors with typical morphology of outer radial glia (oRG), which are most abundant in primates. Furthermore, down-regulation of TBC1D3 in cultured human brain slices decreased generation of oRGs. Interestingly, localized oRG proliferation resulting from either in utero electroporation or transgenic expression of TBC1D3, was often found to underlie cortical regions exhibiting folding. Thus, we have identified a hominoid gene that is required for oRG generation in regulating the cortical expansion and folding. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18197.001 PMID:27504805

  14. Characterization and Regeneration of Pt-Catalysts Deactivated in Municipal Waste Flue Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Kustov, Arkadii; Due-Hansen, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Severe deactivation was observed for industrially aged catalysts used in waste incineration plants and tested in lab-scale. Possible compounds that cause deactivation of these Pt-based CO oxidation catalysts have been studied. Kinetic observations of industrial and model catalysts showed...... that siloxanes were the most severe catalyst poisons, although acidic sulfur compounds also caused deactivation. Furthermore, a method for on-site regeneration without shutdown of the catalytic flue gas cleaning system has been developed, i.e. an addition of H-2/N-2 gas to the off-gas can completely restore...... the activity of the deactivated catalysts. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  15. Deactivation of nickel catalysts in the methanization of hydrogen/carbon monoxide mixtures under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeeb, H P

    1979-01-01

    The deactivation course of nickel methanization catalysts was investigated in the temperature range of 310/sup 0/C to 370/sup 0/C and in the pressure region of 20 to 80 bar. Raising the CO partial pressure accelerated the deactivation whereas raising the H/sub 2/ partial pressure slowed it down. An influence of the temperature could not be clearly recognized. The deactivation got slower with greater dwell time and larger degree of conversion. Two hypotheses to explain the deactivation are given.

  16. Thermal stress analysis of sulfur deactivated solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shumao; Parbey, Joseph; Yu, Guangsen; Xu, Min; Li, Tingshuai; Andersson, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide in fuels can deactivate catalyst for solid oxide fuel cells, which has become one of the most critical challenges to stability. The reactions between sulfur and catalyst will cause phase changes, leading to increase in cell polarization and mechanical mismatch. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach based on the finite element method (FEM) is thus used to investigate the polarization, temperature and thermal stress in a sulfur deactivated SOFC by coupling equations for gas-phase species, heat, momentum, ion and electron transport. The results indicate that sulfur in fuels can strongly affect the cell polarization and thermal stresses, which shows a sharp decrease in the vicinity of electrolyte when 10% nickel in the functional layer is poisoned, but they remain almost unchanged even when the poisoned Ni content was increased to 90%. This investigation is helpful to deeply understand the sulfur poisoning effects and also benefit the material design and optimization of electrode structure to enhance cell performance and lifetimes in various hydrocarbon fuels containing impurities.

  17. Dopaminergic Modulation of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in Parkinson Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders H. Andersen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is associated with emotional abnormalities. Dopaminergic medications ameliorate Parkinsonian motor symptoms, but less is known regarding the impact of dopaminergic agents on affective processing, particularly in depressed PD (dPD patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on brain activation to emotional stimuli in depressed versus nondepressed Parkinson disease (ndPD patients. Participants included 18 ndPD patients (11 men, 7 women and 10 dPD patients (7 men, 3 women. Patients viewed photographs of emotional faces during functional MRI. Scans were performed while the patient was taking anti-Parkinson medication and the day after medication had been temporarily discontinued. Results indicate that dopaminergic medications have opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex depending upon depression status. DPD patients show greater deactivation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC on dopaminergic medications than off, while ndPD patients show greater deactivation in this region off drugs. The VMPFC is in the default-mode network (DMN. DMN activity is negatively correlated with activity in brain systems used for external visual attention. Thus dopaminergic medications may promote increased attention to external visual stimuli among dPD patients but impede normal suppression of DMN activity during external stimulation among ndPD patients.

  18. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-09-01

    The term 'cortical tremor' was first introduced by Ikeda and colleagues to indicate a postural and action-induced shivering movement of the hands which mimics essential tremor, but presents with the electrophysiological findings of cortical reflex myoclonus. The association between autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy (ADCME) was first recognized in Japanese families and is now increasingly reported worldwide, although it is described using different acronyms (BAFME, FAME, FEME, FCTE and others). The disease usually takes a benign course, although drug-resistant focal seizures or slight intellectual disability occur in some cases. Moreover, a worsening of cortical tremor and myoclonus is common in advanced age. Although not yet recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), this is a well-delineated epilepsy syndrome with remarkable features that clearly distinguishes it from other myoclonus epilepsies. Moreover, genetic studies of these families show heterogeneity and different susceptible chromosomal loci have been identified.

  19. Functional connections between activated and deactivated brain regions mediate emotional interference during externally directed cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Plinio, Simone; Ferri, Francesca; Marzetti, Laura; Romani, Gian Luca; Northoff, Georg; Pizzella, Vittorio

    2018-04-24

    Recent evidence shows that task-deactivations are functionally relevant for cognitive performance. Indeed, higher cognitive engagement has been associated with higher suppression of activity in task-deactivated brain regions - usually ascribed to the Default Mode Network (DMN). Moreover, a negative correlation between these regions and areas actively engaged by the task is associated with better performance. DMN regions show positive modulation during autobiographical, social, and emotional tasks. However, it is not clear how processing of emotional stimuli affects the interplay between the DMN and executive brain regions. We studied this interplay in an fMRI experiment using emotional negative stimuli as distractors. Activity modulations induced by the emotional interference of negative stimuli were found in frontal, parietal, and visual areas, and were associated with modulations of functional connectivity between these task-activated areas and DMN regions. A worse performance was predicted both by lower activity in the superior parietal cortex and higher connectivity between visual areas and frontal DMN regions. Connectivity between right inferior frontal gyrus and several DMN regions in the left hemisphere was related to the behavioral performance. This relation was weaker in the negative than in the neutral condition, likely suggesting less functional inhibitions of DMN regions during emotional processing. These results show that both executive and DMN regions are crucial for the emotional interference process and suggest that DMN connections are related to the interplay between externally-directed and internally-focused processes. Among DMN regions, superior frontal gyrus may be a key node in regulating the interference triggered by emotional stimuli. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Model dependences of the deactivation of phytoplankton pigment excitation energy on environmental conditions in the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Ostrowska

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical, physical models have been derived of the quantum yield ofthe deactivation processes (fluorescence, photosynthesis and heat productionof excited states in phytoplankton pigment molecules. Besides some alreadyknown models (photosynthesis and fluorescence, this novel approachincorporates the dependence of the dissipation yield of the excitation energyin phytoplankton pigment molecules on heat. The quantitative dependences ofthe quantum yields of these three processes on three fundamental parameters ofthe marine environment are defined: the chlorophyll concentration in the surface water layer Ca(0 (the basin trophicity,the irradiance PAR(z and the temperature temp(z at the study site.The model is complemented with two other relevant models describing thequantum yield of photosynthesis and of natural Sun-Induced Chlorophyll a Fluorescence (SICF in the sea, derived earlier by the author or with herparticipation on the basis of statistical analyses of a vast amount ofempirical material. The model described in the present paper enables theestimation of the quantum yields of phytoplankton pigment heat production forany region and season, in waters of any trophicity at different depths fromthe surface to depths of ca 60 m. The model can therefore be used to estimatethe yields of these deactivation processes in more than half the thickness ofthe euphotic zone in oligotrophic waters and in the whole thickness (anddeeper of this zone in mesotrophic and eutrophic waters. In particular theserelationships may be useful for a component analysis of the budget of lightenergy absorbed by phytoplankton pigments, namely, its utilization influorescence, photochemical quenching and nonphotochemical radiationlessdissipation - i.e. direct heat production.

  1. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sype, T.T.; Fischer, S.R.; Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex

  2. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sype, T.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fischer, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex.

  3. Investigation and deactivation of B Plant HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roege, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the integrated approach used to manage environmental, safety, and health considerations related to the B Plant canyon exhaust air filters at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The narrative illustrates the development and implementation of integrated safety management as applied to a facility and its systems undergoing deactivation. During their lifetime, the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters prevented the release of significant quantities of radioactive materials into the air. As the material in B Plant AVESF accumulated on the filters, it created an unusual situation. Over long periods of time, the radiation dose from the filter loading, combined with aging and chemical exposure actually degrade those filters which were intended to protect against any release to the environment

  4. Studies of Deactivation of Methanol to Formaldehyde Selective Oxidation Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raun, Kristian Viegaard; Schumann, Max; Høj, Martin

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) may be synthesized industrially by selective oxidation of methanol over an iron-molybdate (Fe-Mo) oxide catalyst according to: CH3OH + ½O2 →CH2O + H2O. The reaction is normally carried out in a multitubular reactor with excess of air at 250-400 °C (yield = 90-95 %), known...... the activity of the catalyst [2]. Pure MoO3 in itself has low activity. Literature from the last decades agrees that the major reason for the deactivation is loss of molybdenum from the catalyst. Molybdenum forms volatile species with methanol, which can leave behind Mo poor zones. The catalyst is usually...

  5. Deactivation of Escherichia coli by the plasma needle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladek, R E J; Stoffels, E

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a parameter study on deactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) by means of a non-thermal plasma (plasma needle). The plasma needle is a small-sized (1 mm) atmospheric glow sustained by radio-frequency excitation. This plasma will be used to disinfect heat-sensitive objects; one of the intended applications is in vivo deactivation of dental bacteria: destruction of plaque and treatment of caries. We use E. coli films plated on agar dishes as a model system to optimize the conditions for bacterial destruction. Plasma power, treatment time and needle-to-sample distance are varied. Plasma treatment of E. coli films results in formation of a bacteria-free void with a size up to 12 mm. 10 4 -10 5 colony forming units are already destroyed after 10 s of treatment. Prolongation of treatment time and usage of high powers do not significantly improve the destruction efficiency: short exposure at low plasma power is sufficient. Furthermore, we study the effects of temperature increase on the survival of E. coli and compare it with thermal effects of the plasma. The population of E. coli heated in a warm water bath starts to decrease at temperatures above 40 deg. C. Sample temperature during plasma treatment has been monitored. The temperature can reach up to 60 deg. C at high plasma powers and short needle-to-sample distances. However, thermal effects cannot account for bacterial destruction at low power conditions. For safe and efficient in vivo disinfection, the sample temperature should be kept low. Thus, plasma power and treatment time should not exceed 150 mW and 60 s, respectively

  6. Deactivation of Escherichia coli by the plasma needle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladek, R E J; Stoffels, E [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2005-06-07

    In this paper we present a parameter study on deactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) by means of a non-thermal plasma (plasma needle). The plasma needle is a small-sized (1 mm) atmospheric glow sustained by radio-frequency excitation. This plasma will be used to disinfect heat-sensitive objects; one of the intended applications is in vivo deactivation of dental bacteria: destruction of plaque and treatment of caries. We use E. coli films plated on agar dishes as a model system to optimize the conditions for bacterial destruction. Plasma power, treatment time and needle-to-sample distance are varied. Plasma treatment of E. coli films results in formation of a bacteria-free void with a size up to 12 mm. 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} colony forming units are already destroyed after 10 s of treatment. Prolongation of treatment time and usage of high powers do not significantly improve the destruction efficiency: short exposure at low plasma power is sufficient. Furthermore, we study the effects of temperature increase on the survival of E. coli and compare it with thermal effects of the plasma. The population of E. coli heated in a warm water bath starts to decrease at temperatures above 40 deg. C. Sample temperature during plasma treatment has been monitored. The temperature can reach up to 60 deg. C at high plasma powers and short needle-to-sample distances. However, thermal effects cannot account for bacterial destruction at low power conditions. For safe and efficient in vivo disinfection, the sample temperature should be kept low. Thus, plasma power and treatment time should not exceed 150 mW and 60 s, respectively.

  7. β-Arrestin-dependent deactivation of mouse melanopsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan G Cameron

    Full Text Available In mammals, the expression of the unusual visual pigment, melanopsin, is restricted to a small subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs, whose signaling regulate numerous non-visual functions including sleep, circadian photoentrainment and pupillary constriction. IpRGCs exhibit attenuated electrical responses following sequential and prolonged light exposures indicative of an adaptational response. The molecular mechanisms underlying deactivation and adaptation in ipRGCs however, have yet to be fully elucidated. The role of melanopsin phosphorylation and β-arrestin binding in this adaptive process is suggested by the phosphorylation-dependent reduction of melanopsin signaling in vitro and the ubiquitous expression of β-arrestin in the retina. These observations, along with the conspicuous absence of visual arrestin in ipRGCs, suggest that a β-arrestin terminates melanopsin signaling. Here, we describe a light- and phosphorylation- dependent reduction in melanopsin signaling mediated by both β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2. Using an in vitro calcium imaging assay, we demonstrate that increasing the cellular concentration of β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2 significantly increases the rate of deactivation of light-activated melanopsin in HEK293 cells. Furthermore, we show that this response is dependent on melanopsin carboxyl-tail phosphorylation. Crosslinking and co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirm β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2 bind to melanopsin in a light- and phosphorylation- dependent manner. These data are further supported by proximity ligation assays (PLA, which demonstrate a melanopsin/β-arrestin interaction in HEK293 cells and ipRGCs. Together, these results suggest that melanopsin signaling is terminated in a light- and phosphorylation-dependent manner through the binding of a β-arrestin within the retina.

  8. Cortical actin networks induce spatio-temporal confinement of phospholipids in the plasma membrane--a minimally invasive investigation by STED-FCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Débora M; Clausen, Mathias P; Keller, Jan; Mueller, Veronika; Wu, Congying; Bear, James E; Hell, Stefan W; Lagerholm, B Christoffer; Eggeling, Christian

    2015-06-29

    Important discoveries in the last decades have changed our view of the plasma membrane organisation. Specifically, the cortical cytoskeleton has emerged as a key modulator of the lateral diffusion of membrane proteins. Cytoskeleton-dependent compartmentalised lipid diffusion has been proposed, but this concept remains controversial because this phenomenon has thus far only been observed with artefact-prone probes in combination with a single technique: single particle tracking. In this paper, we report the first direct observation of compartmentalised phospholipid diffusion in the plasma membrane of living cells using a minimally invasive, fluorescent dye labelled lipid analogue. These observations were made using optical STED nanoscopy in combination with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (STED-FCS), a technique which allows the study of membrane dynamics on a sub-millisecond time-scale and with a spatial resolution of down to 40 nm. Specifically, we find that compartmentalised phospholipid diffusion depends on the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and that this constrained diffusion is directly dependent on the F-actin branching nucleator Arp2/3. These findings provide solid evidence that the Arp2/3-dependent cortical actin cytoskeleton plays a pivotal role in the dynamic organisation of the plasma membrane, potentially regulating fundamental cellular processes.

  9. Cortical bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.M. Jr.; Rogers, L.F.; Hendrix, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-five cases of bone metastases involving the cortex alone are reviewed. Seven patients had primary lung carcinoma, while 18 had primary tumors not previously reported to produce cortical bone metastases (tumors of the breast, kidney, pancreas, adenocarcinoma of unknown origin, multiple myeloma). Radiographically, these cortical lesions were well circumscribed, osteolytic, and produced soft-tissue swelling and occasional periosteal reaction. A recurrent pattern of metadiaphyseal involvement of the long bones of the lower extremity (particularly the femur) was noted, and is discussed. Findings reported in the literature, review, pathophysiology, and the role of skeletal radiographs, bone scans, and CT scans in evaluating cortical bone metastases are addressed

  10. Deactivation and Regeneration of Commercial Type Fischer-Tropsch Co-Catalysts—A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling Rytter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deactivation of commercially relevant cobalt catalysts for Low Temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT synthesis is discussed with a focus on the two main long-term deactivation mechanisms proposed: Carbon deposits covering the catalytic surface and re-oxidation of the cobalt metal. There is a great variety in commercial, demonstration or pilot LTFT operations in terms of reactor systems employed, catalyst formulations and process conditions. Lack of sufficient data makes it difficult to correlate the deactivation mechanism with the actual process and catalyst design. It is well known that long term catalyst deactivation is sensitive to the conditions the actual catalyst experiences in the reactor. Therefore, great care should be taken during start-up, shutdown and upsets to monitor and control process variables such as reactant concentrations, pressure and temperature which greatly affect deactivation mechanism and rate. Nevertheless, evidence so far shows that carbon deposition is the main long-term deactivation mechanism for most LTFT operations. It is intriguing that some reports indicate a low deactivation rate for multi-channel micro-reactors. In situ rejuvenation and regeneration of Co catalysts are economically necessary for extending their life to several years. The review covers information from open sources, but with a particular focus on patent literature.

  11. Aberrant cortical associative plasticity associated with severe adult Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Ruiz-Rodríguez, María Adilia; Palomar, Francisco J; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas, Laura; Porcacchia, Paolo; Gómez-Crespo, Mercedes; Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Carrillo, Fátima; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Mir, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown altered cortical plasticity in adult patients with Tourette syndrome. However, the clinical significance of this finding remains elusive. Motor cortical plasticity was evaluated in 15 adult patients with severe Tourette syndrome and 16 healthy controls using the paired associative stimulation protocol by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Associations between paired associative stimulation-induced plasticity and relevant clinical variables, including cortical excitability, psychiatric comorbidities, drug treatment and tic severity, were assessed. Motor cortical plasticity was abnormally increased in patients with Tourette syndrome compared with healthy subjects. This abnormal plasticity was independently associated with tic severity. Patients with severe Tourette syndrome display abnormally increased cortical associative plasticity. This aberrant cortical plasticity was associated with tic severity, suggesting an underlying mechanism for tic pathophysiology. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Inhibition of Cathepsins B Induces Neuroprotection Against Secondary Degeneration in Ipsilateral Substantia Nigra After Focal Cortical Infarction in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xialin Zuo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in the world. In general, recovery from stroke is incomplete. Accumulating evidences have shown that focal cerebral infarction leads to dynamic trans-neuronal degeneration in non-ischemic remote brain regions, with the disruption of connections to synapsed neurons sustaining ischemic insults. Previously, we had reported that the ipsilateral striatum, thalamus degenerated in succession after permanent distal branch of middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats and cathepsin (Cath B was activated before these relay degeneration. Here, we investigate the role of CathB in the secondary degeneration of ipsilateral substantia nigra (SN after focal cortical infarction. We further examined whether the inhibition of CathB with L-3-trans-(Propyl-carbamoyloxirane-2-carbonyl-L-isoleucyl-L-proline methyl ester (CA-074Me would attenuate secondary degeneration through enhancing the cortico-striatum-nigral connections and contribute to the neuroprotective effects. Our results demonstrated that secondary degeneration in the ipsilateral SN occurred and CathB was upregulated in the ipsilateral SN after focal cortical infarction. The inhibition of CathB with CA-074Me reduced the neuronal loss and gliosis in the ipsilateral SN. Using biotinylated dextran amine (BDA or pseudorabies virus (PRV 152 as anterograde or retrograde tracer to trace striatum-nigral and cortico-nigral projections pathway, CA-074Me can effectively enhance the cortico-striatum-nigral connections and exert neuroprotection against secondary degeneration in the ipsilateral SN after cortical ischemia. Our study suggests that the lysosomal protease CathB mediates the secondary damage in the ipsilateral SN after dMCAO, thus it can be a promising neuroprotective target for the rehabilitation of stroke patients.

