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Sample records for cortical cells harboring

  1. Medicago truncatula and Glomus intraradices gene expression in cortical cells harboring arbuscules in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Yuhong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most vascular flowering plants have the capacity to form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi. The symbiosis develops in the roots where AM fungi colonize the root cortex and form arbuscules within the cortical cells. Arbuscules are enveloped in a novel plant membrane and their establishment requires the coordinated cellular activities of both symbiotic partners. The arbuscule-cortical cell interface is the primary functional interface of the symbiosis and is of central importance in nutrient exchange. To determine the molecular events the underlie arbuscule development and function, it is first necessary to identify genes that may play a role in this process. Toward this goal we used the Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array to document the M. truncatula transcript profiles associated with AM symbiosis, and then developed laser microdissection (LM of M. truncatula root cortical cells to enable analyses of gene expression in individual cell types by RT-PCR. Results This approach led to the identification of novel M. truncatula and G. intraradices genes expressed in colonized cortical cells and in arbuscules. Within the arbuscule, expression of genes associated with the urea cycle, amino acid biosynthesis and cellular autophagy was detected. Analysis of gene expression in the colonized cortical cell revealed up-regulation of a lysine motif (LysM-receptor like kinase, members of the GRAS transcription factor family and a symbiosis-specific ammonium transporter that is a likely candidate for mediating ammonium transport in the AM symbiosis. Conclusion Transcript profiling using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array provided new insights into gene expression in M. truncatula roots during AM symbiosis and revealed the existence of several G. intraradices genes on the M. truncatula GeneChip®. A laser microdissection protocol that incorporates low-melting temperature Steedman's wax, was

  2. Grid cells and cortical representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Edvard I; Roudi, Yasser; Witter, Menno P; Kentros, Clifford; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Moser, May-Britt

    2014-07-01

    One of the grand challenges in neuroscience is to comprehend neural computation in the association cortices, the parts of the cortex that have shown the largest expansion and differentiation during mammalian evolution and that are thought to contribute profoundly to the emergence of advanced cognition in humans. In this Review, we use grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex as a gateway to understand network computation at a stage of cortical processing in which firing patterns are shaped not primarily by incoming sensory signals but to a large extent by the intrinsic properties of the local circuit.

  3. Orange County Littoral Cell CRSMP Harbor Receiver Sites 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Harbor reciever sites from Everest (2009) 'Harbor Area Management Plan, In-Harbor Beach Replenishment Strategy', Technical Report. Prepared for Harbor Resources...

  4. Primary cortical brain cells influence osteoblast activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anissian, Lucas; Kirby, Michael; Stark, André

    2009-12-18

    The presence of neuropeptides and neuroreceptors in the bone have been reported in several studies. Bone turn-over seems to be controlled by the nervous system. The actual pathway or the control mechanism is still under investigation. In this study we investigate the changes in osteoblast cells if they are in co-culture with primary cortical brain cells. After seven days in co-culture with the primary fetal brain cells the osteoblast cells exhibited hypertrophic morphological changes and showed stronger ALP activity.

  5. Adult mouse cortical cell taxonomy revealed by single cell transcriptomics.

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    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T; Sorensen, Staci A; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-02-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. We constructed a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice on the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing. We identified 49 transcriptomic cell types, including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and 7 non-neuronal types. We also analyzed cell type-specific mRNA processing and characterized genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we found that some of our transcriptomic cell types displayed specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single-cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties.

  6. Centrosomal and mitotic abnormalities in cell lines derived from papillary thyroid cancer harboring specific gene alterations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maric, Irena; Viaggi, Silvia; Caria, Paola; Frau, Daniela V; Degan, Paolo; Vanni, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    .... We investigated the centrosome status and mitotic abnormalities in three thyroid carcinoma-derived cell lines, each maintaining the specific, biologically relevant gene alteration harbored by the parental tumors...

  7. Viability of dielectrophoretically trapped neural cortical cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, T.; Vulto, P.; Rutten, W.L.C.; Marani, E.

    2001-01-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic trapping of neural cells is an efficient way to position neural cells on the electrode sites of planar micro-electrode arrays. The preservation of viability of the neural cells is essential for this approach. This study investigates the viability of postnatal cortical rat

  8. Homeostatic responses by surviving cortical pyramidal cells in neurodegenerative tauopathy.

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    Crimins, Johanna L; Rocher, Anne B; Peters, Alan; Shultz, Penny; Lewis, Jada; Luebke, Jennifer I

    2011-11-01

    Cortical neuron death is prevalent by 9 months in rTg(tau(P301L))4510 tau mutant mice (TG) and surviving pyramidal cells exhibit dendritic regression and spine loss. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to investigate the impact of these marked structural changes on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) of layer 3 pyramidal cells in frontal cortical slices from behaviorally characterized TG and non-transgenic (NT) mice at this age. Frontal lobe function of TG mice was intact following a short delay interval but impaired following a long delay interval in an object recognition test, and cortical atrophy and cell loss were pronounced. Surviving TG cells had significantly reduced dendritic diameters, total spine density, and mushroom spines, yet sEPSCs were increased and sIPSCs were unchanged in frequency. Thus, despite significant regressive structural changes, synaptic responses were not reduced in TG cells, indicating that homeostatic compensatory mechanisms occur during progressive tauopathy. Consistent with this idea, surviving TG cells were more intrinsically excitable than NT cells, and exhibited sprouting of filopodia and axonal boutons. Moreover, the neuropil in TG mice showed an increased density of asymmetric synapses, although their mean size was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that during progressive tauopathy, cortical pyramidal cells compensate for loss of afferent input by increased excitability and establishment of new synapses. These compensatory homeostatic mechanisms may play an important role in slowing the progression of neuronal network dysfunction during neurodegenerative tauopathies.

  9. Rat full term amniotic fluid harbors highly potent stem cells.

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    Mun-Fun, Hoo; Ferdaos, Nurfarhana; Hamzah, Siti Nurusaadah; Ridzuan, Noridzzaida; Hisham, Nurul Afiqah; Abdullah, Syahril; Ramasamy, Rajesh; Cheah, Pike See; Thilakavathy, Karrupiah; Yazid, Mohd Nazri; Nordin, Norshariza

    2015-10-01

    Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) are commonly isolated from mid-term amniotic fluid (AF) of animals and human collected via an invasive technique, amniocentesis. Alternatively, AFSCs could be collected at full-term. However, it is unclear whether AFSCs are present in the AF at full term. Here, we aimed to isolate and characterize stem cells isolated from AF of full term pregnant rats. Three stem cell lines have been established following immuno-selection against the stem cell marker, c-kit. Two of the new lines expressed multiple markers of pluripotency until more than passage 90. Further, they spontaneously differentiated into derivatives of the three primary germ layers through the formation of good quality embryoid bodies (EBs), and can be directly differentiated into neural lineage. Their strong stemness and potent neurogenic properties highlight the presence of highly potent stem cells in AF of full-term pregnancies, which could serve as a potential source of stem cells for regenerative medicine.

  10. Cortical network from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The connection of embryonic stem cell technology and developmental biology provides valuable tools to decipher the mechanisms underlying human brain development and diseases, especially among neuronal populations, that are not readily available in primary cultures. It is obviously the case of neurons forming the human cerebral cortex. In the images that are presented, the neurons were generated in vitro from human embryonic stem cells via forebrain-like progenitors. Maintained in cul...

  11. Cortical Flow-Driven Shapes of Nonadherent Cells

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    Callan-Jones, A. C.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Heisenberg, C. P.; Voituriez, R.

    2016-01-01

    Nonadherent polarized cells have been observed to have a pearlike, elongated shape. Using a minimal model that describes the cell cortex as a thin layer of contractile active gel, we show that the anisotropy of active stresses, controlled by cortical viscosity and filament ordering, can account for this morphology. The predicted shapes can be determined from the flow pattern only; they prove to be independent of the mechanism at the origin of the cortical flow, and are only weakly sensitive to the cytoplasmic rheology. In the case of actin flows resulting from a contractile instability, we propose a phase diagram of three-dimensional cell shapes that encompasses nonpolarized spherical, elongated, as well as oblate shapes, all of which have been observed in experiment.

  12. Brown adipose tissue harbors a distinct sub-population of regulatory T cells.

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    Dasa Medrikova

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are critical determinants of both immune responses and metabolic control. Here we show that systemic ablation of Treg cells compromised the adaptation of whole-body energy expenditure to cold exposure, correlating with impairment in thermogenic marker gene expression and massive invasion of pro-inflammatory macrophages in brown adipose tissue (BAT. Indeed, BAT harbored a unique sub-set of Treg cells characterized by a unique gene signature. As these Treg cells respond to BAT activation upon cold exposure, this study defines a BAT-specific Treg sub-set with direct implications for the regulation of energy homeostasis in response to environmental stress.

  13. Adaptive responses to dasatinib-treated lung squamous cell cancer cells harboring DDR2 mutations.

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    Bai, Yun; Kim, Jae-Young; Watters, January M; Fang, Bin; Kinose, Fumi; Song, Lanxi; Koomen, John M; Teer, Jamie K; Fisher, Kate; Chen, Yian Ann; Rix, Uwe; Haura, Eric B

    2014-12-15

    DDR2 mutations occur in approximately 4% of lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) where the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib has emerged as a new therapeutic option. We found that ERK and AKT phosphorylation was weakly inhibited by dasatinib in DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells, suggesting that dasatinib inhibits survival signals distinct from other oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and/or compensatory signals exist that dampen dasatinib activity. To gain better insight into dasatinib's action in these cells, we assessed altered global tyrosine phosphorylation (pY) after dasatinib exposure using a mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach. Overlaying protein-protein interaction relationships upon this dasatinib-regulated pY network revealed decreased phosphorylation of Src family kinases and their targets. Conversely, dasatinib enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation in a panel of RTK and their signaling adaptor complexes, including EGFR, MET/GAB1, and IGF1R/IRS2, implicating a RTK-driven adaptive response associated with dasatinib. To address the significance of this observation, these results were further integrated with results from a small-molecule chemical library screen. We found that dasatinib combined with MET and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) inhibitors had a synergistic effect, and ligand stimulation of EGFR and MET rescued DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells from dasatinib-induced loss of cell viability. Importantly, we observed high levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR and MET in a panel of human lung SCC tissues harboring DDR2 mutations. Our results highlight potential RTK-driven adaptive-resistant mechanisms upon DDR2 targeting, and they suggest new, rationale cotargeting strategies for DDR2-mutant lung SCC.

  14. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells

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    Giacaman Rodrigo A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. Results To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Δenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+ by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Conclusion Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  15. Imprint lithography provides topographical nanocues to guide cell growth in primary cortical cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Sijia; Lüttge, Regina

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a technology platform to study the effect of nanocues on the cell growth direction in primary cortical cell culture. Topographical cues to cells are provided using nanoscale features created by Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography, coated with polyethylenimine. We

  16. Cortical cell and neuron density estimates in one chimpanzee hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christine E; Turner, Emily C; Sawyer, Eva Kille; Reed, Jamie L; Young, Nicole A; Flaherty, David K; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-19

    The density of cells and neurons in the neocortex of many mammals varies across cortical areas and regions. This variability is, perhaps, most pronounced in primates. Nonuniformity in the composition of cortex suggests regions of the cortex have different specializations. Specifically, regions with densely packed neurons contain smaller neurons that are activated by relatively few inputs, thereby preserving information, whereas regions that are less densely packed have larger neurons that have more integrative functions. Here we present the numbers of cells and neurons for 742 discrete locations across the neocortex in a chimpanzee. Using isotropic fractionation and flow fractionation methods for cell and neuron counts, we estimate that neocortex of one hemisphere contains 9.5 billion cells and 3.7 billion neurons. Primary visual cortex occupies 35 cm(2) of surface, 10% of the total, and contains 737 million densely packed neurons, 20% of the total neurons contained within the hemisphere. Other areas of high neuron packing include secondary visual areas, somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal granular cortex. Areas of low levels of neuron packing density include motor and premotor cortex. These values reflect those obtained from more limited samples of cortex in humans and other primates.

  17. Lithium chloride decreases proliferation and migration of C6 glioma cells harboring isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutant via GSK-3β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuejun; Zheng, Yali; Chan, Kok-Gan; Liang, Aihua; Hu, Fengyun

    2014-06-01

    The gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is somatically mutated predominantly in secondary glioblastoma multiforme. Mutations of IDH1 and IDH2 lead to simultaneous loss and gain of activities in the production of α-ketoglutarate and 2-hydroxyglutarate, respectively. Lithium chloride was recently proved efficient in inhibiting glioma cell migration. The mechanism of lithium chloride on C6 glioma cells harboring IDH2 mutation has not been studied. Here, we found lithium chloride induced inhibitive effects on cell proliferation of both C6 glioma cells with and without IDH2 mutation, although IDH2 mutation increased the stability of HIF-1α. GSK-3β could be phosphorylated at Ser9 and its activity was inhibited when C6 glioma cells were treated by lithium chloride. The degree of phosphorylation in IDH2(R172G) treatment group was lower than that as compared to the control and IDH2 treatment groups. At the same time, the accumulation of β-catenin in C6 cell nucleus was decreased. Moreover, although the β-catenin and HIF-1α increased the secretion of metalloproteinase-2,-9 in C6 glioma cells harboring IDH2 mutation, the migration potential of lithium chloride-treated C6 glioma cells harboring the IDH2 and its mutant was uniform. These results indicated lithium chloride could decrease the proliferation and migration potential of C6 glioma cells harboring IDH2 mutation.

  18. MENINGES HARBOR CELLS EXPRESSING NEURAL PRECURSOR MARKERS DURING DEVELOPMENT AND ADULTHOOD

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    Francesco eBifari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain and skull developments are tightly synchronized, allowing the cranial bones to dynamically adapt to the brain shape. At the brain-skull interface, meninges produce the trophic signals necessary for normal corticogenesis and bone development. Meninges harbor different cell populations, including cells forming the endosteum of the cranial vault. Recently, we and other groups have described the presence in meninges of a cell population endowed with neural differentiation potential in vitro and, after transplantation, in vivo. However, whether meninges may be a niche for neural progenitor cells during embryonic development and in adulthood remains to be determined.In this work we provide the first description of the distribution of neural precursor markers in rat meninges during development up to adulthood. We conclude that meninges share common properties with the classical neural stem cell niche, as they: i are a highly proliferating tissue; ii host cells expressing neural precursor markers such as nestin, vimentin, Sox2 and doublecortin; and iii are enriched in extracellular matrix components (e.g. fractones known to bind and concentrate growth factors. This study underlines the importance of meninges as a potential niche for endogenous precursor cells during development and in adulthood.

  19. Matrine Activates PTEN to Induce Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis in V600EBRAF Harboring Melanoma Cells

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    Shuiying Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a natural chemical Matrine, which exhibits anti-melanoma potential with its PTEN activation mechanism. Matrine effectively inhibited proliferation of several carcinoma cell lines, including melanoma V600EBRAF harboring M21 cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed Matrine induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in M21 cells dose-dependently. Apoptosis in M21 cells induced by Matrine was identified by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL analysis and Annexin-V/FITC staining. Molecular mechanistic study suggested that Matrine upregulated both mRNA level and protein expression level of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN, leading to inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Downregulation of phosphor-Aktser473 by Matrine activated p21 and Bax, which contributed to G0/G1 cell cycle and apoptosis. Besides, Matrine enhanced the PI3K/Akt inhibition effects to inhibit the cell proliferation with PI3K inhibitor, LY2940002. In summary, our findings suggest Matrine is a promising antitumor drug candidate with its possible PTEN activation mechanisms for treating cancer diseases, such as melanomas.

  20. Meninges harbor cells expressing neural precursor markers during development and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifari, Francesco; Berton, Valeria; Pino, Annachiara; Kusalo, Marijana; Malpeli, Giorgio; Di Chio, Marzia; Bersan, Emanuela; Amato, Eliana; Scarpa, Aldo; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido; Decimo, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Brain and skull developments are tightly synchronized, allowing the cranial bones to dynamically adapt to the brain shape. At the brain-skull interface, meninges produce the trophic signals necessary for normal corticogenesis and bone development. Meninges harbor different cell populations, including cells forming the endosteum of the cranial vault. Recently, we and other groups have described the presence in meninges of a cell population endowed with neural differentiation potential in vitro and, after transplantation, in vivo. However, whether meninges may be a niche for neural progenitor cells during embryonic development and in adulthood remains to be determined. In this work we provide the first description of the distribution of neural precursor markers in rat meninges during development up to adulthood. We conclude that meninges share common properties with the classical neural stem cell niche, as they: (i) are a highly proliferating tissue; (ii) host cells expressing neural precursor markers such as nestin, vimentin, Sox2 and doublecortin; and (iii) are enriched in extracellular matrix components (e.g., fractones) known to bind and concentrate growth factors. This study underlines the importance of meninges as a potential niche for endogenous precursor cells during development and in adulthood.

  1. Adhesion functions in cell sorting by mechanically coupling the cortices of adhering cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Berthoumieux, Hélène; Krens, Simon Frederik Gabriel; Salbreux, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank; Paluch, Ewa; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2012-10-12

    Differential cell adhesion and cortex tension are thought to drive cell sorting by controlling cell-cell contact formation. Here, we show that cell adhesion and cortex tension have different mechanical functions in controlling progenitor cell-cell contact formation and sorting during zebrafish gastrulation. Cortex tension controls cell-cell contact expansion by modulating interfacial tension at the contact. By contrast, adhesion has little direct function in contact expansion, but instead is needed to mechanically couple the cortices of adhering cells at their contacts, allowing cortex tension to control contact expansion. The coupling function of adhesion is mediated by E-cadherin and limited by the mechanical anchoring of E-cadherin to the cortex. Thus, cell adhesion provides the mechanical scaffold for cell cortex tension to drive cell sorting during gastrulation.

  2. Antitumor effects and molecular mechanisms of ponatinib on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hee; Kwak, Yeonui; Kim, Nam Doo; Sim, Taebo

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant mutational activation of FGFR2 is associated with endometrial cancers (ECs). AP24534 (ponatinib) currently undergoing clinical trials has been known to be an orally available multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our biochemical kinase assay showed that AP24534 is potent against wild-type FGFR1-4 and 5 mutant FGFRs (V561M-FGFR1, N549H-FGFR2, K650E-FGFR3, G697C-FGFR3, N535K-FGFR4) and possesses the strongest kinase-inhibitory activity on N549H-FGFR2 (IC50 of 0.5 nM) among all FGFRs tested. We therefore investigated the effects of AP24534 on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. AP24534 significantly inhibited the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells bearing activating FGFR2 mutations (N549K, K310R/N549K, S252W) and mainly induced G1/S cell cycle arrest leading to apoptosis. AP24534 also diminished the kinase activity of immunoprecipitated FGFR2 derived from MFE-296 and MFE-280 cells and reduced the phosphorylation of FGFR2 and FRS2 on MFE-296 and AN3CA cells. AP24534 caused substantial reductions in ERK phosphorylation, PLCγ signaling and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs bearing FGFR2 activating mutations. Akt signaling pathway was also deactivated by AP24534. AP24534 causes the chemotherapeutic effect through mainly the blockade of ERK, PLCγ and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs. Moreover, AP24534 inhibited migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells with FGFR2 mutations. In addition, AP24534 significantly blocked anchorage-independent growth of endometrial cancer cells. We, for the first time, report the molecular mechanisms by which AP24534 exerts antitumor effects on ECs with FGFR2 activating mutations, which would provide mechanistic insight into ongoing clinical investigations of AP24534 for ECs.

  3. Modeling astrocytoma pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo using cortical astrocytes or neural stem cells from conditional, genetically engineered mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Robert S; Schmid, Ralf S; Bash, Ryan E; Vitucci, Mark; White, Kristen K; Werneke, Andrea M; Constance, Brian H; Huff, Byron; Miller, C Ryan

    2014-08-12

    Current astrocytoma models are limited in their ability to define the roles of oncogenic mutations in specific brain cell types during disease pathogenesis and their utility for preclinical drug development. In order to design a better model system for these applications, phenotypically wild-type cortical astrocytes and neural stem cells (NSC) from conditional, genetically engineered mice (GEM) that harbor various combinations of floxed oncogenic alleles were harvested and grown in culture. Genetic recombination was induced in vitro using adenoviral Cre-mediated recombination, resulting in expression of mutated oncogenes and deletion of tumor suppressor genes. The phenotypic consequences of these mutations were defined by measuring proliferation, transformation, and drug response in vitro. Orthotopic allograft models, whereby transformed cells are stereotactically injected into the brains of immune-competent, syngeneic littermates, were developed to define the role of oncogenic mutations and cell type on tumorigenesis in vivo. Unlike most established human glioblastoma cell line xenografts, injection of transformed GEM-derived cortical astrocytes into the brains of immune-competent littermates produced astrocytomas, including the most aggressive subtype, glioblastoma, that recapitulated the histopathological hallmarks of human astrocytomas, including diffuse invasion of normal brain parenchyma. Bioluminescence imaging of orthotopic allografts from transformed astrocytes engineered to express luciferase was utilized to monitor in vivo tumor growth over time. Thus, astrocytoma models using astrocytes and NSC harvested from GEM with conditional oncogenic alleles provide an integrated system to study the genetics and cell biology of astrocytoma pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo and may be useful in preclinical drug development for these devastating diseases.

  4. Stromal derived factor-1 exerts differential regulation on distinct cortical cell populations in vitro

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    Zeef Leo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal derived factor (SDF-1, an alpha chemokine, is a widely known chemoattractant in the immune system. A growing body of evidence now suggests multiple regulatory roles for SDF-1 in the developing nervous system. Results To investigate the role of SDF-1 signaling in the growth and differentiation of cortical cells, we performed numerous in vitro experiments, including gene chip and quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Using SDF-1 medium and AMD3100, a receptor antagonist, we demonstrate that the chemokine signaling regulates key events during early cortical development. First, SDF-1 signaling maintains cortical progenitors in proliferation, possibly through a mechanism involving connexin 43 mediated intercellular coupling. Second, SDF-1 signaling upregulates the differentiation of cortical GABAergic neurons, independent of sonic signaling pathway. Third, SDF-1 enables the elongation and branching of axons of cortical glutamatergic neurons. Finally, cortical cultures derived from CXCR4-/- mutants show a close parallel to AMD3100 treatment with reduced cell proliferation and differentiation of GABAergic neurons. Conclusion Results from this study show that SDF-1 regulates distinct cortical cell populations in vitro.

  5. Human Amniotic Fluid Cells Form Functional Gap Junctions with Cortical Cells

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    Anna Jezierski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The usage of stem cells is a promising strategy for the repair of damaged tissue in the injured brain. Recently, amniotic fluid (AF cells have received a lot of attention as an alternative source of stem cells for cell-based therapies. However, the success of this approach relies significantly on proper interactions between graft and host tissue. In particular, the reestablishment of functional brain networks requires formation of gap junctions, as a key step to provide sufficient intercellular communication. In this study, we show that AF cells express high levels of CX43 (GJA1 and are able to establish functional gap junctions with cortical cultures. Furthermore, we report an induction of Cx43 expression in astrocytes following injury to the mouse motor cortex and demonstrate for the first time CX43 expression at the interface between implanted AF cells and host brain cells. These findings suggest that CX43-mediated intercellular communication between AF cells and cortical astrocytes may contribute to the reconstruction of damaged tissue by mediating modulatory, homeostatic, and protective factors in the injured brain and hence warrants further investigation.

  6. A subset of prostatic basal cell carcinomas harbor the MYB rearrangement of adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Justin A; Yonescu, Raluca; Epstein, Jonathan I; Westra, William H

    2015-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a basaloid tumor consisting of myoepithelial and ductal cells typically arranged in a cribriform pattern. Adenoid cystic carcinoma is generally regarded as a form of salivary gland carcinoma, but it can arise from sites unassociated with salivary tissue. A rare form of prostate carcinoma exhibits ACC-like features; it is no longer regarded as a true ACC but rather as prostatic basal cell carcinoma (PBCC) and within the spectrum of basaloid prostatic proliferations. True ACCs often harbor MYB translocations resulting in the MYB-NFIB fusion protein. MYB analysis could clarify the true nature of prostatic carcinomas that exhibit ACC features and thus help refine the classification of prostatic basaloid proliferations. Twelve PBCCs were identified from the pathology consultation files of Johns Hopkins Hospital. The histopathologic features were reviewed, and break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization for MYB was performed. All 12 cases exhibited prominent basaloid histology. Four were purely solid, 7 exhibited a cribriform pattern reminiscent of salivary ACC, and 1 had a mixed pattern. The MYB rearrangement was detected in 2 (29%) of 7 ACC-like carcinomas but in none (0%) of the 5 PBCCs with a prominent solid pattern. True ACCs can arise in the prostate as is evidenced by the presence of the characteristic MYB rearrangement. When dealing with malignant basaloid proliferations in the prostate, recommendations to consolidate ACCs with other tumor types may need to be reassessed, particularly in light of the rapidly advancing field of biologic therapy where the identification of tumor-specific genetic alterations presents novel therapeutic targets.

  7. Outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring trisomy 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuma, Takaaki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Takuya; Uchida, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Kato, Chiaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kanamori, Heiwa; Eto, Tetsuya; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Kohno, Akio; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Takami, Akiyoshi; Yano, Shingo

    2017-03-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is one of the most common cytogenetic abnormalities in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in adult patients with AML harboring +8 remains unclear. To evaluate, the outcome and prognostic factors in patients with AML harboring +8 as the only chromosomal abnormality or in association with other abnormalities, we retrospectively analyzed the Japanese registration data of 631 adult patients with AML harboring +8 treated with allogeneic HSCT between 1990 and 2013. In total, 388 (61%) patients were not in remission at the time of HSCT. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, the probability of overall survival and the cumulative incidence of relapse at 3 years were 40 and 34%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, two or more additional cytogenetic abnormalities and not being in remission at the time of HSCT were significantly associated with a higher overall mortality and relapse. Nevertheless, no significant impact on the outcome was observed in cases with one cytogenetic abnormality in addition to +8. Although more than 60% of the patients received HSCT when not in remission, allogeneic HSCT offered a curative option for adult patients with AML harboring +8.

  8. EFFECTS OF CEREBRAL CORTICAL CONCIS ON CELL PROLIFERATION OF THE SUBVENTRICULAR ZONE IN ADULT RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yuelin; Qiu Shudong; Zhang Pengbo; Shi Wei

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the proliferative response and time course of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells after cerebral cortical concis in the adult rats. Methods Eighty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Cumulative BrdU labeling was employed to detect the proliferating cells. At 1 d, 3 d, 7 d, 14 d, and 21 d after cerebral cortical concis, the rats were killed for BrdU immunohistochemical staining and cell counting in the injured ipsilateral SVZ. Results Little BrdU immunoreactivity cells was present in SVZ of the control rats from day 7 to day 21 after sham operation. The number of BrdU immunoreactivity cells in the injured ipsilateral SVZ increased at day 1 and peaked at day 7 after cerebral cortical concis. Conclusion After cerebral cortical concis of the adult rats, neural stem/progenitor cells in the injured ipsilateral SVZ markedly proliferated with a peak at day 7. This finding may be important for manipulating SVZ cells to promote the recovery from cerebral cortical concis.

  9. Disrupted cross-laminar cortical processing in β amyloid pathology precedes cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lison, H; Happel, M F K; Schneider, F; Baldauf, K; Kerbstat, S; Seelbinder, B; Schneeberg, J; Zappe, M; Goldschmidt, J; Budinger, E; Schröder, U H; Ohl, F W; Schilling, S; Demuth, H-U; Scheich, H; Reymann, K G; Rönicke, R

    2014-03-01

    Disruption of neuronal networks in the Alzheimer-afflicted brain is increasingly recognized as a key correlate of cognitive and memory decline in Alzheimer patients. We hypothesized that functional synaptic disconnections within cortical columnar microcircuits by pathological β-amyloid accumulation, rather than cell death, initially causes the cognitive impairments. During development of cortical β-amyloidosis with still few plaques in the transgenic 5xFAD mouse model single cell resolution mapping of neuronal thallium uptake revealed that electrical activity of pyramidal cells breaks down throughout infragranular cortical layer V long before cell death occurs. Treatment of 5xFAD mice with the glutaminyl cyclase inhibitor, PQ 529, partially prevented the decline of pyramidal cell activity, indicating pyroglutamate-modified forms, potentially mixed oligomers of Aβ are contributing to neuronal impairment. Laminar investigation of cortical circuit dysfunction with current source density analysis identified an early loss of excitatory synaptic input in infragranular layers, linked to pathological recurrent activations in supragranular layers. This specific disruption of normal cross-laminar cortical processing coincided with a decline of contextual fear learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. C3G regulates cortical neuron migration, preplate splitting and radial glial cell attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Anne K; Britto, Joanne M; Dixon, Mathew P; Sheikh, Bilal N; Collin, Caitlin; Tan, Seong-Seng; Thomas, Tim

    2008-06-01

    Neuronal migration is integral to the development of the cerebral cortex and higher brain function. Cortical neuron migration defects lead to mental disorders such as lissencephaly and epilepsy. Interaction of neurons with their extracellular environment regulates cortical neuron migration through cell surface receptors. However, it is unclear how the signals from extracellular matrix proteins are transduced intracellularly. We report here that mouse embryos lacking the Ras family guanine nucleotide exchange factor, C3G (Rapgef1, Grf2), exhibit a cortical neuron migration defect resulting in a failure to split the preplate into marginal zone and subplate and a failure to form a cortical plate. C3G-deficient cortical neurons fail to migrate. Instead, they arrest in a multipolar state and accumulate below the preplate. The basement membrane is disrupted and radial glial processes are disorganised and lack attachment in C3G-deficient brains. C3G is activated in response to reelin in cortical neurons, which, in turn, leads to activation of the small GTPase Rap1. In C3G-deficient cells, Rap1 GTP loading in response to reelin stimulation is reduced. In conclusion, the Ras family regulator C3G is essential for two aspects of cortex development, namely radial glial attachment and neuronal migration.

  11. [Pearl Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "Loblolly Magazine" was written in observance of the 50th anniversary of the U.S. entrance into World War II. The publication features interviews conducted by East Texas high school students with Clarence Otterman, one of the few survivors of the crew of the USS Arizona, which was bombed during the attack on Pearl Harbor,…

  12. IgLON cell adhesion molecules are shed from the cell surface of cortical neurons to promote neuronal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ricardo; Ferraro, Gino B; Fournier, Alyson E

    2015-02-13

    Matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases are members of the zinc endopeptidases, which cleave components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell surface proteins resulting in degradation or release of biologically active fragments. Surface ectodomain shedding affects numerous biological processes, including survival, axon outgrowth, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the role of metalloproteinases in regulating cortical neurite growth. We found that treatment of mature cortical neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors or with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 reduced neurite outgrowth. Through mass spectrometry, we characterized the metalloproteinase-sensitive cell surface proteome of mature cortical neurons. Members of the IgLON family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neural cell adhesion molecules were identified and validated as proteins that were shed from the surface of mature cortical neurons in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner. Introduction of two members of the IgLON family, neurotrimin and NEGR1, in early embryonic neurons was sufficient to confer sensitivity to metalloproteinase inhibitors in neurite outgrowth assays. Outgrowth experiments on immobilized IgLON proteins revealed a role for all IgLON family members in promoting neurite extension from cortical neurons. Together, our findings support a role for metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of IgLON family members in regulating neurite outgrowth from mature cortical neurons.

  13. IgLON Cell Adhesion Molecules Are Shed from the Cell Surface of Cortical Neurons to Promote Neuronal Growth*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ricardo; Ferraro, Gino B.; Fournier, Alyson E.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases are members of the zinc endopeptidases, which cleave components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell surface proteins resulting in degradation or release of biologically active fragments. Surface ectodomain shedding affects numerous biological processes, including survival, axon outgrowth, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the role of metalloproteinases in regulating cortical neurite growth. We found that treatment of mature cortical neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors or with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 reduced neurite outgrowth. Through mass spectrometry, we characterized the metalloproteinase-sensitive cell surface proteome of mature cortical neurons. Members of the IgLON family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neural cell adhesion molecules were identified and validated as proteins that were shed from the surface of mature cortical neurons in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner. Introduction of two members of the IgLON family, neurotrimin and NEGR1, in early embryonic neurons was sufficient to confer sensitivity to metalloproteinase inhibitors in neurite outgrowth assays. Outgrowth experiments on immobilized IgLON proteins revealed a role for all IgLON family members in promoting neurite extension from cortical neurons. Together, our findings support a role for metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of IgLON family members in regulating neurite outgrowth from mature cortical neurons. PMID:25538237

  14. Transcriptome profiling identifies genes and pathways deregulated upon floxuridine treatment in colorectal cancer cells harboring GOF mutant p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Datta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutation in TP53 is a common genetic alteration in human cancers. Certain tumor associated p53 missense mutants acquire gain-of-function (GOF properties and confer oncogenic phenotypes including enhanced chemoresistance. The colorectal cancers (CRC harboring mutant p53 are generally aggressive in nature and difficult to treat. To identify a potential gene expression signature of GOF mutant p53-driven acquired chemoresistance in CRC, we performed transcriptome profiling of floxuridine (FUdR treated SW480 cells expressing mutant p53R273H (GEO#: GSE77533. We obtained several genes differentially regulated between FUdR treated and untreated cells. Further, functional characterization and pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of crucial biological processes and pathways upon FUdR treatment in SW480 cells. Our data suggest that in response to chemotherapeutics treatment, cancer cells with GOF mutant p53 can modulate key cellular pathways to withstand the cytotoxic effect of the drugs. The genes and pathways identified in the present study can be further validated and targeted for better chemotherapy response in colorectal cancer patients harboring mutant p53.

  15. Fixed endothelial cells exhibit physiologically relevant nanomechanics of the cortical actin web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo Grimm, Kai; Oberleithner, Hans; Fels, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    It has been unknown whether cells retain their mechanical properties after fixation. Therefore, this study was designed to compare the stiffness properties of the cell cortex (the 50-100 nm thick zone below the plasma membrane) before and after fixation. Atomic force microscopy was used to acquire force indentation curves from which the nanomechanical cell properties were derived. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of actin destabilizing agent cytochalasin D, which results in a gradual softening of the cell cortex. Then cells were studied ‘alive’ or ‘fixed’. We show that the cortical stiffness of fixed endothelial cells still reports functional properties of the actin web qualitatively comparable to those of living cells. Myosin motor protein activity, tested by blebbistatin inhibition, can only be detected, in terms of cortical mechanics, in living but not in fixed cells. We conclude that fixation interferes with motor proteins while maintaining a functional cortical actin web. Thus, fixation of cells opens up the prospect of differentially studying the actions of cellular myosin and actin.

  16. Interpolation of microtubules into cortical arrays during cell elongation and differentiation in roots of Azolla pinnata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardham, A R; Gunning, B E

    1979-06-01

    Longitudinal sections of roots of Azolla pinnata R. Br. were prepared for electron microscopy so that cortical microtubules could be counted along the longitudinal walls in cell files in the endodermis, pericycle, and inner and outer cortex, and in sieve and xylem elements. With the exception of the xylem, where there are no transverse cell divisions, each file of cells commences with its initial cell and then possesses a zone of concomitant cell expansion and transverse cell division, followed, after completion of the divisions, by a zone of terminal cell differentiation. The cells augment their population of cortical microtubules as they elongate and divide, showing a net increase of up to 0.6 micron of polymerized microtubule length per min. Two main sub-processes were found: (i) When a longitudinal wall is first formed it is supplied with a higher number of microtubules per unit length of wall than it will have later, when it is being expanded. This initial quota becomes diluted as the second sub-process commences. (ii) The cells interpolate new microtubules at a rate which is characteristic of the cell, and, in the endodermis, of the face of the cell, while the cell elongates. Most cell types thus maintain a set density of cortical microtubules while they elongate and divide. Comparisons of endodermal cells in untreated controls, and roots that had been treated with colchicine, low temperature, or high pressure indicate that the initial quota of microtubules, and the later interpolations, and differentially sensitive to microtuble perturbations. Three types of behaviour, all related to changes in the cell walls, were noted as cortex, xylem and sieve element cells entered their respective phases of cell differentiation. The cortical cells expanded in all dimensions, and the interpolation of microtubules diminished or ceased. The sieve elements continued to elongate, and interpolated at a high rate, reaching unusually high densities of microtubules when the cell

  17. Ischemia-Induced Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Pia Mater Following Cortical Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakagomi, Takayuki; Molnar, Zoltan; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Taguchi, Akihiko; Saino, Orie; Kubo, Shuji; Clausen, Martijn; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Nakagomi, Nami; Matsuyama, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that neural stem/ progenitor cells (NSPCs) can be activated in the nonconventional neurogenic zones such as the cortex following ischemic stroke. However, the precise origin, identity, and subtypes of the ischemia-induced NSPCs (iNSPCs), which can contribute to cortical

  18. Ischemia-Induced Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in the Pia Mater Following Cortical Infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakagomi, Takayuki; Molnar, Zoltan; Nakano-Doi, Akiko; Taguchi, Akihiko; Saino, Orie; Kubo, Shuji; Clausen, Martijn; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Nakagomi, Nami; Matsuyama, Tomohiro

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that neural stem/ progenitor cells (NSPCs) can be activated in the nonconventional neurogenic zones such as the cortex following ischemic stroke. However, the precise origin, identity, and subtypes of the ischemia-induced NSPCs (iNSPCs), which can contribute to cortical neu

  19. Interconnections between cell wall polymers, wall mechanics, and cortical microtubules: Teasing out causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chaowen; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    In plants, cell wall components including cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins interact with each other to form complex extracellular network structures that control cell growth and maintain cell shape. However, it is still not clear exactly how different wall polymers interact, how the conformations and interactions of cell wall polymers relate to wall mechanics, and how these factors impinge on intracellular structures such as the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, based on studies of Arabidopsis thaliana xxt1 xxt2 mutants, which lack detectable xyloglucan in their walls and display aberrant wall mechanics, altered cellulose patterning and biosynthesis, and reduced cortical microtubule stability, we discuss the potential relationships between cell wall biosynthesis, wall mechanics, and cytoskeletal dynamics in an effort to better understand their roles in controlling plant growth and morphogenesis.

  20. Plant cortical microtubule dynamics and cell division plane orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakrabortty, Bandan

    2017-01-01

    This thesis work aimed at a better understanding of the molecular basis of oriented cell division in plant cell. As, the efficiency of plant morphogenesis depends on oriented cell division, this work should contribute  towards a fundamental understanding of the  molecular basis of

  1. Comparative study on direction selectivity and functional organization of the primary visual cortical cells in monkeys and cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寿天德; 周逸峰; 俞洪波

    2000-01-01

    Although the directionally selective cells in many visual cortical areas are organized in columnar manner, the functional organization of direction selectivity of area VI in the monkey still remains unclear. We quantitatively studied the proportion of directionally selective cells, direction selectivity and the functional organization of the striate cortical cells in the monkey and compared those with the cat. The results show that the direction selectivity and directional organization of striate cortical cells in the monkey are significantly weaker than those in the cat, suggesting that the species difference between the two kinds of animal is related to their different anatomic pathways.

  2. Comparative study on direction selectivity and functional organization of the primary visual cortical cells in monkeys and cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Although the directionally selective cells in many visual cortical areas are organized in columnar manner, the functional organization of direction selectivity of area Vl in the monkey still remains unclear. We quantitatively studied the proportion of directionally selective cells, direction selectivity and the functional organization of the striate cortical cells in the monkey and compared those with the cat. The results show that the direction selectivity and directional organization of striate cortical cells in the monkey are significantly weaker than those in the cat, suggesting that the species difference between the two kinds of animal is related to their different anatomic pathways.

  3. Effects of deuterium oxide and galvanic vestibular stimulation on visual cortical cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinis, S.; Landolt, J.P.; Weiss, D.S.; Money, K.E.

    1984-03-01

    The spontaneous and evoked unit activities of complex visual cortical cells were recorded from Brodmann's area 18 in immobilized, unanesthetized cats before, during, and after stimulation of the vestibular system. The vestibular system was stimulated by intravenous injection of deuterium oxide (D2O)--a noted nystagmogenic agent--or by direct galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth. Measures of the receptive-field areas, poststimulus time histograms, directional preferences, and the optimal speed of the light bar stimulating the cell were obtained before and after the application of D2O. Directional preferences were determined in a novel manner, using a method derived from a hierarchical clustering technique. Data were collected and analyzed from a) visual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths, b) visual cortical cells in cats following bilateral labrinthectomies, and c) nonvisual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths. The other cellular characteristics were also altered by the D2O. Galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth resembles, in its effects, the injection of D2O. In labyrinth-intact cats, the time course of area 18 spontaneous activity dramatically increased 30 min or more after D2O was administered. It peaked 2-3 h later and still had not returned to preinjection levels even 7 h after the D2O administration. In bilaterally labyrinthectomized cats, the spontaneous activity of the visual cells did not change following D2O administration. In nonvisual cells from labyrinth-intact cats, the spontaneous activity demonstrated a slight but significant decrease over time after D2O injection. In pilot studies, the cats were injected with D2O. Within 8-10 min afterward, signs of positional nystagmus commenced; and within 30 min, problems in maintaining balance were noted. This continued for 7-8 h before disappearing. In the labyrinthectomized animals, such effects were not observed.

  4. Tangential migration of glutamatergic neurons and cortical patterning during development: Lessons from Cajal-Retzius cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Melissa; Pierani, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Tangential migration is a mode of cell movement, which in the developing cerebral cortex, is defined by displacement parallel to the ventricular surface and orthogonal to the radial glial fibers. This mode of long-range migration is a strategy by which distinct neuronal classes generated from spatially and molecularly distinct origins can integrate to form appropriate neural circuits within the cortical plate. While it was previously believed that only GABAergic cortical interneurons migrate tangentially from their origins in the subpallial ganglionic eminences to integrate in the cortical plate, it is now known that transient populations of glutamatergic neurons also adopt this mode of migration. These include Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), subplate neurons (SPs), and cortical plate transient neurons (CPTs), which have crucial roles in orchestrating the radial and tangential development of the embryonic cerebral cortex in a noncell-autonomous manner. While CRs have been extensively studied, it is only in the last decade that the molecular mechanisms governing their tangential migration have begun to be elucidated. To date, the mechanisms of SPs and CPTs tangential migration remain unknown. We therefore review the known signaling pathways, which regulate parameters of CRs migration including their motility, contact-redistribution and adhesion to the pial surface, and discuss this in the context of how CR migration may regulate their signaling activity in a spatial and temporal manner. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 847-881, 2016.

  5. Wdr1-mediated cell shape dynamics and cortical tension are essential for epidermal planar cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxenburg, Chen; Heller, Evan; Pasolli, H Amalia; Chai, Sophia; Nikolova, Maria; Stokes, Nicole; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-05-01

    During mouse development, core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins become polarized in the epidermal plane to guide angling/morphogenesis of hair follicles. How PCP is established is poorly understood. Here, we identify a key role for Wdr1 (also known as Aip1), an F-actin-binding protein that enhances cofilin/destrin-mediated F-actin disassembly. We show that cofilin and destrin function redundantly in developing epidermis, but their combined depletion perturbs cell adhesion, cytokinesis, apicobasal polarity and PCP. Although Wdr1 depletion accentuates single-loss-of-cofilin/destrin phenotypes, alone it resembles core PCP mutations. Seeking a mechanism, we find that Wdr1 and cofilin/destrin-mediated actomyosin remodelling are essential for generating or maintaining cortical tension within the developing epidermal sheet and driving the cell shape and planar orientation changes that accompany establishment of PCP in mammalian epidermis. Our findings suggest intriguing evolutionary parallels but mechanistic modifications to the distal wing hinge-mediated mechanical forces that drive cell shape change and orient PCP in the Drosophila wing disc.

  6. NKT Cell-Deficient Mice Harbor an Altered Microbiota That Fuels Intestinal Inflammation during Chemically Induced Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvanantham, Thirumahal; Lin, Qiaochu; Guo, Cynthia Xinyi; Surendra, Anuradha; Fieve, Stephanie; Escalante, Nichole K; Guttman, David S; Streutker, Catherine J; Robertson, Susan J; Philpott, Dana J; Mallevaey, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    NKT cells are unconventional T cells that respond to self and microbe-derived lipid and glycolipid Ags presented by the CD1d molecule. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells influence immune responses in numerous diseases. Although only a few studies have examined their role during intestinal inflammation, it appears that iNKT cells protect from Th1-mediated inflammation but exacerbate Th2-mediated inflammation. Studies using iNKT cell-deficient mice and chemically induced dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis have led to inconsistent results. In this study, we show that CD1d-deficient mice, which lack all NKT cells, harbor an altered intestinal microbiota that is associated with exacerbated intestinal inflammation at steady-state and following DSS treatment. This altered microbiota, characterized by increased abundance of the bacterial phyla Proteobacteria, Deferribacteres, and TM7, among which the mucin-eating Mucispirillum, as well as members of the genus Prevotella and segmented filamentous bacteria, was transmissible upon fecal transplant, along with the procolitogenic phenotype. Our results also demonstrate that this proinflammatory microbiota influences iNKT cell function upon activation during DSS colitis. Collectively, alterations of the microbiota have a major influence on colitis outcome and therefore have to be accounted for in such experimental settings and in studies focusing on iNKT cells. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Generation of GFP Reporter Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using AAVS1 Safe Harbor Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongquan; Rao, Mahendra; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-05-16

    Generation of a fluorescent GFP reporter line in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides enormous potentials in both basic stem cell research and regenerative medicine. A protocol for efficiently generating such an engineered reporter line by gene targeting is highly desired. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a new class of artificial restriction enzymes that have been shown to significantly promote homologous recombination by >1000-fold. The AAVS1 (adeno-associated virus integration site 1) locus is a "safe harbor" and has an open chromatin structure that allows insertion and stable expression of transgene. Here, we describe a step-by-step protocol from determination of TALENs activity, hiPSC culture, and delivery of a donor into AAVS1 targeting site, to validation of targeted integration by PCR and Southern blot analysis using hiPSC line, and a pair of open-source AAVS1 TALENs.

  8. Cell-sized liposomes reveal how actomyosin cortical tension drives shape change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Kevin; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Tsai, Feng C; Lees, Edouard; Voituriez, Raphaël; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Sykes, Cecile

    2013-10-08

    Animal cells actively generate contractile stress in the actin cortex, a thin actin network beneath the cell membrane, to facilitate shape changes during processes like cytokinesis and motility. On the microscopic scale, this stress is generated by myosin molecular motors, which bind to actin cytoskeletal filaments and use chemical energy to exert pulling forces. To decipher the physical basis for the regulation of cell shape changes, here, we use a cell-like system with a cortex anchored to the outside or inside of a liposome membrane. This system enables us to dissect the interplay between motor pulling forces, cortex-membrane anchoring, and network connectivity. We show that cortices on the outside of liposomes either spontaneously rupture and relax built-up mechanical stress by peeling away around the liposome or actively compress and crush the liposome. The decision between peeling and crushing depends on the cortical tension determined by the amount of motors and also on the connectivity of the cortex and its attachment to the membrane. Membrane anchoring strongly affects the morphology of cortex contraction inside liposomes: cortices contract inward when weakly attached, whereas they contract toward the membrane when strongly attached. We propose a physical model based on a balance of active tension and mechanical resistance to rupture. Our findings show how membrane attachment and network connectivity are able to regulate actin cortex remodeling and membrane-shape changes for cell polarization.

  9. Effects of deuterium oxide and galvanic vestibular stimulation on visual cortical cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinis, S; Landolt, J P; Weiss, D S; Money, K E

    1984-03-01

    /he spontaneous and evoked unit activities of complex visual cortical cells were recorded from Brodmann's area 18 in immobilized, unanesthetized cats before, during, and after stimulation of the vestibular system. The vestibular system was stimulated by intravenous injection of deuterium oxide (D2O)--a noted nystagmogenic agent (14)--or by direct galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth. Measures of the receptive-field areas, poststimulus time histograms, directional preferences, and the optimal speed of the light bar stimulating the cell were obtained before and after the application of D2O. Directional preferences were determined in a novel manner, using a method derived from a hierarchical clustering technique (19). Data were collected and analyzed from a) visual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths, b) visual cortical cells in cats following bilateral labrinthectomies, and c) nonvisual cortical cells in cats with intact labyrinths. In cats with intact labyrinths, D2O changed the optimal length of the light bar that was able to stimulate the cortical cell as well as the path on which it evoked the response of the cell. Both values, which constitute the receptive field of the cell, changed approximately proportionately. This effect usually lasts for less than 4.5 h. The other cellular characteristics were also altered by the D2O. Galvanic stimulation of the labyrinth resembles, in its effects, the injection of D2O. In labyrinth-intact cats, the time course of area 18 spontaneous activity dramatically increased 30 min or more after D2O was administered. It peaked 2-3 h later and still had not returned to preinjection levels even 7 h after the D2O administration. In bilaterally labyrinthectomized cats, the spontaneous activity of the visual cells (and the other cellular characteristics studied) did not change following D2O administration. In nonvisual cells from labyrinth-intact cats, the spontaneous activity demonstrated a slight but significant decrease

  10. Efficient subtractive cloning of genes activated by lipopolysaccharide and interferon γ in primary-cultured cortical cells of newborn mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Miyauchi

    Full Text Available Innate immune responses play a central role in neuroprotection and neurotoxicity during inflammatory processes that are triggered by pathogen-associated molecular pattern-exhibiting agents such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS and that are modulated by inflammatory cytokines such as interferon γ (IFNγ. Recent findings describing the unexpected complexity of mammalian genomes and transcriptomes have stimulated further identification of novel transcripts involved in specific physiological and pathological processes, such as the neural innate immune response that alters the expression of many genes. We developed a system for efficient subtractive cloning that employs both sense and antisense cRNA drivers, and coupled it with in-house cDNA microarray analysis. This system enabled effective direct cloning of differentially expressed transcripts, from a small amount (0.5 µg of total RNA. We applied this system to isolation of genes activated by LPS and IFNγ in primary-cultured cortical cells that were derived from newborn mice, to investigate the mechanisms involved in neuroprotection and neurotoxicity in maternal/perinatal infections that cause various brain injuries including periventricular leukomalacia. A number of genes involved in the immune and inflammatory response were identified, showing that neonatal neuronal/glial cells are highly responsive to LPS and IFNγ. Subsequent RNA blot analysis revealed that the identified genes were activated by LPS and IFNγ in a cooperative or distinctive manner, thereby supporting the notion that these bacterial and cellular inflammatory mediators can affect the brain through direct but complicated pathways. We also identified several novel clones of apparently non-coding RNAs that potentially harbor various regulatory functions. Characterization of the presently identified genes will give insights into mechanisms and interventions not only for perinatal infection-induced brain damage, but also for

  11. Cyclooxygenase-2 contributes to VX-induced cell death in cultured cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenn, Catherine C; Weiss, M Tracy; Beaup, Claire; Peinnequin, Andre; Wang, Yushan; Dorandeu, Frederic

    2012-04-05

    The link between cell death and increased cyclooxygenases-2 (COX-2) activity has not been clearly established. In this study, we examined whether COX-2 activation contributed to the mechanism of neurotoxicity produced by an organophosphorous nerve agent in cultured rat cortical neurons. Exposure of neuronal cells to the nerve agent, VX resulted in an increase in COX enzyme activity in the culture media. A concentration dependent increase in the activity levels of COX-2 enzyme was observed while there was little to no effect on COX-1. In addition, COX-2 mRNA and protein levels increased several hours post-VX exposure. Pre-treatment of the cortical cells with the COX-2 selective inhibitor, NS 398 resulted in a decrease in both the enzyme activity and prostaglandin (PGE(2) and PGF(2α)) release, as well as in a reduction in cell death. These findings indicate that the increase in COX-2 activity may contribute to the mechanism of VX-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neuron.

  12. Human Lymphoid Tissues Harbor a Distinct CD69+CXCR6+ NK Cell Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugthart, Gertjan; Melsen, Janine E; Vervat, Carly; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Corver, Willem E; Roelen, Dave L; van Bergen, Jeroen; van Tol, Maarten J D; Lankester, Arjan C; Schilham, Marco W

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of human NK cells is based primarily on conventional CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from blood. However, most cellular immune interactions occur in lymphoid organs. Based on the coexpression of CD69 and CXCR6, we identified a third major NK cell subset in lymphoid tissues. This population represents 30-60% of NK cells in marrow, spleen, and lymph node but is absent from blood. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells have an intermediate expression of CD56 and high expression of NKp46 and ICAM-1. In contrast to circulating NK cells, they have a bimodal expression of the activating receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells do not express the early markers c-kit and IL-7Rα, nor killer cell Ig-like receptors or other late-differentiation markers. After cytokine stimulation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells produce IFN-γ at levels comparable to CD56(dim) NK cells. They constitutively express perforin but require preactivation to express granzyme B and exert cytotoxicity. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells do not exhibit the hyperexpansion observed for both conventional NK cell populations. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells constitute a separate NK cell population with a distinct phenotype and function. The identification of this NK cell population in lymphoid tissues provides tools to further evaluate the cellular interactions and role of NK cells in human immunity.

  13. Potentials of Endogenous Neural Stem cells in Cortical Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar eSaha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades great thrust has been put in the area of regenerative neurobiology research to combat brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. The recent discovery of neurogenic niches in the adult brain has led researchers to study how to mobilize these cells to orchestrate an endogenous repair mechanism. The brain can minimize injury-induced damage by means of an immediate glial response and by initiating repair mechanisms that involve the generation and mobilization of new neurons to the site of injury where they can integrate into the existing circuit. This review highlights the current status of research in this field. Here, we discuss the changes that take place in the neurogenic milieu following injury. We will focus, in particular, on the cellular and molecular controls that lead to increased proliferation in the Sub ventricular Zone (SVZ as well as neurogenesis. We will also concentrate on how these cellular and molecular mechanisms influence the migration of new cells to the affected area and their differentiation into neuronal/glial lineage that initiate the repair mechanism. Next, we will discuss some of the different factors that limit/retard the repair process and highlight future lines of research that can help to overcome these limitations. A clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms and physiological changes following brain damage and the subsequent endogenous repair should help us develop better strategies to repair damaged brains.

  14. Contribution of constitutively proliferating precursor cell subtypes to dentate neurogenesis after cortical infarcts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberland Julia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that focal ischemia increases neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation but the cellular mechanisms underlying this proliferative response are only poorly understood. We here investigated whether precursor cells which constitutively proliferate before the ischemic infarct contribute to post-ischemic neurogenesis. To this purpose, transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the nestin promoter received repetitive injections of the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU prior to induction of cortical infarcts. We then immunocytochemically analyzed the fate of these BrdU-positive precursor cell subtypes from day 4 to day 28 after the lesion. Results Quantification of BrdU-expressing precursor cell populations revealed no alteration in number of radial glia-like type 1 cells but a sequential increase of later precursor cell subtypes in lesioned animals (type 2a cells at day 7, type 3 cells/immature neurons at day 14. These alterations result in an enhanced survival of mature neurons 4 weeks postinfarct. Conclusions Focal cortical infarcts recruit dentate precursor cells generated already before the infarct and significantly contribute to an enhanced neurogenesis. Our findings thereby increase our understanding of the complex cellular mechanisms of postlesional neurogenesis.

  15. Proteomic analysis of HUH-7 cells harboring in vitro-transcribed full-length hepatitis C virus 1b RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng XUN; Si-hai ZHAO; Chun-xia CAO; Juan SONG; Ming-ming SHAO; Yong-lie CHU

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The present study examined the differential expression of proteins in HuH-7 cells and HUH-7 cells harboring in vitro-transcribed full-length hepatitis C virus 1b RNA (HuH-7-HCV), and elucidated the cellular responses to HCV replication. Methods: The protein profiles of matched pairs of HuH-7-HCV cells and HUH-7 mock cells were analyzed by 2-D electrophoresis (2DE). Solubilized proteins were separated in the first dimension by isoelectric focusing, and by 12.5% SDS-PAGE in the second dimension. The differential protein expression was analyzed by use of image analysis software to identify candidates for HCV infection-associated proteins. Results: In total, 29 protein spots showed increases and 25 protein spots showed decreases in signal in HuH-7-HCV cell 2DE profiles as compared with HuH-7 mock cells. In the next step, the 10 spots showing the greatest in-crease and the 10 spots showing the greatest decrease were excised from gels and the proteins present were identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ioniza-tion Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (MALDI-TOF MS) or MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In total, 13 proteins were identified successfully. The potential significance of the differential expression due to HCV replication was discussed. Conclusion: Our study identifies changes in the proteome of HuH-7 cells in the presence of HCV replication and yields information of the mechanism of HCV pathogenesis. These results will be useful for the identification of HCV infection-associated proteins that could be molecular targets for treatment.

  16. Annexin A2 promotes the migration and invasion of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro by regulating the shedding of CD147-harboring microvesicles from tumor cells.

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    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available It has been reported that Annexin A2 (ANXA2 is up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but the roles of ANXA2 in the migration and invasion of HCC cells have not been determined. In this study, we found that ANXA2-specific siRNA (si-ANXA2 significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of HCC cells co-cultured with fibroblasts in vitro. In addition, the production of MMP-2 by fibroblasts cultured in supernatant collected from si-ANXA2-transfected HCC cells was notably down-regulated. ANXA2 was also found to be co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with CD147. Further investigation revealed that the expression of ANXA2 in HCC cells affected the shedding of CD147-harboring membrane microvesicles, acting as a vehicle for CD147 in tumor-stromal interactions and thereby regulating the production of MMP-2 by fibroblasts. Together, these results suggest that ANXA2 enhances the migration and invasion potential of HCC cells in vitro by regulating the trafficking of CD147-harboring membrane microvesicles.