  13. The investigation of deactivation the tailings from sulphate uranium technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, V.I.; Knjazev, O.I.; Ruzin, L.I.; Smolnya, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of investigation is to decrease contamination of the environment from wastes, produced on treatment of uranium ores by traditional sulphate uranium technology. In the result of treatment the sulphate uranium leaching cakes by 1-3 M chloride or nitrate of alkali-earth metals solutions, the content of radium decrease till (2.4 - 3.0) x 10 -8 Ci/kg. Produced deactivating solutions in which the content of radium-226 and other natural radionuclides exceeds of ten times the limit of tolerance safe concentrations for water (5.4 x 10 -11 Ci/l Ra-226) further may be treated by sorption or extraction. Due to the reason we pay our attention to the class of non-traditional ion-exchangers, which is the micellar wastes from production of antibiotics (MPW). The problems of it's utilization is very acute. MPW from antibiotics generates everyday is amount of tens tones (on dried mass), contents till 80% of moisture and include in solid phase 50 - 95 % organics in the work we used MPW from erythromycin in form of dried powder with size of particles to 0.05 - 0.16 mm. The possibility of radionuclides extraction by mixture of D2EHPA with TBP or TOPO for nitric deactivated solutions are investigated. It was received the complete extraction Th-230 into organic phase and next concentration with high content of isotope Th-230. Ra-D and Po are not recovered by the extractant. Using the extractant preliminary saturated with barium permit to extract completely Ra from solution. The method purification of technological solutions from activity with using solid extractants - TVEKS was developed. The TVEKS samples on styren-divinylbenzen copolymer base with size 1.0 - 1.5 mm were synthesized. The solid carrier was impregnated by D2EHPA or PN-1200 extractant solution in kerosene and used for extraction of radioactive elements (mainly Ra) from chloride acid solutions with summary activity 8.7 x 10 -10 Ci/l. TVEKS was activated by barium to capacity 1-3 mg/l for increasing purification

  14. Memantine, a Low-Affinity NMDA Receptor Antagonist, Protects against Methylmercury-Induced Cytotoxicity of Rat Primary Cultured Cortical Neurons, Involvement of Ca2+ Dyshomeostasis Antagonism, and Indirect Antioxidation Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhaofa; Yang, Tianyao; Xu, Bin; Deng, Yu; Feng, Shu

    2017-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an extremely dangerous environmental pollutant that induces severe toxic effects in the central nervous system. Neuronal damage plays critical roles mediating MeHg-induced loss of brain function and neurotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms of MeHg neurotoxicity are incompletely understood. The objective of the study is to explore mechanisms that contribute to MeHg-induced neurocyte injuries focusing on neuronal Ca 2+ dyshomeostasis and alteration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) expression, as well as oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of memantine against MeHg cytotoxicity were also investigated. The cortical neurons were exposed to 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, or 2 μM methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) for 0.5-12 h, or pre-treated with 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 μM memantine for 0.5-6 h, respectively; cell viability and LDH release were then quantified. For further experiments, 2.5, 5, and 10 μM of memantine pre-treatment for 3 h followed by 1 μM MeHgCl for 6 h were performed for evaluation of neuronal injuries, specifically addressing apoptosis; intracellular free Ca 2+ concentrations; ATPase activities; calpain activities; expressions of NMDAR subunits (NR1, NR2A, NR2B); NPSH levels; and ROS formation. Exposure of MeHgCl resulted in toxicity of cortical neurons, which were shown as a loss of cell viability, high levels of LDH release, morphological changes, and cell apoptosis. Moreover, intracellular Ca 2+ dyshomeostasis, ATPase activities inhibition, calpain activities, and NMDARs expression alteration were observed with 1 μM MeHgCl administration. Last but not least, NPSH depletion and reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction showed an obvious oxidative stress in neurons. However, memantine pre-treatment dose-dependently antagonized MeHg-induced neuronal toxic effects, apoptosis, Ca 2+ dyshomeostasis, NMDARs expression alteration, and oxidative stress. In conclusion, the

  15. Impaired social interaction and enhanced sensitivity to phencyclidine-induced deficits in novel object recognition in rats with cortical cholinergic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, S; Kehr, J; Olson, L; Mattsson, A

    2011-11-10

    Dysregulated cholinergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, particularly negative symptoms and cognitive deficits. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of neocortical cholinergic innervation and of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) on social interaction and novel object recognition (NOR), a declarative memory task. The cholinergic corticopetal projection was lesioned by local infusion of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin into nucleus basalis magnocellularis of adult male Lister hooded rats. Behavior was assessed 2.5 weeks later in a social interaction paradigm followed by the NOR task. We found that selective cholinergic denervation of neocortex led to a significant reduction in duration of social interaction, specifically active social interaction. Acute administration of PCP (1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) caused a marked decrease of active social interaction, such that there was no longer a difference between intact and denervated animals. Neither cholinergic denervation alone, nor PCP (1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) alone blocked the ability of rats to recognize a novel object. However, when animals lacking cortical cholinergic innervation were challenged by PCP, they were no longer able to recognize a novel object. This study indicates that rats lacking cholinergic innervation of neocortex have impaired social interaction and specifically that the duration of active contact is shortened. Animals with severe cortical cholinergic hypofunction maintain the ability to perform in a declarative memory test, although the task is carried out less intensively. However, a provocation of psychosis-like behavior by a dose of PCP that does not by itself impair performance in normal animals, will abolish the ability to recognize novel objects in animals lacking cortical cholinergic innervation. The present findings support a possible role for cortical cholinergic hypofunction in the negative and cognitive

  16. Cylinder deactivation for valve trains with roller finger follower; Zylinderabschaltung fuer Ventiltriebe mit Rollenschlepphebeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Hermann; Loch, Adam; Widmann, Richard [Mahle International GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). Zentrale Voraussentwicklung; Kreussen, Gerhard; Rebbert, Martin [FEV Motorentechnik GmbH, Aachen (Germany). Abt. Dynamik; Meehsen, Daniel [FEV Motorentechnik GmbH, Aachen (Germany). Abt. Mechanik Versuch

    2009-04-15

    Cylinder deactivation increases efficiency of gasoline engines without negative effects in terms of exhaust gas emissions or driving dynamics. In particular, the advantageous cost/benefit ratio and great affinity to technologies currently used in gasoline engines support cylinder deactivation as the right path in meeting future market demands. The design and function of cylinder deactivation for valve trains with roller finger follower will be explained and examined with regard to functional aspects, such as stiffness, mass, and kinematic behavior. Based on initial results, design and production characteristics of this new technology are evaluated and technical control interactions in engine applications are presented by Mahle. (orig.)

  17. Calpain activation and disturbance of autophagy are induced in cortical neurons in vitro by exposure to HA/β-Ga2O3:Cr3+ nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yu; Wang, Chengkun; Jiang, Quan; Sun, Xiaoyi; Du, Yongzhong; Zhu, Yaofeng; Lu, Yingmei

    2018-01-01

    The toxicity of engineered nanoparticles remains a concern. The knowledge of biohazards associated with particular nanoparticles is crucial to make this cutting-edge technology more beneficial and safe. Here, we evaluated the toxicity of Ga 2 O 3 nanoparticles (NPs), which are frequently used to enhance the performance of metal catalysts in a variety of catalytic reactions. The potential inflammatory signaling associated with the toxicity of HA/β-Ga 2 O 3 :Cr 3+ NPs in primary cortical neurons was examined. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis in neurons following various concentrations (0, 1, 5, 25, 50, 100 µg/ml) of HA/β-Ga 2 O 3 :Cr 3+ NPs treatment. Consistently, constitutively active forms of calcineurin (48 kDa) were significantly elevated in cultured primary cortical neurons, which was consistent with calpain activation indicated by the breakdown products of spectrin. Moreover, HA/β-Ga 2 O 3 :Cr 3+ NPs result in the elevation of LC3-II formation, SQSTM/p62, and Cathepsin B, whereas phosphorylation of CaMKII (Thr286) and Synapsin I (Ser603) were downregulated in the same context. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that calpain activation and a disturbance of autophagy signaling are evoked by exposure to HA/β-Ga 2 O 3 :Cr 3+ NPs, which may contribute to neuronal injury in vitro .

  18. Calpain activation and disturbance of autophagy are induced in cortical neurons in vitro by exposure to HA/β-Ga2O3:Cr3+ nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of engineered nanoparticles remains a concern. The knowledge of biohazards associated with particular nanoparticles is crucial to make this cutting-edge technology more beneficial and safe. Here, we evaluated the toxicity of Ga2O3 nanoparticles (NPs, which are frequently used to enhance the performance of metal catalysts in a variety of catalytic reactions. The potential inflammatory signaling associated with the toxicity of HA/β-Ga2O3:Cr3+ NPs in primary cortical neurons was examined. We observed a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis in neurons following various concentrations (0, 1, 5, 25, 50, 100 µg/ml of HA/β-Ga2O3:Cr3+ NPs treatment. Consistently, constitutively active forms of calcineurin (48 kDa were significantly elevated in cultured primary cortical neurons, which was consistent with calpain activation indicated by the breakdown products of spectrin. Moreover, HA/β-Ga2O3:Cr3+ NPs result in the elevation of LC3-II formation, SQSTM/p62, and Cathepsin B, whereas phosphorylation of CaMKII (Thr286 and Synapsin I (Ser603 were downregulated in the same context. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that calpain activation and a disturbance of autophagy signaling are evoked by exposure to HA/β-Ga2O3:Cr3+ NPs, which may contribute to neuronal injury in vitro.

  19. Isotopes facilities deactivation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eversole, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    The production and distribution of radioisotopes for medical, scientific, and industrial applications has been a major activity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since the late 1940s. As the demand for many of these isotopes grew and their sale became profitable, the technology for the production of the isotopes was transferred to private industry, and thus, many of the production facilities at ORNL became underutilized. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) instructed ORNL to identify and prepare various isotopes production facilities for safe shutdown. In response, ORNL identified 19 candidate facilities for shutdown and established the Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program. In 1993, responsibility for the program was transitioned from the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to the DOE Office of Environmental Management and Uranium Enrichment Operation`s Office of Facility Transition and Management. The program was retitled the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP), and implementation responsibility was transferred from ORNL to the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES), Environmental Restoration (ER) Program.

  20. Isotopes facilities deactivation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eversole, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    The production and distribution of radioisotopes for medical, scientific, and industrial applications has been a major activity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since the late 1940s. As the demand for many of these isotopes grew and their sale became profitable, the technology for the production of the isotopes was transferred to private industry, and thus, many of the production facilities at ORNL became underutilized. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) instructed ORNL to identify and prepare various isotopes production facilities for safe shutdown. In response, ORNL identified 19 candidate facilities for shutdown and established the Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program. In 1993, responsibility for the program was transitioned from the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to the DOE Office of Environmental Management and Uranium Enrichment Operation's Office of Facility Transition and Management. The program was retitled the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP), and implementation responsibility was transferred from ORNL to the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES), Environmental Restoration (ER) Program

  1. Soluble inhibitors/deactivators of cellulase enzymes from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngmi; Ximenes, Eduardo; Mosier, Nathan S; Ladisch, Michael R

    2011-04-07

    Liquid hot water, steam explosion, and dilute acid pretreatments of lignocellulose generate soluble inhibitors which hamper enzymatic hydrolysis as well as fermentation of sugars to ethanol. Toxic and inhibitory compounds will vary with pretreatment and include soluble sugars, furan derivatives (hydroxymethyl fulfural, furfural), organic acids (acetic, formic and, levulinic acid), and phenolic compounds. Their effect is seen when an increase in the concentration of pretreated biomass in a hydrolysis slurry results in decreased cellulose conversion, even though the ratio of enzyme to cellulose is kept constant. We used lignin-free cellulose, Solka Floc, combined with mixtures of soluble components released during pretreatment of wood, to prove that the decrease in the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis is due to a combination of enzyme inhibition and deactivation. The causative agents were extracted from wood pretreatment liquid using PEG surfactant, activated charcoal or ethyl acetate and then desorbed, recovered, and added back to a mixture of enzyme and cellulose. At enzyme loadings of either 1 or 25mg protein/g glucan, the most inhibitory components, later identified as phenolics, decreased the rate and extent of cellulose hydrolysis by half due to both inhibition and precipitation of the enzymes. Full enzyme activity occurred when the phenols were removed. Hence detoxification of pretreated woods through phenol removal is expected to reduce enzyme loadings, and therefore reduce enzyme costs, for a given level of cellulose conversion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A study of paint sludge deactivation by pyrolysis reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniz L.A.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of large quantities of paint sludge is a serious environmental problem. This work evaluates the use of pyrolysis reaction as a process for deactivating paint sludge that generates a combustible gas phase, a solvent liquid phase and an inert solid phase. These wastes were classified into three types: water-based solvent (latex resin and solvents based on their resins (alkyd and polyurethane. An electrically heated stainless steel batch reactor with a capacity of 579 mL and a maximum pressure of 30 atm was used. Following the reactor, a flash separator, which was operated at atmospheric pressure, partially condensed and separated liquid and gas products. Pressure and temperature were monitored on-line by a control and data acquisition system, which adjusted the heating power supplied to the pyrolysis reactor. Reactions followed an experimental design with two factors (reaction time and temperature and three levels (10, 50 and 90 minutes; 450, 550 and 650degreesC. The response variables were liquid and solid masses and net heat of combustion. The optimal operational range for the pyrolysis process was obtained for each response variable. A significant reduction in total mass of solid waste was obtained.

  3. Soot oxidation over NOx storage catalysts. Activity and deactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, K.; Makkee, M.

    2006-01-01

    Soot oxidation activity and deactivation of NO x storage and reduction (NSR) catalysts containing Pt, K, and Ba supported on Al 2 O 3 , are studied under a variety of reaction conditions. K-containing catalysts decrease soot oxidation temperature with O 2 alone and the presence of Pt further enhance the activity due to synergetic effect. The active species responsible for synergism on Pt/K-Al 2 O 3 are unstable and cannot be regenerated. Soot oxidation temperature decreases by about 150 o C with NO+O 2 exhaust feed gas and under lean conditions NSR system acts as catalysed soot filter (CSF). The reactions that are mainly responsible for decreasing soot oxidation temperature are: (1) soot oxidation with NO 2 followed by NO recycles to NO 2 , and (2) soot oxidation with O 2 assisted by NO 2 . Only a part of the stored NO x that is decomposed at high temperatures under lean conditions is found to be useful for soot oxidation. NO x storage capacity of NSR catalysts decreases upon ageing under soot oxidising conditions. This will lead to a decreased soot oxidation activity on stored nitrate decomposition. Pt/K-Al 2 O 3 catalyst is more active, but least stable compared with Pt/Ba-Al 2 O 3 . (author)

  4. Partridgeberry polyphenols protect rat primary cortical neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-reperfusion-induced injury via suppression of inflammatory adipokines and regulation of HIF-1α and PPARγ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Khushwant S; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective ability of partridgeberry polyphenols in rat primary cortical neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) injury in vitro and explore the underlying therapeutic mechanism(s). The OGD/R injury was induced in rat primary cortical neurons by incubation with deoxygenated glucose-free medium in a hypoxia chamber. The strongest activity in this regard was exhibited by partridgeberry-derived PPF2 and PPF3, i.e. the flavan-3-ol- and flavonol-rich polyphenol fractions of partridgeberry (P ≤ 0.05). Moreover, partridgeberry polyphenol pre-treatment reduced the membrane damage in primary neurons, as measured by the lactose dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay (P ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, PPF2 and PPF3 pre-treatment (100 µg ml(-1)) for 24 hours, before OGD/R, resulted in the strongest suppression of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α induction by OGD/R injury, compared with the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Additionally, the protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α) and PPARγ, quantified by ELISA presented a significant modulation following PPFs treatment (100 µg ml(-1)), favorably toward neuroprotection, compared with the respective controls after OGD/R injury in vitro (P ≤ 0.05). In summary, partridgeberry polyphenols at concentrations of 1-100 µg ml(-1), significantly induced a decline in OGD/R injury-triggered apoptosis in vitro, suppressed the inflammatory biomarkers in primary neurons, and modulated the activity of HIF-1α and proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) following hypoxic injury.

  5. Mass Spectrometric Determination of the Effect of Surface Deactivation on Membranes Used for In-Situ Sampling of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgny Undin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a strategy for structured monitoring of surface modifications to control protein adsorption to membrane structures is presented. The already established on-surface enzymatic digestion (oSED method combined with nano-liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS analysis was employed for the analysis of proteins in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (vCSF from neurointensive care patients. Protein adsorption was studied by in-situ sampling in a temporally resolved manner on both immobilized native and Pluronic-deactivated membranes. Deactivation was significantly reducing the protein adsorption but it also induced novel selective properties of the surface. The proposed versatile strategy will facilitate protein-biomaterial, protein-polymer, protein-protein interaction studies in the future.

  6. Integrated Project Management Planning for the Deactivation of the Savannah River Site F-Canyon Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, T.G.

    2000-12-01

    This paper explains the planning process that is being utilized by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company to take the F-Canyon Complex facilities from operations to a deactivated condition awaiting final decommissioning.

  7. Influence of mass transport towards deactivation in tert-butyl-source driven isobutane/2-butene alkylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschauer, S.J.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2011-07-01

    The deactivation of i-butane/trans-2-butene alkylation using tert-butyl-halide promoted ionic liquid catalysts is studied.Here, the mass transport was modified by varying the feed rate and the type of promoter addition. The experimental data show that the deactivation increases with increasing feed rate. Moreover, a biliquid foam is formed when feed rates above 1 g/min are adjusted. As the results indicate a strong influence of the biliquid foam and its formation on deactivation, both aspects are also discussed.When the promoter is added to the feed mixture an increase of conversion with time on stream is observed. A deactivation in continuous promoter addition mode could not be noted in the investigated time-on-stream range. (orig.)

  8. Selective deactivation of M13 bacteriophage in E. Coli using femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molukanele, P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Potential for the selective deactivation of viruses while leaving the sensitive material such as the host cell unharmed was studied using a femtosecond laser system, and preliminary results are reported....

  9. Patients' perspective on deactivation of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator near the end of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Chaitsing, Rismy; Szili-Torok, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    (67%) completed the survey. Most patients (68%) were aware that it is possible to turn the ICD off, and 95% believed it is important to inform patients about the possibility. Of the patients completing the survey, 84% indicated a choice for or against deactivation. Psychological morbidity......Recent guidelines have emphasized the importance of discussing the issue of deactivation near the end of life with patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). Few studies have examined the patient perspective and patients' wishes. We examined patients' knowledge and wishes...... for information; and the prevalence and correlates of a favorable attitude toward deactivation. Three cohorts of ICD patients (n = 440) extracted from our institutional database were asked to complete a survey that included a vignette about deactivation near the end of life. Of the 440 patients approached, 294...

  10. Vibrational deactivation and atom exchange in O(3P)+CO(X 1Σ+) collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, J.D.; Thommarson, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    A quasiclassical Monte Carlo averaged trajectory study of the ground-state O, CO collision system is presented. An ''effective'' adiabatic potential surface is constructed using pertinent theoretical and experimental data. Vibrational deactivation rates for CO(v=1, 3) and atom exchange rates for CO(v=0, 1, 3) are calculated and compared with experimental data. The high-temperature (400 K< T<2000 K) and low-temperature (270 K< T<400 K) CO deactivation data, and the low-temperature (300 K< T<400 K) atom exchange data are all fit reasonably well by the calculation. However, comparison of the deactivation data to the atom exchange data suggests that at temperatures below 400 K an additional nonadiabatic mechanism may be contributing to the overall deactivation rate

  11. The role of silicon interstitials in the deactivation and reactivation of high concentration boron profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboy, Maria [Campus Miguel Delibes, University of Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: marabo@tel.uva.es; Pelaz, Lourdes [Campus Miguel Delibes, University of Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Marques, Luis A. [Campus Miguel Delibes, University of Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Lopez, Pedro [Campus Miguel Delibes, University of Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Barbolla, Juan [Campus Miguel Delibes, University of Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Venezia, V.C. [Philips Research Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Duffy, R. [Philips Research Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Griffin, Peter B. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2004-12-15

    Boron cluster formation and dissolution in high concentration B profiles and the role of Si interstitials in these processes are analyzed by kinetic non-lattice Monte Carlo atomistic simulations. For this purpose, we use theoretical structures as simplifications of boron implants into preamorphized Si, followed by low-temperature solid phase epitaxial (SPE) regrowth or laser thermal annealing process. We observe that in the presence of high B concentrations (above 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}), significant deactivation occurs during high temperature anneal, even in the presence of only equilibrium Si interstitials. The presence of additional Si interstitials from an end of range (EOR) damage region accelerates the deactivation process and makes B deactivation slightly higher. We show that B deactivation and reactivation processes can be clearly correlated to the evolution of Si interstitial defects at the EOR. The minimum level of activation occurs when the Si interstitial defects at EOR dissolve or form very stable defects.

  12. Deactivation of group III acceptors in silicon during keV electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, C.; Sun, J.Y.; Tzou, J.J.; Pan, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental results on p-Si metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSC's) are presented which demonstrate the electrical deactivation of the acceptor dopant impurity during 8-keV electron irradiation not only in boron but also aluminum and indium-doped silicon. The deactivation rates of the acceptors during the 8-keV electron irradiation are nearly independent of the acceptor impurity type. The final density of the remaining active acceptor approaches nonzero values N/sub infinity/, with N/sub infinity/(B) Al--H>In-H. These deactivation results are consistent with our hydrogen bond model. The thermal annealing or regeneration rate of the deactivated acceptors in the MOSC's irradiated by 8-keV electron is much smaller than that in the MOSC's that have undergone avalanche electron injection, indicating that the keV electron irradiation gives rise to stronger hydrogen-acceptor bond

  13. Selective Deactivation of Gibberellins below the Shoot Apex is Critical to Flowering but Not to Stem Elongation of Lolium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Rod W; Mander, Lewis N; Asp, Torben

    2008-01-01

    in their effectiveness for flowering because they are deactivated by C-2 hydroxylation below the shoot apex. In contrast, GA5 is effective because of its structural protection at C-2. Excised vegetative shoot tips rapidly degrade [14C]GA1, [14C]GA4, and [14C]GA20 (>80% in 6 h), but not [14C]GA5. Coincidentally, genes...... encoding two 2β-oxidases and a putative 16-17-epoxidase were most expressed just below the shoot apex (4 mm), expression of these GA deactivation genes is reduced, so allowing GA1 and GA4 to promote sub-apical stem elongation. Subsequently, GA degradation declines...... in florally induced shoot tips and these GAs can become active for floral development. Structural changes which stabilize GA4 confirm the link between florigenicity and restricted GA 2β-hydroxylation (e.g. 2 -hydroxylation and C-2 di-methylation). Additionally, a 2-oxidase inhibitor (Trinexapac Ethyl...

  14. Dopamine Transporters in Striatum Correlate with Deactivation in the Default Mode Network during Visuospatial Attention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasi, D.; Fowler, J.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.L.; Telang, F.; Wang, Chang L.; Ernst, T.; Fowler, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Dopamine and dopamine transporters (DAT, which regulate extracellular dopamine in the brain) are implicated in the modulation of attention but their specific roles are not well understood. Here we hypothesized that dopamine modulates attention by facilitation of brain deactivation in the default mode network (DMN). Thus, higher striatal DAT levels, which would result in an enhanced clearance of dopamine and hence weaker dopamine signals, would be associated to lower deactivation in the DMN during an attention task. For this purpose we assessed the relationship between DAT in striatum (measured with positron emission tomography and [ 11 C]cocaine used as DAT radiotracer) and brain activation and deactivation during a parametric visual attention task (measured with blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging) in healthy controls. We show that DAT availability in caudate and putamen had a negative correlation with deactivation in ventral parietal regions of the DMN (precuneus, BA 7) and a positive correlation with deactivation in a small region in the ventral anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24/32). With increasing attentional load, DAT in caudate showed a negative correlation with load-related deactivation increases in precuneus. These findings provide evidence that dopamine transporters modulate neural activity in the DMN and anterior cingulate gyrus during visuospatial attention. Our findings suggest that dopamine modulates attention in part by regulating neuronal activity in posterior parietal cortex including precuneus (region involved in alertness) and cingulate gyrus (region deactivated in proportion to emotional interference). These findings suggest that the beneficial effects of stimulant medications (increase dopamine by blocking DAT) in inattention reflect in part their ability to facilitate the deactivation of the DMN.

  15. Deactivation and Regeneration of Commercial Type Fischer-Tropsch Co-Catalysts—A Mini-Review

    OpenAIRE

    Erling Rytter; Anders Holmen

    2015-01-01

    Deactivation of commercially relevant cobalt catalysts for Low Temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT) synthesis is discussed with a focus on the two main long-term deactivation mechanisms proposed: Carbon deposits covering the catalytic surface and re-oxidation of the cobalt metal. There is a great variety in commercial, demonstration or pilot LTFT operations in terms of reactor systems employed, catalyst formulations and process conditions. Lack of sufficient data makes it difficult to correlat...

  16. Decreased prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L; Douaihy, Antoine B; Frankle, W Gordon

    2014-08-01

    Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such as working memory, attention, inhibitory control, and risk/reward decisions, all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies of alcoholism that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, the authors hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in persons with alcohol dependence. To test this hypothesis, amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography were used to measure cortical dopamine transmission in 21 recently abstinent persons with alcohol dependence and 21 matched healthy comparison subjects. [11C]FLB 457 binding potential, specific compared to nondisplaceable uptake (BPND), was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg-1 of d-amphetamine. Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (ΔBPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in the alcohol-dependent group compared with the healthy comparison group. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in the alcohol-dependent group included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and medial temporal lobe. The results of this study, for the first time, unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism.