  17. Annexin A2 Promotes the Migration and Invasion of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells In Vitro by Regulating the Shedding of CD147-Harboring Microvesicles from Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lei; Song, Zhen-Shun; Cao, Da-Yong; Tao, Kai-Shan; Zhou, Wen-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Dou, Ke-Feng

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that Annexin A2 (ANXA2) is up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the roles of ANXA2 in the migration and invasion of HCC cells have not been determined. In this study, we found that ANXA2-specific siRNA (si-ANXA2) significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of HCC cells co-cultured with fibroblasts in vitro. In addition, the production of MMP-2 by fibroblasts cultured in supernatant collected from si-ANXA2-transfected HCC cells was notably down-regulated. ANXA2 was also found to be co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with CD147. Further investigation revealed that the expression of ANXA2 in HCC cells affected the shedding of CD147-harboring membrane microvesicles, acting as a vehicle for CD147 in tumor-stromal interactions and thereby regulating the production of MMP-2 by fibroblasts. Together, these results suggest that ANXA2 enhances the migration and invasion potential of HCC cells in vitro by regulating the trafficking of CD147-harboring membrane microvesicles. PMID:23950866

  18. A cortical attractor network with Martinotti cells driven by facilitating synapses.

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    Pradeep Krishnamurthy

    Full Text Available The population of pyramidal cells significantly outnumbers the inhibitory interneurons in the neocortex, while at the same time the diversity of interneuron types is much more pronounced. One acknowledged key role of inhibition is to control the rate and patterning of pyramidal cell firing via negative feedback, but most likely the diversity of inhibitory pathways is matched by a corresponding diversity of functional roles. An important distinguishing feature of cortical interneurons is the variability of the short-term plasticity properties of synapses received from pyramidal cells. The Martinotti cell type has recently come under scrutiny due to the distinctly facilitating nature of the synapses they receive from pyramidal cells. This distinguishes these neurons from basket cells and other inhibitory interneurons typically targeted by depressing synapses. A key aspect of the work reported here has been to pinpoint the role of this variability. We first set out to reproduce quantitatively based on in vitro data the di-synaptic inhibitory microcircuit connecting two pyramidal cells via one or a few Martinotti cells. In a second step, we embedded this microcircuit in a previously developed attractor memory network model of neocortical layers 2/3. This model network demonstrated that basket cells with their characteristic depressing synapses are the first to discharge when the network enters an attractor state and that Martinotti cells respond with a delay, thereby shifting the excitation-inhibition balance and acting to terminate the attractor state. A parameter sensitivity analysis suggested that Martinotti cells might, in fact, play a dominant role in setting the attractor dwell time and thus cortical speed of processing, with cellular adaptation and synaptic depression having a less prominent role than previously thought.

  19. UPREGULATION OF BNIP3 AND TRANSLOCATION TO MITOCHONDRIA MEDIATES CYANIDE-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN CORTICAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, K.; Li, L.; Zhang, L.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2008-01-01

    BNIP3, a BH3 domain only Bcl-2 protein, has been identified as a mitochrondrial mediator of hypoxia-induced cell death. Since cyanide produces histotoxic anoxia (chemical hypoxia), the present study was undertaken in primary cortical cells to determine involvement of the BNIP3 signaling pathway in cyanide-induced death. Over a 20 h exposure KCN increased BNIP3 expression, followed by a concentration-related apoptotic death. To determine if BNIP3 plays a role in the cell death, expression was either overexpressed with BNIP3 cDNA (BNIP3+) or knocked down with small interfering RNA (RNAi). In BNIP3+ cells, cyanide-induced apoptotic death was markedly enhanced and preceded by reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and elevated caspase 3 and 7 activity. Pretreatment with the pan caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk suppressed BNIP3+-mediated cell death, thus confirming a caspase-dependent apoptosis. On the other hand, BNIP3 knock down by RNAi or antagonism of BNIP3 by a transmembrane-deleted dominant-negative mutant (BNIP3ΔTM) markedly reduced cell death. Immunohistochemical imaging showed that cyanide stimulated translocation of BNIP3 from cytosol to mitochondria and displacement studies with BNIP3ΔTM showed that integration of BNIP3 into the mitochondrial outer membrane was necessary for the cell death. In BNIP3+ cells, cyclosporin-A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial pore transition, blocked the cyanide-induced reduction of Δψm and decreased the apoptotic death. These results demonstrate in cortical cells that cyanide induces a rapid upregulation of BNIP3 expression, followed by translocation to the mitochondrial outer membrane to reduceΔψm This was followed by mitochondrial release of cytochrome c to execute a caspase-dependent cell death. PMID:17980495

  20. Various tolerances to arsenic trioxide between human cortical neurons and leukemic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jin; MENG Ran; SUI Xinhua; LI Wenbin; YANG Baofeng

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is very effective for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) but little can pass through the blood-brain-barrier (BBB),which limits its use in the prevention and treatment of central nervous system leukaemia (CNSL). Before creating a non-invasive method to help As2O3 's access, the safe and effective therapeutic concentration of As2O3 in the CNS ought to be known. The changes of apoptosis biomarkers, [Ca2+]i and PKC activity of both leukaemia cells and human cortical neurons, were monitored before and after being treated with As2O3 in vitro with laser confocal microscopy and Western blot. NSE concentration, the neuron invasive biomarker, was monitored by enzyme immunoassay (NSE-EIA). This study revealed that cortical neuron was more tolerable to As2O3 compared to NB4. 1.0 μmol / L As2O3 showed little influence on cortical neuron but effectively promoted apoptosis and induced differentiation of NB4.

  1. Mycoplasma contamination revisited: mesenchymal stromal cells harboring Mycoplasma hyorhinis potently inhibit lymphocyte proliferation in vitro.

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    Severin Zinöcker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC have important immunomodulatory effects that can be exploited in the clinical setting, e.g. in patients suffering from graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In an experimental animal model, cultures of rat T lymphocytes were stimulated in vitro either with the mitogen Concanavalin A or with irradiated allogeneic cells in mixed lymphocyte reactions, the latter to simulate allo-immunogenic activation of transplanted T cells in vivo. This study investigated the inhibitory effects of rat bone marrow-derived MSC subsequently found to be infected with a common mycoplasma species (Mycoplasma hyorhinis on T cell activation in vitro and experimental graft-versus-host disease in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that M. hyorhinis infection increased the anti-proliferative effect of MSC dramatically, as measured by both radiometric and fluorimetric methods. Inhibition could not be explained solely by the well-known ability of mycoplasmas to degrade tritiated thymidine, but likely was the result of rapid dissemination of M. hyorhinis in the lymphocyte culture. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the potent inhibitory effect exerted by M. hyorhinis in standard lymphocyte proliferation assays in vitro. MSC are efficient vectors of mycoplasma infection, emphasizing the importance of monitoring cell cultures for contamination.

  2. Cancer cells that survive checkpoint adaptation contain micronuclei that harbor damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cody W; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2016-11-16

    We have examined the relationship between checkpoint adaptation (mitosis with damaged DNA) and micronuclei. Micronuclei in cancer cells are linked to genomic change, and may induce chromothripsis (chromosome shattering). We measured the cytotoxicity of the cancer drug cisplatin in M059K (glioma fibroblasts, IC50 15 μM). Nearly 100% of M059K cells were positive for histone γH2AX staining after 48 h treatment with a cytotoxic concentration of cisplatin. The proportion of micronucleated cells, as confirmed by microscopy using DAPI and lamin A/C staining, increased from 24% to 48%, and the total micronuclei in surviving cells accumulated over time. Promoting entry into mitosis with a checkpoint inhibitor increased the number of micronuclei in cells whereas blocking checkpoint adaptation with a Cdk inhibitor reduced the number of micronuclei. Interestingly, some micronuclei underwent asynchronous DNA replication, relative to the main nuclei, as measured by deoxy-bromo-uracil (BrdU) staining. These micronuclei stained positive for histone γH2AX, which was linked to DNA replication, suggesting that micronuclei arise from checkpoint adaptation and that micronuclei may continue to damage DNA. By contrast the normal cell line WI-38 did not undergo checkpoint adaptation when treated with cisplatin and did not show changes in micronuclei number. These data reveal that the production of micronuclei by checkpoint adaptation is part of a process that contributes to genomic change.

  3. Restoration of proper trafficking to the cell surface for membrane proteins harboring cysteine mutations.

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    Angelica Lopez-Rodriguez

    Full Text Available A common phenotype for many genetic diseases is that the cell is unable to deliver full-length membrane proteins to the cell surface. For some forms of autism, hereditary spherocytosis and color blindness, the culprits are single point mutations to cysteine. We have studied two inheritable cysteine mutants of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels that produce achromatopsia, a common form of severe color blindness. By taking advantage of the reactivity of cysteine's sulfhydryl group, we modified these mutants with chemical reagents that attach moieties with similar chemistries to the wild-type amino acids' side chains. We show that these modifications restored proper delivery to the cell membrane. Once there, the channels exhibited normal functional properties. This strategy might provide a unique opportunity to assess the chemical nature of membrane protein traffic problems.

  4. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck Emmanuel; Basak, Grzegorz W; Soverini, Simona;

    2011-01-01

    T315I(+) Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias are inherently resistant to all licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and therapeutic options remain limited. We report the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in 64 patients with documented BCR-ABL(T315I) mutations. Median follow...... myeloid leukemia. The occurrence of chronic GVHD had a positive impact on overall survival (P = .047). Transplant-related mortality rates were low. Multivariate analysis identified only blast phase at transplantation (hazard ratio 3.68, P = .0011) and unrelated stem cell donor (hazard ratio 2.98, P = .011......) as unfavorable factors. We conclude that allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents a valuable therapeutic tool for eligible patients with BCR-ABL(T315I) mutation, a tool that may or may not be replaced by third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors....

  5. Stimulation of cortical myosin phosphorylation by p114RhoGEF drives cell migration and tumor cell invasion.

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    Stephen J Terry

    Full Text Available Actinomyosin activity is an important driver of cell locomotion and has been shown to promote collective cell migration of epithelial sheets as well as single cell migration and tumor cell invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying activation of cortical myosin to stimulate single cell movement, and the relationship between the mechanisms that drive single cell locomotion and those that mediate collective cell migration of epithelial sheets are incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that p114RhoGEF, an activator of RhoA that associates with non-muscle myosin IIA, regulates collective cell migration of epithelial sheets and tumor cell invasion. Depletion of p114RhoGEF resulted in specific spatial inhibition of myosin activation at cell-cell contacts in migrating epithelial sheets and the cortex of migrating single cells, but only affected double and not single phosphorylation of myosin light chain. In agreement, overall elasticity and contractility of the cells, processes that rely on persistent and more constant forces, were not affected, suggesting that p114RhoGEF mediates process-specific myosin activation. Locomotion was p114RhoGEF-dependent on Matrigel, which favors more roundish cells and amoeboid-like actinomyosin-driven movement, but not on fibronectin, which stimulates flatter cells and lamellipodia-driven, mesenchymal-like migration. Accordingly, depletion of p114RhoGEF led to reduced RhoA, but increased Rac activity. Invasion of 3D matrices was p114RhoGEF-dependent under conditions that do not require metalloproteinase activity, supporting a role of p114RhoGEF in myosin-dependent, amoeboid-like locomotion. Our data demonstrate that p114RhoGEF drives cortical myosin activation by stimulating myosin light chain double phosphorylation and, thereby, collective cell migration of epithelial sheets and amoeboid-like motility of tumor cells.

  6. VERO cells harbor a poly-ADP-ribose belt partnering their epithelial adhesion belt

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    Laura Lafon-Hughes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly-ADP-ribose (PAR is a polymer of up to 400 ADP-ribose units synthesized by poly-ADP-ribose-polymerases (PARPs and degraded by poly-ADP-ribose-glycohydrolase (PARG. Nuclear PAR modulates chromatin compaction, affecting nuclear functions (gene expression, DNA repair. Diverse defined PARP cytoplasmic allocation patterns contrast with the yet still imprecise PAR distribution and still unclear functions. Based on previous evidence from other models, we hypothesized that PAR could be present in epithelial cells where cadherin-based adherens junctions are linked with the actin cytoskeleton (constituting the adhesion belt. In the present work, we have examined through immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, the subcellular localization of PAR in an epithelial monkey kidney cell line (VERO. PAR was distinguished colocalizing with actin and vinculin in the epithelial belt, a location that has not been previously reported. Actin filaments disruption with cytochalasin D was paralleled by PAR belt disruption. Conversely, PARP inhibitors 3-aminobenzamide, PJ34 or XAV 939, affected PAR belt synthesis, actin distribution, cell shape and adhesion. Extracellular calcium chelation displayed similar effects. Our results demonstrate the existence of PAR in a novel subcellular localization. An initial interpretation of all the available evidence points towards TNKS-1 as the most probable PAR belt architect, although TNKS-2 involvement cannot be discarded. Forthcoming research will test this hypothesis as well as explore the existence of the PAR belt in other epithelial cells and deepen into its functional implications.

  7. Cell Signaling Mechanisms by which Geniposide Regulates Insulin- Degrading Enzyme Expression in Primary Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonglan; Xia, Zhining; Liu, Jianhui; Yin, Fei

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays an essential role in both the degradation and its activity of β-amyloid (Aβ). Therefore, the regulation of IDE expression and/or modification of IDE-dependent actions are two emerging strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously observed that geniposide, a novel agonist of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R), could attenuate Aβ-induced neurotoxicity by regulating the expression of IDE in primary cortical neurons. However, the signal transduction mechanisms underlying this effect were not elucidated. The present study, therefore examined and explored the cell signaling transduction and molecular mechanisms by which geniposide induces the expression of IDE in primary cortical neurons. The current study revealed that LY294002 (an inhibitor for phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase, PI3K), PP1 (inhibitor for c-Src), GW9662 (antagonist for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, PPARγ), H89 (an inhibitor for protein kinase A, PKA) and AG1478 (an antagonist for epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR) prohibited the up-regulation of IDE induced by geniposide in primary cortical neurons. Further, geniposide also enhanced the phosphorylation of PPARγ and accelerated the release of phosphorylated FoxO1 (forkhead box O1) from nuclear fraction to the cytosol. Moreover, geniposide directly activated the activity of IDE promoter in PC12 cells, which confirmed the presence of the GLP-1 receptor. Taken together, our findings reveal for the first time the cell signaling transduction pathway of geniposide regulating the expression of IDE in neurons.

  8. Docetaxel for non small cell lung cancer harboring the activated EGFR mutation with T790M at initial presentation

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    Yamane H

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hiromichi Yamane,1 Nobuaki Ochi,1 Masayuki Yasugi,2 Takayuki Tabayashi,1 Tomoko Yamagishi,1 Yasumasa Monobe,3 Akiko Hisamoto,4 Katsuyuki Kiura,4 Nagio Takigawa1 1Department of General Internal Medicine 4, Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama, Japan; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, National Hospital Organization Fukuyama Medical Center, Fukuyama, Japan; 3Department of Pathology, Kawasaki Medical School Kawasaki Hospital, Okayama, Japan; 4Department of Hematology, Oncology, and Respiratory Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama, Japan Abstract: A 72-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with Stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Chest computed tomography revealed a mass in the upper lobe of the right lung, with pleural effusion. Cytologic examination identified adenocarcinoma cells in the right pleural effusion. Furthermore, both a deletion mutation in exon 19 and a threonine–methionine substitution mutation at position 790 in exon 20 (T790M were detected in the epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR in the malignant cells. As systemic chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and pemetrexed or erlotinib proved ineffective, docetaxel monotherapy was initiated as a third-line treatment. Following salvage chemotherapy, her Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status improved from 3 to 1, with tumor regression over 5 months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful docetaxel treatment for a patient with NSCLC harboring the T790M EGFR-activating mutation identified before treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, EGFR mutation, pretreatment mutation, T790M, docetaxel

  9. Ultrafast laser-assisted spatially targeted optoporation into cortical axons and retinal cells in the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2017-06-01

    Visualization and assessment of the cellular structure and function require localized delivery of the molecules into specific cells in restricted spatial regions of the tissue and may necessitate subcellular delivery and localization. Earlier, we have shown ultrafast near-infrared laser beam-assisted optoporation of actin-staining molecules into cortical neurons with single-cell resolution and high efficiency. However, diffusion of optoporated molecules in soma degrades toward the growth cone, leading to difficulties in visualization of the actin network in the growth cone in cases of long axons. Here, we demonstrate optoporation of impermeable molecules to functional cortical neurons by precise laser subaxotomy near the growth cone, leading to visualization of the actin network in the growth cone. Further, we demonstrate patterned delivery of impermeable molecules into targeted retinal cells in the rat eye. The development of optoporation as a minimally invasive approach to reliably deliver exogenous molecules into targeted axons and soma of retinal neurons in vivo will enable enhanced visualization of the structure and function of the retina.

  10. Abscisic acid induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through cortical microtubule reorganization in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Shogo; Hirayama, Takashi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Takahashi, Taku; Motose, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates seed maturation, germination and various stress responses in plants. The roles of ABA in cellular growth and morphogenesis, however, remain to be explored. Here, we report that ABA induces the ectopic outgrowth of epidermal cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. Seedlings of A. thaliana germinated and grown in the presence of ABA developed ectopic protrusions in the epidermal cells of hypocotyls, petioles and cotyledons. One protrusion was formed in the middle of each epidermal cell. In the hypocotyl epidermis, two types of cell files are arranged alternately into non-stoma cell files and stoma cell files, ectopic protrusions being restricted to the non-stoma cell files. This suggests the presence of a difference in the degree of sensitivity to ABA or in the capacity of cells to form protrusions between the two cell files. The ectopic outgrowth was suppressed in ABA insensitive mutants, whereas it was enhanced in ABA hypersensitive mutants. Interestingly, ABA-induced ectopic outgrowth was also suppressed in mutants in which microtubule organization was compromised. Furthermore, cortical microtubules were disorganized and depolymerized by the ABA treatment. These results suggest that ABA signaling induces ectopic outgrowth in epidermal cells through microtubule reorganization. PMID:26068445

  11. Gene expression pattern in transmitochondrial cytoplasmic hybrid cells harboring type 2 diabetes-associated mitochondrial DNA haplogroups.

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    Seungwoo Hwang

    Full Text Available Decreased mitochondrial function plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Recently, it was reported that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups confer genetic susceptibility to T2DM in Koreans and Japanese. Particularly, mtDNA haplogroup N9a is associated with a decreased risk of T2DM, whereas haplogroups D5 and F are associated with an increased risk. To examine functional consequences of these haplogroups without being confounded by the heterogeneous nuclear genomic backgrounds of different subjects, we constructed transmitochondrial cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid cells harboring each of the three haplogroups (N9a, D5, and F in a background of a shared nuclear genome. We compared the functional consequences of the three haplogroups using cell-based assays and gene expression microarrays. Cell-based assays did not detect differences in mitochondrial functions among the haplogroups in terms of ATP generation, reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cellular dehydrogenase activity. However, differential expression and clustering analyses of microarray data revealed that the three haplogroups exhibit a distinctive nuclear gene expression pattern that correlates with their susceptibility to T2DM. Pathway analysis of microarray data identified several differentially regulated metabolic pathways. Notably, compared to the T2DM-resistant haplogroup N9a, the T2DM-susceptible haplogroup F showed down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation and up-regulation of glycolysis. These results suggest that variations in mtDNA can affect the expression of nuclear genes regulating mitochondrial functions or cellular energetics. Given that impaired mitochondrial function caused by T2DM-associated mtDNA haplogroups is compensated by the nuclear genome, we speculate that defective nuclear compensation, under certain circumstances, might lead to the development of T2DM.

  12. Impact of physical size on gefitinib efficacy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Eiki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Takigawa, Nagio; Kudo, Kenichiro; Kato, Yuka; Honda, Yoshihiro; Hayakawa, Hiromi; Minami, Daisuke; Sato, Akiko; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2013-09-01

    Gefitinib is an essential drug for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. The approved dosage is 250 mg/body/day without adjustment for physical size such as body surface area (BSA), and the impact of physical size on the efficacy of gefitinib has not been evaluated. Here, we sought to clarify this issue using a retrospective cohort. We reviewed the medical records of patients with consecutive advanced NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations who underwent gefitinib monotherapy at Okayama University Hospital. In total, 101 patients were included in this study, and the median BSA in this cohort was 1.5 m(2). The median progression-free survival (PFS) of the patients with higher BSA (≥1.5 m(2)) was significantly worse than that of those with lower BSA (BSA on PFS (hazards ratio, 2.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.78-2.89; p = 0.002). By contrast, no significant association between BSA and PFS was observed in those undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy (4.0 vs. 5.1 months; p = 0.989, log-rank test), suggesting that BSA is a predictive, rather than a prognostic, marker for gefitinib therapy in EGFR-mutated NSCLC. In conclusion, BSA affected PFS in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC who underwent gefitinib monotherapy, suggesting the need for appraisal of BSA-based dose adjustment, even for this molecular target-based therapy.

  13. Cecum lymph node dendritic cells harbor slow-growing bacteria phenotypically tolerant to antibiotic treatment.

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    Patrick Kaiser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN, the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%-20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103⁺CX₃CR1⁻CD11c⁺ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics.

  14. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (Pimmunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  15. Mitochondrial-associated cell death mechanisms are reset to an embryonic-like state in aged donor-derived iPS cells harboring chromosomal aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigione, Alessandro; Hossini, Amir M; Lichtner, Björn; Serin, Akdes; Fauler, Beatrix; Megges, Matthias; Lurz, Rudi; Lehrach, Hans; Makrantonaki, Eugenia; Zouboulis, Christos C; Adjaye, James

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cells reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) acquire features of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and thus represent a promising source for cellular therapy of debilitating diseases, such as age-related disorders. However, reprogrammed cell lines have been found to harbor various genomic alterations. In addition, we recently discovered that the mitochondrial DNA of human fibroblasts also undergoes random mutational events upon reprogramming. Aged somatic cells might possess high susceptibility to nuclear and mitochondrial genome instability. Hence, concerns over the oncogenic potential of reprogrammed cells due to the lack of genomic integrity may hinder the applicability of iPSC-based therapies for age-associated conditions. Here, we investigated whether aged reprogrammed cells harboring chromosomal abnormalities show resistance to apoptotic cell death or mitochondrial-associated oxidative stress, both hallmarks of cancer transformation. Four iPSC lines were generated from dermal fibroblasts derived from an 84-year-old woman, representing the oldest human donor so far reprogrammed to pluripotency. Despite the presence of karyotype aberrations, all aged-iPSCs were able to differentiate into neurons, re-establish telomerase activity, and reconfigure mitochondrial ultra-structure and functionality to a hESC-like state. Importantly, aged-iPSCs exhibited high sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis and low levels of oxidative stress and DNA damage, in a similar fashion as iPSCs derived from young donors and hESCs. Thus, the occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities within aged reprogrammed cells might not be sufficient to over-ride the cellular surveillance machinery and induce malignant transformation through the alteration of mitochondrial-associated cell death. Taken together, we unveiled that cellular reprogramming is capable of reversing aging-related features in somatic cells from a very old subject, despite the presence of genomic

  16. Mitochondrial-associated cell death mechanisms are reset to an embryonic-like state in aged donor-derived iPS cells harboring chromosomal aberrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Prigione

    Full Text Available Somatic cells reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs acquire features of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and thus represent a promising source for cellular therapy of debilitating diseases, such as age-related disorders. However, reprogrammed cell lines have been found to harbor various genomic alterations. In addition, we recently discovered that the mitochondrial DNA of human fibroblasts also undergoes random mutational events upon reprogramming. Aged somatic cells might possess high susceptibility to nuclear and mitochondrial genome instability. Hence, concerns over the oncogenic potential of reprogrammed cells due to the lack of genomic integrity may hinder the applicability of iPSC-based therapies for age-associated conditions. Here, we investigated whether aged reprogrammed cells harboring chromosomal abnormalities show resistance to apoptotic cell death or mitochondrial-associated oxidative stress, both hallmarks of cancer transformation. Four iPSC lines were generated from dermal fibroblasts derived from an 84-year-old woman, representing the oldest human donor so far reprogrammed to pluripotency. Despite the presence of karyotype aberrations, all aged-iPSCs were able to differentiate into neurons, re-establish telomerase activity, and reconfigure mitochondrial ultra-structure and functionality to a hESC-like state. Importantly, aged-iPSCs exhibited high sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis and low levels of oxidative stress and DNA damage, in a similar fashion as iPSCs derived from young donors and hESCs. Thus, the occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities within aged reprogrammed cells might not be sufficient to over-ride the cellular surveillance machinery and induce malignant transformation through the alteration of mitochondrial-associated cell death. Taken together, we unveiled that cellular reprogramming is capable of reversing aging-related features in somatic cells from a very old subject, despite the presence

  17. Local pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of the myosin 2A motor in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michelle A.; Billington, Neil; Wang, Aibing; Adelstein, Robert S.; Sellers, James R.; Fischer, Robert S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) pulsatile dynamics in generating contractile forces required for developmental morphogenesis has been characterized, but whether these pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of all actomyosin networks is not known. Here we used live-cell fluorescence imaging to show that transient, local assembly of NM2A “pulses” occurs in the cortical cytoskeleton of single adherent cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and sarcoma origin, independent of developmental signaling cues and cell–cell or cell–ECM interactions. We show that pulses in the cortical cytoskeleton require Rho-associated kinase– or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity, increases in cytosolic calcium, and NM2 ATPase activity. Surprisingly, we find that cortical cytoskeleton pulses specifically require the head domain of NM2A, as they do not occur with either NM2B or a 2B-head-2A-tail chimera. Our results thus suggest that pulsatile contractions in the cortical cytoskeleton are an intrinsic property of the NM2A motor that may mediate its role in homeostatic maintenance of tension in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells. PMID:27881665

  18. Remodelling of cortical actin where lytic granules dock at natural killer cell immune synapses revealed by super-resolution microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice C N Brown

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are innate immune cells that secrete lytic granules to directly kill virus-infected or transformed cells across an immune synapse. However, a major gap in understanding this process is in establishing how lytic granules pass through the mesh of cortical actin known to underlie the NK cell membrane. Research has been hampered by the resolution of conventional light microscopy, which is too low to resolve cortical actin during lytic granule secretion. Here we use two high-resolution imaging techniques to probe the synaptic organisation of NK cell receptors and filamentous (F-actin. A combination of optical tweezers and live cell confocal microscopy reveals that microclusters of NKG2D assemble into a ring-shaped structure at the centre of intercellular synapses, where Vav1 and Grb2 also accumulate. Within this ring-shaped organisation of NK cell proteins, lytic granules accumulate for secretion. Using 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM to gain super-resolution of ~100 nm, cortical actin was detected in a central region of the NK cell synapse irrespective of whether activating or inhibitory signals dominate. Strikingly, the periodicity of the cortical actin mesh increased in specific domains at the synapse when the NK cell was activated. Two-colour super-resolution imaging revealed that lytic granules docked precisely in these domains which were also proximal to where the microtubule-organising centre (MTOC polarised. Together, these data demonstrate that remodelling of the cortical actin mesh occurs at the central region of the cytolytic NK cell immune synapse. This is likely to occur for other types of cell secretion and also emphasises the importance of emerging super-resolution imaging technology for revealing new biology.

  19. Remodelling of cortical actin where lytic granules dock at natural killer cell immune synapses revealed by super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alice C N; Oddos, Stephane; Dobbie, Ian M; Alakoskela, Juha-Matti; Parton, Richard M; Eissmann, Philipp; Neil, Mark A A; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M W; Davis, Ilan; Davis, Daniel M

    2011-09-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate immune cells that secrete lytic granules to directly kill virus-infected or transformed cells across an immune synapse. However, a major gap in understanding this process is in establishing how lytic granules pass through the mesh of cortical actin known to underlie the NK cell membrane. Research has been hampered by the resolution of conventional light microscopy, which is too low to resolve cortical actin during lytic granule secretion. Here we use two high-resolution imaging techniques to probe the synaptic organisation of NK cell receptors and filamentous (F)-actin. A combination of optical tweezers and live cell confocal microscopy reveals that microclusters of NKG2D assemble into a ring-shaped structure at the centre of intercellular synapses, where Vav1 and Grb2 also accumulate. Within this ring-shaped organisation of NK cell proteins, lytic granules accumulate for secretion. Using 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) to gain super-resolution of ~100 nm, cortical actin was detected in a central region of the NK cell synapse irrespective of whether activating or inhibitory signals dominate. Strikingly, the periodicity of the cortical actin mesh increased in specific domains at the synapse when the NK cell was activated. Two-colour super-resolution imaging revealed that lytic granules docked precisely in these domains which were also proximal to where the microtubule-organising centre (MTOC) polarised. Together, these data demonstrate that remodelling of the cortical actin mesh occurs at the central region of the cytolytic NK cell immune synapse. This is likely to occur for other types of cell secretion and also emphasises the importance of emerging super-resolution imaging technology for revealing new biology.

  20. Abnormal maturation and differentiation of neocortical neurons in epileptogenic cortical malformation: unique distribution of layer-specific marker cells of focal cortical dysplasia and hemimegalencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Asako; Saito, Takashi; Hanai, Sae; Sukigara, Sayuri; Nabatame, Shin; Otsuki, Taisuke; Nakagawa, Eiji; Takahashi, Akio; Kaneko, Yuu; Kaido, Takanobu; Saito, Yuko; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Goto, Yu-Ichi; Itoh, Masayuki

    2012-08-27

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and hemimegalencephaly (HME) are major causes of intractable epilepsy in children. The probable pathogenesis of FCD and HMG is the abnormal migration and differentiation of neurons. The aim of the present study was to clarify the abnormal cytoarchitecture, based on neuronal immaturation. Tissue samples were obtained from 16 FCD and seven HME patients, aged between 2 months and 12 years, who had been diagnosed as typical FCD and HME, following surgical treatment for intractable epilepsy. Paraffin-embedded sections were stained with the antibodies of three layer-markers that are usually present only during the fetal period, namely SATB2 (expressed in the upper layer of the normal fetal neocortex), FOXP1 (expressed in the 5th layer), and TBR1 (expressed in the 6th layer). In FCD, SATB2-positive (+) cells located in the middle and deep regions of FCD Ia and Ib, but only in the superficial region of FCD IIa and IIb. FOXP1+ cells diffusely located in the neocortex, especially the upper layer of FCD IIa and IIb. TBR1+ cells mainly located in the middle and deep regions, and also white matter. In FCD IIb, TBR1+ cells were in the superficial region. In HME, SATB2+ and FOXP1+ cells were found diffusely. TBR1+ cells were in the middle and deep regions. On the basis of continued expression of fetal cortical layer-specific markers in FCD and HME brains, the abnormal neocortical formation in both is likely to be the result of disrupted neuronal migration and dysmaturation. The expression pattern is different between FCD and HME. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. From oocyte to 16-cell stage: cytoplasmic and cortical reorganizations that pattern the ascidian embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardet, Christian; Paix, Alexandre; Prodon, François; Dru, Philippe; Chenevert, Janet

    2007-07-01

    The dorsoventral and anteroposterior axes of the ascidian embryo are defined before first cleavage by means of a series of reorganizations that reposition cytoplasmic and cortical domains established during oogenesis. These domains situated in the periphery of the oocyte contain developmental determinants and a population of maternal postplasmic/PEM RNAs. One of these RNAs (macho-1) is a determinant for the muscle cells of the tadpole embryo. Oocytes acquire a primary animal-vegetal (a-v) axis during meiotic maturation, when a subcortical mitochondria-rich domain (myoplasm) and a domain rich in cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) and maternal postplasmic/PEM RNAs (cER-mRNA domain) become polarized and asymmetrically enriched in the vegetal hemisphere. Fertilization at metaphase of meiosis I initiates a series of dramatic cytoplasmic and cortical reorganizations of the zygote, which occur in two major phases. The first major phase depends on sperm entry which triggers a calcium wave leading in turn to an actomyosin-driven contraction wave. The contraction concentrates the cER-mRNA domain and myoplasm in and around a vegetal/contraction pole. The precise localization of the vegetal/contraction pole depends on both the a-v axis and the location of sperm entry and prefigures the future site of gastrulation and dorsal side of the embryo. The second major phase of reorganization occurs between meiosis completion and first cleavage. Sperm aster microtubules and then cortical microfilaments cause the cER-mRNA domain and myoplasm to reposition toward the posterior of the zygote. The location of the posterior pole depends on the localization of the sperm centrosome/aster attained during the first major phase of reorganization. Both cER-mRNA and myoplasm domains localized in the posterior region are partitioned equally between the first two blastomeres and then asymmetrically over the next two cleavages. At the eight-cell stage the cER-mRNA domain compacts and gives rise to

  2. Protective effects of isoatriplicolide tiglate from Paulownia coreana against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat cortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Kim, Eun-Hye; Jeon, Hyun-Seok; Moon, Hyung-In

    2010-06-01

    To examine the neuroprotective effects of Paulownia coreana, we tested its protection against the glutamate-induced neurotoxicity to primary cultured cortical neurons. An aqueous extract of the plants exhibited significant protection against glutamate-induced toxicity in primary cultured rat cortical cells. In order to clarify the neuroprotective mechanism(s) of this observed effect, isolation was performed to seek and identify active fractions and components. By such fractionation, one bioactive sesquiterpene lactone, isoatriplicolide tiglate, was isolated, which exhibited significant neuroprotective activities against glutamate-induced toxicity, exhibiting cell viability of about 50%, at concentrations ranging from 0.1 microM to 10 microM.

  3. [Cortical cytoskeletal ring in prophase II leads to correction of abnormalities of the first meiotic division and to meiotic restitution of pollen mother cell nucleus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamina, N V; Zaporozhchenko, I A; Maksiutova, Iu R; Shatskaia, O A

    2007-01-01

    The deviation of prophase cytoskeletal ring formation was determined during meiotic division in 50% of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in maize haploid No 1498 (Zea mays). At prophase in both meiotic divisions the cytoskeletal ring is formed in cortical region of cytoplasm instead of perinuclear. Sometimes formation of both perinuclear and cortical rings is observed in the same cell. It has been shown that in multinucleate PMCs the cortical ring leads to the consolidation of chromosomes into common spindle and to meiotic restitution.

  4. Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility is used to aid in the planning of harbor development and in the design and layout of breakwaters, absorbers, etc.. The goal is...

  5. Balance of microtubule stiffness and cortical tension determines the size of blood cells with marginal band across species

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Mathur, Aastha; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The fast blood stream of animals is associated with large shear stresses. Consequently, blood cells have evolved a special morphology and a specific internal architecture allowing them to maintain their integrity over several weeks. For instance, non-mammalian red blood cells, mammalian erythroblasts and platelets have a peripheral ring of microtubules, called the marginal band, that flattens the overall cell morphology by pushing on the cell cortex. In this article, we model how the shape of these cells stems from the balance between marginal band elasticity and cortical tension. We predict that the diameter of the cell scales with the total microtubule polymer, and verify the predicted law across a wide range of species. Our analysis also shows that the combination of the marginal band rigidity and cortical tension increases the ability of the cell to withstand forces without deformation. Finally, we model the marginal band coiling that occurs during the disc-to-sphere transition observed for instance at th...

  6. [The role of cortical microtubules in moss protonemal cells during dehydration/rehydration cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Ling; Ouyang, Hao-Miao; Liu, Xiang-Lin; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2003-05-01

    Plant cells response to water deficit through a variety of physiological processes. In this work, we studied the function of microtubule cytoskeleton during dehydration/rehydration cycle in moss (Atrichum undulatum) protonemal cells as a model system. The morphological and cytological change of protonemal cells during dehydration and rehydration cycle were first investigated. Under normal conditions, protonemal cells showed bright green colour and appeared wet and fresh. Numerous chloroplasts distributed regularly throughout the cytoplasm in each cell. After dehydration treatment, protonemal cells lost most of their chlorophylls and turned to look yellow and dry. In addition, dehydration caused plasmolysis in these cells. Upon rehydration, the cells could recover completely from the dehydrated state. These results indicated that moss had a remarkable intrinsic ability to survive from the extreme drought stress. Microtubule, an important component of cytoskeleton, is considered to play crucial roles in the responses to some environmental stresses such as cold and light. To see if it is also involved in the drought tolerance, dynamic organization of microtubules in protonemal cells of Atrichum undulatum subjected to drought and rehydration were examined by indirect immunofluorescence combined with confocal lasersharp scanning microscopy. The cortical microtubules were arranged into a fine structure with a predominant orientation parallel to the long axis of the cells in the control cells. After dehydration, the microtubule organization was remarkablly altered and the fine microtubule structure disappeared whereas some thicker cables formed. When the cells were grown under rehydration conditions, the fine microtubule arrays reappeared. These results provided a piece of evidence that microtubules play a role in the cellular responses to drought stress in moss. Furthermore, we analyzed the effects of the microtubule-disrupting agent colchicine on the morphology recovery

  7. The niche factor syndecan-1 regulates the maintenance and proliferation of neural progenitor cells during mammalian cortical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjie Wang

    Full Text Available Neural progenitor cells (NPCs divide and differentiate in a precisely regulated manner over time to achieve the remarkable expansion and assembly of the layered mammalian cerebral cortex. Both intrinsic signaling pathways and environmental factors control the behavior of NPCs during cortical development. Heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPG are critical environmental regulators that help modulate and integrate environmental cues and downstream intracellular signals. Syndecan-1 (Sdc1, a major transmembrane HSPG, is highly enriched in the early neural germinal zone, but its function in modulating NPC behavior and cortical development has not been explored. In this study we investigate the expression pattern and function of Sdc1 in the developing mouse cerebral cortex. We found that Sdc1 is highly expressed by cortical NPCs. Knockdown of Sdc1 in vivo by in utero electroporation reduces NPC proliferation and causes their premature differentiation, corroborated in isolated cells in vitro. We found that Sdc1 knockdown leads to reduced levels of β-catenin, indicating reduced canonical Wnt signaling. Consistent with this, GSK3β inhibition helps rescue the Sdc1 knockdown phenotype, partially restoring NPC number and proliferation. Moreover, exogenous Wnt protein promotes cortical NPC proliferation, but this is prevented by Sdc1 knockdown. Thus, Sdc1 in the germinal niche is a key HSPG regulating the maintenance and proliferation of NPCs during cortical neurogenesis, in part by modulating the ability of NPCs to respond to Wnt ligands.

  8. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons integrate in stroke-injured cortex and improve functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero, Daniel; Wattananit, Somsak; Grønning Madsen, Marita; Koch, Philipp; Wood, James; Tatarishvili, Jemal; Mine, Yutaka; Ge, Ruimin; Monni, Emanuela; Devaraju, Karthikeyan; Hevner, Robert F; Brüstle, Oliver; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2013-12-01

    Stem cell-based approaches to restore function after stroke through replacement of dead neurons require the generation of specific neuronal subtypes. Loss of neurons in the cerebral cortex is a major cause of stroke-induced neurological deficits in adult humans. Reprogramming of adult human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells is a novel approach to produce patient-specific cells for autologous transplantation. Whether such cells can be converted to functional cortical neurons that survive and give rise to behavioural recovery after transplantation in the stroke-injured cerebral cortex is not known. We have generated progenitors in vitro, expressing specific cortical markers and giving rise to functional neurons, from long-term self-renewing neuroepithelial-like stem cells, produced from adult human fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. At 2 months after transplantation into the stroke-damaged rat cortex, the cortically fated cells showed less proliferation and more efficient conversion to mature neurons with morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a cortical phenotype and higher axonal projection density as compared with non-fated cells. Pyramidal morphology and localization of the cells expressing the cortex-specific marker TBR1 in a certain layered pattern provided further evidence supporting the cortical phenotype of the fated, grafted cells, and electrophysiological recordings demonstrated their functionality. Both fated and non-fated cell-transplanted groups showed bilateral recovery of the impaired function in the stepping test compared with vehicle-injected animals. The behavioural improvement at this early time point was most likely not due to neuronal replacement and reconstruction of circuitry. At 5 months after stroke in immunocompromised rats, there was no tumour formation and the grafted cells exhibited electrophysiological properties of mature neurons with evidence of integration in host circuitry. Our

  9. Studies on the cortical morphogenesis during cell division in Halteria grandinella (Muller, 1773) (Ciliophora, Oligotrichida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weibo

    1993-06-01

    Morphogenesis during cell division was investigated in oligotrichous ciliate, Halteria grandinella utilizing protargol impregnated specimens. The cortical morphogenetical pattern of Halteria grandinella is generally similar to that given by Fauré-Fremiet. The proter inherits the parental adoral zone of membranelles (AZM) apparently unchanged; in the opisthe the oral primordium develops de novo from a single. AZM-anlage; somatic cirri for both the proter and opisthe are separately differentiated from 10 (seldom 9) cirral primordia that originate de novo from 10 latitudinal developmental analagen. The anlage of paroral membrane of opisthe forms just to the right of the posterior end of the oral primordium. Each streak of cirral primordia develops 4 groups of basal body pairs: both of the anterior two consist of only one pair of basal bodies, on the contrary, each of the last two groups has 2 basal body pairs.

  10. Role of AQP2 during apoptosis in cortical collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamenco, Pilar; Galizia, Luciano; Rivarola, Valeria; Fernandez, Juan; Ford, Paula; Capurro, Claudia

    2009-04-01

    A major hallmark of apoptosis is cell shrinkage, termed apoptotic volume decrease, due to the cellular outflow of potassium and chloride ions, followed by osmotically obliged water. In many cells, the ionic pathways triggered during the apoptotic volume decrease may be similar to that observed during a regulatory volume decrease response under hypotonic conditions. However, the pathways involved in water loss during apoptosis have been largely ignored. It was recently reported that in some systems this water movement is mediated via specific water channels (aquaporins). Nevertheless, it is important to identify whether this is a ubiquitous aspect of apoptosis as well as to define the mechanisms involved. The aim of the present work was to investigate the role of aquaporin-2 during apoptosis in renal-collecting duct cells. We evaluated the putative relationship between aquaporin-2 expression and the activation of the ionic pathways involved in the regulatory volume response. Apoptosis was induced by incubating cells with a hypertonic solution or with cycloheximide in two cortical collecting duct cell lines: one not expressing aquaporins and the other stably transfected with aquaporin-2. Typical features of apoptosis were evaluated with different approaches and the water permeability was measured by fluorescence videomicroscopy. Our results show that the rate of apoptosis is significantly increased in aquaporin-2 cells and it is linked to the rapid activation of volume-regulatory potassium and chloride channels. Furthermore, the water permeability of cells expressing aquaporin-2 was strongly reduced during the apoptotic process and it occurs before DNA degradation. These results let us propose that under apoptotic stimulation aquaporin-2 would act as a sensor leading to a co-ordinated activation of specific ionic channels for potassium and chloride efflux, resulting in both more rapid cell shrinkage and more rapid achievement of adequate levels of ions necessary to

  11. Homocysteine Aggravates Cortical Neural Cell Injury through Neuronal Autophagy Overactivation following Rat Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqian Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Elevated homocysteine (Hcy levels have been reported to be involved in neurotoxicity after ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood to date. In the current study, we hypothesized that neuronal autophagy activation may be involved in the toxic effect of Hcy on cortical neurons following cerebral ischemia. Brain cell injury was determined by hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining and TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL staining. The level and localization of autophagy were detected by transmission electron microscopy, western blot and immunofluorescence double labeling. The oxidative DNA damage was revealed by immunofluorescence of 8-Hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. Hcy treatment aggravated neuronal cell death, significantly increased the formation of autophagosomes and the expression of LC3B and Beclin-1 in the brain cortex after middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO. Immunofluorescence analysis of LC3B and Beclin-1 distribution indicated that their expression occurred mainly in neurons (NeuN-positive and hardly in astrocytes (GFAP-positive. 8-OHdG expression was also increased in the ischemic cortex of Hcy-treated animals. Conversely, LC3B and Beclin-1 overexpression and autophagosome accumulation caused by Hcy were partially blocked by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA. Hcy administration enhanced neuronal autophagy, which contributes to cell death following cerebral ischemia. The oxidative damage-mediated autophagy may be a molecular mechanism underlying neuronal cell toxicity of elevated Hcy level.

  12. MDMA (Ecstasy) Decreases the Number of Neurons and Stem Cells in Embryonic Cortical Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindlundh-Högberg, Anna M S; Pickering, Chris; Wicher, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    Ecstasy, 3,4-methylenedioxymetamphetamine (MDMA), is a recreational drug used among adolescents, including young pregnant women. MDMA passes the placental barrier and may therefore influence fetal development. The aim was to investigate the direct effect of MDMA on cortical cells using dissociated...... CNS cortex of rat embryos, E17. The primary culture was exposed to a single dose of MDMA and collected 5 days later. MDMA caused a dramatic, dose-dependent (100 and 400 muM) decrease in nestin-positive stem cell density, as well as a significant reduction (400 muM) in NeuN-positive cells. By q......PCR, MDMA (200 muM) caused a significant decrease in mRNA expression of the 5HT3 receptor, dopamine D(1) receptor, and glutamate transporter EAAT2-1, as well as an increase in mRNA levels of the NMDA NR1 receptor subunit and the 5HT(1A) receptor. In conclusion, MDMA caused a marked reduction in stem cells...

  13. Lymph nodes from HIV-infected individuals harbor mature dendritic cells and increased numbers of PD-L1+ conventional dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Paloma; Del Río Estrada, Perla M; Díaz Rivera, Dafne; Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    The immune response induced by dendritic cells (DC) during the HIV infection has been of remarkable interest because of the therapeutic potential of DC for vaccine development. However, their beneficial or detrimental contribution in HIV infection remains unclear. The activation state of DC in lymph nodes (LN) is essential to induce T cell responses against HIV. In the present study, we characterized the immunophenotype and function of conventional (cDC) and plasmacytoid (pDC) dendritic cells from peripheral blood (PB) and LN of HIV(+) individuals. We observed that the frequency of PB pDC was decreased and exhibited an immature phenotype; whereas in the LN, activated pDC accumulated (CD40(+) and CD83(+)). In addition, the frequency of PB cDC from HIV(+) individuals was decreased and exhibited an immature phenotype, whereas LN harbored activated and mature cDC (CD40(+), CD83(+), CD80(+) and CD86(+)). However, an increased number of PD-L1(+) cDC was also observed in the LN. Moreover, pDC and cDC were able to produce inflammatory cytokines (IFN-α, TNF-α and IL-12) after TLR stimulation. These findings suggests that LN cDC expressing PD-L1 from HIV(+) individuals may negatively impact the generation of HIV-specific T cells and that DC might be contributing to tissue chronic immune activation.

  14. Populations of Radial Glial Cells Respond Differently to Reelin and Neuregulin1 in a Ferret Model of Cortical Dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    out of the ventricular zone, but do not play a role in allowing further movement toward the cortical plate. Materials and Methods Ethics Statement...transformation into astrocytes. Anatomy and embryology 156(2): 115–152. 11. Voigt T (1989) Development of glial cells in the cerebral wall of ferrets

  15. Cortical excitatory neurons become protected from cell division during neurogenesis in an Rb family-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikawa, Mio; Okada, Kei; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ajioka, Itsuki

    2013-06-01

    Cell cycle dysregulation leads to abnormal proliferation and cell death in a context-specific manner. Cell cycle progression driven via the Rb pathway forces neurons to undergo S-phase, resulting in cell death associated with the progression of neuronal degeneration. Nevertheless, some Rb- and Rb family (Rb, p107 and p130)-deficient differentiating neurons can proliferate and form tumors. Here, we found in mouse that differentiating cerebral cortical excitatory neurons underwent S-phase progression but not cell division after acute Rb family inactivation in differentiating neurons. However, the differentiating neurons underwent cell division and proliferated when Rb family members were inactivated in cortical progenitors. Differentiating neurons generated from Rb(-/-); p107(-/-); p130(-/-) (Rb-TKO) progenitors, but not acutely inactivated Rb-TKO differentiating neurons, activated the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway without increasing trimethylation at lysine 20 of histone H4 (H4K20), which has a role in protection against DNA damage. The activation of the DSB repair pathway was essential for the cell division of Rb-TKO differentiating neurons. These results suggest that newly born cortical neurons from progenitors become epigenetically protected from DNA damage and cell division in an Rb family-dependent manner.

  16. Isolation of locally derived stem/progenitor cells from the peri-infarct area that do not migrate from the lateral ventricle after cortical stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Issei S; Peterson, Brittni M; Spees, Jeffrey L

    2010-09-01

    Neurogenesis can arise from neural stem/progenitor cells of the subventricular zone after strokes involving both the cortex and striatum. However, it is controversial whether all types of stroke and strokes of different sizes activate neurogenesis from the subventricular zone niche. In contrast with cortical/striatal strokes, repair and remodeling after mild cortical strokes may involve to a greater extent local cortical stem/progenitor cells and cells from nonneurogenic niches. We compared stem/progenitor cell responses after focal cortical strokes produced by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion and cortical/striatal strokes produced by the intraluminal suture model. To label migrating neuroblasts from the subventricular zone, we injected DiI to the lateral ventricle after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. By immunohistochemistry, we characterized cells expressing stem/progenitor cell markers in the peri-infarct area. We isolated cortical stem/progenitor cells from the peri-infarct area after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion and assayed their self-renewal and differentiation capacity. In contrast with cortical/striatal strokes, focal cortical strokes did not induce neuroblast migration from the subventricular zone to the infarct zone after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion. By immunohistochemistry, we observed subpopulations of reactive astrocytes in the peri-infarct area that coexpressed radial glial cell markers such as Sox2, Nestin, and RC2. Clonal neural spheres isolated from the peri-infarct area after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and smooth muscle cells. Notably, neural spheres isolated from the peri-infarct area also expressed RC2 before differentiation. Mild cortical strokes that do not penetrate the striatum activate local cortical stem/progenitor cells but do not induce neuroblast migration from the subventricular zone niche.

  17. The cortical cytoskeletal network and cell-wall dynamics in the unicellular charophycean green alga Penium margaritaceum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Julie; LaRue, Therese; Tinaz, Berke; Yongue, Camille; Domozych, David S

    2014-10-01

    Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga with a unique bi-directional polar expansion mechanism that occurs at the central isthmus zone prior to cell division. This entails the focused deposition of cell-wall polymers coordinated by the activities of components of the endomembrane system and cytoskeletal networks. The goal of this study was to elucidate the structural organization of the cortical cytoskeletal network during the cell cycle and identify its specific functional roles during key cell-wall developmental events: pre-division expansion and cell division. Microtubules and actin filaments were labelled during various cell cycle phases with an anti-tubulin antibody and rhodamine phalloidin, respectively. Chemically induced disruption of the cytoskeleton was used to elucidate specific functional roles of microtubules and actin during cell expansion and division. Correlation of cytoskeletal dynamics with cell-wall development included live cell labelling with wall polymer-specific antibodies and electron microscopy. The cortical cytoplasm of Penium is highlighted by a band of microtubules found at the cell isthmus, i.e. the site of pre-division wall expansion. This band, along with an associated, transient band of actin filaments, probably acts to direct the deposition of new wall material and to mark the plane of the future cell division. Two additional bands of microtubules, which we identify as satellite bands, arise from the isthmus microtubular band at the onset of expansion and displace toward the poles during expansion, ultimately marking the isthmus of future daughter cells. Treatment with microtubule and actin perturbation agents reversibly stops cell division. The cortical cytoplasm of Penium contains distinct bands of microtubules and actin filaments that persist through the cell cycle. One of these bands, termed the isthmus microtubule band, or IMB, marks the site of both pre-division wall expansion and the zone where a cross

  18. Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells harbor alterations in the major tumor suppressor pathways and cell-cycle checkpoints: analyses using tissue microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Juan F; Camacho, Francisca I; Morente, Manuel; Fraga, Máximo; Montalbán, Carlos; Alvaro, Tomás; Bellas, Carmen; Castaño, Angel; Díez, Ana; Flores, Teresa; Martin, Carmen; Martinez, Miguel A; Mazorra, Francisco; Menárguez, Javier; Mestre, Maria J; Mollejo, Manuela; Sáez, Ana I; Sánchez, Lydia; Piris, Miguel A

    2003-01-15

    Tumoral cells in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) display an increased growth fraction and diminished apoptosis, implying a profound disturbance of the cell cycle and apoptosis regulation. However, limitations of molecular techniques have prevented the analysis of the tumor suppressor pathways and cell-cycle checkpoints. Tissue microarray (TMA) is a powerful tool for analyzing a large number of molecular variables in a large series of tumors, although the feasibility of this technique has not yet been demonstrated in heterogeneous tumors. The expression of 29 genes regulating the cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in 288 HL biopsies using TMA. The sensitivity of the technique was validated by comparing the results with those obtained in standard tissue sections. The results revealed multiple alterations in different pathways and checkpoints, including G1/S and G2/M transition and apoptosis. Striking findings were the overexpression of cyclin E, CDK2, CDK6, STAT3, Hdm2, Bcl2, Bcl-X(L), survivin, and NF-kappaB proteins. A multiparametric analysis identified proteins associated with increased growth fraction (Hdm2, p53, p21, Rb, cyclins A, B1, D3, and E, CDK2, CDK6, SKP2, Bcl-X(L), survivin, STAT1, and STAT3), and proteins associated with apoptosis (NF-kappaB, STAT1, and RB). The analysis also demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive cases displayed a characteristic profile, confirming the pathogenic role of EBV in HL. Survival probability depends on multiple biologic factors, including overexpression of Bcl2, p53, Bax, Bcl-X(L), MIB1, and apoptotic index. In conclusion, Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells harbor concurrent and overlapping alterations in the major tumor suppressor pathways and cell-cycle checkpoints. This appears to determine the viability of the tumoral cells and the clinical outcome.

  19. Balance of microtubule stiffness and cortical tension determines the size of blood cells with marginal band across species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Alsina, Adolfo; Mathur, Aastha; Nédélec, François J

    2017-04-25

    The fast bloodstream of animals is associated with large shear stresses. To withstand these conditions, blood cells have evolved a special morphology and a specific internal architecture to maintain their integrity over several weeks. For instance, nonmammalian red blood cells, mammalian erythroblasts, and platelets have a peripheral ring of microtubules, called the marginal band, that flattens the overall cell morphology by pushing on the cell cortex. In this work, we model how the shape of these cells stems from the balance between marginal band rigidity and cortical tension. We predict that the diameter of the cell scales with the total microtubule polymer and verify the predicted law across a wide range of species. Our analysis also shows that the combination of the marginal band rigidity and cortical tension increases the ability of the cell to withstand forces without deformation. Finally, we model the marginal band coiling that occurs during the disk-to-sphere transition observed, for instance, at the onset of blood platelet activation. We show that when cortical tension increases faster than cross-linkers can unbind, the marginal band will coil, whereas if the tension increases more slowly, the marginal band may shorten as microtubules slide relative to each other.

  20. Disrupted cell cycle control in cultured endometrial cells from patients with endometriosis harboring the progesterone receptor polymorphism PROGINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amora, Paulo; Maciel, Thiago Trovati; Tambellini, Rodrigo; Mori, Marcelo A; Pesquero, João Bosco; Sato, Helio; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Guerreiro da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim; Schor, Eduardo

    2009-07-01

    Presently, little is understood about how endometriosis is established or maintained, or how genetic factors can predispose women to the disease. Because of the crucial role that the progesterone receptor polymorphism PROGINS plays in predisposing women to the development of endometriosis, we hypothesized that this variant may influence critical steps during endometrial cell metabolism that are involved in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Eutopic endometria were collected from three sources: women with endometriosis who had a single PROGINS allele (from the progesterone receptor gene); women with endometriosis who had the wild-type progesterone receptor allele; and women without endometriosis who had the wild-type allele. Cells prepared from the eutopic endometria of these women were stimulated with both estradiol and progesterone, and then examined for cell proliferation, viability, and apoptosis. The cells from women with endometriosis that carried the PROGINS allele demonstrated increased proliferation, greater viability, and decreased apoptosis following progesterone treatment. In general, these parameters were very different as compared with those of women with endometriosis but without the PROGINS allele and women in the control group. This result indicates there is a reduced level of progesterone responsiveness in women who carry the PROGINS polymorphism. Because progesterone responsiveness is known to be an important characteristic of women with endometriosis, these data support the contention that the PROGINS polymorphism enhances the endometriosis phenotype.

  1. Cell wall matrix polysaccharide distribution and cortical microtubule organization: two factors controlling mesophyll cell morphogenesis in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, P; Giannoutsou, E; Panteris, E; Apostolakos, P; Galatis, B

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the involvement of local differentiation of cell wall matrix polysaccharides and the role of microtubules in the morphogenesis of mesophyll cells (MCs) of three types (lobed, branched and palisade) in the dicotyledon Vigna sinensis and the fern Asplenium nidus. Homogalacturonan (HGA) epitopes recognized by the 2F4, JIM5 and JIM7 antibodies and callose were immunolocalized in hand-made leaf sections. Callose was also stained with aniline blue. We studied microtubule organization by tubulin immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. In both plants, the matrix cell wall polysaccharide distribution underwent definite changes during MC differentiation. Callose constantly defined the sites of MC contacts. The 2F4 HGA epitope in V. sinensis first appeared in MC contacts but gradually moved towards the cell wall regions facing the intercellular spaces, while in A. nidus it was initially localized at the cell walls delimiting the intercellular spaces, but finally shifted to MC contacts. In V. sinensis, the JIM5 and JIM7 HGA epitopes initially marked the cell walls delimiting the intercellular spaces and gradually shifted in MC contacts, while in A. nidus they constantly enriched MC contacts. In all MC types examined, the cortical microtubules played a crucial role in their morphogenesis. In particular, in palisade MCs, cortical microtubule helices, by controlling cellulose microfibril orientation, forced these MCs to acquire a truncated cone-like shape. Unexpectedly in V. sinensis, the differentiation of colchicine-affected MCs deviated completely, since they developed a cell wall ingrowth labyrinth, becoming transfer-like cells. The results of this work and previous studies on Zea mays (Giannoutsou et al., Annals of Botany 2013; 112: : 1067-1081) revealed highly controlled local cell wall matrix differentiation in MCs of species belonging to different plant groups. This, in coordination with microtubule-dependent cellulose microfibril

  2. Trans-anethole protects cortical neuronal cells against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sangwoo; Seol, Geun Hee; Park, Hyeon; Choi, In-Young

    2014-10-01

    Trans-anethole has been studied on pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative stress, antifungal and anticancer. However, to date, the anti-ischemic effects of trans-anethole have not been assessed. Therefore, we investigated the neuroprotection of trans-anethole against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R)-induced cortical neuronal cell injury, an in vitro model of ischemia. The abilities of trans-anethole to block excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were evaluated in OGD/R-induced neurons. Trans-anethole significantly ameliorated OGD/R-induced neuronal cell injury by attenuating the intracellular calcium overload via the activation of NMDA receptors. Trans-anethole also inhibited OGD/R-induced reactive oxygen species overproduction, which may be derived from the scavenging activity in peroxyl radicals, assessed in an oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. Furthermore, trans-anethole was shown to attenuate the depolarization of mitochondrial transmembrane. These results indicated that the neuroprotective effect of trans-anethole on OGD/R-induced neuronal injury might be due to its ability to inhibit excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Considering these multiple pathways causing ischemic neuronal damage, the multi-functional effect of trans-anethole suggested that it may be effective in treating ischemic stroke.

  3. Sustained centrosome-cortical contact ensures robust polarization of the one-cell C. elegans embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, Dominique M; Castanzo, Dominic T; Williams, Margaret; Parikh, Devayu A; Jaeger, Eva C; Lyczak, Rebecca

    2017-02-15

    In C. elegans, the anterior-posterior axis is established at the one-cell stage when the embryo polarizes along its long axis. One model suggests that a cue from the centrosome triggers symmetry breaking and is then dispensable for further steps in the process. In the absence of the initial centrosome cue, a redundant mechanism, reliant on the centrosome's microtubules, can polarize the cell. Despite this model, data from multiple sources suggest that direct centrosome-contact with the cortex may play a role in ensuring robust polarization. Some of this past work includes analysis of pam-1 mutants, which lack a functional puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase and have aberrant centrosome positioning and variable polarization defects. To better understand the role of centrosome dynamics in polarization, we looked in detail at centrosome behavior in relation to key polarity landmarks in pam-1 mutants as well as those lacking cortical flows. We provide evidence for a model in which sustained direct contact between the centrosome and the cortex acts to reinforce both the actomyosin and the microtubule-dependent pathways. This contact is necessary for polarization when flows are inhibited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Protection of cortical cells by equine estrogens against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity is mediated through a calcium independent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrella Joel

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High concentrations of glutamate can accumulate in the brain and may be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. This form of neurotoxicity involves changes in the regulation of cellular calcium (Ca2+ and generation of free radicals such as peroxynitrite (ONOO-. Estrogen may protect against glutamate-induced cell death by reducing the excitotoxic Ca2+ influx associated with glutamate excitotoxicity. In this study, the inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor and nitric oxide synthase (NOS along with the effect of 17β-estradiol (17β-E2 and a more potent antioxidant Δ8, 17β-estradiol (Δ8, 17β-E2 on cell viability and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i, following treatment of rat cortical cells with glutamate, was investigated. Results Primary rat cortical cells were cultured for 7–12 days in Neurobasal medium containing B27 supplements. Addition of glutamate (200 μM decreased cell viability to 51.3 ± 0.7% compared to control. Treatment with the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist, MK-801, and the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, completely prevented cell death. Pretreatment (24 hrs with 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2 (0.01 to 10 μM significantly reduced cell death. 17β-E2 was more potent than Δ8, 17β-E2. Glutamate caused a rapid 2.5 fold increase in [Ca2+]i. Treatment with 0.001 to 10 μM MK-801 reduced the initial Ca2+ influx by 14–41% and increased cell viability significantly. Pretreatment with 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2 had no effect on Ca2+ influx but protected the cortical cells against glutamate-induced cell death. Conclusion Glutamate-induced cell death in cortical cultures can occur through NMDAR and NOS-linked mechanisms by increasing nitric oxide and ONOO-. Equine estrogens: 17β-E2 and Δ8, 17β-E2, significantly protected cortical cells against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by a mechanism that appears to be independent of Ca2+ influx. To our knowledge, this is a first

  5. Restoration of Progranulin Expression Rescues Cortical Neuron Generation in an Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of Frontotemporal Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Raitano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand how haploinsufficiency of progranulin (PGRN causes frontotemporal dementia (FTD, we created induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients carrying the GRNIVS1+5G > C mutation (FTD-iPSCs. FTD-iPSCs were fated to cortical neurons, the cells most affected in FTD. Although generation of neuroprogenitors was unaffected, their further differentiation into CTIP2-, FOXP2-, or TBR1-TUJ1 double-positive cortical neurons, but not motorneurons, was significantly decreased in FTD-neural progeny. Zinc finger nuclease-mediated introduction of GRN cDNA into the AAVS1 locus corrected defects in cortical neurogenesis, demonstrating that PGRN haploinsufficiency causes inefficient cortical neuron generation. RNA sequencing analysis confirmed reversal of the altered gene expression profile following genetic correction. We identified the Wnt signaling pathway as one of the top defective pathways in FTD-iPSC-derived neurons, which was reversed following genetic correction. Differentiation of FTD-iPSCs in the presence of a WNT inhibitor mitigated defective corticogenesis. Therefore, we demonstrate that PGRN haploinsufficiency hampers corticogenesis in vitro.

  6. Calcium-dependent depletion zones in the cortical microtubule array coincide with sites of, but do not regulate, wall ingrowth papillae deposition in epidermal transfer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hui-Ming; Talbot, Mark J.; McCurdy, David W.; Patrick, John W.; Offler, Christina E.

    2015-01-01

    Trans-differentiation to a transfer-cell morphology is characterized by the localized deposition of wall ingrowth papillae that protrude into the cytosol. Whether the cortical microtubule array directs wall ingrowth papillae formation was investigated using a Vicia faba cotyledon culture system in which their adaxial epidermal cells were spontaneously induced to trans-differentiate to transfer cells. During deposition of wall ingrowth papillae, the aligned cortical microtubule arrays in precu...

  7. Glutamate receptor GluR3 antibodies and death of cortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X P; Patel, M; Whitney, K D; Janumpalli, S; Tenner, A; McNamara, J O

    1998-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE), a childhood disease characterized by epileptic seizures associated with progressive destruction of a single cerebral hemisphere, is an autoimmune disease in which one of the autoantigens is a glutamate receptor, GluR3. The improvement of some affected children following plasma exchange that removed circulating GluR3 antibodies (anti-GluR3) suggested that anti-GluR3 gained access to the central nervous system where it exerted deleterious effects. Here, we demonstrate that a subset of rabbits immunized with a GluR3 fusion protein develops a neurological disorder mimicking RE. Anti-GluR3 IgG isolated from serum of both ill and healthy GluR3-immunized animals promoted death of cultured cortical cells by a complement-dependent mechanism. IgG immunoreactivity decorated neurons and their processes in neocortex and hippocampus in ill but not in healthy rabbits. Moreover, both IgG and complement membrane attack complex (MAC) immunoreactivity was evident on neurons and their processes in the cortex of a subset of patients with RE. We suggest that access of IgG to epitopes in the central nervous system triggers complement-mediated neuronal damage and contributes to the pathogenesis of both this animal model and RE.

  8. Dendritic Properties Control Energy Efficiency of Action Potentials in Cortical Pyramidal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guosheng Yi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural computation is performed by transforming input signals into sequences of action potentials (APs, which is metabolically expensive and limited by the energy available to the brain. The metabolic efficiency of single AP has important consequences for the computational power of the cell, which is determined by its biophysical properties and morphologies. Here we adopt biophysically-based two-compartment models to investigate how dendrites affect energy efficiency of APs in cortical pyramidal neurons. We measure the Na+ entry during the spike and examine how it is efficiently used for generating AP depolarization. We show that increasing the proportion of dendritic area or coupling conductance between two chambers decreases Na+ entry efficiency of somatic AP. Activating inward Ca2+ current in dendrites results in dendritic spike, which increases AP efficiency. Activating Ca2+-activated outward K+ current in dendrites, however, decreases Na+ entry efficiency. We demonstrate that the active and passive dendrites take effects by altering the overlap between Na+ influx and internal current flowing from soma to dendrite. We explain a fundamental link between dendritic properties and AP efficiency, which is essential to interpret how neural computation consumes metabolic energy and how biophysics and morphologies contribute to such consumption.

  9. Combined small-molecule inhibition accelerates the derivation of functional cortical neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yuchen; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Renier, Nicolas; Wu, Zhuhao; Atkin, Talia; Sun, Ziyi; Ozair, M Zeeshan; Tchieu, Jason; Zimmer, Bastian; Fattahi, Faranak; Ganat, Yosif; Azevedo, Ricardo; Zeltner, Nadja; Brivanlou, Ali H; Karayiorgou, Maria; Gogos, Joseph; Tomishima, Mark; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Shi, Song-Hai; Studer, Lorenz

    2017-02-01

    Considerable progress has been made in converting human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into functional neurons. However, the protracted timing of human neuron specification and functional maturation remains a key challenge that hampers the routine application of hPSC-derived lineages in disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Using a combinatorial small-molecule screen, we previously identified conditions to rapidly differentiate hPSCs into peripheral sensory neurons. Here we generalize the approach to central nervous system (CNS) fates by developing a small-molecule approach for accelerated induction of early-born cortical neurons. Combinatorial application of six pathway inhibitors induces post-mitotic cortical neurons with functional electrophysiological properties by day 16 of differentiation, in the absence of glial cell co-culture. The resulting neurons, transplanted at 8 d of differentiation into the postnatal mouse cortex, are functional and establish long-distance projections, as shown using iDISCO whole-brain imaging. Accelerated differentiation into cortical neuron fates should facilitate hPSC-based strategies for disease modeling and cell therapy in CNS disorders.

  10. Disruption of Cortical Microtubules by Overexpression of Green Fluorescent Protein-Tagged α-Tubulin 6 Causes a Marked Reduction in Cell Wall Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David H. Burk; Ruiqin Zhong; W. Herbert Morrison Ⅲ; Zheng-Hua Ye

    2006-01-01

    It has been known that the transverse orientation of cortical microtubules (MTs) along the elongation axis is essential for normal cell morphogenesis, but whether cortical MTs are essential for normal cell wall synthesis is still not clear. In the present study, we have investigated whether cortical MTs affect cell wall synthesis by direct alteration of the cortical MT organization in Arabidopsis thaliana. Disruption of the cortical MT organization by expression of an excess amount of green fluorescent protein-tagged α-tubulin 6 (GFP-TUA6)in transgenic Arabidopsis plants was found to cause a marked reduction in cell wall thickness and a decrease in the cell wall sugars glucose and xylose. Concomitantly, the stem strength of the GFP-TUA6overexpressors was markedly reduced compared with the wild type. In addition, expression of excess GFPTUA6 results in an alteration in cell morphogenesis and a severe effect on plant growth and development.Together, these results suggest that the proper organization of cortical MTs is essential for the normal synthesis of plant cell walls.

  11. The cytosolic chloride concentration in macula densa and cortical thick ascending limb cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonsson, M; Gonzalez, E; Kornfeld, M; Persson, A E

    1993-03-01

    It is believed that chloride transport through the macula densa (MD) cells is a factor involved in the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism and in MD-mediated renin release. In this study isolated and perfused rabbit kidney cortical thick ascending limb (cTAL) segments containing MD plaques and attached glomeruli were loaded with chloride (CL-sensitive) 6 methoxy-1-fluorophore (sulphanate-propyl) quinolinium (SPQ). MD and cTAL intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl-]i) was determined by using image-intensified video microscopy and digital image-processing for measuring the intensity of the emitted SPQ fluorescence. With 150 mM NaCl in lumen and bath the [Cl-]i in MD and cTAL cells was 58.8 +/- 7.2 mM (n = 20) and 68.7 +/- 9.8 mM (n = 14), respectively. When the presumed luminal Na(+)-2Cl(-)-K+ co-transporter was blocked by adding 10(-4)M furosemide, the [Cl-]i was reduced in both, MD and cTAL cells from 55.5 +/- 11.9 to 28.6 +/- 10.0 mM (n = 10) and from 43.8 +/- 2.6 to 13.1 +/- 4.5 mM (n = 5), respectively. A reduction in luminal NaCl from 150 to 30 mM also decreased both, MD and cTAL [Cl-]i from 69.4 +/- 9.1 to 36.5 +/- 5.1 mM (n = 9) and from 82.9 +/- 14.5 to 49.4 +/- 8.0 mM (n = 8), respectively. Basolateral addition of the Cl(-)-channel blocker NPPB increased MD [Cl-]i from 31.1 +/- 2.0 to 100.7 +/- 17.0 mM (n = 5) and cTAL [Cl-]i from 44.4 +/- 12.9 to 89.7 +/- 11.7 mM (n = 5).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Acute myeloid leukemia of donor origin after allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a sibling who harbors germline XPD and XRCC3 homozygous polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Dayse A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 54-year-old woman was diagnosed with infiltrative ductal breast carcinoma. Two years after treatment, the patient developed an acute myeloid leukemia (AML which harbored del(11q23 in 8% of the blast cells. The patient was submitted for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (aSCT from her HLA-compatible sister. Ten months after transplantation, she relapsed with an AML with basophilic maturation characterized by CD45low CD33high, CD117+, CD13-/+, HLA Drhigh, CD123high, and CD203c+ blast cells lacking expression of CD7, CD10, CD34, CD15, CD14, CD56, CD36, CD64, and cytoplasmic tryptase. Karyotype analysis showed the emergence of a new clone with t(2;14 and FISH analysis indicated the presence of MLL gene rearrangement consistent with del(11q23. Interestingly, AML blast cell DNA tested with microsatellite markers showed the same pattern as the donor's, suggesting that this AML emerged from donor cells. Additionally, polymorphisms of the XPA, XPD, XRCC1, XRCC3 and RAD51 DNA repair genes revealed three unfavorable alleles with low DNA repair capacity. In summary, we report the first case of AML involving XPD and XRCC3 polymorphisms from donor origin following allogeneic stem cell transplantation and highlight the potential need for careful analysis of DNA repair gene polymorphisms in selecting candidate donors prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  13. Associations of unilateral whisker and olfactory signals induce synapse formation and memory cell recruitment in bilateral barrel cortices: cellular mechanism for unilateral training toward bilateral memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilong Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveals the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory.

  14. Associations of Unilateral Whisker and Olfactory Signals Induce Synapse Formation and Memory Cell Recruitment in Bilateral Barrel Cortices: Cellular Mechanism for Unilateral Training Toward Bilateral Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zilong; Chen, Lei; Fan, Ruicheng; Lu, Wei; Wang, Dangui; Cui, Shan; Huang, Li; Zhao, Shidi; Guan, Sudong; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Somatosensory signals and operative skills learned by unilateral limbs can be retrieved bilaterally. In terms of cellular mechanism underlying this unilateral learning toward bilateral memory, we hypothesized that associative memory cells in bilateral cortices and synapse innervations between them were produced. In the examination of this hypothesis, we have observed that paired unilateral whisker and odor stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motions in bilateral sides, which were attenuated by inhibiting the activity of barrel cortices. In the mice that showed bilateral cross-modal responses, the neurons in both sides of barrel cortices became to encode this new odor signal alongside the innate whisker signal. Axon projections and synapse formations from the barrel cortex, which was co-activated with the piriform cortex, toward its contralateral barrel cortex (CBC) were upregulated. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission in bilateral barrel cortices was upregulated and GABAergic synaptic transmission was downregulated. The associative activations of the sensory cortices facilitate new axon projection, glutamatergic synapse formation and GABAergic synapse downregulation, which drive the neurons to be recruited as associative memory cells in the bilateral cortices. Our data reveal the productions of associative memory cells and synapse innervations in bilateral sensory cortices for unilateral training toward bilateral memory. PMID:28018178

  15. Drosophila sosie functions with βH-Spectrin and actin organizers in cell migration, epithelial morphogenesis and cortical stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Urwyler

    2012-08-01

    Morphogenesis in multicellular organisms requires the careful coordination of cytoskeletal elements, dynamic regulation of cell adhesion and extensive cell migration. sosie (sie is a novel gene required in various morphogenesis processes in Drosophila oogenesis. Lack of sie interferes with normal egg chamber packaging, maintenance of epithelial integrity and control of follicle cell migration, indicating that sie is involved in controlling epithelial integrity and cell migration. For these functions sie is required both in the germ line and in the soma. Consistent with this, Sosie localizes to plasma membranes in the germ line and in the somatic follicle cells and is predicted to present an EGF-like domain on the extracellular side. Two positively charged residues, C-terminal to the predicted transmembrane domain (on the cytoplasmic side, are required for normal plasma membrane localization of Sosie. Because sie also contributes to normal cortical localization of βH-Spectrin, it appears that cortical βH-Spectrin mediates some of the functions of sosie. sie also interacts with the genes coding for the actin organizers Filamin and Profilin and, in the absence of sie function, F-actin is less well organized and nurse cells frequently fuse.

  16. GAPDH--a recruits a plant virus movement protein to cortical virus replication complexes to facilitate viral cell-to-cell movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kaido

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of virus movement protein (MP-containing punctate structures on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum is required for efficient intercellular movement of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV, a bipartite positive-strand RNA plant virus. We found that these cortical punctate structures constitute a viral replication complex (VRC in addition to the previously reported aggregate structures that formed adjacent to the nucleus. We identified host proteins that interacted with RCNMV MP in virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using a tandem affinity purification method followed by mass spectrometry. One of these host proteins was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-A (NbGAPDH-A, which is a component of the Calvin-Benson cycle in chloroplasts. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A reduced RCNMV multiplication in the inoculated leaves, but not in the single cells, thereby suggesting that GAPDH-A plays a positive role in cell-to-cell movement of RCNMV. The fusion protein of NbGAPDH-A and green fluorescent protein localized exclusively to the chloroplasts. In the presence of RCNMV RNA1, however, the protein localized to the cortical VRC as well as the chloroplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay and GST pulldown assay confirmed in vivo and in vitro interactions, respectively, between the MP and NbGAPDH-A. Furthermore, gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A inhibited MP localization to the cortical VRC. We discuss the possible roles of NbGAPDH-A in the RCNMV movement process.

  17. Pearl Harbor Biological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-30

    Distribution of Porifera (Wet Weight in Grams) Collected in Piling Samples from Pearl Harbor, Oahu 2.4-26 2.4-7. Syllidae 2.4-28 2.4-8. Cirratulidae...COLLECTED FROM PEARL HARBOR m .-. Sped es/Group Porifera Demospongiae Cnidaria Hydrozoa Hydrdda Anthozoa Actlnarla Stolchactlnldae Radianthus...and abundance data for 113 taxa (species, genera and higher taxa) are provided in Table 2.4-4. Wet weights are listed for all sponges ( porifera ). The

  18. The human vascular endothelial cell line HUV-EC-C harbors the integrated HHV-6B genome which remains stable in long term culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioda, Setsuko; Kasai, Fumio; Ozawa, Midori; Hirayama, Noriko; Satoh, Motonobu; Kameoka, Yousuke; Watanabe, Ken; Shimizu, Norio; Tang, Huamin; Mori, Yasuko; Kohara, Arihiro

    2017-07-28

    Human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) is a common human pathogen that is most often detected in hematopoietic cells. Although human cells harboring chromosomally integrated HHV-6 can be generated in vitro, the availability of such cell lines originating from in vivo tissues is limited. In this study, chromosomally integrated HHV-6B has been identified in a human vascular endothelial cell line, HUV-EC-C (IFO50271), derived from normal umbilical cord tissue. Sequence analysis revealed that the viral genome was similar to the HHV-6B HST strain. FISH analysis using a HHV-6 DNA probe showed one signal in each cell, detected at the distal end of the long arm of chromosome 9. This was consistent with a digital PCR assay, validating one copy of the viral DNA. Because exposure of HUV-EC-C to chemicals did not cause viral reactivation, long term cell culture of HUV-EC-C was carried out to assess the stability of viral integration. The growth rate was altered depending on passage numbers, and morphology also changed during culture. SNP microarray profiles showed some differences between low and high passages, implying that the HUV-EC-C genome had changed during culture. However, no detectable change was observed in chromosome 9, where HHV-6B integration and the viral copy number remained unchanged. Our results suggest that integrated HHV-6B is stable in HUV-EC-C despite genome instability.

  19. Gefitinib analogue V1801 induces apoptosis of T790M EGFR-harboring lung cancer cells by up-regulation of the BH-3 only protein Noxa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    Full Text Available Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with drugs targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, e.g., gefitinib and erlotinib, will eventually fail because of the development of secondary mutations such as T790M in EGFR. Strategies to overcome this resistance are therefore an urgent need. In this study, we synthesized a dozen of novel gefitinib analogues and evaluated their effects on L858R/T790M-EGFR harboring NSCLC cells, and reported that one of these gefitinib mimetics, N-(2-bromo-5-(trifluoromethyl phenyl-6-methoxy-7-(3-(piperidin-1-ylpropoxyquinazolin-4-amine (hereafter, V1801, triggered apoptosis of the NSCLC cells and overcame gefitinib-resistance in mice inoculated with NCI-H1975 cells. Though V1801 only moderately inhibited EGFR kinase activity, it markedly induced the expression of the BH3-only protein Noxa, and Noxa silencing significantly reduced V1801-induced apoptosis of NCI-H1975 cells. It is showed that V1801 interfered with the expression of the transcription factor c-Myc and the extracellular signal regulated kinase (Erk pathway. V1801 in combination with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib exerted enhanced cytotoxicity in NCI-H1975 cells possibly due to potentiated induction of Noxa expression. These data indicate that gefinitib analogues with weak EGFR inhibitory activity may overcome drug-resistance via activation of BH-3 only pro-apoptotic proteins, and V1801 may have therapeutic potentials for NSCLC.

  20. A regimen combining the Wee1 inhibitor AZD1775 with HDAC inhibitors targets human acute myeloid leukemia cells harboring various genetic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L; Zhang, Y; Chen, S; Kmieciak, M; Leng, Y; Lin, H; Rizzo, K A; Dumur, C I; Ferreira-Gonzalez, A; Dai, Y; Grant, S

    2015-04-01

    AZD1775 targets the cell cycle checkpoint kinase Wee1 and potentiates genotoxic agent cytotoxicity through p53-dependent or -independent mechanisms. Here, we report that AZD1775 interacted synergistically with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs, for example, Vorinostat), which interrupt the DNA damage response, to kill p53-wild type (wt) or -deficient as well as FLT3-ITD leukemia cells in association with pronounced Wee1 inhibition and diminished cdc2/Cdk1 Y15 phosphorylation. Similarly, Wee1 shRNA knockdown significantly sensitized cells to HDACIs. Although AZD1775 induced Chk1 activation, reflected by markedly increased Chk1 S296/S317/S345 phosphorylation leading to inhibitory T14 phosphorylation of cdc2/Cdk1, these compensatory responses were sharply abrogated by HDACIs. This was accompanied by premature mitotic entry, multiple mitotic abnormalities and accumulation of early S-phase cells displaying increased newly replicated DNA, culminating in robust DNA damage and apoptosis. The regimen was active against patient-derived acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells harboring either wt or mutant p53 and various next-generation sequencing-defined mutations. Primitive CD34(+)/CD123(+)/CD38(-) populations enriched for leukemia-initiating progenitors, but not normal CD34(+) hematopoietic cells, were highly susceptible to this regimen. Finally, combining AZD1775 with Vorinostat in AML murine xenografts significantly reduced tumor burden and prolonged animal survival. A strategy combining Wee1 with HDACI inhibition warrants further investigation in AML with poor prognostic genetic aberrations.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells from cortical bone demonstrate increased clonal incidence, potency, and developmental capacity compared to their bone marrow–derived counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Blashki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we show that matrix dense cortical bone is the more potent compartment of bone than bone marrow as a stromal source for mesenchymal stem cells as isolated from adult rats. Lineage-depleted cortical bone-mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated >150-fold enrichment of colony forming unit–fibroblasts per cell incidence. compared to lineage-depleted bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells, corresponding to a 70-fold increase in absolute recovered colony forming unit–fibroblasts. The composite phenotype Lin−/CD45−/CD31−/VLA-1+/Thy-1+ enriched for clonogenic mesenchymal stem cells solely from cortical bone–derived cells from which 70% of clones spontaneously differentiated into all lineages of bone, cartilage, and adipose. Both populations generated vascularized bone tissue within subcutaneous implanted collagen scaffolds; however, cortical bone–derived cells formed significantly more osteoid than bone marrow counterparts, quantified by histology. The data demonstrate that our isolation protocol identifies and validates mesenchymal stem cells with superior clonal, proliferative, and developmental potential from cortical bone compared to the bone marrow niche although marrow persists as the typical source for mesenchymal stem cells both in the literature and current pre-clinical therapies.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells from cortical bone demonstrate increased clonal incidence, potency, and developmental capacity compared to their bone marrow–derived counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashki, Daniel; Murphy, Matthew B; Ferrari, Mauro; Simmons, Paul J; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we show that matrix dense cortical bone is the more potent compartment of bone than bone marrow as a stromal source for mesenchymal stem cells as isolated from adult rats. Lineage-depleted cortical bone-mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated >150-fold enrichment of colony forming unit–fibroblasts per cell incidence. compared to lineage-depleted bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells, corresponding to a 70-fold increase in absolute recovered colony forming unit–fibroblasts. The composite phenotype Lin−/CD45−/CD31−/VLA-1+/Thy-1+ enriched for clonogenic mesenchymal stem cells solely from cortical bone–derived cells from which 70% of clones spontaneously differentiated into all lineages of bone, cartilage, and adipose. Both populations generated vascularized bone tissue within subcutaneous implanted collagen scaffolds; however, cortical bone–derived cells formed significantly more osteoid than bone marrow counterparts, quantified by histology. The data demonstrate that our isolation protocol identifies and validates mesenchymal stem cells with superior clonal, proliferative, and developmental potential from cortical bone compared to the bone marrow niche although marrow persists as the typical source for mesenchymal stem cells both in the literature and current pre-clinical therapies. PMID:27579159

  3. Evolution of cortical neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Mannan, Omar; Cheung, Amanda F P; Molnár, Zoltán

    2008-03-18

    The neurons of the mammalian neocortex are organised into six layers. By contrast, the reptilian and avian dorsal cortices only have three layers which are thought to be equivalent to layers I, V and VI of mammals. Increased repertoire of mammalian higher cognitive functions is likely a result of an expanded cortical surface area. The majority of cortical cell proliferation in mammals occurs in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ), with a small number of scattered divisions outside the germinal zone. Comparative developmental studies suggest that the appearance of SVZ coincides with the laminar expansion of the cortex to six layers, as well as the tangential expansion of the cortical sheet seen within mammals. In spite of great variation and further compartmentalisation in the mitotic compartments, the number of neurons in an arbitrary cortical column appears to be remarkably constant within mammals. The current challenge is to understand how the emergence and elaboration of the SVZ has contributed to increased cortical cell diversity, tangential expansion and gyrus formation of the mammalian neocortex. This review discusses neurogenic processes that are believed to underlie these major changes in cortical dimensions in vertebrates.

  4. [Cortical blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokron, S

    2014-02-01

    Cortical blindness refers to a visual loss induced by a bilateral occipital lesion. The very strong cooperation between psychophysics, cognitive psychology, neurophysiology and neuropsychology these latter twenty years as well as recent progress in cerebral imagery have led to a better understanding of neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness. It thus becomes possible now to propose an earlier diagnosis of cortical blindness as well as new perspectives for rehabilitation in children as well as in adults. On the other hand, studying complex neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness is a way to infer normal functioning of the visual system.

  5. The preferred substrates for transglutaminase 2 in a complex wheat gluten digest are Peptide fragments harboring celiac disease T-cell epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri Dørum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory disorder of the gut that is induced by dietary exposure to gluten proteins. CD4+ T cells of the intestinal lesion recognize gluten peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2.5 or HLA-DQ8 and the gluten derived peptides become better T-cell antigens after deamidation catalyzed by the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2. In this study we aimed to identify the preferred peptide substrates of TG2 in a heterogeneous proteolytic digest of whole wheat gluten. METHODS: A method was established to enrich for preferred TG2 substrates in a complex gluten peptide mixture by tagging with 5-biotinamido-pentylamine. Tagged peptides were isolated and then identified by nano-liquid chromatography online-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, database searching and final manual data validation. RESULTS: We identified 31 different peptides as preferred substrates of TG2. Strikingly, the majority of these peptides were harboring known gluten T-cell epitopes. Five TG2 peptide substrates that were predicted to bind to HLA-DQ2.5 did not contain previously characterized sequences of T-cell epitopes. Two of these peptides elicited T-cell responses when tested for recognition by intestinal T-cell lines of celiac disease patients, and thus they contain novel candidate T-cell epitopes. We also found that the intact 9mer core sequences of the respective epitopes were not present in all peptide substrates. Interestingly, those epitopes that were represented by intact forms were frequently recognized by T cells in celiac disease patients, whereas those that were present in truncated versions were infrequently recognized. CONCLUSION: TG2 as well as gastrointestinal proteolysis play important roles in the selection of gluten T-cell epitopes in celiac disease.

  6. Efficient derivation of cortical glutamatergic neurons from human pluripotent stem cells: a model system to study neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazin, Tandis; Ball, K Aurelia; Lu, Hui; Park, Hyungju; Ataeijannati, Yasaman; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Poo, Mu-ming; Schaffer, David V

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is among the most prevalent forms of dementia affecting the aging population, and pharmacological therapies to date have not been successful in preventing disease progression. Future therapeutic efforts may benefit from the development of models that enable basic investigation of early disease pathology. In particular, disease-relevant models based on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) may be promising approaches to assess the impact of neurotoxic agents in AD on specific neuronal populations and thereby facilitate the development of novel interventions to avert early disease mechanisms. We implemented an efficient paradigm to convert hPSCs into enriched populations of cortical glutamatergic neurons emerging from dorsal forebrain neural progenitors, aided by modulating Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Since AD is generally known to be toxic to glutamatergic circuits, we exposed glutamatergic neurons derived from hESCs to an oligomeric pre-fibrillar forms of Aβ known as "globulomers", which have shown strong correlation with the level of cognitive deficits in AD. Administration of such Aβ oligomers yielded signs of the disease, including cell culture age-dependent binding of Aβ and cell death in the glutamatergic populations. Furthermore, consistent with previous findings in postmortem human AD brain, Aβ-induced toxicity was selective for glutamatergic rather than GABAeric neurons present in our cultures. This in vitro model of cortical glutamatergic neurons thus offers a system for future mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development for AD pathology using human cell types specifically affected by this disease. © 2013.

  7. Entorhinal cortical innervation of parvalbumin-containing neurons (Basket and Chandelier cells) in the rat Ammon's horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, J; Buzsaki, G; Morrow, J S; Glantz, S B; Leranth, C

    1996-01-01

    Physiological data suggest that in the CA1-CA3 hippocampal areas of rats, entorhinal cortical efferents directly influence the activity of interneurons, in addition to pyramidal cells. To verify this hypothesis, the following experiments were performed: 1) light microscopic double-immunostaining for parvalbumin and the anterograde tracer Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin injected into the entorhinal cortex; 2) light and electron microscopic analysis of cleaved spectrin-immunostained (i.e., degenerating axons and boutons) hippocampal sections following entorhinal cortex lesion; and 3) an electron microscopic study of parvalbumin-immunostained hippocampal sections after entorhinal cortex lesion. The results demonstrate that in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare of the CA1 and CA3 regions, entorhinal cortical axons form asymmetric synaptic contacts on parvalbumin-containing dendritic shafts. In the stratum lacunosum-moleculare, parvalbumin-immunoreactive dendrites represent processes of GABAergic, inhibitory basket and chandelier cells; these interneurons innervate the perisomatic area and axon initial segments of pyramidal cells, respectively. A feed-forward activation of these neurons by the entorhinal input may explain the strong, short-latency inhibition of pyramidal cells.

  8. Non-linear Membrane Properties in Entorhinal Cortical Stellate Cells Reduce Modulation of Input-Output Responses by Voltage Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Fernando R; Malerba, Paola; White, John A

    2015-04-01

    The presence of voltage fluctuations arising from synaptic activity is a critical component in models of gain control, neuronal output gating, and spike rate coding. The degree to which individual neuronal input-output functions are modulated by voltage fluctuations, however, is not well established across different cortical areas. Additionally, the extent and mechanisms of input-output modulation through fluctuations have been explored largely in simplified models of spike generation, and with limited consideration for the role of non-linear and voltage-dependent membrane properties. To address these issues, we studied fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses in medial entorhinal cortical (MEC) stellate cells of rats, which express strong sub-threshold non-linear membrane properties. Using in vitro recordings, dynamic clamp and modeling, we show that the modulation of input-output responses by random voltage fluctuations in stellate cells is significantly limited. In stellate cells, a voltage-dependent increase in membrane resistance at sub-threshold voltages mediated by Na+ conductance activation limits the ability of fluctuations to elicit spikes. Similarly, in exponential leaky integrate-and-fire models using a shallow voltage-dependence for the exponential term that matches stellate cell membrane properties, a low degree of fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses can be attained. These results demonstrate that fluctuation-based modulation of input-output responses is not a universal feature of neurons and can be significantly limited by subthreshold voltage-gated conductances.

  9. Control of patterns of symmetric cell division in the epidermal and cortical tissues of the Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanwen; Iakovidis, Michail; Costa, Silvia

    2016-03-15

    Controlled cell division is central to the growth and development of all multicellular organisms. Within the proliferating zone of the Arabidopsis root, regular symmetric divisions give rise to patterns of parallel files of cells, the genetic basis of which remains unclear. We found that genotypes impaired in the TONNEAU1a (TON1a) gene display misoriented symmetric divisions in the epidermis and have no division defects in the underlying cortical tissue. The TON1a gene encodes a microtubule-associated protein. We show that in the ton1a mutant, epidermal and cortical cells do not form narrow, ring-like preprophase bands (PPBs), which are plant-specific, cytoskeletal structures that predict the position of the division plane before mitosis. The results indicate that in the cortex but not in the epidermis, division plane positioning and patterning can proceed correctly in the absence of both a functional TON1a and PPB formation. Differences between tissues in how they respond to the signals that guide symmetric division orientation during patterning might provide the basis for organised organ growth in the absence of cell movements.

  10. Immunohistochemical characterization of selected cell markers for the detection of hematopoietic cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded lymphoid tissues of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, H; Stimmer, L; Siebert, U; Beineke, A

    2010-10-15

    To facilitate a detailed investigation of pinniped lymphoid organs, 30 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) as well as eight polyclonal antibodies (pAb) of different species specificities directed against cell antigens of the hematopoietic system were tested for immunohistochemical cross-reactivity on formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and a walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus). Six monoclonal and eight polyclonal antibodies showed specific immunoreactivities. Lymphocytes were immunolabeled by an anti-CD3 pAb, anti-Foxp3 mAb and anti-CD79 alpha mAb, while plasma cell subpopulations were recognized by anti-IgA pAb, anti-IgG pAb and anti-IgM pAb as well as by anti-kappa- and anti-lambda light chain pAb. Cells of the histiocytic lineage were recognized by lysozyme-, myeloid/histiocyte antigen-, and CD68-specific markers. Furthermore, dendritic cell-like cells were detected by an anti-S100 protein pAb. The MHC class II antigen was labeled on the majority of immune cells of the harbor seal and walrus using a bovine mAb. Mast cells were stained by an anti-mast cell tryptase mAb. Thus, using these antibodies from various species, it is now possible to determine phenotypical changes in lymphoid organs and detect different leukocyte subsets involved in inflammatory responses in archived tissue samples of these pinniped species.

  11. Duration of culture and sonic hedgehog signaling differentially specify PV versus SST cortical interneuron fates from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Jennifer A; Goldberg, Ethan M; Maroof, Asif M; Xu, Qing; Petros, Timothy J; Anderson, Stewart A

    2015-04-01

    Medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-derived GABAergic cortical interneurons (cINs) consist of multiple subtypes that are involved in many cortical functions. They also have a remarkable capacity to migrate, survive and integrate into cortical circuitry after transplantation into postnatal cortex. These features have engendered considerable interest in generating distinct subgroups of interneurons from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) for the study of interneuron fate and function, and for the development of cell-based therapies. Although advances have been made, the capacity to generate highly enriched pools of subgroup fate-committed interneuron progenitors from PSCs has remained elusive. Previous studies have suggested that the two main MGE-derived interneuron subgroups--those expressing somatostatin (SST) and those expressing parvalbumin (PV)--are specified in the MGE from Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors at higher or lower levels of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, respectively. To further explore the role of Shh and other factors in cIN fate determination, we generated a reporter line such that Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors express mCherry and postmitotic Lhx6-expressing MGE-derived interneurons express GFP. Manipulations of Shh exposure and time in culture influenced the subgroup fates of ESC-derived interneurons. Exposure to higher Shh levels, and collecting GFP-expressing precursors at 12 days in culture, resulted in the strongest enrichment for SST interneurons over those expressing PV, whereas the strongest enrichment for PV interneurons was produced by lower Shh and by collecting mCherry-expressing cells after 17 days in culture. These findings confirm that fate determination of cIN subgroups is crucially influenced by Shh signaling, and provide a system for the further study of interneuron fate and function.

  12. Cortical Proteins are Chemokinetic to Cells from the Medial Ganglionic Eminence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-28

    development, other novel factors have been demonstrated to exist, but are not yet identified ( Britto et al., 2006). 11   1.1.5 Further directions...chemorepulsive response. This underlies the temporal complexity of cortical development as demonstrated by Britto et al. (2006). By switching the neocortex of...E12.5 mouse organotypic slice cultures with E13.5 neocortex, Britto et al. showed that interneurons from the MGE and LGE switch from being repelled

  13. Genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed receptors harboring TAG-72-specific camelid single domain antibodies as targeting agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the preclinical success of adoptive therapy with T cells bearing chimeric nanoconstructed antigen receptors (CARs), certain limitations of this therapeutic approach such as the immunogenicity of the antigen binding domain, the emergence of tumor cell escape variants and the blocking capac...... to reverse multiple tumor immune evasion mechanisms, avoid CAR immunogenicity, and overcome problems in cancer gene therapy with engineered nanoconstructs....

  14. Perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells From the Adult Human Brain Harbor No Instrinsic Neuroectodermal but High Mesodermal Differentiation Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lojewski, Xenia; Srimasorn, Sumitra; Rauh, Juliane; Francke, Silvan; Wobus, Manja; Taylor, Verdon; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Hallmeyer-Elgner, Susanne; Kirsch, Matthias; Schwarz, Sigrid; Schwarz, Johannes; Storch, Alexander; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Brain perivascular cells have recently been identified as a novel mesodermal cell type in the human brain. These cells reside in the perivascular niche and were shown to have mesodermal and, to a lesser extent, tissue-specific differentiation potential. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely proposed for use in cell therapy in many neurological disorders; therefore, it is of importance to better understand the "intrinsic" MSC population of the human brain. We systematically characterized adult human brain-derived pericytes during in vitro expansion and differentiation and compared these cells with fetal and adult human brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and adult human bone marrow-derived MSCs. We found that adult human brain pericytes, which can be isolated from the hippocampus and from subcortical white matter, are-in contrast to adult human NSCs-easily expandable in monolayer cultures and show many similarities to human bone marrow-derived MSCs both regarding both surface marker expression and after whole transcriptome profile. Human brain pericytes showed a negligible propensity for neuroectodermal differentiation under various differentiation conditions but efficiently generated mesodermal progeny. Consequently, human brain pericytes resemble bone marrow-derived MSCs and might be very interesting for possible autologous and endogenous stem cell-based treatment strategies and cell therapeutic approaches for treating neurological diseases. Perivascular mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) recently gained significant interest because of their appearance in many tissues including the human brain. MSCs were often reported as being beneficial after transplantation in the central nervous system in different neurological diseases; therefore, adult brain perivascular cells derived from human neural tissue were systematically characterized concerning neural stem cell and MSC marker expression, transcriptomics, and mesodermal and inherent neuroectodermal differentiation

  15. Nitrilase-catalyzed conversion of (R,S)-mandelonitrile by immobilized recombinant Escherichia coli cells harboring nitrilase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Hong; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xue, Ya-Ping; Xu, Ming; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-07-01

    (R)-(-)-Mandelic acid (R-MA) is widely used both as a versatile intermediate for pharmaceuticals and a resolving agent in chiral resolution processes. In the current study, to improve the stability of operation, recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing nitrilase from Alcaligenes faecalis were immobilized for the enantioselective hydrolysis of (R,S)-mandelonitrile to R-MA. Different immobilization methods including entrapment matrices, entrapment matrices cross-linked by cross-linking and polymerization agents, and direct cross-linking cells using glutaraldehyde (GA) or bionic silicon were investigated. To facilitate industrial solid-liquid separation, the direct cross-linking recombinant E. coli cells using diatomite/GA/polyethyleneimine with 135.95% relative activity compared with free cells was chosen using water as the reaction medium. The operational stability of the immobilized cells was obviously superior to that of free cells, without significant activity loss after 28 cycles of batch reaction and the successive production of R-MA could reach 1.88 M. Moreover, the immobilized cells showed good storage stability with about 52% relative activity after storing for 30 days at 4 °C. Therefore, the immobilized biocatalyst is very promising for upscale production of optically pure R-MA with high performance and low cost.

  16. Identification of hepatic niche harboring human acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells via the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itaru Kato

    Full Text Available In acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients, the bone marrow niche is widely known to be an important element of treatment response and relapse. Furthermore, a characteristic liver pathology observed in ALL patients implies that the hepatic microenvironment provides an extramedullary niche for leukemic cells. However, it remains unclear whether the liver actually provides a specific niche. The mechanism underlying this pathology is also poorly understood. Here, to answer these questions, we reconstituted the histopathology of leukemic liver by using patients-derived primary ALL cells into NOD/SCID/Yc (null mice. The liver pathology in this model was similar to that observed in the patients. By using this model, we clearly demonstrated that bile duct epithelial cells form a hepatic niche that supports infiltration and proliferation of ALL cells in the liver. Furthermore, we showed that functions of the niche are maintained by the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, proposing a novel therapeutic approach targeting the extramedullary niche by inhibition of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the liver dissemination of leukemia is not due to nonselective infiltration, but rather systematic invasion and proliferation of leukemic cells in hepatic niche. Although the contribution of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis is reported in some cancer cells or leukemic niches such as bone marrow, we demonstrated that this axis works even in the extramedullary niche of leukemic cells. Our findings form the basis for therapeutic approaches that target the extramedullary niche by inhibiting the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  17. Modulation of NMDA and AMPA-mediated synaptic transmission by CB1 receptors in frontal cortical pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Yan, Haidun; Wilson, Wilkie A; Swartzwelder, H Scott

    2010-06-25

    Although the endogenous cannabinoid system modulates a variety of physiological and pharmacological processes, the specific role of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission and neural plasticity is not well understood. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques, evoked or spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs or sEPSCs) were recorded from visualized, layer II/III pyramidal cells in frontal cortical slices from rat brain. Bath application of the CB1 receptor agonist, WIN 55212-2 (WIN), reduced the amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. When co-applied with the specific CB1 antagonists, AM251 or AM281, WIN did not suppress NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs. WIN also reduced the amplitude of evoked AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs, an effect that was also reversed by AM251. Both the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs were significantly reduced by WIN. In contrast, WIN reduced the frequency, but not the amplitude of miniature EPSCs, suggesting that the suppression of glutamatergic activity by CB1 receptors in the frontal neocortex is mediated by a presynaptic mechanism. Taken together, these data indicate a critical role for endocannabinoid signaling in the regulation of excitatory synaptic transmission in frontal neocortex, and suggest a possible neuronal mechanism whereby THC regulates cortical function.

  18. Single-cell coding of sensory, spatial and numerical magnitudes in primate prefrontal, premotor and cingulate motor cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiselt, Anne-Kathrin; Nieder, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The representation of magnitude information enables humans and animal species alike to successfully interact with the external environment. However, how various types of magnitudes are processed by single neurons to guide goal-directed behavior remains elusive. Here, we recorded single-cell activity from the dorsolateral prefrontal (PFC), dorsal premotor (PMd) and cingulate motor (CMA) cortices in monkeys discriminating discrete numerical (numerosity), continuous spatial (line length) and basic sensory (spatial frequency) stimuli. We found that almost exclusively PFC neurons represented the different magnitude types during sample presentation and working memory periods. The frequency of magnitude-selective cells in PMd and CMA did not exceed chance level. The proportion of PFC neurons selectively tuned to each of the three magnitude types were comparable. Magnitude coding was mainly dissociated at the single-neuron level, with individual neurons representing only one of the three tested magnitude types. Neuronal magnitude discriminability, coding strength and temporal evolution were comparable between magnitude types encoded by PFC neuron populations. Our data highlight the importance of PFC neurons in representing various magnitude categories. Such magnitude representations are based on largely distributed coding by single neurons that are anatomically intermingled within the same cortical area.

  19. Human bone marrow harbors cells with neural crest-associated characteristics like human adipose and dermis tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Sharma, Anil; Agirman, Gulistan; Rogister, Bernard; Foguenne, Jacques; Lallemend, François; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Adult neural crest stem-derived cells (NCSC) are of extraordinary high plasticity and promising candidates for use in regenerative medicine. Several locations such as skin, adipose tissue, dental pulp or bone marrow have been described in rodent, as sources of NCSC. However, very little information is available concerning their correspondence in human tissues, and more precisely for human bone marrow. The main objective of this study was therefore to characterize NCSC from adult human bone marrow. In this purpose, we compared human bone marrow stromal cells to human adipose tissue and dermis, already described for containing NCSC. We performed comparative analyses in terms of gene and protein expression as well as functional characterizations. It appeared that human bone marrow, similarly to adipose tissue and dermis, contains NESTIN+ / SOX9+ / TWIST+ / SLUG+ / P75NTR+ / BRN3A+/ MSI1+/ SNAIL1+ cells and were able to differentiate into melanocytes, Schwann cells and neurons. Moreover, when injected into chicken embryos, all those cells were able to migrate and follow endogenous neural crest migration pathways. Altogether, the phenotypic characterization and migration abilities strongly suggest the presence of neural crest-derived cells in human adult bone marrow.

  20. Metabolically active CD4+ T cells expressing Glut1 and OX40 preferentially harbor HIV during in vitro infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Clovis S; Duette, Gabriel A; Wagner, Marc C E; Henstridge, Darren C; Saleh, Suah; Pereira, Candida; Zhou, Jingling; Simar, David; Lewin, Sharon R; Ostrowski, Matias; McCune, Joseph M; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2017-09-11

    High Glut1 surface expression is associated with increased glycolytic activity in activated CD4+ T cells. PI3K activation measured by p-Akt and OX40 is elevated in CD4+Glut1+ T cells from HIV+ subjects. TCR engagement of CD4+Glut1+ T cells from HIV+ subjects demonstrate hyper-responsive PI3K-mTOR signalling. High basal Glut1 and OX40 on CD4+ T cells from combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-treated HIV+ patients represent a sufficiently metabolically active state permissive for HIV infection in vitro without external stimuli. The majority of CD4+OX40+ T cells express Glut1, thus OX40 rather than Glut1 itself may facilitate HIV infection. Furthermore, infection of CD4+ T cells is limited by p110γ PI3K inhibition. Modulating glucose metabolism may limit cellular activation and prevent residual HIV replication in 'virologically suppressed' cART-treated HIV+ persons. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Normal distribution and medullary-to-cortical shift of Nestin-expressing cells in acute renal ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patschan, D; Michurina, T; Shi, H K; Dolff, S; Brodsky, S V; Vasilieva, T; Cohen-Gould, L; Winaver, J; Chander, P N; Enikolopov, G; Goligorsky, M S

    2007-04-01

    Nestin, a marker of multi-lineage stem and progenitor cells, is a member of intermediate filament family, which is expressed in neuroepithelial stem cells, several embryonic cell types, including mesonephric mesenchyme, endothelial cells of developing blood vessels, and in the adult kidney. We used Nestin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice to characterize its expression in normal and post-ischemic kidneys. Nestin-GFP-expressing cells were detected in large clusters within the papilla, along the vasa rectae, and, less prominently, in the glomeruli and juxta-glomerular arterioles. In mice subjected to 30 min bilateral renal ischemia, glomerular, endothelial, and perivascular cells showed increased Nestin expression. In the post-ischemic period, there was an increase in fluorescence intensity with no significant changes in the total number of Nestin-GFP-expressing cells. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy performed before and after ischemia ruled out the possibility of engraftment by the circulating Nestin-expressing cells, at least within the first 3 h post-ischemia. Incubation of non-perfused kidney sections resulted in a medullary-to-cortical migration of Nestin-GFP-positive cells with the rate of expansion of their front averaging 40 microm/30 min during the first 3 h and was detectable already after 30 min of incubation. Explant matrigel cultures of the kidney and aorta exhibited sprouting angiogenesis with cells co-expressing Nestin and endothelial marker, Tie-2. In conclusion, several lines of circumstantial evidence identify a sub-population of Nestin-expressing cells with the mural cells, which are recruited in the post-ischemic period to migrate from the medulla toward the renal cortex. These migrating Nestin-positive cells may be involved in the process of post-ischemic tissue regeneration.

  2. An instructive role for C. elegans E-cadherin in translating cell contact cues into cortical polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klompstra, Diana; Anderson, Dorian C; Yeh, Justin Y; Zilberman, Yuliya; Nance, Jeremy

    2015-06-01

    Cell contacts provide spatial cues that polarize early embryos and epithelial cells. The homophilic adhesion protein E-cadherin is required for contact-induced polarity in many cells. However, it is debated whether E-cadherin functions instructively as a spatial cue, or permissively by ensuring adequate adhesion so that cells can sense other contact signals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, contacts polarize early embryonic cells by recruiting the RhoGAP PAC-1 to the adjacent cortex, inducing PAR protein asymmetry. Here we show that the E-cadherin HMR-1, which is dispensable for adhesion, functions together with the α-catenin HMP-1, the p120 catenin JAC-1, and the previously uncharacterized linker PICC-1 (human CCDC85A-C) to bind PAC-1 and recruit it to contacts. Mislocalizing the HMR-1 intracellular domain to contact-free surfaces draws PAC-1 to these sites and depolarizes cells, demonstrating an instructive role for HMR-1 in polarization. Our findings identify an E-cadherin-mediated pathway that translates cell contacts into cortical polarity by directly recruiting a symmetry-breaking factor to the adjacent cortex.

  3. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations...... in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia...... subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s)....

  4. DYRK1A-mediated Cyclin D1 Degradation in Neural Stem Cells Contributes to the Neurogenic Cortical Defects in Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sònia Najas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in cerebral cortex connectivity lead to intellectual disability and in Down syndrome, this is associated with a deficit in cortical neurons that arises during prenatal development. However, the pathogenic mechanisms that cause this deficit have not yet been defined. Here we show that the human DYRK1A kinase on chromosome 21 tightly regulates the nuclear levels of Cyclin D1 in embryonic cortical stem (radial glia cells, and that a modest increase in DYRK1A protein in transgenic embryos lengthens the G1 phase in these progenitors. These alterations promote asymmetric proliferative divisions at the expense of neurogenic divisions, producing a deficit in cortical projection neurons that persists in postnatal stages. Moreover, radial glial progenitors in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome have less Cyclin D1, and Dyrk1a is the triplicated gene that causes both early cortical neurogenic defects and decreased nuclear Cyclin D1 levels in this model. These data provide insights into the mechanisms that couple cell cycle regulation and neuron production in cortical neural stem cells, emphasizing that the deleterious effect of DYRK1A triplication in the formation of the cerebral cortex begins at the onset of neurogenesis, which is relevant to the search for early therapeutic interventions in Down syndrome.

  5. Microtubule heterogeneity of Ornithogalum umbellatum ovary epidermal cells: non-stable cortical microtubules and stable lipotubuloid microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kwiatkowska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipotubuloids, structures containing lipid bodies and microtubules, are described in ovary epidermalcells of Ornithogalum umbellatum. Microtubules of lipotubuloids can be fixed in electron microscope fixativecontaining only buffered OsO4 or in glutaraldehyde with OsO4 post-fixation, or in a mixture of OsO4 and glutaraldehyde[1]. None of these substances fixes cortical microtubules of ovary epidermis of this plant which ischaracterized by dynamic longitudinal growth. However, cortical microtubules can be fixed with cold methanolaccording immunocytological methods with the use of b-tubulin antibodies and fluorescein. The existence ofcortical microtubules has also been evidenced by EM observations solely after the use of taxol, microtubulestabilizer, and fixation in a glutaraldehyde/OsO4 mixture. These microtubules mostly lie transversely, sometimesobliquely, and rarely parallel to the cell axis. Staining, using Ruthenium Red and silver hexamine, has revealedthat lipotubuloid microtubules surface is covered with polysaccharides. The presumption has been made thatthe presence of a polysaccharide layer enhances the stability of lipotubuloid microtubules.

  6. Foxn1 regulates lineage progression in cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells but is dispensable for medullary sublineage divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig S Nowell

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The forkhead transcription factor Foxn1 is indispensable for thymus development, but the mechanisms by which it mediates thymic epithelial cell (TEC development are poorly understood. To examine the cellular and molecular basis of Foxn1 function, we generated a novel and revertible hypomorphic allele of Foxn1. By varying levels of its expression, we identified a number of features of the Foxn1 system. Here we show that Foxn1 is a powerful regulator of TEC differentiation that is required at multiple intermediate stages of TE lineage development in the fetal and adult thymus. We find no evidence for a role for Foxn1 in TEC fate-choice. Rather, we show it is required for stable entry into both the cortical and medullary TEC differentiation programmes and subsequently is needed at increasing dosage for progression through successive differentiation states in both cortical and medullary TEC. We further demonstrate regulation by Foxn1 of a suite of genes with diverse roles in thymus development and/or function, suggesting it acts as a master regulator of the core thymic epithelial programme rather than regulating a particular aspect of TEC biology. Overall, our data establish a genetics-based model of cellular hierarchies in the TE lineage and provide mechanistic insight relating titration of a single transcription factor to control of lineage progression. Our novel revertible hypomorph system may be similarly applied to analyzing other regulators of development.

  7. Port and Harbor Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T; Guthmuller, H; DeWeert, M

    2004-12-15

    Port and Harbor Security is a daunting task to which optics and photonics offers significant solutions. We are pleased to report that the 2005 Defense and Security Symposium (DSS, Orlando, FL) will include reports on active and passive photonic systems operating from both airborne and subsurface platforms. In addition to imaging techniques, there are various photonic applications, such as total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), which can be used to ''sniff'' for traces of explosives or contaminants in marine. These non-imaging technologies are beyond the scope of this article, but will also be represented at DSS 2005. We encourage colleagues to join our technical group to help us to make our ports and harbors safer and more secure.

  8. Toward an ideal animal model to trace donor cell fates after stem cell therapy: production of stably labeled multipotent mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow of transgenic pigs harboring enhanced green fluorescence protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, F S H; Lian, W S; Lin, S P; Lin, C J; Lin, Y S; Cheng, E C H; Liu, C W; Cheng, C C; Cheng, P H; Ding, S T; Lee, K H; Kuo, T F; Cheng, C F; Cheng, W T K; Wu, S C

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of postnatal mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) with their general multipotentiality has fueled much interest in the development of cell-based therapies. Proper identification of transplanted MSC is crucial for evaluating donor cell distribution, differentiation, and migration. Lack of an efficient marker of transplanted MSC has precluded our understanding of MSC-related regenerative studies, especially in large animal models such as pigs. In the present study, we produced transgenic pigs harboring an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. The pigs provide a reliable and reproducible source for obtaining stable EGFP-labeled MSC, which is very useful for donor cell tracking after transplantation. The undifferentiated EGFP-tagged MSC expressed a greater quantity of EGFP while maintaining MSC multipotentiality. These cells exhibited homogeneous surface epitopes and possessed classic trilineage differentiation potential into osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages, with robust EGFP expression maintained in all differentiated progeny. Injection of donor MSC can dramatically increase the thickness of infarcted myocardium and improve cardiac function in mice. Moreover, the MSC, with their strong EGFP expression, can be easily distinguished from the background autofluorescence in myocardial infarcts. We demonstrated an efficient, effective, and easy way to identify MSC after long-term culture and transplantation. With the transgenic model, we were able to obtain stem or progenitor cells in earlier passages compared with the transfection of traceable markers into established MSC. Because the integration site of the transgene was the same for all cells, we lessened the potential for positional effects and the heterogeneity of the stem cells. The EGFP-transgenic pigs may serve as useful biomedical and agricultural models of somatic stem cell biology.

  9. Pristimerin induces apoptosis in imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia cells harboring T315I mutation by blocking NF-κB signaling and depleting Bcr-Abl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Qi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is characterized by the chimeric tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl. Bcr-Abl-T315I is the notorious point mutation that causes resistance to imatinib and the second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, leading to poor prognosis. CML blasts have constitutive p65 (RelA NF-κB transcriptional activity, and NF-κB may be a potential target for molecular therapies in CML that may also be effective against CML cells with Bcr-Abl-T315I. Results In this report, we discovered that pristimerin, a quinonemethide triterpenoid isolated from Celastraceae and Hippocrateaceae, inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in CML cells, including the cells harboring Bcr-Abl-T315I mutation. Additionally, pristimerin inhibited the growth of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in nude mice. Pristimerin blocked the TNFα-induced IκBα phosphorylation, translocation of p65, and expression of NF-κB-regulated genes. Pristimerin inhibited two steps in NF-κB signaling: TAK1→IKK and IKK→IκBα. Pristimerin potently inhibited two pairs of CML cell lines (KBM5 versus KBM5-T315I, 32D-Bcr-Abl versus 32D-Bcr-Abl-T315I and primary cells from a CML patient with acquired resistance to imatinib. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl in imatinib-sensitive (KBM5 or imatinib-resistant (KBM5-T315I CML cells were reduced after pristimerin treatment. Further, inactivation of Bcr-Abl by imatinib pretreatment did not abrogate the TNFα-induced NF-κB activation while silencing p65 by siRNA did not affect the levels of Bcr-Abl, both results together indicating that NF-κB inactivation and Bcr-Abl inhibition may be parallel independent pathways. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that pristimerin is effective in vitro and in vivo against CML cells, including those with the T315I mutation. The mechanisms may involve inhibition of NF-κB and Bcr-Abl. We concluded that pristimerin could be a lead compound for

  10. Elevated PC responsive B cells and anti-PC antibody production in transgenic mice harboring anti-PC immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkert, C A; Manz, J; Linton, P J; Klinman, N R; Storb, U

    1989-12-01

    The rearrangement of heavy and light chain immunoglobulin genes is necessary for the production of functional antibody molecules. The myeloma MOPC 167 produces specific antibodies to the antigen phosphorylcholine (PC), which is present on bacterial surfaces, fungi and other environmental contaminants. Rearranged heavy and light chain immunoglobulin genes cloned from MOPC 167 were microinjected into mouse eggs. Within the resulting transgenic mice, expression of the transgenes were limited to lymphoid tissues. Transgenic mice produced elevated levels of anti-PC antibodies constitutively, at 16 days of age, when normal non-transgenic mice were not fully immunocompetent. A triggering antigenic stimulus was not necessary to evoke anti-PC immunoglobulin production. Additionally, the frequency of PC-responsive B cells in these transgenic mice was further increased upon specific immunization.