  17. Hexavalent chromium-induced differential disruption of cortical microtubules in some Fabaceae species is correlated with acetylation of α-tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Michalopoulou, Vasiliki A

    2016-03-01

    The effects of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on the cortical microtubules (MTs) of five species of the Fabaceae family (Vicia faba, Pisum sativum, Vigna sinensis, Vigna angularis, and Medicago sativa) were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy after immunolocalization of total tubulin with conventional immunofluorescence techniques and of acetylated α-tubulin with the specific 6-11B-1 monoclonal antibody. Moreover, total α-tubulin and acetylated α-tubulin were quantified by Western immunoblotting and scanning densitometry. Results showed the universality of Cr(VI) detrimental effects to cortical MTs, which proved to be a sensitive and reliable subcellular marker for monitoring Cr(VI) toxicity in plant cells. However, a species-specific response was recorded, and a correlation of MT disturbance with the acetylation status of α-tubulin was demonstrated. In V. faba, MTs were depolymerized at the gain of cytoplasmic tubulin background and displayed low α-tubulin acetylation, while in P. sativum, V. sinensis, V. angularis, and M. sativa, MTs became bundled and changed orientation from perpendicular to oblique or longitudinal. Bundled MTs were highly acetylated as determined by both immunofluorescence and Western immunoblotting. Tubulin acetylation in P. sativum and M. sativa preceded MT bundling; in V. sinensis it followed MT derangement, while in V. angularis the two phenomena coincided. Total α-tubulin remained constant in all treatments. Should acetylation be an indicator of MT stabilization, it is deduced that bundled MTs became stabilized, lost their dynamic properties, and were rendered inactive. Results of this report allow the conclusion that Cr(VI) toxicity disrupts MTs and deranges the MT-mediated functions either by depolymerizing or stabilizing them.

  18. Mapping cortical mesoscopic networks of single spiking cortical or sub-cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dongsheng; Vanni, Matthieu P; Mitelut, Catalin C; Chan, Allen W; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Xie, Yicheng; Chen, Andrew Cn; Swindale, Nicholas V; Murphy, Timothy H

    2017-02-04

    Understanding the basis of brain function requires knowledge of cortical operations over wide-spatial scales, but also within the context of single neurons. In vivo, wide-field GCaMP imaging and sub-cortical/cortical cellular electrophysiology were used in mice to investigate relationships between spontaneous single neuron spiking and mesoscopic cortical activity. We make use of a rich set of cortical activity motifs that are present in spontaneous activity in anesthetized and awake animals. A mesoscale spike-triggered averaging procedure allowed the identification of motifs that are preferentially linked to individual spiking neurons by employing genetically targeted indicators of neuronal activity. Thalamic neurons predicted and reported specific cycles of wide-scale cortical inhibition/excitation. In contrast, spike-triggered maps derived from single cortical neurons yielded spatio-temporal maps expected for regional cortical consensus function. This approach can define network relationships between any point source of neuronal spiking and mesoscale cortical maps.

  19. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D&D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also

  20. Sunlight technologies for photochemical deactivation of organic pollutants in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acher, A.; Fischer, E.; Tornheim, R. [The Volcani Center, Inst. of Soils and Water, Bet Dagan (Israel); Manor, Y. [Sheba Medical Center, Central Virology Lab., Ramat Gan (Israel)

    1997-12-31

    Sensitized-photochemical oxidation methods aimed at use in water treatment technologies for deactivation of biotic (microorganisms) and/or of xenobiotic (pesticides) pollutants in water were developed using global solar radiation or concentrated sunlight (up to 250 suns). The solar global radiation was used either for detoxification of industrial waste water from a pesticide factory to allow their discharge into the urban sewer, or for disinfection of domestric effluents to be used in crop irrigation. The disinfection process was eventually carried out in an experimental pilot-scale plant, capable of disinfection up to 50 m{sup 3}/h of effluent supplied by an activated sludge sewage treatment plant located in Tel-Aviv area. The treated effluents did not show any regrowth of the microorganisms during 7 days. The solar concentrated radiation experiments performed using facilities of the Sun Tower of The Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovot. The concentrated sunlight was provided by different combination of several computer controlled heliostates, up to 8, that track the sun and focus the received sunlight onto the target situated on the roof of the sun-tower. The sunlight intensities measured on the target reached up to 200 kW/m{sup 2}. The experiments were performed either batch- or continuous-wise. The water-samples exposed to disinfection were the above effluent, filtered and supplemented with vaccine strain poliovirus or with different concentrations of an industrial potential pollutant (bromacil), MB 2 mg/L and two concentrations of dissolved oxygen (8.0 or 40.0 mg O{sub 2}/L). An exposure time of 2-3 seconds at 150 kW/m{sup 2} was decreased the microorganisms alive (counts) by five orders of magnitude. A comparison between the two above water treatment technologies is presented. (orig./SR)

  1. Natural radionuclides in effluents release by a deactivated uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Kelecom, Alphonse; Silva, Ademir X.; Lopes, José M.; Pinto, Carlos E.C.; Py Júnior, Delcy A.; Antunes, Marcos M., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com, E-mail: caerjbr@gmail.com, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.br, E-mail: Antunes@inb.gov.br, E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com, E-mail: Ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: marqueslopes@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Veiga de Almeida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (COMAP.N/FCN/INB), Resende RJ (Brazil). Fábrica de Combustível Nuclear. Coordenação de Meio Ambiente e Proteção Radiológica Ambiental; Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil). Laboratório de Radiobiologia e Radiometria; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (OTU) is a mine and deactivated uranium plant in the city of Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil. This facility possesses three points of release of liquid effluents containing radionuclides: point 014, 025 and 076. At these points, the values of activity concentrations (AC) of the radionuclides U{sub nat}, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 232}Th and {sup 228}Ra were analyzed in 2012. The evaluation of point 014 by univariate statistics pointed four groups. [U{sub nat} > {sup 228}Ra > ({sup 226}Ra = {sup 210}Pb) >{sup 232}Th]. The multivariate statistics separated the radionuclides into two groups: [(U{sub nat} and {sup 232}Th) and ({sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb)]. At point 025, the univariate statistics described three groups: [Un{sub at} > ({sup 228}Ra = {sup 210}Pb) > ({sup 226}Ra = {sup 232}Th)] and the multivariate analysis also described three but different groups: [(U{sub nat} and {sup 228}Ra), ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb) and {sup 232}Th]. In turn, point 076 showed another behavior. The univariate analysis showed only two groups: [(U{sub nat}) > ({sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 232}Th)]. Differently, the multivariate statistics defined three groups: [(U{sub nat} and {sup 232}Th), ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) and {sup 210}Pb].Thus, statistical analysis showed that each point has releases of effluents with different characteristics. Both the behaviors of releases, based on multivariate statistics, and of the AC magnitudes, based on the univariate statistics, are different between the points. The only common features were the greater magnitude of uranium and the smaller magnitude of thorium. (author)

  2. Biomonitoring a human population inhabiting nearby a deactivated uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenço, J.; Pereira, R.; Pinto, F.; Caetano, T.; Silva, A.; Carvalheiro, T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Human population environmentally exposed to uranium mining wastes. ► Significantly higher levels of manganese and uranium in peripheral blood samples. ► Significant DNA damages detected by the comet assay. ► Significant decrease of NK and T lymphocytes counts in exposed individuals. ► Concerns on the risks of human populations living nearby uranium mining areas. - Abstract: Environmental exposure to uranium and its daughter radionuclides, has been linked to several negative effects such as those related with important physiological processes, like hematopoiesis, and may also be associated with genotoxicity effects. Herein, genotoxic effects, immunotoxicity, trace elements and C reactive protein (CRP) analyses, were performed in peripheral blood samples collected from individuals of a population living near a deactivated uranium mine. C reactive protein analysis was performed to exclude candidates with active inflammatory processes from further evaluations. DNA damage and immunotoxicity (immunophenotyping and immune cell counts) were evaluated by comet assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Significant DNA damage was observed in the peripheral blood samples from volunteers living in the Cunha Baixa village. A significant decrease of NK and T lymphocytes counts were observed in the individuals from the Cunha Baixa village, when compared with individuals from the reference site. Uranium and manganese levels were significantly higher in the Cunha Baixa village inhabitants. On the other hand, zinc levels were significantly lower in those individuals when compared with the volunteers from the control village. Results suggest that inhabitants from Cunha Baixa have a higher risk of suffering from serious diseases such as cancer, since high DNA damages were observed in peripheral blood leukocytes and also decreased levels of NK and T cells, which play an essential role in the defense against tumor growth

  3. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING (D AND D) TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ongoing task of making Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) operations more efficient, this subtask has addressed the need to integrate existing characterization technologies with decontamination technologies in order to provide real-time data on the progress of contamination removal. Specifically, technologies associated with concrete decontamination and/or removal have been examined with the goal of integrating existing technologies and commercializing the resulting hybrid. The Department of Energy (DOE) has estimated that 23 million cubic meters of concrete will require disposition as 1200 buildings undergo the D and D process. All concrete removal to be performed will also necessitate extensive use of characterization techniques. The in-process characterization presents the most potential for improvement and cost-savings as compared to other types. Current methods for in-process characterization usually require cessation of work to allow for radiation surveys to assess the rate of decontamination. Combining together decontamination and characterization technologies would allow for in-process evaluation of decontamination efforts. Since the present methods do not use in-process evaluations for the progress of decontamination, they may allow for ''overremoval'' of materials (removal of contaminated along with non-contaminated materials). Overremoval increases the volume of waste and therefore the costs associated with disposal. Integrating technologies would facilitate the removal of only contaminated concrete and reduce the total volume of radioactive waste, which would be disposed of. This would eventually ensure better productivity and time savings. This project presents a general procedure to integrate the above-mentioned technologies in the form of the Technology Integration Module (TIM) along with combination lists of commercially available decontamination and characterization technologies. The scope of the project has also been

  4. Exciplex formation and excited state deactivation of difluoroborondipyrromethene (Bodipy) dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benniston, Andrew C; Copley, Graeme; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Tkachenko, Nikolai V

    2010-06-07

    Two series of geometrically-related dyads are discussed based on the difluoroborondipyrromethene (Bodipy) unit, and incorporating covalently attached hydroquinone/quinone groups. These units are anchored directly, or via a phenylene spacer, to the Bodipy core at the meso position in one series (BD-MHQ, BD-MQ, BD-MPHQ, BD-MPQ), but for the second series the attachment site is the 2-position (BD-SHQ, BD-SQ, BD-SPHQ, BD-SPQ). The compounds show various levels of fluorescence depending on the oxidation state of the appended group and the substitution pattern. In non-polar solvents such as toluene, diethyl ether and dichlorobenzene, the S(1) state deactivation of the Bodipy unit in BD-SPQ and BD-MPQ is dominated by (1, 3)exciplex formation, which has not been reported for Bodipy derivatives so far. In the latter molecule, the decay of the exciplex is divided between population of the Bodipy triplet state (13 %-21 %) and ground state reformation. This partitioning is not seen for the side-on substituted derivative, BD-SPQ, and only ground state reformation is observed following decay of the exciplex. This difference in behavior is explained by the radical-pair inter-system-crossing mechanism, which more effectively operates in BD-MPQ because of the orthogonality of the donor-acceptor units. In the more polar solvent CH(3)CN all the quinone derivatives show fast formation of the charge-separated state (k(CS)) followed by slower charge recombination (k(CR)). The ratio k(CS)/k(CR)

  5. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Thom, M; Ellison, DW; Wilkins, P; Barnes, D; Thompson, PD; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. Background: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  6. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, M. A.; Thom, M.; Ellison, D. W.; Wilkins, P.; Barnes, D.; Thompson, P. D.; Brown, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. BACKGROUND: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  7. Nuclear fuel reprocessing deactivation plan for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.W.

    1994-10-01

    The decision was announced on April 28, 1992 to cease all United States Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels. This decision leads to the deactivation of all fuels dissolution, solvent extraction, krypton gas recovery operations, and product denitration at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The reprocessing facilities will be converted to a safe and stable shutdown condition awaiting future alternate uses or decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). This ICPP Deactivation Plan includes the scope of work, schedule, costs, and associated staffing levels necessary to achieve a safe and orderly deactivation of reprocessing activities and the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). Deactivation activities primarily involve shutdown of operating systems and buildings, fissile and hazardous material removal, and related activities. A minimum required level of continued surveillance and maintenance is planned for each facility/process system to ensure necessary environmental, health, and safety margins are maintained and to support ongoing operations for ICPP facilities that are not being deactivated. Management of the ICPP was transferred from Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) to Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on October 1, 1994 as part of the INEL consolidated contract. This revision of the deactivation plan (formerly the Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Phaseout Plan for the ICPP) is being published during the consolidation of the INEL site-wide contract and the information presented here is current as of October 31, 1994. LITCO has adopted the existing plans for the deactivation of ICPP reprocessing facilities and the plans developed under WINCO are still being actively pursued, although the change in management may result in changes which have not yet been identified. Accordingly, the contents of this plan are subject to revision

  8. Differential deactivation during mentalizing and classification of autism based on default mode network connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna L Murdaugh

    Full Text Available The default mode network (DMN is a collection of brain areas found to be consistently deactivated during task performance. Previous neuroimaging studies of resting state have revealed reduced task-related deactivation of this network in autism. We investigated the DMN in 13 high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and 14 typically developing control participants during three fMRI studies (two language tasks and a Theory-of-Mind (ToM task. Each study had separate blocks of fixation/resting baseline. The data from the task blocks and fixation blocks were collated to examine deactivation and functional connectivity. Deficits in the deactivation of the DMN in individuals with ASD were specific only to the ToM task, with no group differences in deactivation during the language tasks or a combined language and self-other discrimination task. During rest blocks following the ToM task, the ASD group showed less deactivation than the control group in a number of DMN regions, including medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC, anterior cingulate cortex, and posterior cingulate gyrus/precuneus. In addition, we found weaker functional connectivity of the MPFC in individuals with ASD compared to controls. Furthermore, we were able to reliably classify participants into ASD or typically developing control groups based on both the whole-brain and seed-based connectivity patterns with accuracy up to 96.3%. These findings indicate that deactivation and connectivity of the DMN were altered in individuals with ASD. In addition, these findings suggest that the deficits in DMN connectivity could be a neural signature that can be used for classifying an individual as belonging to the ASD group.

  9. Motor Improvement of Skilled Forelimb Use Induced by Treatment with Growth Hormone and Rehabilitation Is Dependent on the Onset of the Treatment after Cortical Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Heredia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that the administration of GH immediately after severe motor cortex injury, in rats, followed by rehabilitation, improved the functionality of the affected limb and reexpressed nestin in the contralateral motor cortex. Here, we analyze whether these GH effects depend on a time window after the injury and on the reexpression of nestin and actin. Injured animals were treated with GH (0.15 mg/kg/day or vehicle, at days 7, 14, and 35 after cortical ablation. Rehabilitation was applied at short and long term (LTR after the lesion and then sacrificed. Nestin and actin were analyzed by immunoblotting in the contralateral motor cortex. Giving GH at days 7 or 35 after the lesion, but not 14 days after it, led to a remarkable improvement in the functionality of the affected paw. Contralateral nestin and actin reexpression was clearly higher in GH-treated animals, probably because compensatory brain plasticity was established. GH and immediate rehabilitation are key for repairing brain injuries, with the exception of a critical time period: GH treatment starting 14 days after the lesion. Our data also indicate that there is not a clear plateau in the recovery from a brain injury in agreement with our data in human patients.

  10. Natural radionuclides in effluents release by a deactivated uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Kelecom, Alphonse; Silva, Ademir X.; Lopes, José M.; Pinto, Carlos E.C.; Py Júnior, Delcy A.; Antunes, Marcos M.; Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (OTU) is a mine and deactivated uranium plant in the city of Caldas, Minas Gerais, Brazil. This facility possesses three points of release of liquid effluents containing radionuclides: point 014, 025 and 076. At these points, the values of activity concentrations (AC) of the radionuclides U_n_a_t, "2"2"6Ra, "2"1"0Pb, "2"3"2Th and "2"2"8Ra were analyzed in 2012. The evaluation of point 014 by univariate statistics pointed four groups. [U_n_a_t > "2"2"8Ra > ("2"2"6Ra = "2"1"0Pb) >"2"3"2Th]. The multivariate statistics separated the radionuclides into two groups: [(U_n_a_t and "2"3"2Th) and ("2"2"6Ra, "2"2"8Ra and "2"1"0Pb)]. At point 025, the univariate statistics described three groups: [Un_a_t > ("2"2"8Ra = "2"1"0Pb) > ("2"2"6Ra = "2"3"2Th)] and the multivariate analysis also described three but different groups: [(U_n_a_t and "2"2"8Ra), ("2"2"6Ra and "2"1"0Pb) and "2"3"2Th]. In turn, point 076 showed another behavior. The univariate analysis showed only two groups: [(U_n_a_t) > ("2"2"6Ra, "2"2"8Ra, "2"1"0Pb, "2"3"2Th)]. Differently, the multivariate statistics defined three groups: [(U_n_a_t and "2"3"2Th), ("2"2"6Ra and "2"2"8Ra) and "2"1"0Pb].Thus, statistical analysis showed that each point has releases of effluents with different characteristics. Both the behaviors of releases, based on multivariate statistics, and of the AC magnitudes, based on the univariate statistics, are different between the points. The only common features were the greater magnitude of uranium and the smaller magnitude of thorium. (author)

  11. Ultrafast deactivation processes in the 2-aminopyridine dimer and the adenine-thymine base pair: Similarities and differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai Yuejie; Zhang Feng; Cui Ganglong; Fang Weihai; Luo Yi

    2010-01-01

    2-aminopyridine dimer has frequently been used as a model system for studying photochemistry of DNA base pairs. We examine here the relevance of 2-aminopyridine dimer for a Watson-Crick adenine-thymine base pair by studying UV-light induced photodynamics along two main hydrogen bridges after the excitation to the localized 1 ππ* excited-state. The respective two-dimensional potential-energy surfaces have been determined by time-dependent density functional theory with Coulomb-attenuated hybrid exchange-correlation functional (CAM-B3LYP). Different mechanistic aspects of the deactivation pathway have been analyzed and compared in detail for both systems, while the related reaction rates have also be obtained from Monte Carlo kinetic simulations. The limitations of the 2-aminopyridine dimer as a model system for the adenine-thymine base pair are discussed.

  12. The enemy within: propagation of aberrant corticostriatal learning to cortical function in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff A Beeler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Motor dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease is believed to arise primarily from pathophysiology in the dorsal striatum and its related corticostriatal and thalamostriatal circuits during progressive dopamine denervation. One function of these circuits is to provide a filter that selectively facilitates or inhibits cortical activity to optimize cortical processing, making motor responses rapid and efficient. Corticostriatal synaptic plasticity mediates the learning that underlies this performance-optimizing filter. Under dopamine denervation, corticostriatal plasticity is altered, resulting in aberrant learning that induces inappropriate basal ganglia filtering that impedes rather than optimizes cortical processing. Human imaging suggests that increased cortical activity may compensate for striatal dysfunction in PD patients. In this Perspective article, we consider how aberrant learning at corticostriatal synapses may impair cortical processing and learning and undermine potential cortical compensatory mechanisms. Blocking or remediating aberrant corticostriatal plasticity may protect cortical function and support cortical compensatory mechanisms mitigating the functional decline associated with progressive dopamine denervation.

  13. Early and phasic cortical metabolic changes in vestibular neuritis onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alessandrini

    Full Text Available Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN, that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [(18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients' cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34 and Temporal (BA 38 cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34 and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38 respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients' subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding

  14. Up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-target genes in cortical neurons by the novel multifunctional iron chelator anti-Alzheimer drug, M30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramovich-Tirosh, Y; Bar-Am, O; Amit, T; Youdim, M B H; Weinreb, O

    2010-06-01

    Based on a multimodal drug design paradigm, we have synthesized a multifunctional non-toxic, brain permeable iron chelator, M30, possessing the neuroprotective propargylamine moiety of the anti-Parkinsonian drug, rasagiline (Azilect) and antioxidant-iron chelator moiety of an 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative of our iron chelator, VK28. M30 was recently found to confer potential neuroprotective effects in vitro and in various preclinical neurodegenerative models and regulate the levels and processing of the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein and its toxic amyloidogenic derivative, Abeta. Here, we show that M30 activates the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha signaling pathway, thus promoting HIF-1alpha mRNA and protein expression levels, as well as increasing transcription of HIF-1alpha-dependent genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor, erythropoietin, enolase-1, p21 and tyrosine hydroxylase in rat primary cortical cells. In addition, M30 also increased the expression levels of the transcripts of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Regarding aspects of relevance to Alzheimer's disease (AD), western blotting analysis of glycogen synthase kinase- 3beta (GSK-3beta) signaling pathway revealed that M30 enhanced the levels of phospho-AKT (Ser473) and phospho- GSK-3beta (Ser9) and attenuated Tau phosphorylation. M30 was also shown to protect cultured cortical neurons against Abeta(25-35) toxicity. All these multimodal pharmacological activities of M30 might be beneficial for its potent efficacy in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson's disease and AD in which oxidative stress and iron-mediated toxicity are involved.

  15. Mitochondrial bioenergetics during the initiation of mercuric chloride-induced renal activity. II. Functional alterations of renal cortical mitochondria isolated after mercuric chloride treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, J.M. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI); Harding, P.G.; Humes, H.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mitochondrial functional defects occurring in the early stages of nephrotoxic renal injury secondary to mercuric chloride have been characterized. No loss of cellular integrity or major mitochondrial structural alterations occurred within the first 3 hr after a subcutaneous injection of 5 mg/kg of HgCl/sub 2/. At 3 h, levels of Hg/sup 2 +/ in renal cortex and isolated renal cortical mitochondria were 1.87 and 0.72 nmol/mg of protein, respectively. Much evidence suggested that this Hg/sup 2 +/ had reached the mitochondria in situ and not during the isolation process. Mitochondria isolated beginning 1 h after treatment with HgCl/sub 2/ showed depressed ADP uptake. At 2 h, inhibitions of State 3 and 2,4-dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration were detected. Inhibition of 2,4-dinitrophenol-activated mitochondrial ATPase activity was present when measured on mitochondria isolated at 3 h. These effects were not reversed by 2 mM dithioerythritol, 50 mg/ml of albumin or 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/. Analysis of the data in the context of information available on the in vitro effects of HgCl/sub 2/ (Weinberg, J.M., Harding, P.G., and Humes, H.D. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 60-67) indicated that the mitochondrial functional effects could not be attributed to interaction of the mitochondria with Hg/sup 2 +/ during their isolation. These studies implicate compromised mitochondrial bioenergetic function as one of the earliest intracellular effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ in the production of nephrotoxicity but suggest that the intracellular process involves events in addition to those seen with direct exposure of mitochondria to Hg/sup 2 +/ in vitro.