  11. Lipid domains in intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of human eye lenses of donors from different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-03-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors' age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors' age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  12. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans from Schisandra chinensis protect primary cultures of rat cortical cells from glutamate-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Ra; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Koo, Kyung Ah; Kim, Seung Hyun; Sung, Sang Hyun; Lee, Na Gyong; Markelonis, George J; Oh, Tae H; Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Young Choong

    2004-05-01

    A methanolic extract of dried Schisandra fruit (Schisandra chinensis Baill.; Schisandraceae) significantly attenuated the neurotoxicity induced by L-glutamate in primary cultures of rat cortical cells. Five dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans (deoxyschisandrin, gomisin N, gomisin A, schisandrin, and wuweizisu C) were isolated from the methanolic extract; their protective effects against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity were then evaluated. Among the five lignans, deoxyschisandrin, gomisin N, and wuweizisu C significantly attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity as measured by 1). an inhibition in the increase of intracellular [Ca(2+)]; 2). an improvement in the glutathione defense system, the level of glutathione, and the activity of glutathione peroxidase; and 3). an inhibition in the formation of cellular peroxide. These results suggest that dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans from Schisandra chinensis may possess therapeutic potential against oxidative neuronal damage induced by excitotoxin.

  13. Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers of higher-power-producing bacteria than abundant genera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Patrick D.; Call, Douglas F.; Yates, Matthew D.; Regan, John M.; Logan, Bruce E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-09-15

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode communities often reveal just a few genera, but it is not known to what extent less abundant bacteria could be important for improving performance. We examined the microbial community in an MFC fed with formic acid for more than 1 year and determined using 16S rRNA gene cloning and fluorescent in situ hybridization that members of the Paracoccus genus comprised most ({proportional_to}30%) of the anode community. A Paracoccus isolate obtained from this biofilm (Paracoccus denitrificans strain PS-1) produced only 5.6 mW/m{sup 2}, whereas the original mixed culture produced up to 10 mW/m{sup 2}. Despite the absence of any Shewanella species in the clone library, we isolated a strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (strain PS-2) from the same biofilm capable of producing a higher-power density (17.4 mW/m{sup 2}) than the mixed culture, although voltage generation was variable. Our results suggest that the numerical abundance of microorganisms in biofilms cannot be assumed a priori to correlate to capacities of these predominant species for high-power production. Detailed screening of bacterial biofilms may therefore be needed to identify important strains capable of high-power generation for specific substrates. (orig.)

  14. Anodic biofilms in microbial fuel cells harbor low numbers of higher-power-producing bacteria than abundant genera

    KAUST Repository

    Kiely, Patrick D.

    2010-07-15

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode communities often reveal just a few genera, but it is not known to what extent less abundant bacteria could be important for improving performance. We examined the microbial community in an MFC fed with formic acid for more than 1 year and determined using 16S rRNA gene cloning and fluorescent in situ hybridization that members of the Paracoccus genus comprised most (~30%) of the anode community. A Paracoccus isolate obtained from this biofilm (Paracoccus denitrificans strain PS-1) produced only 5.6 mW/m 2, whereas the original mixed culture produced up to 10 mW/m 2. Despite the absence of any Shewanella species in the clone library, we isolated a strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (strain PS-2) from the same biofilm capable of producing a higher-power density (17.4 mW/m2) than the mixed culture, although voltage generation was variable. Our results suggest that the numerical abundance of microorganisms in biofilms cannot be assumed a priori to correlate to capacities of these predominant species for high-power production. Detailed screening of bacterial biofilms may therefore be needed to identify important strains capable of high-power generation for specific substrates. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This volume contains the first part of the proceeding of the 53rd Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. This years topic was Immune Recognition. Part 1, this volume, contains papers prepared by presenters of the sessions entitled Introduction, Lymphocyte Development and Receptor Selection, and Recognition by Antibodies, Antigen Recognition by T cells. (DT)

  16. Synergy by secretory phospholipase A2 and glutamate on inducing cell death and sustained arachidonic acid metabolic changes in primary cortical neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; DeCoster, M A; de Turco, E B

    1996-01-01

    Secretory and cytosolic phospholipases A2 (sPLA2 and cPLA2) may contribute to the release of arachidonic acid and other bioactive lipids, which are modulators of synaptic function. In primary cortical neuron cultures, neurotoxic cell death and [3H]arachidonate metabolism was studied after adding ...

  17. Does the presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at CT have any prognostic value in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Hugo J.A.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Klerk, John M.H. de [Meander Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Fijnheer, Rob [Meander Medical Center, Department of Hematology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Heggelman, Ben G.F. [Meander Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Dubois, Stefan V. [Meander Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    To determine the prognostic value of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at computed tomography (CT) in newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This retrospective study included 105 patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL who had undergone CT and bone marrow biopsy (BMB) before R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin, and prednisolone) chemo-immunotherapy. Cox regression analyses were used to determine the associations of cortical bone status at CT (absence vs. presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction), BMB findings (negative vs. positive for lymphomatous involvement), and dichotomized National Comprehensive Cancer Network International Prognostic Index (NCCN-IPI) strata (low risk vs. high risk) with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Univariate Cox regression analysis indicated that cortical bone status at CT was no significant predictor of either PFS or OS (p = 0.358 and p = 0.560, respectively), whereas BMB findings (p = 0.002 and p = 0.013, respectively) and dichotomized NCCN-IPI risk strata (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively) were significant predictors of both PFS and OS. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, only the dichotomized NCCN-IPI score was an independent predictive factor of PFS and OS (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). The presence of tumor-induced cortical bone destruction at CT was not found to have any prognostic implications in newly diagnosed DLBCL. (orig.)

  18. Patterned cortical tension mediated by N-cadherin controls cell geometric order in the Drosophila eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eunice HoYee; Chavadimane Shivakumar, Pruthvi; Clément, Raphaël; Laugier, Edith; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion molecules hold cells together but also couple cell membranes to a contractile actomyosin network, which limits the expansion of cell contacts. Despite their fundamental role in tissue morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, how adhesion molecules control cell shapes and cell patterns in tissues remains unclear. Here we address this question in vivo using the Drosophila eye. We show that cone cell shapes depend little on adhesion bonds and mostly on contractile forces. However, N-cadherin has an indirect control on cell shape. At homotypic contacts, junctional N-cadherin bonds downregulate Myosin-II contractility. At heterotypic contacts with E-cadherin, unbound N-cadherin induces an asymmetric accumulation of Myosin-II, which leads to a highly contractile cell interface. Such differential regulation of contractility is essential for morphogenesis as loss of N-cadherin disrupts cell rearrangements. Our results establish a quantitative link between adhesion and contractility and reveal an unprecedented role of N-cadherin on cell shapes and cell arrangements. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22796.001 PMID:28537220

  19. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Ziv

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  20. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Omer; Zaritsky, Assaf; Yaffe, Yakey; Mutukula, Naresh; Edri, Reuven; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture) and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM)--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII) reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  1. Lipidome of midbody released from neural stem and progenitor cells during mammalian cortical neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko eArai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Midbody release from proliferative neural progenitor cells is tightly associated with the neuronal commitment of neural progenitor cells during the progression of neurogenesis in the mammalian cerebral cortex. While the central portion of the midbody, a cytoplasmic bridge between nascent daughter cells, is engulfed by one of the daughter cell by most cells in vitro, it is shown to be released into the extracellular cerebrospinal fluid in vivo in mouse embryos. Several proteins have been involved in midbody release; however, few studies have addressed the participation of the plasma membrane’s lipids in this process. Here, we show by Shotgun Lipidomic analysis that phosphatydylserine (PS, among other lipids, is enriched in the released midbodies compared to lipoparticles and cellular membranes, both collected from the cerebrospinal fluid of the developing mouse embryos. Moreover, the developing mouse embryo neural progenitor cells released two distinct types of midbodies carrying either internalized PS or externalized PS on their membrane. This strongly suggests that phagocytosis and an alternative fate of released midbodies exists. HeLa cells, which are known to mainly engulf the midbody show almost no PS exposure, if any, on the outer leaflet of the midbody membrane. These results point towards that PS exposure might be involved in the selection of recipients of released midbodies, either to be engulfed by daughter cells or phagocytosed by non-daughter cells or another cell type in the developing cerebral cortex.

  2. Analysis of Neural Stem Cells from Human Cortical Brain Structures In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, M A; Poltavtseva, R A; Marei, M V; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-05-01

    Comparative immunohistochemical analysis of the neocortex from human fetuses showed that neural stem and progenitor cells are present in the brain throughout the gestation period, at least from week 8 through 26. At the same time, neural stem cells from the first and second trimester fetuses differed by the distribution, morphology, growth, and quantity. Immunocytochemical analysis of neural stem cells derived from fetuses at different gestation terms and cultured under different conditions showed their differentiation capacity. Detailed analysis of neural stem cell populations derived from fetuses on gestation weeks 8-9, 18-20, and 26 expressing Lex/SSEA1 was performed.

  3. Improving the Post-Stroke Therapeutic Potency of Mesenchymal Multipotent Stromal Cells by Cocultivation With Cortical Neurons: The Role of Crosstalk Between Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, Valentina A; Silachev, Denis N; Zorova, Ljubava D; Pevzner, Irina B; Khutornenko, Anastasia A; Plotnikov, Egor Y; Sukhikh, Gennady T; Zorov, Dmitry B

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to maximally alleviate the negative impact of stroke by increasing the therapeutic potency of injected mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells (MMSCs). To pursue this goal, the intercellular communications of MMSCs and neuronal cells were studied in vitro. As a result of cocultivation of MMSCs and rat cortical neurons, we proved the existence of intercellular contacts providing transfer of cellular contents from one cell to another. We present evidence of intercellular exchange with fluorescent probes specifically occupied by cytosol with preferential transfer from neurons toward MMSCs. In contrast, we observed a reversed transfer of mitochondria (from MMSCs to neural cells). Intravenous injection of MMSCs in a postischemic period alleviated the pathological indexes of a stroke, expressed as a lower infarct volume in the brain and partial restoration of neurological status. Also, MMSCs after cocultivation with neurons demonstrated more profound neuroprotective effects than did unprimed MMSCs. The production of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor was slightly increased in MMSCs, and the factor itself was redistributed in these cells after cocultivation. The level of Miro1 responsible for intercellular traffic of mitochondria was increased in MMSCs after cocultivation. We conclude that the exchange by cellular compartments between neural and stem cells improves MMSCs' protective abilities for better rehabilitation after stroke. This could be used as an approach to enhance the therapeutic benefits of stem cell therapy to the damaged brain. The idea of priming stem cells before practical use for clinical purposes was applied. Thus, cells were preconditioned by coculturing them with the targeted cells (i.e., neurons for the treatment of brain pathological features) before the transfusion of stem cells to the organism. Such priming improved the capacity of stem cells to treat stroke. Some additional minimal study will be required to

  4. Phospho-Rb mediating cell cycle reentry induces early apoptosis following oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Ren, Qing-Guo; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Ke; Yu, Zhi-Yuan; Luo, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cell cycle reentry and apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We found that the percentage of neurons with BrdU uptake, TUNEL staining, and colocalized BrdU uptake and TUNEL staining was increased relative to control 6, 12 and 24 h after 1 h of OGD. The number of neurons with colocalized BrdU and TUNEL staining was decreased relative to the number of TUNEL-positive neurons at 24 h. The expression of phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (phospho-Rb) was significantly increased 6, 12 and 24 h after OGD, parallel with the changes in BrdU uptake. Phospho-Rb and TUNEL staining were colocalized in neurons 6 and 12 h after OGD. This colocalization was strikingly decreased 24 h after OGD. Treatment with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine (100 μM) decreased the expression of phospho-Rb and reduced neuronal apoptosis in vitro. These results demonstrated that attempted cell cycle reentry with phosphorylation of Rb induce early apoptosis in neurons after OGD and there must be other mechanisms involved in the later stages of neuronal apoptosis besides cell cycle reentry. Phosphoralated Rb may be an important factor which closely associates aberrant cell cycle reentry with the early stages of neuronal apoptosis following ischemia/hypoxia in vitro, and pharmacological interventions for neuroprotection may be useful directed at this keypoint.

  5. Prenatal Exposure to Autism-Specific Maternal Autoantibodies Alters Proliferation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells, Enlarges Brain, and Increases Neuronal Size in Adult Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Camacho, Jasmin; Fox, Elizabeth; Miller, Elaine; Ariza, Jeanelle; Kienzle, Devon; Plank, Kaela; Noctor, Stephen C; Van de Water, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affect up to 1 in 68 children. Autism-specific autoantibodies directed against fetal brain proteins have been found exclusively in a subpopulation of mothers whose children were diagnosed with ASD or maternal autoantibody-related autism. We tested the impact of autoantibodies on brain development in mice by transferring human antigen-specific IgG directly into the cerebral ventricles of embryonic mice during cortical neurogenesis. We show that autoantibodies recognize radial glial cells during development. We also show that prenatal exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies increased stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the embryonic neocortex, increased adult brain size and weight, and increased the size of adult cortical neurons. We propose that prenatal exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies directly affects radial glial cell development and presents a viable pathologic mechanism for the maternal autoantibody-related prenatal ASD risk factor.

  6. Pulsed DC Electric Field-Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Fang Chang

    Full Text Available We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz. The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders.

  7. Pulsed DC Electric Field–Induced Differentiation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Lee, Ying-Shan; Tang, Tang K.; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2016-01-01

    We report the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells solely induced by direct current (DC) pulses stimulation. Neural stem and progenitor cells in the adult mammalian brain are promising candidates for the development of therapeutic neuroregeneration strategies. The differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells depends on various in vivo environmental factors, such as nerve growth factor and endogenous EF. In this study, we demonstrated that the morphologic and phenotypic changes of mouse neural stem and progenitor cells (mNPCs) could be induced solely by exposure to square-wave DC pulses (magnitude 300 mV/mm at frequency of 100-Hz). The DC pulse stimulation was conducted for 48 h, and the morphologic changes of mNPCs were monitored continuously. The length of primary processes and the amount of branching significantly increased after stimulation by DC pulses for 48 h. After DC pulse treatment, the mNPCs differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes simultaneously in stem cell maintenance medium. Our results suggest that simple DC pulse treatment could control the fate of NPCs. With further studies, DC pulses may be applied to manipulate NPC differentiation and may be used for the development of therapeutic strategies that employ NPCs to treat nervous system disorders. PMID:27352251

  8. Prey capture by harbor porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Lee; Verfuss, Ursula

    2009-01-01

      The harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) is a small toothed whale living mostly in coastal waters.  There are large, but unknown, numbers in the inner Danish waters. Four are in captivity at Fjord & Bælt, Kerteminde, Denmark, one of which was born here in 2006. Harbor porpoises use their ultraso...

  9. Network meta-analysis of erlotinib, gefitinib, afatinib and icotinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer harboring EGFR mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs including erlotinib, gefitinib, afatinib and icotinib are currently available as treatment for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC who harbor EGFR mutations. However, no head to head trials between these TKIs in mutated populations have been reported, which provides room for indirect and integrated comparisons. METHODS: We searched electronic databases for eligible literatures. Pooled data on objective response rate (ORR, progression free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS were calculated. Appropriate networks for different outcomes were established to incorporate all evidences. Multiple-treatments comparisons (MTCs based on Bayesian network integrated the efficacy and specific toxicities of all included treatments. RESULTS: Twelve phase III RCTs that investigated EGFR-TKIs involving 1821 participants with EGFR mutation were included. For mutant patients, the weighted pooled ORR and 1-year PFS of EGFR-TKIs were significant superior to that of standard chemotherapy (ORR: 66.6% vs. 30.9%, OR 5.46, 95%CI 3.59 to 8.30, P<0.00001; 1-year PFS: 42.9% vs. 9.7%, OR 7.83, 95%CI 4.50 to 13.61; P<0.00001 through direct meta-analysis. In the network meta-analyses, no statistically significant differences in efficacy were found between these four TKIs with respect to all outcome measures. Trend analyses of rank probabilities revealed that the cumulative probabilities of being the most efficacious treatments were (ORR, 1-year PFS, 1-year OS, 2-year OS: erlotinib (51%, 38%, 14%, 19%, gefitinib (1%, 6%, 5%, 16%, afatinib (29%, 27%, 30%, 27% and icotinib (19%, 29%, NA, NA, respectively. However, afatinib and erlotinib showed significant severer rash and diarrhea compared with gefitinib and icotinib. CONCLUSIONS: The current study indicated that erlotinib, gefitinib, afatinib and icotinib shared equivalent efficacy but presented different efficacy-toxicity pattern for EGFR

  10. Protein kinase D stabilizes aldosterone-induced ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in M1 renal cortical collecting duct cells to promote cell proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEneaney, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Aldosterone elicits transcriptional responses in target tissues and also rapidly stimulates the activation of protein kinase signalling cascades independently of de novo protein synthesis. Here we investigated aldosterone-induced cell proliferation and extra-cellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1\\/2) mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling in the M1 cortical collecting duct cell line (M1-CCD). Aldosterone promoted the proliferative growth of M1-CCD cells, an effect that was protein kinase D1 (PKD1), PKCdelta and ERK1\\/2-dependent. Aldosterone induced the rapid activation of ERK1\\/2 with peaks of activation at 2 and 10 to 30 min after hormone treatment followed by sustained activation lasting beyond 120 min. M1-CCD cells suppressed in PKD1 expression exhibited only the early, transient peaks in ERK1\\/2 activation without the sustained phase. Aldosterone stimulated the physical association of PKD1 with ERK1\\/2 within 2 min of treatment. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist RU28318 inhibited the early and late phases of aldosterone-induced ERK1\\/2 activation, and also aldosterone-induced proliferative cell growth. Aldosterone induced the sub-cellular redistribution of ERK1\\/2 to the nuclei at 2 min and to cytoplasmic sites, proximal to the nuclei after 30 min. This sub-cellular distribution of ERK1\\/2 was inhibited in cells suppressed in the expression of PKD1.

  11. Cell-attached recordings of responses evoked by photorelease of GABA in the immature cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat eMinlebaev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel non-invasive technique to measure the polarity of GABAergic responses based on cell-attached recordings of currents activated by laser-uncaging of GABA. For these recordings, a patch pipette was filled with a solution containing RuBi-GABA, and GABA was released from this complex by a laser beam conducted to the tip of the patch pipette via an optic fiber. In cell-attached recordings from neocortical and hippocampal neurons in postnatal days P2-5 rat brain slices in vitro, we found that laser-uncaging of GABA activates integral cell-attached currents mediated by tens of GABA(A channels. The initial response was inwardly directed, indicating a depolarizing response to GABA. The direction of the initial response was dependent on the pipette potential and analysis of its slope-voltage relationships revealed a depolarizing driving force of +11 mV for the currents through GABA channels. Initial depolarizing responses to GABA uncaging were inverted to hyperpolarizing in the presence of the NKCC1 blocker bumetanide. Current-voltage relationships of the currents evoked by Rubi-GABA uncaging using voltage-ramps at the peak of responses not only revealed a bumetanide-sensitive depolarizing reversal potential of the GABA(A receptor mediated responses, but also showed a strong voltage-dependent hysteresis. Upon desensitization of the uncaged-GABA response, current-voltage relationships of the currents through single GABA(A channels revealed depolarizing responses with the driving force values similar to those obtained for the initial response. Thus, cell-attached recordings of the responses evoked by local intrapipette GABA uncaging are suitable to assess the polarity of the GABA(A-Rs mediated signals in small cell compartments.

  12. Synergistic growth inhibition of cancer cells harboring the RET/PTC1 oncogene by staurosporine and rotenone involves enhanced cell death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    António Pedro Gonçalves; Arnaldo Videira; Valdemar Máximo; Paula Soares

    2011-09-01

    TPC-1 is a highly proliferative thyroid papillary carcinoma-derived cell line. These cells express the RET/PTC1 fusion protein, whose isoforms are characterized in this work. The bacterial alkaloid staurosporine and the plant extract rotenone are death-inducing drugs that have an inhibitory synergistic effect on the growth of TPC-1 cells. We show that this synergism is accompanied by an enhancement of the induction of cell death. Staurosporine alone induces cell cycle arrest in G1, whereas rotenone induces arrest in G2/M. We suggest that this additive pressure may drive cells to die, resulting in the synergistic interaction of the drug combination. These data emphasize the potential use of the staurosporine plus rotenone combination as an anticancer tool.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of triterpene glycosides from glycine max against glutamate induced toxicity in primary cultured rat cortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyung-In; Lee, Jai-Heon

    2012-01-01

    To examine the neuroprotective effects of Glycine max, we tested its protection against the glutamate-induced toxicity in primary cortical cultured neurons. In order to clarify the neuroprotective mechanism(s) of this observed effect, isolation was performed to seek and identify active fractions and components. From such fractionation, two triterpene glycosides, 3-O-[α-l-rhamnopyranosyl(1-2)-β-d-glucopyranosyl(1-2)-β-d-glucuronopyranosyl]olean-12-en-3β,22β,24-triol (1) and 3-O-[β-d-glucopyranosyl(1-2)-β-d-galactopyranosyl(1-2)-β-d-glucuronopyranosyl]olean-12-en-3β,22β,24-triol (2) were isolated with the methanol extracts with of air-dried Glycine max. Among these compounds, compound 2 exhibited significant neuroprotective activities against glutamate-induced toxicity, exhibiting cell viability of about 50% at concentrations ranging from 0.1 μM to 10 μM. Therefore, the neuroprotective effect of Glycine max might be due to the inhibition of glutamate-induced toxicity by triterpene glycosides.

  14. Effects of Dimeric PSD-95 Inhibition on Excitotoxic Cell Death and Outcome After Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Jens Bak; Bach, Anders; Malá, Hana; Gynther, Mikko; Bjerre, Ann-Sofie; Gram, Marie Gajhede; Marschner, Linda; Strømgaard, Kristian; Mogensen, Jesper; Pickering, Darryl S

    2017-08-21

    Therapeutic effects of PSD-95 inhibition have been demonstrated in numerous studies of stroke; however only few studies have assessed the effects of PSD-95 inhibitors in traumatic brain injury (TBI). As the pathophysiology of TBI partially overlaps with that of stroke, PSD-95 inhibition may also be an effective therapeutic strategy in TBI. The objectives of the present study were to assess the effects of a dimeric inhibitor of PSD-95, UCCB01-144, on excitotoxic cell death in vitro and outcome after experimental TBI in rats in vivo. In addition, the pharmacokinetic parameters of UCCB01-144 were investigated in order to assess uptake of the drug into the central nervous system of rats. After a controlled cortical impact rats were randomized to receive a single injection of either saline or two different doses of UCCB01-144 (10 or 20 mg/kg IV) immediately after injury. Spatial learning and memory were assessed in a water maze at 2 weeks post-trauma, and at 4 weeks lesion volumes were estimated. Overall, UCCB01-144 did not protect against NMDA-toxicity in neuronal cultures or experimental TBI in rats. Important factors that should be investigated further in future studies assessing the effects of PSD-95 inhibitors in TBI are discussed.

  15. The shh signaling pathway is upregulated in multiple cell types in cortical ischemia and influences the outcome of stroke in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongmin; Raviv, Nataly; Barnett, Austin; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Filichia, Emily; Luo, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Recently the sonic hedgehog (shh) signaling pathway has been shown to play an important role in regulating repair and regenerative responses after brain injury, including ischemia. However, the precise cellular components that express and upregulate the shh gene and the cellular components that respond to shh signaling remain to be identified. In this study, using a distal MCA occlusion model, our data show that the shh signal is upregulated both at the cortical area near the injury site and in the adjacent striatum. Multiple cell types upregulate shh signaling in ischemic brain, including neurons, reactive astrocytes and nestin-expressing cells. The shh signaling pathway genes are also expressed in the neural stem cells (NSCs) niche in the subventricular zone (SVZ). Conditional deletion of the shh gene in nestin-expressing cells both at the SVZ niche and at the ischemic site lead to significantly more severe behavioral deficits in these shh iKO mice after cortical stroke, measured using an automated open field locomotion apparatus (Student's t-test, pshh signaling agonist (SAG) demonstrated less deficits in behavioral function, compared to vehicle-treated mice. At 7 days after stroke, SAG-treated mice showed higher values in multiple horizontal movement parameters compared to vehicle treated mice (Student's t-test, p0.05). In summary, our data demonstrate that shh signaling plays critical and ongoing roles in response to ischemic injury and modulation of shh signaling in vivo alters the functional outcome after cortical ischemic injury.

  16. A quantitative framework to evaluate modeling of cortical development by neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jason L.; de la Torre-Ubieta, Luis; Tian, Yuan; Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Hernandez, Israel A.; Marchetto, Maria C.; Baker, Dylan K.; Lu, Daning; Hinman, Cassidy R.; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Wexler, Eric M.; Muotri, Alysson R.; Gage, Fred H.; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neural stem cells have been adopted to model a wide range of neuropsychiatric conditions in vitro. However, how well such models correspond to in vivo brain has not been evaluated in an unbiased, comprehensive manner. We used transcriptomic analyses to compare in vitro systems to developing human fetal brain and observed strong conservation of in vivo gene expression and network architecture in differentiating primary human neural progenitor cells (phNPCs). Conserved modules are enriched in genes associated with ASD, supporting the utility of phNPCs for studying neuropsychiatric disease. We also developed and validated a machine learning approach called CoNTExT that identifies the developmental maturity and regional identity of in vitro models. We observed strong differences between in vitro models, including hiPSC-derived neural progenitors from multiple laboratories. This work provides a systems biology framework for evaluating in vitro systems and supports their value in studying the molecular mechanisms of human neurodevelopmental disease. PMID:24991955

  17. Turgor pressure regulation and the orientation of cortical microtubules in Spirogyra cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, K; Tazawa, M; Itoh, T

    2001-06-01

    Microtubules (MTs) of cells of Spirogyra sp. were depolymerized by treatment with amiprophos-methyl (APM) for 1 h and then reorganized in 0.30 M mannitol solution. The reorganized MTs after 1.5 h incubation showed an oblique/longitudinal orientation and then became transversely oriented as the incubation was prolonged. During this incubation, the osmotic pressure of cells was measured by the plasmolysis method. The cell osmotic pressure increased with time. The calculated turgor pressure at 1.5 h was 0.11 M (mannitol equivalent) and, at 13.5 h, 0.25 M. Similar changes in MT orientation and recovery of the turgor pressure were also observed in 0.30 M sorbitol solution. These results suggest that the MT orientation may be correlated with the turgor pressure. Among fresh water algae sensitive to a saline environment, this Spirogyra was the first species shown to have a turgor regulating mechanism, although the recovery of turgor pressure was incomplete. The recovery of turgor pressure in mannitol solutions was also observed without APM treatment.

  18. Adaptation to alkalosis induces cell cycle delay and apoptosis in cortical collecting duct cells: role of Aquaporin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivarola, Valeria; Flamenco, Pilar; Melamud, Luciana; Galizia, Luciano; Ford, Paula; Capurro, Claudia

    2010-08-01

    Collecting ducts (CD) not only constitute the final site for regulating urine concentration by increasing apical membrane Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression, but are also essential for the control of acid-base status. The aim of this work was to examine, in renal cells, the effects of chronic alkalosis on cell growth/death as well as to define whether AQP2 expression plays any role during this adaptation. Two CD cell lines were used: WT- (not expressing AQPs) and AQP2-RCCD(1) (expressing apical AQP2). Our results showed that AQP2 expression per se accelerates cell proliferation by an increase in cell cycle progression. Chronic alkalosis induced, in both cells lines, a time-dependent reduction in cell growth. Even more, cell cycle movement, assessed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase and propidium iodide analyses, revealed a G2/M phase cell accumulation associated with longer S- and G2/M-transit times. This G2/M arrest is paralleled with changes consistent with apoptosis. All these effects appeared 24 h before and were always more pronounced in cells expressing AQP2. Moreover, in AQP2-expressing cells, part of the observed alkalosis cell growth decrease is explained by AQP2 protein down-regulation. We conclude that in CD cells alkalosis causes a reduction in cell growth by cell cycle delay that triggers apoptosis as an adaptive reaction to this environment stress. Since cell volume changes are prerequisite for the initiation of cell proliferation or apoptosis, we propose that AQP2 expression facilitates cell swelling or shrinkage leading to the activation of channels necessary to the control of these processes.

  19. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Ramalho Romero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma.

  20. Nonislet Cell Tumor Hypoglycemia in a Patient with Adrenal Cortical Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Won Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonislet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH is a rare but serious paraneoplastic syndrome in which a tumor secretes incompletely processed precursors of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II, causing hypoglycemia. Here, we report an exceptional case of NICTH caused by nonfunctioning adrenocortical carcinoma in a 39-year-old male with recurrent hypoglycemia. The patient’s serum IGF-II/IGF-I ratio had increased to 27.8. The serum level of the IGF-II/IGF-I ratio was normalized after removal of the tumor, and the hypoglycemic attacks no longer occurred after the operation.

  1. Schizandrin Protects Primary Rat Cortical Cell Cultures from Glutamate-Induced Apoptosis by Inhibiting Activation of the MAPK Family and the Mitochondria Dependent Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Huang Peng; Ming-Tsuen Hsieh; Fan-Shiu Tsai; Li-Wei Lin; Jiin-Cherng Yen; Jung Chao; Meng-Shiou Lee; Hao-Yuan Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity has been implicated in a variety of neuronal degenerative disorders. In the present study, we investigated the possible neuroprotective effects of schizandrin against apoptosis of primary cultured rat cortical cells induced by glutamate. Glutamate (10 μM) administered for 24 h decreased the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL protein, whereas increased the expression of Bax, Bak, apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), endonuclease G (Nodo G) and endoplasmic reti...

  2. Scavenging ROS dramatically increase NMDA receptor whole-cell currents in painted turtle cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukoff, David James; Hogg, David William; Hawrysh, Peter John; Buck, Leslie Thomas

    2014-09-15

    Oxygen deprivation triggers excitotoxic cell death in mammal neurons through excessive calcium loading via over-activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. This does not occur in the western painted turtle, which overwinters for months without oxygen. Neurological damage is avoided through anoxia-mediated decreases in NMDA and AMPA receptor currents that are dependent upon a modest rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) originating from mitochondria. Anoxia also blocks mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which is another potential signaling mechanism to regulate glutamate receptors. To assess the effects of decreased intracellular [ROS] on NMDA and AMPA receptor currents, we scavenged ROS with N-2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Unlike anoxia, ROS scavengers increased NMDA receptor whole-cell currents by 100%, while hydrogen peroxide decreased currents. AMPA receptor currents and [Ca(2+)]i concentrations were unaffected by ROS manipulation. Because decreases in [ROS] increased NMDA receptor currents, we next asked whether mitochondrial Ca(2+) release prevents receptor potentiation during anoxia. Normoxic activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium (mKATP) channels with diazoxide decreased NMDA receptor currents and was unaffected by subsequent ROS scavenging. Diazoxide application following ROS scavenging did not rescue scavenger-mediated increases in NMDA receptor currents. Fluorescent measurement of [Ca(2+)]i and ROS levels demonstrated that [Ca(2+)]i increases before ROS decreases. We conclude that decreases in ROS concentration are not linked to anoxia-mediated decreases in NMDA/AMPA receptor currents but are rather associated with an increase in NMDA receptor currents that is prevented during anoxia by mitochondrial Ca(2+) release.

  3. Cortical region-specific engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells restores axonal sprouting to a subcortical target and achieves motor functional recovery in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuya eShinoyama

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy (HIE at birth could cause cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and epilepsy, which last throughout the individual’s lifetime. However, few restorative treatments for ischemic tissue are currently available. Cell replacement therapy offers the potential to rescue brain damage caused by HI and to restore motor function. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells (ES-NPCs to become cortical deep layer neurons, to restore the neural network, and to repair brain damage in an HIE mouse model. ES cells stably expressing the reporter gene GFP are induced to a neural precursor state by stromal cell co-culture. Forty-hours after the induction of HIE, animals were grafted with ES-NPCs targeting the deep layer of the motor cortex in the ischemic brain. Motor function was evaluated 3 weeks after transplantation. Immunohistochemistry and neuroanatomical tracing with GFP were used to analyze neuronal differentiation and axonal sprouting. ES-NPCs could differentiate to cortical neurons with pyramidal morphology and expressed the deep layer-specific marker, Ctip2. The graft showed good survival and an appropriate innervation pattern via axonal sprouting from engrafted cells in the ischemic brain. The motor functions of the transplanted HIE mice also improved significantly compared to the sham-transplanted group. These findings suggest that cortical region specific engraftment of preconditioned cortical precursor cells could support motor functional recovery in the HIE model. It is not clear whether this is a direct effect of the engrafted cells or due to neurotrophic factors produced by these cells. These results suggest that cortical region-specific NPC engraftment is a promising therapeutic approach for brain repair.

  4. Cortical region-specific engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells restores axonal sprouting to a subcortical target and achieves motor functional recovery in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoyama, Mizuya; Ideguchi, Makoto; Kida, Hiroyuki; Kajiwara, Koji; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Maeda, Yoshihiko; Nomura, Sadahiro; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) at birth could cause cerebral palsy (CP), mental retardation, and epilepsy, which last throughout the individual's lifetime. However, few restorative treatments for ischemic tissue are currently available. Cell replacement therapy offers the potential to rescue brain damage caused by HI and to restore motor function. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells (ES-NPCs) to become cortical deep layer neurons, to restore the neural network, and to repair brain damage in an HIE mouse model. ES cells stably expressing the reporter gene GFP are induced to a neural precursor state by stromal cell co-culture. Forty-hours after the induction of HIE, animals were grafted with ES-NPCs targeting the deep layer of the motor cortex in the ischemic brain. Motor function was evaluated 3 weeks after transplantation. Immunohistochemistry and neuroanatomical tracing with GFP were used to analyze neuronal differentiation and axonal sprouting. ES-NPCs could differentiate to cortical neurons with pyramidal morphology and expressed the deep layer-specific marker, Ctip2. The graft showed good survival and an appropriate innervation pattern via axonal sprouting from engrafted cells in the ischemic brain. The motor functions of the transplanted HIE mice also improved significantly compared to the sham-transplanted group. These findings suggest that cortical region specific engraftment of preconditioned cortical precursor cells could support motor functional recovery in the HIE model. It is not clear whether this is a direct effect of the engrafted cells or due to neurotrophic factors produced by these cells. These results suggest that cortical region-specific NPC engraftment is a promising therapeutic approach for brain repair.

  5. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased visual ...

  6. Coconut oil protects cortical neurons from amyloid beta toxicity by enhancing signaling of cell survival pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafar, F; Clarke, J P; Mearow, K M

    2017-01-23

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that has links with other conditions that can often be modified by dietary and life-style interventions. In particular, coconut oil has received attention as having potentially having benefits in lessening the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. In a recent report, we showed that neuron survival in cultures co-treated with coconut oil and Aβ was rescued compared to cultures exposed only to Aβ. Here we investigated treatment with Aβ for 1, 6 or 24 h followed by addition of coconut oil for a further 24 h, or treatment with coconut oil for 24 h followed by Aβ exposure for various periods. Neuronal survival and several cellular parameters (cleaved caspase 3, synaptophysin labeling and ROS) were assessed. In addition, the influence of these treatments on relevant signaling pathways was investigated with Western blotting. In terms of the treatment timing, our data indicated that coconut oil rescues cells pre-exposed to Aβ for 1 or 6 h, but is less effective when the pre-exposure has been 24 h. However, pretreatment with coconut oil prior to Aβ exposure showed the best outcomes. Treatment with octanoic or lauric acid also provided protection against Aβ, but was not as effective as the complete oil. The coconut oil treatment reduced the number of cells with cleaved caspase and ROS labeling, as well as rescuing the loss of synaptophysin labeling observed with Aβ treatment. Treatment with coconut oil, as well as octanoic, decanoic and lauric acids, resulted in a modest increase in ketone bodies compared to controls. The biochemical data suggest that Akt and ERK activation may contribute to the survival promoting influence of coconut oil. This was supported by observations that a PI3-Kinase inhibitor blocked the rescue effect of CoOil on Aβ amyloid toxicity. Further studies into the mechanisms of action of coconut oil and its constituent medium chain fatty acids are warranted.

  7. Distinct Thalamic Reticular Cell Types Differentially Modulate Normal and Pathological Cortical Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Clemente-Perez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Integrative brain functions depend on widely distributed, rhythmically coordinated computations. Through its long-ranging connections with cortex and most senses, the thalamus orchestrates the flow of cognitive and sensory information. Essential in this process, the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRT gates different information streams through its extensive inhibition onto other thalamic nuclei, however, we lack an understanding of how different inhibitory neuron subpopulations in nRT function as gatekeepers. We dissociated the connectivity, physiology, and circuit functions of neurons within rodent nRT, based on parvalbumin (PV and somatostatin (SOM expression, and validated the existence of such populations in human nRT. We found that PV, but not SOM, cells are rhythmogenic, and that PV and SOM neurons are connected to and modulate distinct thalamocortical circuits. Notably, PV, but not SOM, neurons modulate somatosensory behavior and disrupt seizures. These results provide a conceptual framework for how nRT may gate incoming information to modulate brain-wide rhythms.

  8. Protective effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonism on VX-induced neuronal cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yushan; Weiss, M Tracy; Yin, Junfei; Tenn, Catherine C; Nelson, Peggy D; Mikler, John R

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of the central nervous system to organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents induces seizures and neuronal cell death. Here we report that the OP nerve agent, VX, induces apoptotic-like cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. The VX effects on neurons were concentration-dependent, with an IC(50) of approximately 30 microM. Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) with 50 microM. D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) diminished 30 microM VX-induced total cell death, as assessed by alamarBlue assay and Hoechst staining. In contrast, neither antagonists of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) nor metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) had any effect on VX-induced neurotoxicity. VX-induced neuronal cell death could not be solely attributed to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, since neither the reversible pharmacological cholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, nor the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine, affected VX-induced cell death. Importantly, APV was found to be therapeutically effective against VX-induced cell death up to 2 h post VX exposure. These results suggest that NMDARs, but not AMPARs or mGluRs, play important roles in VX-induced cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. Based on their therapeutic effects, NMDAR antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of VX-induced neurotoxicities.

  9. Spindle oscillations during asymmetric cell division require a threshold number of active cortical force generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecreaux, Jacques; Röper, Jens-Christian; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank; Hyman, Anthony A; Grill, Stephan W; Howard, Jonathon

    2006-11-07

    Asymmetric division of the C. elegans zygote is due to the posterior-directed movement of the mitotic spindle during metaphase and anaphase. During this movement along the anterior-posterior axis, the spindle oscillates transversely. These motions are thought to be driven by a force-generating complex-possibly containing the motor protein cytoplasmic dynein-that is located at the cell cortex and pulls on microtubules growing out from the spindle poles. A theoretical analysis indicates that the oscillations might arise from mechanical coordination of the force-generating motors, and this coordination is mediated by the load dependence of the motors' detachment from the microtubules. The model predicts that the motor activity must exceed a threshold for oscillations to occur. We have tested the existence of a threshold by using RNA interference to gradually reduce the levels of dynein light intermediate chain as well as GPR-1 and GPR-2 that are involved in the G protein-mediated regulation of the force generators. We found an abrupt cessation of oscillations as expected if the motor activity dropped below a threshold. Furthermore, we can account for the complex choreography of the mitotic spindle-the precise temporal coordination of the buildup and die-down of the transverse oscillations with the posterior displacement-by a gradual increase in the processivity of a single type of motor machinery during metaphase and anaphase. The agreement between our results and modeling suggests that the force generators themselves have the intrinsic capability of generating oscillations when opposing forces exceed a threshold.

  10. Alzheimer caregiver stress: basal natural killer cell activity, pituitary-adrenal cortical function, and sympathetic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, M; Hauger, R; Patterson, T L; Semple, S; Ziegler, M; Grant, I

    1997-01-01

    The association between Alzheimer caregiving and natural killer (NK) cell activity and basal plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, beta-endorphin, prolactin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and neuropeptide Y was determined in 100 spousal Alzheimer caregivers and 33 age- and gender-comparable control volunteers upon intake into a study of the psychological and physiologic impact of caregiving. The relationship between these physiologic measures and individual characteristics such as age, gender, medical status, severity of stress, severity of depressive symptoms, and caregiver burden was tested. In addition, the association between NK activity and alterations of the neuroendocrine measures was investigated. As compared to controls, the Alzheimer caregivers had similar levels of NK activity and of basal plasma neuroendocrine hormones and sympathetic measures. While older age and male gender status were associated with increased levels of ACTH, neither medical caseness, severity of life stress, nor severity of depressive symptoms was associated with alterations in any of the multiple physiologic domains. Classification of Alzheimer caregiver burden identified caregivers who were mismatched in terms of the amount of care they were required to provide and the amount of respite time received. The mismatched caregivers had significantly higher basal plasma ACTH but no change in other physiological measures, as compared to non-mismatched caregivers. NK activity was negatively correlated with plasma levels of neuropeptide Y but not with any of the other neuroendocrine measures. Based on this cross-sectional evaluation of NK activity and neuroendocrine and sympathetic measures, we conclude that most Alzheimer caregivers do not show evidence of altered basal physiology.

  11. Sediment toxicity in Savannah Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Savannah Harbor, located near the mouth of the Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina, is impacted by industrial and municipal effluents. Contaminants released...

  12. Alaska Harbor Seal Glacial Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Floating glacial ice serves as a haul-out substrate for a significant number (10-15%) of Alaskan harbor seals, and thus surveying tidewater glacial fjords is an...

  13. 2007 China Harbor Ten People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ 2007 China Harbor Ten People elected the entrepreneurs who contributed a lot to port economy and enterprises this year trough their talent management.These ten people embody their social responsibility,professional skills,creative ability,and charming personality.Bearing full confidence in China's port economy,the port entrepreneurs are brave enough to explore a brand new area,so as to promote harbor economic development.

  14. A new model of strabismic amblyopia: Loss of spatial acuity due to increased temporal dispersion of geniculate X-cell afferents on to cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewther, D P; Crewther, S G

    2015-09-01

    Although the neural locus of strabismic amblyopia has been shown to lie at the first site of binocular integration, first in cat and then in primate, an adequate mechanism is still lacking. Here we hypothesise that increased temporal dispersion of LGN X-cell afferents driven by the deviating eye onto single cortical neurons may provide a neural mechanism for strabismic amblyopia. This idea was investigated via single cell extracellular recordings of 93 X and 50 Y type LGN neurons from strabismic and normal cats. Both X and Y neurons driven by the non-deviating eye showed shorter latencies than those driven by either the strabismic or normal eyes. Also the mean latency difference between X and Y neurons was much greater for the strabismic cells compared with the other two groups. The incidence of lagged X-cells driven by the deviating eye of the strabismic cats was higher than that of LGN X-cells from normal animals. Remarkably, none of the cells recorded from the laminae driven by the non-deviating eye were of the lagged class. A simple computational model was constructed in which a mixture of lagged and non-lagged afferents converge on to single cortical neurons. Model cut-off spatial frequencies to a moving grating stimulus were sensitive to the temporal dispersion of the geniculate afferents. Thus strabismic amblyopia could be viewed as a lack of developmental tuning of geniculate lags for neurons driven by the amblyopic eye. Monocular control of fixation by the non-deviating eye is associated with reduced incidence of lagged neurons, suggesting that in normal vision, lagged neurons might play a role in maintaining binocular connections for cortical neurons.

  15. Self-renewal and differentiation of reactive astrocyte-derived neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the cortical peri-infarct area after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Issei S; LeComte, Matthew D; Granger, Jerrica C; Quinlan, Noah J; Spees, Jeffrey L

    2012-06-06

    In response to stroke, subpopulations of cortical reactive astrocytes proliferate and express proteins commonly associated with neural stem/progenitor cells such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Nestin. To examine the stem cell-related properties of cortical reactive astrocytes after injury, we generated GFAP-CreER(TM);tdRFP mice to permanently label reactive astrocytes. We isolated cells from the cortical peri-infarct area 3 d after stroke, and cultured them in neural stem cell medium containing epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. We observed tdRFP-positive neural spheres in culture, suggestive of tdRFP-positive reactive astrocyte-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (Rad-NSCs). Cultured Rad-NSCs self-renewed and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Pharmacological inhibition and conditional knock-out mouse studies showed that Presenilin 1 and Notch 1 controlled neural sphere formation by Rad-NSCs after stroke. To examine the self-renewal and differentiation potential of Rad-NSCs in vivo, Rad-NSCs were transplanted into embryonic, neonatal, and adult mouse brains. Transplanted Rad-NSCs were observed to persist in the subventricular zone and secondary Rad-NSCs were isolated from the host brain 28 d after transplantation. In contrast with neurogenic postnatal day 4 NSCs and adult NSCs from the subventricular zone, transplanted Rad-NSCs differentiated into astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, but not neurons, demonstrating that Rad-NSCs had restricted differentiation in vivo. Our results indicate that Rad-NSCs are unlikely to be suitable for neuronal replacement in the absence of genetic or epigenetic modification.

  16. Serping1/C1 Inhibitor Affects Cortical Development in a Cell Autonomous and Non-cell Autonomous Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gorelik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge regarding regulation of radial neuronal migration is mainly focused on intracellular molecules. Our unbiased screen aimed at identification of non-cell autonomous mechanisms involved in this process detected differential expression of Serping1 or C1 inhibitor, which is known to inhibit the initiation of the complement cascade. The complement cascade is composed of three pathways; the classical, lectin, and the alternative pathway; the first two are inhibited by C1 inhibitor, and all three converge at the level of C3. Knockdown or knockout of Serping1 affected neuronal stem cell proliferation and impaired neuronal migration in mice. Knockdown of Serping1 by in utero electroporation resulted in a migration delay of the electroporated cells as well as their neighboring cells demonstrating a non-cell autonomous effect. Cellular polarity was also affected. Most importantly, expression of protein components mimicking cleaved C3 rescued the knockdown of Serping1, indicating complement pathway functionality. Furthermore, we propose that this activity is mediated mainly via the complement peptide C5a receptors. Whereas addition of a selective C3a receptor agonist was minimally effective, the addition of a dual C3aR/C5a receptor agonist significantly rescued Serping1 knockdown-mediated neuronal migration defects. Our findings suggest that modulating Serping1 levels in the developing brain may affect the complement pathway in a complex way. Collectively, our findings demonstrate an unorthodox activity for the complement pathway during brain development.

  17. Effects of glossy privet fruit on neural cell apoptosis in the cortical parietal lobe and hippocampal CA1 region of vascular dementia rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Cai; Fan Zhou; Jian Du

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glossy privet fruit inhibits neural cell apoptosis following the onset of vascular dementia. OBJECTIVE: To confirm glossy privet fruit effects on neural cell apoptosis in the cortical parietal lobe and hippocampal CA1 region of rat models of vascular dementia using molecular biology techniques. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The neural cell morphology experiment was performed at the Laboratory of Flow Cells and Biochemistry, Academy of Integrative Medicine, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and the Basic Room of Pathology, Academy of Chinese Medicine from December 2006 to May 2008.MATERIALS: A total of 60 Wistar rats were used to establish vascular dementia models using a photochemical reaction method. Glossy privet fruit was purchased from Fujian, China. Hydergine was co-produced by Sandoz, Switzerland and Huajin, China. METHODS: The 60 Wistar rats were randomly divided into 6 equal sized groups (n = 10), I.e. Model, blank, high, moderate and low doses of Chinese medicine, and hydergine control groups. Rats in the model group were treated with distilled water (1 mL/100 g) by gavage following model establishment. Rats in the blank group underwent experimental procedures as for the model group, except that rat models were created without illumination. Rats in the high, moderate and low doses of Chinese medicine groups, and the hydergine control group respectively received high, moderate and low doses of glossy privet fruit, and hydergine suspension (1 mL/100 g) by gavage, once a day, for 30 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Morphology of neural cells from the rat cortical parietal lobe and hippocampal CA1 region of all groups was observed with an electron microscope. Positive neural cells in the injury site of the rat cortical parietal lobe and hippocampal CA1 region were investigated using the Fas immunohistochemical method. Absorbance of Fas-positive neurons was detected by the MPIAS-500 multimedia color imaging analysis system. RESULTS: Neural

  18. Influences of 3-methylcholanthrene, phenobarbital and dexamethasone on xenobiotic metabolizing-related cytochrome P450 enzymes and steroidogenesis in human fetal adrenal cortical cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui WANG; Min HUANG; Ren-xiu PENG; Jiang LE

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To explore the influence and possible mechanism of xenobiotics on adrenal steroidogenesis during fetal development. Methods: Primary human fetal adrenal cortical cells were prepared, cultured and treated with 3-methylcholanthrene, phenobarbital and dexamethasone. The activities of 7-ethoxyresorufin 0-dealkylase, benzphetamine, aminopyrine and erythromycin N-demethylases were measured by enzyme assays. At the same time, quantitative analysis of steroid hormones cortisol, aldosterone, testosterone and progesterone were carried out in cultural medium by radioimmunoassays. Results: The activities of benzphetamine and aminopyrine Ar-demethylase were increased in the cultural fetal adrenal cells treated with phenobarbital (0.25-1 mmol/L) for 24 h. Dexamethasone (25-100 μmol/L) also increased the activity of erythromycin W-demethylase. The activity of 7-ethoxyresorufin 0-dealkylase was undetected in the cells treated without and with 3-methylcholanthrene (0.5-2 μmol/L). Meanwhile, the contents of medium cortisol, aldosterone and progesterone were decreased after treatment with 3-methylcholanthrene. Cortisol, aldosterone and progesterone concentrations were also slightly decreased with phenobarbital. Dexamethasone enhanced the productions of cortisol and progesterone remarkably. The trend of testosterone concentration was uncertain after 3-methylcholanthrene, phenobarbital or dexamethasone treatment. Conclusion: 3-Methylcholanthrene, phenobarbital or dexamethasone could interfere with the synthesis of cortisol, aldosterone and progesterone in primary human fetal adrenal cortical cells, which likely act through xenobiotic metabolizing-related cytochrome P450 isoform activation.

  19. Thiazolidinediones alter growth and epithelial cell integrity, independent of PPAR-γ and MAPK activation, in mouse M1 cortical collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrallah, Rania; Clark, Jordan; Corinaldi, Jaime; Paris, Geneviève; Miura, Pedro; Jasmin, Bernard J; Hébert, Richard L

    2010-05-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ is highly expressed in the collecting duct (CD), yet little is known about the effects of PPAR-γ ligands, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), on CD cell structure and function. M1 mouse cortical CD cells were treated with 5 μM troglitazone (TRO) and rosiglitazone (ROSI). First, growth was measured by [(3)H]thymidine and [(3)H]leucine incorporation, as well as analysis of cyclin D1 and the CDK inhibitor p27 by Western blot. [(3)H]thymidine incorporation was reduced by 56 and 24% by TRO and ROSI at 6 h, and [(3)H]leucine by 21 and 10%. A similar growth inhibition was also observed after 24 h for thymidine, but leucine was reduced by 48 and 24%, respectively. Likewise, cyclin D1 was diminished 60% by TRO, and p27 was elevated 1.6- and 1.7-fold in response to TRO and ROSI. Next, epithelial cell integrity was assessed by measuring different markers by Western blot analysis. While fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin levels were unchanged, by 24 h E-cadherin was decreased by 50%, and β-catenin levels were reduced 2- and 1.5-fold in response to TRO and ROSI, respectively. GW9662, a PPAR-γ antagonist, did not reverse any of the TZD responses in M1 cells. Of interest, phosho-p38 levels were also elevated 2-fold in response to TRO and 2.3-fold to ROSI, but MAPK inhibition by PD98059 or SB203580 caused an additive inhibition of cell growth and did not alter E-cadherin or β-catenin in response to TZDs. Finally, apoptotic death was assessed by Western blot, but cleaved caspase-3 levels were unchanged from 15 min to 24 h in response to TZDs, and TRO did not affect cell viability or reactive oxygen species generation. Our data suggest that TZDs cause a disruption of M1 cell integrity that is preceded by an inhibition of cell growth. This response is independent of p38 or PPAR-γ activation.

  20. ESP-102, a combined extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis and Schizandra chinensis, protects against glutamate-induced toxicity in primary cultures of rat cortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Choong Je; Kim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Ki Yong; Oh, Taehwan; Kim, Sun Yeou; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Choong

    2009-11-01

    It was reported previously that ESP-102, a combined extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis and Schizandra chinensis, significantly improved scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice and protected primary cultured rat cortical cells against glutamate-induced toxicity. To corroborate this effect, the action patterns of ESP-102 were elucidated using the same in vitro system. ESP-102 decreased the cellular calcium concentration increased by glutamate, and inhibited the subsequent overproduction of cellular nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species to the level of control cells. It also preserved cellular activities of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase reduced in the glutamate-injured neuronal cells. While a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was observed in glutamate treated cells, the mitochondrial membrane potential was maintained by ESP-102. These results support that the actual mechanism of neuroprotective activity of ESP-102 against glutamate-induced oxidative stress might be its antioxidative activity.

  1. The Theory of Localist Representation and of a Purely Abstract Cognitive System: The Evidence from Cortical Columns, Category Cells, and Multisensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Asim

    2017-01-01

    The debate about representation in the brain and the nature of the cognitive system has been going on for decades now. This paper examines the neurophysiological evidence, primarily from single cell recordings, to get a better perspective on both the issues. After an initial review of some basic concepts, the paper reviews the data from single cell recordings – in cortical columns and of category-selective and multisensory neurons. In neuroscience, columns in the neocortex (cortical columns) are understood to be a basic functional/computational unit. The paper reviews the fundamental discoveries about the columnar organization and finds that it reveals a massively parallel search mechanism. This columnar organization could be the most extensive neurophysiological evidence for the widespread use of localist representation in the brain. The paper also reviews studies of category-selective cells. The evidence for category-selective cells reveals that localist representation is also used to encode complex abstract concepts at the highest levels of processing in the brain. A third major issue is the nature of the cognitive system in the brain and whether there is a form that is purely abstract and encoded by single cells. To provide evidence for a single-cell based purely abstract cognitive system, the paper reviews some of the findings related to multisensory cells. It appears that there is widespread usage of multisensory cells in the brain in the same areas where sensory processing takes place. Plus there is evidence for abstract modality invariant cells at higher levels of cortical processing. Overall, that reveals the existence of a purely abstract cognitive system in the brain. The paper also argues that since there is no evidence for dense distributed representation and since sparse representation is actually used to encode memories, there is actually no evidence for distributed representation in the brain. Overall, it appears that, at an abstract level, the

  2. The Theory of Localist Representation and of a Purely Abstract Cognitive System: The Evidence from Cortical Columns, Category Cells, and Multisensory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Asim

    2017-01-01

    The debate about representation in the brain and the nature of the cognitive system has been going on for decades now. This paper examines the neurophysiological evidence, primarily from single cell recordings, to get a better perspective on both the issues. After an initial review of some basic concepts, the paper reviews the data from single cell recordings - in cortical columns and of category-selective and multisensory neurons. In neuroscience, columns in the neocortex (cortical columns) are understood to be a basic functional/computational unit. The paper reviews the fundamental discoveries about the columnar organization and finds that it reveals a massively parallel search mechanism. This columnar organization could be the most extensive neurophysiological evidence for the widespread use of localist representation in the brain. The paper also reviews studies of category-selective cells. The evidence for category-selective cells reveals that localist representation is also used to encode complex abstract concepts at the highest levels of processing in the brain. A third major issue is the nature of the cognitive system in the brain and whether there is a form that is purely abstract and encoded by single cells. To provide evidence for a single-cell based purely abstract cognitive system, the paper reviews some of the findings related to multisensory cells. It appears that there is widespread usage of multisensory cells in the brain in the same areas where sensory processing takes place. Plus there is evidence for abstract modality invariant cells at higher levels of cortical processing. Overall, that reveals the existence of a purely abstract cognitive system in the brain. The paper also argues that since there is no evidence for dense distributed representation and since sparse representation is actually used to encode memories, there is actually no evidence for distributed representation in the brain. Overall, it appears that, at an abstract level, the

  3. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding either 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β-events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α-events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β-events lie upstream of α-events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify inter-mitotic times for β-events on a per-cell basis in post-natal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereological studies. PMID:25668568

  4. Extensive cortical remyelination in patients with chronic multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Monika; Antel, Jack; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies revealed prominent cortical demyelination in patients with chronic multiple sclerosis (MS). Demyelination in white matter lesions is frequently accompanied by remyelination. This repair process, however, often remains incomplete and restricted to the lesion border. In the present study, we examined the frequency and extent of remyelination in cortical and white matter lesions in autopsy brain tissue of 33 patients with chronic MS. The majority of patients (29 of 33) harbored cortical demyelination. Remyelination of cortical lesions was identified light microscopically by the presence of thin and irregularly arranged myelin sheaths, and confirmed by electron microscopy. Extensive remyelination was found in 18%, remyelination restricted to the lesion border in 54%, and no remyelination in 28% of cortical lesions. A direct comparison of the extent of remyelination in white matter and cortical lesions of the same patients revealed that remyelination of cortical lesions was consistently more extensive. In addition, g-ratios of fibers in areas of "normal appearing cortex" yielded values consistent with remyelination. Our data confirm the high prevalence of cortical demyelination in chronic MS and imply that the propensity to remyelinate is high in cortical MS lesions.