  16. Autophagy fails to prevent glucose deprivation/glucose reintroduction-induced neuronal death due to calpain-mediated lysosomal dysfunction in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Montiel, Teresa; Rincon-Heredia, Ruth; Castro-Obregón, Susana; Massieu, Lourdes

    2017-06-29

    Autophagy is triggered during nutrient and energy deprivation in a variety of cells as a homeostatic response to metabolic stress. In the CNS, deficient autophagy has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and ischemic brain injury. However, its role in hypoglycemic damage is poorly understood and the dynamics of autophagy during the hypoglycemic and the glucose reperfusion periods, has not been fully described. In the present study, we analyzed the changes in the content of the autophagy proteins BECN1, LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1 by western blot, and autophagosome formation was followed through time-lapse experiments, during glucose deprivation (GD) and glucose reintroduction (GR) in cortical cultures. According to the results, autophagosome formation rapidly increased during GD, and was followed by an active autophagic flux early after glucose replenishment. However, cells progressively died during GR and autophagy inhibition reduced neuronal death. Neurons undergoing apoptosis during GR did not form autophagosomes, while those surviving up to late GR showed autophagosomes. Calpain activity strongly increased during GR and remained elevated during progressive neuronal death. Its activation led to the cleavage of LAMP2 resulting in lysosome membrane permeabilization (LMP) and release of cathepsin B to the cytosol. Calpain inhibition prevented LMP and increased the number of neurons containing lysosomes and autophagosomes increasing cell viability. Taken together, the present results suggest that calpain-mediated lysosome dysfunction during GR turns an adaptive autophagy response to energy stress into a defective autophagy pathway, which contributes to neuronal death. In these conditions, autophagy inhibition results in the improvement of cell survival.

  17. Removal of toluene by sequential adsorption-plasma oxidation: Mixed support and catalyst deactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Caihong; Huang, Xuemin; Zhao, Junjie; Huang, Jiayu; Kang, Zhongli; Dang, Xiaoqing

    2017-07-15

    A sequential adsorption-plasma oxidation system was used to remove toluene from simulated dry air using γ-Al 2 O 3 , HZSM-5, a mixture of the two materials or their supported Mn-Ag catalyst as adsorbents under atmospheric pressure and room temperature. After 120min of plasma oxidation, γ-Al 2 O 3 had a better carbon balance (∼75%) than HZSM-5, but the CO 2 yield of γ-Al 2 O 3 was only ∼50%; and there was some desorption of toluene when γ-Al 2 O 3 was used. When a mixture of HZSM-5 and γ-Al 2 O 3 with a mass ratio of 1/2 was used, the carbon balance was up to 90% and 82% of this was CO 2 . The adsorption performance and electric discharge characteristics of the mixed supports were tested in order to rationalize this high CO x yield. After seven cycles of sequential adsorption-plasma oxidation, support and Mn-Ag catalyst deactivation occurred. The support and catalyst were characterized before and after deactivation by SEM, a BET method, XRD, XPS and GC-MS in order to probe the mechanism of their deactivation. 97.6% of the deactivated supports and 76% of the deactivated catalysts could be recovered by O 2 temperature-programmed oxidation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Amitriptyline induces brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression through ERK-dependent modulation of multiple BDNF mRNA variants in primary cultured rat cortical astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Kajitani, Naoto; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shigetou, Takahiro; Kasai, Miho; Matsumoto, Chie; Yokoe, Toshiki; Azuma, Honami; Takebayashi, Minoru; Morioka, Norimitsu; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-03-01

    A significant role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been previously implicated in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. To ascertain the contribution of specific cell types in the brain that produce BDNF following antidepressant treatment, the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline on rat primary neuronal, astrocytic and microglial cortical cultures were examined. Amitriptyline increased the expression of BDNF mRNA in astrocytic and microglial cultures but not neuronal cultures. Antidepressants with distinct mechanisms of action, such as clomipramine, duloxetine and fluvoxamine, also increased BDNF mRNA expression in astrocytic and microglial cultures. There are multiple BDNF mRNA variants (exon I, IIA, IV and VI) expressed in astrocytes and microglia and the variant induced by antidepressants has yet to be elaborated. Treatment with antidepressants increased the expression of exon I, IV and VI in astrocyte and microglia. Clomipramine alone significantly upregulated expression of exon IIA. The amitriptyline-induced expression of both total and individual BDNF mRNA variants (exon I, IV and VI) were blocked by MEK inhibitor U0126, indicating MEK/ERK signaling is required in the expression of BDNF. These findings indicate that non-neural cells are a significant target of antidepressants and further support the contention that glial production of BDNF is crucial role in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. The current data suggest that targeting of glial function could lead to the development of antidepressants with a truly novel mechanism of action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Palmitoylethanolamide Blunts Amyloid-β42-Induced Astrocyte Activation and Improves Neuronal Survival in Primary Mouse Cortical Astrocyte-Neuron Co-Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggiato, Sarah; Borelli, Andrea Celeste; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Antonelli, Tiziana; Tomasini, Maria Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Based on the pivotal role of astrocytes in brain homeostasis and the strong metabolic cooperation existing between neurons and astrocytes, it has been suggested that astrocytic dysfunctions might cause and/or contribute to neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative processes. Therapeutic approaches aimed at both neuroprotection and neuroinflammation reduction may prove particularly effective in slowing the progression of these diseases. The endogenous lipid mediator palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) displayed neuroprotective and anti(neuro)inflammatory properties, and demonstrated interesting potential as a novel treatment for Alzheimer's disease. We firstly evaluated whether astrocytes could participate in regulating the Aβ42-induced neuronal damage, by using primary mouse astrocytes cell cultures and mixed astrocytes-neurons cultures. Furthermore, the possible protective effects of PEA against Aβ42-induced neuronal toxicity have also been investigated by evaluating neuronal viability, apoptosis, and morphometric parameters. The presence of astrocytes pre-exposed to Aβ42 (0.5μM; 24 h) induced a reduction of neuronal viability in primary mouse astrocytes-neurons co-cultures. Furthermore, under these experimental conditions, an increase in the number of neuronal apoptotic nuclei and a decrease in the number of MAP-2 positive neurons were observed. Finally, astrocytic Aβ42 pre-exposure induced an increase in the number of neurite aggregations/100μm as compared to control (i.e., untreated) astrocytes-neurons co-cultures. These effects were not observed in neurons cultured in the presence of astrocytes pre-exposed to PEA (0.1μM), applied 1 h before and maintained during Aβ42 treatment. Astrocytes contribute to Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity and PEA, by blunting Aβ42-induced astrocyte activation, improved neuronal survival in mouse astrocyte-neuron co-cultures.

  20. L-ascorbate attenuates the endotoxin-induced production of inflammatory mediators by inhibiting MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation in cortical neurons/glia Cocultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ni Huang

    Full Text Available In response to acute insults to the central nervous system, such as pathogen invasion or neuronal injuries, glial cells become activated and secrete inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines. This neuroinflammation plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Endogenous ascorbate levels are significantly decreased among patients with septic encephalopathy. Using the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS to induce neuroinflammation in primary neuron/glia cocultures, we investigated how L-ascorbate (vitamin C; Vit. C affected neuroinflammation. LPS (100 ng/ml induced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS and the production of NO, interleukin (IL-6, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2/CXCL2 in a time-dependent manner; however, cotreatment with Vit. C (5 or 10 mM attenuated the LPS-induced iNOS expression and production of NO, IL-6, and MIP-2 production. The morphological features revealed after immunocytochemical staining confirmed that Vit. C suppressed LPS-induced astrocytic and microglial activation. Because Vit. C can be transported into neurons and glia via the sodium-dependent Vit. C transporter-2, we examined how Vit. C affected LPS-activated intracellular signaling in neuron/glia cocultures. The results indicated the increased activation (caused by phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, such as p38 at 30 min and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs at 180 min after LPS treatment. The inhibition of p38 and ERK MAPK suppressed the LPS-induced production of inflammatory mediators. Vit. C also inhibited the LPS-induced activation of p38 and ERK. Combined treatments of Vit. C and the inhibitors of p38 and ERK yielded no additional inhibition compared with using the inhibitors alone, suggesting that Vit. C functions through the same signaling pathway (i.e., MAPK as these inhibitors. Vit. C also reduced LPS-induced

  1. Highly controlled nest homeostasis of honey bees helps deactivate phenolics in nectar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fanglin; He, Jianzhong; Fu, Wenjun

    2005-06-01

    Honey bees have a highly developed nest homeostasis, for example, maintaining low CO2 levels and stable nest temperatures at 35°C.We investigate the role of nest homeostasis in deactivating phenolic compounds present in the nectar of Aloe littoralis. We show that the phenolic content in nectar was reduced (from 0.65% to 0.49%) after nectar was incubated in a nest of Apis cerana, and that it was reduced still more (from 0.65% to 0.37%) if nectar was mixed with hypopharyngeal gland proteins (HGP) of worker bees before being placed inside a nest. HGP had little effect on samples outside a nest, indicating that nest conditions are necessary for HGP to deactivate phenolics in nectar. Consequently, the highly controlled nest homeostasis of honey bees facilitates direct deactivation of phenolics in nectar, and plays a role in the action of HGP as well.

  2. An Analytical Technique to Determine the Potential for Moisture Accumulation in Deactivated Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MINICHAN, RL

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical technique developed to predict an order of magnitude volume of moisture accumulation in massive structures after deactivation. This work was done to support deactivation of a Department of Energy nuclear materials processing facility. The structure is a four-story, concrete building with a rectangular footprint that is approximately 250m long by 37m wide by 22m high. Its walls are 1.2m thick. The building will be supplied with unconditioned ventilation air after deactivation. The objective of the work was to provide a cost effective engineering evaluation to determine if the un-conditioned ventilation air would result in condensate accumulating inside the building under study. The analysis described is a simple representation of a complex problem. The modeling method is discussed in sufficient detail to allow its application to the study of similar structures

  3. Application, Deactivation, and Regeneration of Heterogeneous Catalysts in Bio-Oil Upgrading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyun Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The massive consumption of fossil fuels and associated environmental issues are leading to an increased interest in alternative resources such as biofuels. The renewable biofuels can be upgraded from bio-oils that are derived from biomass pyrolysis. Catalytic cracking and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO are two of the most promising bio-oil upgrading processes for biofuel production. Heterogeneous catalysts are essential for upgrading bio-oil into hydrocarbon biofuel. Although advances have been achieved, the deactivation and regeneration of catalysts still remains a challenge. This review focuses on the current progress and challenges of heterogeneous catalyst application, deactivation, and regeneration. The technologies of catalysts deactivation, reduction, and regeneration for improving catalyst activity and stability are discussed. Some suggestions for future research including catalyst mechanism, catalyst development, process integration, and biomass modification for the production of hydrocarbon biofuels are provided.

  4. Immobilized glucose oxidase--catalase and their deactivation in a differential-bed loop reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenosil, J E

    1979-01-01

    Glucose oxidase containing catalase was immobilized with a copolymer of phenylenediamine and glutaraldehyde on pumice and titania carrier to study the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in a differential-bed loop reactor. The reaction rate was found to be first order with respect to the concentration of limiting oxygen substrate, suggesting a strong external mass-transfer resistance for all the flow rates used. The partial pressure of oxygen was varied from 21.3 up to 202.6 kPa. The use of a differential-bed loop reactor for the determination of the active enzyme concentration in the catalyst with negligible internal pore diffusion resistance is shown. Catalyst deactivation was studied, especially with respect to the presence of catalase. It is believed that the hydrogen peroxide formed in the oxidation reaction deactivates catalase first; if an excess of catalase is present, the deactivation of glucose oxidase remains small. The mathematical model subsequently developed adequately describes the experimental results.

  5. Comparison of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons and Rat Primary CorticalNeurons as In Vitro Models of Neurite Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput assays that can quantify chemical-induced changes at the cellular and molecular level have been recommended for use in chemical safety assessment. High-throughput, high content imaging assays for the key cellular events of neurodevelopment have been proposed to ra...

  6. PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE TRAINING INDUCES ENHANCED LEVELS OF IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR AND COEXPRESSED PKC-GAMMA AND MAP-2 IN RAT CORTICAL-NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DOUMA, BRK; BOHUS, B; LUITEN, PGM

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neocortical immunoreactivity (ir) for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), protein kinase C gamma (PKC gamma), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) induced by the performance of a one-trial passive shock avoidance (PSA) task

  7. The p38/CYLD Pathway is Involved in Necroptosis Induced by Oxygen-glucose Deprivation Combined with ZVAD in Primary Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Chen, WeiWei; Zhang, CaiYi; Xiang, Jie; Ding, HongMei; Wu, LianLian; Geng, DeQin

    2017-08-01

    Recently, necroptosis, a form of programmed necrosis, has been widely studied. It has previously been shown that knockout of lysine 63 deubiquitinase CYLD significantly inhibits necroptosis in other cell lines, and serum response factor (SRF) could regulate CYLD gene expression through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). In the following study, we show oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) combined with a caspase inhibitor, ZVAD (OGD/ZVAD), induced CYLD protein expression in a time-dependent manner. Immunofluorescence studies showed that CYLD was localized strongly to the nucleus and weakly to the cytoplasm of neurons. The expression of CYLD in the cytoplasm, but not in the nucleus, was increased significantly upon OGD treatment. SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) protected against neuronal injury induced by OGD/ZVAD treatment. More importantly, SB203580 decreased CYLD protein levels by inhibiting SRF phosphorylation and indirectly prevented SRF from binding to a CYLD promoter. We also found that cells with knockdown of SRF by short interfering RNA in a lentivirus vector tolerated OGD/ZVAD-induced necroptosis, when the expression of CYLD protein decreased. The results show that SB203580 prevented necroptosis induced by OGD/ZVAD injury by blocking a p38/CYLD dependent pathway.

  8. Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S&M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S&M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the IFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of IFDP facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 1999. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $36M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S&M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year.

  9. Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S and M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S and M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the EFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of EFDP Facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 2000. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $51M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S and M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year

  10. Understanding the mechanism of DNA deactivation in ion therapy of cancer cells: hydrogen peroxide action*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatnytskyi, Dmytro V.; Zdorevskyi, Oleksiy O.; Perepelytsya, Sergiy M.; Volkov, Sergey N.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the medium of biological cells under ion beam irradiation has been considered as a possible cause of cell function disruption in the living body. The interaction of hydrogen peroxide, a long-lived molecular product of water radiolysis, with active sites of DNA macromolecule was studied, and the formation of stable DNA-peroxide complexes was considered. The phosphate groups of the macromolecule backbone were picked out among the atomic groups of DNA double helix as a probable target for interaction with hydrogen peroxide molecules. Complexes consisting of combinations including: the DNA phosphate group, H2O2 and H2O molecules, and Na+ counterion, were considered. The counterions have been taken into consideration insofar as under the natural conditions they neutralise DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. The energy of the complexes have been determined by considering the electrostatic and the Van der Waals interactions within the framework of atom-atom potential functions. As a result, the stability of various configurations of molecular complexes was estimated. It was shown that DNA phosphate groups and counterions can form stable complexes with hydrogen peroxide molecules, which are as stable as the complexes with water molecules. It has been demonstrated that the formation of stable complexes of H2O2-Na+-PO4- may be detected experimentally by observing specific vibrations in the low-frequency Raman spectra. The interaction of H2O2 molecule with phosphate group of the double helix backbone can disrupt DNA biological function and induce the deactivation of the cell genetic apparatus. Thus, the production of hydrogen peroxide molecules in the nucleus of living cells can be considered as an additional mechanism by which high-energy ion beams destroy tumour cells during ion beam therapy. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene

  11. Catalytic Activity and Deactivation of SO2 Oxidation Catalysts in Simulated Power Plant Flue Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masters, Stephen G.; Chrissanthopoulos, Asthanassios; Eriksen, Kim Michael

    1997-01-01

    The catalyst deactivation and the simultaneious formation of compounds in commercial SO2 oxidation catalysts have been studied by combined activity measurements and in situ EPR spectroscopy in the temperature range 350-480 C in wet and dry simulated power plant flue gas.......The catalyst deactivation and the simultaneious formation of compounds in commercial SO2 oxidation catalysts have been studied by combined activity measurements and in situ EPR spectroscopy in the temperature range 350-480 C in wet and dry simulated power plant flue gas....

  12. A novel tarantula toxin stabilizes the deactivated voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Nguyen, Phuong Tran; Zhang, Yunxiao; Hu, Zhaotun; Zhang, Changxin; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; DeCaen, Paul G; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2017-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na V s) are activated by transiting the voltage sensor from the deactivated to the activated state. The crystal structures of several bacterial Na V s have captured the voltage sensor module (VSM) in an activated state, but structure of the deactivated voltage sensor remains elusive. In this study, we sought to identify peptide toxins stabilizing the deactivated VSM of bacterial Na V s. We screened fractions from several venoms and characterized a cystine knot toxin called JZTx-27 from the venom of tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao as a high-affinity antagonist of the prokaryotic Na V s Ns V Ba (nonselective voltage-gated Bacillus alcalophilus ) and NaChBac (bacterial sodium channel from Bacillus halodurans ) (IC 50 = 112 nM and 30 nM, respectively). JZTx-27 was more efficacious at weaker depolarizing voltages and significantly slowed the activation but accelerated the deactivation of Ns V Ba, whereas the local anesthetic drug lidocaine was shown to antagonize Ns V Ba without affecting channel gating. Mutation analysis confirmed that JZTx-27 bound to S3-4 linker of Ns V Ba, with F98 being the critical residue in determining toxin affinity. All electrophysiological data and in silico analysis suggested that JZTx-27 trapped VSM of Ns V Ba in one of the deactivated states. In mammalian Na V s, JZTx-27 preferably inhibited the inactivation of Na V 1.5 by targeting the fourth transmembrane domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of peptide antagonist for prokaryotic Na V s. More important, we proposed that JZTx-27 stabilized the Ns V Ba VSM in the deactivated state and may be used as a probe to determine the structure of the deactivated VSM of Na V s.-Tang, C., Zhou, X., Nguyen, P. T., Zhang, Y., Hu, Z., Zhang, C., Yarov-Yarovoy, V., DeCaen, P. G., Liang, S., Liu, Z. A novel tarantula toxin stabilizes the deactivated voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channel. © FASEB.

  13. Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E.

    2008-01-01

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design

  14. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: roles of the receptor complex. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14609719 Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolys...acol Ther. 2003 Nov;100(2):171-94. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Molecular mechanisms of macrophage act...medID 14609719 Title Molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation and deactivation bylipopolysaccharide: ro

  15. Final deactivation project report on the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility, Building 7602 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the Integrated Process Demonstration Facility (Building 7602) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities by the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP). This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This report provides a history and description of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S ampersand M) Plan, remaining hazardous and radioactive materials inventory, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed

  16. Functional cortical mapping of scale illusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li-qun; Kuriki, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    We have studied cortical activation using 1.5 T fMRI during 'Scale Illusion', a kind of auditory illusion, in which subjects perceive smooth melodies while listening to dichotic irregular pitch sequences consisting of scale tones, in repeated phrases composed of eight tones. Four male and four female subjects listened to different stimuli, that including illusion-inducing tone sequence, monaural tone sequence and perceived pitch sequence with a control of white noises delivered to the right and left ears in random order. 32 scans with a repetition time (TR) 3 s Between 3 s interval for each type of the four stimuli were performed. In BOLD signals, activation was observed in the prefrontal and temporal cortices, parietal lobule and occipital areas by first-level group analysis. However, there existed large intersubject variability such that systematic tendency of the activation was not clear. The study will be continued to obtain larger number of subjects for group analysis. (author)

  17. Neuroprotective and antioxidant activities of bamboo salt soy sauce against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jong Hee; Noh, Min-Young; Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Haiwon; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Bamboo salt (BS) and soy sauce (SS) are traditional foods in Asia, which contain antioxidants that have cytoprotective effects on the body. The majority of SS products contain high levels of common salt, consumption of which has been associated with numerous detrimental effects on the body. However, BS may be considered a healthier substitute to common salt. The present study hypothesized that SS made from BS, known as bamboo salt soy sauce (BSSS), may possess enhanced cytoprotective properties; this was evaluated using a hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-induced neuronal cell death rat model. Rat neuronal cells were pretreated with various concentrations (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10%) of BSSS, traditional soy sauce (TRSS) and brewed soy sauce (BRSS), and were subsequently exposed to H 2 O 2 (100 µM). The viability of neuronal cells, and the occurrence of DNA fragmentation, was subsequently examined. Pretreatment of neuronal cells with TRSS and BRSS reduced cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas neuronal cells pretreated with BSSS exhibited increased cell viability, as compared with non-treated neuronal cells. Furthermore, neuronal cells pretreated with 0.01% BSSS exhibited the greatest increase in viability. Exposure of neuronal cells to H 2 O 2 significantly increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein, poly (ADP-ribose), cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, cytochrome c , apoptosis-inducing factor, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3, in all cases. Pretreatment of neuronal cells with BSSS significantly reduced the levels of ROS generated by H 2 O 2 , and increased the levels of phosphorylated AKT and phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Furthermore, the observed effects of BSSS could be blocked by administration of 10 µM LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. The results of the present study suggested that BSSS may exert positive neuroprotective effects against H 2 O 2

  18. Identification of a brainstem circuit regulating visual cortical state in parallel with locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A Moses; Hoy, Jennifer L; Bonci, Antonello; Wilbrecht, Linda; Stryker, Michael P; Niell, Cristopher M

    2014-07-16

    Sensory processing is dependent upon behavioral state. In mice, locomotion is accompanied by changes in cortical state and enhanced visual responses. Although recent studies have begun to elucidate intrinsic cortical mechanisms underlying this effect, the neural circuits that initially couple locomotion to cortical processing are unknown. The mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) has been shown to be capable of initiating running and is associated with the ascending reticular activating system. Here, we find that optogenetic stimulation of the MLR in awake, head-fixed mice can induce both locomotion and increases in the gain of cortical responses. MLR stimulation below the threshold for overt movement similarly changed cortical processing, revealing that MLR's effects on cortex are dissociable from locomotion. Likewise, stimulation of MLR projections to the basal forebrain also enhanced cortical responses, suggesting a pathway linking the MLR to cortex. These studies demonstrate that the MLR regulates cortical state in parallel with locomotion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Step changes and deactivation behaviour in the continuous decarboxylation of stearic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Theilgaard; Rozmyslowicz, B.; Simakova, I.