  5. Characterizing HSF1 Binding and Post-Translational Modifications of hsp70 Promoter in Cultured Cortical Neurons: Implications in the Heat-Shock Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea V Gómez

    Full Text Available Causes of lower induction of Hsp70 in neurons during heat shock are still a matter of debate. To further inquire into the mechanisms regulating Hsp70 expression in neurons, we studied the activity of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1 and histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs at the hsp70 promoter in rat cortical neurons. Heat shock induced a transient and efficient translocation of HSF1 to neuronal nuclei. However, no binding of HSF1 at the hsp70 promoter was detected while it bound to the hsp25 promoter in cortical neurons during heat shock. Histone PTMs analysis showed that the hsp70 promoter harbors lower levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation in cortical neurons compared to PC12 cells under basal conditions. Transcriptomic profiling data analysis showed a predominant usage of cryptic transcriptional start sites at hsp70 gene in the rat cerebral cortex, compared with the whole brain. These data support a weaker activation of hsp70 canonical promoter. Heat shock increased H3Ac at the hsp70 promoter in PC12 cells, which correlated with increased Hsp70 expression while no modifications occurred at the hsp70 promoter in cortical neurons. Increased histone H3 acetylation by Trichostatin A led to hsp70 mRNA and protein induction in cortical neurons. In conclusion, we found that two independent mechanisms maintain a lower induction of Hsp70 in cortical neurons. First, HSF1 fails to bind specifically to the hsp70 promoter in cortical neurons during heat shock and, second, the hsp70 promoter is less accessible in neurons compared to non-neuronal cells due to histone deacetylases repression.

  6. Spatial and temporal regulation of nucleating sites for arrays of cortical microtubules in root tip cells of the water fern Azolla pinnata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, B S

    1980-12-01

    Root primordia of the water fern Azolla pinnata were examined by conventional and high voltage electron microscopy to extend previous evidence concerning the existence and behaviour of nucleating sites (NS) for microtubule arrays in the cortex of plant cells. Putative NS are visible as foci consisting of clusters of microtubules, a population of particles or vesicles and associated dense material. They are concentrated along the edges of the cells but become conspicuous only when cortical arrays are being generated, i.e. at the early post-cytokinesis phase when interphase arrays are being reinstated and when pre-prophase bands are forming. Examples of temporal regulation during the cell cycle are documented. The predictable anatomy of the Azolla root allows specified edges of cells to be examined in successive cell cycles. The NS first appear at a newly generated edge (where one of the walls that meet at the edge is derived from a new cell plate) and reappear after cytokinesis at that same edge in later cycles, irrespective of the plane of division, when it is no longer newly formed but one, two or more cell cycles old. All of the edges of a cell, whether radial, longitudinal, or tangential, have the potential to develop NS but a strong element of selectivity appears to be imposed. The possible role of the system of NS in microtubule development and overall morphogenesis in the root is discussed.

  7. ENOD40 expression in the pericycle precedes cortical cell division in Rhizobium-legume interaction and the highly conserved internal region of the gene does not encode a peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compaan, B.; Yang, W.C.; Bisseling, T.; Franssen, H.

    2001-01-01

    In situ expression studies show that MsENOD40 is expressed in pericycle cells of alfalfa roots within 3 hr after addition of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. This is about 15 hr before cortical cell divisions become apparent. All ENOD40 clones isolated so far share two conserved regions, box 1 and box 2

  8. Enhancement of Median Nerve Regeneration by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Engraftment in an Absorbable Conduit: Improvement of Peripheral Nerve Morphology with Enlargement of Somatosensory Cortical Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Teixeira Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN, 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1, electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in 3 groups: MN Intact (n=4, PCL-Only (n=3 and PCL+MSC (n=3. Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group or without (PCL-Only group injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to 5 animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383±390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively than the PCL-Only group (2,226±575 fibers; 1.6 mm2. In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of a sesquiterpene lactone and flavanones from Paulownia tomentosa Steud. against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat cortical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Ki; Cho, Sang-Buem; Moon, Hyung-In

    2010-12-01

    The neuroprotective effects of Paulownia tomentosa against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity were studied in primary cultured rat cortical cells. It was found that the aqueous extract of this medicinal plant significantly attenuated glutamate-induced toxicity. In order to clarify the mechanism(s) underlying this neuroprotective effect, the active fractions and components were isolated and identified. Five compounds were isolated as the methanol extracts from air-dried flowers of P. tomentosa. Isoatriplicolide tiglate exhibited significant neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced toxicity at concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 10 μM, and exhibited cell viability of approximately 43-78%. Therefore, the neuroprotective effect of P. tomentosa might be due to the inhibition of glutamate-induced toxicity by the sesquiterpene lactone derivative it contains.

  10. Na(+)/H(+) exchange regulatory factor 1 is required for ROMK1 K(+) channel expression in the surface membrane of cultured M-1 cortical collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Mayanagi, Taira; Sobue, Kenji; Kubokawa, Manabu

    2017-07-22

    The ROMK1 K(+) channel, a member of the ROMK channel family, is the major candidate for the K(+) secretion pathway in the renal cortical collecting duct (CCD). ROMK1 possesses a PDZ domain-binding motif at its C-terminus that is considered a modulator of ROMK1 expression via interaction with Na(+)/H(+) exchange regulatory factor (NHERF) 1 and NHERF2 scaffold protein. Although NHERF1 is a potential binding partner of the ROMK1 K(+) channel, the interaction between NHERF1 and K(+) channel activity remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we knocked down NHERF1 in cultured M-1 cells derived from mouse CCD and investigated the surface expression and K(+) channel current in these cells after exogenous transfection with EGFP-ROMK1. NHERF1 knockdown resulted in reduced surface expression of ROMK1 as indicated by a cell biotinylation assay. Using the patch-clamp technique, we further found that the number of active channels per patched membrane and the Ba(2+)-sensitive whole-cell K(+) current were decreased in the knockdown cells, suggesting that reduced K(+) current was accompanied by decreased surface expression of ROMK1 in the NHERF1 knockdown cells. Our results provide evidence that NHERF1 mediates K(+) current activity through acceleration of the surface expression of ROMK1 K(+) channels in M-1 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impaired TGF-beta induced growth inhibition contributes to the increased proliferation rate of neural stem cells harboring mutant p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, P.; Naumann, U.; Aigner, L.;

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas have been classified according to their histological properties. However, their respective cells of origin are still unknown. Neural progenitor cells (NPC) from the subventricular zone (SVZ) can initiate tumors in murine models of glioma and are likely cells of origin in the human disease...

  12. Surgidero de Batabanó Harbor, Cuba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopmans, R.; Van Kessel, L.; Lendering, K.; Oud, M.; Tromp, R.

    2011-01-01

    The harbor of Surgidero de Batabano is a harbor that lies in the Gulf of Batabano in the South-Western part of Cuba. It serves as a connection between the main land of Cuba and the islands 'Isla de la Juventud' and Cayo Largo. The Batabano harbor suffers from sediment accretion. The accretion of sed

  13. Surgidero de Batabanó Harbor, Cuba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopmans, R.; Van Kessel, L.; Lendering, K.; Oud, M.; Tromp, R.

    2011-01-01

    The harbor of Surgidero de Batabano is a harbor that lies in the Gulf of Batabano in the South-Western part of Cuba. It serves as a connection between the main land of Cuba and the islands 'Isla de la Juventud' and Cayo Largo. The Batabano harbor suffers from sediment accretion. The accretion of

  14. Harbor Expansion Facilitates Crude and Petrochemicals Transportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ Douwei Harbor attracting petrochem investment Substantial progress has been made in the preliminary preparation of Douwei Harbor project in Hui'an, Fujian Province. It is one of the major four transfer ports in China planned by the Ministry of Transportation. A number of projects, with a total investment approaching 10 billion yuan,will come under construction in the harbor zone.

  15. Rehabilitative Therapies Differentially Alter Proliferation and Survival of Glial Cell Populations in the Perilesional Zone of Cortical Infarcts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SILKE KEINER; FANNY WURM; ALBRECHT KUNZE; OTTO W. WITTE; CHRISTOPH REDECKER

    2008-01-01

    Rehabilitative therapies after stroke are designed to improve remodeling of neuronal circuits and to promote functional recovery. Only very little is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms. In particular, the effects of rehabilitative training on glial cells, which play an important role in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, are only poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of rehabilitative therapies on proliferation and survival of distinct glial populations in the perilesional area of photochemically induced focal ischemic infarcts in the forelimb sensorimotor cortex in rats. Immediately after the infarct,one group of animals housed in standard cages received daily sessions of skilled reaching training of the impaired forelimb; a second group was transferred to an enriched environment, whereas a third control group remained in standard cages without further treatment. Functional recovery was assessed in a sensorimotor walking task. To label proliferating cells, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered from day 2 until day 6 postinfarct. Proliferation and survival of astrocytes, microglia/macrophages, and immature and mature oligodendrocytes in the perilesional zone were immunocytochemically quantified at day 10 and 42. Using this approach, we demonstrate that enriched environment and reaching training both significantly improve functional recovery of the impaired forelimb. Furthermore,these therapies strongly reduce the proliferation of microglia/macrophages in the perilesional zone, and daily training of the impaired forelimb significantly increased the survival of newly generated astrocytes. Our data, therefore,demonstrate that rehabilitative therapies after cortical infarcts not only improve the functional recovery but also significantly influence the glial response in the perilesional zone.%卒中后的康复治疗能改善神经环路的重塑,促进功能恢复.但人们对其潜在的细胞分子机制却知之甚少.特别是康

  16. Codon optimization of the human papillomavirus E7 oncogene induces a CD8+ T cell response to a cryptic epitope not harbored by wild-type E7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix K M Lorenz

    Full Text Available Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine.

  17. Knowledge based recognition of harbor target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Bing; Li Jinzong; Cheng Aijun

    2006-01-01

    A fast knowledge based recognition method of the harbor target in large gray remote-sensing image is presented. First, the distributed features and the inherent feature are analyzed according to the knowledge of harbor targets; then, two methods for extracting the candidate region of harbor are devised in accordance with different sizes of the harbors; after that, thresholds are used to segment the land and the sea with strategies of the segmentation error control; finally, harbor recognition is implemented according to its inherent character (semi-closed region of seawater).

  18. Cold spring harbor symposia on quantitative biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    For many decades, it has been clear that cells have a multitude of ways of sensing their environment and converting a plethora of external signals into measured intracellular responses. Now we realize that many first messengers do not act directly through second messengers, but instead work at the genetic level by binding to cytoplasmically located receptors, which can then bind to DNA and turn on or off the functioning of specific genes. Today, we refer to the way that external signals are passed through various cellular components as signal transduction processes, with receptors and their associated molecules known as biological transducers. Because most transducer molecules are present in very limited amounts, their study at the biochemical level until recently was at best difficult, and hypothesis as to how they functioned were almost impossible to test rigorously. Today, recombinant DNA techniques have dramatically changed the picture. Even very rare receptors are now open to analyses if their respective genes can be cloned, and virtually every month, the amino acid sequence of a new key biological transducer is established. The time was thus appropriate last June to hold a Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on the Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction. The final program consisted of 119 speakers, who spoke before an audience of 439, the largest ever yet to attend a Cold spring Harbor Symposium. This volume contains 61 papers. Individual papers are indexed separately on the energy data base.

  19. Cold spring harbor symposia on quantitative biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    For many decades, it has been clear that cells have a multitude of ways of sensing their environment and converting a plethora of external signals into measured intracellular responses. Now we realize that many first messengers do not act directly through second messengers, but instead work at the genetic level by binding to cytoplasmically located receptors, which can then bind to DNA and turn on or off the functioning of specific genes. Today, we refer to the way that external signals are passed through various cellular components as signal transduction processes, with receptors and their associated molecules known as biological transducers. Because most transducer molecules are present in very limited amounts, their study at the biochemical level until recently was at best difficult, and hypotheses as to how they functioned were almost impossible to test rigorously. Today, recombinant DNA techniques have dramatically changed the picture. Even very rare receptors are now open to analysis if their respective genes can be cloned, and virtually every month the amino acid sequence of a new key biological transducer is established. The time was thus appropriate last June to hold a Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on the Molecular Biology of Signal Transduction. The final program consisted of 119 speakers, who spoke before an audience of 439, the largest ever yet to attend a Cold Spring Harbor Symposium. This volume contains 54 papers. Individual papers are indexed separately on the energy data base.

  20. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor Breakwater South Light 1. (b) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor Breakwater North Light to Channel Islands Harbor North Jetty Light 5....

  1. Heterotopic neurogenesis in a rat with cortical heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K S; Collins, J L; Anzivino, M J; Frankel, E A; Schottler, F

    1998-11-15

    Early cellular development was studied in the neocortex of the tish rat. This neurological mutant is seizure-prone and displays cortical heterotopia similar to those observed in certain epileptic patients. The present study demonstrates that a single cortical preplate is formed in a typical superficial position of the developing tish neocortex. In contrast, two cortical plates are formed: one in a normotopic position and a second in a heterotopic position in the intermediate zone. As the normotopic cortical plate is formed, it characteristically separates the subplate cells from the superficial Cajal-Retzius cells. In contrast, the heterotopic cortical plate is not intercalated between the preplate cells because of its deeper position in the developing cortex. Cellular proliferation occurs in two zones of the developing tish cortex. One proliferative zone is located in a typical position in the ventricular/subventricular zone. A second proliferative zone is located in a heterotopic position in the superficial intermediate zone, i.e., between the two cortical plates. This misplaced proliferative zone may contribute cells to both the normotopic and heterotopic cortical plates. Taken together, these findings indicate that misplaced cortical plate cells, but not preplate cells, comprise the heterotopia of the tish cortex. Heterotopic neurogenesis is an early developmental event that is initiated before the migration of most cortical plate cells. It is concluded that misplaced cellular proliferation, in addition to disturbed neuronal migration, can play a key role in the formation of large cortical heterotopia.

  2. Nuclear reprogramming of luminal-like breast cancer cells generates Sox2-overexpressing cancer stem-like cellular states harboring transcriptional activation of the mTOR pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cufí, Sílvia; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Lupu, Ruth; Alarcón, Tomás; Vellon, Luciano; Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Leis, Olatz; Martín, Ángel G; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism plasticity enables stemness programs during the reprogramming of somatic cells to an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) state. This relationship may introduce a new era in the understanding of Warburg’s theory on the metabolic origin of cancer at the level of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here, we used Yamanaka’s stem cell technology in an attempt to create stable CSC research lines in which to dissect the transcriptional control of mTOR—the master switch of cellular catabolism and anabolism—in CSC-like states. The rare colonies with iPSC-like morphology, obtained following the viral transduction of the Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM) stemness factors into MCF-7 luminal-like breast cancer cells (MCF-7/Rep), demonstrated an intermediate state between cancer cells and bona fide iPSCs. MCF-7/Rep cells notably overexpressed SOX2 and stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 proteins; however, other stemness-related markers (OCT4, NANOG, SSEA-1, TRA-1–60, and TRA-1–81) were found at low to moderate levels. The transcriptional analyses of OSKM factors confirmed the strong but unique reactivation of the endogenous Sox2 stemness gene accompanied by the silencing of the exogenous Sox2 transgene in MCF-7/Rep cells. Some but not all MCF-7/Rep cells acquired strong alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity compared with MCF-7 parental cells. SOX2-overexpressing MCF-7/Rep cells contained drastically higher percentages of CD44+ and ALDEFLUOR-stained ALDHbright cells than MCF-7 parental cells. The overlap between differentially expressed mTOR signaling-related genes in 3 different SOX2-overexpressing CSC-like cell lines revealed a notable downregulation of 3 genes, PRKAA1 (which codes for the catalytic α 1 subunit of AMPK), DDIT4/REDD1 (a stress response gene that operates as a negative regulator of mTOR), and DEPTOR (a naturally occurring endogenous inhibitor of mTOR activity). The insulin-receptor gene (INSR) was differentially upregulated in MCF-7/Rep

  3. Extracellular GTP is a potent water-transport regulator via aquaporin 5 plasma-membrane insertion in M1-CCD epithelial cortical collecting duct cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, Rosa; La Rovere, Rita Maria Laura; Fulle, Stefania; Miscia, Sebastiano; Marchisio, Marco; Pierdomenico, Laura; Lanuti, Paola; Procino, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Claudia; Svelto, Maria; Fanò-Illic, Giorgio; Pietrangelo, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular GTP is able to modulate some specific functions in neuron, glia and muscle cell models as it has been demonstrated over the last two decades. In fact, extracellular GTP binds its specific plasma membrane binding sites and induces signal transduction via [Ca(2+)]i increase. We demonstrate, for the first time, that extracellular GTP is able to modulate cell swelling in M1-CCD cortical collecting duct epithelial cells via upregulation of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) expression. We used videoimaging, immunocitochemistry, flow cytometry, confocal techniques, Western blotting and RT-PCR for protein and gene expression analysis, respectively. We demonstrate that AQP5 mRNA is up-regulated 7 h after the GTP exposure in the cell culture medium, and its protein level is increased after 12-24 h. We show that AQP5 is targeted to the plasma membrane of M1-CCD cells, where it facilitates cell swelling, and that the GTP-dependent AQP5 up-regulation occurs via [Ca(2+)]i increase. Indeed, GTP induces both oscillating and transient [Ca(2+)]i increase, and specifically the oscillating kinetic appears to be responsible for blocking cell cycle in the S-phase while the [Ca(2+)]i influx, with whatever kinetic, seems to be responsible for inducing AQP5 expression. The role of GTP as a regulator of AQP5-mediated water transport in renal cells is of great importance in the physiology of renal epithelia, due to its possible physiopathological implications. GTP-dependent AQP5 expression could act as osmosensor. In addition, the data presented here suggest that GTP might play the same role in other tissues where rapid water transport is required for cell volume regulation and maintenance of the homeostasis. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Extracellular GTP is a Potent Water-Transport Regulator via Aquaporin 5 Plasma-Membrane Insertion in M1-CCD Epithelial Cortical Collecting Duct Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Mancinelli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Extracellular GTP is able to modulate some specific functions in neuron, glia and muscle cell models as it has been demonstrated over the last two decades. In fact, extracellular GTP binds its specific plasma membrane binding sites and induces signal transduction via [Ca2+]i increase. We demonstrate, for the first time, that extracellular GTP is able to modulate cell swelling in M1-CCD cortical collecting duct epithelial cells via upregulation of aquaporin 5 (AQP5 expression. Methods: We used videoimaging, immunocitochemistry, flow cytometry, confocal techniques, Western blotting and RT-PCR for protein and gene expression analysis, respectively. Results: We demonstrate that AQP5 mRNA is up-regulated 7 h after the GTP exposure in the cell culture medium, and its protein level is increased after 12-24 h. We show that AQP5 is targeted to the plasma membrane of M1-CCD cells, where it facilitates cell swelling, and that the GTP-dependent AQP5 up-regulation occurs via [Ca2+]i increase. Indeed, GTP induces both oscillating and transient [Ca2+]i increase, and specifically the oscillating kinetic appears to be responsible for blocking cell cycle in the S-phase while the [Ca2+]i influx, with whatever kinetic, seems to be responsible for inducing AQP5 expression. Conclusion: The role of GTP as a regulator of AQP5-mediated water transport in renal cells is of great importance in the physiology of renal epithelia, due to its possible physiopathological implications. GTP-dependent AQP5 expression could act as osmosensor. In addition, the data presented here suggest that GTP might play the same role in other tissues where rapid water transport is required for cell volume regulation and maintenance of the homeostasis.

  5. A nicardipine-sensitive Ca2+ entry contributes to the hypotonicity-induced increase in [Ca2+]i of principal cells in rat cortical collecting duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komagiri, You; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Kubokawa, Manabu

    2011-01-01

    We examined the mechanisms involved in the [Ca(2+)](i) response to the extracellular hypotonicity in the principal cells of freshly isolated rat cortical collecting duct (CCD), using Fura-2/AM fluorescence imaging. Reduction of extracellular osmolality from 305 (control) to 195 mosmol/kgH(2)O (hypotonic) evoked transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i) of principal cells of rat CCDs. The [Ca(2+)](i) increase was markedly attenuated by the removal of extracellular Ca(2+)(.) The application of a P(2) purinoceptor antagonist, suramin failed to inhibit the hypotonicity-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase. The [Ca(2+)](i) increase in response to extracellular hypotonicity was not influenced by application of Gd(3+) and ruthenium red. On the other hand, a voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, nicardipine, significantly reduced the peak amplitude of [Ca(2+)](i) increase in the principal cells. In order to assess Ca(2+) entry during the hypotonic stimulation, we measured the quenching of Fura-2 fluorescence intensity by Mn(2+). The hypotonic stimulation enhanced quenching of Fura-2 fluorescence by Mn(2+), indicating that a Ca(2+)-permeable pathway was activated by the hypotonicity. The hypotonicity-mediated enhancement of Mn(2+) quenching was significantly inhibited by nicardipine. These results strongly suggested that a nicardipine-sensitive Ca(2+) entry pathway would contribute to the mechanisms underlying the hypotonicity-induced [Ca(2+)](i) elevation of principal cells in rat CCD.

  6. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease.

  7. "Curing" of plasmid DNA in acetogen using microwave or applying an electric pulse improves cell growth and metabolite production as compared to the plasmid-harboring strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzin, Vel; Kiriukhin, Michael; Tyurin, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Plasmid-free acetogen Clostridium sp. MT962 electrotransformed with a small cryptic plasmid pMT351 was used to develop time- and cost-effective methods for plasmid elimination. Elimination of pMT351 restored production of acetate and ethanol to the levels of the plasmid-free strain with no dry cell weight changes. Destabilizing cell membrane via microwave at 2.45 GHz, or exposure to a single 12 ms square electric pulse at 35 kV cm⁻¹, eliminated pMT351 in 42-47 % of cells. Plasmid elimination with a single square electric pulse required 10 versus 0.1 J needed to introduce the same 3,202-bp plasmid into the cells as calculated per cell sample of Clostridium sp. MT962. Microwave caused visible changes in repPCR pattern and increased ethanol production at the expense of acetate. This is the first report on microwave of microwave ovens, wireless routers, and mobile devices causing chromosomal DNA aberrations in microbes along with carbon flux change.

  8. MicroRNA-143 replenishment re-sensitizes colorectal cancer cells harboring mutant, but not wild-type, KRAS to paclitaxel treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Bing-Yuan; Wang, Xiu-Ying; Fang, Xue-Dong

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) global incidence is one of the highest among cancers. The KRAS gene has been shown as a robust biomarker for poor prognosis and drug resistance. MicroRNA-143 (miR-143) and let-7 are families of tumor suppressor microRNAs that are often downregulated in CRC, especially with coexistent KRAS mutations. In order to evaluate if miR-143 and/or let-7b replenishment would re-sensitize CRC cells to paclitaxel treatment, we investigated in effect of miR-143 and let-7b replenishments on sensitivity to paclitaxel treatment in KRAS mutant LoVo and wild-type SW48 CRC cell lines. Our results showed that miR-143, but not let-7b, increased sensitization of KRAS mutant tumor cells to paclitaxel. Furthermore, transfection of miR-143, but not let-7b, mimic negatively regulated the expression of mutant but not wild-type KRAS. Combination of miR-143 mimic and paclitaxel induced the onset of apoptosis, and reverted in vitro metastatic properties (migration and invasion) in KRAS mutant tumor cells. MiR-143 thus can be used as a chemosensitizer for the treatment of KRAS mutant tumors and warrants further investigations in in vitro and pre-clinical in vivo models.

  9. Characterization of energy and neurotransmitter metabolism in cortical glutamatergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells: A novel approach to study metabolism in human neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, Blanca I; Zhang, Yu; Lihme, Maria Fog; Bak, Lasse K; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Holst, Bjørn; Hyttel, Poul; Freude, Kristine K; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-02-24

    Alterations in the cellular metabolic machinery of the brain are associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Novel human cellular disease models are essential in order to study underlying disease mechanisms. In the present study, we characterized major metabolic pathways in neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). With this aim, cultures of hiPSC-derived neurons were incubated with [U-(13)C]glucose, [U-(13)C]glutamate or [U-(13)C]glutamine. Isotopic labeling in metabolites was determined using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and cellular amino acid content was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Additionally, we evaluated mitochondrial function using real-time assessment of oxygen consumption via the Seahorse XF(e)96 Analyzer. Moreover, in order to validate the hiPSC-derived neurons as a model system, a metabolic profiling was performed in parallel in primary neuronal cultures of mouse cerebral cortex and cerebellum. These serve as well-established models of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively. The hiPSC-derived neurons were previously characterized as being forebrain-specific cortical glutamatergic neurons. However, a comparable preparation of predominantly mouse cortical glutamatergic neurons is not available. We found a higher glycolytic capacity in hiPSC-derived neurons compared to mouse neurons and a substantial oxidative metabolism through the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. This finding is supported by the extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates measured in the cultured human neurons. [U-(13)C]Glutamate and [U-(13)C]glutamine were found to be efficient energy substrates for the neuronal cultures originating from both mice and humans. Interestingly, isotopic labeling in metabolites from [U-(13)C]glutamate was higher than that from [U-(13)C]glutamine. Although the metabolic profile of hiPSC-derived neurons in vitro was

  10. Towards a 'canonical' agranular cortical microcircuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F. Beul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on regularities in the intrinsic microcircuitry of cortical areas, variants of a 'canonical' cortical microcircuit have been proposed and widely adopted, particularly in computational neuroscience and neuroinformatics. However, this circuit is founded on striate cortex, which manifests perhaps the most extreme instance of cortical organization, in terms of a very high density of cells in highly differentiated cortical layers. Most other cortical regions have a less well differentiated architecture, stretching in gradients from the very dense eulaminate primary cortical areas to the other extreme of dysgranular and agranular areas of low density and poor laminar differentiation. It is unlikely for the patterns of inter- and intra-laminar connections to be uniform in spite of strong variations of their structural substrate. This assumption is corroborated by reports of divergence in intrinsic circuitry across the cortex. Consequently, it remains an important goal to define local microcircuits for a variety of cortical types, in particular, agranular cortical regions. As a counterpoint to the striate microcircuit, which may be anchored in an exceptional cytoarchitecture, we here outline a tentative microcircuit for agranular cortex. The circuit is based on a synthesis of the available literature on the local microcircuitry in agranular cortical areas of the rodent brain, investigated by anatomical and electrophysiological approaches. A central observation of these investigations is a weakening of interlaminar inhibition as cortical cytoarchitecture becomes less distinctive. Thus, our study of agranular microcircuitry revealed deviations from the well-known 'canonical' microcircuit established for striate cortex, suggesting variations in the intrinsic circuitry across the cortex that may be functionally relevant.

  11. Prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia harboring monosomal karyotype in patients treated with or without allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after achieving complete remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanada, Masamitsu; Kurosawa, Saiko; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Yamashita, Takuya; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Ago, Hiroatsu; Takeuchi, Jin; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Taguchi, Jun; Sakura, Toru; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Waki, Fusako; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Watanabe, Masato; Emi, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic impact of monosomal karyotype on post-remission outcome in acute myeloid leukemia, we retrospectively analyzed 2,099 patients who had achieved complete remission. Monosomal karyotype was noted in 73 patients (4%). Of these, the probability of overall survival from first complete remission was 14% at four years, which was significantly lower than that reported in patients without monosomal karyotype, primarily due to a high relapse rate (86%). Monosomal karyotype remained significantly associated with worse overall survival among patients with unfavorable cytogenetics or complex karyotype, and even in patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation during first complete remission. These findings confirm that monosomal karyotype has a significantly adverse effect on post-remission outcome in patients with acute myeloid leukemia treated with and without allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in first complete remission, emphasizing the need for the development of alternative therapies for this patient population. PMID:22180431

  12. Nucleic acid-based polymers effective against hepatitis B Virus infection in patients don’t harbor immunostimulatory properties in primary isolated liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Catherine Isabell; Werner, Melanie; Paul, Andreas; Gerken, Guido; Schlaak, Joerg Friedrich; Vaillant, Andrew; Broering, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acid polymers (NAPs) block the release of subviral particles from hepatocytes, a mechanism consistent with their antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) in patients. Analysis of immunostimulatory properties of NAPs were conducted with several NAP species: REP 2006, the prototypic degenerate NAP [dN]40, containing TLR9-stimulatory CpG; REP 2055 a clinically active NAP with a sequence [dAdC]20 devoid of CpG content; REP 2139 (also clinically active) and REP 2165 (REP 2055 analogues further rendered immunologically inactive by replacing cytidine with 5-methylcytidine and incorporating 2′-O methylation of riboses). These analyses revealed pro-inflammatory responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with REP 2006 and with REP 2139 and REP 2165 only at high dose but displayed no significant antiviral activity. In primary isolated human hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells no significant inflammatory or antiviral responses were detected for any NAPs. In human Kupffer cells pro-inflammatory activity was observed with REP 2006 and REP 2055, whereas a weak but significant induction of interferon genes was only observed with REP 2006 at the highest concentration. We therefore hypothesize that the antiviral activity of NAPs optimized to treat HBV infection in patients cannot be explained by direct induction of innate antiviral responses. PMID:28272460

  13. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki eKubota

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their IPSP size is not uniform. Thus cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit.

  14. Glutamate-bound NMDARs arising from in vivo-like network activity extend spatio-temporal integration in a L5 cortical pyramidal cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Farinella

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In vivo, cortical pyramidal cells are bombarded by asynchronous synaptic input arising from ongoing network activity. However, little is known about how such 'background' synaptic input interacts with nonlinear dendritic mechanisms. We have modified an existing model of a layer 5 (L5 pyramidal cell to explore how dendritic integration in the apical dendritic tuft could be altered by the levels of network activity observed in vivo. Here we show that asynchronous background excitatory input increases neuronal gain and extends both temporal and spatial integration of stimulus-evoked synaptic input onto the dendritic tuft. Addition of fast and slow inhibitory synaptic conductances, with properties similar to those from dendritic targeting interneurons, that provided a 'balanced' background configuration, partially counteracted these effects, suggesting that inhibition can tune spatio-temporal integration in the tuft. Excitatory background input lowered the threshold for NMDA receptor-mediated dendritic spikes, extended their duration and increased the probability of additional regenerative events occurring in neighbouring branches. These effects were also observed in a passive model where all the non-synaptic voltage-gated conductances were removed. Our results show that glutamate-bound NMDA receptors arising from ongoing network activity can provide a powerful spatially distributed nonlinear dendritic conductance. This may enable L5 pyramidal cells to change their integrative properties as a function of local network activity, potentially allowing both clustered and spatially distributed synaptic inputs to be integrated over extended timescales.

  15. Comparison of four decontamination treatments on porcine renal decellularized extracellular matrix structure, composition, and support of human renal cortical tubular epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornejad, Nafiseh; Nielsen, Jeffery J; Morris, Ryan J; Gassman, Jason R; Reynolds, Paul R; Roeder, Beverly L; Cook, Alonzo D

    2016-03-01

    Engineering whole organs from porcine decellularized extracellular matrix and human cells may lead to a plentiful source of implantable organs. Decontaminating the porcine decellularized extracellular matrix scaffolds is an essential step prior to introducing human cells. However, decontamination of whole porcine kidneys is a major challenge because the decontamination agent or irradiation needs to diffuse deep into the structure to eliminate all microbial contamination while minimizing damage to the structure and composition of the decellularized extracellular matrix. In this study, we compared four decontamination treatments that could be applicable to whole porcine kidneys: 70% ethanol, 0.2% peracetic acid in 1 M NaCl, 0.2% peracetic acid in 4% ethanol, and gamma (γ)-irradiation. Porcine kidneys were decellularized by perfusion of 0.5% (w/v) aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate and the four decontamination treatments were optimized using segments (n = 60) of renal tissue to ensure a consistent comparison. Although all four methods were successful in decontamination, γ-irradiation was very damaging to collagen fibers and glycosaminoglycans, leading to less proliferation of human renal cortical tubular epithelium cells within the porcine decellularized extracellular matrix. The effectiveness of the other three optimized solution treatments were then all confirmed using whole decellularized porcine kidneys (n = 3). An aqueous solution of 0.2% peracetic acid in 1 M NaCl was determined to be the best method for decontamination of porcine decellularized extracellular matrix.

  16. CRSMP Potential Harbor Borrow Sites 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Harbor locations as identified originally in the California Shoreline Database compiled by Noble Consultants (Jon Moore) for California Department of Boating and...

  17. Patient affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 and thyroid C-cell hyperplasia harboring pathogenic germ-line mutations in both NF1 and RET genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolino, Tonino; Lai, Roberta; Giachè, Valentino; Melchionda, Salvatore; Carella, Massimo; Delitala, Alessandro; Mannelli, Massimo; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2014-02-25

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a rare autosomal dominant disease with an estimated incidence of 1 in 3000/3500 live births. NF1 is caused by a mutation in a gene which encodes a protein known as neurofibromin. In up to 5% of cases, NF1 is associated with pheochromocytomas. RET proto-oncogene encodes a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family involved in the normal development or the neoplastic growth of neural crest cell lineages. Germ-line RET mutations account for cases of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), an autosomal dominant genetic syndrome where medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is the major and more clinically severe feature, with nearly complete penetrance. C-cell hyperplasia (CCH) is described in MEN2 patients, and it has been implicated as the precursor of in situ MTC. Patients with RET mutations develop pheochromocytomas in 50% of cases. Rarely, patients with NF1 have been found to present, in addition to the NF1 clinical picture, other lesions, such as parathyroid hyperplasia/adenoma and/or medullary thyroid carcinoma. In spite of the presence of these MEN2 lesions, in none of these patients mutations of gene RET have been found so far. In this report, we describe the first case of a patient affected by a germ-line mutation in both NF1 and RET genes.

  18. Prey capture by harbor porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Lee

    2008-01-01

    their ultrasonic clicks as biosonar for orientation and detection of prey (mostly smaller pelagic and bottom dwelling fish), and for communication.  For studying wild animals, hydrophone arrays [Villadsgaard et al. J.Exp.Biol. 210 (2007)] and acoustic (time/depth) tags [Akamatsu et al. Deep Sea Research II 54...... (2007)] have been used.  For studying captive animals, arrays and video techniques [Verfuss et al. J.Exp.Biol. 208 (2005)] as well as miniature acoustic-behavioral tags [Deruiter et al. JASA 123 (2008)] have been used.  While searching for prey, harbor porpoises use clicks at long intervals (~50 ms......) that progressively decrease when closing on an object.  After detecting the prey, the click interval stabilizes and then becomes progressively shorter while approaching the prey.  The sequence ends in a terminal, high repetition rate buzz (~500 clicks/s) just before capturing the prey (a video will be shown...

  19. Comparative transcriptional survey between laser-microdissected cells from laminar abscission zone and petiolar cortical tissue during ethylene-promoted abscission in citrus leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeo Francisco R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abscission is the cell separation process by which plants are able to shed organs. It has a great impact on the yield of most crop plants. At the same time, the process itself also constitutes an excellent model to study cell separation processes, since it occurs in concrete areas known as abscission zones (AZs which are composed of a specific cell type. However, molecular approaches are generally hampered by the limited area and cell number constituting the AZ. Therefore, detailed studies at the resolution of cell type are of great relevance in order to accurately describe the process and to identify potential candidate genes for biotechnological applications. Results Efficient protocols for the isolation of specific citrus cell types, namely laminar abscission zone (LAZ and petiolar cortical (Pet cells based on laser capture microdissection (LCM and for RNA microextraction and amplification have been developed. A comparative transcriptome analysis between LAZ and Pet from citrus leaf explants subjected to an in-vitro 24 h ethylene treatment was performed utilising microarray hybridization and analysis. Our analyses of gene functional classes differentially represented in ethylene-treated LAZ revealed an activation program dominated by the expression of genes associated with protein synthesis, protein fate, cell type differentiation, development and transcription. The extensive repertoire of genes associated with cell wall biosynthesis and metabolism strongly suggests that LAZ layers activate both catabolic and anabolic wall modification pathways during the abscission program. In addition, over-representation of particular members of different transcription factor families suggests important roles for these genes in the differentiation of the effective cell separation layer within the many layers contained in the citrus LAZ. Preferential expression of stress-related and defensive genes in Pet reveals that this tissue is

  20. Organisation of Xenopus oocyte and egg cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P; Pérez-Mongiovi, D; Houliston, E

    1999-03-15

    The division of the Xenopus oocyte cortex into structurally and functionally distinct "animal" and "vegetal" regions during oogenesis provides the basis of the organisation of the early embryo. The vegetal region of the cortex accumulates specific maternal mRNAs that specify the development of the endoderm and mesoderm, as well as functionally-defined "determinants" of dorso-anterior development, and recognisable "germ plasm" determinants that segregate into primary germ cells. These localised elements on the vegetal cortex underlie both the primary animal-vegetal polarity of the egg and the organisation of the developing embryo. The animal cortex meanwhile becomes specialised for the events associated with fertilisation: sperm entry, calcium release into the cytoplasm, cortical granule exocytosis, and polarised cortical contraction. Cortical and subcortical reorganisations associated with meiotic maturation, fertilisation, cortical rotation, and the first mitotic cleavage divisions redistribute the vegetal cortical determinants, contributing to the specification of dorso-anterior axis and segregation of the germ line. In this article we consider what is known about the changing organisation of the oocyte and egg cortex in relation to the mechanisms of determinant localisation, anchorage, and redistribution, and show novel ultrastructural views of cortices isolated at different stages and processed by the rapid-freeze deep-etch method. Cortical organisation involves interactions between the different cytoskeletal filament systems and internal membranes. Associated proteins and cytoplasmic signals probably modulate these interactions in stage-specific ways, leaving much to be understood.

  1. Periodic Inspections of Cleveland Harbor East Breakwater, Ohio, and Burns Harbor North Breakwater, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    lwd. The authorized channel depth is -30 ft lwd at the entrance and -28 ft lwd in the Harbor. Original construction of Burns Harbor was completed in...and Burns Harbor North Breakwater, Indiana C oa st al a n d H yd ra u lic s La b or at or y Glenn B. Myrick, Jeffrey A. Melby, and...Breakwater, Ohio, and Burns Harbor North Breakwater, Indiana Glenn B. Myrick, Jeffrey A. Melby, and Elizabeth C. Burg Coastal and Hydraulics

  2. 33 CFR 100.109 - Winter Harbor Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter Harbor Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME. 100.109 Section 100.109 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME. (a) Regulated area. The regulated area includes all waters of...

  3. 75 FR 78601 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, New Orleans Harbor, Inner Harbor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Orleans Harbor, Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Seeber/Claiborne Avenue) ] vertical lift bridge across the Inner Harbor Navigational Canal, mile 0.9, (Gulf Intracoastal Waterway mile 6.7 East of Harvey Lock), at New Orleans, Orleans Parish,...

  4. 76 FR 8653 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, New Orleans Harbor, Inner Harbor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... Orleans Harbor, Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Seeber/Claiborne Avenue) vertical lift bridge across the Inner Harbor Navigational Canal, mile 0.9, (Gulf Intracoastal Waterway mile 6.7 East of Harvey Lock), at New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana. This...

  5. Ca2+ signaling in HEK-293 and skeletal muscle cells expressing recombinant ryanodine receptors harboring malignant hyperthermia and central core disease mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Marisa; Manni, Sabrina; Pierobon, Nicola; Du, Guo Guang; Sharma, Parveen; MacLennan, David H; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2005-04-15

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) and central core disease (CCD) are caused by mutations in the RYR1 gene encoding the skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), a homotetrameric Ca(2+) release channel. Rabbit RyR1 mutant cDNAs carrying mutations corresponding to those in human RyR1 that cause MH and CCD were expressed in HEK-293 cells, which do not have endogenous RyR, and in primary cultures of rat skeletal muscle, which express rat RyR1. Analysis of intracellular Ca(2+) pools was performed using aequorin probes targeted to the lumen of the endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR), to the mitochondrial matrix, or to the cytosol. Mutations associated with MH caused alterations in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis different from those associated with CCD. Measurements of luminal ER/SR Ca(2+) revealed that the mutations generated leaky channels in all cases, but the leak was particularly pronounced in CCD mutants. Cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) transients induced by caffeine stimulation were drastically augmented in the MH mutant, slightly reduced in one CCD mutant (Y523S) and completely abolished in another (I4898T). The results suggest that local Ca(2+) derangements of different degrees account for the specific cellular phenotypes of the two disorders.

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis of kidney distal convoluted tubule and cortical collecting duct cells following long-term hormonal stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qi; Moller, Hanne; Rosenbaek, Lena Lindtoft

    2017-01-01

    -desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP, 1nM) or angiotensin II (ANGII, 1nM). Cells were harvested, equally pooled and subjected to offline high-pH fractionation based two dimensional LC-MS/MS analysis (Q-Exactive). Identification and quantification of proteins was performed by MaxQuant. Proteins that had...... FDR threshold in one cell type plus the unique proteins in this cell type. These 1025 mpkDCT specific proteins and 1211 mpkCCD specific proteins under the three conditions were subjected to further bioinformatics analyses including Panther and DAVID gene ontology analyses, E3 ligase...

  7. Differences in the mechanical properties of the developing cerebral cortical proliferative zone between mice and ferrets at both the tissue and single-cell levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arata Nagasaka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-producing events in developing tissues are mechanically dynamic throughout the cell cycle. In many epithelial systems, cells are apicobasally tall, with nuclei and somata that adopt different apicobasal positions because nuclei and somata move in a cell cycle–dependent manner. This movement is apical during G2 phase and basal during G1 phase, whereas mitosis occurs at the apical surface. These movements are collectively referred to as interkinetic nuclear migration, and such epithelia are called pseudostratified. The embryonic mammalian cerebral cortical neuroepithelium is a good model for highly pseudostratified epithelia, and we previously found differences between mice and ferrets in both horizontal cellular density (greater in ferrets and nuclear/somal movements (slower during G2 and faster during G1 in ferrets. These differences suggest that neuroepithelial cells alter their nucleokinetic behavior in response to physical factors that they encounter, which may form the basis for evolutionary transitions towards more abundant brain-cell production from mice to ferrets and primates. To address how mouse and ferret neuroepithelia may differ physically in a quantitative manner, we used atomic force microscopy to determine that the vertical stiffness of their apical surface is greater in ferrets (Young’s modulus = 1700 Pa than in mice (1400 Pa. We systematically analyzed factors underlying the apical-surface stiffness through experiments to pharmacologically inhibit actomyosin or microtubules and to examine recoiling behaviors of the apical surface upon laser ablation and also through electron microscopy to observe adherens junction. We found that although both actomyosin and microtubules are partly responsible for the apical-surface stiffness, the mousecells is

  8. Imprinting and recalling cortical ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yang, Weijian; Bando, Yuki; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-08-12

    Neuronal ensembles are coactive groups of neurons that may represent building blocks of cortical circuits. These ensembles could be formed by Hebbian plasticity, whereby synapses between coactive neurons are strengthened. Here we report that repetitive activation with two-photon optogenetics of neuronal populations from ensembles in the visual cortex of awake mice builds neuronal ensembles that recur spontaneously after being imprinted and do not disrupt preexisting ones. Moreover, imprinted ensembles can be recalled by single- cell stimulation and remain coactive on consecutive days. Our results demonstrate the persistent reconfiguration of cortical circuits by two-photon optogenetics into neuronal ensembles that can perform pattern completion. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Embryo genome profiling by single-cell sequencing for successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis in a family harboring COL4A1 c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nayana H.; Bhadarka, Harsha K.; Patel, Kruti B.; Vaniawala, Salil N.; Acharya, Arpan; Mukhopadhyaya, Pratap N.; Sodagar, Nilofar R.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Genetic profiling of embryos (also known as preimplantation genetic diagnosis) before implantation has dramatically enhanced the success quotient of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in recent times. The technology helps in avoiding selective pregnancy termination since the baby is likely to be free of the disease under consideration. AIM: Screening of embryos free from c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation within the COL4A1 gene for which the father was known in before be in heterozygous condition. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Processing of trophectoderm biopsies was done from twelve embryos for c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation within the COL4A1 gene. DNA extracted from isolated cells were subjected to whole genome amplification using an isothermal amplification and strand displacement technology. Oligonucleotide primers bracketing the mutation were synthesized and used to amplify 162 base pairs (bp) polymerase chain reaction amplicons originating from each embryo which were subsequently sequenced to detect the presence or absence of the single base polymorphism. RESULTS: Three out of 12 embryos interrogated in this study were found to be normal while 9 were found to harbor the mutation in heterozygous condition. Implantation of one of the normal embryos following by chorionic villus sampling at 11th week of pregnancy indicated that the baby was free from c.1537G>A; p.G513S mutation within the COL4A1 gene. CONCLUSIONS: Single-cell sequencing is a helpful tool for preimplantation embryo profiling. This is the first report from India describing the birth of a normal child through IVF procedure where a potential pathogenic COL4A1 allele was avoided using this technology. PMID:27803589

  10. Combination of the somatic cell nuclear transfer method and RNAi technology for the production of a prion gene-knockdown calf using plasmid vectors harboring the U6 or tRNA promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsrikeao, Pimprapar; Sutou, Shizuyo; Kunishi, Miho; Dong, Ya Juan; Bai, Xuejin; Otoi, Takeshige

    2011-01-01

    By combining RNAi technology with SCNT method, we attempted to produce transgenic calves with knocked down bPRNP for technological assessments. The respective utilities of type II (tRNA) and type III (hU6) Pol III promoters in mediating plasmid vector-based RNAi for the production of a bPRNP-knockdown calf were compared. Plasmid harboring DNA for siRNA expression was introduced stably into the genome of primary cultured bovine cells. By inserting the transgenic cell into an enucleated bovine egg, SCNT embryos were produced. The ability for SCNT embryos to develop to blastocysts was higher in hU6 based vector groups (44-53%) than in a tRNA group (32%). In all, 30 hU6-embryos and 12 tRNA-embryos were transferred to 11 recipients. Only tRNA-embryos were able to impregnate recipients (6 out of 11 transfers), resulting in four aborted fetuses, one stillbirth, and one live-born calf. The expression of EGFP, a marker, was detected in all six. The bPRNP transcript levels in the nervous tissues (brain, cerebellum, spinal bulb, and spinal cord) from the calf, which was killed 20 days after birth, were reduced to 35% of those of the control calf on average, as determined by qRT-PCR. The PrPC levels, as estimated by western blot were reduced to 86% on average in the nervous tissues. These findings suggest that SCNT technology remains immature, that the tRNA promoter is useful, and that RNAi can significantly reduce PRNP mRNA levels, but insufficient reduction of PrPC levels exists in cattle under these conditions.

  11. Clinicopathologic characteristics andtherapeutic responses ofChinese patients withnon-small cell lung cancer who harbor an anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShaFu; HaiYunWang; FangWang; MaYanHuang; LingDeng; XiaoZhang; ZuLuYe; JianYong Shao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:The rearrangement of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene accounts for approximately 1%–6%of lung adenocarcinoma cases and deifnes a molecular subgroup of tumors characterized by clinical sensitivity toALK inhibitors such as crizotinib. This study aimed to identify the relationship betweenALK rearrangement and the clinico‑pathologic characteristics of non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to analyze the therapeutic responses of crizotinib and conventional chemotherapy toALK rearrangement in NSCLC patients. Methods:A total of 487 lung cancer patients who underwent testing forALK rearrangement in our department were included in this study.ALK rearrangement was examined by using lfuorescence insitu hybridization (FISH) assay. Results:Among the 487 patients, 44 (9.0%) were diagnosed withALK rearrangement by using FISH assay. In 123 patients with adenocarcinoma who were non‑smokers and of a young age (≤58years old), the frequency ofALK rearrangement was 20.3% (25/123). Short overall survival (OS) was associated with non‑adenocarcinoma tumor type (P=0.006), poorly differentiated tumors (P=0.001), advanced‑stage tumors (P<0.001), smoking history (P=0.008), and wild‑type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (P=0.008). Moreover, patients with poorly differentiated and advanced‑stage tumors had a shorter time to cancer progression compared with those with well differentiated (P=0.023) and early‑stage tumors (P=0.001), respectively. Conclusions:ALK‑rearranged NSCLC tends to occur in younger individuals who are either non‑smokers or light smokers with adenocarcinoma. Patients withALK rearrangement might beneift fromALK inhibitor therapy.

  12. Patients with Merkel cell carcinoma tumors < or = 1.0 cm in diameter are unlikely to harbor regional lymph node metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Jayme B; Graw, Katherine S; Dengel, Lynn T; Swenson, Brian R; Bauer, Todd W; Slingluff, Craig L; Ledesma, Elihu J

    2009-08-10

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive neuroendocrine cutaneous malignancy. Current recommendations include offering regional lymph node evaluation by either sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) or complete lymph node dissection (CLND) to all patients with MCC; however, we hypothesized a cohort of low-risk patients may exist for whom regional nodal metastasis would be unlikely. A retrospective review of the Department of Veterans Affairs national health care database was performed. Patients undergoing resection of primary MCC were identified; and demographic, medical, and social history; tumor characteristics; nodal status; and recurrence events were recorded. Between 1995 and 2006, 346 patients were diagnosed with MCC. Of these, 213 underwent resection of the primary lesion and evaluation of the draining lymph node basin. Fifty-four patients (25%) had tumors < or = 1.0 cm in diameter. Average tumor diameter was 0.7 cm, and 63% were located on the head or neck. Only two patients (4%) with tumors < or = 1.0 cm had regional lymph node metastasis, compared with 51 (24%) of 213 patients with tumors more than 1.0 cm (P < .0001). Both patients had clinically evident nodal disease at presentation and underwent CLND. Both have remained recurrence-free for 40 months. Thirteen (25%) of 51 patients with nodal metastasis and tumors more than 1 cm had occult nodal metastasis. In this series, patients with MCC < or = 1.0 cm were unlikely to have regional lymph node metastasis, suggesting that regional nodal evaluation may reasonably be avoided in these patients. However, these data support SLNB for MCC more than 1 cm in diameter.

  13. Madaket Harbor, Nantucket, Massachusetts. Water Resources Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-01

    beamc. Tnis material will be re-deposited,, viaj troio it 1-apfro1inr ox prior location. j, MADAKET HARBOR NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS FEASIBILITY...re- colonization of approximately 395 acres by scallops and quahogs. Also, barring any future disruption of the harbor area, the continued use of

  14. 33 CFR 117.549 - Cambridge Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cambridge Harbor. 117.549 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.549 Cambridge Harbor. The draw of the S342 bridge, mile 0.1 at Cambridge, shall open on signal from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.; except that, from...

  15. Clinacanthus nutans Extracts Modulate Epigenetic Link to Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Expression in SH-SY5Y Cells and Primary Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlene Siew-Hon; Ho, Christabel Fung-Yih; Heng, Swan-Ser; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Tan, Benny Kwong-Huat; Ng, Yee-Kong; Sun, Grace Y; Lin, Teng-Nan; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2016-09-01

    Clinacanthus nutans Lindau (C. nutans), commonly known as Sabah Snake Grass in southeast Asia, is widely used in folk medicine due to its analgesic, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. Our recent study provided evidence for the regulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) mRNA expression by epigenetic factors (Tan et al. in Mol Neurobiol. doi: 10.1007/s12035-015-9314-z , 2015). This enzyme catalyzes the release of arachidonic acid from glycerophospholipids, and formation of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids or toxic lipid peroxidation products such as 4-hydroxynonenal. In this study, we examined the effects of C. nutans ethanol leaf extracts on epigenetic regulation of cPLA2 mRNA expression in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and mouse primary cortical neurons. C. nutans modulated induction of cPLA2 expression in SH-SY5Y cells by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, MS-275, MC-1568, and TSA. C. nutans extracts also inhibited histone acetylase (HAT) activity. Levels of cPLA2 mRNA expression were increased in primary cortical neurons subjected to 0.5-h oxygen-glucose deprivation injury (OGD). This increase was significantly inhibited by C. nutans treatment. Treatment of primary neurons with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 augmented OGD-induced cPLA2 mRNA expression, and this increase was modulated by C. nutans extracts. OGD-stimulated increase in cPLA2 mRNA expression was also reduced by a Tip60 HAT inhibitor, NU9056. In view of a key role of cPLA2 in the production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and free radical damage, and the fact that epigenetic effects on genes are often long-lasting, results suggest a role for C. nutans and phytochemicals to inhibit the production of arachidonic acid-derived pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and chronic inflammation, through epigenetic regulation of cPLA2 expression.

  16. Membrane-bound catechol-O-methyl transferase in cortical neurons and glial cells is intracellularly oriented

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn H Schott

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT is involved in the inactivation of dopamine in brain regions in which the dopamine transporter (DAT1 is sparsely expressed. The membrane-bound isoform of COMT (MB-COMT is the predominantly expressed form in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS. It has been a matter of debate whether in neural cells of the CNS the enzymatic domain of MB-COMT is oriented towards the cytoplasmic or the extracellular compartment. Here we used live immunocytochemistry on cultured neocortical neurons and glial cells to investigate the expression and membrane orientation of native COMT and of transfected MB-COMT fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP. After live staining, COMT immunoreactivity was reliably detected in both neurons and glial cells after permeabilization, but not on unpermeabilized cells. Similarly, autofluorescence of COMT-GFP fusion protein and antibody fluorescence showed overlap only in permeabilized neurons. Our data provide converging evidence for an intracellular membrane orientation of MB-COMT in neurons and glial cells, suggesting the presence of a DAT1-independent postsynaptic uptake mechanism for dopamine, prior to its degradation via COMT.

  17. Cortical Lewy Body Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. G. Gibb

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available In cortical Lewy body dementia the distribution of Lewy bodies in the nervous system follows that of Parkinson's disease, except for their greater profusion in the cerebral cortex. The cortical tangles and plaques of Alzheimer pathology are often present, the likely explanation being that Alzheimer pathology provokes dementia in many patients. Pure cortical Lewy body dementia without Alzheimer pathology is uncommon. The age of onset reflects that of Parkinson's disease, and clinical features, though not diagnostic, include aphasias, apraxias, agnosias, paranoid delusions and visual hallucinations. Parkinsonism may present before or after the dementia, and survival duration is approximately half that seen in Parkinson's disease without dementia.

  18. Nrdp1 Increases Ischemia Induced Primary Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons and Pheochromocytoma Cells Apoptosis Via Downregulation of HIF-1α Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin receptor degradation protein-1 (Nrdp1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets proteins for degradation and regulates cell growth, apoptosis and oxidative stress in various cell types. We have previously shown that Nrdp1 is implicated in ischemic cardiomyocyte death. In this study, we investigated the change of Nrdp1 expression in ischemic neurons and its role in ischemic neuronal injury. Primary rat cerebral cortical neurons and pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells were infected with adenoviral constructs expressing Nrdp1 gene or its siRNA before exposing to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD treatment. Our data showed that Nrdp1 was upregulated in ischemic brain tissue 3 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and in OGD-treated neurons. Of note, Nrdp1 overexpression by Ad-Nrdp1 enhanced OGD-induced neuron apoptosis, while knockdown of Nrdp1 with siRNA attenuated this effect, implicating a role of Nrdp1 in ischemic neuron injury. Moreover, Nrdp1 upregulation is accompanied by increased protein ubiquitylation and decreased protein levels of ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8 in OGD-treated neurons, which led to a suppressed interaction between USP8 and HIF-1α and subsequently a reduction in HIF-1α protein accumulation in neurons under OGD conditions. In conclusion, our data support an important role of Nrdp1 upregulation in ischemic neuronal death, and suppressing the interaction between USP8 and HIF-1α and consequently the hypoxic adaptive response of neurons may account for this detrimental effect.

  19. Quantitative image analysis tool to study the plasma membrane localization of proteins and cortical actin in neuroendocrine cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurps, J.; Broeke, J.H.; Cijsouw, T.; Kompatscher, A.; Weering, J.R. van; Wit, H. de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adrenal chromaffin cells are a widely used model system to study regulated exocytosis and other membrane-associated processes. Alterations in the amount and localization of the proteins involved in these processes can be visualized with fluorescent probes that report the effect of differ

  20. Human Cortical Neural Stem Cells Expressing Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Lisa M; Sims, Erika; Lunn, J Simon; Kashlan, Osama N; Chen, Kevin S; Bruno, Elizabeth S; Pacut, Crystal M; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. Current treatment fails to modify underlying disease pathologies and very little progress has been made to develop effective drug treatments. Cellular therapies impact disease by multiple mechanisms, providing increased efficacy compared with traditional single-target approaches. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we have shown that transplanted spinal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate into the spinal cord, form synapses with the host, improve inflammation, and reduce disease-associated pathologies. Our current goal is to develop a similar "best in class" cellular therapy for AD. Here, we characterize a novel human cortex-derived NSC line modified to express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), HK532-IGF-I. Because IGF-I promotes neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in vivo, this enhanced NSC line offers additional environmental enrichment, enhanced neuroprotection, and a multifaceted approach to treating complex AD pathologies. We show that autocrine IGF-I production does not impact the cell secretome or normal cellular functions, including proliferation, migration, or maintenance of progenitor status. However, HK532-IGF-I cells preferentially differentiate into gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons, a subtype dysregulated in AD; produce increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels; and display an increased neuroprotective capacity in vitro. We also demonstrate that HK532-IGF-I cells survive peri-hippocampal transplantation in a murine AD model and exhibit long-term persistence in targeted brain areas. In conclusion, we believe that harnessing the benefits of cellular and IGF-I therapies together will provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to patients, and our findings support further preclinical development of HK532-IGF-I cells into a disease-modifying intervention for AD. ©AlphaMed Press.

  1. Focal cortical dysplasia - review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults.Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed - from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized.Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe.Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes.New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life.Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias.THE MOST COMMON FINDINGS ON MRI IMAGING INCLUDE: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also in both types

  2. Quantifying noise-induced stability of a cortical fast-spiking cell model with Kv3-channel-like current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, T; Robinson, H P C

    2007-01-01

    Population oscillations in neural activity in the gamma (>30 Hz) and higher frequency ranges are found over wide areas of the mammalian cortex. Recently, in the somatosensory cortex, the details of neural connections formed by several types of GABAergic interneurons have become apparent, and they are believed to play a significant role in generating these oscillations through synaptic and gap-junctional interactions. However, little is known about the mechanism of how such oscillations are maintained stably by particular interneurons and by their local networks, in a noisy environment with abundant synaptic inputs. To obtain more insight into this, we studied a fast-spiking (FS)-cell model including Kv3-channel-like current, which is a distinctive feature of these cells, from the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamical systems. To examine the specific role of the Kv3-channel in determining oscillation properties, we analyzed basic properties of the FS-cell model, such as the bifurcation structure and phase resetting curves (PRCs). Furthermore, to quantitatively characterize the oscillation stability under noisy fluctuations mimicking small fast synaptic inputs, we applied a recently developed method from random dynamical system theory to estimate Lyapunov exponents, both for the original four-dimensional dynamics and for a reduced one-dimensional phase-equation on the circle. The results indicated that the presence of the Kv3-channel-like current helps to regulate the stability of noisy neural oscillations and a transient-period length to stochastic attractors.