    2011-01-01

    % conversion of pure stearic acid. Deactivation took place in H-2-deficient gas atmosphere, probably as a result of the formation of unsaturated products and coking in the pore system. Transient experiments with step changes were performed: 1 h was required for the step change to be visible in liquid sampling...

  20. Stability, Deactivation, and Regeneration of Chloroaluminate Ionic Liquid as Catalyst for Industrial C4 Alkylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alkylation of isobutane and 2-butene was carried out in a continuous unit using triethylamine hydrochloride (Et3NHCl-aluminum chloride (AlCl3 ionic liquid (IL as catalyst. The effects of impurities such as water, methanol, and diethyl ether on the stability of the catalytic properties and deactivation of the ionic liquid were studied in the continuous alkylation. In the Et3NHCl-2AlCl3 ionic liquid, only one half of the aluminum chloride could act as the active site. With a molar ratio of 1:1, the active aluminum chloride in the ionic liquid was deactivated by water by reaction or by diethyl ether through complexation while the complexation of aluminum chloride with two molecular proportions of methanol inactivated the active aluminum chloride in the ionic liquid. The deactivation of chloroaluminate ionic liquid was observed when the active aluminum chloride, i.e., one half of the total aluminum chloride in the ionic liquid, was consumed completely. The regeneration of the deactivated ionic liquid was also investigated and the catalytic activity could be recovered by means of replenishment with fresh aluminum chloride.

  1. Innovative Work Practices and Lessons Learned at the N Area Deactivation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    This report identifies many of the lessons learned, innovations,and effective work practices that derived from activities supporting the N Area Deactivation Project at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The work practices discussed in this report may be applicable and beneficial to similar projects throughout the DOE complex

  2. Deactivation of Legionella Pneumophila in municipal wastewater by ozone generated in arrays of microchannel plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengkun; Li, Jun; Kim, Min-Hwan; Cho, Jinhoon; Park, Sung-Jin; Nguyen, Thanh H.; Eden, J. Gary

    2018-06-01

    A greater than four log10 reduction in the concentration of Legionella pneumophila in municipal wastewater has been achieved in 1 min with ozone produced by a microchannel plasma reactor. Requiring less than 22 W of electrical power, and ambient air as the feedstock gas, the microplasma ozone generator is robust and a promising alternative to conventional corona and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technologies. Contrary to previous studies, the Ct model for pathogen deactivation (i.e. rate proportional to the product of the available disinfectant concentration and the exposure duration) is found to be valid for L. pneumophila. Accordingly, wastewater-specific Ct equations have been developed to predict the deactivation of L. pneumophila in the secondary wastewater environment. Inactivation of this pathogen was found to be dependent on temperature only in the absence of wastewater organic matter (WOM). In the presence of WOM, pathogen deactivation is controlled by the disinfection contact time, initial ozone concentration (varied between 15 and 281 µg l‑1), and initial WOM loading. The data reported here will assist in the implementation of plasma ozone generators for L. pneumophila deactivation in cooling towers, point-of-use systems, and wastewater reclamation facilities.

  3. A One Year Study of Mode Deactivation Therapy: Adolescent Residential Patients with Conduct and Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Christopher J.; Siv, Alexander M.

    2011-01-01

    This case study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) implementation in a child and adolescent residential treatment unit and provide preliminary effectiveness data on MDT versus treatment as usual (TAU). This case study compared the efficacy of two treatment methodologies for adolescent males in residential treatment…

  4. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy as a Manualized Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Houston, Marsha-Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of Mode Deactivation Family Therapy (MDT) in an outpatient setting as compared to Treatment as Usual (TAU). MDT is an evidence-based psychotherapy and has been shown to be effective treating adolescents with a variety of problems involving emotional disorder, physical and sexual aggression, as well as…

  5. Boron deactivation in heavily boron-doped Czochralski silicon during rapid thermal anneal: Atomic level understanding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Chao; Dong, Peng; Yi, Jun; Ma, Xiangyang; Yang, Deren; Lu, Yunhao

    2014-01-01

    The changes in hole concentration of heavily boron (B)-doped Czochralski silicon subjected to high temperature rapid thermal anneal (RTA) and following conventional furnace anneal (CFA) have been investigated. It is found that decrease in hole concentration, namely, B deactivation, is observed starting from 1050 °C and increases with RTA temperature. The following CFA at 300–500 °C leads to further B deactivation, while that at 600–800 °C results in B reactivation. It is supposed that the interaction between B atoms and silicon interstitials (I) thus forming BI pairs leads to the B deactivation during the high temperature RTA, and, moreover, the formation of extended B 2 I complexes results in further B deactivation in the following CFA at 300–500 °C. On the contrary, the dissociation of BI pairs during the following CFA at 600–800 °C enables the B reactivation. Importantly, the first-principles calculation results can soundly account for the above-mentioned supposition

  6. Boron deactivation in heavily boron-doped Czochralski silicon during rapid thermal anneal: Atomic level understanding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Chao; Dong, Peng; Yi, Jun; Ma, Xiangyang, E-mail: luyh@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: mxyoung@zju.edu.cn; Yang, Deren [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Lu, Yunhao, E-mail: luyh@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: mxyoung@zju.edu.cn [International Center for New-Structured Materials and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-01-20

    The changes in hole concentration of heavily boron (B)-doped Czochralski silicon subjected to high temperature rapid thermal anneal (RTA) and following conventional furnace anneal (CFA) have been investigated. It is found that decrease in hole concentration, namely, B deactivation, is observed starting from 1050 °C and increases with RTA temperature. The following CFA at 300–500 °C leads to further B deactivation, while that at 600–800 °C results in B reactivation. It is supposed that the interaction between B atoms and silicon interstitials (I) thus forming BI pairs leads to the B deactivation during the high temperature RTA, and, moreover, the formation of extended B{sub 2}I complexes results in further B deactivation in the following CFA at 300–500 °C. On the contrary, the dissociation of BI pairs during the following CFA at 600–800 °C enables the B reactivation. Importantly, the first-principles calculation results can soundly account for the above-mentioned supposition.

  7. Deactivation of vanadia-based commercial SCR catalysts by polyphosphoric acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellino, Francesco; Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    Commercial vanadia-based SCR monoliths have been exposed to flue gases in a pilot-scale Setup into which phosphoric acid has been added and the deactivation has been followed during the exposure time. Separate measurements by SMPS showed that the phosphoric acid formed polyphosphoric acid aerosols...

  8. Project Management Plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) and as quickly and economically as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the already small risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, the project should result in significant S ampersand M cost savings in the future. The IFDP management plan has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted a strategy to deactivate the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project, and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify those activities, that best promote the project mission and result in largest cost savings. The Work Plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Energy Systems 1994) defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project

  9. On the Deactivation of Cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cats, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) process is an attractive way to obtain synthetic liquid fuel from alternative energy sources such as natural gas, coal or biomass. However, the deactivation of the catalyst, consisting of cobalt nanoparticles supported on TiO2, currently hampers the industrial

  10. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2013-09-04

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG) thalamocortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1), which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID), the plasticity protocol used, medication, and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g., brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism), emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic, and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  11. Planning for closure and deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; Poland, H.F.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    In January 1994, DOE terminated the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program. Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a detailed plan to put Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a safe condition, including removal of irradiated fueled subassemblies from the plant, transfer of subassemblies, and removal and stabilization of primary and secondary sodium liquid heat transfer metal. The goal of deactivation is to stabilize the EBR-II complex until decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) is implemented, thereby minimizing maintenance and surveillance. Deactivation of a sodium cooled reactor presents unique concerns. Residual sodium in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude concerns with explosive sodium-air reactions. Also, residual sodium on components will effectively solder these items in place, making removal unfeasible. Several special cases reside in the primary system, including primary cold traps, a cesium trap, a cover gas condenser, and systems containing sodium-potassium alloy. The sodium or sodium-potassium alloy in these components must be reacted in place or the components removed. The Sodium Components Maintenance Shop at ANL-W provides the capability for washing primary components, removing residual quantities of sodium while providing some decontamination capacity. Considerations need to be given to component removal necessary for providing access to primary tank internals for D ampersand D activities, removal of hazardous materials, and removal of stored energy sources. ANL-W's plan for the deactivation of EBR-II addresses these issues, providing for an industrially and radiologically safe complex, requiring minimal surveillance during the interim period between deactivation and D ampersand D. Throughout the deactivation and closure of the EBR-II complex, federal environmental concerns will be addressed, including obtaining the proper permits for facility condition and waste processing

  12. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per E Roland

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available IIn principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG, and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review.

  13. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  14. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Fábio Henrique de Gobbi; Machado, Gislaine Cristina Lopes; Morillo, Lilian Schafirovits; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi

    2010-01-01

    Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD) is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal) and ventral (occipito-temporal) pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction), complete Balint’s syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right. Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD. PMID:29213665

  15. Modeling cortical circuits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  16. Effects of articaine on [3H]noradrenaline release from cortical and spinal cord slices prepared from normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and compared to lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Végh, D; Somogyi, A; Bányai, D; Lakatos, M; Balogh, M; Al-Khrasani, M; Fürst, S; Vizi, E S; Hermann, P

    2017-10-01

    Since a significant proportion of diabetic patients have clinical or subclinical neuropathy, there may be concerns about the use of local anaesthetics. The present study was designed to determine and compare the effects of articaine, a widely used anaesthetic in dental practice, and lidocaine on the resting and axonal stimulation-evoked release of [ 3 H]noradrenaline ([ 3 H]NA) in prefrontal cortex slices and the release of [ 3 H]NA in spinal cord slices prepared from non-diabetic and streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic (glucose level=22.03±2.31mmol/l) rats. The peak of allodynia was achieved 9 weeks after STZ-treatment. Articaine and lidocaine inhibited the stimulation-evoked release in a concentration-dependent manner and increased the resting release by two to six times. These effects indicate an inhibitory action of these anaesthetics on Na + - and K + -channels. There was no difference in clinically important nerve conduction between non-diabetic and diabetic rats, as measured by the release of transmitter in response to axonal stimulation. The uptake and resting release of NA was significantly higher in the brain slices prepared from diabetic rats, but there were no differences in the spinal cord. For the adverse effects, the effects of articaine on K + channels (resting release) are more pronounced compared to lidocaine. In this respect, articaine has a thiophene ring with high lipid solubility, which may present potential risks for some patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomechanics of far cortical locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottlang, Michael; Feist, Florian

    2011-02-01

    The development of far cortical locking (FCL) was motivated by a conundrum: locked plating constructs provide inherently rigid stabilization, yet they should facilitate biologic fixation and secondary bone healing that relies on flexible fixation to stimulate callus formation. Recent studies have confirmed that the high stiffness of standard locked plating constructs can suppress interfragmentary motion to a level that is insufficient to reliably promote secondary fracture healing by callus formation. Furthermore, rigid locking screws cause an uneven stress distribution that may lead to stress fracture at the end screw and stress shielding under the plate. This review summarizes four key features of FCL constructs that have been shown to enhance fixation and healing of fractures: flexible fixation, load distribution, progressive stiffening, and parallel interfragmentary motion. Specifically, flexible fixation provided by FCL reduces the stiffness of a locked plating construct by 80% to 88% to actively promote callus proliferation similar to an external fixator. Load is evenly distributed between FCL screws to mitigate stress risers at the end screw. Progressive stiffening occurs by near cortex support of FCL screws and provides additional support under elevated loading. Finally, parallel interfragmentary motion by the S-shaped flexion of FCL screws promotes symmetric callus formation. In combination, these features of FCL constructs have been shown to induce more callus and to yield significantly stronger and more consistent healing compared with standard locked plating constructs. As such, FCL constructs function as true internal fixators by replicating the biomechanical behavior and biologic healing response of external fixators.

  18. Radiative lifetimes and two-body collisional deactivation rate constants in argon for Kr(4p 55p) and Kr(4p 55p') states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, R.S.F.; Horiguchi, H.; Setser, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    The radiative lifetimes and collisional deactivation rate constants, in argon, of eight Kr(4p 5 [ 2 P/sub 1/2/]5p and [ 2 P/sub 3/2/]5p) levels have been measured by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in a flowing afterglow apparatus. The measured radiative lifetimes are compared with other experimental values and with theoretical calculations. Radiative branching ratios of these excited states also were measured in order to assign the absolute transition probabilities of the Kr(5p,5p'--5s, 5s') transition array from the radiative lifetimes. In addition to the total deactivation rate constants, product states from two-body collisions between Kr(5p and 5p') atoms and ground state argon atoms were identified from the laser-induced emission spectra, and product formation rate constants were assigned. Two-body intermultiplet transfer from Kr(4p 5 [ 2 P/sub 1/2/]5p) to the Kr(4p 5 [ 2 P/sub 3/2/]4d) levels occurs with ease. Intermultiplet transfer from the lowest level in the (4p 5 5p) configuration to the Kr(4p 5 5s and 5s') manifold was fast despite the large energy defect. However, this was the only Kr(5p) level that gave appreciable transfer to the Kr(5s or 5s') manifold. Generally the favored product states are within a few kT of the entrance channel

  19. Attempts to deactivate tannins in fodder shrubs with physical and chemical treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salem, H. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)]. E-mail: bensalem.hichem@iresa.agrinet.tn; Saghrouni, L. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Ecole Superieure d' Agriculture de Mateur, Mateur (Tunisia); Nefzaoui, A. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie, Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)

    2005-08-19

    Chopping, water sprinkling, storage under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, urea, wood ash, activated charcoal and polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG) treatments were evaluated for their efficiency in deactivating tannins in shrub foliage. In a first trial, fresh leaves of Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. (acacia) were stored after chopping or without chopping and spraying or without spraying with water under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. The plant material was stored for 1, 7 and 14 days and analysed thereafter for extractable total phenols (TP), extractable total tannins (TT) and extractable condensed tannins (CT) contents. Chopping and water spraying substantially decreased the levels of TP, TT and CT of acacia. The rate of tannin deactivation increased in acacia stored under anaerobic conditions. Acacia stored for 7 days exhibited lower TP, TT and CT contents than that stored for only 1 day. Compared to the 7-day storage period, there was a further non-significant decrease in the level of these phenolic compounds when the storage duration was extended to 14 days. The highest level of rumen degradation of crude protein (CP) in sheep rumen was obtained with chopped, water sprinkled acacia leaves stored under anaerobic conditions. The second trial investigated the effect of increasing levels of urea (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 g/kg) and treatment duration (7, 14, 21 and 28 days) on CP, TP, TT and CT in acacia leaves. The 20 g/kg urea level was sufficient to totally deactivate tannins in acacia even with the shortest storage period, i.e. 7 days. However, urea treatment increased ash-free neutral detergent fibre content and did not improve in sacco acacia degradation. In the third trial air-dried 1 mm ground samples of acacia and kermes oak (Quercus coccifera L.) leaves were added to water (control), acacia wood ash, activated charcoal or PEG solutions (100 g/kg) at 1:10 (w/v) and shaken for 20 min. All these four treatments decreased TP, TT and CT contents and could be classified

  20. Project management plan for the isotopes facilities deactivation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Purpose of the deactivation project is to place former isotopes production facilities at ORNL in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance. This management plan was prepared to document project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first. The plan provides a road map for the quality assurance program and identifies other documents supporting the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project

  1. Deactivation of tracer-flo equipment thru retrieval of its radioactive Krypton-85 gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domondon, D.B.; Rara, R.B.; Borras, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Tracer-flo equipment must be cleared of Krypton-85 before these can be transported. The rules and regulations on safe transport of radioactive materials require Kr-85 gas to be transported in an approved container. A new innovative technique/procedure in deactivating tracer-flo equipment i.e., without separation of the Kr-85 from the nitrogen was developed by the authors. The developed procedure was successfully applied in four tracer-flo equipment of three (3) semiconductor firms. In the process, the three firms have saved about US$ 28,000.00 (P 800,000.00) if the deactivation were undertaken by a foreign service company. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) retrieved about P 382,000.00 worth of Kr-85 that could be used in industrial applications such as leak tracing of buried pipes, etc. (author). 1 ref.; 5 figs

  2. Electron microscopy study of the deactivation of nickel based catalysts for bio oil hydrodeoxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Carvalho, Hudson W. P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is proposed as an efficient way to remove oxygen in bio-oil, improving its quality as a more sustainable alternative to conventional fuels in terms of CO2 neutrality and relative short production cycle [1]. Ni and Ni-MoS2 nanoparticles supported on ZrO2 show potential...... as high-pressure (100 bar) catalysts for purification of bio-oil by HDO. However, the catalysts deactivate in presence of sulfur, chlorine and potassium species, which are all naturally occurring in real bio-oil. The deactivation mechanisms of the Ni/ZrO2 have been investigated through scanning...... transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Catalytic testing has been performed using guaiacol in 1-octanol acting as a model compound for bio-oil. Addition of sulphur (0.3 vol% octanethiol) in the feed...

  3. Classification of Cortical Brain Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, radiological, and genetic classifications of 113 cases of malformations of cortical development (MCD were evaluated at the Erasmus Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

  4. High-intensity erotic visual stimuli de-activate the primary visual cortex in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hieu K; Beers, Caroline; Willemsen, Antoon; Lont, Erna; Laan, Ellen; Dierckx, Rudi; Jansen, Monique; Sand, Michael; Weijmar Schultz, Willibrord; Holstege, Gert

    2012-06-01

    The primary visual cortex, Brodmann's area (BA 17), plays a vital role in basic survival mechanisms in humans. In most neuro-imaging studies in which the volunteers have to watch pictures or movies, the primary visual cortex is similarly activated independent of the content of the pictures or movies. However, in case the volunteers perform demanding non-visual tasks, the primary visual cortex becomes de-activated, although the amount of incoming visual sensory information is the same. Do low- and high-intensity erotic movies, compared to neutral movies, produce similar de-activation of the primary visual cortex? Brain activation/de-activation was studied by Positron Emission Tomography scanning of the brains of 12 healthy heterosexual premenopausal women, aged 18-47, who watched neutral, low- and high-intensity erotic film segments. We measured differences in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the primary visual cortex during watching neutral, low-intensity erotic, and high-intensity erotic film segments. Watching high-intensity erotic, but not low-intensity erotic movies, compared to neutral movies resulted in strong de-activation of the primary (BA 17) and adjoining parts of the secondary visual cortex. The strong de-activation during watching high-intensity erotic film might represent compensation for the increased blood supply in the brain regions involved in sexual arousal, also because high-intensity erotic movies do not require precise scanning of the visual field, because the impact is clear to the observer. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  5. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant phaseout/deactivation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.W.; Thompson, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The decision to cease all US Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels was made on April 28, 1992. This study provides insight into and a comparison of the management, technical, compliance, and safety strategies for deactivating the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this study is to ensure that lessons-learned and future plans are coordinated between the two facilities

  6. Integrated project management plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant stabilization and deactivation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    This document sets forth the plans, organization, and control systems for managing the PFP Stabilization and Deactivation Project, and includes the top level cost and schedule baselines. The project includes the stabilization of Pu-bearing materials, storage, packaging, and transport of these and other nuclear materials, surveillance and maintenance of facilities and systems relied upon for storage of the materials, and transition of the facilities in the PFP Complex

  7. Deactivation kinetics of acid-sensing ion channel 1a are strongly pH-sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, David M; Jayaraman, Vasanthi

    2017-03-21

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are trimeric cation-selective ion channels activated by protons in the physiological range. Recent reports have revealed that postsynaptically localized ASICs contribute to the excitatory postsynaptic current by responding to the transient acidification of the synaptic cleft that accompanies neurotransmission. In response to such brief acidic transients, both recombinant and native ASICs show extremely rapid deactivation in outside-out patches when jumping from a pH 5 stimulus to a single resting pH of 8. Given that the resting pH of the synaptic cleft is highly dynamic and depends on recent synaptic activity, we explored the kinetics of ASIC1a and 1a/2a heteromers to such brief pH transients over a wider [H + ] range to approximate neuronal conditions better. Surprisingly, the deactivation of ASICs was steeply dependent on the pH, spanning nearly three orders of magnitude from extremely fast (pH 8 to very slow (>300 ms) at pH 7. This study provides an example of a ligand-gated ion channel whose deactivation is sensitive to agonist concentrations that do not directly activate the receptor. Kinetic simulations and further mutagenesis provide evidence that ASICs show such steeply agonist-dependent deactivation because of strong cooperativity in proton binding. This capacity to signal across such a large synaptically relevant bandwidth enhances the response to small-amplitude acidifications likely to occur at the cleft and may provide ASICs with the ability to shape activity in response to the recent history of the synapse.

  8. Anterior medial prefrontal cortex exhibits activation during task preparation but deactivation during task execution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideya Koshino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC exhibits activation during some cognitive tasks, including episodic memory, reasoning, attention, multitasking, task sets, decision making, mentalizing, and processing of self-referenced information. However, the medial part of anterior PFC is part of the default mode network (DMN, which shows deactivation during various goal-directed cognitive tasks compared to a resting baseline. One possible factor for this pattern is that activity in the anterior medial PFC (MPFC is affected by dynamic allocation of attentional resources depending on task demands. We investigated this possibility using an event related fMRI with a face working memory task. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sixteen students participated in a single fMRI session. They were asked to form a task set to remember the faces (Face memory condition or to ignore them (No face memory condition, then they were given 6 seconds of preparation period before the onset of the face stimuli. During this 6-second period, four single digits were presented one at a time at the center of the display, and participants were asked to add them and to remember the final answer. When participants formed a task set to remember faces, the anterior MPFC exhibited activation during a task preparation period but deactivation during a task execution period within a single trial. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the anterior MPFC plays a role in task set formation but is not involved in execution of the face working memory task. Therefore, when attentional resources are allocated to other brain regions during task execution, the anterior MPFC shows deactivation. The results suggest that activation and deactivation in the anterior MPFC are affected by dynamic allocation of processing resources across different phases of processing.