  3. Protein kinase D1 modulates aldosterone-induced ENaC activity in a renal cortical collecting duct cell line.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEneaney, Victoria

    2010-08-30

    Aldosterone treatment of M1-CCD cells stimulated an increase in epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) alpha-subunit expression that was mainly localized to the apical membrane. PKD1-suppressed cells constitutively expressed ENaCalpha at low abundance, with no increase after aldosterone treatment. In the PKD1-suppressed cells, ENaCalpha was mainly localized proximal to the basolateral surface of the epithelium both before and after aldosterone treatment. Apical membrane insertion of ENaCbeta in response to aldosterone treatment was also sensitive to PKD1 suppression as was the aldosterone-induced rise in the amiloride-sensitive, trans-epithelial current (I(TE)). The interaction of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) with specific elements in the promoters of aldosterone responsive genes is stabilized by ligand interaction and phosphorylation. PKD1 suppression inhibited aldosterone-induced SGK-1 expression. The nuclear localization of MR was also blocked by PKD1 suppression and MEK antagonism implicating both these kinases in MR nuclear stabilization. PKD1 thus modulates aldosterone-induced ENaC activity through the modulation of sub-cellular trafficking and the stabilization of MR nuclear localization.

  4. Postpartum cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Shakeel Ahmed

    2008-09-01

    A 30-years-old third gravida with previous normal pregnancies and an unremarkable prenatal course had an emergency lower segment caesarean section at a periphery hospital for failure of labour to progress. She developed bilateral cortical blindness immediately after recovery from anesthesia due to cerebral angiopathy shown by CT and MR scan as cortical infarct cerebral angiopathy, which is a rare complication of a normal pregnancy.

  5. Inner Harbor Navigation Canal Basin Velocity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 4- 12 Inner Harbor Navigation Canal Basin Velocity Analysis Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry...library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. ERDC/CHL TR-14-12 October 2014 Inner Harbor Navigation Canal Basin Velocity Analysis...system of levees, gates, and drainage structures in the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (IHNC) basin and the greater New Orleans, Louisiana, area. Two

  6. Characterization of energy and neurotransmitter metabolism in cortical glutamatergic neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana, Blanca I; Zhang, Yu; Lihme, Maria Fog

    2017-01-01

    pathways in neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). With this aim, cultures of hiPSC-derived neurons were incubated with [U-(13)C]glucose, [U-(13)C]glutamate or [U-(13)C]glutamine. Isotopic labeling in metabolites was determined using gas chromatography coupled to mass...... acid (TCA) cycle. This finding is supported by the extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates measured in the cultured human neurons. [U-(13)C]Glutamate and [U-(13)C]glutamine were found to be efficient energy substrates for the neuronal cultures originating from both mice and humans...

  7. The origin of cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Parnavelas

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex comprise two broad classes: pyramidal neurons, which project to distant targets, and the inhibitory nonpyramidal cells, the cortical interneurons. Pyramidal neurons are generated in the germinal ventricular zone, which lines the lateral ventricles, and migrate along the processes of radial glial cells to their positions in the developing cortex in an `inside-out' sequence. The GABA-containing nonpyramidal cells originate for the most part in the ganglionic eminence, the primordium of the basal ganglia in the ventral telencephalon. These cells follow tangential migratory routes to enter the cortex and are in close association with the corticofugal axonal system. Once they enter the cortex, they move towards the ventricular zone, possibly to obtain positional information, before they migrate radially in the direction of the pial surface to take up their positions in the developing cortex. The mechanisms that guide interneurons throughout these long and complex migratory routes are currently under investigation.

  8. Cortical Neural Computation by Discrete Results Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejon, Carlos; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in neuroscience is to understand how the cortex performs computations. There is increasing evidence that the power of the cortical processing is produced by populations of neurons forming dynamic neuronal ensembles. Theoretical proposals and multineuronal experimental studies have revealed that ensembles of neurons can form emergent functional units. However, how these ensembles are implicated in cortical computations is still a mystery. Although cell ensembles have been associated with brain rhythms, the functional interaction remains largely unclear. It is still unknown how spatially distributed neuronal activity can be temporally integrated to contribute to cortical computations. A theoretical explanation integrating spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing is still lacking. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we propose a new functional theoretical framework to explain the computational roles of these ensembles in cortical processing. We suggest that complex neural computations underlying cortical processing could be temporally discrete and that sensory information would need to be quantized to be computed by the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, we propose that cortical processing is produced by the computation of discrete spatio-temporal functional units that we have called “Discrete Results” (Discrete Results Hypothesis). This hypothesis represents a novel functional mechanism by which information processing is computed in the cortex. Furthermore, we propose that precise dynamic sequences of “Discrete Results” is the mechanism used by the cortex to extract, code, memorize and transmit neural information. The novel “Discrete Results” concept has the ability to match the spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing. We discuss the possible neural underpinnings of these functional computational units and describe the empirical evidence supporting our hypothesis. We propose that fast

  9. Effects of dimeric PSD-95 inhibition on excitotoxic cell death and outcome after controlled cortical impact in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Jens Bak; Bach, Anders; Rytter, Hana Malá

    2017-01-01

    be an effective therapeutic strategy in TBI. The objectives of the present study were to assess the effects of a dimeric inhibitor of PSD-95, UCCB01-144, on excitotoxic cell death in vitro and outcome after experimental TBI in rats in vivo. In addition, the pharmacokinetic parameters of UCCB01-144 were...... assessed in a water maze at two weeks post-trauma, and at four weeks lesion volumes were estimated. Overall, UCCB01-144 did not protect against NMDA-toxicity in neuronal cultures or experimental TBI in rats. Important factors that should be investigated further in future studies assessing the effects......Therapeutic effects of PSD-95 inhibition have been demonstrated in numerous studies of stroke; however only few studies have assessed the effects of PSD-95 inhibitors in traumatic brain injury (TBI). As the pathophysiology of TBI partially overlaps with that of stroke, PSD-95 inhibition may also...

  10. Accelerated dendritic development of rat cortical pyramidal cells and interneurons after biolistic transfection with BDNF and NT4/5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Marcus J; Brun, Annika; Grabert, Jochen; Patz, Silke; Wahle, Petra

    2003-12-01

    Neurotrophins are candidate molecules for regulating dendritogenesis. We report here on dendritic growth of rat visual cortex pyramidal and interneurons overexpressing 'brain-derived neurotrophic factor' BDNF and 'neurotrophin 4/5' NT4/5. Neurons in organotypic cultures were transfected with plasmids encoding either 'enhanced green fluorescent protein' EGFP, BDNF/EGFP or NT4/5/EGFP either at the day of birth with analysis at 5 days in vitro, or at 5 days in vitro with analysis at 10 days in vitro. In pyramidal neurons, both TrkB ligands increased dendritic length and number of segments without affecting maximum branch order and number of primary dendrites. In the early time window, only infragranular neurons were responsive. Neurons in layers II/III became responsive to NT4/5, but not BDNF, during the later time window. BDNF and NT4/5 transfectants at 10 days in vitro had still significantly shorter dendrites than adult pyramidal neurons, suggesting a massive growth spurt after 10 days in vitro. However, segment numbers were already in the range of adult neurons. Although this suggested a role for BDNF, long-term activity-deprived, and thus BDNF-deprived, pyramidal cells developed a dendritic complexity not different from neurons in active cultures except for higher spine densities on neurons of layers II/III and VI. Neutralization of endogenous NT4/5 causes shorter and less branched dendrites at 10 days in vitro suggesting an essential role for NT4/5. Neutralization of BDNF had no effect. Transfected multipolar interneurons became identifiable during the second time window. Both TrkB ligands significantly increased number of segments and branch order towards the adult state with little effects on dendritic length. The results suggested that early in development BDNF and NT4/5 probably accelerate dendritogenesis in an autocrine fashion. In particular, branch formation was advanced towards the adult pattern in pyramidal cells and interneurons.

  11. Low concentrations of the solvent dimethyl sulphoxide alter intrinsic excitability properties of cortical and hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tamagnini

    Full Text Available Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO is a widely used solvent in biology. It has many applications perhaps the most common of which is in aiding the preparation of drug solutions from hydrophobic chemical entities. Recent studies have suggested that this molecule may be able to induce apoptosis in neural tissues urging caution regarding its introduction into humans, for example as part of stem cell transplants. Here we have used in vitro electrophysiological methods applied to murine brain slices to examine whether a few hours treatment with 0.05% DMSO (a concentration regarded by many as innocuous alters intrinsic excitability properties of neurones. We investigated pyramidal neurones in two distinct brain regions, namely area CA1 of the hippocampus and layer 2 of perirhinal cortex. In the former there was no effect on resting potential but input resistance was decreased by DMSO pre-treatment. In line with this action potential count for any level of depolarizing current stimulus was reduced by ∼25% following DMSO treatment. Ih-mediated "sag" was also increased in CA1 pyramids and action potential waveform analysis demonstrated that DMSO treatment moved action potential threshold towards resting potential. In perirhinal cortex a decreased action potential output for various depolarizing current stimuli was also seen. In these cells action potential threshold was unaltered by DMSO but a significant increase in action potential width was apparent. These data indicate that pre-treatment with this widely employed solvent can elicit multifaceted neurophysiological changes in mammalian neurones at concentrations below those frequently encountered in the published literature.

  12. Chignik small boat harbor planning aid report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Unless additional salmon use data would indicate otherwise, harbor site 3 is considered the environmentally preferred alternative for construction of a small...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Floating-Harbor syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child may have bones more typical of a child of 2. However, bone age is usually normal by age 6 to 12. Delay in speech development (expressive language delay) may be severe in Floating-Harbor syndrome , ...

  14. A neurological comparative study of the harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walløe, Solveig; Eriksen, Nina; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    The cetacean brain is well studied. However, few comparisons have been done with other marine mammals. In this study, we compared the harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and the harbor porpoise brain (Phocoena phocoena). Stereological methods were applied to compare three areas of interest...... are the first to provide estimates of the number of neurons and glial cells in the neocortex of the harp seal and harbor porpoise brain and offer new data to the comparative field of mammalian brain evolution....

  15. Cortical Polarity of the RING Protein PAR-2 Is Maintained by Exchange Rate Kinetics at the Cortical-Cytoplasmic Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinobu Arata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell polarity arises through the spatial segregation of polarity regulators. PAR proteins are polarity regulators that localize asymmetrically to two opposing cortical domains. However, it is unclear how the spatially segregated PAR proteins interact to maintain their mutually exclusive partitioning. Here, single-molecule detection analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos reveals that cortical PAR-2 diffuses only short distances, and, as a result, most PAR-2 molecules associate and dissociate from the cortex without crossing into the opposing domain. Our results show that cortical PAR-2 asymmetry is maintained by the local exchange reactions that occur at the cortical-cytoplasmic boundary. Additionally, we demonstrate that local exchange reactions are sufficient to maintain cortical asymmetry in a parameter-free mathematical model. These findings suggest that anterior and posterior PAR proteins primarily interact through the cytoplasmic pool and not via cortical diffusion.

  16. Cortical Polarity of the RING Protein PAR-2 Is Maintained by Exchange Rate Kinetics at the Cortical-Cytoplasmic Boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Yukinobu; Hiroshima, Michio; Pack, Chan-Gi; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Motegi, Fumio; Nakazato, Kenichi; Shindo, Yuki; Wiseman, Paul W; Sawa, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Brandão, Hugo B; Shibata, Tatsuo; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-08-23

    Cell polarity arises through the spatial segregation of polarity regulators. PAR proteins are polarity regulators that localize asymmetrically to two opposing cortical domains. However, it is unclear how the spatially segregated PAR proteins interact to maintain their mutually exclusive partitioning. Here, single-molecule detection analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos reveals that cortical PAR-2 diffuses only short distances, and, as a result, most PAR-2 molecules associate and dissociate from the cortex without crossing into the opposing domain. Our results show that cortical PAR-2 asymmetry is maintained by the local exchange reactions that occur at the cortical-cytoplasmic boundary. Additionally, we demonstrate that local exchange reactions are sufficient to maintain cortical asymmetry in a parameter-free mathematical model. These findings suggest that anterior and posterior PAR proteins primarily interact through the cytoplasmic pool and not via cortical diffusion.

  17. Peptides Regulate Cortical Thymocytes Differentiation, Proliferation, and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kh. Khavinson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis were studied in a cell culture of human cortical thymocytes under the influence of short peptides T-32 (Glu-Asp-Ala and T-38 (Lys-Glu-Asp. Peptides T-32 and T-38 amplified cortical thymocytes differentiation towards regulatory T cells, increased their proliferative activity, and decreased the level of apoptosis. Moreover, peptides under study stimulated proliferative and antiapoptotic activity of the mature regulatory T cells.

  18. Melatonin Sensitizes H1975 Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Harboring a T790M-Targeted Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation to the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Gefitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyong Yun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs to target active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-harbouring mutations has been effective in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, the use of TKIs in NSCLS patients with somatic EGFR mutations, particularly T790M, causes drug resistance. Thus, in the present study, we investigated overcoming resistance against the TKI gefitinib by combination treatment with melatonin in H1975 NSCLC cells harbouring the T790M somatic mutation. Methods: H1975 and HCC827 cells were treated with melatonin in combination with gefitinib, and cell viability, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and EGFR, AKT, p38, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, caspase 3 and Bad protein levels were examined. Results: Treatment with melatonin dose-dependently decreased the viability of H1975 cells harbouring the T790M somatic mutation compared to HCC827 cells with an EGFR active mutation. Melatonin-mediated cell death resulted in decreased phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt, leading to attenuated expression of survival proteins, such as Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin, and activated caspase 3 in H1975 cells, but not in HCC827 cells. However, we did not observe a significant change in expression of cell cycle proteins, such as cyclin D, cyclin A, p21 and CDK4 in H1975 cells. Surprisingly, co-treatment of gefitinib with melatonin effectively decreased the viability of H1975 cells, but not HCC827 cells. Moreover, co-treatment of H1975 cells caused consistent down-regulation of EGFR phosphorylation and induced apoptosis compared to treatment with gefitinib or melatonin alone. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that melatonin acts as a potent chemotherapeutic agent by sensitising to gefitinib TKI-resistant H1975 cells that harbour a EGFR T790M mutation.

  19. Melatonin sensitizes H1975 non-small-cell lung cancer cells harboring a T790M-targeted epidermal growth factor receptor mutation to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Miyong; Kim, Eun-Ok; Lee, Duckgue; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jaekwang; Lee, Hyemin; Lee, Jihyun; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to target active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-harbouring mutations has been effective in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the use of TKIs in NSCLS patients with somatic EGFR mutations, particularly T790M, causes drug resistance. Thus, in the present study, we investigated overcoming resistance against the TKI gefitinib by combination treatment with melatonin in H1975 NSCLC cells harbouring the T790M somatic mutation. H1975 and HCC827 cells were treated with melatonin in combination with gefitinib, and cell viability, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and EGFR, AKT, p38, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, caspase 3 and Bad protein levels were examined. Treatment with melatonin dose-dependently decreased the viability of H1975 cells harbouring the T790M somatic mutation compared to HCC827 cells with an EGFR active mutation. Melatonin-mediated cell death resulted in decreased phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt, leading to attenuated expression of survival proteins, such as Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin, and activated caspase 3 in H1975 cells, but not in HCC827 cells. However, we did not observe a significant change in expression of cell cycle proteins, such as cyclin D, cyclin A, p21 and CDK4 in H1975 cells. Surprisingly, co-treatment of gefitinib with melatonin effectively decreased the viability of H1975 cells, but not HCC827 cells. Moreover, co-treatment of H1975 cells caused consistent down-regulation of EGFR phosphorylation and induced apoptosis compared to treatment with gefitinib or melatonin alone. Our findings demonstrate that melatonin acts as a potent chemotherapeutic agent by sensitising to gefitinib TKI-resistant H1975 cells that harbour a EGFR T790M mutation. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Locus coeruleus stimulation recruits a broad cortical neuronal network and increases cortical perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussay, Xavier; Basu, Kaustuv; Lacoste, Baptiste; Hamel, Edith

    2013-02-20

    The locus coeruleus (LC), the main source of brain noradrenalin (NA), modulates cortical activity, cerebral blood flow (CBF), glucose metabolism, and blood-brain barrier permeability. However, the role of the LC-NA system in the regulation of cortical CBF has remained elusive. This rat study shows that similar proportions (∼20%) of cortical pyramidal cells and GABA interneurons are contacted by LC-NA afferents on their cell soma or proximal dendrites. LC stimulation induced ipsilateral activation (c-Fos upregulation) of pyramidal cells and of a larger proportion (>36%) of interneurons that colocalize parvalbumin, somatostatin, or nitric oxide synthase compared with pyramidal cells expressing cyclooxygenase-2 (22%, p interneurons (16%, p BK, -52%, p < 0.05), and inward-rectifier (Kir, -40%, p < 0.05) K+ channels primarily impaired the hyperemic response. The data demonstrate that LC stimulation recruits a broad network of cortical excitatory and inhibitory neurons resulting in increased cortical activity and that K+ fluxes and EET signaling mediate a large part of the hemodynamic response.

  1. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Thom, M; Ellison, DW; Wilkins, P; Barnes, D; Thompson, PD; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. Background: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  2. Cortical Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Grey-matter abnormalities at the cortical surface and regional brain size were mapped by high-resolution MRI and surface-based, computational image analytical techniques in a group of 27 children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and 46 controls, matched by age and sex, at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  3. Lineage-specific laminar organization of cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Gabriele; Dehorter, Nathalie; Sols, Ignasi; Huang, Z Josh; Maravall, Miguel; Marín, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    In the cerebral cortex, pyramidal cells and interneurons are generated in distant germinal zones, and so the mechanisms that control their precise assembly into specific microcircuits remain an enigma. Here we report that cortical interneurons labeled at the clonal level do not distribute randomly but rather have a strong tendency to cluster in the mouse neocortex. This behavior is common to different classes of interneurons, independently of their origin. Interneuron clusters are typically contained within one or two adjacent cortical layers, are largely formed by isochronically generated neurons and populate specific layers, as revealed by unbiased hierarchical clustering methods. Our results suggest that different progenitor cells give rise to interneurons populating infra- and supragranular cortical layers, which challenges current views of cortical neurogenesis. Thus, specific lineages of cortical interneurons seem to be produced to primarily mirror the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex, rather than its columnar organization.

  4. Meningeal and cortical grey matter pathology in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh Popescu Bogdan F

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although historically considered a disease primarily affecting the white matter of the central nervous system, recent pathological and imaging studies have established that cortical demyelination is common in multiple sclerosis and more extensive than previously appreciated. Subpial, intracortical and leukocortical lesions are the three cortical lesion types described in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices of patients with multiple sclerosis. Cortical demyelination may be the pathological substrate of progression, and an important pathologic correlate of irreversible disability, epilepsy and cognitive impairment. Cortical lesions of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis patients are characterized by a dominant effector cell population of microglia, by the absence of macrophagic and leukocytic inflammatory infiltrates, and may be driven in part by organized meningeal inflammatory infiltrates. Cortical demyelination is also present and common in early MS, is topographically associated with prominent meningeal inflammation and may even precede the appearance of classic white matter plaques in some MS patients. However, the pathology of early cortical lesions is different than that of chronic MS in the sense that early cortical lesions are highly inflammatory, suggesting that neurodegeneration in MS occurs on an inflammatory background and raising interesting questions regarding the role of cortical demyelination and meningeal inflammation in initiating and perpetuating the disease process in early MS.

  5. The changing roles of neurons in the cortical subplate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Friedlander

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons may serve different functions over the course of an organism’s life. Recent evidence suggests that cortical subplate neurons including those that reside in the white matter may perform longitudinal multi-tasking at different stages of development. These cells play a key role in early cortical development in coordinating thalamocortical reciprocal innervation. At later stages of development, they become integrated within the cortical microcircuitry. This type of longitudinal multi-tasking can enhance the capacity for information processing by populations of cells serving different functions over the lifespan. Subplate cells are initially derived when cells from the ventricular zone underlying the cortex migrate to the cortical preplate that is subsequently split by the differentiating neurons of the cortical plate with some neurons locating in the marginal zone and others settling below in the subplate (SP. While the cortical plate neurons form most of the cortical layers (layers 2-6, the marginal zone neurons form layer 1 and the SP neurons become interstitial cells of the white matter as well as forming a compact sublayer along the bottom of layer 6. After serving as transient innervation targets for thalamocortical axons, most of these cells die and layer 4 neurons become innervated by thalamic axons. However, 10-20% survives, remaining into adulthood along the bottom of layer 6 and as a scattered population of interstitial neurons in the white matter. Surviving subplate cells’ axons project throughout the overlying laminae, reaching layer 1 and issuing axon collaterals within white matter and in lower layer 6. This suggests that they participate in local synaptic networks, as well. Moreover, they receive excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs, potentially monitoring outputs from axon collaterals of cortical efferents, from cortical afferents and/or from each other. We explore our understanding of the functional connectivity of

  6. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization is involved in oxidative stress-induced apoptotic cell death in LAMP2-deficient iPSCs-derived cerebral cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheuk-Yiu Law

    2016-03-01

    Our results from cellular fractionation and inhibitor blockade experiments further revealed that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in the LAMP2-deficient cortical neurons was caused by increased abundance of cytosolic cathepsin L. These results suggest the involvement of lysosomal membrane permeabilization in the LAMP2 deficiency associated neural injury.

  7. Narrow harbors. Few joint ventures will find haven in the investment-interest safe harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, G J; Swoboda, J

    1991-12-01

    Investors and potential investors had hoped for meaningful guidance from the safe harbor regulations on appropriate structures for healthcare joint ventures. Unfortunately, the narrowly drawn final investment-interest safe harbor offers relatively little meaningful guidance or protection for the vast majority of such ventures. The Illegal Remuneration Statute (also known as the fraud and abuse statute) was first enacted in 1972 to prohibit members of the healthcare community from exchanging patient referrals for any kind of remuneration. In 1987 Congress instructed the secretary of Health and Human Services to create "safe harbors" for legitimate payment practices that, although they may violate the statute's strict prohibition, will be protected from prosecution. The investment-interest safe harbor has garnered the most attention. It provides two safe harbors, one for investments in large entities and one for investments in small entities. Both safe harbors contain onerous threshold requirements and other restrictions that diminish the usefulness of the safe harbor for all but a very few ventures. In addition, the Office of the Inspector General has created other obstacles to forming and preserving "safe" healthcare business ventures, including a refusal to "grandfather" or create a "safe harbor restructuring period" for existing business arrangements. Because most existing or planned joint ventures do not qualify for the investment-interest safe harbor, investors are forced to make their business decisions on the basis of the same factors used before publication of the safe harbor regulations. Such analysis will continue to focus on factors that demonstrate organizations' intent in making payments to investors as a return on investments.

  8. Electro-acupuncture exerts beneficial effects against cerebral ischemia and promotes the proliferation of neural progenitor cells in the cortical peri-infarct area through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Tao, Jing; Lin, Yukun; Lin, Ruhui; Liu, Weilin; Chen, Lidian

    2015-11-01

    Electro-acupuncture (EA) is a novel therapy based on combining traditional acupuncture with modern electrotherapy, and it is currently being investigated as a treatment for ischemic stroke. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms through which EA regulates the proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the cortical peri‑infarct area after stroke. The neuroprotective effects of EA on ischemic rats were evaluated by determining the neurological deficit scores and cerebral infarct volumes. The proliferation of the NPCs and the activation of the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway in the cortical peri‑infarct area were examined. Our results revealed that EA significantly alleviated neurological deficits, reduced the infarct volume and enhanced NPC proliferation [nestin/glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)‑double positive] in the cortex of rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Moreover, the Wnt1 and β‑catenin mRNA and protein levels were increased, while glycogen synthase kinase‑3 (GSK3) transcription was suppressed by EA. These results suggest that the upregulatory effects of EA on the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway may promote NPC proliferation in the cortical peri-infarct area after stroke, consequently providing a therapeutic effect against cerebral ischemia.

  9. Disorganized Cortical Patches Suggest Prenatal Origin of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 Disorganized cortical patches suggest prenatal origin of autism NIH-funded study shows disrupted cell layering process ... study suggests that brain irregularities in children with autism can be traced back to prenatal development. “While ...

  10. Malformations of cortical development: 3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battal, Bilal; Ince, Selami; Akgun, Veysel; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ozcan, Emrah; Tasar, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development (MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images. PMID:26516429

  11. Malformations of cortical development:3T magnetic resonance imaging features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bilal; Battal; Selami; Ince; Veysel; Akgun; Murat; Kocaoglu; Emrah; Ozcan; Mustafa; Tasar

    2015-01-01

    Malformation of cortical development(MCD) is a term representing an inhomogeneous group of central nervous system abnormalities, referring particularly to embriyological aspect as a consequence of any of the three developmental stages, i.e., cell proliferation, cell migration and cortical organization. These include cotical dysgenesis, microcephaly, polymicrogyria, schizencephaly, lissencephaly, hemimegalencephaly, heterotopia and focal cortical dysplasia. Since magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice that best identifies the structural anomalies of the brain cortex, we aimed to provide a mini review of MCD by using 3T magnetic resonance scanner images.

  12. Next-generation EGFR/HER tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer harboring EGFR mutations: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiaochun Wang,1,2 David Goldstein,3 Philip J Crowe,1,2 Jia-Lin Yang1,2 1Department of Surgery, 2Sarcoma and Nanooncology Group, Adult Cancer Program, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, 3Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs against human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER family have been introduced into the clinic to treat cancers, particularly non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. There have been three generations of the EGFR/HER-TKIs. First-generation EGFR/HER-TKIs, binding competitively and reversibly to the ATP-binding site of the EGFR TK domain, show a significant breakthrough treatment in selected NSCLC patients with activating EGFR mutations (actEGFRm EGFRL858R and EGFRDel19, in terms of safety, efficacy, and quality of life. However, all those responders inevitably develop acquired resistance within 12 months, because of the EGFRT790M mutation, which prevents TKI binding to ATP-pocket of EGFR by steric hindrance. The second-generation EGFR/HER-TKIs were developed to prolong and maintain more potent response as well as overcome the resistance to the first-generation EGFR/HER-TKIs. They are different from the first-generation EGFR/HER-TKIs by covalently binding to the ATP-binding site, irreversibly blocking enzymatic activation, and targeting EGFR/HER family members, including EGFR, HER2, and HER4. Preclinically, these compounds inhibit the enzymatic activation for actEGFRm, EGFRT790M, and wtEGFR. The second-generation EGFR/HER-TKIs improve overall survival in cancer patients with actEGFRm in a modest way. However, they are not clinically active in overcoming EGFRT790M resistance, mainly because of dose-limiting toxicity due to simultaneous inhibition against wtEGFR. The third-generation EGFR/HER-TKIs selectively and irreversibly target EGFRT790M and actEGFRm while sparing wtEGFR. They yield

  13. [Posterior cortical atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyga, Volker Moræus; Western, Elin; Solheim, Hanne; Hassel, Bjørnar; Kerty, Emilia

    2015-06-02

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a neurodegenerative condition with atrophy of posterior parts of the cerebral cortex, including the visual cortex and parts of the parietal and temporal cortices. It presents early, in the 50s or 60s, with nonspecific visual disturbances that are often misinterpreted as ophthalmological, which can delay the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to present current knowledge about symptoms, diagnostics and treatment of this condition. The review is based on a selection of relevant articles in PubMed and on the authors' own experience with the patient group. Posterior cortical atrophy causes gradually increasing impairment in reading, distance judgement, and the ability to perceive complex images. Examination of higher visual functions, neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging contribute to diagnosis. In the early stages, patients do not have problems with memory or insight, but cognitive impairment and dementia can develop. It is unclear whether the condition is a variant of Alzheimer's disease, or whether it is a separate disease entity. There is no established treatment, but practical measures such as the aid of social care workers, telephones with large keypads, computers with voice recognition software and audiobooks can be useful. Currently available treatment has very limited effect on the disease itself. Nevertheless it is important to identify and diagnose the condition in its early stages in order to be able to offer patients practical assistance in their daily lives.

  14. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    Volume 55 of the Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology is dedicated to the study of the brain. The symposium was subdivided into four major sections. Papers were presented in Molecular Mechanisms for Signalling; Neural Development; Sensory and Motor Systems; and Cognitive Neuroscience. Individual papers from the symposium are abstracted separately. (MHB)

  15. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This volume contains the second part of the proceedings of the 53rd Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. This years topic was Immune Recognition. This volume, part 2, contains papers prepared by presenters for two sessions entitled Signals for Lymphocyte Activation, Proliferation, and Adhesion, and entitled Tolerance and Self Recognition. (DT)

  16. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S ONLINE... provide the same or greater protections for children as those contained in §§ 312.2 through 312.9; (2)...

  17. Neuregulin 3 Mediates Cortical Plate Invasion and Laminar Allocation of GABAergic Interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Bartolini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits in the cerebral cortex consist of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons. These two main classes of cortical neurons follow largely different genetic programs, yet they assemble into highly specialized circuits during development following a very precise choreography. Previous studies have shown that signals produced by pyramidal cells influence the migration of cortical interneurons, but the molecular nature of these factors has remained elusive. Here, we identified Neuregulin 3 (Nrg3 as a chemoattractive factor expressed by developing pyramidal cells that guides the allocation of cortical interneurons in the developing cortical plate. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that Nrg3 modulates the migration of interneurons into the cortical plate in a process that is dependent on the tyrosine kinase receptor ErbB4. Perturbation of Nrg3 signaling in conditional mutants leads to abnormal lamination of cortical interneurons. Nrg3 is therefore a critical mediator in the assembly of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  18. Somatostatin-expressing inhibitory interneurons in cortical circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Yavorska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical layers. Through these disinhibitory circuits, SOM cells help encode the behavioral relevance of sensory stimuli by regulating the activity of cortical neurons based on subcortical and intracortical modulatory input. Associative learning leads to long-term changes in the strength of connectivity of SOM cells with other neurons, often influencing the strength of inhibitory input they receive. Thus despite their heterogeneity and variability across cortical areas, current evidence shows that SOM neurons perform unique neural computations, forming not only distinct molecular but also functional subclasses of cortical inhibitory interneurons.

  19. Akutan, Alaska bottomfish harbor study feasibility stage: Planning aid report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Six alternatives are presently being studied by the Corps of Engineers, in conjunction with facilitating construction of a bottomfish harbor at Akutan Harbor located...

  20. Aerial Survey Units for Harbor Seals in Coastal Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys of coastal Alaska are the primary method for estimating abundance of harbor seals. A particular challenge associated with aerial surveys of harbor...

  1. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  2. Effects of polar cortical cytoskeleton and unbalanced cortical surface tension on intercellular bridge thinning during cytokinesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Mei-Wen An; Xiao-Na Li; Fang Yang; Yang Liu

    2011-01-01

    To probe the contributions of polar cortical cytoskeleton and the surface tension of daughter cells to intercellular bridgethinning dynamics during cytokinesis,we applied cytochalasin D (CD) or colchicine (COLC) in a highly localized manner to polar regions of dividing normal rat kidney (NRK) cells.We observed cellular morphological changes and analyzed the intercellular bridge thinning trajectories of dividing cells with different polar cortical characteristics.Global blebbistatin (BS) application was used to obtain cells losing active contractile force groups.Our results show that locally released CD or colchicine at the polar region caused inhibition of cytokinesis before ingression.Similar treatment at phases after ingression allowed completion of cytokinesis but dramatically influenced the trajectories of intercellular bridge thinning.Disturbing single polar cortical actin induced transformation of the intercellular bridge thinning process,and polar cortical tension controlled deformation time of intercellular bridges.Our study provides a feasible framework to induce and analyze the effects of local changes in mechanical properties of cellular components on single cellular cytokinesis.

  3. Monocytes harboring cytomegalovirus: interactions with endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Possible mechanisms for activating virus delivered by monocytes to sites of vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guetta, E; Guetta, V; Shibutani, T; Epstein, S E

    1997-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and its periodic reactivation from latency may contribute to atherogenesis and restenosis. It is unknown how CMV is delivered to the vessel wall and is reactivated. We examined the following hypothesis: CMV, present in monocytes recruited to sites of vascular injury, is activated by endothelial cell (EC) or smooth muscle cell (SMC) contact and by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs). The CMV major immediate-early promoter (MIEP) controls immediate-early (IE) gene expression, and thereby viral replication. To determine whether elements of the vessel wall can activate CMV present in monocytes, we transiently transfected the promonocytic cell line HL-60 with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene construct driven by MIEP. MIEP activity increased 1.7 +/- 0.5-fold (P = .02) when the transfected HL-60 cells were cocultured with ECs, 4.5 +/- 1.5-fold when cocultured with SMCs (P = .03), and 2.0 +/- 0.5-fold (P = .01) when exposed to oxLDL. The combination of oxLDL and EC coculture increased MIEP activity over 7-fold. We also found that freshly isolated human monocytes, infected with endothelium-passaged CMV, were capable of transmitting infectious virus to cocultured ECs or SMCs. CMV-related progression of atherosclerosis or restenosis may, at least in part, involve monocyte delivery of the virus to the site of vascular injury, where the vascular milieu, ie, contact with ECs, SMCs, and oxLDL, can contribute to viral reactivation and/or replication by enhancing CMV IE gene expression. The virus may then infect neighboring ECs or SMCs, initiating a cascade of events predisposing to the development of atherogenesis-related processes.

  4. Malformations of cortical development and neocortical focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Kilb, Werner; Clusmann, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Developmental neocortical malformations resulting from abnormal neurogenesis, disturbances in programmed cell death, or neuronal migration disorders may cause a long-term hyperexcitability. Early generated Cajal-Retzius and subplate neurons play important roles in transient cortical circuits, and structural/functional disorders in early cortical development may induce persistent network disturbances and epileptic disorders. In particular, depolarizing GABAergic responses are important for the regulation of neurodevelopmental events, like neurogenesis or migration, while pathophysiological alterations in chloride homeostasis may cause epileptic activity. Although modern imaging techniques may provide an estimate of the structural lesion, the site and extent of the cortical malformation may not correlate with the epileptogenic zone. The neocortical focus may be surrounded by widespread molecular, structural, and functional disturbances, which are difficult to recognize with imaging technologies. However, modern imaging and electrophysiological techniques enable focused hypotheses of the neocortical epileptogenic zone, thus allowing more specific epilepsy surgery. Focal cortical malformation can be successfully removed with minimal rim, close to or even within eloquent cortex with a promising risk-benefit ratio.

  5. Remembering Pearl Harbor at 75 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehr, Patricia; Sopcheck, Janet; Milbrath, Gwyneth

    2016-12-01

    : On December 7, 1941, the Sunday-morning quiet of the U.S. naval base in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, was shattered by dive-bombing Japanese fighter planes. The planes came in two waves-and when it was all over, more than 2,400 were killed and more than 1,100 were injured.Nurses were stationed at U.S. Naval Hospital Pearl Harbor, Tripler General Hospital (now Tripler Army Medical Center), Hickam Field Hospital, Schofield Barracks Station Hospital, and aboard the USS Solace, and witnessed the devastation. But they also did what nurses do in emergencies-they responded and provided care to those in need. Here are the stories of a few of those nurses.

  6. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander, U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is responsible for prescribing and enforcing such rules and...

  7. 78 FR 75207 - National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9068 of December 5, 2013 National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2013 By the... resolve. On National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, we honor the men and women who selflessly sacrificed... forces of tyranny and oppression in the Second World War. In remembrance of Pearl Harbor and to...

  8. 75 FR 76613 - National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8614 of December 7, 2010 National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2010 By the... service members and civilians awoke on a quiet Sunday to a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor by Japanese... lives lost were forever seared into our national memory. The deadly attack on Pearl Harbor did...

  9. Teaching about Pearl Harbor. Curriculum Enhancement Series #1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Anna Marshall

    These materials consist of sample lesson plans for teaching about the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, in both U.S. and world history classes. The lesson plans challenge students to examine how current attitudes toward the Japanese may be rooted in World War II and Pearl Harbor. Selected bibliographies on Pearl Harbor, World…

  10. Gulfport Harbor, Mississippi. Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    the finback whale (Balaenoptera physalus), humpback whale ( Megaptera novaeangliae ), sei whale (B. borealis), green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas...Environmental Policy Act, as amended, 42 USC 4321, et seq. Rivers and Harbors Act, 33 USC 401 et seq. Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act, 16...USC 1001, et seq. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, as amended, 16 USC 1271, et seq. Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act

  11. UP states protect ongoing cortical activity from thalamic inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendon O Watson

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vitro and in vivo fluctuate spontaneously between two stable membrane potentials: a depolarized UP state and a hyperpolarized DOWN state. UP states temporally correspond with multineuronal firing sequences which may be important for information processing. To examine how thalamic inputs interact with ongoing cortical UP state activity, we used calcium imaging and targeted whole-cell recordings of activated neurons in thalamocortical slices of mouse somatosensory cortex. Whereas thalamic stimulation during DOWN states generated multineuronal, synchronized UP states, identical stimulation during UP states had no effect on the subthreshold membrane dynamics of the vast majority of cells or on ongoing multineuronal temporal patterns. Both thalamocortical and corticocortical PSPs were significantly reduced and neuronal input resistance was significantly decreased during cortical UP states -- mechanistically consistent with UP state insensitivity. Our results demonstrate that cortical dynamics during UP states are insensitive to thalamic inputs.

  12. Disorganization of cortical microtubules stimulates tangential expansion and reduces the uniformity of cellulose microfibril alignment among cells in the root of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Tobias I; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Judy-March, Jan E; Marga, Françoise

    2004-08-01

    To test the role of cortical microtubules in aligning cellulose microfibrils and controlling anisotropic expansion, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana roots to moderate levels of the microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin. After 2 d of treatment, roots grow at approximately steady state. At that time, the spatial profiles of relative expansion rate in length and diameter were quantified, and roots were cryofixed, freeze-substituted, embedded in plastic, and sectioned. The angular distribution of microtubules as a function of distance from the tip was quantified from antitubulin immunofluorescence images. In alternate sections, the overall amount of alignment among microfibrils and their mean orientation as a function of position was quantified with polarized-light microscopy. The spatial profiles of relative expansion show that the drug affects relative elongation and tangential expansion rates independently. The microtubule distributions averaged to transverse in the growth zone for all treatments, but on oryzalin the distributions became broad, indicating poorly organized arrays. At a subcellular scale, cellulose microfibrils in oryzalin-treated roots were as well aligned as in controls; however, the mean alignment direction, while consistently transverse in the controls, was increasingly variable with oryzalin concentration, meaning that microfibril orientation in one location tended to differ from that of a neighboring location. This conclusion was confirmed by direct observations of microfibrils with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, these results suggest that cortical microtubules ensure microfibrils are aligned consistently across the organ, thereby endowing the organ with a uniform mechanical structure.

  13. Disorganization of Cortical Microtubules Stimulates Tangential Expansion and Reduces the Uniformity of Cellulose Microfibril Alignment among Cells in the Root of Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Tobias I.; Beemster, Gerrit T.S.; Judy-March, Jan E.; Marga, Françoise

    2004-01-01

    To test the role of cortical microtubules in aligning cellulose microfibrils and controlling anisotropic expansion, we exposed Arabidopsis thaliana roots to moderate levels of the microtubule inhibitor, oryzalin. After 2 d of treatment, roots grow at approximately steady state. At that time, the spatial profiles of relative expansion rate in length and diameter were quantified, and roots were cryofixed, freeze-substituted, embedded in plastic, and sectioned. The angular distribution of microtubules as a function of distance from the tip was quantified from antitubulin immunofluorescence images. In alternate sections, the overall amount of alignment among microfibrils and their mean orientation as a function of position was quantified with polarized-light microscopy. The spatial profiles of relative expansion show that the drug affects relative elongation and tangential expansion rates independently. The microtubule distributions averaged to transverse in the growth zone for all treatments, but on oryzalin the distributions became broad, indicating poorly organized arrays. At a subcellular scale, cellulose microfibrils in oryzalin-treated roots were as well aligned as in controls; however, the mean alignment direction, while consistently transverse in the controls, was increasingly variable with oryzalin concentration, meaning that microfibril orientation in one location tended to differ from that of a neighboring location. This conclusion was confirmed by direct observations of microfibrils with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Taken together, these results suggest that cortical microtubules ensure microfibrils are aligned consistently across the organ, thereby endowing the organ with a uniform mechanical structure. PMID:15299138

  14. Lateral Entorhinal Modulation of Piriform Cortical Activity and Fine Odor Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Chapuis, Julie; Cohen, Yaniv; He, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zhijan; Jin, Sen; Xu, Fuqiang; Wilson, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    The lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) receives direct input from olfactory bulb mitral cells and piriform cortical pyramidal cells and is the gateway for olfactory input to the hippocampus. However, the LEC also projects back to the piriform cortex and olfactory bulb. Activity in the LEC is shaped by input from the perirhinal cortices, hippocampus, and amygdala, and thus could provide a rich contextual modulation of cortical odor processing. The present study further explored LEC feedback to an...

  15. Evaluating mandibular cortical index quantitatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Fusun; Akgunlu, Faruk

    2008-10-01

    The aim was to assess whether Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity analysis can discriminate patients having different mandibular cortical shape. Panoramic radiographs of 52 patients were evaluated for mandibular cortical index. Weighted Kappa between the observations were varying between 0.718-0.805. These radiographs were scanned and converted to binary images. Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity were calculated from the regions where best represents the cortical morphology. It was found that there were statistically significant difference between the Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 1 and Cl 2 (Fractal Dimension P:0.000; Lacunarity P:0.003); and Cl 1 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:0.008; Lacunarity P:0.001); but there was no statistically significant difference between Fractal Dimension and Lacunarity of radiographs which were classified as having Cl 2 and Cl 3 cortical morphology (Fractal Dimension P:1.000; Lacunarity P:0.758). FD and L can differentiate Cl 1 mandibular cortical shape from both Cl 2 and Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape but cannot differentiate Cl 2 from Cl 3 mandibular cortical shape on panoramic radiographs.

  16. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per E Roland

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available IIn principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG, and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review.

  17. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume 54, Immunological recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This volume contains the first part of the proceeding of the 53rd Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. This years topic was Immune Recognition. Part 1, this volume, contains papers prepared by presenters of the sessions entitled Introduction, Lymphocyte Development and Receptor Selection, and Recognition by Antibodies, Antigen Recognition by T cells. (DT)

  18. Modeling cortical circuits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  19. Cortical and spinal assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, I W; Gram, Mikkel; Hansen, T M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standardized objective methods to assess the analgesic effects of opioids, enable identification of underlying mechanisms of drug actions in the central nervous system. Opioids may exert their effect on both cortical and spinal levels. In this study actions of morphine at both levels...... subjects was included in the data analysis. There was no change in the activity in resting EEG (P>0.05) after morphine administration as compared to placebo. During cold pressor stimulation, morphine significantly lowered the relative activity in the delta (1-4Hz) band (P=0.03) and increased the activity...... morphine administration (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Cold pressor EEG and the nociceptive reflex were more sensitive to morphine analgesia than resting EEG and can be used as standardized objective methods to assess opioid effects. However, no correlation between the analgesic effect of morphine on the spinal...

  20. Hiperostosis cortical infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina; Orelvis Pérez Duerto

    2015-01-01

    La enfermedad de Caffey, o hiperostosis cortical infantil, es una rara enfermedad ósea autolimitada, que aparece de preferencia en lactantes con signos inespecíficos sistémicos; el más relevante es la reacción subperióstica e hiperostosis en varios huesos del cuerpo, con predilección en el 75-80 % de los casos por la mandíbula. Su pronóstico es bueno, la mayoría no deja secuelas. El propósito del presente trabajo es describir las características clínicas, presentes en un lactante de cinco mes...

  1. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  2. Cortical plasticity and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moucha, Raluca; Kilgard, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    The brain is constantly adapting to environmental and endogenous changes (including injury) that occur at every stage of life. The mechanisms that regulate neural plasticity have been refined over millions of years. Motivation and sensory experience directly shape the rewiring that makes learning and neurological recovery possible. Guiding neural reorganization in a manner that facilitates recovery of function is a primary goal of neurological rehabilitation. As the rules that govern neural plasticity become better understood, it will be possible to manipulate the sensory and motor experience of patients to induce specific forms of plasticity. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding factors that regulate cortical plasticity, illustrates specific forms of reorganization induced by control of each factor, and suggests how to exploit these factors for clinical benefit.

  3. Zic deficiency in the cortical marginal zone and meninges results in cortical lamination defects resembling those in type II lissencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Masaharu; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Aruga, Jun

    2008-04-30

    The formation of the highly organized cortical structure depends on the production and correct placement of the appropriate number and types of neurons. The Zic family of zinc-finger transcription factors plays essential roles in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitors in the medial forebrain and the cerebellum. Examination of the expression of Zic genes demonstrated that Zic1, Zic2, and Zic3 were expressed by the progenitor cells in the septum and cortical hem, the sites of generation of the Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells. Immunohistochemical studies have revealed that Zic proteins were abundantly expressed in the meningeal cells and that the majority of the CR cells distributed in the medial and dorsal cortex also expressed Zic proteins in the mid-late embryonic and postnatal cortical marginal zones. During embryonic cortical development, Zic1/Zic3 double-mutant and hypomorphic Zic2 mutant mice showed a reduction in the number of CR cells in the rostral cortex, whereas the cell number remained unaffected in the caudal cortex. These mutants also showed mislocalization of the CR cells and cortical lamination defects, resembling the changes noted in type II (cobblestone) lissencephaly, throughout the brain. In the Zic1/3 mutant, reduced proliferation of the meningeal cells was observed before the thinner and disrupted organization of the pial basement membrane (BM) with reduced expression of the BM components and the meningeal cell-derived secretory factor. These defects correlated with the changes in the end feet morphology of the radial glial cells. These findings indicate that the Zic genes play critical roles in cortical development through regulating the proliferation of meningeal cells and the pial BM assembly.

  4. Re-recognition of treatments in patients of non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR-TKI resistance%非小细胞肺癌EGFR-TKI耐药治疗策略再认识∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何圆(综述); 尤长宣(审校)

    2015-01-01

    Globally, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer⁃related death with high morbidity, mortality and poor prognosis. The epidermal growth factor receptor⁃tyrosine kinase inhibitor( EGFR⁃TKI) , a means of molecularly targeted therapy, offers a novel ap⁃proach for the treatment of patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR mutation effectively. However, the problem of EGFR⁃TKI resistance ex⁃ists inevitably. A number of promising strategies based on different mechanisms have now been evaluated in phaseⅠ/Ⅱtrials. These in⁃clude EGFR⁃TKI discontinuation, EGFR⁃TKI continuing, EGFR⁃TKI+local treatment, EGFR+other molecularly targeted drugs, EGFR⁃TKI+chemotherapy, EGFR⁃TKI rechallenge, chemotherapy, chemotherapy+other molecularly targeted drugs and EGFR⁃TKI+immunother⁃apy. The purpose of this paper will draw a summary on the progress of treatments in patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR⁃TKI resistance.%肺癌是全球范围内首位癌性死亡因素,发病率、死亡率高,预后欠佳。作为一种分子靶向治疗手段,表皮生长因子酪氨酸激酶抑制剂(EGFR⁃TKI)为EGFR突变的非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)患者提供了一个新的治疗方向,且疗效显著,然而不可避免的是EGFR⁃TKI耐药问题。鉴于Ⅰ/Ⅱ期临床试验结果,目前有关EGFR⁃TKI耐药治疗策略包括:EGFR⁃TKI停药、继续EGFR⁃TKI、EGFR⁃TKI+局部治疗、EGFR⁃TKI+化疗、EGFR+其他分子靶向药物治疗、EGFR⁃TKI再尝试、化疗、化疗+其他分子靶向药物治疗、EGFR⁃TKI+免疫治疗等,前景值得期待。本文就当前NSCLC患者EGFR⁃TKI耐药治疗进展作一综述。

  5. Extensive cortical involvement in leptomeningeal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayzenberg, I; Börnke, C; Tönnes, C; Ziebarth, W; Lavrov, A; Lukas, C

    2012-12-01

    We present a 77-year-old previously well patient with facial asymmetry and progressive weakness of the lower extremities. An initial MRI revealed slight contrast enhancement of the meninges. Three consecutive cerebrospinal fluid examinations demonstrated low glucose concentration, marked elevation of total protein and moderate pleocytosis. No tumor cells, fungi, acid-fast bacilli or mycobacterial DNA were found. The patient's level of consciousness deteriorated dramatically, and follow-up MRI showed widespread extensive cortical hyperintensities. The lesions showed restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted images as well as low values on the corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient maps, the changes consistent with diffuse cytotoxic edema. Neuropathological examination findings were of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) with diffuse continuous infiltration of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and spinal cord. The autopsy revealed a subcentimetre adenocarcinoma of the lung. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating extensive cortical involvement in adenocarcinomatous LMC.

  6. Wild snakes harbor West Nile virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Dahlin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV has a complex eco-epidemiology with birds acting as reservoirs and hosts for the virus. Less well understood is the role of reptiles, especially in wild populations. The goal of our study was to determine whether a wild population of snakes in Pennsylvania harbored WNV. Six species of snakes were orally sampled in the summer of 2013 and were tested for the presence of WNV viral RNA using RT-PCR. Two Eastern Garter Snakes, Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis tested positive for viral RNA (2/123, 1.62%. These results indicate a possible role for snakes in the complex transmission cycle of WNV.

  7. Stearic acid protects primary cultured cortical neurons against oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-jian WANG; Cui-ling LIANG; Guang-mei LI; Cai-yi YU; Ming YIN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effects of stearic acid against oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. Methods: Cortical neurons were exposed to glutamate,hydrogen peroxide (H202), or NaN3 insult in the presence or absence of stearic acid. Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by MTT assay and LDH release. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes activity[superoxide dismutases (SOD),glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation in cultured cortical neurons were evaluated using commercial kits. {3-[1(p-chloro-benzyl)-5-(isopropyl)-3-t-butylthiondol-2-yl]-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid, Na}[MK886; 5 pmol/L; a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR)α], bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; 100 μmol/L; an antagonist of PPARγ), and cycloheximide (CHX; 30 μmol/L, an inhibitor of protein synthesis)were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by stearic acid.Western blotting was used to determine the PPARγ protein level in cortical neurons.Results: Stearic acid dose-dependently protected cortical neurons against glutamate or H202 injury and increased glutamate uptake in cultured neurons.This protection was concomitant to the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and to the promotion activity of Cu/Zn SOD and CAT in cultured cortical neurons. Its neuroprotective effects were completely blocked by BADGE and CHX. After incubation with H2O2 for 24 h, the expression of the PPARγ protein decreased significantly (P<0.05), and the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on the expression of PPARγ can be attenuated by stearic acid. Conclusion: Stearic acid can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by boosting the internal antioxidant enzymes.Its neuroprotective effect may be mainly mediated by the activation of PPARγ and new protein synthesis in cortical neurons.

  8. Acute phencyclidine administration induces c-Fos-immunoreactivity in interneurons in cortical and subcortical regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervig, Mona E.; Thomsen, Morten S; Kalló, Imre;

    2016-01-01

    ) field of hippocampus and mediodorsal thalamus (MD); (2) PV-IR cells in the ventrolateral orbitofrontal and retrosplenial cortices and CA1 field of hippocampus; and (3) CB-IR cells in the motor cortex. Overall, our data indicate that PCP activates a wide range of cortical and subcortical brain regions...

  9. Assortment of GABAergic plasticity in the cortical interneuron melting pot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Pablo; Bacci, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Cortical structures of the adult mammalian brain are characterized by a spectacular diversity of inhibitory interneurons, which use GABA as neurotransmitter. GABAergic neurotransmission is fundamental for integrating and filtering incoming information and dictating postsynaptic neuronal spike timing, therefore providing a tight temporal code used by each neuron, or ensemble of neurons, to perform sophisticated computational operations. However, the heterogeneity of cortical GABAergic cells is associated to equally diverse properties governing intrinsic excitability as well as strength, dynamic range, spatial extent, anatomical localization, and molecular components of inhibitory synaptic connections that they form with pyramidal neurons. Recent studies showed that similarly to their excitatory (glutamatergic) counterparts, also inhibitory synapses can undergo activity-dependent changes in their strength. Here, some aspects related to plasticity and modulation of adult cortical and hippocampal GABAergic synaptic transmission will be reviewed, aiming at providing a fresh perspective towards the elucidation of the role played by specific cellular elements of cortical microcircuits during both physiological and pathological operations.

  10. Electrochemical Oxidation of PAHs in Water from Harbor Sediment Purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muff, Jens; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    to contamination by PAH, heavy metals, TBT etc. In Denmark, contaminated harbor sediment is pumped ashore to inland lakes or upland sites where treatment of the runoff water is required before discharge to the recipient. In this study, electrochemical oxidation (EO) has been investigated as a method for treatment...... of the discharge water addressing primarily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are by-products of incomplete combustion of organic materials with recalcitrant and strong mutagenic/carcinogenic properties, due to their benzene analogue structures. PAHs are hydrophobic compounds and their persistence...... in the environment is mainly due to their low water solubility. The experimental study was performed in laboratory scale with volumes of water from 3 to 10 L in a batch recirculation experimental setup at constant temperature with a commercial one-compartment cell of tubular design with Ti/Pt90-Ir10 anode (60 cm2...

  11. Numerical study of transient nonlinear harbor resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    It is generally accepted that nonlinear wave-wave interactions play an important role in harbor resonance. Nevertheless it is not clear how waves take part in those interactions. The aim of this paper is to investigate those processes for a rectangular harbor at transient phases. Long-period oscillations excited by bichromatic waves are simulated by the Boussinesq model. The simulations start from calm conditions for the purpose of studying the response process. The internal wavemaker stops working after the oscillations have reached a quasi-steady state, and it is used to simulate the damp process. In order to analyze temporary features of wave-wave interactions in different states, the wavelet-based bispectrum is employed. The influence of the short wave frequencies on long-period oscillations is investigated, and reasons are tried to be given from nonlinear triad interactions between different wave components and the interaction of short waves and the bay entrance. Finally, the response time and the damp time are estimated by a simple method.

  12. A Mouse Model for Conditional Secretion of Specific Single-Chain Antibodies Provides Genetic Evidence for Regulation of Cortical Plasticity by a Non-cell Autonomous Homeoprotein Transcription Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During postnatal life the cerebral cortex passes through critical periods of plasticity allowing its physiological adaptation to the environment. In the visual cortex, critical period onset and closure are influenced by the non-cell autonomous activity of the Otx2 homeoprotein transcription factor, which regulates the maturation of parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons (PV cells. In adult mice, the maintenance of a non-plastic adult state requires continuous Otx2 import by PV cells. An important source of extra-cortical Otx2 is the choroid plexus, which secretes Otx2 into the cerebrospinal fluid. Otx2 secretion and internalization requires two small peptidic domains that are part of the DNA-binding domain. Thus, mutating these "transfer" sequences also modifies cell autonomous transcription, precluding this approach to obtain a cell autonomous-only mouse. Here, we develop a mouse model with inducible secretion of an anti-Otx2 single-chain antibody to trap Otx2 in the extracellular milieu. Postnatal secretion of this single-chain antibody by PV cells delays PV maturation and reduces plasticity gene expression. Induced adult expression of this single-chain antibody in cerebrospinal fluid decreases Otx2 internalization by PV cells, strongly induces plasticity gene expression and reopens physiological plasticity. We provide the first mammalian genetic evidence for a signaling mechanism involving intercellular transfer of a homeoprotein transcription factor. Our single-chain antibody mouse model is a valid strategy for extracellular neutralization that could be applied to other homeoproteins and signaling molecules within and beyond the nervous system.

  13. Boussinesq Modeling for Inlets, Harbors, and Structures (Bouss-2D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    2). BMT provides key engineering estimates for storms and non-storm waves, wave setup and wave-induced currents necessary for a risk-based design...Mississippi River Gulf Outlet, New Orleans Flood Control Gates, LA; Buffalo Harbor, NY; Tau Harbor, and Faleasao Harbor, American Samoa. BMT helps...innovative infrastructures design; probabilistic engineering design and rehabilitation estimates for jetties, breakwaters for coastal protection

  14. Assessment of Modifications for Improving Navigation at Hilo Harbor, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    of the harbor. A low- frequency surge problem occurs in the interior harbor, caused by waves that reach Piers 1 and 2. According to ship captains...present near the piers and at ADCP1. The amplitude and frequency of IG waves appeared to be more sensitive to dampers assigned to land boundaries...Results also showed the existence of wave energy in low frequencies near the harbor entrance far from the piers where the surge problem has been

  15. Economic Impact of Cruise Ship Passengers in Bar Harbor, Maine

    OpenAIRE

    Gabe, Todd; Lynch, Colleen; McConnon, James; Allen, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    This report examines the economic impact of cruise ship passengers in Bar Harbor, Maine. In 2002, 64 cruise ships docked in Bar Harbor carrying about 120,000 passengers and crewmembers. The analysis presented in the report is based on 1,080 passenger surveys conducted between August and October of 2002. Economic impact figures are based on a total of 97,190 passengers, which is the capacity of the 64 cruise ships that were scheduled to visit Bar Harbor in 2002.

  16. Focal cortical dysplasia – review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults. Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed – from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized. Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe. Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes. New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life. Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias. The most common findings on MRI imaging include: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also

  17. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  18. A STUDY OF MARINE FOULING IN MONTEREY HARBOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PIERS, *FOULING, *HARBORS, *MARINE BIOLOGY, CALIFORNIA, PACIFIC OCEAN, NAVAL RESEARCH, CRUSTACEA, ANIMALS, PERIODIC VARIATIONS, ENVIRONMENTAL TESTS, TIME, DISTRIBUTION, SEA WATER, PLATYHELMINTHES , OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA.

  19. Submarine harbor navigation using image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubberud, Stephen C.; Kramer, Kathleen A.

    2017-01-01

    The process of ingress and egress of a United States Navy submarine is a human-intensive process that takes numerous individuals to monitor locations and for hazards. Sailors pass vocal information to bridge where it is processed manually. There is interest in using video imaging of the periscope view to more automatically provide navigation within harbors and other points of ingress and egress. In this paper, video-based navigation is examined as a target-tracking problem. While some image-processing methods claim to provide range information, the moving platform problem and weather concerns, such as fog, reduce the effectiveness of these range estimates. The video-navigation problem then becomes an angle-only tracking problem. Angle-only tracking is known to be fraught with difficulties, due to the fact that the unobservable space is not the null space. When using a Kalman filter estimator to perform the tracking, significant errors arise which could endanger the submarine. This work analyzes the performance of the Kalman filter when angle-only measurements are used to provide the target tracks. This paper addresses estimation unobservability and the minimal set of requirements that are needed to address it in this complex but real-world problem. Three major issues are addressed: the knowledge of navigation beacons/landmarks' locations, the minimal number of these beacons needed to maintain the course, and update rates of the angles of the landmarks as the periscope rotates and landmarks become obscured due to blockage and weather. The goal is to address the problem of navigation to and from the docks, while maintaining the traversing of the harbor channel based on maritime rules relying solely on the image-based data. The minimal number of beacons will be considered. For this effort, the image correlation from frame to frame is assumed to be achieved perfectly. Variation in the update rates and the dropping of data due to rotation and obscuration is considered

  20. Is the Cortical Deficit in Amblyopia Due to Reduced Cortical Magnification, Loss of Neural Resolution, or Neural Disorganization?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clavagnier, Simon; Dumoulin, S.O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314406514; Hess, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    The neural basis of amblyopia is a matter of debate. The following possibilities have been suggested: loss of foveal cells, reduced cortical magnification, loss of spatial resolution of foveal cells, and topographical disarray in the cellular map. To resolve this we undertook a population receptive

  1. Is the Cortical Deficit in Amblyopia Due to Reduced Cortical Magnification, Loss of Neural Resolution, or Neural Disorganization?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clavagnier, Simon; Dumoulin, S.O.; Hess, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    The neural basis of amblyopia is a matter of debate. The following possibilities have been suggested: loss of foveal cells, reduced cortical magnification, loss of spatial resolution of foveal cells, and topographical disarray in the cellular map. To resolve this we undertook a population receptive

  2. 腺病毒介导蜂毒素基因转染对HepG2细胞生长及AFP表达的影响%Effect of recombinant adenovirus harboring melittin gene on growth of HepG2 cells and AFP expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李绍祥; 文军慧; 凌昌全

    2004-01-01

    目的:将蜂毒素基因置于甲胎蛋白(AFP)转录调控元件(rAFP)驱动之下,构件重组腺病毒载体,观察蜂毒素基因转染对肝癌细胞生长及AFP表达的影响.方法::将蜂毒素基因置于rAFP之后,用细菌内高效同源重组法将目的基因重组入腺病毒质粒中,将腺病毒质粒用PacⅠ酶切线性化后,用脂质体介导转染293细胞进行腺病毒的包装.携有蜂毒素基因的腺病毒感染肝癌细胞后,RT-PCR实验观察蜂毒素基因是否发生转录;MTT法测定蜂毒素基因转染对肝癌细胞增殖的影响;ELISA双抗体夹心法定量检测AFP.结果:RT-PCR实验表明蜂毒素基因转染肝癌细胞后可以被转录;蜂毒素基因在rAFP的控制下,可以特异性的抑制AFP阳性肝癌细胞的增殖,并降低其AFP的生成量.结论:蜂毒素基因转染对肝癌细胞的生长及AFP的表达具有抑制作用,可降低其恶性度.%Objective:To construct recombinant adenovirus harboring melittin gene under the control of AFP transcription regulatory element rAFP,and to observe its tumor inhibition effects in vitro as well as its effect on AFP expression in hepatocarcinoma cells.Methods:Melittin gene was driven by rAFP.The gene of interest was cloned into adenoviral backbone plasmid through a new simplified bacterial homologous recombinant system,then the recombinant adenoviral plasmids were linearized with PacⅠand then were used to transfect 293 cells (mediated by lipofectin) for generation of the desired recombinant adenoviruses.The resultant viruses harboring melittin gene was used to infect the AFP-positive HepG2 cells. Transcription of melittin gene was verified by RT-PCR,and its proliferation inhibition effect was observed by MTT assay. AFP was measured by ELISA double antibody sandwiched method.Results:Recombinant adenoviruses harboring melittin gene were successfully constructed and transfect hepatocarcinoma cells,and melittin gene was transcripted.Under the control of r

  3. Comparative aspects of cortical neurogenesis in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Amanda F P; Pollen, Alexander A; Tavare, Aniket; DeProto, Jamin; Molnár, Zoltán

    2007-08-01

    The mammalian neocortex consists of six layers. By contrast, the reptilian and avian cortices have only three, which are believed to be equivalent to layers I, V and VI of mammals. In mammals, the majority of cortical cell proliferation occurs in the ventricular and subventricular zones, but there are a small number of scattered individual divisions throughout the cortex. Neurogenesis in the cortical subventricular zone is believed to contribute to the supragranular layers. To estimate the proportions of different forms of divisions in reptiles and birds, we examined the site of proliferation in embryonic turtle (stages 18-25) and chick (embryonic days 8-15) brains using phospho-histone H3 (a G2 and M phase marker) immunohistochemistry. In turtle, only few scattered abventricular H3-immunoreactive cells were found outside the ventricular zone; the majority of the H3-immunoreactive cells were located in the ventricular zone throughout the entire turtle brain. Ventricular zone cell proliferation peaks at stages 18 and 20, before an increase of abventricular proliferation at stages 23 and 25. In turtle cortex, however, abventricular proliferation at any given stage never exceeded 17.5+/-2.47% of the total division and the mitotic profiles did not align parallel to the ventricular zone. Phospho-histone H3 immunoreactivity in embryonic chick brains suggests the lack of subventricular zone in the dorsal cortex, but the presence of subventricular zone in the ventral telencephalon. We were able to demonstrate that the avian subventricular zone is present in both pallial and subpallial regions of the ventral telencephalon during embryonic development, and we characterize the spatial and temporal organization of the subventricular zone. Comparative studies suggest that the subventricular zone was involved in the laminar expansion of the cortex to six layers in mammals from the three-layered cortex found in reptiles and birds. Within mammals, the number of neurons in a

  4. Hiperostosis cortical infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Caffey, o hiperostosis cortical infantil, es una rara enfermedad ósea autolimitada, que aparece de preferencia en lactantes con signos inespecíficos sistémicos; el más relevante es la reacción subperióstica e hiperostosis en varios huesos del cuerpo, con predilección en el 75-80 % de los casos por la mandíbula. Su pronóstico es bueno, la mayoría no deja secuelas. El propósito del presente trabajo es describir las características clínicas, presentes en un lactante de cinco meses de edad, atendido en el Hospital Pediátrico Provincial “Mártires de Las Tunas” con este diagnóstico, quien ingresó en el servicio de miscelánea B por una celulitis facial. Presentaba aumento de volumen en la región geniana izquierda, febrícola e inapetencia. Se impuso tratamiento con cefazolina y se egresó a los siete días. Acudió nuevamente con tumefacción blanda y difusa de ambas hemicaras, irritabilidad y fiebre. Se interconsultó con cirugía maxilofacial, se indicaron estudios sanguíneos y radiológicos. Se diagnosticó como enfermedad de Caffey, basado en la edad del niño, tumefacción facial sin signos inflamatorios agudos e hiperostosis en ambas corticales mandibulares a la radiografía AP mandíbula; unido a anemia ligera, leucocitosis y eritrosedimentación acelerada. El paciente se trató sintomáticamente y con antinflamatorios no esteroideos. Esta rara entidad se debe tener presente en casos de niños y lactantes con irritabilidad y fiebre inespecífica

  5. New Harbor in Kangerlussuaq, Western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenstad, Jaran Gjerlandj; Eppeland, Kjetil Grødal; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    transported by rivers from the inland ice to the inner parts of the fjord. These sediment layers reduce the water depth and prevent container- and cruiseships to dock, imposing large additional maintenance costs, and inefficient operability. Through engineering geological field and lab investigations......The international airport of Greenland is located in Kangerlussuaq, making it an important connection point for tourists and transportation of goods. However, the existing harbor in Kangerlussuaq experiences major challenges in the form of extensive sedimentation of glaciofluvial sediments...... sediment deposits at the location are reusable as construction material and may reduce construction costs. Bathymetry investigations indicate however that measures must be taken to increase the water depth, and the offshore sediments were found not suitable as support for foundations....

  6. [Cortical spreading depolarization: a new pathophysiological mechanism in neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Porras, Renán; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Santos, Edgar

    2014-05-20

    Cortical spreading depolarization is a wave of almost complete depolarization of the neuronal and glial cells that occurs in different neurological diseases such as migraine with aura, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, head trauma and stroke. These depolarization waves are characterized by a change in the negative potential with an amplitude between -10 and -30mV, duration of ∼1min and changes in the ion homeostasis between the intra- and extracellular space. This results in neuronal edema and dendritic distortion. Under pathologic states of hypoperfusion, cortical spreading depolarization can produce oxidative stress, worsen hypoxia and induce neuronal death. This is due to intense arterial vasoconstriction produced by an inverse response called spreading ischemia. Only in the last years there has been an electrophysiological confirmation of cortical spreading depolarization in human brains. Occurrence of cortical spreading depolarization has been associated with worse outcome in patients. Currently, increased knowledge regarding the pathophysiologic mechanisms supports the hypothetical correlation of cortical spreading depolarization with brain damage in humans. There are diverse therapeutic alternatives that promise inhibition of cortical spreading depolarization and subsequent better outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Dendritic bundles, minicolumns, columns, and cortical output units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Innocenti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for the fundamental building block of the cerebral cortex has highlighted three structures, perpendicular to the cortical surface: i columns of neurons with radially invariant response properties, e.g., receptive field position, sensory modality, stimulus orientation or direction, frequency tuning etc. ii minicolumns of radially aligned cell bodies and iii bundles, constituted by the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons with cell bodies in different layers. The latter were described in detail, and sometimes quantitatively, in several species and areas. It was recently suggested that the dendritic bundles consist of apical dendrites belonging to neurons projecting their axons to specific targets. We review the concept above and suggest that another structural and computational unit of cerebral cortex is the cortical output unit (COU, i.e. an assembly of bundles of apical dendrites and their parent cell bodies including each of the outputs to distant cortical or subcortical structures, of a given cortical locus (area or part of an area. This somato-dendritic assembly receives inputs some of which are common to the whole assembly and determine its radially invariant response properties, others are specific to one or more dendritic bundles, and determine the specific response signature of neurons in the different cortical layers and projecting to different targets.

  8. Cholinergic Neurons Excite Cortically Projecting Basal Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; McKenna, James T.; Zant, Janneke C.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in the control of cortical activation and attention. Understanding the modulation of BF neuronal activity is a prerequisite to treat disorders of cortical activation involving BF dysfunction, such as Alzheimer's disease. Here we reveal the interaction between cholinergic neurons and cortically projecting BF GABAergic neurons using immunohistochemistry and whole-cell recordings in vitro. In GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, BF cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) neurons were intermingled with GABAergic (GFP+) neurons. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that cholinergic fibers apposed putative cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing parvalbumin (PV). In coronal BF slices from GAD67-GFP knock-in or PV-tdTomato mice, pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors with bath application of carbachol increased the firing rate of large (>20 μm diameter) BF GFP+ and PV (tdTomato+) neurons, which exhibited the intrinsic membrane properties of cortically projecting neurons. The excitatory effect of carbachol was blocked by antagonists of M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors in two subpopulations of BF GABAergic neurons [large hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and small Ih, respectively]. Ion substitution experiments and reversal potential measurements suggested that the carbachol-induced inward current was mediated mainly by sodium-permeable cation channels. Carbachol also increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic neurons/fibers caused a mecamylamine- and atropine-sensitive inward current in putative GABAergic neurons. Thus, cortically projecting, BF GABAergic/PV neurons are excited by neighboring BF and/or brainstem cholinergic neurons. Loss of cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease may impair cortical activation, in part, through disfacilitation of BF cortically

  9. Properties of persistent postnatal cortical subplate neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Reveron, Juan; Friedlander, Michael J

    2007-09-12

    Subplate (SP) neurons are important for the proper development of thalamocortical innervation. They are necessary for formation of ocular dominance and orientation columns in visual cortex. During the perinatal period, many SP neurons die. The surviving cohort forms interstitial cells in the white matter (WM) and a band of horizontally oriented cells below layer VI (layer VIb, layer VII, or subplate cells). Although the function of embryonic SP neurons has been well established, the functional roles of WM and postnatal SP cells are not known. We used a combination of anatomical, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological techniques to explore the dendritic morphology, neurotransmitter phenotype, intrinsic electrophysiological, and synaptic input properties of these surviving cells in the rat visual cortex. The density of SP and WM cells significantly decreases during the first month of life. Both populations express neuronal markers and have extensive dendritic arborizations within the SP, WM, and to the overlying visual cortex. Some intrinsic electrophysiological properties of SP and WM cells are similar: each generates high-frequency slowly adapting trains of action potentials in response to a sustained depolarization. However, SP cells exhibit greater frequency-dependent action potential broadening than WM neurons. Both cell types receive predominantly AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic input that undergoes paired-pulse facilitation as well as NMDA receptor and GABAergic input. Synaptic inputs to these cells can also undergo long-term synaptic plasticity. Thus, surviving SP and WM cells are functional electrogenic neurons integrated within the postnatal visual cortical circuit.

  10. Cell categories and K-nearest neighbor algorithm based decoding of primary motor cortical activity during reach-to-grasp task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangyang Guo; Wei Li; Jiping He

    2014-01-01

    Neural decoding is a procedure to acquire intended movement information from neural activity and generate movement commands to control external devices such as intelligent prostheses. In this study, monkey Astra was trained to accomplish a 3-D reach-to-grasp task, and we recorded neural signals from its primary motor cortex (M1) during the task. The task-related cells were divided into four classes based on their correlation with two movement parameters: movement direction and orientation. We adopted the simple k-nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm as the classifier, and chose cells from appropriate cell classes for movement parameter decoding. Cell classification was shown improving decoding accuracy with relatively less cells, even during movement planning stage (CRT). High decoding accuracy before movement actually performed is of great significance for intelligent prostheses control, and provides evidence that M1 is more than accepting ready-made movement commands but also participating in movement planning. We also found that population of task-related cells in M1 had a preference for specific direction and orientation, and this preference was more significant when it came to population of direction-related cells and orientation-related cells.

  11. Activation of expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor at the site of implantation of allogenic and xenogenic neural stem (progenitor) cells in rats with ischemic cortical stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhonin, V P; Lebedev, S V; Volkov, A I; Pavlov, K A; Ter-Arutyunyants, A A; Volgina, N E; Savchenko, E A; Grinenko, N F; Lazarenko, I P

    2011-02-01

    Ischemic stroke was modeled in the sensorimotor zone of the brain cortex in adult rats. Rat embryonic nervous tissue, neural stem cells from human olfactory epithelium, and rat fibroblasts (cell control) were implanted into the peri-infarction area of rats of different groups immediately after stroke modeling. Expression of BDNF mRNA was analyzed 7 days after surgery by real-time PCR. BDNF expression in cell preparation before their implantation was minimum. The expression of BDNF mRNA increased by 5-6 times in the areas of implantation of rat fibroblasts and human olfactory epithelium and by 23 times in the area of implantation of rat embryonic nervous tissue compared to periinfarction areas without cell implantation. These findings confirm the possibility of realization of the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells via expression of trophic factors.

  12. Cortical factor feedback model for cellular locomotion and cytofission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin I Nishimura

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells can move spontaneously without being guided by external cues. For such spontaneous movements, a variety of different modes have been observed, including the amoeboid-like locomotion with protrusion of multiple pseudopods, the keratocyte-like locomotion with a widely spread lamellipodium, cell division with two daughter cells crawling in opposite directions, and fragmentations of a cell to multiple pieces. Mutagenesis studies have revealed that cells exhibit these modes depending on which genes are deficient, suggesting that seemingly different modes are the manifestation of a common mechanism to regulate cell motion. In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that the positive feedback mechanism working through the inhomogeneous distribution of regulatory proteins underlies this variety of cell locomotion and cytofission. In this hypothesis, a set of regulatory proteins, which we call cortical factors, suppress actin polymerization. These suppressing factors are diluted at the extending front and accumulated at the retracting rear of cell, which establishes a cellular polarity and enhances the cell motility, leading to the further accumulation of cortical factors at the rear. Stochastic simulation of cell movement shows that the positive feedback mechanism of cortical factors stabilizes or destabilizes modes of movement and determines the cell migration pattern. The model predicts that the pattern is selected by changing the rate of formation of the actin-filament network or the threshold to initiate the network formation.

  13. 33 CFR 80.1134 - Monterey Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monterey Harbor, CA. 80.1134 Section 80.1134 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1134 Monterey Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  14. 33 CFR 80.1110 - Dana Point Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dana Point Harbor, CA. 80.1110 Section 80.1110 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1110 Dana Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  15. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136 Section 80.1136 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  16. 33 CFR 110.210 - San Diego Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Harbor, CA. 110.210... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.210 San Diego Harbor, CA. (a) The anchorage grounds. (1... Commander, Naval Base, San Diego, CA. The administration of these anchorages is exercised by the...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1152 - Crescent City Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crescent City Harbor, CA. 80.1152 Section 80.1152 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1152 Crescent City Harbor, CA. A line...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1138 - Santa Cruz Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. 80.1138 Section 80.1138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1138 Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1116 - Redondo Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Redondo Harbor, CA. 80.1116 Section 80.1116 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1116 Redondo Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1108 - Oceanside Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oceanside Harbor, CA. 80.1108 Section 80.1108 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1108 Oceanside Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1126 - Santa Barbara Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. 80.1126 Section 80.1126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1126 Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. A line...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1140 - Pillar Point Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pillar Point Harbor, CA. 80.1140 Section 80.1140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1140 Pillar Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  4. 33 CFR 80.1104 - San Diego Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Harbor, CA. 80.1104 Section 80.1104 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1104 San Diego Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  5. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  6. Nonuniform Deployment of Autonomous Agents in Harbor-Like Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-12

    defender will be used interchangeably throughout this paper. 2.2. Harbor System Architecture A high-level architecture of a harbor defence system is de...of a quadratic Lyapunov function. Let κ and μ2 be positive constants. Before defining the feedback laws for the agent dynamics (1), we intro - duce the

  7. 33 CFR 117.181 - Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal. 117.181 Section 117.181 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.181 Oakland Inner Harbor Tidal Canal. The draws of the...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  10. 78 FR 63381 - Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors, HI.... 14-1414 Safety Zones; Hawaiian Islands Commercial Harbors; HI. (a) Location. The following...

  11. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  12. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  13. 33 CFR 110.111 - Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif. 110.111 Section 110.111 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.111 Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif. An area in the main channel within the...

  14. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  15. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  16. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  17. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  18. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  19. 33 CFR 110.32 - Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. 110.32 Section 110.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.32 Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. (a) Area...

  20. 77 FR 27625 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY..., Prevention Department, Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI at (414) 747-7188, email Jon.K.Grob....935, Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, at the following time for the following events:...

  1. 75 FR 44141 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY... Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI at 414-747-7154, e-mail Adam.D.Kraft@uscg.mil . SUPPLEMENTARY... Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for the following events: (1) Arab World Festival fireworks display on August...

  2. 75 FR 34361 - Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS..., call ] or e-mail BM1 Adam Kraft, Prevention Department, Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI... enforce the safety zone listed in 33 CFR 165.935, Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for...

  3. 78 FR 37456 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI at (414) 747-7148, email joseph.p.mccollum@uscg.mil . SUPPLEMENTARY... Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, at the following times for the following events: (1) Polish Fest fireworks...

  4. 78 FR 28742 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI at (414) 747-7148, email joseph.p.mccollum@uscg.mil . SUPPLEMENTARY... Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for the 2013 Pridefest fireworks. This zone will be enforced from 9:15 p.m....

  5. 75 FR 49848 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY..., WI at 414-747-7154, e-mail Adam.D.Kraft@uscg.mil . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Coast Guard will enforce the safety zone listed in 33 CFR 165.935, Safety Zone, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for...

  6. 75 FR 22234 - Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI AGENCY... BM1 Adam Kraft, Prevention Department, Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan, Milwaukee, WI at 414-747-7154... zone listed in 33 CFR 165.935, Safety Zones, Milwaukee Harbor, Milwaukee, WI, for the following...

  7. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255 Section 110.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  8. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31... NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. (a) Limited space and the desirability of keeping the Memorial simple and dignified require...

  9. 33 CFR 110.58 - Cos Cob Harbor, Greenwich, Conn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cos Cob Harbor, Greenwich, Conn. 110.58 Section 110.58 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.58 Cos Cob Harbor, Greenwich, Conn. (a) Area...

  10. Broadcasting of cortical activity to the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Alison M; Kato, Hiroyuki K; Komiyama, Takaki; Isaacson, Jeffry S

    2015-02-24

    Odor representations are initially formed in the olfactory bulb, which contains a topographic glomerular map of odor molecular features. The bulb transmits sensory information directly to piriform cortex, where it is encoded by distributed ensembles of pyramidal cells without spatial order. Intriguingly, piriform cortex pyramidal cells project back to the bulb, but the information contained in this feedback projection is unknown. Here, we use imaging in awake mice to directly monitor activity in the presynaptic boutons of cortical feedback fibers. We show that the cortex provides the bulb with a rich array of information for any individual odor and that cortical feedback is dependent on brain state. In contrast to the stereotyped, spatial arrangement of olfactory bulb glomeruli, cortical inputs tuned to different odors commingle and indiscriminately target individual glomerular channels. Thus, the cortex modulates early odor representations by broadcasting sensory information diffusely onto spatially ordered bulbar circuits.

  11. Cortical Correlates of Fitts’ Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eIfft

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fitts' law describes the fundamental trade-off between movement accuracy and speed: It states that the duration of reaching movements is a function of target size and distance. While Fitts' law has been extensively studied in ergonomics and has guided the design of human-computer interfaces, there have been few studies on its neuronal correlates. To elucidate sensorimotor cortical activity underlying Fitts’ law, we implanted two monkeys with multielectrode arrays in the primary motor (M1 and primary somatosensory (S1 cortices. The monkeys performed reaches with a joystick-controlled cursor towards targets of different size. The reaction time, movement time and movement velocity changed with target size, and M1 and S1 activity reflected these changes. Moreover, modifications of cortical activity could not be explained by changes of movement parameters alone, but required target size as an additional parameter. Neuronal representation of target size was especially prominent during the early reaction time period where it influenced the slope of the firing rate rise preceding movement initiation. During the movement period, cortical activity was mostly correlated with movement velocity. Neural decoders were applied to simultaneously decode target size and motor parameters from cortical modulations. We suggest using such classifiers to improve neuroprosthetic control.

  12. Difference in trafficking of brain-derived neurotrophic factor between axons and dendrites of cortical neurons, revealed by live-cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohara Keigo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, which is sorted into a regulated secretory pathway of neurons, is supposed to act retrogradely through dendrites on presynaptic neurons or anterogradely through axons on postsynaptic neurons. Depending on which is the case, the pattern and direction of trafficking of BDNF in dendrites and axons are expected to be different. To address this issue, we analyzed movements of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged BDNF in axons and dendrites of living cortical neurons by time-lapse imaging. In part of the experiments, the expression of BDNF tagged with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was compared with that of nerve growth factor (NGF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, to see whether fluorescent protein-tagged BDNF is expressed in a manner specific to this neurotrophin. Results We found that BDNF tagged with GFP or CFP was expressed in a punctated manner in dendrites and axons in about two-thirds of neurons into which plasmid cDNAs had been injected, while NGF tagged with GFP or YFP was diffusely expressed even in dendrites in about 70% of the plasmid-injected neurons. In neurons in which BDNF-GFP was expressed as vesicular puncta in axons, 59 and 23% of the puncta were moving rapidly in the anterograde and retrograde directions, respectively. On the other hand, 64% of BDNF-GFP puncta in dendrites did not move at all or fluttered back and forth within a short distance. The rest of the puncta in dendrites were moving relatively smoothly in either direction, but their mean velocity of transport, 0.47 ± 0.23 (SD μm/s, was slower than that of the moving puncta in axons (0.73 ± 0.26 μm/s. Conclusion The present results show that the pattern and velocity of the trafficking of fluorescence protein-tagged BDNF are different between axons and dendrites, and suggest that the anterograde transport in axons may be the dominant stream of BDNF to release sites.

  13. Recombinant human erythropoietin increases cerebral cortical width index and neurogenesis following ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongmin Wen; Peiji Wang

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral cortical expansion index refers to the ratio between left and right cortex width and is recognized as an indicator for cortical hyperplasia. Cerebral ischemia was established in CB-17 mice in the present study, and the mice were subsequently treated with recombinant human erythropoietin via subcutaneous injection. Results demonstrated that cerebral cortical width index significantly increased. Immunofluorescence detection showed that the number of nuclear antigen antibody/5-bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells at the infarction edge significantly increased. Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between neurological scores and cortical width indices in rats following ischemic stroke. These experimental findings suggested that recombinant human erythropoietin promoted cerebral cortical hyperplasia, increased cortical neurogenesis, and enhanced functional recovery following ischemic stroke.

  14. Leading role of thalamic over cortical neurons during postinhibitory rebound excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, F.; Timofeev, I.; Steriade, M.

    1998-01-01

    The postinhibitory rebound excitation is an intrinsic property of thalamic and cortical neurons that is implicated in a variety of normal and abnormal operations of neuronal networks, such as slow or fast brain rhythms during different states of vigilance as well as seizures. We used dual simultaneous intracellular recordings of thalamocortical neurons from the ventrolateral nucleus and neurons from the motor cortex, together with thalamic and cortical field potentials, to investigate the temporal relations between thalamic and cortical events during the rebound excitation that follows prolonged periods of stimulus-induced inhibition. Invariably, the rebound spike-bursts in thalamocortical cells occurred before the rebound depolarization in cortical neurons and preceded the peak of the depth-negative, rebound field potential in cortical areas. Also, the inhibitory-rebound sequences were more pronounced and prolonged in cortical neurons when elicited by thalamic stimuli, compared with cortical stimuli. The role of thalamocortical loops in the rebound excitation of cortical neurons was shown further by the absence of rebound activity in isolated cortical slabs. However, whereas thalamocortical neurons remained hyperpolarized after rebound excitation, because of the prolonged spike-bursts in inhibitory thalamic reticular neurons, the rebound depolarization in cortical neurons was prolonged, suggesting the role of intracortical excitatory circuits in this sustained activity. The role of intrathalamic events in triggering rebound cortical activity should be taken into consideration when analyzing information processes at the cortical level; at each step, corticothalamic volleys can set into action thalamic inhibitory neurons, leading to rebound spike-bursts that are transferred back to the cortex, thus modifying cortical activities. PMID:9811903

  15. Submarine Groundwater Discharge into Tolo Harbor, Hong Kong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, J. J.

    2008-12-01

    Tolo Harbor is an elongate and semi-enclosed bay in igneous rock areas in northeastern Hong Kong. It has an area of about 50 km2 and the groundwater catchment behind the harbor has an area of 160 km2, which is well-defined by ridges that reach a maximum elevation of 957 m above sea level. Over the last two decades, about half of the algal blooms reported in Hong Kong waters occurred in the harbor. Rivers and sewage are recognized as two key sources of nutrients. It is speculated that this harbor may have relatively high submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) due to its special topographical and hydrogeological setting and that the SGD may be another source of nutrients to the harbor. A research project is conduced to quantify the SGD into Tolo Harbor and to estimate the nutrient flux into the harbor through this pathway. The geochemical tracers of radon (222Rn) and radium (223Ra, 224Ra, 226Ra, and 228Ra) in groundwater and seawater are measured over the harbor and a seepage meter is deployed for direct and continuous SGD measurement for 72 hours. The study shows that the geochemical tracers fluctuate temporally in anti-phase with tidal height and that there is general trend for the geochemical tracers to decrease with distance offshore. Three sites with relatively high SGD are identified. The residence time estimated from 224Ra is around 30 days, which correlates well with previous studies. The flux of SGD to the harbor is estimated by three different approaches including radium and radon budget analyses and seepage meter. Finally, nutrient flux to the harbor through SGD is estimated, which shows that the nutrient loading through this pathway is significant. It is suggested that current practice for the management of algal blooms in Hong Kong, in which nutrient loading through SGD is ignored, should be reviewed and the control measures of groundwater contamination are obviously required.

  16. Development and maturation of embryonic cortical neurons grafted into the damaged adult motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissrine Ballout

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the human central nervous system can lead to devastating consequences due to its poor ability to self-repair. Neural transplantation aimed at replacing lost neurons and restore functional circuitry has proven to be a promising therapeutical avenue. We previously reported in adult rodent animal models with cortical lesions that grafted fetal cortical neurons could effectively re-establish specific patterns of projections and synapses. The current study was designed to provide a detailed characterization of the spatio-temporal in vivo development of fetal cortical transplanted cells within the lesioned adult motor cortex and their corresponding axonal projections. We show here that as early as two weeks after grafting, cortical neuroblasts transplanted into damaged adult motor cortex developed appropriate projections to cortical and subcortical targets. Grafted cells initially exhibited characteristics of immature neurons, which then differentiated into mature neurons with appropriate cortical phenotypes where most were glutamatergic and few were GABAergic. All cortical subtypes identified with the specific markers CTIP2, Cux1, FOXP2 and Tbr1 were generated after grafting as evidenced with BrdU co-labeling.The set of data provided here is of interest as it sets biological standards for future studies aimed at replacing fetal cells with embryonic stem cells as a source of cortical neurons.

  17. Multidrug Resistance-Related Protein 1 (MRP1) Function and Localization Depend on Cortical Actin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Ina; Klappe, Karin; Ercan, Cigdem; Kok, Jan Willem

    2011-01-01

    MRP1 (ABCC1) is known to be localized in lipid rafts. Here we show in two different cell lines that localization of Mrp1/MRP1 (Abcc1/ABCC1) in lipid rafts and its function as an efflux pump are dependent on cortical actin. Latrunculin B disrupts both cortical actin and actin stress fibers. This resu

  18. Cortical myoclonus in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P D; Bhatia, K P; Brown, P; Davis, M B; Pires, M; Quinn, N P; Luthert, P; Honovar, M; O'Brien, M D; Marsden, C D

    1994-11-01

    We describe three patients with Huntington's disease, from two families, in whom myoclonus was the predominant clinical feature. The diagnosis was confirmed at autopsy in two cases and by DNA analysis in all three. These patients all presented before the age of 30 years and were the offspring of affected fathers. Neurophysiological studies documented generalised and multifocal action myoclonus of cortical origin that was strikingly stimulus sensitive, without enlargement of the cortical somatosensory evoked potential. The myoclonus improved with piracetam therapy in one patient and a combination of sodium valproate and clonazepam in the other two. Cortical reflex myoclonus is a rare but disabling component of the complex movement disorder of Huntington's disease, which may lead to substantial diagnostic difficulties.

  19. Comparison of repair of DNA double-strand breaks in identical sequences in primary human fibroblast and immortal hamster-human hybrid cells harboring a single copy of human chromosome 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladi, B.; Waldren, C. A.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We have optimized a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis assay that measures induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in specific regions of the genome (Lobrich et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 12050-12054, 1995). The increased sensitivity resulting from these improvements makes it possible to analyze the size distribution of broken DNA molecules immediately after the introduction of DSBs and after repair incubation. This analysis shows that the distribution of broken DNA pieces after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation is consistent with the distribution expected from randomly induced DSBs. It is apparent from the distribution of rejoined DNA pieces after repair incubation that DNA ends continue to rejoin between 3 and 24 h postirradiation and that some of these rejoining events are in fact misrejoining events, since novel restriction fragments both larger and smaller than the original fragment are generated after repair. This improved assay was also used to study the kinetics of DSB rejoining and the extent of misrejoining in identical DNA sequences in human GM38 cells and human-hamster hybrid A(L) cells containing a single human chromosome 11. Despite the numerous differences between these cells, which include species and tissue of origin, levels of TP53, expression of telomerase, and the presence or absence of a homologous chromosome for the restriction fragments examined, the kinetics of rejoining of radiation-induced DSBs and the extent of misrejoining were similar in the two cell lines when studied in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, DSBs were removed from the single-copy human chromosome in the hamster A(L) cells with similar kinetics and misrejoining frequency as at a locus on this hybrid's CHO chromosomes.

  20. Green fluorescent protein-tagged sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase overexpression in Paramecium cells: isoforms, subcellular localization, biogenesis of cortical calcium stores and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, K; Pavlovic, N; Klauke, N; Geissinger, D; Plattner, H

    2000-08-01

    We have followed the time-dependent transfection of Paramecium cells with a vector containing the gene of green fluorescent protein (GFP) attached to the C-terminus of the PtSERCA1 gene. The outlines of alveolar sacs (ASs) are labelled, as is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) throughout the cell. When GFP fluorescence is compared with previous anti-PtSERCA1 antibody labelling, the much wider distribution of GFP (ER+ASs) indicates that only a small amount of SERCA molecules is normally retained in the ER. A second isoform, PtSERCA2, also occurs and its C-terminal GFP-tagging results in the same distribution pattern. However, when GFP is inserted in the major cytoplasmic loop, PtSERCA1 and two fusion proteins are mostly retained in the ER, probably because of the presence of the overt C-terminal KKXX ER-retention signal and/or masking of a signal for transfer into ASs. On the overall cell surface, new SERCA molecules seem to be permanently delivered from the ER to ASs by vesicle transport, whereas in the fission zone of dividing cells ASs may form anew. In cells overexpressing PtSERCA1 (with C-terminal GFP) in ASs, [Ca2+]i regulation during exocytosis is not significantly different from controls, probably because their Ca2+ pump has to mediate only slow reuptake.

  1. Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia : Cortical or non-cortical origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strien, Teun W.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Hilgevoord, Anthony A. J.; Linssen, Wim H. J. P.; Groffen, Alexander J. A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is characterized by involuntary dystonia and/or chorea triggered by a sudden movement. Cases are usually familial with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of PKD focus on the controversy whether PKD has a cortical or non-co

  2. Antitumor Efficacy of the Dual PI3K/mTOR Inhibitor PF-04691502 in a Human Xenograft Tumor Model Derived from Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells Harboring a PIK3CA Mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D Fang

    Full Text Available PIK3CA (phosphoinositide-3-kinase, catalytic, alpha polypeptide mutations can help predict the antitumor activity of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway inhibitors in both preclinical and clinical settings. In light of the recent discovery of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs in various tumor types, we developed an in vitro CSC model from xenograft tumors established in mice from a colorectal cancer patient tumor in which the CD133+/EpCAM+ population represented tumor-initiating cells. CD133+/EpCAM+ CSCs were enriched under stem cell culture conditions and formed 3-dimensional tumor spheroids. Tumor spheroid cells exhibited CSC properties, including the capability for differentiation and self-renewal, higher tumorigenic potential and chemo-resistance. Genetic analysis using an OncoCarta™ panel revealed a PIK3CA (H1047R mutation in these cells. Using a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, PF-04691502, we then showed that blockage of the PI3K/mTOR pathway inhibited the in vitro proliferation of CSCs and in vivo xenograft tumor growth with manageable toxicity. Tumor growth inhibition in mice was accompanied by a significant reduction of phosphorylated Akt (pAKT (S473, a well-established surrogate biomarker of PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway inhibition. Collectively, our data suggest that PF-04691502 exhibits potent anticancer activity in colorectal cancer by targeting both PIK3CA (H1047R mutant CSCs and their derivatives. These results may assist in the clinical development of PF-04691502 for the treatment of a subpopulation of colorectal cancer patients with poor outcomes.

  3. Ginkgolides protects cultured cortical neurons against excitotoxic and oxidative insults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYu-Yang; YUQing-Hai; YOUSong; SHENGLi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The neurotoxicity of glutamate is associated with neurological disorders including hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Studies using cultured cortical neurons have demonstrated that exposure to glutamate produced delayed degeneration of mature neurons. Oxygen free radicals generated during injury have been postulated to be a major cause of neuronal cell

  4. Diving Related Changes in the Blood Oxygen Stores of Rehabilitating Harbor Seal Pups (Phoca vitulina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Amber; Ono, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pups begin diving within hours of birth, stimulating the development of the blood oxygen (O2) stores necessary to sustain underwater aerobic metabolism. Since harbor seals experience a brief nursing period, the early-life development of these blood O2 stores is necessary for successful post-weaning foraging. If mothers and pups become prematurely separated, the pup may be transported to a wildlife rehabilitation center for care. Previous studies suggest that the shallow pools and lack of diving in rehabilitation facilities may lead to under-developed blood O2 stores, but diving behavior during rehabilitation has not been investigated. This study aimed to simultaneously study the diving behaviors and blood O2 store development of rehabilitating harbor seal pups. Standard hematology measurements (Hct, Hb, RBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC) were taken to investigate O2 storage capacity and pups were equipped with time-depth recorders to investigate natural diving behavior while in rehabilitation. Linear mixed models of the data indicate that all measured blood parameters changed with age; however, when compared to literature values for wild harbor seal pups, rehabilitating pups have smaller red blood cells (RBCs) that can store less hemoglobin (Hb) and subsequently, less O2, potentially limiting their diving capabilities. Wild pups completed longer dives at younger ages (maximum reported dives were observed (maximum during rehabilitation: 13.6 min at 89 days of age). Further, this study suggests that there may be a positive relationship between RBC size and the frequency of long duration dives. Thus, rehabilitating harbor seal pups should be encouraged to make frequent, long duration dives to prepare themselves for post-release foraging.

  5. The endogenous hallucinogen and trace amine N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT displays potent protective effects against hypoxia via sigma-1 receptor activation in human primary iPSC-derived cortical neurons and microglia-like immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szabo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT is a potent endogenous hallucinogen present in the brain of humans and other mammals. Despite extensive research, its physiological role remains largely unknown. Recently, DMT has been found to activate the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R, an intracellular chaperone fulfilling an interface role between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria. It ensures the correct transmission of ER stress into the nucleus resulting in the enhanced production of antistress and antioxidant proteins. Due to this function, the activation of Sig-1R can mitigate the outcome of hypoxia or oxidative stress. In this paper we aimed to test the hypothesis that DMT plays a neuroprotective role in the brain by activating the Sig-1R. We tested whether DMT can mitigate hypoxic stress in in vitro cultured human cortical neurons (derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, and in monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. Here we report that DMT robustly increases the survival of these cell types in severe hypoxia (0.5% O2 through the Sig-1R. Furthermore, this phenomenon is associated with the decreased expression and function of the alpha subunit of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 suggesting that DMT-mediated Sig-1R activation may alleviate hypoxia-induced cellular stress and increase survival in a HIF-1-independent manner. Our results reveal a novel and important role of DMT in human cellular physiology. We postulate that this compound may be endogenously generated in situations of stress, ameliorating the adverse effects of hypoxic/ischemic insult to the brain.

  6. The Endogenous Hallucinogen and Trace Amine N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) Displays Potent Protective Effects against Hypoxia via Sigma-1 Receptor Activation in Human Primary iPSC-Derived Cortical Neurons and Microglia-Like Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Attila; Kovacs, Attila; Riba, Jordi; Djurovic, Srdjan; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Frecska, Ede

    2016-01-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a potent endogenous hallucinogen present in the brain of humans and other mammals. Despite extensive research, its physiological role remains largely unknown. Recently, DMT has been found to activate the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), an intracellular chaperone fulfilling an interface role between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. It ensures the correct transmission of ER stress into the nucleus resulting in the enhanced production of antistress and antioxidant proteins. Due to this function, the activation of Sig-1R can mitigate the outcome of hypoxia or oxidative stress. In this paper, we aimed to test the hypothesis that DMT plays a neuroprotective role in the brain by activating the Sig-1R. We tested whether DMT can mitigate hypoxic stress in in vitro cultured human cortical neurons (derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs), monocyte-derived macrophages (moMACs), and dendritic cells (moDCs). Results showed that DMT robustly increases the survival of these cell types in severe hypoxia (0.5% O2) through the Sig-1R. Furthermore, this phenomenon is associated with the decreased expression and function of the alpha subunit of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) suggesting that DMT-mediated Sig-1R activation may alleviate hypoxia-induced cellular stress and increase survival in a HIF-1-independent manner. Our results reveal a novel and important role of DMT in human cellular physiology. We postulate that this compound may be endogenously generated in situations of stress, ameliorating the adverse effects of hypoxic/ischemic insult to the brain.

  7. Effects of huperzine A on secretion of nerve growth factor in cultured rat cortical astrocytes and neurite outgrowth in rat PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-li TANG; Rui WANG; Xi-can TANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study the effects of huperzine A (HupA) on neuritogenic activity and the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF). Methods: After being treated with 10 μmol/L HupA, neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells was observed and counted under phase-contrast microscopy. Mitogenic activity was assayed by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Cell cytotoxicity was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)release. AChE activity, mRNA and protein expression were measured by the Ellman's method, RT-PCR, and Western blot, respectively. NGF mRNA and protein levels were determined by RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Results: Treatment of PC 12 cells with 10 μmol/L HupA for 48 h markedly increased the number of neuritebearing cells, but caused no significant alteration in cell viability or other signs of cytotoxicity. In addition to inhibiting AChE activity, 10 μmol/L HupA also increased the mRNA and protein levels of this enzyme. In addition, following 2 h exposure of the astrocytes to 10 μmol/L HupA, there was a significant up-regulation of mRNA for NGF and P75 low-affinity NGF receptor. The protein level of NGF was also increased after 24 h treatment with HupA. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate for the first time that HupA has a direct or indirect neurotrophic activity, which might be beneficial in treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease.

  8. Supratentorial cortical ependymoma: An unusual presentation of a rare tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mohaghegh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. Two thirds of ependymomas arise in the infratentorial or intraventricles, whereas one-third are located in supratentorial space. But supratentorial "cortical" ependymomas are very rare. We report a case of a cortical ependymoma in a 17-year-old boy. The patient presented with transient recurrent right weakness and diplopia. This tumor was located in the left parieto-occipital region and he had gross total excision. Microscopy and immunohistochemistry showed grade III differentiation ependymoma.

  9. Supratentorial cortical ependymoma: An unusual presentation of a rare tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaghegh, Mohammad Reza; Chitsaz, Ahmad; Okhovat, Ali Asghar; Pour, Elnaz Babaei

    2015-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. Two thirds of ependymomas arise in the infratentorial or intraventricles, whereas one-third are located in supratentorial space. But supratentorial "cortical" ependymomas are very rare. We report a case of a cortical ependymoma in a 17-year-old boy. The patient presented with transient recurrent right weakness and diplopia. This tumor was located in the left parieto-occipital region and he had gross total excision. Microscopy and immunohistochemistry showed grade III differentiation ependymoma.

  10. Face activated neurodynamic cortical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susac, Ana; Ilmoniemi, Risto J; Ranken, Doug; Supek, Selma

    2011-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have shown that complex visual stimuli, such as faces, activate multiple brain regions, yet little is known on the dynamics and complexity of the activated cortical networks during the entire measurable evoked response. In this study, we used simulated and face-evoked empirical MEG data from an oddball study to investigate the feasibility of accurate, efficient, and reliable spatio-temporal tracking of cortical pathways over prolonged time intervals. We applied a data-driven, semiautomated approach to spatio-temporal source localization with no prior assumptions on active cortical regions to explore non-invasively face-processing dynamics and their modulation by task. Simulations demonstrated that the use of multi-start downhill simplex and data-driven selections of time intervals submitted to the Calibrated Start Spatio-Temporal (CSST) algorithm resulted in improved accuracy of the source localization and the estimation of the onset of their activity. Locations and dynamics of the identified sources indicated a distributed cortical network involved in face processing whose complexity was task dependent. This MEG study provided the first non-invasive demonstration, agreeing with intracranial recordings, of an early onset of the activity in the fusiform face gyrus (FFG), and that frontal activation preceded parietal for responses elicited by target faces.

  11. Effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on the axonal outgrowth through activation of PI3K/AKT signaling in primary cortical neurons followed oxygen-glucose deprivation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transplantation with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs improves the survival of neurons and axonal outgrowth after stroke remains undetermined. Here, we investigated whether PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is involved in these therapeutic effects of BMSCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1 BMSCs and cortical neurons were derived from Sprague-Dawley rats. The injured neurons were induced by Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation (OGD, and then were respectively co-cultured for 48 hours with BMSCs at different densities (5×10(3, 5×10(5/ml in transwell co-culture system. The average length of axon and expression of GAP-43 were examined to assess the effect of BMSCs on axonal outgrowth after the damage of neurons induced by OGD. (2 The injured neurons were cultured with a conditioned medium (CM of BMSCs cultured for 24 hours in neurobasal medium. During the process, we further identified whether PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is involved through the adjunction of LY294002 (a specific phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor. Two hours later, the expression of pAKT (phosphorylated AKT and AKT were analyzed by Western blotting. The length of axons, the expression of GAP-43 and the survival of neurons were measured at 48 hours. RESULTS: Both BMSCs and CM from BMSCs inreased the axonal length and GAP-43 expression in OGD-injured cortical neurons. There was no difference between the effects of BMSCs of 5×10(5/ml and of 5×10(3/ml on axonal outgrowth. Expression of pAKT enhanced significantly at 2 hours and the neuron survival increased at 48 hours after the injured neurons cultured with the CM, respectively. These effects of CM were prevented by inhibitor LY294002. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: BMSCs promote axonal outgrowth and the survival of neurons against the damage from OGD in vitro by the paracrine effects through PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  12. Impact of prenatal environmental stress on cortical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji eIshii

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to various types of environmental stress increases susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Given that even subtle perturbations by prenatal environmental stress in the cerebral cortex impair the cognitive and memory functions, this review focuses on underlying molecular mechanisms of pathological cortical development. We especially highlight recent works that utilized animal exposure models, human specimens or/and induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells to demonstrate: 1. molecular mechanisms shared by various types of environmental stressors, 2. the mechanisms by which the affected extracortical tissues indirectly impact the cortical development and function, and 3. interaction between prenatal environmental stress and the genetic predisposition of neuropsychiatric disorders. Finally, we discuss current challenges for achieving a comprehensive understanding of the role of environmentally disturbed molecular expressions in cortical maldevelopment, knowledge of which may eventually facilitate discovery of interventions for prenatal environment-linked neuropsychiatric disorders.

  13. Retinoic acid from the meninges regulates cortical neuron generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Julie A; Ashique, Amir M; Zarbalis, Konstantinos; Patterson, Katelin P; Hecht, Jonathan H; Kane, Maureen A; Folias, Alexandra E; Choe, Youngshik; May, Scott R; Kume, Tsutomu; Napoli, Joseph L; Peterson, Andrew S; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2009-10-30

    Extrinsic signals controlling generation of neocortical neurons during embryonic life have been difficult to identify. In this study we demonstrate that the dorsal forebrain meninges communicate with the adjacent radial glial endfeet and influence cortical development. We took advantage of Foxc1 mutant mice with defects in forebrain meningeal formation. Foxc1 dosage and loss of meninges correlated with a dramatic reduction in both neuron and intermediate progenitor production and elongation of the neuroepithelium. Several types of experiments demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) is the key component of this secreted activity. In addition, Rdh10- and Raldh2-expressing cells in the dorsal meninges were either reduced or absent in the Foxc1 mutants, and Rdh10 mutants had a cortical phenotype similar to the Foxc1 null mutants. Lastly, in utero RA treatment rescued the cortical phenotype in Foxc1 mutants. These results establish RA as a potent, meningeal-derived cue required for successful corticogenesis.

  14. Sint1, a common integration site in SL3-3-induced T-cell lymphomas, harbors a putative proto-oncogene with homology to the septin gene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A B; Lund, Anders Henrik; Ethelberg, S;

    2000-01-01

    The murine retrovirus SL3-3 is a potent inducer of T-cell lymphomas when inoculated into susceptible newborn mice. Previously, DNAs from twenty SL3-3-induced tumors were screened by PCR for provirus integration sites. Two out of 20 tumors demonstrated clonal provirus insertion into a common region....... This region has now been isolated and characterized. The region, named SL3-3 integration site 1 (Sint1), maps to the distal end of mouse chromosome 11, corresponding to human chromosome 17q25, and may be identical to a mouse mammary tumor virus integration site in a T-cell lymphoma, Pad3. Two overlapping...... genomic lambda clones spanning about 35 kb were isolated and used as a starting point for a search for genes in the neighborhood of the virus integration sites. A genomic fragment was used as a hybridization probe to isolate a 3-kb cDNA clone, the expression of which was upregulated in one of two tumors...

  15. Pearl Harbor National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Pearl Harbor National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  16. Characterizing freshwater and nutrient fluxes to West Falmouth Harbor, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data present oceanographic and water-quality observations made at 4 locations in West Falmouth Harbor and 3 in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts. While both Buzzards...

  17. 78 FR 52783 - Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-26

    ...: September 11, 2013, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. (Eastern). Location: Partnership Office, 15 State Street, 8th... recommendations to the Boston Harbor Islands Partnership with respect to the implementation of a management...

  18. 77 FR 25890 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Manchester Harbor, Manchester, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Manchester Harbor, Manchester, MA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulations. SUMMARY: The...

  19. 78 FR 68867 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... receive all compensation benefits to which they are entitled. Agency: Office of Workers' Compensation... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection...

  20. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  1. Ground-water status report, Pearl Harbor area, Hawaii, 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroos, Ronald L.; Ewart, Charles J.

    1979-01-01

    Increasing demand for freshwater in Hawaii has placed heavy stress on many of the State 's basal aquifer systems. The most heavily stressed of these systems is the Pearl Harbor on Oahu. The Pearl Harbor basal aquifer supplies as much as 277 million gallons per day. Since early in this century, spring discharge has been declining while pumpage has been increasing. Total ground-water discharge has remained steady despite short-term fluctuations. Some wells show general increases in chloride concentration while others remain steady. Chloride concentrations throughout the area show no apparent increase since 1970. Basal water head maps of the Pearl Harbor area clearly reflect the natural discharge points, which are the springs located along the shore near the center of Pearl Harbor. Basal-water hydrographs show a general decline of about 0.09 foot per year. This implies depletion of storage at a rate of about 25 million gallons per day. (USGS).

  2. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Pearl Harbor Hawaii Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  3. Apra Harbor, Guam Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Apra Harbor, Guam Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  4. Arabidopsis cortical microtubules position cellulose synthase delivery to the plasma membrane and interact with cellulose synthase trafficking compartments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, R.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Paredez, A.R.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ehrhardt, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis relies on the organization and function of two polymer arrays separated by the plasma membrane: the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton and cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. Studies using in vivo markers confirmed that one function of the cortical microtubule array is

  5. Arabidopsis cortical microtubules position cellulose synthase delivery to the plasma membrane and interact with cellulose synthase trafficking compartments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, R.; Lindeboom, J.J.; Paredez, A.R.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ehrhardt, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis relies on the organization and function of two polymer arrays separated by the plasma membrane: the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton and cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. Studies using in vivo markers confirmed that one function of the cortical microtubule array is t

  6. Dissecting the molecular mechanism underlying the intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and cortical microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eLei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A central question in plant cell development is how the cell wall determines directional cell expansion and therefore the final shape of the cell. As the major load-bearing component of the cell wall, cellulose microfibrils are laid down transversely to the axis of elongation, thus forming a spring-like structure that reinforces the cell laterally and while favoring longitudinal expansion in most growing cells. Mounting evidence suggests that cortical microtubules organize the deposition of cellulose microfibrils, but the precise molecular mechanisms linking microtubules to cellulose organization have remained unclear until the recent discovery of CSI1, a linker protein between the cortical microtubules and the cellulose biosynthesizing machinery. In this review, we will focus on the intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and cortical microtubules, in particular, we will discuss microtubule arrangement and cell wall architecture, the linkage between cellulose synthase complexes and microtubules, and the feedback mechanisms between cell wall and microtubules.

  7. Motor cortical thresholds and cortical silent periods in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Ozkiziltan, Safa; Baklan, Baris

    2004-10-01

    We studied motor cortical thresholds (TIs) and cortical silent periods (SPs) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in 110 epileptic patients. Sixty-two had primary generalised, 48 had partial type seizures. Fifteen out 110 patients were analysed both before and after anticonvulsant medication. Our aims were to evaluate the TI levels and the duration of SPs in patients with epilepsy and to determine the reliability of TMS in patients with epilepsy. There was no negative effect of TMS on the clinical status and EEG findings in patients with epilepsy. TIs obtained from patients with partial epilepsy were higher than those obtained from both controls and primary epileptics. The duration of SP in patients with primary epileptics was more prolonged than those obtained from controls. There was no correlation between EEG lateralisation and both SP duration and TI values. In de novo patient group, SP duration was significantly prolonged after anticonvulsant medication. We concluded that TMS is a reliable electrophysiological investigation in patients with epilepsy. The analysis of SP duration may be an appropriate investigation in monitoring the effect of anticonvulsant medication on the cortical inhibitory activity.

  8. Revisiting the enigmatic cortical calretinin-expressing interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eCauli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical calretinin (CR-expressing interneurons represent a heterogeneous subpopulation of about 10-30% of GABAergic interneurons, which altogether total ca. 12-20% of all cortical neurons. In the rodent neocortex, CR cells display different somatodendritic morphologies ranging from bipolar to multipolar but the bipolar cells and their variations dominate. They are also diverse at the molecular level as they were shown to express numerous neuropeptides in different combinations including vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP, cholecystokinin (CCK, neurokinin B (NKB corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF, enkephalin (Enk but also neuropeptide Y (NPY and somatostatin (SOM to a lesser extent. CR-expressing interneurons exhibit different firing behaviors such as adapting, bursting or irregular. They mainly originate from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE but a subpopulation also derives from the dorsal part of the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE. Cortical GABAergic CR-expressing interneurons can be divided in two main populations: VIP-bipolar interneurons deriving from the CGE and SOM-Martinotti-like interneurons originating in the dorsal MGE. Although bipolar cells account for the majority of CR-expressing interneurons, the roles they play in cortical neuronal circuits and in the more general metabolic physiology of the brain remain elusive and enigmatic. The aim of this review is, firstly, to provide a comprehensive view of the morphological, molecular and electrophysiological features defining this cell type. We will, secondly, also summarize what is known about their place in the cortical circuit, their modulation by subcortical afferents and the functional roles they might play in neuronal processing and energy metabolism.

  9. Autaptic self-inhibition of cortical GABAergic neurons: synaptic narcissism or useful introspection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, Charlotte; Pazienti, Antonio; Bacci, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Fast synaptic inhibition sculpts all forms of cortical activity by means of a specialized connectivity pattern between highly heterogeneous inhibitory interneurons and principal excitatory cells. Importantly, inhibitory neurons connect also to each other extensively, following a detailed blueprint, and, indeed, specific forms of disinhibition affect important behavioral functions. Here we discuss a peculiar form of cortical disinhibition: the massive autaptic self-inhibition of parvalbumin-(PV) positive basket cells. Despite being described long ago, autaptic inhibition onto PV basket cells is rarely included in cortical circuit diagrams, perhaps because of its still elusive function. We propose here a potential dual role of autaptic feedback inhibition in temporally coordinating PV basket cells during cortical network activity.

  10. Evolving Models of Pavlovian Conditioning : Cerebellar Cortical Dynamics in Awake Behaving Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Brinke, Michiel M; Boele, Henk-Jan; Spanke, Jochen K; Potters, Jan-Willem; Kornysheva, Katja; Wulff, Peer; IJpelaar, Anna C H G; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2015-01-01

    Three decades of electrophysiological research on cerebellar cortical activity underlying Pavlovian conditioning have expanded our understanding of motor learning in the brain. Purkinje cell simple spike suppression is considered to be crucial in the expression of conditional blink responses (CRs).

  11. Physiological maturation and drug responses of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neuronal networks in long-term culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odawara, A; Katoh, H; Matsuda, N; Suzuki, I

    2016-05-18

    The functional network of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons is a potentially powerful in vitro model for evaluating disease mechanisms and drug responses. However, the culture time required for the full functional maturation of individual neurons and networks is uncertain. We investigated the development of spontaneous electrophysiological activity and pharmacological responses for over 1 year in culture using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). The complete maturation of spontaneous firing, evoked responses, and modulation of activity by glutamatergic and GABAergic receptor antagonists/agonists required 20-30 weeks. At this stage, neural networks also demonstrated epileptiform synchronized burst firing (SBF) in response to pro-convulsants and SBF suppression using clinical anti-epilepsy drugs. Our results reveal the feasibility of long-term MEA measurements from hiPSC-derived neuronal networks in vitro for mechanistic analyses and drug screening. However, developmental changes in electrophysiological and pharmacological properties indicate the necessity for the international standardization of culture and evaluation procedures.

  12. Cortical sensorimotor integration: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuev, A S

    1989-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed that neocortex is constructed from structural neuronal modules (columns and rings). Each module is considered as unit for cortical sensorimotor integration. Complex functional relationships between modules can be arranged by intracortical inhibition participation. High pronounced neocortical plasticity ensures the process of continuous formation of various dominating operative constellations comprising stable neuronal modules whose component structure and distributive characteristic are determined by the dominant motivation and the central motor program.