  9. Chemicals and excess materials disposition during deactivation as a means of pollution prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents several innovative and common sense approaches to pollution prevention that have been employed during facility deactivation at the Hanford Site in South Central Washington. It also presents several pollution prevention principles applicable to other projects. Innovative pollution prevention ideas employed at the Hanford site during facility deactivation included: (1) Recycling more than 185,000 gallons of radioactively contaminated nitric acid by sending it to an operating nuclear fuels reprocessing facility in England; (2) Recycling millions of pounds of chemicals and excess materials to other industries for reuse; (3) Evaporating flush water at a low rate and discharging it into the facility exhaust air stream to avoid discharging thousands of gallons of liquid to the soil column; and (4) Decontaminating and disposing of thousands of gallons of radioactively contaminated organic solvent waste to a RCRA licensed, power-producing, commercial incinerator. Common sense pollution prevention ideas that were employed include recycling office furniture, recycling paper from office files, and redeploying tools and miscellaneous process equipment. Additional pollution prevention occurred as the facility liquid and gaseous discharge streams were deactivated. From the facilities deactivation experiences at Hanford and the ensuing efforts to disposition excess chemicals and materials, several key pollution prevention principles should be considered at other projects and facilities, especially during the operational periods of the facility's mission. These principles include: Institute pollution prevention as a fundamental requirement early in the planning stage of a project or during the operational phase of a facility's mission; Promote recognition and implementation of pollution prevention initiatives; Instill pollution prevention as a value in all participants in the project or facility work scope; Minimize the amount of chemical products and materials

  10. Focal cortical dysplasia – review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults. Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed – from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized. Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe. Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes. New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life. Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias. The most common findings on MRI imaging include: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also in both

  11. Spatial integration and cortical dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, C D; Das, A; Ito, M; Kapadia, M; Westheimer, G

    1996-01-01

    Cells in adult primary visual cortex are capable of integrating information over much larger portions of the visual field than was originally thought. Moreover, their receptive field properties can be altered by the context within which local features are presented and by changes in visual experience. The substrate for both spatial integration and cortical plasticity is likely to be found in a plexus of long-range horizontal connections, formed by cortical pyramidal cells, which link cells wi...

  12. Environmental assessment for the deactivation of the N Reactor facilities. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) provides information for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to decide whether the Proposed Action for the N Reactor facilities warrants a Finding of No Significant Impact or requires the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS). The EA describes current conditions at the N Reactor facilities, the need to take action at the facilities, the elements of the Proposed Action and alternatives, and the potential environmental impacts. The N Reactor facilities are currently in a surveillance and maintenance program, and will eventually be decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D). Operation and maintenance of the facilities resulted in conditions that could adversely impact human health or the environment if left as is until final D and D. The Proposed Action would deactivate the facilities to remove the conditions that present a potential threat to human health and the environment and to reduce surveillance and maintenance requirements. The action would include surveillance and maintenance after deactivation. Deactivation would take about three years and would involve about 80 facilities. Surveillance and maintenance would continue until final D and D, which is expected to be complete for all facilities except the N Reactor itself by the year 2018

  13. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda ePletzer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret.Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection. During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval.

  14. Mathematics anxiety reduces default mode network deactivation in response to numerical tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Belinda; Kronbichler, Martin; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics anxiety is negatively related to mathematics performance, thereby threatening the professional success. Preoccupation with the emotional content of the stimuli may consume working memory resources, which may be reflected in decreased deactivation of areas associated with the default mode network (DMN) activated during self-referential and emotional processing. The common problem is that math anxiety is usually associated with poor math performance, so that any group differences are difficult to interpret. Here we compared the BOLD-response of 18 participants with high (HMAs) and 18 participants with low mathematics anxiety (LMAs) matched for their mathematical performance to two numerical tasks (number comparison, number bisection). During both tasks, we found stronger deactivation within the DMN in LMAs compared to HMAs, while BOLD-response in task-related activation areas did not differ between HMAs and LMAs. The difference in DMN deactivation between the HMA and LMA group was more pronounced in stimuli with additional requirement on inhibitory functions, but did not differ between number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval.

  15. Annual evaluation of routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivating Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The Bethel Valley Watershed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has several Environmental Management (EM) facilities that are designated for deactivation and subsequent decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The Surplus Facilities Program at ORNL provides surveillance and maintenance support for these facilities as deactivation objectives are completed to reduce the risks associated with radioactive material inventories, etc. The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program has established requirements for radiological monitoring and surveying radiological conditions in these facilities. These requirements include an annual evaluation of routine radiation survey and monitoring frequencies. Radiological survey/monitoring frequencies were evaluated for two High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project facilities, the Bulk Shielding Facility and Tower Shielding Facility. Considerable progress has been made toward accomplishing deactivation objectives, thus the routine radiological survey/monitoring frequencies are being reduced for 1999. This report identifies the survey/monitoring frequency adjustments and provides justification that the applicable RADCON Program requirements are also satisfied

  16. Final Deactivation Project report on the Alpha Powder Facility, Building 3028, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the condition of the Alpha Powder Facility (APF), Building 3028, after completion of deactivation activities. Activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) program are outlined. A history and profile of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities are provided. Turnover items, such as the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance (S&M) plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided for in the DOE Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) turnover package are discussed.

  17. Final Deactivation Project report on the Alpha Powder Facility, Building 3028, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the condition of the Alpha Powder Facility (APF), Building 3028, after completion of deactivation activities. Activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) program are outlined. A history and profile of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities are provided. Turnover items, such as the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided for in the DOE Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) turnover package are discussed

  18. Distinctive Spectral Features of Exciton and Excimer States in the Ultrafast Electronic Deactivation of the Adenine Dinucleotide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhldreier, Mayra C.; Röttger, Katharina; Temps, Friedrich

    We report the observation by transient absorption spectroscopy of distinctive spectro-temporal signatures of delocalized exciton versus relaxed, weakly bound excimer states in the ultrafast electronic deactivation after UV photoexcitation of the adenine dinucleotide.

  19. Design of Embedded Metal Catalysts via Reverser Micro-Emulsion System: a Way to Suppress Catalyst Deactivation by Metal Sintering

    KAUST Repository

    Al Mana, Noor

    2016-01-01

    are embedded inside the protecting shell have attracted a lot of researchers working in the field of catalysis owing to their enhanced physical and chemical properties suppress catalyst deactivation. Also, a new active site generated at the interface between

  20. Hiperostosis cortical infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Caffey, o hiperostosis cortical infantil, es una rara enfermedad ósea autolimitada, que aparece de preferencia en lactantes con signos inespecíficos sistémicos; el más relevante es la reacción subperióstica e hiperostosis en varios huesos del cuerpo, con predilección en el 75-80 % de los casos por la mandíbula. Su pronóstico es bueno, la mayoría no deja secuelas. El propósito del presente trabajo es describir las características clínicas, presentes en un lactante de cinco meses de edad, atendido en el Hospital Pediátrico Provincial “Mártires de Las Tunas” con este diagnóstico, quien ingresó en el servicio de miscelánea B por una celulitis facial. Presentaba aumento de volumen en la región geniana izquierda, febrícola e inapetencia. Se impuso tratamiento con cefazolina y se egresó a los siete días. Acudió nuevamente con tumefacción blanda y difusa de ambas hemicaras, irritabilidad y fiebre. Se interconsultó con cirugía maxilofacial, se indicaron estudios sanguíneos y radiológicos. Se diagnosticó como enfermedad de Caffey, basado en la edad del niño, tumefacción facial sin signos inflamatorios agudos e hiperostosis en ambas corticales mandibulares a la radiografía AP mandíbula; unido a anemia ligera, leucocitosis y eritrosedimentación acelerada. El paciente se trató sintomáticamente y con antinflamatorios no esteroideos. Esta rara entidad se debe tener presente en casos de niños y lactantes con irritabilidad y fiebre inespecífica

  1. Final deactivation report on the Radioisotope Production Lab-E, Building 3032, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Bldg. 3032, after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration Program (EM-40). This report provides a history and profile of Bldg. 3032 prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance ampersand Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the EM-60 turnover package are discussed. Building 3032 will be used as the Health Physics Office for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Program area and will require access for these offices and to facilitate required surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Bldg. 3032 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S ampersand M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. All materials have been removed from the building, and all utility systems, piping, and alarms have been deactivated except electricity and steam needed for the office areas

  2. Life cycle baseline summary for ADS 6504IS Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facility Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) and as quickly and economically as possible. This baseline plan establishes the official target schedule for completing the deactivation work and the associated budget required for deactivation and the necessary S ampersand M. Deactivation of the facilities 3026C, 3026D, 3028, 3029, 3038E, 3038M, and 3038AHF, the Center Circle buildings 3047, 3517, and 7025 will continue though Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The focus of the project in the early years will be on the smaller buildings that require less deactivation and can bring an early return in reducing S ampersand M costs. This baseline plan covers the period from FY1995 throughout FY2000. Deactivation will continue in various facilities through FY1999. A final year of S ampersand M will conclude the project in FY2000. The estimated total cost of the project during this period is $51M

  3. The cortical signature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Agosta

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the pattern of regional cortical thickness in patients with non-familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and to investigate whether cortical thinning is associated with disease progression rate. Cortical thickness analysis was performed in 44 ALS patients and 26 healthy controls. Group differences in cortical thickness and the age-by-group effects were assessed using vertex-by-vertex and multivariate linear models. The discriminatory ability of MRI variables in distinguishing patients from controls was estimated using the Concordance Statistics (C-statistic within logistic regression analyses. Correlations between cortical thickness measures and disease progression rate were tested using the Pearson coefficient. Relative to controls, ALS patients showed a bilateral cortical thinning of the primary motor, prefrontal and ventral frontal cortices, cingulate gyrus, insula, superior and inferior temporal and parietal regions, and medial and lateral occipital areas. There was a significant age-by-group effect in the sensorimotor cortices bilaterally, suggesting a stronger association between age and cortical thinning in ALS patients compared to controls. The mean cortical thickness of the sensorimotor cortices distinguished patients with ALS from controls (C-statistic ≥ 0.74. Cortical thinning of the left sensorimotor cortices was related to a faster clinical progression (r = -0.33, p = 0.03. Cortical thickness measurements allowed the detection and quantification of motor and extramotor involvement in patients with ALS. Cortical thinning of the precentral gyrus might offer a marker of upper motor neuron involvement and disease progression.

  4. The cortical signature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Valsasina, Paola; Riva, Nilo; Copetti, Massimiliano; Messina, Maria Josè; Prelle, Alessandro; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the pattern of regional cortical thickness in patients with non-familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to investigate whether cortical thinning is associated with disease progression rate. Cortical thickness analysis was performed in 44 ALS patients and 26 healthy controls. Group differences in cortical thickness and the age-by-group effects were assessed using vertex-by-vertex and multivariate linear models. The discriminatory ability of MRI variables in distinguishing patients from controls was estimated using the Concordance Statistics (C-statistic) within logistic regression analyses. Correlations between cortical thickness measures and disease progression rate were tested using the Pearson coefficient. Relative to controls, ALS patients showed a bilateral cortical thinning of the primary motor, prefrontal and ventral frontal cortices, cingulate gyrus, insula, superior and inferior temporal and parietal regions, and medial and lateral occipital areas. There was a significant age-by-group effect in the sensorimotor cortices bilaterally, suggesting a stronger association between age and cortical thinning in ALS patients compared to controls. The mean cortical thickness of the sensorimotor cortices distinguished patients with ALS from controls (C-statistic ≥ 0.74). Cortical thinning of the left sensorimotor cortices was related to a faster clinical progression (r = -0.33, p = 0.03). Cortical thickness measurements allowed the detection and quantification of motor and extramotor involvement in patients with ALS. Cortical thinning of the precentral gyrus might offer a marker of upper motor neuron involvement and disease progression.

  5. Cortical tremor: a variant of cortical reflex myoclonus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, A; Kakigi, R; Funai, N; Neshige, R; Kuroda, Y; Shibasaki, H

    1990-10-01

    Two patients with action tremor that was thought to originate in the cerebral cortex showed fine shivering-like finger twitching provoked mainly by action and posture. Surface EMG showed relatively rhythmic discharge at a rate of about 9 Hz, which resembled essential tremor. However, electrophysiologic studies revealed giant somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) with enhanced long-loop reflex and premovement cortical spike by the jerk-locked averaging method. Treatment with beta-blocker showed no effect, but anticonvulsants such as clonazepam, valproate, and primidone were effective to suppress the tremor and the amplitude of SEPs. We call this involuntary movement "cortical tremor," which is in fact a variant of cortical reflex myoclonus.

  6. Opsoclonus-induced occipital deactivation with a region-specific distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, BM; van Weerden, TW; Haaxma, R

    The cerebral distribution of 2-[18F]fluoro 2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake in a patient with opsoclonus was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and subsequently compared with the distribution in ten normal subjects. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) revealed a decreased occipital FDG

  7. Impact of prenatal environmental stress on cortical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji eIshii

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to various types of environmental stress increases susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Given that even subtle perturbations by prenatal environmental stress in the cerebral cortex impair the cognitive and memory functions, this review focuses on underlying molecular mechanisms of pathological cortical development. We especially highlight recent works that utilized animal exposure models, human specimens or/and induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells to demonstrate: 1. molecular mechanisms shared by various types of environmental stressors, 2. the mechanisms by which the affected extracortical tissues indirectly impact the cortical development and function, and 3. interaction between prenatal environmental stress and the genetic predisposition of neuropsychiatric disorders. Finally, we discuss current challenges for achieving a comprehensive understanding of the role of environmentally disturbed molecular expressions in cortical maldevelopment, knowledge of which may eventually facilitate discovery of interventions for prenatal environment-linked neuropsychiatric disorders.

  8. Effects of vitamin K2 on cortical and cancellous bone mass, cortical osteocyte and lacunar system, and porosity in sciatic neurectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Jun; Matsumoto, Hideo; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Yoshihiro; Yeh, James K

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of vitamin K2 on cortical and cancellous bone mass, cortical osteocyte and lacunar system, and porosity in sciatic neurectomized rats. Thirty-four female Sprague-Dawley retired breeder rats were randomized into three groups: age-matched control, sciatic neurectomy (NX), and NX + vitamin K2 administration (menatetrenone, 30 mg/kg/day p.o., three times a week). At the end of the 8-week experiment, bone histomorphometric analysis was performed on cortical and cancellous bone of the tibial diaphysis and proximal metaphysis, respectively, and osteocyte lacunar system and porosity were evaluated on cortical bone of the tibial diaphysis. NX decreased cortical and cancellous bone mass compared with age-matched controls as a result of increased endocortical and trabecular bone erosion and decreased trabecular mineral apposition rate (MAR). Vitamin K2 ameliorated the NX-induced increase in bone erosion, prevented the NX-induced decrease in MAR, and increased bone formation rate (BFR/bone surface) in cancellous bone, resulting in an attenuation of NX-induced cancellous bone loss. However, vitamin K2 did not significantly influence cortical bone mass. NX also decreased osteocyte density and lacunar occupancy and increased porosity in cortical bone compared with age-matched controls. Vitamin K2 ameliorated the NX-induced decrease in lacunar occupancy by viable osteocytes and the NX-induced increase in porosity. The present study showed the efficacy of vitamin K2 for cancellous bone mass and cortical lacunar occupancy by viable osteocytes and porosity in sciatic NX rats.

  9. Horizontal integration and cortical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, C D

    1992-07-01

    We have discussed several results that lead to a view that cells in the visual system are endowed with dynamic properties, influenced by context, expectation, and long-term modifications of the cortical network. These observations will be important for understanding how neuronal ensembles produce a system that perceives, remembers, and adapts to injury. The advantage to being able to observe changes at early stages in a sensory pathway is that one may be able to understand the way in which neuronal ensembles encode and represent images at the level of their receptive field properties, of cortical topographies, and of the patterns of connections between cells participating in a network.

  10. Controlled-Deactivation CB1 Receptor Ligands as a Novel Strategy to Lower Intraocular Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Miller

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Nearly half a century has passed since the demonstration that cannabis and its chief psychoactive component Δ9-THC lowers intraocular pressure (IOP. Elevated IOP remains the chief hallmark and therapeutic target for glaucoma, a condition that places millions at risk of blindness. It is likely that Δ9-THC exerts much of its IOP-lowering effects via the activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors. However, the initial promise of CB1 as a target for treating glaucoma has not thus far translated into a credible therapeutic strategy. We have recently shown that blocking monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL, an enzyme that breaks the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG, substantially lowers IOP. Another strategy is to develop cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists that are optimized for topical application to the eye. Recently we have reported on a controlled-deactivation approach where the “soft” drug concept of enzymatic deactivation was combined with a “depot effect” that is commonly observed with Δ9-THC and other lipophilic cannabinoids. This approach allowed us to develop novel cannabinoids with a predictable duration of action and is particularly attractive for the design of CB1 activators for ophthalmic use with limited or no psychoactive effects. We have tested a novel class of compounds using a combination of electrophysiology in autaptic hippocampal neurons, a well-characterized model of endogenous cannabinoid signaling, and measurements of IOP in a mouse model. We now report that AM7410 is a reasonably potent and efficacious agonist at CB1 in neurons and that it substantially (30% lowers IOP for as long as 5 h after a single topical treatment. This effect is absent in CB1 knockout mice. Our results indicate that the direct targeting of CB1 receptors with controlled-deactivation ligands is a viable approach to lower IOP in a murine model and merits further study in other model systems.

  11. Step Changes and Deactivation Behavior in the Continuous Decarboxylation of Stearic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Theilgaard; Rozmysłowicz, Bartosz; Simakova, Irina L.

    2011-01-01

    Deoxygenation of dilute and concentrated stearic acid over 2% Pd/C beads was performed in a continuous reactor at 300 °C and 20 bar pressure of Ar or 5% H2/Ar. Stable operation was obtained in 5% H2 atmosphere, with 95% conversion of 10 mol % dilute stearic acid in dodecane and 12% conversion...... of pure stearic acid. Deactivation took place in H2-deficient gas atmosphere, probably as a result of the formation of unsaturated products and coking in the pore system. Transient experiments with step changes were performed: 1 h was required for the step change to be visible in liquid sampling, whereas...

  12. The effect of barrier layer-mediated catalytic deactivation in vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patole, S P; Yu, Seong-Man; Shin, Dong-Wook; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Kim, Ha-Jin; Han, In-Taek; Kwon, Kee-Won

    2010-01-01

    The effect of Al-barrier layer-mediated Fe-catalytic deactivation in vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) growth was studied. The substrate surface morphology, catalytic diffusion and barrier layer oxidation were found to be dependent on the annealing temperature of the barrier layer, which ultimately affects CNT growth. The annealed barrier layer without complete oxidation was found to be suitable for top to bottom super aligned CNT arrays. The highest average CNT growth rate of up to 3.88 μm s -1 was observed using this simple approach. Details of the analysis are also presented.

  13. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy of hydrogen complex deactivation on InP:Zn(1 0 0) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.D.; Williams, S.C.; Yasharahla, S.A.; Jallow, N.

    2007-01-01

    Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy is used to study the kinetics of the H-Zn complex deactivation in Zn doped InP(1 0 0). Hydrogen injected into the material electronically passivates the local carrier concentration. Reverse-biased anneals of the InP under ultra-high vacuum show a dramatic change in the work function of the material with increasing temperature. Spectral features are also shown to be sensitive to sample temperature. To our knowledge, we show the first view of hydrogen retrapping at the surface using photoemission spectroscopy. A simple photoelectron threshold energy analysis shows the state of charge compensation of the material

  14. ALARA Review for the Deactivation of the 107-N Pump Well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    This as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review provides a description of the engineering and administrative controls used during the completion of deactivation work at the 107-N Building. This ALARA assessment focuses on the 107-N Building pump well. The level of contamination found in the pump well has been estimated to be approximately 830 mRad/hr beta and 680,000 disintegrations per minute (dpm) alpha per large area wipe. As part of the characterization of the water and sediment, samples were taken to determine the isotopic distribution

  15. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state: A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Tongjun; Zhang, Guifeng; Li, Ganlong; Lu, Na; Lai, Xinsheng; Lu, Yangjia; Chen, Jiarong

    2012-10-25

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state, as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture. Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint. Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling, true needling activated Brodmann areas 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 20, 21, 37, 39, 40, 43, and 47, the head of the caudate nucleus, the parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus and red nucleus. True needling also deactivated Brodmann areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 18, 24, 31, 40 and 46.

  16. Characterization of deactivated catalytic cracking catalyst and evaluation as absorbent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valt, R.B.G.; Kaminari, N.M.S.; Cordeiro, B.; Ponte, M.J.J.S.; Ponte, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main uses of catalysts in the petroleum industry is in step catalytic cracking, which after use and regeneration cycles generates large quantities of waste material. In this research the deactivated FCC catalyst was characterized before and after the electrokinetic remediation process, in order to assess the change of its structure and possible adsorptive capacity. Analyses of X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and BET surface area measurement were performed. The analysis showed no structural change due to the process employed and that electrokinetic remediation has recovered 42% of adsorption capacity of the material, by removing about 89% of heavy metals adhered initially in the catalyst surface. (author)

  17. Deactivation of medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortex in anxiety disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaohu; Wang Peijun; Dong Ningxin; Li Chunbo; Wu Wenyuan; Hu Zhenghui; Tang Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We used blood oxygenation level dependent-functional MR imaging (BOLD- fMRI) to explore the characteristics of deactivation patterns in patients with anxiety disorders and the underlying neural mechanism of this disease. Methods: Ten patients and ten healthy controls participated the experiments. All subjects performed the trait portion of the State-Trait anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) prior to the fMRI scans. The subjects underwent noninvasive functional magnetic resonance imaging while listening actively to emotionally neutral words alternating with no words (experiment 1) and threat related-words alternating with emotionally neutral words (experiment2). During fMRI scanning, subjects were instructed to closely listen to each stimuli word and to silently make a judgment of the word's valence. Data were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping (SPM 99). Individual and group analysis were conducted. Results: Mean STAI-T score was significantly higher for patients group than that of controls (58 ± 8 for patients group and 33 ± 5 for controls, t=8.3, P<0.01). Our fMRI data revealed sets of deactivation brain regions in Experiment for patients and healthy controls, however, the deactivation can be found in experiment 2 only for patients. Interestingly, all the observed deactivation patterns were similar. The related areas compromise medial prefrontal cortex(BA 10, BA 24/32), posterior cingulate (BA 31/30) and Bilateral inferior parietal cortex (MPFC) (BA 39/40), which nearly overlapping with the organized default model network. Further more, the mean t values in the MPFC area (BA 24/32) was significantly higher for control group than that of patient (5.1 controls and 4.2 for patients, t=4.8, P=0.006), conversely, the mean t values in the posterior cingulate cortex(PCC) area was significantly higher for patients l than that of controls (4.9 controls and 5.8 for patients, t=2.4, P=0.026). Conclusion: Our observations suggest that the default model network

  18. Selective Deactivation of M13 Bacteriophage in E. Coli using Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molukanele, P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deactivation of M13 Bacteriophage in E. Coli using Femtosecond Laser Pulses P. Molukanele 1, 3, A. Du Plessis 1, T. Roberts 1, L. Botha 1, M. Khati 2,3, W. Campos 2, 3 1CSIR National Laser Centre, Femtosecond Science group, Pretoria, South Africa 2CSIR... that is about 1 ?m long and 5-6 nm in diameter. Its host Escherichia coli (E.coli), is approximately 2-6 ?m long and 1-1.5 ?m in diameter, see figure 1 below. Figure 1: Schematic representations of M13 bacteriophage and its host E.coli...