  13. [Parietal Cortices and Body Information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Eiichi; Amemiya, Kaoru; Morita, Tomoyo

    2016-11-01

    Proprioceptive signals originating from skeletal muscles and joints contribute to the formation of both the human body schema and the body image. In this chapter, we introduce various types of bodily illusions that are elicited by proprioceptive inputs, and we discuss distinct functions implemented by different parietal cortices. First, we illustrate the primary importance of the motor network in the processing of proprioceptive (kinesthetic) signals originating from muscle spindles. Next, we argue that the right inferior parietal cortex, in concert with the inferior frontal cortex (both regions connected by the inferior branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus-SLF III), may be involved in the conscious experience of body image. Further, we hypothesize other functions of distinct parietal regions: the association between internal hand motor representation with external object representation in the left inferior parietal cortex, visuo-kinesthetic processing in the bilateral posterior parietal cortices, and the integration of somatic signals from different body parts in the higher-order somatosensory parietal cortices. Our results indicate that a distinct parietal region, in concert with its anatomically and functionally connected frontal regions, probably plays specialized roles in the processing of body-related information.

  14. An improved quantitative analysis method for plant cortical microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Huang, Chenyang; Wang, Jia; Shang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of plant cortical microtubules can reflect the physiological state of cells. However, little attention has been paid to the image quantitative analysis of plant cortical microtubules so far. In this paper, Bidimensional Empirical Mode Decomposition (BEMD) algorithm was applied in the image preprocessing of the original microtubule image. And then Intrinsic Mode Function 1 (IMF1) image obtained by decomposition was selected to do the texture analysis based on Grey-Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) algorithm. Meanwhile, in order to further verify its reliability, the proposed texture analysis method was utilized to distinguish different images of Arabidopsis microtubules. The results showed that the effect of BEMD algorithm on edge preserving accompanied with noise reduction was positive, and the geometrical characteristic of the texture was obvious. Four texture parameters extracted by GLCM perfectly reflected the different arrangements between the two images of cortical microtubules. In summary, the results indicate that this method is feasible and effective for the image quantitative analysis of plant cortical microtubules. It not only provides a new quantitative approach for the comprehensive study of the role played by microtubules in cell life activities but also supplies references for other similar studies.

  15. An Improved Quantitative Analysis Method for Plant Cortical Microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The arrangement of plant cortical microtubules can reflect the physiological state of cells. However, little attention has been paid to the image quantitative analysis of plant cortical microtubules so far. In this paper, Bidimensional Empirical Mode Decomposition (BEMD algorithm was applied in the image preprocessing of the original microtubule image. And then Intrinsic Mode Function 1 (IMF1 image obtained by decomposition was selected to do the texture analysis based on Grey-Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM algorithm. Meanwhile, in order to further verify its reliability, the proposed texture analysis method was utilized to distinguish different images of Arabidopsis microtubules. The results showed that the effect of BEMD algorithm on edge preserving accompanied with noise reduction was positive, and the geometrical characteristic of the texture was obvious. Four texture parameters extracted by GLCM perfectly reflected the different arrangements between the two images of cortical microtubules. In summary, the results indicate that this method is feasible and effective for the image quantitative analysis of plant cortical microtubules. It not only provides a new quantitative approach for the comprehensive study of the role played by microtubules in cell life activities but also supplies references for other similar studies.

  16. Models of cortical malformation--Chemical and physical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-02-15

    Pharmaco-resistant epilepsies, and also some neuropsychiatric disorders, are often associated with malformations in hippocampal and neocortical structures. The mechanisms leading to these cortical malformations causing an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory system are largely unknown. Animal models using chemical or physical manipulations reproduce different human pathologies by interfering with cell generation and neuronal migration. The model of in utero injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) acetate mimics periventricular nodular heterotopia. The freeze lesion model reproduces (poly)microgyria, focal heterotopia and schizencephaly. The in utero irradiation model causes microgyria and heterotopia. Intraperitoneal injections of carmustine 1-3-bis-chloroethyl-nitrosurea (BCNU) to pregnant rats produces laminar disorganization, heterotopias and cytomegalic neurons. The ibotenic acid model induces focal cortical malformations, which resemble human microgyria and ulegyria. Cortical dysplasia can be also observed following prenatal exposure to ethanol, cocaine or antiepileptic drugs. All these models of cortical malformations are characterized by a pronounced hyperexcitability, few of them also produce spontaneous epileptic seizures. This dysfunction results from an impairment in GABAergic inhibition and/or an increase in glutamatergic synaptic transmission. The cortical region initiating or contributing to this hyperexcitability may not necessarily correspond to the site of the focal malformation. In some models wide-spread molecular and functional changes can be observed in remote regions of the brain, where they cause pathophysiological activities. This paper gives an overview on different animal models of cortical malformations, which are mostly used in rodents and which mimic the pathology and to some extent the pathophysiology of neuronal migration disorders associated with epilepsy in humans.

  17. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume L, Molecular biology of development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains contributions by contributors to the 1985 Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. This year's theme was Molecular Biology of Development. The volume consists of 104 articles organized by content into sections entitled Nuclear/Cytoplasmic Interactions in Early Development; Lineage and Segmentation/Pattern Formation; Homeotic Mutants; Homeo Boxes; Tissue Specificity/Position Effects; Expression of Genes Introduced into Transgenic Mice; Induced Developmental Defects; Control of Gene Expression; Sex Determination; Cell-cycle Effects; Pluripotent Cells/Oncogenes; Cellular Differentiation; and Developmental Neurobiology.

  18. HIV-1-infected and immune-activated macrophages induce astrocytic differentiation of human cortical neural progenitor cells via the STAT3 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Peng

    Full Text Available Diminished adult neurogenesis is considered a potential mechanism in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD. In HAD, HIV-1-infected and immune-activated brain mononuclear phagocytes (MP; perivascular macrophages and microglia drive central nervous system (CNS inflammation and may alter normal neurogenesis. We previously demonstrated HIV-1-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS activated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM inhibit human neural progenitor cell (NPC neurogenesis, while enhancing astrogliogenesis through the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, in vitro and in vivo. Here we further test the hypothesis that HIV-1-infected/activated MDM promote NPC astrogliogenesis via activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, a critical factor for astrogliogenesis. Our results show that LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS-MCM and HIV-infected/LPS-activated MDM-conditioned medium (LPS+HIV-MCM induced Janus kinase 1 (Jak1 and STAT3 activation. Induction of the Jak-STAT3 activation correlated with increased glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP expression, demonstrating an induction of astrogliogenesis. Moreover, STAT3-targeting siRNA (siSTAT3 decreased MCM-induced STAT3 activation and NPC astrogliogenesis. Furthermore, inflammatory cytokines (including IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α produced by LPS-activated and/or HIV-1-infected MDM may contribute to MCM-induced STAT3 activation and astrocytic differentiation. These observations were confirmed in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice with HIV-1 encephalitis (HIVE. In HIVE mice, siRNA control (without target sequence, sicon pre-transfected NPCs injected with HIV-1-infected MDM showed more astrocytic differentiation and less neuronal differentiation of NPCs as compared to NPC injection alone. siSTAT3 abrogated HIV-1-infected MDM-induced astrogliogenesis of injected NPCs. Collectively, these

  19. Relationship between higher cortical dysfunction and the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeshima, Etsuko; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Yamada, Yoichi; Yukawa, Susumu [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    The relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and organic lesions was investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to clarify the etiology of higher cortical dysfunction in SLE. The subjects were 10 patients with SLE, and higher cortical dysfunction was observed in 8 (80%) of the 10 patients. Five (82.5%) of the 8 patients showed abnormal MRI findings. The findings of higher cortical dysfunction were consistent with the MRI findings in 1 of the 5 patients, but not in the remaining four. MRI revealed no lesion despite the presence of higher cortical dysfunction in three patients. These results suggest that the association of organic changes and functional changes in cerebral nerve cells is important for etiology of higher cortical dysfunction in SLE. (author).

  20. Pharmacological Activation Gi/o Protein Increases Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Production through Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway in Primary Cultured Rat Cortical Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Matsumoto, Chie; Azuma, Honami; Taki, Sayaka; Takebayashi, Minoru; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Morioka, Norimitsu

    2017-01-01

    A significant reduction of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been identified in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, clarification of the mechanism of GDNF production, and modulating brain GDNF levels could be a novel therapeutic approach. A previous study demonstrated that antidepressant amitriptyline-induced GDNF production was significantly inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), a Gi/o protein inhibitor in astrocytes, the main source of GDNF in the brain. However, it is not known whether direct activation of Gi/o protein might induce GDNF expression, and what mechanisms might be involved after Gi/o protein activation. The current study investigated Gi/o protein-initiated GDNF production in rat cortical astrocytes using activators that directly activate Gi/o protein, mastoparan and compound48/80. Treatment of astrocytes with either mastoparan or compound48/80 increased GDNF mRNA expression at 3 and 6 h, and GDNF protein release at 24 h. Treatment of astrocyte with either mastoparan or compound48/80 increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression as well as GDNF. Mastoparan and compound48/80-induced GDNF mRNA expression were significantly inhibited by not only PTX, but also fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor. In fact, both FGFR substrate2α (FRS2α) and ERK phosphorylation were increased by treatment with either mastoparan or compound48/80, and these were significantly blocked by PTX. Thus, direct, receptor-independent Gi/o protein activation increases GDNF production through FGFR/ERK signaling pathway. The current results indicate a critical role of Gi/o signaling in the regulation of GDNF expression in astrocytes.

  1. Characterization of Tunisian marine sediments in Rades and Gabes harbors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Imen BEL HADJ ALI; Zoubeir LAFHAJ; Mounir BOUASSIDA; Imen SAID

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to study the geotechnical and environmental characteristics of sediments dredged from two Tunisian harbors:Rades and Gabes. The first harbor represents the main facility place in the national transport chain. The second one is selected as its sediments present a serious ecological constraint caused by the discharge of wastes into the marine environment. These sediments are either discarded at sea or landfilled despite their harmful effects on the environment. The article is divided into three main sections. The first one presents the material that was carried for Rades and Gabes harbors. The conservation conditions and the used experimental tests are detailed. Geotechnical characterization includes the determination of the grain size distribution, the water content, the Atterberg limits, the methylene blue value, the specific area, the bulk density, the specific unit weight, the organic and carbonate contents. Environmental characterization is assessed by the determination of metals concentrations in a leaching solution. The second section deals with the description and analysis of geotechnical properties of Rades and Gabes harbors’ sediments. The results obtained show that Rades harbor sediments are slightly sandy clayey silts whereas Gabes harbor sediments are silty sands characterized by a highly plastic clay fraction. Both of the two sediments don’t exhibit a high organic content. Finally, chemical, mineralogical and environmental properties are presented and then analysed. The experimental results obtained show that Rades and Gabes sediments could be used as a sand substitute in the formulation of a new construction material. Gabes harbor sediments are more polluted than Rades harbor sediments.

  2. 75 FR 26198 - Foreign-Trade Zone 152 - Burns Harbor, Indiana, Application for Reorganization under Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 152 - Burns Harbor, Indiana, Application for Reorganization...-purpose zone currently consists of six sites in the Burns Harbor/Gary, Indiana area: Site 1: (533,288 sq...); Site 2: (441 acres) within the Port of Indiana/Burns International Harbor, Burns Harbor (Porter...

  3. Tech Talk for Social Studies Teachers Lest We Forget: Remembering Pearl Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Tim

    2001-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites about Pearl Harbor (Hawaii). Includes Web sites that cover Pearl Harbor history, a live view of Pearl Harbor, stories from people who remember where they were during the attack, information on the naval station at Pearl Harbor, and a virtual tour of the USS Arizona. (CMK)

  4. Protective effects of berberine against amyloid beta-induced toxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Yanjun Zhang; Shuai Du; Mixia Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Berberine, a major constituent of Coptidis rhizoma, exhibits neural protective effects. The present study analyzed the potential protective effect of berberine against amyloid G-induced cytotoxicity in rat cerebral cortical neurons. Alzheimer's disease cell models were treated with 0.5 and 2 μmol/Lberberine for 36 hours to inhibit amyloid G-induced toxicity. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining results showed that berberine significantly increased cell viability and reduced cell apoptosis in primary cultured rat cortical neurons. In addition, western blot analysis revealed a protective effect of berberine against amyloid β-induced toxicity in cultured cortical neurons, which coincided with significantly decreased abnormal up-regulation of activated caspase-3. These results showed that berberine exhibited a protective effect against amyloid 13-induced cytotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons.

  5. Cortical spreading depolarization increases adult neurogenesis, and alters behavior and hippocampus-dependent memory in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, Anja; Baum, Eileen; Braun, Falko; Witte, Otto W

    2017-05-01

    Cortical spreading depolarizations are an epiphenomenon of human brain pathologies and associated with extensive but transient changes in ion homeostasis, metabolism, and blood flow. Previously, we have shown that cortical spreading depolarization have long-lasting consequences on the brains transcriptome and structure. In particular, we found that cortical spreading depolarization stimulate hippocampal cell proliferation resulting in a sustained increase in adult neurogenesis. Since the hippocampus is responsible for explicit memory and adult-born dentate granule neurons contribute to this function, cortical spreading depolarization might influence hippocampus-dependent cognition. To address this question, we induced cortical spreading depolarization in C57Bl/6 J mice by epidural application of 1.5 mol/L KCl and evaluated neurogenesis and behavior at two, four, or six weeks thereafter. Congruent with our previous findings in rats, we found that cortical spreading depolarization increases numbers of newborn dentate granule neurons. Moreover, exploratory behavior and object location memory were consistently enhanced. Reference memory in the water maze was virtually unaffected, whereas memory formation in the Barnes maze was impaired with a delay of two weeks and facilitated after four weeks. These data show that cortical spreading depolarization produces lasting changes in psychomotor behavior and complex, delay- and task-dependent changes in spatial memory, and suggest that cortical spreading depolarization-like events affect the emotional and cognitive outcomes of associated brain pathologies.

  6. Cloning and Sequencing of Protein Kinase cDNA from Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. C. Neale

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases (PKs play critical roles in signal transduction and activation of lymphocytes. The identification of PK genes provides a tool for understanding mechanisms of immunotoxic xenobiotics. As part of a larger study investigating persistent organic pollutants in the harbor seal and their possible immunomodulatory actions, we sequenced harbor seal cDNA fragments encoding PKs. The procedure, using degenerate primers based on conserved motifs of human protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs, successfully amplified nine phocid PK gene fragments with high homology to human and rodent orthologs. We identified eight PTKs and one dual (serine/threonine and tyrosine kinase. Among these were several PKs important in early signaling events through the B- and T-cell receptors (FYN, LYN, ITK and SYK and a MAP kinase involved in downstream signal transduction. V-FGR, RET and DDR2 were also expressed. Sequential activation of protein kinases ultimately induces gene transcription leading to the proliferation and differentiation of lymphocytes critical to adaptive immunity. PKs are potential targets of bioactive xenobiotics, including persistent organic pollutants of the marine environment; characterization of these molecules in the harbor seal provides a foundation for further research illuminating mechanisms of action of contaminants speculated to contribute to large-scale die-offs of marine mammals via immunosuppression.

  7. Ten Year Resurveys of the Biodiversity of Marine Communities and Introduced Species in Pearl Harbor, Honolulu Harbor, and Ke’Ehi Lagoon, O’Ahu, Hawai’i

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-30

    observations at the former collection stations, snorkeling surveys were conducted throughout Pearl Harbor and Ke’ehi Lagoon to estimate the abundance of introduced algae and in Pearl Harbor to document the occurrence of reef corals.

  8. The neuroprotective efficacy of cell-penetrating peptides TAT, penetratin, Arg-9, and Pep-1 in glutamic acid, kainic acid, and in vitro ischemia injury models using primary cortical neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Bruno P; Craig, Amanda J; Milech, Nadia; Hopkins, Richard M; Watt, Paul M; Knuckey, Neville W

    2014-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small peptides (typically 5-25 amino acids), which are used to facilitate the delivery of normally non-permeable cargos such as other peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, or drugs into cells. However, several recent studies have demonstrated that the TAT CPP has neuroprotective properties. Therefore, in this study, we assessed the TAT and three other CPPs (penetratin, Arg-9, Pep-1) for their neuroprotective properties in cortical neuronal cultures following exposure to glutamic acid, kainic acid, or in vitro ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation). Arg-9, penetratin, and TAT-D displayed consistent and high level neuroprotective activity in both the glutamic acid (IC50: 0.78, 3.4, 13.9 μM) and kainic acid (IC50: 0.81, 2.0, 6.2 μM) injury models, while Pep-1 was ineffective. The TAT-D isoform displayed similar efficacy to the TAT-L isoform in the glutamic acid model. Interestingly, Arg-9 was the only CPP that displayed efficacy when washed-out prior to glutamic acid exposure. Neuroprotection following in vitro ischemia was more variable with all peptides providing some level of neuroprotection (IC50; Arg-9: 6.0 μM, TAT-D: 7.1 μM, penetratin/Pep-1: >10 μM). The positive control peptides JNKI-1D-TAT (JNK inhibitory peptide) and/or PYC36L-TAT (AP-1 inhibitory peptide) were neuroprotective in all models. Finally, in a post-glutamic acid treatment experiment, Arg-9 was highly effective when added immediately after, and mildly effective when added 15 min post-insult, while the JNKI-1D-TAT control peptide was ineffective when added post-insult. These findings demonstrate that different CPPs have the ability to inhibit neurodamaging events/pathways associated with excitotoxic and ischemic injuries. More importantly, they highlight the need to interpret neuroprotection studies when using CPPs as delivery agents with caution. On a positive note, the cytoprotective properties of CPPs suggests they are ideal carrier molecules to

  9. Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton on cortical surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y; Thompson, P M; Dinov, I; Toga, A W

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to construct graphical representations of cortical folding patterns by computing skeletons on triangulated cortical surfaces. In our approach, a cortical surface is first partitioned into sulcal and gyral regions via the solution of a variational problem using graph cuts, which can guarantee global optimality. After that, we extend the method of Hamilton-Jacobi skeleton [1] to subsets of triangulated surfaces, together with a geometrically intuitive pruning process that can trade off between skeleton complexity and the completeness of representing folding patterns. Compared with previous work that uses skeletons of 3-D volumes to represent sulcal patterns, the skeletons on cortical surfaces can be easily decomposed into branches and provide a simpler way to construct graphical representations of cortical morphometry. In our experiments, we demonstrate our method on two different cortical surface models, its ability of capturing major sulcal patterns and its application to compute skeletons of gyral regions.

  10. Disorders of cortical formation: MR imaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razek, A A K; Kandell, A Y; Elsorogy, L G; Elmongy, A; Basett, A A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the embryologic stages of the cerebral cortex, illustrate the classification of disorders of cortical formation, and finally describe the main MR imaging features of these disorders. Disorders of cortical formation are classified according to the embryologic stage of the cerebral cortex at which the abnormality occurred. MR imaging shows diminished cortical thickness and sulcation in microcephaly, enlarged dysplastic cortex in hemimegalencephaly, and ipsilateral focal cortical thickening with radial hyperintense bands in focal cortical dysplasia. MR imaging detects smooth brain in classic lissencephaly, the nodular cortex with cobblestone cortex with congenital muscular dystrophy, and the ectopic position of the gray matter with heterotopias. MR imaging can detect polymicrogyria and related syndromes as well as the types of schizencephaly. We concluded that MR imaging is essential to demonstrate the morphology, distribution, and extent of different disorders of cortical formation as well as the associated anomalies and related syndromes.

  11. Cortical microtubules are responsible for gravity resistance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Shouhei; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki

    2010-06-01

    Mechanical resistance to the gravitational force is a principal gravity response in plants distinct from gravitropism. In the final step of gravity resistance, plants increase the rigidity of their cell walls. Here we discuss the role of cortical microtubules, which sustain the function of the cell wall, in gravity resistance. Hypocotyls of Arabidopsis tubulin mutants were shorter and thicker than the wild-type, and showed either left-handed or right-handed helical growth at 1 g. The degree of twisting phenotype was intensified under hypergravity conditions. Hypergravity also induces reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions in epidermal cells. In tubulin mutants, the percentage of cells with longitudinal microtubules was high even at 1 g, and it was further increased by hypergravity. The left-handed helical growth mutants had right-handed microtubule arrays, whereas the right-handed mutant had left-handed arrays. Moreover, blockers of mechanoreceptors suppressed both the twisting phenotype and reorientation of microtubules in tubulin mutants. These results support the hypothesis that cortical microtubules play an essential role in maintenance of normal growth phenotype against the gravitational force, and suggest that mechanoreceptors are involved in signal perception in gravity resistance. Space experiments will confirm whether this view is applicable to plant resistance to 1 g gravity, as to the resistance to hypergravity.

  12. Respiratory properties of blood in the harbor porpoise, Phocoena phocoena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Lisette B; Hansen, Marie N; van Elk, Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    blood. Further, O(2) affinity tended to increase with increasing body mass. A high O(2) affinity favors O(2) extraction from the lungs, but a normal Bohr effect (¿logP(50)/¿pH=-0.46) gradually lowers O(2) affinity during dives (where CO(2) accumulates) to assist O(2) off-loading to perfused tissues......Harbor porpoises are active divers that exchange O(2) and CO(2) with the environment during a fast single breath upon surfacing. We investigated blood O(2)-transporting properties, buffer characteristics, Cl(-) transport via the erythrocyte anion exchanger (AE1), circulating nitric oxide...... metabolites and hemoglobin nitrite reduction in harbor porpoises with the aim to evaluate traits that are adaptive for diving behavior. Blood O(2) affinity was higher in harbor porpoises than in similar sized terrestrial mammals, as supported by our parallel recordings of O(2) equilibria in sheep and pig...

  13. Respiratory properties of blood in the harbor porpoise, Phocoena phocoena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Lisette B.; Hansen, Marie Niemann; van Elk, Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    Harbor porpoises are active divers that exchange O2 and CO2 with the environment during a fast single breath upon surfacing. We investigated blood O2-transporting properties, buffer characteristics, Cl– transport via the erythrocyte anion exchanger (AE1), circulating nitric oxide metabolites...... and hemoglobin nitrite reduction in harbor porpoises with the aim to evaluate traits that are adaptive for diving behavior. Blood O2 affinity was higher in harbor porpoises than in similar sized terrestrial mammals, as supported by our parallel recordings of O2 equilibria in sheep and pig blood. Further, O2...... affinity tended to increase with increasing body mass. A high O2 affinity favors O2 extraction from the lungs, but a normal Bohr effect (ΔlogP50/ΔpH = –0.46) gradually lowers O2 affinity during dives (where CO2 accumulates) to assist O2 off-loading to perfused tissues. The true plasma non...

  14. A Rare Hydrocephalus Complication: Cortical Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Emre; Göçmen, Rahşan; Işıkay, Ayşe İlksen; Tekşam, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Cortical blindness related to bilateral occipital lobe infarction is an extremely rare complication of hydrocephalus. Compression of the posterior cerebral artery, secondary to tentorial herniation, is the cause of occipital infarction. Particularly in children and mentally ill patients, cortical blindness may be missed. Therefore, early diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is important. We present herein a child of ventricular shunt malfunction complicated by cortical blindness.

  15. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  16. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  17. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  18. Lateral entorhinal modulation of piriform cortical activity and fine odor discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Julie; Cohen, Yaniv; He, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zhijan; Jin, Sen; Xu, Fuqiang; Wilson, Donald A

    2013-08-14

    The lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) receives direct input from olfactory bulb mitral cells and piriform cortical pyramidal cells and is the gateway for olfactory input to the hippocampus. However, the LEC also projects back to the piriform cortex and olfactory bulb. Activity in the LEC is shaped by input from the perirhinal cortices, hippocampus, and amygdala, and thus could provide a rich contextual modulation of cortical odor processing. The present study further explored LEC feedback to anterior piriform cortex by examining how LEC top-down input modulates anterior piriform cortex odor evoked activity in rats. Retrograde viral tracing confirmed rich LEC projections to both the olfactory bulb and piriform cortices. In anesthetized rats, reversible lesions of the ipsilateral LEC increased anterior piriform cortical single-unit spontaneous activity. In awake animals performing an odor discrimination task, unilateral LEC reversible lesions enhanced ipsilateral piriform cortical local field potential oscillations during odor sampling, with minimal impact on contralateral activity. Bilateral LEC reversible lesions impaired discrimination performance on a well learned, difficult odor discrimination task, but had no impact on a well learned simple odor discrimination task. The simple discrimination task was impaired by bilateral reversible lesions of the anterior piriform cortex. Given the known function of LEC in working memory and multisensory integration, these results suggest it may serve as a powerful top-down modulator of olfactory cortical function and odor perception. Furthermore, the results provide potential insight into how neuropathology in the entorhinal cortex could contribute to early olfactory deficits seen in Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Decreased cortical inhibition and yet cerebellar pathology in 'familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; Bour, Lo J.; Edwards, Mark J.; Brown, Peter; Aronica, Eleonora; Rozemuller-Kwakkel, Johanna M.; Koehler, Peter J.; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Rothwell, John C.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Cortical hyperexcitability is a feature of "familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy" (FCMTE). However, neuropathological investigations in a single FCMTE patient showed isolated cerebellar pathology. Pathological investigations in a second FCMTE patient, reported here, confirmed cerebellar

  20. Negative Correlations in Visual Cortical Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chelaru, Mircea I; Dragoi, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    .... Whereas positive noise correlations have been extensively studied using experimental and theoretical tools, the functional role of negative correlations in cortical circuits has remained elusive...

  1. Extrachromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid in R factor-harboring Enterobacteriaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, JK; Bak, AL; Christiansen, C

    1976-01-01

    Extrachromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from 24 different R factor-harboring Enterobacteriaceae was isolated and characterized by analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The R factors represented 15 different patterns of transferable drug resistance found in enterobacteria from...... from 1.700 to 1.720 g/cm3. The majority of the bacteria contained extrachromosomal DNAs of various densities. Three-fourths of the R factors were classified as fi+. The investigation illustrates the extensive variability in the physical characteristics of plasmid DNA from R factor-harboring strains....

  2. The myokine irisin increases cortical bone mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaianni, Graziana; Cuscito, Concetta; Mongelli, Teresa; Pignataro, Paolo; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Liu, Peng; Lu, Ping; Sartini, Loris; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Mori, Giorgio; Di Benedetto, Adriana; Brunetti, Giacomina; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Reseland, Janne E.; Colucci, Silvia; New, Maria I.; Zaidi, Mone; Cinti, Saverio; Grano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear how physical activity stimulates new bone synthesis. We explored whether irisin, a newly discovered myokine released upon physical activity, displays anabolic actions on the skeleton. Young male mice were injected with vehicle or recombinant irisin (r-irisin) at a low cumulative weekly dose of 100 µg kg−1. We observed significant increases in cortical bone mass and strength, notably in cortical tissue mineral density, periosteal circumference, polar moment of inertia, and bending strength. This anabolic action was mediated primarily through the stimulation of bone formation, but with parallel notable reductions in osteoclast numbers. The trabecular compartment of the same bones was spared, as were vertebrae from the same mice. Higher irisin doses (3,500 µg kg−1 per week) cause browning of adipose tissue; this was not seen with low-dose r-irisin. Expectedly, low-dose r-irisin modulated the skeletal genes, Opn and Sost, but not Ucp1 or Pparγ expression in white adipose tissue. In bone marrow stromal cell cultures, r-irisin rapidly phosphorylated Erk, and up-regulated Atf4, Runx2, Osx, Lrp5, β-catenin, Alp, and Col1a1; this is consistent with a direct receptor-mediated action to stimulate osteogenesis. We also noted that, although the irisin precursor Fndc5 was expressed abundantly in skeletal muscle, other sites, such as bone and brain, also expressed Fndc5, albeit at low levels. Furthermore, muscle fibers from r-irisin–injected mice displayed enhanced Fndc5 positivity, and irisin induced Fdnc5 mRNA expression in cultured myoblasts. Our data therefore highlight a previously unknown action of the myokine irisin, which may be the molecular entity responsible for muscle–bone connectivity. PMID:26374841

  3. Cortical inputs innervate calbindin-immunoreactive interneurons of the rat basolateral amygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Gunes; Paré, Jean-Francois; Smith, Yoland; Paré, Denis

    2014-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to shed light on the synaptic organization of the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA). The BLA contains multiple types of GABAergic interneurons that are differentially connected with extrinsic afferents and other BLA cells. Previously, it was reported that parvalbumin immunoreactive (PV(+) ) interneurons receive strong excitatory inputs from principal BLA cells but very few cortical inputs, implying a prevalent role in feedback inhibition. However, because prior physiological studies indicate that cortical afferents do trigger feedforward inhibition in principal cells, the present study aimed to determine whether a numerically important subtype of interneurons, expressing calbindin (CB(+) ), receives cortical inputs. Rats received injections of the anterograde tracer Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin (PHAL) in the perirhinal cortex or adjacent temporal neocortex. Light and electron microscopic observations of the relations between cortical inputs and BLA neurons were performed in the lateral (LA) and basolateral (BL) nuclei. Irrespective of the injection site (perirhinal or temporal neocortex) and target nucleus (LA or BL), ~90% of cortical axon terminals formed asymmetric synapses with dendritic spines of principal BLA neurons, while 10% contacted the dendritic shafts of presumed interneurons, half of which were CB(+) . Given the previously reported pattern of CB coexpression among GABAergic interneurons of the BLA, these results suggest that a subset of PV-immunonegative cells that express CB, most likely the somatostatin-positive interneurons, are important mediators of cortically evoked feedforward inhibition in the BLA.

  4. Complement inhibition and statins prevent fetal brain cortical abnormalities in a mouse model of preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroni, Silvia M A; Gonzalez, Juan M; Wade, Jean; Jansen, Maurits A; Serio, Andrea; Marshall, Ian; Lennen, Ross J; Girardi, Guillermina

    2014-01-01

    Premature babies are particularly vulnerable to brain injury. In this study we focus on cortical brain damage associated with long-term cognitive, behavioral, attentional or socialization deficits in children born preterm. Using a mouse model of preterm birth (PTB), we demonstrated that complement component C5a contributes to fetal cortical brain injury. Disruption of cortical dendritic and axonal cytoarchitecture was observed in PTB-mice. Fetuses deficient in C5aR (-/-) did not show cortical brain damage. Treatment with antibody anti-C5, that prevents generation of C5a, also prevented cortical fetal brain injury in PTB-mice. C5a also showed a detrimental effect on fetal cortical neuron development and survival in vitro. Increased glutamate release was observed in cortical neurons in culture exposed to C5a. Blockade of C5aR prevented glutamate increase and restored neurons dendritic and axonal growth and survival. Similarly, increased glutamate levels - measured by (1)HMRS - were observed in vivo in PTB-fetuses compared to age-matched controls. The blockade of glutamate receptors prevented C5a-induced abnormal growth and increased cell death in isolated fetal cortical neurons. Simvastatin and pravastatin prevented cortical fetal brain developmental and metabolic abnormalities -in vivo and in vitro. Neuroprotective effects of statins were mediated by Akt/PKB signaling pathways. This study shows that complement activation plays a crucial role in cortical fetal brain injury in PTL and suggests that complement inhibitors and statins might be good therapeutic options to improve neonatal outcomes in preterm birth. © 2013.

  5. Cortistain is expressed in a distinct subset of cortical interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lecea Flores de Lemus, Luis de; Río Fernández, José Antonio del; Alcántara Horrillo, Soledad; Criado, José R.; Morales, Marisela; Danielson, Patria E.; Henriksen, Steven J.; Soriano García, Eduardo; Sutcliffe, J. Gregor

    1997-01-01

    Cortistatin is a presumptive neuropeptide that shares 11 of its 14 amino acids with somatostatin. In contrast to somatostatin, administration of cortistatin into the rat brain ventricles specifically enhances slow wave sleep, apparently by antagonizing the effects of acetylcholine on cortical excitability. Here we show that preprocortistatin mRNA is expressed in a subset of GABAergic cells in the cortex and hippocampus that partially overlap with those containing somatostatin. A significant p...

  6. Gyrification from constrained cortical expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Biggins, John S; Mahadevan, L

    2015-01-01

    The exterior of the mammalian brain - the cerebral cortex - has a conserved layered structure whose thickness varies little across species. However, selection pressures over evolutionary time scales have led to cortices that have a large surface area to volume ratio in some organisms, with the result that the brain is strongly convoluted into sulci and gyri. Here we show that the gyrification can arise as a nonlinear consequence of a simple mechanical instability driven by tangential expansion of the gray matter constrained by the white matter. A physical mimic of the process using a layered swelling gel captures the essence of the mechanism, and numerical simulations of the brain treated as a soft solid lead to the formation of cusped sulci and smooth gyri similar to those in the brain. The resulting gyrification patterns are a function of relative cortical expansion and relative thickness (compared with brain size), and are consistent with observations of a wide range of brains, ranging from smooth to highl...

  7. Cortical control of facial expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müri, René M

    2016-06-01

    The present Review deals with the motor control of facial expressions in humans. Facial expressions are a central part of human communication. Emotional face expressions have a crucial role in human nonverbal behavior, allowing a rapid transfer of information between individuals. Facial expressions can be either voluntarily or emotionally controlled. Recent studies in nonhuman primates and humans have revealed that the motor control of facial expressions has a distributed neural representation. At least five cortical regions on the medial and lateral aspects of each hemisphere are involved: the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area on the medial wall, and the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex. The results of studies in humans and nonhuman primates suggest that the innervation of the face is bilaterally controlled for the upper part and mainly contralaterally controlled for the lower part. Furthermore, the primary motor cortex, the ventral lateral premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area are essential for the voluntary control of facial expressions. In contrast, the cingulate cortical areas are important for emotional expression, because they receive input from different structures of the limbic system.

  8. SLEEP AND OLFACTORY CORTICAL PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eBarnes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many systems, sleep plays a vital role in memory consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. These processes together help store information of biological significance and reset synaptic circuits to facilitate acquisition of information in the future. In this review, we describe recent evidence of sleep-dependent changes in olfactory system structure and function which contribute to odor memory and perception. During slow-wave sleep, the piriform cortex becomes hypo-responsive to odor stimulation and instead displays sharp-wave activity similar to that observed within the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and other cortical and limbic regions is enhanced during slow-wave sleep compared to waking. This combination of conditions may allow odor memory consolidation to occur during a state of reduced external interference and facilitate association of odor memories with stored hedonic and contextual cues. Evidence consistent with sleep-dependent odor replay within olfactory cortical circuits is presented. These data suggest that both the strength and precision of odor memories is sleep-dependent. The work further emphasizes the critical role of synaptic plasticity and memory in not only odor memory but also basic odor perception. The work also suggests a possible link between sleep disturbances that are frequently co-morbid with a wide range of pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression and the known olfactory impairments associated with those disorders.

  9. Distinct Afatinib Resistance Mechanisms Identified in Lung Adenocarcinoma Harboring an EGFR Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Toshimitsu; Ohmori, Tohru; Ohba, Motoi; Arata, Satoru; Murata, Yasunori; Kusumoto, Sojiro; Ando, Koichi; Ishida, Hiroo; Ohnishi, Tsukasa; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2017-03-13

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are associated with significant responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR-activating mutations. However, acquired resistance to reversible EGFR-TKIs remains a major obstacle. In particular, while the second-generation irreversible EGFR-TKI afatinib is currently used for treating NSCLC patients, the mechanisms underlying acquired afatinib resistance remain poorly understood. Here, heterogeneous mechanisms of acquired resistance were identified following long-term exposure to increasing doses of afatinib in EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells. Notably, three resistant cell lines, PC-9AFR1, PC-9AFR2, and PC-9AFR3 (AFR1, AFR2, and AFR3, respectively), employed distinct mechanisms for avoiding EGFR inhibition, with increased EGFR expression being detected in all resistant cell lines. Moreover, an activating EGFR mutation was partially lost in AFR1 and AFR2 cells. AFR1 cells exhibited afatinib resistance as a result of wild-type KRAS amplification and overexpression; however, these cells showed a progressive decrease and eventual loss of the acquired KRAS dependence, as well as resensitization to afatinib, following a drug holiday. Meanwhile, AFR2 cells exhibited increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), which promoted insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) activity and subsequent AKT phosphorylation, thereby indicating a potential bypass signaling pathway associated with IGFR1. Finally, AFR3 cells harbored the secondary EGFR mutation T790M. Our findings constitute the first report showing acquired wild-type KRAS overexpression and attenuation of afatinib resistance following a drug holiday.

  10. Immunoprofiling of rice root cortex reveals two cortical subdomains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia eHenry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation and differentiation of aerenchyma, i.e., air-containing cavities that are critical for flooding tolerance, take place exclusively in the cortex. The understanding of development and differentiation of the cortex is thus an important issue; however, studies on this tissue are limited, partly because of the lack of available molecular tools. We screened a commercially available library of cell wall antibodies to identify markers of cortical tissue in rice roots. Out of the 174 antibodies screened, eight were cortex-specific. Our analysis revealed that two types of cortical tissues are present in rice root seedlings. We named these cell layers 'inner' and 'outer' based on their location relative to the stele. We then used the antibodies to clarify cell identity in lateral roots. Without these markers, previous studies could not distinguish between the cortex and sclerenchyma in small lateral roots. By immunostaining lateral root sections, we showed that the internal ground tissue in small lateral roots has outer cortical identity.

  11. Active Chemical Thermodynamics promoted by activity of cortical actin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    The spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of the nanoclusters of cell surface proteins is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we have proposed a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. We study the consequences of such active actin-based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that the active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in efficiency and extent of conformational spread, even at low levels of expression at the cell surface. We define a activity temperature (τa) arising due to actin activities which can be used to describe chemical thermodynamics of the system. We plot TTT (time-temparature-transformation) curves and compute the Arrhenius factors which depend on τa . With this, the active asters can be treated as enzymes whose enzymatic reaction rate can be related to the activity.

  12. A Comparison of Microbial Water Quality and Diversity for Ballast and Tropical Harbor Waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Ng

    Full Text Available Indicator organisms and antibiotic resistance were used as a proxy to measure microbial water quality of ballast tanks of ships, and surface waters in a tropical harbor. The survival of marine bacteria in ballast tanks appeared to diminish over longer water retention time, with a reduction of cell viability observed after a week based on heterotrophic plate counts. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed distinct differences in microbial composition of ballast and harbor waters. The harbor waters had a higher abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs assigned to Cyanobacteria (Synechococcus spp. and α-proteobacteria (SAR11 members, while marine hydrocarbon degraders such as γ-proteobacteria (Ocenspirillaes spp., Thiotrchales spp. and Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteriales spp. dominated the ballast water samples. Screening of indicator organisms found Escherichia coli (E. coli, Enterococcus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa in two or more of the ballast and harbor water samples tested. Vibrio spp. and Salmonella spp. were detected exclusively in harbor water samples. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR, we screened for 13 antibiotic resistant gene (ARG targets and found higher abundances of sul1 (4.13-3.44 x 102 copies/mL, dfrA (0.77-1.80 x10 copies/mL and cfr (2.00-5.21 copies/mL genes compared to the other ARG targets selected for this survey. These genes encode for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim and chloramphenicol-florfenicol antibiotics, which are also known to persist in sediments of aquaculture farms and coastal environments. Among the ARGs screened, we found significant correlations (P<0.05 between ereA, ermG, cfr and tetO genes to one or more of the indicator organisms detected in this study, which may suggest that these members contribute to the environmental resistome. This study provides a baseline water quality survey, quantitatively assessing indicators of antibiotic resistance, potentially pathogenic organisms and a

  13. Responses to Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid of Rat Visual Cortical Neurons in Tissue Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    Neurol. 234: 242-263. Peters, A. and Proskauer, c. C. (1980) Synaptic relationships between a multipolar stellate cell and a pyramidal neuron in rat...APR 1986 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Responses to Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid of Rat Visual Cortical Neurons in...AIR FORCE MEDICAL CENTER Title of Thesis: Responses to Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid of Rat Visual Cortical Neurons in Tissue Slices Name of Candidate

  14. 33 CFR 110.45a - Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass. 110.45a Section 110.45a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mattapoisett, Mass. (a) Area No. 1 beginning at a point on the shore at latitude 41°39′23″ N., longitude...

  15. 77 FR 22489 - Special Anchorage Regulations, Newport Bay Harbor, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... Master Plan Subcommittee of the City of Newport Harbor Commission led an outreach campaign involving a... meetings, the City of Newport asked the Coast Guard to amend its anchorage regulations. The Coast Guard... incorporated into area A-11 under revised Sec. 110.95(k). An image of the anchorage areas is available in...

  16. 77 FR 35846 - Safety Zone; Sheboygan Harbor Fest, Sheboygan, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Sheboygan Harbor Fest, Sheboygan, WI AGENCY... safety zone on Lake Michigan and the Sheboygan River, Sheboygan, WI. This safety zone is intended...

  17. Army Engineer Divers: First In Port-Au-Prince Harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    America . Shortly after the quake hit, United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) diverted the USNS Grasp and the 544th to Port-au-Prince. Once there...Prince harbor. Pe- troleum floated on top of the water, and numerous marine hazards like jellyfish , human waste, and debris floated be- neath the

  18. 78 FR 29089 - Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... announced by a later notice in the Federal Register. B. Basis and Purpose Tsunamis can occur at any time. There is no tsunami season. The destructive potential of a tsunami can take lives, cause millions of... of the harbors in the event a tsunami warning is issued for the main Hawaiian Islands. DATES...

  19. The unimodal distribution of sub-threshold, ongoing activity in cortical networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat eYaron-Jakoubovitch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of the subthreshold, ongoing-activity in cortical neurons has been the focus of numerous studies. This activity, described as spontaneous slow waves in membrane potential, has been observed in a span of species in diverse cortical and subcortical areas. We here characterized membrane potential fluctuations in motor and the frontal association cortices cortical neurons of ketamine-xylazine anesthetized rats. We recorded from 95 neurons from a range of cortical depths to unravel the network and cellular mechanisms that shape the subthreshold ongoing spontaneous activity of these neurons. We define a unitary event that generates the sub-threshold ongoing activity: Giant Synaptic Potentials (GSPs. These events have a duration of 87 ± 50 ms and an amplitude of 19 ± 6.4 mV. They occur at a frequency of 3.7 ± 0.8 Hz and involve an increase in conductance change of 22 ± 21%. GSPs are mainly due to excitatory activity that occurs throughout all cortical layers, unaffected by the intrinsic properties of the cells. Indeed, blocking the GABAA receptors, a procedure that had a profound effect on cortical activity, did not alter these unitary events. We propose that this unitary event is composed of individual, excitatory synaptic potentials that appear at different levels of synchrony and that the level of synchrony determines the shape of the subthreshold activity.

  20. Cortical control of whisker movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Carl C H

    2014-01-01

    Facial muscles drive whisker movements, which are important for active tactile sensory perception in mice and rats. These whisker muscles are innervated by cholinergic motor neurons located in the lateral facial nucleus. The whisker motor neurons receive synaptic inputs from premotor neurons, which are located within the brain stem, the midbrain, and the neocortex. Complex, distributed neural circuits therefore regulate whisker movement during behavior. This review focuses specifically on cortical whisker motor control. The whisker primary motor cortex (M1) strongly innervates brain stem reticular nuclei containing whisker premotor neurons, which might form a central pattern generator for rhythmic whisker protraction. In a parallel analogous pathway, the whisker primary somatosensory cortex (S1) strongly projects to the brain stem spinal trigeminal interpolaris nucleus, which contains whisker premotor neurons innervating muscles for whisker retraction. These anatomical pathways may play important functional roles, since stimulation of M1 drives exploratory rhythmic whisking, whereas stimulation of S1 drives whisker retraction.

  1. Cortical cartography and Caret software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Essen, David C

    2012-08-15

    Caret software is widely used for analyzing and visualizing many types of fMRI data, often in conjunction with experimental data from other modalities. This article places Caret's development in a historical context that spans three decades of brain mapping--from the early days of manually generated flat maps to the nascent field of human connectomics. It also highlights some of Caret's distinctive capabilities. This includes the ease of visualizing data on surfaces and/or volumes and on atlases as well as individual subjects. Caret can display many types of experimental data using various combinations of overlays (e.g., fMRI activation maps, cortical parcellations, areal boundaries), and it has other features that facilitate the analysis and visualization of complex neuroimaging datasets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Environmental Breviatea harbor mutualistic Arcobacter epibionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Emmo; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald; Kleiner, Manuel; Tegetmeyer, Halina E.; Riedel, Dietmar; Littmann, Sten; Chen, Jianwei; Milucka, Jana; Viehweger, Bernhard; Becker, Kevin W.; Dong, Xiaoli; Stairs, Courtney W.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Brown, Matthew W.; Roger, Andrew J.; Strous, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Summary Breviatea form a lineage of free living, unicellular protists, distantly related to animals and fungi1–3. This lineage emerged almost one billion years ago, when the oceanic oxygen content was low, and extant Breviatea have evolved or retained an anaerobic lifestyle4. Here we report the cultivation of Lenisia limosa, gen. et sp. nov., a newly discovered breviate colonized by relatives of animal-associated Arcobacter. Physiological experiments showed that the association of L. limosa with Arcobacter was driven by the transfer of hydrogen and was mutualistic, providing benefits to both partners. With whole genome sequencing and differential proteomics we show that an experimentally observed fitness gain of L. limosa could be explained by the activity of a so far unknown type of NAD(P)H accepting hydrogenase, which was expressed in the presence, but not in the absence of Arcobacter. Differential proteomics further revealed that the presence of Lenisia stimulated expression of known “virulence” factors by Arcobacter. These proteins typically enable colonization of animal cells during infection5, but may in the present case act for mutual benefit. Finally, re-investigation of two currently available transcriptomic datasets of other Breviatea4 revealed the presence and activity of related hydrogen-consuming Arcobacter, indicating that mutualistic interaction between these two groups of microbes might be pervasive. Our results support the notion that molecular mechanisms involved in virulence can also support mutualism6 as shown here for Arcobacter and Breviatea. PMID:27279223

  3. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features.

  4. β2 and γ3 laminins are critical cortical basement membrane components: ablation of Lamb2 and Lamc3 genes disrupts cortical lamination and produces dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radner, Stephanie; Banos, Charles; Bachay, Galina; Li, Yong N; Hunter, Dale D; Brunken, William J; Yee, Kathleen T

    2013-03-01

    Cortical development is dependent on the timely production and migration of neurons from neurogenic sites to their mature positions. Mutations in several receptors for extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and their downstream signaling cascades produce dysplasia in brain. Although mutation of a critical binding site in the gene that encodes the ECM molecule laminin γ1 (Lamc1) disrupts cortical lamination, the ECM ligand(s) for many ECM receptors have not been demonstrated directly in the cortex. Several isoforms of the heterotrimeric laminins, all containing the β2 and γ3 chain, have been isolated from the brain, suggesting they are important for CNS function. Here, we report that mice homozygous null for the laminin β2 and γ3 chains exhibit cortical laminar disorganization. Mice lacking both of these laminin chains exhibit hallmarks of human cobblestone lissencephaly (type II, nonclassical): they demonstrate severe laminar disruption; midline fusion; perturbation of Cajal-Retzius cell distribution; altered radial glial cell morphology; and ectopic germinal zones. Surprisingly, heterozygous mice also exhibit laminar disruption of cortical neurons, albeit with lesser severity. In compound null mice, the pial basement membrane is fractured, and the distribution of a key laminin receptor, dystroglycan, is altered. These data suggest that β2 and γ3-containing laminins play an important dose-dependent role in development of the cortical pial basement membrane, which serves as an attachment site for Cajal-Retzius and radial glial cells, thereby guiding neural development.

  5. Case study of small harbor excitation under storm and tsunami conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synolakis, Costas; Maravelakis, Nikos; Kalligeris, Nikos; Skanavis, Vassilios; Kanoglu, Utku; Yalciner, Ahmet; Lynett, Pat

    2016-04-01

    enough information to infer the resonant modes of the basins excited during storm conditions. The deployment position of the pressure gauges is based on numerical modeling results. We have employed the fully nonlinear Boussinesq module of COULWAVE using a high resolution (2m cell size) relief model and an idealized TMA directional wave spectrum. The wave field and low frequency energy distribution in the basin are captured by both numerical modeling and field measurements. The field measurements agree well with the numerical modeling analysis, providing insight as to the causes of severe disturbance and useful information that should be considered for an effective solution to the protection of the harbor. Our measurements appear the first ever nearshore measurements of waves and currents for a 2+ year period duration in Greece. The work is also being used for validation tsunami inundation models for civil defense applications in Crete. * This work was supported by the project ASTARTE, Grant no 603839 7th FP (ENV.213.6.4.3) to the Technical University of Crete and to the Middle East Technical University.

  6. Underwater noise from three types of offshore wind turbines: estimation of impact zones for harbor porpoises and harbor seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougaard, Jakob; Henriksen, Oluf Damsgaard; Miller, Lee A

    2009-06-01

    Underwater noise was recorded from three different types of wind turbines in Denmark and Sweden (Middelgrunden, Vindeby, and Bockstigen-Valar) during normal operation. Wind turbine noise was only measurable above ambient noise at frequencies below 500 Hz. Total sound pressure level was in the range 109-127 dB re 1 microPa rms, measured at distances between 14 and 20 m from the foundations. The 1/3-octave noise levels were compared with audiograms of harbor seals and harbor porpoises. Maximum 1/3-octave levels were in the range 106-126 dB re 1 microPa rms. Maximum range of audibility was estimated under two extreme assumptions on transmission loss (3 and 9 dB per doubling of distance, respectively). Audibility was low for harbor porpoises extending 20-70 m from the foundation, whereas audibility for harbor seals ranged from less than 100 m to several kilometers. Behavioral reactions of porpoises to the noise appear unlikely except if they are very close to the foundations. However, behavioral reactions from seals cannot be excluded up to distances of a few hundred meters. It is unlikely that the noise reaches dangerous levels at any distance from the turbines and the noise is considered incapable of masking acoustic communication by seals and porpoises.

  7. Mouse embryonic retina delivers information controlling cortical neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Bonetti

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms to cortical development is an intensely debated issue and an outstanding question in neurobiology. Currently, the emerging view is that interplay between intrinsic genetic mechanisms and extrinsic information shape different stages of cortical development. Yet, whereas the intrinsic program of early neocortical developmental events has been at least in part decoded, the exact nature and impact of extrinsic signaling are still elusive and controversial. We found that in the mouse developing visual system, acute pharmacological inhibition of spontaneous retinal activity (retinal waves-RWs during embryonic stages increase the rate of corticogenesis (cell cycle withdrawal. Furthermore, early perturbation of retinal spontaneous activity leads to changes of cortical layer structure at a later time point. These data suggest that mouse embryonic retina delivers long-distance information capable of modulating cell genesis in the developing visual cortex and that spontaneous activity is the candidate long-distance acting extrinsic cue mediating this process. In addition, these data may support spontaneous activity to be a general signal coordinating neurogenesis in other developing sensory pathways or areas of the central nervous system.

  8. Cortical conditions for fused binocular vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, B D; Pritchard, R

    1968-07-01

    1. The behaviour of twenty-six single neurones has been studied in the visual cerebral cortex of the cat's neurologically isolated and unanaesthetized forebrain. In a separate series of experiments binocular vision was investigated in five human subjects.2. Units in the cat's brain were excited by two straight, light-dark edges, projected independently, one upon each retina; these edges were given identical, artificial saccadic movements. The average response of neurones was measured from the post-stimulus-histogram (P.S.H.), which provided the probability of unit-discharge at various times after the pattern movement.3. A district within either eye-field could usually be found, such that the saccadic movements of edges passing through this part of the field, caused maximal responses; this part of each field is termed the ;representative district'. The most exciting orientations of the stimulating patterns were similar for both eyes. A cell excited by similarly oriented patterns, ;aligned' through the representative districts for each eye, exhibited dramatic spatial summation. Mutual inhibition between retinal inputs was never seen.4. The response of cortical neurones to such aligned patterns was always greater than that when one pattern was misaligned by displacement in either direction from its representative district.5. When the pattern in one eye was inverted, the cell gave less response to aligned than to misaligned patterns.6. Human subjects, viewing similar inverted patterns through a mirror stereoscope, could only obtain stable fusion with a 5 min arc misalignment of the optic axes.7. In other experiments, one eye of each subject was presented with a white rectangular bar upon a black background, while the other eye was excited by a similar black bar upon a white background. Stable fusion was reported, providing percepts of either one single low contrast bar or two neighbouring bars of high contrast. There was a range of relative pattern positions over which

  9. (-) deprenyl attenuates aluminium induced neurotoxicity in primary cortical cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirathinam, S; Lakshmana, M K; Raju, T R

    1996-06-01

    The role of (-) deprenyl in offering neuroprotection to cortical neurons exposed to Aluminium chloride (AlCl3) was examined. Primary cortical cultures derived from newborn rats were exposed to AlCl3 on 6th day in vitro, at 100,200,400,600,800 and 1000 microM concentrations of AlCl3. After 48 h of AlCl3 exposure, many nerve cell bodies were swollen; a beading of neurites and a disruption of the neuritic network were also observed suggesting neurodegeneration. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) efflux increased in a dose-dependent manner (59-120%). (-) Deprenyl co-exposure at concentrations of 10(-7), 10(-8) and 10(-9) M significantly attenuated both the morphological alterations and the LDH efflux induced by AlCl3. This in vitro study has demonstrated that (-) deprenyl can protect neurons from aluminium induced neurotoxicity.

  10. Glioactive ATP controls BDNF recycling in cortical astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoli, Beatrice; Canossa, Marco

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have recently reported that long-term memory retention requires synaptic glia for proBDNF uptake and recycling. Through the recycling course, glial cells release endocytic BDNF, a mechanism that is activated in response to glutamate via AMPA and mGluRI/II receptors. Cortical astrocytes express receptors for many different transmitters suggesting for a complex signaling controlling endocytic BDNF secretion. Here, we demonstrated that the extracellular nucleotide ATP, activating P2X and P2Y receptors, regulates endocytic BDNF secretion in cultured astrocytes. Our data indicate that distinct glioactive molecules can participate in BDNF glial recycling and suggest that cortical astrocytes contributing to neuronal plasticity can be influenced by neurotransmitters in tune with synaptic needs.

  11. MRI of fibrous cortical defect and non-ossifying fibroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, Yoshiko; Aoki, Takatoshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Nakata, Hajime; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshitaka [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    Fibrous cortical defect and non-ossifying fibroma are the benign fibrous lesions of bone commonly involving children. Their diagnosis is usually done with radiography, and MR examinations are rarely performed. We evaluated MRI findings of 11 lesions in 10 cases of fibrous cortical defect and non-ossifying fibroma. Signal intensity of the lesions was varied and large lesions (2 cm<) tended to show heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images corresponding to a mixture of components including fibrous tissue, hemosiderin and foam cells. MRI helps to delineate the extent of the involved bone and to assess the various histological components of the lesions. However, their diagnosis is basically made on the radiographic findings and the role of MRI is limited. (author)

  12. Columnar architecture improves noise robustness in a model cortical network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Bush

    Full Text Available Cortical columnar architecture was discovered decades ago yet there is no agreed upon explanation for its function. Indeed, some have suggested that it has no function, it is simply an epiphenomenon of developmental processes. To investigate this problem we have constructed a computer model of one square millimeter of layer 2/3 of the primary visual cortex (V1 of the cat. Model cells are connected according to data from recent paired cell studies, in particular the connection probability between pyramidal cells is inversely proportional both to the distance separating the cells and to the distance between the preferred parameters (features of the cells. We find that these constraints, together with a columnar architecture, produce more tightly clustered populations of cells when compared to the random architecture seen in, for example, rodents. This causes the columnar network to converge more quickly and accurately on the pattern representing a particular stimulus in the presence of noise, suggesting that columnar connectivity functions to improve pattern recognition in cortical circuits. The model also suggests that synaptic failure, a phenomenon exhibited by weak synapses, may conserve metabolic resources by reducing transmitter release at these connections that do not contribute to network function.

  13. Low level laser therapy reduces oxidative stress in cortical neurons in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tedford, Clark E.; McCarthy, Thomas; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    It is accepted that the mechanisms of low level laser therapy (LLLT) involves photons that are absorbed in the mitochondria of cells and lead to increase of mitochondrial metabolism resulting in more electron transport, increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, and more ATP production. Intracellular calcium changes are seen that correlate with mitochondrial stimulation. The situation with two other intermediates is more complex however: reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Evidence exists that low levels of ROS are produced by LLLT in normal cells that can be beneficial by (for instance) activating NF-kB. However high fluences of light can produce large amounts of ROS that can damage the cells. In oxidatively stressed cells the situation may be different. We exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or cobalt chloride (CoCl2) oxidative insults in the presence or absence of LLLT (810-nm laser at 0.3 or 3 J/cm2). Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay. ROS in neurons was detected using an ROS probe, MitoRox with confocal microscopy. Results showed that LLLT dose-dependently reversed ROS production and protected cortical neurons against H2O2 or CoCl2 induced oxidative injury in cultured cortical neurons. Conclusion: LLLT can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by reversing the levels of ROS.

  14. Telemetry data from satellite tags deployed on harbor seals in Cook Inlet, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Between 2004 and 2006 we conducted four harbor seal tagging trips in Cook Inlet during the months of October and May. In total, we captured and released 93 harbor...

  15. Observed Haul-out Locations for Harbor Seals in Coastal Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys of coastal Alaska are the primary method for estimating abundance of harbor seals. A particular challenge associated with aerial surveys of harbor...

  16. 75 FR 61096 - Regulated Navigation Area; Reserved Channel, Boston Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... Harbor, Boston, MA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is... Navigation Areas: Reserved Channel, Boston Harbor, Boston, MA (a) Location. The following areas are...

  17. Defined Map Units of the seafloor of Boston Harbor and Approaches (BOTTOMTYPE, UTM 19, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data is a qualitatively-derived interpretative polygon shapefile defining the bottom types of the seafloor from Boston Harbor and the harbor approaches,...

  18. bh_2mmbbath: Multibeam Bathymetry 2 meter/pixel of Boston Harbor and Approaches

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are high-resolution bathymetric measurements of the seafloor from Boston Harbor and the harbor approaches, Massachusetts. Approximately 170 km² of...

  19. Multibeam Bathymetry 2 meter/pixel of Boston Harbor and Approaches (bh_2mmbbath)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are high-resolution bathymetric measurements of the seafloor from Boston Harbor and the harbor approaches, Massachusetts. Approximately 170 km² of...

  20. bh_2mmbbath: Multibeam Bathymetry 2 meter/pixel of Boston Harbor and Approaches

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are high-resolution bathymetric measurements of the seafloor from Boston Harbor and the harbor approaches, Massachusetts. Approximately 170 km² of...