  19. Is cortical bone hip? What determines cortical bone properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Sol

    2007-07-01

    Increased bone turnover may produce a disturbance in bone structure which may result in fracture. In cortical bone, both reduction in turnover and increase in hip bone mineral density (BMD) may be necessary to decrease hip fracture risk and may require relatively greater proportionate changes than for trabecular bone. It should also be noted that increased porosity produces disproportionate reduction in bone strength, and studies have shown that increased cortical porosity and decreased cortical thickness are associated with hip fracture. Continued studies for determining the causes of bone strength and deterioration show distinct promise. Osteocyte viability has been observed to be an indicator of bone strength, with viability as the result of maintaining physiological levels of loading and osteocyte apoptosis as the result of a decrease in loading. Osteocyte apoptosis and decrease are major factors in the bone loss and fracture associated with aging. Both the osteocyte and periosteal cell layer are assuming greater importance in the process of maintaining skeletal integrity as our knowledge of these cells expand, as well being a target for pharmacological agents to reduce fracture especially in cortical bone. The bisphosphonate alendronate has been seen to have a positive effect on cortical bone by allowing customary periosteal growth, while reducing the rate of endocortical bone remodeling and slowing bone loss from the endocortical surface. Risedronate treatment effects were attributed to decrease in bone resorption and thus a decrease in fracture risk. Ibandronate has been seen to increase BMD as the spine and femur as well as a reduced incidence of new vertebral fractures and non vertebral on subset post hoc analysis. And treatment with the anabolic agent PTH(1-34) documented modeling and remodelling of quiescent and active bone surfaces. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) plays a key role in bone destruction, and the human monoclonal

  20. Deactivation Studies of Rh/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 Catalysts in Low Temperature Ethanol Steam Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platon, Alex; Roh, Hyun-Seog; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

    2007-10-30

    Rapid deactivation of Rh/Ce0.8Zr0.2O2 catalysts in low temperature ethanol steam reforming was studied. A significant build-up of carbonaceous intermediate, instead of carbon deposit, was observed at a lower reaction temperature which was attributed to the rapid catalyst deactivation. Co-feed experiments indicated that acetone and ethylene caused more severe catalyst deactivation than other oxygenates such as acidic acid and acetaldehyde.

  1. The N-terminal tail of hERG contains an amphipathic α-helix that regulates channel deactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of the human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG K+ channel is critical for the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel. However, the mechanism(s by which the N-terminal domain regulates deactivation remains to be determined. Here we show that the solution NMR structure of the N-terminal 135 residues of hERG contains a previously described Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain (residues 26-135 as well as an amphipathic α-helix (residues 13-23 and an initial unstructured segment (residues 2-9. Deletion of residues 2-25, only the unstructured segment (residues 2-9 or replacement of the α-helix with a flexible linker all result in enhanced rates of deactivation. Thus, both the initial flexible segment and the α-helix are required but neither is sufficient to confer slow deactivation kinetics. Alanine scanning mutagenesis identified R5 and G6 in the initial flexible segment as critical for slow deactivation. Alanine mutants in the helical region had less dramatic phenotypes. We propose that the PAS domain is bound close to the central core of the channel and that the N-terminal α-helix ensures that the flexible tail is correctly orientated for interaction with the activation gating machinery to stabilize the open state of the channel.

  2. Final deactivation project report on the Source Development Laboratory, building 3029, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Building 3029 after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the DOE Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). This report provides a history and profile of the facility prior to commencing deactivation activities and a profile of the building after completion of deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the post-deactivation surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the EM-60 turnover package are discussed. Building 3029 will require access to facilitate required S ampersand M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. building 3029 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S ampersand M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S ampersand M activities, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S ampersand M. 5 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Characteristics of mordenite-type zeolite catalysts deactivated by SO{sub 2} for the reduction of NO with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M.H.; Nam, I.S.; Kim, Y.G. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology/Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-25

    The deactivation of mordenite-type zeolite catalysts for the selective reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of SO{sub 2} was examined in a packed-bed flow reactor system. The physicochemical properties of the deactivated catalysts by SO{sub 2} were extensively characterized by TGA, TPSR, XPS, Raman, XANES, the measurements of surface area and elemental analysis. Not only the surface area and sulfur content of the deactivated catalysts, but their TGA and TPSR patterns strongly suggest the formation of a sulfur species as a deactivating agent on the catalyst surface. It is also observed that the sulfur species exists in the form of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) by XPS and Raman. It mainly causes the loss of NO removal activity of the catalysts. The sulfate species formed on the deactivated catalysts by SO{sub 2} did not significantly alter the chemical environment of the copper ions contained in the zeolite catalysts such as CuHM and CuNZA. It does not exist in the form of cupric sulfate pentahydrate on the catalyst surface as revealed by Cu K-edge absorption spectra of the catalysts.

  4. Reversible and irreversible deactivation of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR catalysts by SO2 and SO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøi, Peter S.; Jangjou, Yasser; Epling, William S.

    2018-01-01

    be divided into two parts: a reversible deactivation that is restored by the regeneration treatment, and an irreversible part. The irreversible deactivation does not affect the activation energy for NH3-SCR and display a 1:1 correlation with the S-content, consistent with deactivation by Cu-sulfate formation...... is always higher when exposed at 200 °C than at 550 °C, and in wet conditions, compared to a dry feed. The deactivation is predominantly reversible, making regeneration at 550 °C a realistic approach to handle S-poisoning in exhaust systems....

  5. Synergistic effect of metal deactivator and antioxidant on oxidation stability of metal contaminated Jatropha biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarin, Amit [Department of Applied Sciences, Amritsar College of Engineering and Technology, Amritsar 143001 (India); Arora, Rajneesh; Singh, N.P. [Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar (India); Sarin, Rakesh; Malhotra, R.K. [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., R and D Centre, Sector-13, Faridabad 121007 (India); Sharma, Meeta [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., R and D Centre, Sector-13, Faridabad 121007 (India); University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Kashmere Gate, Delhi 110403 (India); Khan, Arif Ali [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Kashmere Gate, Delhi 110403 (India)

    2010-05-15

    Biodiesel is relatively unstable on storage and European biodiesel standard EN-14214 calls for determining oxidation stability at 110 C with a minimum induction time of 6 h by the Rancimat method (EN-14112). According to proposed National Mission on biodiesel in India, we have undertaken studies on stability of biodiesel from tree borne non-edible oil seeds Jatropha. Neat Jatropha biodiesel exhibited oxidation stability of 3.95 h. It is found possible to meet the desired EN specification for neat Jatropha biodiesel and metal contaminated Jatropha biodiesel by using antioxidants; it will have a cost implication, as antioxidants are costly chemicals. Research was conducted to increase the oxidation stability of metal contaminated Jatropha biodiesel by doping metal deactivator with antioxidant, with varying concentrations in order to meet the aforementioned standard required for oxidation stability. It was found that usage of antioxidant can be reduced by 30-50%, therefore the cost, even if very small amount of metal deactivator is doped in Jatropha biodiesel to meet EN-14112 specification. (author)

  6. Deactivation of the E. coli pH stress sensor CadC by cadaverine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneburger, Ina; Fritz, Georg; Jurkschat, Nicole; Tetsch, Larissa; Eichinger, Andreas; Skerra, Arne; Gerland, Ulrich; Jung, Kirsten

    2012-11-23

    At acidic pH and in the presence of lysine, the pH sensor CadC activates transcription of the cadBA operon encoding the lysine/cadaverine antiporter CadB and the lysine decarboxylase CadA. In effect, these proteins contribute to acid stress adaptation in Escherichia coli. cadBA expression is feedback inhibited by cadaverine, and a cadaverine binding site is predicted within the central cavity of the periplasmic domain of CadC on the basis of its crystallographic analysis. Our present study demonstrates that this site only partially accounts for the cadaverine response in vivo. Instead, evidence for a second, pivotal binding site was collected, which overlaps with the pH-responsive patch of amino acids located at the dimer interface of the periplasmic domain. The temporal response of the E. coli Cad module upon acid shock was measured and modeled for two CadC variants with mutated cadaverine binding sites. These studies supported a cascade-like binding and deactivation model for the CadC dimer: binding of cadaverine within the pair of central cavities triggers a conformational transition that exposes two further binding sites at the dimer interface, and the occupation of those stabilizes the inactive conformation. Altogether, these data represent a striking example for the deactivation of a pH sensor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Extended Catalyst Longevity Via Supercritical Isobutane Regeneration of a Partially Deactivated USY Alkylation Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Ginosar; David N. Thompson; Kyle C. Burch; David J. Zalewski

    2005-05-01

    Off-line, in situ activity recovery of a partially deactivated USY zeolite catalyst used for isobutane/butene alkylation was examined in a continuous-flow reaction system employing supercritical isobutane. Catalyst samples were deactivated in a controlled manner by running them to either to a fixed butene conversion level of 95% or a fixed time on stream of three hours, and then exposing the catalyst to supercritical isobutane to restore activity. Activity recovery was determined by comparing alkylation activity before and after the regeneration step. Both single and multiple regenerations were performed. Use of a 95% butene conversion level criterion to terminate the reaction step afforded 86% activity recovery for a single regeneration and provided nine sequential reaction steps for the multiple regeneration studies. Employing a fixed 3 h time on stream criterion resulted in nearly complete activity recovery for a single regeneration, and 24 reaction steps were demonstrated in sequence for the multiple regeneration process, producing only minor product yield declines per step. This resulted in a 12-fold increase in catalyst longevity versus unregenerated catalyst.

  8. Liquid metal reactor deactivation as applied to the experimental breeder reactor - II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, O. K.; Michelbacher, J. A.; Pfannenstiel, D. F.; Wells, P. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was shutdown in September, 1994. This sodium cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and by the US Department of Energy (DOE) mandate, was to be placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for ultimate decommissioning. The deactivation of a liquid metal reactor presents unique concerns. The first major task associated with the project was the removal of all fueled assemblies. In addition, sodium must be drained from systems and processed for ultimate disposal. Residual quantities of sodium remaining in systems must be deactivated or inerted to preclude future hazards associated with pyrophoricity and generation of potentially explosive hydrogen gas. A Sodium Process Facility (SPF) was designed and constructed to react the elemental sodium from the EBR-II primary and secondary systems to sodium hydroxide for disposal. This facility has a design capacity to allow the reaction of the complete inventory of sodium at ANL-W in less than two years. Additional quantities of sodium from the Fermi-1 reactor are also being treated at the SPF

  9. Deactivation of solid catalysts in liquid media: the case of leaching of active sites in biomass conversion reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sádaba, Irantzu; Lopez Granados, Manuel; Riisager, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This review is aimed to be a brief tutorial covering the deactivation of solid catalysts in the liquid phase, with specific focus on leaching, which can be especially helpful to researchers not familiarized with catalytic processes in the liquid phase. Leaching refers to the loss of active species....... However, as a consequence of the development of new processes for biorefineries, an increasing number of reactions deal with liquid media, and thus, the stability and reusability of a solid catalyst in this situation represent a huge challenge that requires specific attention. Leaching of active phases...... is particularly problematic because of its irreversibility and it can be one of the main causes of catalyst deactivation in liquid media, threatening the sustainability of the process. This tutorial review presents a survey of the main aspects concerning the deactivation due to leaching of active species from...

  10. Deactivation of hydrophobic catalysts for a hydrogen isotope exchange: Application of the time-on-stream theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Heui-Joo; Lee, Han Soo; Ahn, Do-Hee; Kim, Jeong-Guk; Kim, Wi-soo; Sohn, SoonHwan

    2005-01-01

    A recycle reactor was built for the purpose of characterizing newly developed hydrophobic catalysts for a hydrogen isotope exchange. The catalytic rate constants of two types of hydrophobic catalysts were measured at a 100% relative humidity. The catalytic rate constants were measured at 60 deg C for 28 days and both the catalysts showed very high initial catalytic rate constants. The measured deactivation profile showed that the catalytic rate constants of both the catalysts were almost identical for 28 days. The deactivation of the catalysts was modelled based upon the time-on-stream theory. The deactivation profiles of the catalysts were estimated by using the model for a period of three years. The results showed that both the catalysts had a good exchange capacity for hydrogen isotopes and they could be applicable to a tritium removal facility that will be built at the Wolsong nuclear power plants in the near future

  11. Cortical-Cortical Interactions And Sensory Information Processing in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-30

    significant development for disseminating the results of biomedical research in our lifetime." Sir Paul Nurse , Cancer Research UK Your research papers...of the evidence for local cortical over-connectivity is anecdotal. Belmonte and colleagues suggested the co-morbidity with epilepsy that is highly...Tomma-Halme J, Lahti-Nuuttila P, Service E, Virsu V: Rate of information segregation in developmentally dyslexic children . Brain Lang 2000, 75:66-81

  12. Final deactivation report on the radioisotope production Lab-H, Building 3118, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration Program (EM-40). This report provides a history and profile of Bldg. 3118 prior to and after deactivation. Turnover items (e.g. Surveillance ampersand Maintenance Plant, remaining materials, etc.) are discussed. Building 3118 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only minimal S ampersand M is required (other than that, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked)

  13. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Vestibulo-cortical Hemispheric Dominance: the link between Anxiety and the Vestibular System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczuk, Nadja F; Casanovas Ortega, Marta; Fluri, Anne-Sophie; Arshad, Qadeer

    2018-05-16

    Vestibular processing and anxiety networks are functionally intertwined, as demonstrated by reports of reciprocal influences upon each other. Yet whether there is an underlying link between these two systems remains unknown Previous findings have highlighted the involvement of hemispheric lateralisation in processing of both anxiety and vestibular signals. Accordingly, we explored the interaction between vestibular cortical processing and anxiety by assessing the relationship between anxiety levels and the degree of hemispheric lateralisation of vestibulo-cortical processing in 64 right-handed, healthy individuals. Vestibulo-cortical hemispheric lateralisation was determined by gaging the degree of caloric-induced nystagmus suppression following modulation of cortical excitability using trans-cranial direct current stimulation targeted over the posterior parietal cortex, an area implicated in the processing of vestibular signals. The degree of nystagmus suppression yields an objective biomarker, allowing the quantification of the degree of right vestibulo-cortical hemisphere dominance. Anxiety levels were quantified using the Trait component of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Questionnaire. Our findings demonstrate that the degree of an individual's vestibulo-cortical hemispheric dominance correlates with their anxiety levels. That is, those individuals with greater right hemispheric vestibulo-cortical dominance exhibited lower levels of anxiety. By extension, our results support the notion that hemispheric lateralisation determines an individual's emotional processing, thereby linking cortical circuits involved in processing anxiety and vestibular signals respectively. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Combined compared to dissociated oral and intestinal sucrose stimuli induce different brain hedonic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouard, Caroline; Meunier-Salaün, Marie-Christine; Meurice, Paul; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Val-Laillet, David

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of brain networks contributing to the processing of oral and/or intestinal sugar signals in a relevant animal model might help to understand the neural mechanisms related to the control of food intake in humans and suggest potential causes for impaired eating behaviors. This study aimed at comparing the brain responses triggered by oral and/or intestinal sucrose sensing in pigs. Seven animals underwent brain single photon emission computed tomography (99mTc-HMPAO) further to oral stimulation with neutral or sucrose artificial saliva paired with saline or sucrose infusion in the duodenum, the proximal part of the intestine. Oral and/or duodenal sucrose sensing induced differential cerebral blood flow changes in brain regions known to be involved in memory, reward processes and hedonic (i.e., pleasure) evaluation of sensory stimuli, including the dorsal striatum, prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, insular cortex, hippocampus, and parahippocampal cortex. Sucrose duodenal infusion only and combined sucrose stimulation induced similar activity patterns in the putamen, ventral anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus. Some brain deactivations in the prefrontal and insular cortices were only detected in the presence of oral sucrose stimulation. Finally, activation of the right insular cortex was only induced by combined oral and duodenal sucrose stimulation, while specific activity patterns were detected in the hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex with oral sucrose dissociated from caloric load. This study sheds new light on the brain hedonic responses to sugar and has potential implications to unravel the neuropsychological mechanisms underlying food pleasure and motivation. PMID:25147536

  16. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviraja eUdupa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease (PD, there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG thalamo-cortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostrial dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1, which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of L-dopa-induced dyskinesias (LID, the plasticity protocol used, medication and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS. The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g. brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism, emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  17. Molecular Correlates of Cortical Network Modulation by Long-Term Sensory Experience in the Adult Rat Barrel Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallès, Astrid; Granic, Ivica; De Weerd, Peter; Martens, Gerard J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of cortical network connectivity is crucial for an adaptive response to experience. In the rat barrel cortex, long-term sensory stimulation induces cortical network modifications and neuronal response changes of which the molecular basis is unknown. Here, we show that long-term somatosensory stimulation by enriched environment…

  18. Cortical Plasticity Induction by Pairing Subthalamic Nucleus Deep-Brain Stimulation and Primary Motor Cortical Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Bahl, Nina; Ni, Zhen; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Moro, Elena; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lozano, Andres M; Lang, Anthony E; Chen, Robert

    2016-01-13

    Noninvasive brain stimulation studies have shown abnormal motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease (PD). These studies used peripheral nerve stimulation paired with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to primary motor cortex (M1) at specific intervals to induce plasticity. Induction of cortical plasticity through stimulation of the basal ganglia (BG)-M1 connections has not been studied. In the present study, we used a novel technique of plasticity induction by repeated pairing of deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the BG with M1 stimulation using TMS. We hypothesize that repeated pairing of subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS and M1-TMS at specific time intervals will lead to plasticity in the M1. Ten PD human patients with STN-DBS were studied in the on-medication state with DBS set to 3 Hz. The interstimulus intervals (ISIs) between STN-DBS and TMS that produced cortical facilitation were determined individually for each patient. Three plasticity induction conditions with repeated pairings (180 times) at specific ISIs (∼ 3 and ∼ 23 ms) that produced cortical facilitation and a control ISI of 167 ms were tested in random order. Repeated pairing of STN-DBS and M1-TMS at short (∼ 3 ms) and medium (∼ 23 ms) latencies increased M1 excitability that lasted for at least 45 min, whereas the control condition (fixed ISI of 167 ms) had no effect. There were no specific changes in motor thresholds, intracortical circuits, or recruitment curves. Our results indicate that paired-associative cortical plasticity can be induced by repeated STN and M1 stimulation at specific intervals. These results show that STN-DBS can modulate cortical plasticity. We introduced a new experimental paradigm to test the hypothesis that pairing subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation (STN-DBS) with motor cortical transcranial magnetic stimulation (M1-TMS) at specific times can induce cortical plasticity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We found that repeated pairing of STN

  19. [Schizophrenia and cortical GABA neurotransmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takanori; Matsubara, Takuro; Lewis, David A

    2010-01-01

    -synaptic GABA-A receptors. Our recent analyses demonstrated that this pattern exists across diverse cortical areas including the prefrontal, anterior cingulate, primary motor, and primary visual cortices. GABA neurotransmission by PV-containing and SST-containing neurons is important for the generation of cortical oscillatory activities in the gamma (30-100 Hz) and theta (4-7 Hz) bands, respectively. These oscillatory activities have been proposed to play critical roles in regulating the efficiency of information transfer between neurons and neuronal networks in the cortex. Altered cortical GABA neurotransmission appears to contribute to disturbances in diverse functions through affecting the generation of cortical oscillations in schizophrenia.

  20. System and method of cylinder deactivation for optimal engine torque-speed map operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujan, Vivek A; Frazier, Timothy R; Follen, Kenneth; Moon, Suk-Min

    2014-11-11

    This disclosure provides a system and method for determining cylinder deactivation in a vehicle engine to optimize fuel consumption while providing the desired or demanded power. In one aspect, data indicative of terrain variation is utilized in determining a vehicle target operating state. An optimal active cylinder distribution and corresponding fueling is determined from a recommendation from a supervisory agent monitoring the operating state of the vehicle of a subset of the total number of cylinders, and a determination as to which number of cylinders provides the optimal fuel consumption. Once the optimal cylinder number is determined, a transmission gear shift recommendation is provided in view of the determined active cylinder distribution and target operating state.

  1. On the effect of atomic structure on the deactivation of catalytic gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, M J; Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2012-01-01

    Here we present atomic scale studies into the nature of both the internal structure and external surfaces of catalytic Au nanoparticles using aberration corrected in-situ electron microscopy. The activity of catalytic nanoparticles is thought to be highly sensitive to the particles' structure, meaning typical local atomic rearrangements are likely to significantly affect the overall performance of the catalyst. As-deposited Au nanoparticles are found to exhibit a variety of morphologies, with many being internally strained or highly stepped at the surface. Upon heating, surface atoms are observed to minimise the particles' surface energy by restructuring towards planar (111) facets, resulting in the removal of low co-ordinated sites thought to be crucial in catalysis by Au nanoparticles. These results suggest the process of surface energy minimisation made possible by heating may lead to a loss of active sites and consequently contribute to the deactivation of the catalyst.

  2. Soluble and immobilized catalase. Effect of pressure and inhibition on kinetics and deactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, P T; Thakur, D S

    1994-12-01

    This article examines the effect of pressure on the steady-state kinetics and long-term deactivation of the enzyme catalase supported on porous alumina. The reaction studied is the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The results of studies carried out in a continuous stirred-tank reactor under isothermal conditions are presented and compared with results obtained for soluble catalase. For soluble catalase, it is found that in the range of pressures studied, the oxygen flow rate increases with increase in pressure up to a certain value and then decreases. Hydrogen peroxide concentration appears to have a strong influence on pressure effects. With immobilized catalase, the pressure effects are not as prominent. Fluorescent microscopy studies of the immobilized enzyme suggest that this is probably because of pore diffusional limitations.

  3. Experimental observation and investigation of reactor Cs-137 isotope deactivation in biological cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysotskii, V.I.; Tashyrev, A.B.; Kornilova, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The problem of natural accelerated deactivation of radioactive waste (including deactivation in environmental) is studied. In the work the process of direct controlled deactivation of water mixture of selected different longlived radioactive isotopes in growing microbiological cultures has been studied. The process was connected with transmutation of long-lived active nuclei to non-radioactive isotopes during growth and metabolism of special microbiological MCT ('microbial catalyst-transmutator'). The MCT is the special granules that include: concentrated biomass of metabolically active microorganisms, sources of carbon and energy, phosphorus, nitrogen, etc., and gluing substances that keep all components in the form of granules stable in water solutions for a long period of time at any external conditions. The base of the MCT is microbe syntrophin associations of thousands different microorganism kinds that are in the state of complete symbiosis. These microorganisms appertain to different physiological groups that represent practically the whole variety of the microbe metabolism and relevantly all kinds of microbe accumulation mechanisms. The state of complete symbiosis of the syntrophin associations results on the possibility of maximal adaptation of the microorganisms' association to any external conditions change. The mechanism of nuclear transmutation in growing biological system is described in details in the book. The research has been carried out on the basis of the same distilled water that contained different long-lived reactor isotopes (e.g., Eu 154 , Eu 155 , Cs 137 , Am 241 ). In our experiments 8 identical closed glass flasks with 10 ml of the same active water in each were used. The 'microbial catalyst-transmutator' was placed in 7 glass flasks. In six different flasks different pure K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe and P salts as single admixture were added to the active water. These chemical elements are vitally necessary

  4. Standard Guide for Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance of Radiologically Contaminated Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide outlines a method for developing a Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) plan for inactive nuclear facilities. It describes the steps and activities necessary to prevent loss or release of radioactive or hazardous materials, and to minimize physical risks between the deactivation phase and the start of facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). 1.2 The primary concerns for S&M are related to (1) animal intrusion, (2) structural integrity degradation, (3) water in-leakage, (4) contamination migration, (5) unauthorized personnel entry, and (6) theft/intrusion. This document is intended to serve as a guide only, and is not intended to modify existing regulations.

  5. A new integrative model of cerebral activation, deactivation and default mode function in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wermke, Marc; Sorg, Christian; Wohlschlaeger, Afra M.; Drzezga, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Functional imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allow in vivo assessment of cerebral metabolism at rest and cerebral responses to cognitive stimuli. Activation studies with different cognitive tasks have deepened the understanding of underlying pathology leading to Alzheimer disease (AD) and how the brain reacts to and potentially compensates the imposed damage inflicted by this disease. The aim of this manuscript study was to summarize current findings of activation studies in healthy people at risk for AD, in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as a possible progenitor of AD and finally in patients with manifest AD, adding recent results about impaired deactivation abilities and default mode function in AD. A new comprehensive model will be introduced integrating these heterogeneous findings and explaining their impact on cognitive performance. (orig.)

  6. Deactivation and regeneration of ZSM-5 zeolite in catalytic pyrolysis of plastic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, A.; Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; Adrados, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Pyrolysis transforms plastic wastes in valuable liquids and gases useful as fuels or source of chemicals. → The use of ZSM-5 zeolite in pyrolysis favours the production of gases and of lighter and more aromatic liquids. → ZSM-5 zeolite is almost completely deactivated after one plastics pyrolysis experiment. → ZSM-5 zeolite used in plastic wastes pyrolysis can be regenerated by burning the deposited coke in an air stream. → Regenerated ZSM-5 recovers its activity and produces liquids and gases equivalent to those obtained with fresh catalyst. - Abstract: In this work, a study of the regeneration and reuse of ZSM-5 zeolite in the pyrolysis of a plastic mixture has been carried out in a semi-batch reactor at 440 deg. C. The results have been compared with those obtained with fresh-catalyst and in non-catalytic experiments with the same conditions. The use of fresh catalyst produces a significant change in both the pyrolysis yields and the properties of the liquids and gases obtained. Gases more rich in C3-C4 and H 2 are produced, as well as lower quantities of aromatic liquids if compared with those obtained in thermal decomposition. The authors have proved that after one pyrolysis experiment the zeolite loses quite a lot of its activity, which is reflected in both the yields and the products quality; however, this deactivation was found to be reversible since after regeneration heating at 550 deg. C in oxygen atmosphere, this catalyst recovered its initial activity, generating similar products and in equivalent proportions as those obtained with fresh catalyst.

  7. Mechanism of de-activation and clustering of B in Si at extremely high concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, L.; Piro, A.M.; Privitera, V.; Rimini, E.; Fortunato, G.; Svensson, B.G.; Foad, M.; Grimaldi, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that B deactivation and clustering occur in the presence of an excess of Si self-interstitials (Is). First principle calculations predicted the path of clusters growth, but the precursor complexes are too small to be visible even by the highest resolution microscopy. Channeling with nuclear reaction analyses allowed to detect the location of small B-Is complexes into the lattice formed as a consequence of the B interaction with the Is. In this work we extend this method to determine the complexes formed during the initial stage of B precipitation in Si doped at extremely high concentration (4 at%) and subjected to thermal treatment. The samples were prepared by excimer laser annealing (ELA) of Si implanted with 1 keV B. The thickness of the molten layer was 100 nm and the B profile was boxlike with a maximum hole concentration of ∼2 x 10 21 cm -3 . The electrical deactivation and carrier mobility of this metastable system has been studied as a function of subsequent annealing in the temperature range between 200 and 850 deg. C. Channeling analyses have been performed to investigate the B lattice location at the initial stage of precipitation. The difference, with respect to previous investigations, is the very small distance (<1 nm) between adjacent B atoms substitutional located in the lattice and the absence of Is that can be released during annealing, since the end of range defects were completely dissolved by ELA. In this way, information on the B complex evolution in a free-of-defects sample have been obtained

  8. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY FOR THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT COMPLEX, HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, A.M.; Heineman, R.; Norton, S.; Miller, M.; Oates, L.

    2003-01-01

    Maintaining compliance with environmental regulatory requirements is a significant priority in successful completion of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Nuclear Material Stabilization (NMS) Project. To ensure regulatory compliance throughout the deactivation and decommissioning of the PFP complex, an environmental regulatory strategy was developed. The overall goal of this strategy is to comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and/or compliance agreements during PFP stabilization, deactivation, and eventual dismantlement. Significant environmental drivers for the PFP Nuclear Material Stabilization Project include the Tri-Party Agreement; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA); the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA); the Clean Air Act (CAA), and the Clean Water Act (CWA). Recent TPA negotiation s with Ecology and EPA have resulted in milestones that support the use of CERCLA as the primary statutory framework for decommissioning PFP. Milestones have been negotiated to support the preparation of Engineering Evaluations/Cost Analyses for decommissioning major PFP buildings. Specifically, CERCLA EE/CA(s) are anticipated for the following scopes of work: Settling Tank 241-Z-361, the 232-Z Incinerator, , the process facilities (eg, 234-5Z, 242, 236) and the process facility support buildings. These CERCLA EE/CA(s) are for the purpose of analyzing the appropriateness of the slab-on-grade endpoint Additionally, agreement was reached on performing an evaluation of actions necessary to address below-grade structures or other structures remaining after completion of the decommissioning of PFP. Remaining CERCLA actions will be integrated with other Central Plateau activities at the Hanford site

  9. Sensory Cortical Plasticity Participates in the Epigenetic Regulation of Robust Memory Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Mimi L. Phan; Kasia M. Bieszczad

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity remodels sensory cortex across the lifespan. A function of adult sensory cortical plasticity may be capturing available information during perception for memory formation. The degree of experience-dependent remodeling in sensory cortex appears to determine memory strength and specificity for important sensory signals. A key open question is how plasticity is engaged to induce different degrees of sensory cortical remodeling. Neural plasticity for long-term memory requires the ...

  10. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME: Probable first family from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Mohan Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME is an extremely rare syndrome characterized by familial occurrence of postural and action-induced tremors of the hands but showing electrophysiologic findings of cortical reflex myoclonus. Patients also have cognitive decline and tonic-clonic seizures, often precipitated by sleep deprivation or photic stimulation. We describe probably the first family from India of this ill-defined syndrome.

  11. Project management plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place nineteen former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) and as quickly and economically as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project win further reduce the already small risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, the project should result in significant S ampersand M cost savings in the future. The IFDP management plan has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted a strategy to deactivate the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project, and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify those activities that best promote the project mission and result in largest cost savings. The Work Plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Energy Systems 1994) defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project

  12. Final deactivation report on the radioisotope production Lab-C, Building 3030, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Bldg. 3030 completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration Program (EM-40). This report provides profile of Bldg. 3030 before and after deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance ampersand Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, QA, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3030 will require access to facilitate required S ampersand M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3030 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal S ampersand M effort would be required to maintain the building's safety envelope. Other than the minimal S ampersand M activities, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only for required S ampersand M. All materials have been removed from the building and the hot cell, and all utility systems, piping, and alarms have been deactivated

  13. Family Mode Deactivation Therapy in a Residential Setting: Treating Adolescents with Conduct Disorder and Multi-Axial Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Zeiter, J. Scott; Houston, Marsha Ann

    2008-01-01

    Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for a variety of adolescent disorders including emotional dysregulation, behavioral dysregulation, physical aggression, sexual aggression, and many harmful symptoms of anxiety and traumatic stress. MDT Family Therapy has been effective in reducing family disharmony in case…

  14. Final deactivation report on the radioisotope production Lab-D, Building 3031, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of Bldg. 3031 after completion of deactivation activities as outlined by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) guidance documentation. This report outlines the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition for transfer to the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) Program. This report provides a profile of Bldg. 3031 before and after deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Postdeactivation Surveillance ampersand Maintenance Plan, remaining hazardous materials, radiological controls, Safeguards and Security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Office of Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program (EM-60) Turnover package, are discussed. Building 3031 will require access to facilitate required surveillance and maintenance activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3031 was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 program, only a minimal surveillance and maintenance effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal surveillance and maintenance activities, the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required surveillance and maintenance. All materials have been removed from the building and the hot cell, and all utility systems, piping, and alarms have been deactivated

  15. Effect of controlled deactivation on the thermochemical characteristics of hydrogen adsorption on skeletal nickel from sodium hydroxide-water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozorov, D. A.; Lukin, M. V.; Ulitin, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    Differential heats of adsorption in a wide range of surface coverage and maximum amounts of adsorbed hydrogen are determined by adsorption calorimetry on partially deactivated skeletal nickel from aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide. The effect of the composition of solutions on the values of limiting adsorption and adsorption equilibria of individual forms of hydrogen is shown.

  16. Large Ferrierite Crystals as Models for Catalyst Deactivation during Skeletal Isomerisation of Oleic Acid : Evidence for Pore Mouth Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedemann, Sophie C. C.; Ristanovic, Zoran; Whiting, Gareth T.; Marthala, V. R. Reddy; Kaerger, Joerg; Weitkamp, Jens; Wels, Bas; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-01-01

    Large zeolite crystals of ferrierite have been used to study the deactivation, at the single particle level, of the alkyl isomerisation catalysis of oleic acid and elaidic acid by a combination of visible micro-spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy (both polarised wide-field and confocal modes).

  17. Health and safety plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This HASP describes the process for identifying the requirements, written safety documentation, and procedures for protecting personnel involved in the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project. Objective of this project is to place 19 former isotope production facilities at ORNL in a safe condition in anticipation of an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance

  18. Spreading depression and focal venous cerebral ischemia enhance cortical neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Tamaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous neurogenesis can arise from a variety of physiological stimuli including exercise, learning, or “enriched environment” as well as pathological conditions such as ischemia, epilepsy or cortical spreading depression. Whether all these conditions use a common trigger to set off endogenous neurogenesis is yet unclear. We hypothesized that cortical spreading depression (CSD induces neurogenesis in the cerebral cortex and dentate gyrus after cerebral venous ischemia. Forty-two Wistar rats alternatively underwent sham operation (Sham, induction of ten CSDs or venous ischemia provoked via occlusion of two adjacent superficial cortical vein followed by ten induced CSDs (CSD + 2-VO. As an additional control, 15 naïve rats received no intervention except 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU treatment for 7 days. Sagittal brain slices (40 μm thick were co-stained for BrdU and doublecortin (DCX; new immature neuronal cells on day 9 or NeuN (new mature neuronal cells on day 28. On day 9 after sham operation, cell proliferation and neurogenesis occurred in the cortex in rats. The sole induction of CSD had no effect. But on days 9 and 28, more proliferating cells and newly formed neurons in the ipsilateral cortex were observed in rats subjected to CSD + 2VO than in rats subjected to sham operation. On days 9 and 28, cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the ipsilateral dentate gyrus was increased in sham-operated rats than in naïve rats. Our data supports the hypothesis that induced cortical neurogenesis after CSD + 2-VO is a direct effect of ischemia, rather than of CSD alone.

  19. Catalyst Deactivation and Regeneration Processes in Biogas Tri-Reforming Process. The Effect of Hydrogen Sulfide Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urko Izquierdo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work studies Ni-based catalyst deactivation and regeneration processes in the presence of H2S under a biogas tri-reforming process for hydrogen production, which is an energy vector of great interest. 25 ppm of hydrogen sulfide were continuously added to the system in order to provoke an observable catalyst deactivation, and once fully deactivated two different regeneration processes were studied: a self-regeneration and a regeneration by low temperature oxidation. For that purpose, several Ni-based catalysts and a bimetallic Rh-Ni catalyst supported on alumina modified with CeO2 and ZrO2 were used as well as a commercial Katalco 57-5 for comparison purposes. Ni/Ce-Al2O3 and Ni/Ce-Zr-Al2O3 catalysts almost recovered their initial activity. For these catalysts, after the regeneration under oxidative conditions at low temperature, the CO2 conversions achieved—79.5% and 86.9%, respectively—were significantly higher than the ones obtained before sulfur poisoning—66.7% and 45.2%, respectively. This effect could be attributed to the support modification with CeO2 and the higher selectivity achieved for the Reverse Water-Gas-Shift (rWGS reaction after catalysts deactivation. As expected, the bimetallic Rh-Ni/Ce-Al2O3 catalyst showed higher resistance to deactivation and its sulfur poisoning seems to be reversible. In the case of the commercial and Ni/Zr-Al2O3 catalysts, they did not recover their activity.

  20. MRI of focal cortical dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.C.P.; Hatfield, G.A.; Bourgeois, B.; Park, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    We studied nine cases of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) by MRI, with surface-rendered 3D reconstructions. One case was also examined using single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS). The histological features were reviewed and correlated with the MRI findings. The gyri affected by FCD were enlarged and the signal of the cortex was slightly increased on T1-weighted images. The gray-white junction was indistinct. Signal from the subcortical white matter was decreased on T1- and increased on T2-weighted images in most cases. Contrast enhancement was seen in two cases. Proton MRS showed a spectrum identical to that of normal brain. (orig.) (orig.)

  1. Communication and Wiring in the Cortical Connectome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian eBudd

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In cerebral cortex, the huge mass of axonal wiring that carries information between near and distant neurons is thought to provide the neural substrate for cognitive and perceptual function. The goal of mapping the connectivity of cortical axons at different spatial scales, the cortical connectome, is to trace the paths of information flow in cerebral cortex. To appreciate the relationship between the connectome and cortical function, we need to discover the nature and purpose of the wiring principles underlying cortical connectivity. A popular explanation has been that axonal length is strictly minimized both within and between cortical regions. In contrast, we have hypothesized the existence of a multi-scale principle of cortical wiring where to optimise communication there is a trade-off between spatial (construction and temporal (routing costs. Here, using recent evidence concerning cortical spatial networks we critically evaluate this hypothesis at neuron, local circuit, and pathway scales. We report three main conclusions. First, the axonal and dendritic arbor morphology of single neocortical neurons may be governed by a similar wiring principle, one that balances the conservation of cellular material and conduction delay. Second, the same principle may be observed for fibre tracts connecting cortical regions. Third, the absence of sufficient local circuit data currently prohibits any meaningful assessment of the hypothesis at this scale of cortical organization. To avoid neglecting neuron and microcircuit levels of cortical organization, the connectome framework should incorporate more morphological description. In addition, structural analyses of temporal cost for cortical circuits should take account of both axonal conduction and neuronal integration delays, which appear mostly of the same order of magnitude. We conclude the hypothesized trade-off between spatial and temporal costs may potentially offer a powerful explanation for

  2. SLEEP AND OLFACTORY CORTICAL PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eBarnes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many systems, sleep plays a vital role in memory consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. These processes together help store information of biological significance and reset synaptic circuits to facilitate acquisition of information in the future. In this review, we describe recent evidence of sleep-dependent changes in olfactory system structure and function which contribute to odor memory and perception. During slow-wave sleep, the piriform cortex becomes hypo-responsive to odor stimulation and instead displays sharp-wave activity similar to that observed within the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and other cortical and limbic regions is enhanced during slow-wave sleep compared to waking. This combination of conditions may allow odor memory consolidation to occur during a state of reduced external interference and facilitate association of odor memories with stored hedonic and contextual cues. Evidence consistent with sleep-dependent odor replay within olfactory cortical circuits is presented. These data suggest that both the strength and precision of odor memories is sleep-dependent. The work further emphasizes the critical role of synaptic plasticity and memory in not only odor memory but also basic odor perception. The work also suggests a possible link between sleep disturbances that are frequently co-morbid with a wide range of pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression and the known olfactory impairments associated with those disorders.

  3. Cortical representations of communication sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Marc A; Cheung, Steven W

    2008-10-01

    This review summarizes recent research into cortical processing of vocalizations in animals and humans. There has been a resurgent interest in this topic accompanied by an increased number of studies using animal models with complex vocalizations and new methods in human brain imaging. Recent results from such studies are discussed. Experiments have begun to reveal the bilateral cortical fields involved in communication sound processing and the transformations of neural representations that occur among those fields. Advances have also been made in understanding the neuronal basis of interaction between developmental exposures and behavioral experiences with vocalization perception. Exposure to sounds during the developmental period produces large effects on brain responses, as do a variety of specific trained tasks in adults. Studies have also uncovered a neural link between the motor production of vocalizations and the representation of vocalizations in cortex. Parallel experiments in humans and animals are answering important questions about vocalization processing in the central nervous system. This dual approach promises to reveal microscopic, mesoscopic, and macroscopic principles of large-scale dynamic interactions between brain regions that underlie the complex phenomenon of vocalization perception. Such advances will yield a greater understanding of the causes, consequences, and treatment of disorders related to speech processing.

  4. Silica supported palladium nanoparticles for the decarboxylation of high-acid feedstocks: Design, deactivation and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Eric Wayne

    2011-12-01

    The major goals of this thesis were to (1) design and synthesize a supported catalyst with well-defined monodisperse palladium nanoparticles evenly distributed throughout an inorganic oxide substrate with tunable porosity characteristics, (2) demonstrate the catalytic activity of this material in the decarboxylation of long chain fatty acids and their derivatives to make diesel-length hydrocarbons, (3) elucidate the deactivation mechanism of supported palladium catalysts under decarboxylation conditions via post mortem catalyst characterization and develop a regeneration methodology thereupon, and (4) apply this catalytic system to a real low-value biofeedstock. Initial catalyst designs were based on the SBA-15 silica support, but in an effort to maximize loading and minimize mass transfer limitations, silica MCF was synthesized as catalyst support. Functionalization with various silane ligands yielded a surface that facilitated even distribution of palladium precursor salts throughout the catalyst particle, and, after reduction, monodisperse palladium nanoparticles approximately 2 nm in diameter. Complete characterization was performed on this Pd-MCF catalyst. The Pd-MCF catalyst showed high one-time activity in the decarboxylation of fatty acids to hydrocarbons in dodecane at 300°C. Hydrogen was found to be an unnecessary reactant in the absence of unsaturations, but was required in their presence---full hydrogenation of the double bonds occurs before any decarboxylation can take place. The Pd-MCF also exhibited good activity for alkyl esters and glycerol, providing a nice hypothetical description of a stepwise reaction pathway for catalytic decarboxylation of acids and their derivatives. As expected, the Pd-MCF catalyst experienced severe deactivation after only one use. Substantial effort was put into elucidating the nature of this deactivation via post mortem catalyst characterization. H2 chemisorption confirmed a loss of active surface area, but TEM and

  5. A study on the deactivation and stability of hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen isotope exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Soon Hwan

    2006-02-01

    The hydrophobic catalyst has been prepared by deposition of platinum on porous styrene divinylbenzene copolymers(Pt/SDBC) and at the same time a separated type catalytic reactor has been developed for the Wolsong tritium removal facility(WTRF). Several tests carried out to obtain the experimental performance data of the Pt/SDBC with a recycle reactor system. The long-term stability was also measured with the Pt/SDBC catalyst immersed in water for a long time. The long-term deactivations of the Pt/SDBC catalyst were evaluated quantitatively by mathematical models. The simple mathematical models were presented to evaluate the uniform poisoning and shell progressive poisoning to be occurred simultaneously during the hydrogen isotope exchange between hydrogen gas and liquid water in the Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange(LPCE) column. The uniform poisoning was well characterized by a time on stream theory and then the deactivation parameters were determined from the experimental performance data. The impurity poisoning was derived by a shell progressive model with two-layer mass transfer. The water vapor condensation was a main cause of the reversible uniform poisoning for the Pt/SDBC catalyst. The values of the decay rate constant (K d ) and order of the decay reaction(m) were of 2 and 4, respectively, based on the experimental data. It indicated that the decay might be attributable to p